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108th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    108-195

======================================================================



 
  DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 
                                  2004

                                _______
                                

 July 10, 2003.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Taylor of North Carolina, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2691]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004. The 
bill provides regular annual appropriations for the Department 
of the Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation) and for 
other related agencies, including the Forest Service, the 
Department of Energy, the Indian Health Service, the 
Smithsonian Institution, and the National Foundation on the 
Arts and the Humanities.

                                CONTENTS

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Department of the Interior:
        Bureau of Land Management..........................     2
                                                                     13
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.....................    12
                                                                     24
        National Park Service..............................    20
                                                                     35
        U.S. Geological Survey.............................    29
                                                                     52
        Minerals Management Service........................    32
                                                                     58
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
            Enforcement....................................    34
                                                                     60
        Bureau of Indian Affairs...........................    36
                                                                     64
        Departmental Offices...............................    44
                                                                     73
        General Provisions.................................    51
                                                                     85
Related Agencies:
        Forest Service, USDA...............................    90
                                                                     87
        Department of Energy...............................   106
                                                                    108
        Fossil Energy......................................   107
                                                                    108
        Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves.............   109
                                                                    114
        Energy Conservation................................   109
                                                                    117
        Economic Regulation................................   110
                                                                    123
        Strategic Petroleum Reserve........................   110
                                                                    124
        Energy Information Administration..................   110
                                                                    125
Indian Health Service, DHHS................................   113
                                                                    125
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation................   120
                                                                    132
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and 
    Arts Development.......................................   121
                                                                    132
Smithsonian Institution....................................   122
                                                                    133
National Gallery of Art....................................   125
                                                                    135
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.............   127
                                                                    137
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars...........   127
                                                                    137
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.........   128
                                                                    138
Commission of Fine Arts....................................   130
                                                                    142
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..................   131
                                                                    143
National Capital Planning Commission.......................   131
                                                                    143
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum....................   131
                                                                    144
Presidio Trust.............................................   132
                                                                    144
Title III--General Provisions..............................   132
                                                                    145

                   Comparison With Budget Resolution

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, requires that the report accompanying a bill providing 
new budget authority contain a Statement detailing how the 
authority compares with the reports submitted under section 302 
of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This information 
follows:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Sec. 302(b)                     This bill--
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Discretionary     Mandatory     Discretionary     Mandatory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget authority................................         $19,627              64         $19,627              64
Outlays.........................................          19,400              70          19,400              70
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          Summary of the Bill

    The Committee has conducted hearings on the programs and 
projects provided for in the Interior and Related Agencies 
Appropriations bill for 2004. The hearings are contained in 8 
published volumes totaling nearly 8,500 pages.
    During the course of the hearings, testimony was taken at 9 
hearings on 8 days, not only from agencies which come under the 
jurisdiction of the Interior Subcommittee, but also from 
Members of Congress, and, in written form, from State and local 
government officials, and private citizens.
    The bill that is recommended for fiscal year 2004 has been 
developed after careful consideration of all the facts and 
details available to the Committee.

                                  BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Committee bill
                        Activity                         Budget estimates,   Committee bill,     compared with
                                                          fiscal year 2004   fiscal year 2004   budget estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior: New Budget             $9,763,661,000     $9,667,322,000       -$96,339,000
 (obligational) authority..............................
Title II, related agencies: New Budget (obligational)        9,727,318,000      9,933,803,000       +206,485,000
 authority.............................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total, New Budget (obligational) authority.     19,490,979,000     19,601,125,000       +110,146,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Total Appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
                                Agencies

    In addition to the amounts in the accompanying bill, which 
are reflected in the table above, permanent legislation 
authorizes the continuation of certain government activities 
without consideration by the Congress during the annual 
appropriations process.
    Details of these activities are listed in tables at the end 
of this report. In fiscal year 2003, these activities are 
estimated to total $3,445,579,000. The estimate for fiscal year 
2004 is $3,518,554,000.
    The following table reflects the total budget 
(obligational) authority contained both in this bill and in 
permanent appropriations for fiscal years 2003 and 2004.

        DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES TOTAL BUDGET AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEARS 2003-2004
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Item                            Fiscal year 2003   Fiscal year 2004        Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Interior and related agencies appropriations bill......    $19,787,481,000    $19,601,125,000      -$186,356,000
Permanent appropriations, Federal funds................      2,849,661,000      2,889,662,000        +40,001,000
Permanent appropriations, trust funds..................        595,918,000        628,892,000        +32,974,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total budget authority...........................     23,233,060,000     23,119,679,000       -113,381,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Revenue Generated by Agencies in Bill

    The following tabulation indicates total new obligational 
authority to date for fiscal years 2002 and 2003, and the 
amount recommended in the bill for fiscal year 2004. It 
compares receipts generated by activities in this bill on an 
actual basis for fiscal year 2002 and on an estimated basis for 
fiscal years 2003 and 2004. The programs in this bill are 
estimated to generate $8.2 billion in revenues for the Federal 
Government in fiscal year 2004. Therefore, the expenditures in 
this bill will contribute to economic stability rather than 
inflation.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year--
                          Item                          --------------------------------------------------------
                                                                2002               2003               2004
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
New obligational authority.............................    $19,157,770,000    $19,787,481,000    $19,601,125,000
Receipts:
    Department of the Interior.........................      8,337,983,000      8,268,121,000      7,815,176,000
    Forest Service.....................................        334,446,000        389,191,000        399,511,000
    Naval Petroleum Reserves...........................          6,728,000          6,988,000          6,927,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total receipts...................................      8,679,157,000      8,664,300,000      8,221,614,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   Application of General Reductions

    The level at which sequestration reductions shall be taken 
pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, if such reductions are required in fiscal year 
2004, is defined by the Committee as follows:
    As provided for by section 256(l)(2) of Public Law 99-177, 
as amended, and for the purpose of a Presidential Order issued 
pursuant to section 254 of said Act, the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' for items under the jurisdiction of the 
Appropriations Subcommittees on the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate is defined as (1) any item specifically identified in 
tables or written material set forth in the Interior and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, or accompanying committee 
reports or the conference report and accompanying joint 
explanatory statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference; (2) any Government-owned or Government-operated 
facility; and (3) management units, such as National parks, 
National forests, fish hatcheries, wildlife refuges, research 
units, regional, State and other administrative units and the 
like, for which funds are provided in fiscal year 2004.
    The Committee emphasizes that any item for which a specific 
dollar amount is mentioned in any accompanying report, 
including all increases over the budget estimate approved by 
the Committee, shall be subject to a percentage reduction no 
greater or less than the percentage reduction applied to all 
domestic discretionary accounts.

                   Federal Funding of Indian Programs

    The Committee recommends appropriations of new budget 
authority aggregating $5.5 billion for Indian programs in 
fiscal year 2004. This is an increase of $26 million above the 
budget request and an increase of $247 million above the amount 
appropriated for fiscal year 2003. Spending for Indian services 
by the Federal Government in total is included in the following 
table.

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       FY 2004
                                                   Approps bills             FY 2002      FY 2003       budget
                                                                              actual      estimate     request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Agriculture...............  (Agriculture)..................      671,438      709,547      720,958
Army Corps of Engineers.................  (Energy/Water).................       26,007       23,631       21,853
Department of Commerce..................  (C/J/S)........................       29,138       12,534       12,534
Department of Defense...................  (Defense)......................       18,000       18,000            0
Department of Education.................  (Labor/HHS/ED).................    2,032,236    2,113,264    2,249,841
Department of Health & Human Services...  (L/HHS/Interior)...............    3,277,192    3,350,956    3,458,012
Department of Housing & Urban             (VA/HUD).......................      731,557      729,500      725,500
 Development.
Department of the Interior..............  (Interior).....................    2,638,061    2,761,654    2,906,204
Department of Justice...................  (C/J/S)........................      241,392      208,656      214,867
Department of Labor.....................  (Labor/HHS/ED).................       73,919       70,014       70,014
Department of Transportation............  (Transportation)...............      245,840      272,076      329,170
Department of Veterans Affairs..........  (VA/HUD).......................          544          558          563
Environmental Protection Agency.........  (VA/HUD).......................      228,698      229,800      234,800
Small Business Administration...........  (C/J/S)........................            0        1,000        1,000
Smithsonian Institution.................  (Interior).....................       67,896       53,517       52,024
Department of the Treasury..............  (VA/HUD).......................        5,000        5,000        3,500
                                                                          ======================================
Other Agencies & Independent Agencies:
    Department of Energy--Tribal Program  (Energy/Water).................        2,840        8,307        6,000
    National Science Foundation.........  (VA/HUD).......................        9,910        9,980        9,980
    Morris K. Udall Foundation..........  (Treasury).....................          345          500          163
    Denali Commission...................  (C/J/S)........................       46,550       38,475       19,475
    Institute of Museum and Library       (Labor/HHS/ED).................        2,941        3,075        3,225
     Services.
    Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian      (Interior).....................       15,148       14,491       13,532
     Relocation.
    Institute of American Indian and      (Interior).....................  ...........  ...........  ...........
     Alaska.
    Native Culture and Arts Development   (Interior).....................        4,490        5,490        5,250
     (IAIA).
                                                                          --------------------------------------
      Total, Others.....................  ...............................       82,224       80,318       57,625
                                                                          ======================================
               Grand Total                ...............................   10,369,142   10,640,025   11,058,465
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        Constitutional Authority

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the House of Representatives 
states that:
    Each report of a committee on a bill or joint resolution of 
a public character, shall include a statement citing the 
specific powers granted to the Congress in the Constitution to 
enact the law proposed by the bill or joint resolution.
    The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to 
report this legislation from Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States of America which 
states: ``No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
consequence of Appropriations made by law. * * *''
    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

              Allocating Congressional Funding Priorities

    The Committee continues to be concerned that the agencies 
funded by this Act are not following a standard methodology for 
allocating appropriated funds to the field where Congressional 
funding priorities are concerned. When Congressional 
instructions are provided, the Committee expects these 
instructions to be closely monitored and followed. The 
Committee directs that earmarks for Congressional funding 
priorities be first allocated to the receiving units, and then 
all remaining funds should be allocated to the field based on 
established procedures. Field units or programs should not have 
their allocations reduced because of earmarks for Congressional 
priorities without direction from or advance approval of the 
Committee.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Committee has revised the reprogramming guidelines to 
address the issue of assessments and charges within department 
and agencies or by other agencies, and to clarify other issues. 
The changes dealing with assessments, as reflected in sections 
2(e) and 10 below, clarify in 2(e) that the head of any 
department or agency or bureau may not assess or charge 
subordinate entities for services or products above the amounts 
that are listed in the budget justification without formal 
Committee approval. If there are any overhead charges or other 
assessments or charges that are not listed in the budget 
justification, the head of the department or agency may not 
require payment of such charges or assessments without 
Committee approval. This same instruction (see section 10 
below) applies to assessments from other agencies such as the 
General Services Administration.
    Section 9 has been modified to delete the reference to 
legislative committees. Sections 11, 12, and 13 have been added 
dealing with land acquisitions and forest legacy projects, land 
exchanges, and appropriations structure issues. Several other 
minor technical changes have been made and section 9(b) has 
been added dealing with Forest Service transfers.
    The following are revised procedures governing 
reprogramming actions for programs and activities funded in the 
Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act:
    1. Definition.--``Reprogramming,'' as defined in these 
procedures, includes the reallocation of funds from one budget 
activity to another. In cases where either Committee report 
displays an allocation of an appropriation below the activity 
level, that more detailed level shall be the basis for 
reprogramming. For construction accounts, a reprogramming 
constitutes the reallocation of funds from one construction 
project identified in the justifications to another. A 
reprogramming shall also consist of any significant departure 
from the program described in the agency's budget 
justifications. This includes proposed reorganizations even 
without a change in funding.
    2. Guidelines for Reprogramming.--(a) A reprogramming 
should be made only when an unforeseen situation arises; and 
then only if postponement of the project or the activity until 
the next appropriation year would result in actual loss or 
damage. Mere convenience or desire should not be factors for 
consideration.
          (b) Any project or activity which may be deferred 
        through reprogramming shall not later be accomplished 
        by means of further reprogramming; but, instead, funds 
        should again be sought for the deferred project or 
        activity through the regular appropriations process.
          (c) Reprogramming should not be employed to initiate 
        new programs or to change allocations specifically 
        denied, limited or increased by the Congress in the Act 
        or the report. In cases where unforeseen events or 
        conditions are deemed to require such changes, 
        proposals shall be submitted in advance to the 
        Committee, regardless of amounts involved, and be fully 
        explained and justified.
          (d) Reprogramming proposals submitted to the 
        Committee for approval shall be considered approved 30 
        calendar days after receipt if the Committee has posed 
        no objection. However, agencies will be expected to 
        extend the approval deadline if specifically requested 
        by either Committee.
          (e) The Secretary or agency head may not assess, 
        charge or bill bureaus or other subordinate entities 
        more than the amounts listed in the budget 
        justification for any products or services, or 
        institute any additional assessments, without formal 
        Committee approval.
    3. Criteria and Exception.--Any proposed reprogramming must 
be submitted to the Committee in writing prior to 
implementation if it exceeds $500,000 annually or results in an 
increase or decrease of more than 10 percent annually in 
affected programs, with the following exception:
    With regard to the tribal priority allocations activity of 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Operations of Indian Programs 
account, there is no restriction on reprogrammings among the 
programs within this activity. However, the Bureau shall report 
on all reprogrammings made during the first six months of the 
fiscal year by no later than May 1 of each year, and shall 
provide a final report of all reprogrammings for the previous 
fiscal year by no later than November 1 of each year.
    4. Quarterly Reports.--(a) All reprogrammings shall be 
reported to the Committee quarterly and shall include 
cumulative totals. (b) Any significant shifts of funding among 
object classifications also should be reported to the 
Committee.
    5. Administrative Overhead Accounts.--For all 
appropriations where costs of overhead administrative expenses 
are funded in part from ``assessments'' of various budget 
activities within an appropriation, the assessments shall be 
shown in justifications under the discussion of administrative 
expenses.
    6. Contingency Accounts.--For all appropriations where 
assessments are made against various budget activities or 
allocations for contingencies, the Committee expects a full 
explanation, separate from the justifications. The explanation 
shall show the amount of the assessment, the activities 
assessed, and the purpose of the fund. The Committee expects 
reports each year detailing the use of these funds. In no case 
shall a fund be used to finance projects and activities 
disapproved or limited by Congress or to finance new permanent 
positions or to finance programs or activities that could be 
foreseen and included in the normal budget review process. 
Contingency funds shall not be used to initiate new programs.
    7. Declarations of Taking.--The Committee directs the 
Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
the National Park Service, and the Forest Service to seek 
Committee approval in advance of filing declarations of taking.
    8. Report Language.--Any limitation, directive, or 
earmarking contained in either the House or Senate report which 
is not contradicted by the other report nor specifically denied 
in the conference report shall be considered as having been 
approved by both Houses of Congress.
    9. Forest Service.--The following procedures shall apply to 
the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture:
          (a) The Forest Service shall not change the 
        boundaries of any region, abolish any region, move or 
        close any regional office for research, State and 
        private forestry, or National Forest System 
        administration, without the consent of the House and 
        Senate Committees on Appropriations in compliance with 
        these reprogramming procedures.
          (b) Provisions of section 702(b) of the Department of 
        Agriculture Organic Act of 1944 (7 U.S.C. 2257) and of 
        7 U.S.C. 147b shall apply to appropriations available 
        to the Forest Service only to the extent that the 
        proposed transfer is approved by the House and Senate 
        Committees on Appropriations in compliance with these 
        reprogramming procedures.
    10. Assessments.--No assessments shall be levied against 
any program, budget activity, subactivity, or project funded by 
the Interior Appropriations Act unless such assessments and the 
basis therefore are presented to the Committees on 
Appropriations and are approved by such Committees, in 
compliance with these procedures.
    11. Land Acquisitions and Forest Legacy.--Lands shall not 
be acquired for more than the approved appraised value (as 
addressed in section 301(3) of Public Law 91-646) except for 
condemnations and declarations of taking, unless such 
acquisitions are submitted to the Committees on Appropriations 
for approval in compliance with these procedures.
    12. Land Exchanges.--Land exchanges, wherein the estimated 
value of the Federal lands to be exchanged is greater than 
$500,000, shall not be consummated until the Committees on 
Appropriations have had a 30-day period in which to examine the 
proposed exchange.
    13. The appropriation structure for any agency shall not be 
altered without advance approval of the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.

                    Erosion of Base Program Budgets

    The Committee is concerned about the erosion of the 
capability of the agencies funded in this bill to deliver 
programs and services to the American people. Each of the last 
three budgets has only partially funded the costs of employee 
pay increases, as proposed by the Administration and approved 
by the Congress. Many of the agencies are salary intensive, 
funding on-the-ground work by rangers, biologists, maintenance 
workers, educators and other dedicated and skilled employees at 
the Nation's parks, wildlife refuges, public land districts, 
National forests, scientific laboratories, and Indian agencies, 
hospitals and schools. If funding to cover pay increases is 
``absorbed'', programs and service inevitably are reduced. In 
the case of the Department of the Interior alone, cumulative 
pay costs of at least $225 million will be absorbed in fiscal 
year 2004. In the case of the National Park Service operating 
account, fixed cost absorption is equivalent to a three percent 
reduction from 2001 program levels. Also unfunded are 
uncontrollable costs, such as utilities, rent increases, and 
inflationary costs that are beyond the agencies' control and 
must be paid. Medical inflation has averaged 15% per year, yet 
there have been no funds provided to the Indian Health Service 
for non-pay inflation in many years.
    The absorption of uncontrollable pay costs has been 
compounded by substantial unbudgeted costs that have been 
incurred for activities associated with management initiatives, 
including competitive sourcing, budget and performance 
integration, financial management reform, activity based 
costing, the program assessment rating tool, and e-government. 
While the Committee is supportive of the goals of these 
initiatives, the costs have, by-in-large, not been requested in 
annual budget justifications or through reprogramming 
procedures. The Committee has thus been unable to evaluate the 
costs, benefits and effectiveness of these initiatives or to 
weigh the priority that these initiatives should receive as 
compared with the important ongoing programs funded in the 
bill.
    Compounding the situation for the agencies is the 
reluctance of the Office of Management and Budget to reimburse 
agencies, such as the National Park Service, for costs 
associated with anti-terrorism security requirements. Since 
January 2003, the National Park Service alone has incurred 
increased security costs in excess of $8 million.
    In fiscal year 2004, ``information technology savings'' 
have been levied by the Administration as cuts to agency 
budgets. While the Committee supports the concept, it is 
unlikely that these savings will be achieved in 2004.
    The Committee believes that if this trend continues, there 
will undoubtedly be reductions in services to the American 
public and urges the Administration to present more realistic 
fiscal year 2005 budget justifications that reflect the true 
costs to agencies of fixed cost increases and management 
initiatives.

                          Competitive Sourcing

    The Committee has carefully reviewed the application of the 
Administration's Competitive Sourcing initiative within the 
agencies and bureaus under its jurisdiction. While there is 
certainly merit to this undertaking, and the Committee commends 
the Department of the Interior, in particular, for its approach 
to addressing this issue, the Committee remains concerned about 
the massive scale, seemingly arbitrary targets, and 
considerable costs associated with this initiative, costs which 
are expected to be absorbed by the agencies at a time when 
federal budgets are declining.
    The Committee is no stranger to competitive sourcing. In 
fiscal year 1996, after careful review, the Committee required 
the United States Geological Survey's National Mapping Division 
to contract out 60 percent of its map and digital data 
production activities. The Committee has carefully monitored, 
on an annual basis, the quality of the product, the overall 
effect this approach had on the Survey's workforce, the ability 
of the National Mapping Division to maintain those workforce 
skills necessary to manage effectively the contracts in the 
future, and the ability of the National Mapping Division to 
maintain a cadre of skilled cartographers to ensure that the 
Geological Survey remains at the cutting edge of its mission-
essential disciplines.
    Similarly, in 1999, the Committee responded to 
recommendations made by the National Academy of Public 
Administration by requiring the outsourcing of 90 percent of 
the National Park Service's construction operation--the Denver 
Service Center. As with the U.S. Geological Survey, workforce 
skills were retained by the Service to manage projects handled 
in-house and to oversee private sector contracts.
    The Committee understands that the Forest Service expects 
to spend $10 million during fiscal year 2003 on competitive 
sourcing activities. The Committee is concerned that all 
forests and most contracting officers will be heavily impacted 
by this effort at a time when they should concentrate their 
attention on improving business practices that were adversely 
affected by last year's severe fiscal situation due to the 
redirection of funds for emergency firefighting.
    This massive initiative appears to be on such a fast track 
that the Congress and the public are neither able to 
participate nor understand the costs and implications of the 
decisions being made. In addition, the Committee's required 
reprogramming guidelines are not being followed. While millions 
have been spent, reprogramming letters have not been forwarded 
to the Committee.
    Based on these and other concerns the Committee has 
included bill language under Title III--General Provisions 
limiting competitive sourcing activities to those that are 
currently underway for fiscal years 2002 and 2003. Each agency 
should provide an in-depth report to the Committee detailing 
the results of completed studies and the action to be taken as 
a result of those studies. The reports should be completed by 
March 1, 2004, and should include specific schedules, plans, 
and cost analyses for the outsourcing competitions.

                            Land Acquisition

    The Committee remains very concerned about the unfocused 
direction demonstrated in Federal Land Acquisition priorities 
for Interior and Related Agencies. There are no clear acreage 
goals for acquisition of Federal lands and little coordination 
among the four land management agencies involved. There needs 
to be a greater focus on how to determine the best potential 
management agency for each land tract. At times it appears that 
agencies seek to expand boundaries without consideration of the 
large backlog of inholdings that currently exist.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture to develop jointly a long-term 
national plan outlining the acreage goals and conservation 
objectives for Federal land acquisition. The plan must 
demonstrate how the agencies will work together to realize 
acreage goals and must include a schedule for monitoring 
progress in meeting Federal land acquisition goals. 
Additionally, the plan should: (1) evaluate existing 
authorities regarding the disposal and consolidation of Federal 
Lands; (2) review the methods employed for receiving and 
evaluating public input on potential acquisitions; and (3) 
address the reimbursement of all costs associated with the 
transfer of former military and other Federal lands to the 
Department of the Interior and the Forest Service. The report 
should be delivered to the Committee no later than March 30, 
2004.
    The Committee strongly discourages boundary expansions 
until such time as the agencies develop and submit the long-
term report mentioned above.
    The Committee directs the agencies to place the highest 
priority on acquiring inholdings that consolidate Federal lands 
and reduce management costs to agencies. Further, conservation 
easements or land exchanges should be considered for each land 
acquisition before any ``fee simple'' purchase is proposed.
    Future budget submissions must contain an evaluation of 
operation and maintenance costs associated with each proposed 
purchase and these costs should be requested in the operation 
and maintenance portion of each agency's budget justification.
    The Committee remains concerned about the involvement of 
third-party land conservation groups and their relationship to 
the priorities set forth by Federal agencies for acquisition. 
Each agency should indicate clearly in future budget 
submissions when a third-party land conservation group is 
monetarily involved in a proposed acquisition.
    Finally, the Committee expects each agency to justify fully 
how each proposed acquisition comports with the long-term plan. 
This information should be displayed in the fiscal year 2005 
budget justification and in subsequent budget justifications.

                 Recreational Fee Demonstration Program

    The Committee has included bill language in Title III 
(Section 332) extending the recreational fee demonstration 
program for an additional two years, consistent with the 
Administration request. The Committee encourages the 
authorizing Committees to continue work on this issue and enact 
a more comprehensive solution. The extension is needed to 
provide consistency and predictability for the American public 
and recreation providers.
    This program, begun in the fiscal year 1996 Interior and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, allows the National Park 
Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service, and Forest Service to charge certain fees for 
recreation activities and retain those fees at the site to 
reduce the backlog in deferred maintenance and enhance the 
visitor experience. To date, the fee program has raised nearly 
one billion dollars to enhance recreational experiences on 
America's public lands. As the agencies move from experimental 
phases of the early program implementation, the Committee 
expects that business practices and management will improve.

       Summary of Recreational Fee Demonstration Program Receipts


                                              [Millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               1997-2002     FY 2003      FY 2004
                                                                 actual      estimate     estimate      Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Park Service.......................................         $584       $124.7       $124.7       $833.4
Bureau of Land Management...................................         24.7          9.5          9.5         43.7
Fish and Wildlife Service...................................         14.1          3.8          4.0         21.9
USDA Forest Service.........................................        124.2           40           42        206.2
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
      Total.................................................          747          178        180.2      1,105.2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to see positive changes as the 
program moves from the demonstration phase to a mature program. 
As the agencies work with the authorizing committees on 
permanent legislation, the Committee offers the following 
guidance:
           The public should not be excluded from the 
        public lands due to excessive fees;
           Recreation receipts should be retained and 
        used at the site of collection;
           Fees should be focused on areas where there 
        is a Federal infrastructure investment, and not be 
        required for general access to national forests or 
        public lands;
           Interagency programs and passes should be 
        increased for the convenience of the public;
           There needs to be full accountability for 
        the use of the receipts;
           Agencies need to maintain good business 
        practices, but the public lands should not be run as a 
        profit-making business;
           Agencies should work with users and 
        communities to help decide on the use of the receipts;
           Receipts should be used to reduce the 
        backlog maintenance and for visitor service 
        enhancements;
           The receipts should not be used to replace 
        Federal appropriations for recreation, rather, they 
        should complement the Federal investment;
           The fee structure should be kept simple; 
        visitor convenience needs to be increased;
           The public should not be subjected to 
        multiple fees on the various public lands they visit;
           Agencies should encourage volunteerism and 
        reward it with reduced fees; and
           Fees should be structured to provide equity 
        among user groups.

       Energy Research--Responding to the National Energy Policy

    Two years ago the Committee wholeheartedly welcomed the 
Administration's National Energy Policy. The Committee agrees 
that the Department of Energy needs to do a better job 
measuring potential program success and discontinuing programs 
that do not yield expected results. The Committee also believes 
that new programs should be considered and promising research 
should be expanded if we are to achieve the goals of energy 
independence, dramatically lower energy consumption, and 
significantly reduced emissions of harmful pollutants from 
energy production and use. It is also critically important to 
continue existing, successful research programs.
    The Committee disagrees with the fiscal year 2004 budget 
request's focus on a few major initiatives and program 
expansions at the expense of critical ongoing research. The 
Committee's recommendations present a balanced approach to 
handling the supply and demand sides of the energy issue and to 
funding long-term research while continuing promising, ongoing 
shorter-term research.
    Incremental improvements to existing technology are 
critical to achieve short-term and mid-term energy efficiency 
improvements and emission reductions. We cannot afford to 
abandon ongoing research in the hope that potential, cutting-
edge improvements can be achieved in the next 15 or 20 years. 
Indeed, the government's track record for picking ``winning'' 
technologies of the future has not been good. Too often new 
technologies have been pursued based on economic assumptions of 
their affordability that fail to materialize. Most major energy 
savings are achieved over time through incremental improvements 
to existing technologies. This country and the world will rely 
on traditional sources of energy supply and on current 
technology for at least the next 20 years. We can't afford to 
back away from research on coal, oil, and natural gas while we 
look for alternative technologies.
    The Committee's recommendations acknowledge that we need 
both traditional fuels and alternative fuels and we need to 
find ways to use all fuels and technologies more efficiently 
and more cleanly. To meet the ever-growing need for energy, 
domestically and worldwide, we are going to need to burn 
traditional fossil fuels more efficiently and with lower 
emissions. We need to expand our use of nuclear energy for 
electric power generation. We also should expand the use of 
alternative energy resources such as solar, wind, geothermal, 
and hydrogen. We will need all of these sources to meet demand.
    The Committee continues to support the President's clean 
coal power initiative and has recommended modest increases in 
funding for the weatherization assistance program and for State 
energy programs. The Committee also has recommended restoring 
many of the reductions proposed in the budget request for 
energy conservation research and for research to improve fossil 
energy technologies. It would be fiscally irresponsible to 
discontinue research in which we have made major investments 
without bringing that research to a logical conclusion.
    The Committee does not object to refocusing some existing 
programs if there is a rational, scientific basis for doing so. 
The Committee has continued funding for independent program 
reviews by the National Academy of Sciences to serve as that 
basis. In the meantime, we need to continue ongoing research if 
we are to have a balanced and effective national energy 
strategy.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management is responsible for the 
multiple use management, protection, and development of a full 
range of natural resources, including minerals, timber, 
rangeland, fish and wildlife habitat, and wilderness on about 
261 million acres of the Nation's public lands and for 
management of 700 million additional acres of Federally-owned 
subsurface mineral rights. The Bureau is the second largest 
supplier of public outdoor recreation in the Western United 
States.
    Under the multiple-use and ecosystem management concept the 
Bureau administers more than 18,000 grazing permits and leases 
and nearly 13 million livestock animal unit months on some 161 
million acres of public land ranges, and manages rangelands and 
facilities for 56,000 wild horses and burros, some 261 million 
acres of wildlife habitat, and over 116,000 miles of fisheries 
habitat. Grazing receipts are estimated to be about $13.2 
million in fiscal year 2004, compared to an estimated $13.2 
million in fiscal year 2003 and actual receipts of $12.7 
million in fiscal year 2002. The Bureau also administers about 
55 million acres of commercial forestlands through the 
``Management of Lands and Resources'' and ``Oregon and 
California grant lands'' appropriations. Timber receipts 
(including salvage) are estimated to be $34.6 million in fiscal 
year 2004 compared to estimated receipts of $24.3 million in 
fiscal year 2003 and actual receipts of $18.1 million in fiscal 
year 2002. The Bureau has an active program of soil and 
watershed management on 175 million acres in the lower 48 
States and 86 million acres in Alaska. Practices such as 
revegetation, protective fencing, and water development are 
designed to conserve, enhance, and develop public land, soil, 
and watershed resources. The Bureau is also responsible for 
fire protection on the public lands and on all Department of 
the Interior managed lands in Alaska, and for the suppression 
of wildfires on the public lands in Alaska and the western 
States.

                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $820,344,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       828,079,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       834,088,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +13,744,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +6,009,000


    The Committee recommends $834,088,000 for management of 
lands and resources an increase of $6,009,000 above the budget 
request and $13,744,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted 
level.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    Land Resources.--The Committee recommends $181,407,000 for 
land resources, $2,000,000 above the budget request and 
$609,000 below the 2003 enacted level including increases above 
the budget request of $1,000,000 for continuation of the San 
Pedro Partnership; and $1,000,000 for rangeland health and 
monitoring.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Bureau's range 
conservation staff levels have decreased dramatically, reducing 
capability to provide rangeland health monitoring and service 
to grazing permit holders. The Committee recommends that the 
$1,000,000 increase be used to enhance the Bureau's capability 
to place more personnel in the field to address more 
effectively rangeland health issues and increase service to 
grazing permittees.
    Wildlife and Fisheries.--The Committee recommends 
$34,292,000 for wildlife and fisheries, the same as the budget 
request and $498,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    Threatened and Endangered Species.--The Committee 
recommends $21,831,000 for threatened and endangered species, 
the same as the budget request and $299,000 above the 2003 
enacted level.
    Recreation Management.--The Committee recommends 
$67,717,000 for recreation management, $1,000,000 above the 
budget request and $7,878,000 above the 2003 enacted level. The 
increase above the budget request is for Otay Mountains 
management.
    The Committee recognizes that the Bureau faces increasing 
demands on the public lands from recreational users, and was 
pleased to see a request for additional funding in the 2004 
budget justification. However, the request does not outline a 
clear long-term strategy for managing recreation on the public 
lands. The Bureau should report to the Committee by March 1, 
2004, on efforts to develop a unified strategy for recreation 
management, including management of dispersed recreation. This 
report should outline anticipated costs of implementing that 
strategy and potential partnership contributions over the five-
year period beginning in 2004.
    The Committee appreciates the efforts of the Bureau of Land 
Management and the Forest Service to assess the current status 
of access to the lands that they manage. The Committee feels 
strongly that the agencies should continue to take proactive 
steps to provide adequate public access for recreation. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the BLM and the Forest Service 
to submit to the Committee, by May 30, 2004, a coordinated 
strategic plan which indicates how the agencies will: (1) 
inventory and identify the ownership of roads, trails, access 
points and existing public rights-of-way within their units; 
(2) identify a priority list of perpetual access easements 
needed to provide adequate permanent legal access to enhance 
the recreation potential of public lands; and (3) establish a 
process and timeline for developing up-to-date recreational 
access plans for individual forest and public land units.
    Energy and Minerals.--The Committee recommends $109,647,000 
for energy and minerals including Alaska minerals, $1,500,000 
above the budget request and $1,264,000 above the 2003 enacted 
level including increases above the budget request of 
$1,500,000 to address the significant coalbed methane permit 
backlog.
    Realty and Ownership Management.--The Committee recommends 
$80,933,000 for realty and ownership management, the same as 
the budget request and $7,687,000 below the 2003 enacted level.
    Resource Protection and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $83,270,000 for resource protection and maintenance, 
$3,600,000 above the budget request and $5,005,000 above the 
2003 enacted level, including increases above the budget 
request of $1,000,000 for the Mojave Desert plan in the 
California desert, $1,000,000 to address public land 
degradation as a result of illegal immigration in Arizona, 
$600,000 for California desert rangers, and $1,000,000 for 
Imperial Sand Dunes law enforcement and management.
    Transportation and Facilities Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $80,344,000 for transportation and facilities 
maintenance, $2,000,000 above the budget request and $2,442,000 
below the 2003 enacted level. The increase above the budget 
request is for infrastructure improvements for fish passage 
(culverts) on Bureau lands.
    Land and Resource Information Systems.--The Committee 
recommends $18,991,000 for land resource information systems, 
the same as the budget request and $224,000 below the 2003 
enacted level.
    Mining Law Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$32,696,000 for mining law administration. This activity is 
supported by offsetting fees equal to the amount made 
available.
    Workforce and Organizational Support.--The Committee 
recommends $138,774,000 for workforce and organizational 
support, the same as the budget request and $6,762,000 above 
the 2003 enacted level.
    Challenge Cost Share.--The Committee recommends $16,882,000 
for challenge cost share, $4,091,000 below the budget request 
and $3,000,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    The Committee originally authorized the Bureau's Challenge 
Cost Share program on a small-scale in 1985, and has supported 
its growth into a Bureau-wide initiative. In 2003, the valuable 
partnership opportunities made possible by challenge cost share 
were expanded under the cooperative conservation initiative. 
These programs are now funded under a single subactivity. While 
the 2004 budget request provides examples of apparently 
worthwhile projects, it does not estimate accomplishments in a 
manner similar to other subactivities, nor is the list of 
projects comprehensive. The Bureau should report to the 
Committee by February 15, 2004, on year-end accomplishments for 
all projects funded in 2003, and should include this 
information in future budget justifications.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $839,153,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       698,725,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       698,725,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................      -140,428,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $698,725,000 for wildland fire 
management, the same as the budget request and $140,428,000 
below the 2003 enacted level. After adjusting for 
reimbursements from other accounts borrowed during last year's 
fire season for wildland fire management there is an increase 
of $48,572,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    The appropriation includes $302,725,000 for preparedness 
and fire use, of which $12,374,000 is for deferred maintenance 
and capital improvement, and $8,000,000 is for the joint fire 
science program; $170,310,000 is for fire suppression 
operations; and $225,690,000 for other operations, of which 
$10,000,000 is for the rural fire assistance program, 
$74,935,000 is for hazardous fuels reduction, $111,255,000 is 
for the wildland urban interface, and $29,500,000 is for 
restoration and rehabilitation of burned-over areas.
    The Committee is concerned that the allocation of funds 
between preparedness and suppression operations may not 
maintain the levels of readiness needed for public safety that 
were established in fiscal years 2001 and 2002. The Committee 
believes that decisive action is necessary to manage escalating 
fire suppression costs. An important component of reducing such 
costs is maintaining initial attack capability so that more 
fires can be contained before they escape and cause serious 
loss of life and property as well as natural resource damage. 
Accordingly, the Committee directs the Department of the 
Interior to analyze current readiness levels to determine 
whether maintaining preparedness resources in the field at a 
level not less than that established in fiscal year 2002 will, 
based on the best information available, result in lower 
overall firefighting costs. If the agency makes such a 
determination, the Committee directs the Department to adjust 
the levels for preparedness and suppression funding accordingly 
and report on these adjustments to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations. The Department should advise the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations in writing prior 
to their decision.
    Bill Language.--Language is included under the wildland 
fire management account allowing the Secretary of the Interior 
and the Secretary of Agriculture to transfer not more than 
$12,000,000 between the two Departments for wildland fire 
management programs and projects. Language is also included 
allowing the use of wildfire suppression funds in support of 
Federal emergency response actions.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $9,913,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         9,978,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         9,978,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................           +65,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Central Hazardous Materials Fund was established to 
include funding for remedial investigations/feasibility studies 
and cleanup of hazardous waste sites for which the Department 
of the Interior is liable pursuant to the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act and 
includes sums recovered from or paid by a party as 
reimbursement for remedial action or response activities.
    The Committee recommends $9,978,000, the budget request, 
for the central hazardous materials fund, an increase of 
$65,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $11,898,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        10,976,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        10,976,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -922,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $10,976,000 for construction the 
same as the budget request and $922,000 below the 2003 enacted 
level.

                            LAND ACQUISITION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $33,233,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        23,686,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        14,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -19,233,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        -9,686,000


    The Committee recommends $14,000,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $9,686,000 below the budget request and 
$19,233,000 below the enacted level. This amount includes 
$8,500,000 for land acquisition projects, $1,500,000 for 
emergencies and hardships, $500,000 for land exchanges and 
$3,500,000 for acquisition management.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
Land Acquisition Projects...............................      $8,500,000
Acquisition Management..................................       3,500,000
Emergency and Hardships.................................       1,500,000
Land Exchanges..........................................         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      14,000,000

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $104,947,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       106,672,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       106,672,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +1,725,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $106,672,000 for the Oregon and 
California grant lands, the same as the budget request and 
$1,725,000 above the 2003 enacted level. These funds are 
provided for construction and acquisition, operation and 
maintenance, and management activities on the revested lands in 
the 18 Oregon and California land grant counties of western 
Oregon.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        10,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of not 
less than $10,000,000 to be derived from public lands receipts 
and Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act lands grazing receipts. 
Receipts are used for construction, purchase, and maintenance 
of range improvements, such as seeding, fence construction, 
weed control, water development, fish and wildlife habitat 
improvement, and planning and design of these projects.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS AND FORFEITURES

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $20,490,000, the budget request, for service 
charges, deposits, and forfeitures. This appropriation is 
offset with fees collected under specified sections of the 
Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 and other Acts 
to pay for reasonable administrative and other costs in 
connection with rights-of-way applications from the private 
sector, miscellaneous cost-recoverable realty cases, timber 
contract expenses, repair of damaged lands, the adopt-a-horse 
program, and the provision of copies of official public land 
documents.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $12,405,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        12,405,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        12,405,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $12,405,000, the budget request, for 
miscellaneous trust funds. The Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976 provides for the receipt and expenditure 
of moneys received as donations or gifts (section 307). Funds 
in this trust fund are derived from the administrative and 
survey costs paid by applicants for conveyance of omitted lands 
(lands fraudulently or erroneously omitted from original 
cadastral surveys), from advances for other types of surveys 
requested by individuals, and from contributions made by users 
of Federal rangelands. Amounts received from the sale of Alaska 
town lots are also available for expenses of sale and 
maintenance of town sites. Revenue from unsurveyed lands, and 
surveys of omitted lands, administrative costs of conveyance, 
and gifts and donations must be appropriated before it can be 
used.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to 
conserve, protect and enhance fish and wildlife and their 
habitats for the continuing benefit of people. The Service has 
responsibility for migratory birds, threatened and endangered 
species, certain marine mammals, and land under Service 
control.
    The Service manages nearly 95 million acres across the 
United States, encompassing a 542-unit National Wildlife Refuge 
System, additional wildlife and wetlands areas, and 69 National 
Fish Hatcheries. A network of law enforcement agents and port 
inspectors enforce Federal laws for the protection of fish and 
wildlife. In 2003, the Service is celebrating the 100th 
anniversary of the establishment of the National Wildlife 
Refuge System.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $911,464,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       941,526,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       959,901,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +48,437,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +18,375,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $959,901,000 for resource 
management, an increase of $18,375,000 above the budget request 
and $48,437,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. Changes to 
the budget request are detailed below.
    Ecological Services.--The Committee recommends $233,185,000 
for ecological services, an increase of $11,325,000 above the 
budget request.
    Increases for endangered species candidate conservation 
programs include $300,000 for Idaho sage grouse, $150,000 for 
Kootenai River burbot, $750,000 for Alaska sea otter, and 
$50,000 for slickspot peppergrass. There is an increase of 
$2,000,000 in consultation for the Natural Communities 
Conservation Planning program. Increases for recovery programs 
include $500,000 for wolf monitoring and $2,000,000 for Pacific 
salmon grants to be administered through the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation.
    Increases recommended for habitat conservation programs 
include $4,600,000 for the Partners for Fish and Wildlife 
program of which $1,400,000 is for Washington regional 
fisheries enhancement groups, $1,500,000 is for Walla Walla 
Basin fish passage and salmon recovery efforts, $1,000,000 is 
for restoration in the Tunkhannock and Bowman's Creek 
watersheds in Pennsylvania, and $700,000 is for Willapa Bay 
spartina grass control; $300,000 in project planning to restore 
the Metropolitan Greenspaces program; and $675,000 for coastal 
programs of which $175,000 is for the Hood Canal Salmon 
Enhancement Group, $200,000 is for Long Live the Kings, and 
$300,000 is to restore funding for the Tampa and Florida 
panhandle field offices.
    Refuges and Wildlife.--The Committee recommends 
$482,852,000 for refuges and wildlife, a decrease of $2,950,000 
below the budget request.
    Changes recommended for refuge operations and maintenance 
include a net increase of $300,000 for refuge operations, 
including increases of $4,000,000 to continue ``minimum 
staffing'' implementation and $300,000 to restore the Spartina 
grass control program at the Willapa NWR, WA, and decreases of 
$2,000,000 for the challenge cost share program and $2,000,000 
for the proposed new land management research and demonstration 
program. There is also a decrease of $5,000,000 for refuge 
maintenance. In law enforcement operations, there is an 
increase of $1,750,000 of which $1,000,000 is for wildlife 
inspectors on the northern and southern borders and $750,000 is 
for operation of the Atlanta, GA port of entry.
    Fisheries.--The Committee recommends $113,206,000 for 
fisheries, an increase of $9,600,000 above the budget request, 
including a decrease of $1,000,000 for hatchery operations and 
a net increase of $2,000,000 for hatchery maintenance, 
including an increase of $3,000,000 for the Washington State 
hatchery improvement project and a decrease of $1,000,000 for 
general program activities. In fish and wildlife assistance, 
increases include $2,000,000 to restore funding for the fish 
passage program, $900,000 to restore Sea lamprey program 
administration, $2,400,000 to restore the Yukon River salmon 
treaty programs, $500,000 to restore the Great Lakes fish and 
wildlife program, $1,600,000 for mass marking machines for 
hatchery fish, and $1,200,000 to restore the marine mammals 
program.
    General Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$130,658,000 for general administration, an increase of 
$400,000 above the budget request to restore the operations and 
maintenance program at the National Conservation Training 
Center.
    Bill Language.--The Committee recommends continuing bill 
language earmarking $2,000,000 for the Natural Communities 
Conservation Planning program.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Service should monitor carefully its travel budget 
to ensure that proposed savings are achieved. The fiscal year 
2005 budget justification should address this issue in detail, 
including travel by headquarters, each regional office, and 
field units in each region; domestic and foreign travel; and 
travel by category (program supervision, conferences, training, 
employee relocation, etc.).
    2. The amount paid for the cost allocation methodology in 
the Resource Management account may only exceed that paid in 
fiscal year 2003 where such costs are clearly the direct result 
of increased space and increased staffing. CAM needs to be 
reformed so that it is clearly justified and transparent. It 
currently is impossible to understand and is used 
inappropriately to supplement shortfalls in the headquarters 
and regional office budgets. The Service should realign its 
budget to show accurately the costs for headquarters and 
regional office functions and should clearly explain what costs 
are included in CAM and why.
    3. The Service's 2004 budget places too much emphasis on 
``targeted'' increases within the refuge operating needs 
system. As a result, not all units appear to have a fair chance 
of addressing critical staffing needs unless they happen to 
fall into one of the targeted categories. The Service needs to 
maintain a general increase for RONS so that minimum staffing 
requirements in areas such as maintenance and administrative 
support can be addressed. The Committee has not agreed to the 
proposed new land management research and demonstration 
program; preferring instead to redirect those funds to basic 
RONS needs across the entire National Wildlife Refuge System.
    4. The Service should continue to provide technical 
assistance to the interagency effort dealing with long-term 
protection of the Hackensack Meadowlands in New Jersey.
    5. The Committee encourages the Service to complete the 
comprehensive conservation plan for the Massassoit Refuge in 
Southeastern Massachusetts as quickly as possible.
    6. Refuge law enforcement is separate and distinct from 
other service law enforcement programs and is critical for 
successful refuge management. Funding for refuge law 
enforcement should remain in the refuge operations budget.
    7. The additional funding provided for law enforcement 
operations is in recognition of the increased demands placed on 
the Service for border security and airport port of entry 
needs. The Service should examine its law enforcement needs and 
budget adequately for those needs in fiscal year 2005.
    8. The Louisville, KY airport and the Memphis, TN airport 
should be considered for port of entry designation in fiscal 
year 2005.
    9. Within the funds provided for hatchery operations, the 
Service should continue to support the Boy Scout Jamboree at 
Fort A.P. Hill.
    10. The Peregrine Fund should be funded at $400,000 in 
fiscal year 2004.
    11. Funding for fisheries programs has been realigned to 
reflect a more appropriate balance between hatcheries and 
habitat restoration. Future Service budgets should be much more 
sensitive to habitat restoration requirements.
    12. The Service is commended for following the Committee's 
direction with respect to supporting and increasing funding for 
the joint venture programs in fiscal year 2004.
    13. The Service should continue and intensify its efforts 
to collect reimbursements for fisheries mitigation efforts and 
use those funds to address habitat restoration and 
conservation.
    14. The Committee has received numerous expressions of 
concern about inadequate ESA program staffing in California. In 
distributing the increased ESA funding, the Service should pay 
particular attention to the needs of the Sacramento and 
Carlsbad offices in California.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $54,073,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        35,393,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        52,718,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -1,355,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +17,325,000


    The Committee recommends $52,718,000 for construction, a 
decrease of $1,355,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level and 
$17,325,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
funds:

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                             Budget      Committee
                  Project                            Description            request   recommendation  Difference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audubon Center for Research of Endangered   Whooping Crane Breeding               $0        $1,200        $1,200
 Species, LA.                                Facility [cc].
Bitter Lake NWR, NM.......................  Joe Skeen Visitors Center              0         1,400         1,400
                                             [cc].
Bozeman Fish Technology Center, MT........  Construction of Laboratory/        1,887         1,887             0
                                             Administration Building--
                                             Phase V [cc].
Bridge Safety Inspections.................  Servicewide..................        575           575             0
Cabo Rojo NWR, PR.........................  Replace Office Building            3,700         3,700             0
                                             (Seismic)--Phase II [cc].
Clark R. Bavin Forensics Laboratory, OR...  Security upgrades (not funded          0           765           765
                                             in 2003).
Crab Orchard NWR, IL......................  Devil's Kitchen Dam--Phase I         500           500             0
                                             [d].
Dams on Recently Acquired NWRs............  Inspections, Classification,       1,291         1,291             0
                                             & Studies.
Dam Safety Program & Inspections..........  Servicewide..................        730           730             0
Dam Safety................................  Structural Studies (not                0           660           660
                                             funded in 2003).
Division of Safety, Security, and           Replacement Survey Aircraft--      1,000         1,000             0
 Aviation, VA.                               Phase I.
Entiat NFH, WA............................  Seismic Safety Rehabilitation        120           120             0
                                             of Four Buildings--Phase I
                                             [p/d].
Iron River NFH, WI........................  Replace Domes at Schacte             600           600             0
                                             Creek with Buildings--Phase
                                             III [cc].
Jordan River NFH, MI......................  Replace Great Lakes Fish           5,500         5,500             0
                                             Stocking Vessel, M/V Togue--
                                             Phase III [cc].
Kofa NWR, AZ..............................  Seismic Safety                       350           350             0
                                             Rehabilitation--Phase I [p/
                                             d].
Lacreek NWR, SD...........................  Little White River Dam--Phase        730           730             0
                                             II [d].
Lahontan NFH, NV..........................  Seismic Safety Rehabilitation         70            70             0
                                             of Two Buildings--Phase I [p/
                                             d].
Makah NFH, WA.............................  Seismic Safety Rehabilitation         80            80             0
                                             of One Building--Phase I [p/
                                             d].
National Eagle Repository, CO.............  Repository incinerator [p/d/         110           110             0
                                             cc].
Neosho NFH, MO............................  Office and Visitors Center             0         1,000         1,000
                                             [c].
Northeast Fishery Center Complex, PA......  Laboratory expansion,                  0         1,150         1,150
                                             accessible fishing, etc.
Northwest Power Planning Area.............  Fish screens, etc............          0         4,000         4,000
Ohio River Islands NWR, WV................  Visitors Center [cc].........          0           850           850
Ottawa NWR, OH............................  Visitors Center--Centennial          850             0          -850
                                             Legacy Project--Phase II
                                             [cc].
Puerto Rican Parrot, PR...................  Replace/Relocate Aviary......          0         1,700         1,700
Savannah NWR, GA..........................  Visitors Center--Centennial          850             0          -850
                                             Legacy Project--Phase II
                                             [cc].
Security Upgrades.........................  Servicewide (not funded in             0           700           700
                                             2003).
Shawangunk NWR, NY........................  Demolish Runways [p/d].......          0           500           500
Ted Stevens Anchorage International         Hangar--Phase II [cc]........      5,000         5,000             0
 Airport, AK.
Visitor Contact Facilities................  Servicewide..................          0         3,000         3,000
Winthrop NFH, WA..........................  Seismic Safety Rehabilitation        130           130             0
                                             of Four Buildings--Phase I
                                             [p/d].
Wolf Creek NFH, KY........................  Visitors Center [cc].........          0         2,100         2,100
                                                                          --------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Line Item Construction....  .............................     24,073        41,398        17,325
                                                                          ======================================
Nationwide Engineering Services:
    Cost Allocation Methodology...........  .............................      3,058         3,058             0
    Environmental Compliance..............  .............................      1,650         1,650             0
    Other, non-project specific Nationwide  .............................      6,262         6,262             0
     Engineering Services.
    Seismic Safety Program................  .............................        200           200             0
    Waste Prevention, Recycling             .............................        150           150             0
     Environmental Management.
                                                                          --------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Nationwide Engineering      .............................     11,320        11,320             0
       Services.
                                                                          ======================================
      Total...............................  .............................     35,393        52,718        17,325
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Service should continue to use its standardized 
design methodology for visitor centers and should continue to 
encourage cost sharing for visitor center construction. The 
Service should report to the Committee on its design and 
costing methodology, including how it has been applied to date.
    2. There are only about 25 Puerto Rican parrots in the wild 
and the current aviary is in need of replacement. The new 
aviary should be more favorably situated to assist with species 
survival. The Committee understands that the Forest Service has 
agreed to provide the necessary land and the National Fish & 
Wildlife Foundation will assist with fundraising for the new 
aviary.

                            LAND ACQUISITION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $72,893,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        40,737,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        23,058,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -49,835,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -17,679,000


    The Committee recommends $23,058,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $17,679,000 below the budget request and 
$49,835,000 below the enacted level. This amount includes 
$7,500,000 for land acquisition projects, $2,500,000 for 
inholdings, $2,000,000 for emergencies and hardships, 
$1,000,000 for exchanges, $2,058,000 for cost allocation 
methodology, and $8,000,000 for acquisition management.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
Land Acquisition Projects...............................      $7,500,000
Acquisition Management..................................       8,000,000
Inholdings..............................................       2,500,000
Exchanges...............................................       1,000,000
Emergency and Hardships.................................       2,000,000
Cost Allocation Methodology.............................       2,058,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      23,058,000

                      LANDOWNER INCENTIVE PROGRAM

    The Landowner Incentive program provides funds to States, 
territories and tribes for matching, competitively awarded 
grants to establish or supplement landowner incentive programs 
that provide technical and financial assistance to private 
landowners. The purpose of these incentive programs is to 
restore and protect habitat of Federally listed, proposed or 
candidate species under the Endangered Species Act, or other at 
risk species on private lands. Eligible grantees include the 
States, the District of Columbia, Indian Tribes, Puerto Rico, 
Guam, the U. S. Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, 
and American Samoa.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $39,740,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        40,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        40,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +260,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $40,000,000, the budget request, 
for the landowner incentive program, an increase of $260,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 level.

                           STEWARDSHIP GRANTS

    The stewardship grants program provides grants and other 
assistance to individuals and groups engaged in local, private, 
and voluntary conservation efforts that benefit federally 
listed, proposed or candidate species, or other at risk 
species.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $9,935,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        10,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................           +65,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $10,000,000, the budget request, 
for the private stewardship grants program, an increase of 
$65,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    Eighty percent of the habitat for more than half of the 
listed endangered and threatened species is on private land. 
The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund provides 
grants to States and territories for endangered species 
recovery actions on non-Federal lands and provides funds for 
non-Federal land acquisition to facilitate habitat protection. 
Individual States and territories provide 25 percent of grant 
project costs. Cost sharing is reduced to 10 percent when two 
or more States or territories are involved in a project.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $80,473,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        86,614,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        86,614,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +6,141,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $86,614,000, the budget request, 
for the cooperative endangered species conservation fund, an 
increase of $6,141,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.
    Bill language is recommended to derive the HCP land 
acquisition portion of this account from the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund, instead of deriving the entire funding from 
the LWCF as proposed in the budget request.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

    Through this program the Service makes payments to counties 
in which Service lands are located, based on their fair market 
value. Payments to counties are estimated to be $17,270,000 in 
fiscal year 2004 with $14,414,000 derived from this 
appropriation and $2,856,000 from net refuge receipts estimated 
to be collected in fiscal year 2003.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $14,320,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        14,414,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        14,414,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................           +94,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $14,414,000, the budget request, 
for the National wildlife refuge fund, an increase of $94,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 funding level.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, through the North 
American Wetlands Conservation Fund, leverages partner 
contributions for wetlands conservation. Projects to date have 
been in 50 States, 13 Canadian provinces, 24 Mexican states and 
the U.S. Virgin Islands. In addition to this appropriation, the 
Service receives funding from receipts in the Federal Aid in 
Wildlife Restoration account from taxes on firearms, 
ammunition, archery equipment, pistols and revolvers, and from 
the Sport Fish Restoration account from taxes on fishing tackle 
and equipment, electric trolling motors and fish finders and 
certain marine gasoline taxes. By law, sport fish restoration 
receipts are used for coastal wetlands in States bordering the 
Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, States bordering the Great Lakes, 
Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands, the freely associated States in the 
Pacific, and American Samoa.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $38,309,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        49,560,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        24,560,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -13,749,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -25,000,000


    The Committee recommends $24,560,000 for the North American 
wetlands conservation fund, a decrease of $25,000,000 below the 
budget request and $13,749,000 below the fiscal year 2003 
level. Decreases to the budget request include $24,000,000 for 
wetlands conservation grants and $1,000,000 for program 
administration.

                NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION

    The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act of 2000 
authorizes grants for the conservation of neotropical migratory 
birds in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, 
with 75 percent of the amounts available to be expended on 
projects outside the U.S. There is a three to one matching 
requirement under this program.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $2,981,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................                 0
Recommended, 2004.....................................         5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +2,019,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +5,000,000


    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the neotropical 
migratory bird conservation program, an increase of $5,000,000 
above the budget request and $2,019,000 above the fiscal year 
2003 level. The Administration proposed $3,000,000 for this 
program as part of the multinational species conservation fund.
    This program provides critically needed resources for 
conservation of neotropical migratory birds. The Committee 
expects the Service to continue to administer this grant 
program through the Service's division of bird habitat 
conservation, following the model of the North American 
wetlands conservation program, and in close coordination with 
the Service's international program.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

    This account combines funding for programs under the former 
rewards and operations (African elephant) account, the former 
rhinoceros and tiger conservation account, the Asian elephant 
conservation program, and the great ape conservation program.
    The African Elephant Act of 1988 established a fund for 
assisting nations and organizations involved with conservation 
of African elephants. The Service provides grants to African 
Nations and to qualified organizations and individuals to 
protect and manage critical populations of these elephants.
    The Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Act of 1994 
authorized programs to enhance compliance with the Convention 
on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and U.S. 
or foreign laws prohibiting the taking or trade of rhinoceros, 
tigers or their habitat.
    The Asian Elephant Conservation Act of 1997 authorized a 
grant program, similar to the African elephant program, to 
enable cooperators from regional and range country agencies and 
organizations to address Asian elephant conservation problems. 
The world's surviving populations of wild Asian elephants are 
found in 13 south and southeastern Asian countries.
    The Great Ape Conservation Act of 2000 authorized grants to 
foreign government, the CITES secretariat, and non-governmental 
organizations for the conservation of great apes.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $4,768,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         7,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +232,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        -2,000,000


    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the multinational 
species conservation fund, an increase of $232,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and $2,000,000 below the budget request. 
Changes to the budget request include a decrease of $3,000,000 
for neotropical migratory birds (which is funded in a separate 
account) and an increase of $1,000,000 including $200,000 each 
for African elephant conservation, Asian elephant conservation, 
and great ape conservation and $400,000 for rhinoceros and 
tiger conservation. The Committee expects these funds to be 
matched by non-Federal funding to leverage private 
contributions to the maximum extent possible.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

    The State and tribal wildlife grant program provides funds 
for States to develop and implement wildlife management and 
habitat restoration for the most critical wildlife needs in 
each State. States are required to develop comprehensive 
wildlife conservation plans to be eligible for grants and to 
provide at least a 25 percent cost share for planning grants 
and at least a 50 percent cost share for implementation grants.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $64,577,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        59,983,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        75,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +10,423,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +15,017,000


    The Committee recommends $75,000,000 for State and tribal 
wildlife grants, an increase of $15,017,000 above the budget 
request and $10,423,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. 
Within the amount provided, $6,000,000 is for competitively 
awarded grants to Indian tribes.
    Each State or eligible entity has two years to enter into 
specific grant agreements with the Service using fiscal year 
2004 funding. If funds remain unobligated at the end of fiscal 
year 2005, the unobligated funds will be reapportioned to all 
States and eligible entities, together with any new 
appropriations provided in fiscal year 2006.
    Not more than 3 percent of the appropriated amount may be 
used for Federal administration of the program. Administrative 
costs for each grantee should also be held to a minimum so that 
the maximum amount of funding is used for on-the-ground 
projects.

                         National Park Service

    The mission of the National Park Service is to preserve 
unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the 
national park system for the enjoyment, education, and 
inspiration of this and future generations. The National Park 
Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of 
natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor 
recreation throughout this country and the world.
    The National Park Service, established in 1916, has 
stewardship responsibilities for the protection and 
preservation of the heritage resources of the national park 
system. The system, consisting of 388 separate and distinct 
units, is recognized globally as a leader in park management 
and resource preservation. The national park system represents 
much of the finest the Nation has to offer in terms of scenery, 
historical and archeological relics, and cultural heritage. 
Through its varied sites, the National Park Service attempts to 
explain America's history, interpret its culture, preserve 
examples of its natural ecosystems, and provide recreational 
and educational opportunities for U.S. citizens and visitors 
from all over the world. In addition, the National Park Service 
provides support to tribal, local, and State governments to 
preserve culturally significant, ecologically important, and 
public recreational lands.

                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................    $1,564,331,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................     1,631,882,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................     1,636,882,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +72,551,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +5,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $1,636,882,000 for operation of 
the National Park System, an increase of $5,000,000 above the 
budget request and $72,551,000 above the enacted level. The 
Committee has provided an additional $10 million for base park 
operating increases and has restored the $4 million for the 
Critical Ecosystems Studies Initiative. This was done by 
redirecting increases in the budget request for lower priority 
items as well as new funds. The Committee has restored the 
$10,234,000 for the across the board reduction taken in fiscal 
year 2003.
    Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$340,442,000 for resource stewardship, an increase of 
$5,796,000 above the budget request and $2,293,000 above the 
enacted level. Included in this amount are increases of 
$7,924,000 for inventory and monitoring, $600,000 to monitor 
water quality, $750,000 for chronic wasting disease, $4,000,000 
for the critical ecosystems studies initiative and a reduction 
of $9,220,000 for uncontrollable expenses.Programmatic 
decreases include $200,000 forgreenspace for living.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends $324,730,000 
for visitor services, an increase of $6,702,000 above the 
budget request and $9,355,000 above the enacted level. Included 
in this amount are increases of $750,000 for border parks 
$1,400,000 for field law enforcement training and $1,412,000 
for uncontrollable expenses.
    Maintenance.--The Committee recommends $569,166,000 for 
maintenance, a decrease of $529,000 below the budget request 
and an increase of $49,196,000 above the enacted level. 
Included in this amount are increases of $9,315,000 for repair 
and rehabilitation, $4,606,000 for condition assessments, 
$14,000,000 for cyclic maintenance and $14,060,000 for 
uncontrollable expenses. The Committee has not agreed to 
provide $1,000,000 for a strategic business advisor.
    The Committee encourages the National Capitol Parks to 
review and improve its management and maintenance procedures 
with regard to parks in the city of Washington to ensure that 
management and maintenance policies fully reflect the public's 
pattern of park use and accommodate park activities ranging 
from child and adolescent play, canine exercise, sports and 
recreation. The Service should report to the Committee no later 
than 90 days after enactment of this Act on its management and 
maintenance practices and proposals for future improvements.
    Within funds available for repair and rehabilitation, 
$300,000 is to continue the cultural landscaping improvements 
at Gettysburg NMP, $550,000 is for improvements to comfort 
stations and the North Shore Cemetery at Great Smoky's NP, 
$210,000 is for a water connection at Indiana Dunes NL, 
$250,000 is for access improvements at Apostle Island NL and 
$200,000 is for rehabilitation work at Valley Forge NMP.
    Park Support.--The Committee recommends $287,621,000 for 
park support, a reduction of $6,969,000 from the budget request 
and an increase of $4,316,000 above the enacted level. Included 
in this amount are increases of $500,000 for a VIP coordinators 
program, $1,000,000 for management account review, $505,000 for 
IT security and accreditation and $1,523,000 for uncontrollable 
expenses. The Committee has not agreed to provide $1,000,000 
for a VIP senior ranger program or the $2,000,000 base increase 
for the regular challenge cost share program. The Committee has 
provided $600,000 under Departmental Management for the public 
lands volunteers program instead of providing funds in this 
account as requested in the Administration's budget. The 
request to increase the CCI challenge cost share program by 
$7,000,000 is reduced to an additional $3,000,000. Programmatic 
decreases include $3,000,000 for incidental personnel costs and 
$200,000 for international travel.
    The Committee expects the Service to continue to allocate 
one third of the funds provided for the challenge cost share 
program to the National Trails System.
    External Administrative Costs.--The Committee has provided 
$114,923,000 for external administrative costs, an increase of 
$7,391,000 above the enacted level and the same as the budget 
request. Included in this amount is $6,687,000 for 
uncontrollable expenses.
    Travel.--The Committee is concerned by the Service's lack 
of sensitivity to the Committee's directive that travel be 
significantly reduced during these difficult fiscal times. 
Earlier this year, the General Accounting Office released a 
report, which disclosed that travel in the Service's 
Washington, DC office has risen by 60 percent over the last 
several years and regional office travel has increased 26 
percent during the same time period. Most alarming is the 
steadily increasing number of trips to foreign countries, which 
rose from 355 in 1999 to 470 in 2002.
    Recently, the Committee discovered that 30 Service 
employees' names had been submitted to attend a conference in 
South Africa in the fall of 2003.
    Agencies have had to absorb pay costs and other 
uncontrollable expenses as well as costs for anti-terrorism 
related security, costs associated with the Administration's 
outsourcing initiative, and costs associated with other 
government-wide and department-wide initiatives. Given the 
tight fiscal times, there is no excuse for the Service's 
seeming inability to restrain its tendency toward excessive 
travel--both the number of trips and the number of people 
taking those trips. The Service must do a better job of 
identifying and eliminating unnecessary domestic and foreign 
travel.
    The Committee has requested that the Inspector General 
monitor travel by Service personnel. The Committee directs the 
Service to provide quarterly reports which detail individual 
foreign trips as well as all Washington and Regional Office 
travel. The Committee understands that some travel is critical 
for meeting mission requirements, but the Service is not able 
currently to demonstrate what travel clearly fits that category 
and what travel is not as mission-essential. The Committee 
should not have to intervene to make such determinations for 
the Service.
    Cooperative Agreements.--The Committee is becoming 
concerned over the possible misuse of cooperative agreements. 
The two areas that have come to the Committee's attention 
lately are the use of these agreements with the National Park 
Foundation, which is discussed below and those being used 
through the rivers and trails conservation assistance program 
which is discussed under the National Recreation and 
Preservation account.
    Since 1997, the Park Service has been providing the 
National Park Foundation with appropriated funds through 
twenty-two cooperative agreements. From 2000 through 2002 
alone, the Service provided the foundation with $1,700,000 of 
appropriated dollars through this mechanism. These funds have 
been used for messaging, brochures, stationary exhibits, 
celebrations, studies, education, conference, reports, 
newsletters and other services.
    The National Park Foundation was chartered by Congress in 
1967 to raise private support for the National Parks. The 
Committee is concerned that the Service may be using 
cooperative agreements to divert funds that were provided by 
the Congress for high priority park needs. Moreover, the 
Committee is troubled that the Foundation, a non-profit 
organization is receiving appropriated funding from the Service 
whereas it was created to raise private funds for the Service.
    The Committee strongly urges the Service to review 
carefully its policy regarding the appropriate use of these 
agreements. The Committee expects the Service to prepare a 
report, which details the rules and approval process for such 
agreements as they apply to all programs, and specifically the 
National Park Foundation, prior to issuing any new agreements. 
Once the Committee has reviewed the official policy, the 
Service should forward all cooperative agreements with the 
Foundation to the Committee on a quarterly basis detailing 
funding amounts and specific requirements.
    South Florida Initiative.--The Committee is concerned that 
recent changes to the State of Florida's 1994 Everglades 
Forever Act represent a departure from the commitments and 
obligations of the State to improve the quality of the water 
entering the Everglades by December 31, 2006. The Committee is 
concerned that this action could delay the restoration and 
protection of A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge and 
Everglades National Park, and frustrate implementation of the 
$7.8 billion Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, which 
is equally cost-shared between the Federal government and the 
State of Florida.
    The Committee made its position on the State bill and 
rulemaking process very clear--clean water by December 2006, no 
mixing zones, no relief from achieving the 10 parts per billion 
standard and restoring integrity to the process. There must be 
an open transparent process with all stakeholders 
participating.
    Since 1996, this Committee has strongly supported the 
Everglades restoration effort. The Committee has funded over $1 
billion in programs and projects benefiting the Everglades. 
Funds provided by the Committee support implementation of the 
Modified Water Deliveries Project; the purchase of the East 
Everglades Addition to Everglades National Park; acquisition of 
lands to be used to increase water storage for environmental 
and urban use, including the Talisman, Berry Groves, and East 
Coast Buffer lands; the funding of scientific research, as well 
as critical projects authorized by the Water Resources 
Development Act of 1996; and implementation of the 
Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan authorized by the 
Water Resources Development Act of 2000. The Committee has 
provided these funds at a time of tight fiscal constraints.
    Future efforts to restore the Everglades that depend upon 
improvements to water quality are now at risk. Given the 
uncertainty over when the State will actually achieve the 
planned water quality improvements, the Committee believes that 
future Federal funding for Everglades restoration should be 
tied to specific progress to improve water quality. The 
Committee is pleased that Governor Bush has stated that the 
State of Florida intends to comply with the terms of the 
Consent Decree in United States v. South Florida Water 
Management District and that the water entering and throughout 
A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge and Everglades 
National Park will meet the specific water quality requirements 
of the Consent Decree.
    The Committee remains concerned that changes to underlying 
State law could frustrate these efforts. The Committee has 
recommended $68,054,000 for Everglades restoration and language 
directing that no funds will be available for the Modified 
Water Deliveries Project unless the Secretaries of the Interior 
and the Army, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency and the Attorney General file a joint report each year 
indicating that the State of Florida is meeting its obligations 
to improve the quality of water entering A.R.M. Loxahatchee 
National Wildlife Refuge and Everglades National Park 
consistent with state water quality standards, including the 
numeric criteria adopted for phosphorus, as well as the terms 
of the Consent Decree entered in United States v. South Florida 
Water Management District. This language ensures that the State 
will remain on schedule to improve the quality of the water for 
these important federal areas as promised. Based upon a 
favorable report, and a response in writing from the 
Committees, the funds will become available for expenditure. In 
the event of an unfavorable report that the State is not in 
compliance with the Consent Decree, the funds will not be 
available for expenditure until the State comes into compliance 
or until corrective measures are undertaken by the State as 
recommended and agreed upon by the principals to the Consent 
Decree.
    Further, the Committee directs the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency to file a report to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations, specifically the 
subcommittees on Interior and Related Agencies and Veteran 
Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, indicating whether 
the amendments adopted by the State of Florida to its 1994 
Everglades Forever Act have been approved by the Environmental 
Protection Agency as a change in water quality standards 
consistent with the requirements of the Clean Water Act. In 
addition, the Committee directs the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency to file a report to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations indicating whether the 
Environmental Protection Agency has approved the State of 
Florida's rule to set forth the numeric interpretation of the 
phosphorus criterion, as required under the Everglades Forever 
Act. The report shall contain EPA's analysis as to whether the 
numeric criterion will result in improvements to the quality of 
water entering the Everglades Protection Area and protect the 
federal resources located therein consistent with the 
requirements of the Consent Decree entered in United States v. 
South Florida Water Management District.
    The Committee is concerned that with the Florida 
Legislature's recent changes to the 1994 Everglades Forever Act 
that acquisition of additional lands for implementation of the 
Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) may not be the 
highest priority for the expenditure of Federal funds that have 
been previously appropriated, but remain unspent. This is 
particularly the case in the event that water quality 
improvements by the State are delayed beyond 2006 and CERP is 
dependent upon achieving water quality that is protective of 
the Everglades environment. Further, the Committee is aware 
that the State of Florida has acquired nearly half the lands 
that are necessary for CERP and that approximately $32 million 
of prior year appropriations to assist the State of Florida in 
this effort remain unobligated. With the potential for delay in 
achieving the necessary water quality improvements, the 
Committee believes that prior year unobligated balances of 
Everglades land acquisition assistance should be used instead 
to fund the highest priority Everglades restoration needs 
benefiting the Department's interests in South Florida. This 
includes the water quality improvements to Storm Water 
Treatment Area 1-East (STA 1-E), eradication of invasive 
exotics at A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, 
recovery of endangered species in South Florida, as well as 
other Everglades restoration needs of the Department.
    Bill language is included under the National Park Service 
land acquisition account directing the Secretary of the 
Interior to redirect $5,000,000 to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service for the purpose of implementing additional water 
quality monitoring and eradication of invasive exotics at 
A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. The Committee 
understands that the refuge used an additional $1,000,000, 
provided by the Department last year, to treat successfully 
nearly 17,000 acres of lands infested with melaleuca and 
lygodium, leaving approximately 95,000 acres still in need of 
treatment. These two invasive exotic plants cover over 80% of 
the refuge and reduction of these species to a maintenance 
control level is identified as the highest priority in the 
refuge's conservation plan. The Committee applauds the 
Department for recognizing the threat to the refuge and intends 
that, of the $5 million transferred, approximately $4 million 
be directed for additional work in this area. This should allow 
the refuge to treat significant additional acreage for both 
melaleuca and lygodium. Additionally, the Committee directs 
that the refuge expend up to $1 million to collect water 
quality data, conduct transect monitoring, and develop a water 
quality model for the refuge in order to track impacts, provide 
information for adaptive design and operation of inflow 
structures, and protect the resource from additional damage 
from the discharge of waters high in phosphorus. The Committee 
directs that the Department file an annual status report with 
the Committee by September 30 each year detailing how the funds 
provided under this provision were spent and the results that 
were achieved. This report should be filed each year until the 
funds are depleted.
    Bill language is also included under Park Service land 
acquisition to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to 
transfer funds to the Corps of Engineers to implement 
additional water quality improvement technologies for STA 1-E. 
Because STA 1-E discharges directly into A.R.M. Loxahatchee 
National Wildlife Refuge, additional water quality improvements 
will greatly facilitate the State of Florida's ability to meet 
water quality standards and discharges of phosphorus to the 
refuge that are protective of the Everglades environment 
consistent with the water quality standards and numeric 
criterion that are to be adopted by the State. The bill 
language clarifies that any Federal funds provided by the 
Secretary under this provision will be matched pursuant to the 
cost sharing provisions of the Water Resources Development Act 
of 1996, which allow the Secretary of the Army to equally cost-
share certain water quality improvements in the event it is 
determined that the projects benefit Everglades restoration 
efforts. In this instance, the Committee believes that these 
actions for STA 1-E will result in significant Everglades 
restoration benefits. In the event funds remain unspent after 
funds are used for the purposes described in this provision, 
the bill language directs the Secretary to file a reprogramming 
request with the Committee detailing how the remaining funds 
may be expended to benefit Everglades restoration activities of 
the Department in South Florida.
    Everglades Research.--Restoring the South Florida ecosystem 
is a complex environmental effort, which will take decades and 
entail significant uncertainties. The conceptual basis for 
restoration rests on sound science, yet the General Accounting 
Office and the National Academy of Sciences recently reported 
that efforts to coordinate scientific information to support 
the restoration initiative need to be improved to increase the 
likelihood that the ecosystem will be successfully restored. 
The GAO stated that the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration 
Task Force has not ensured that scientific activities are well 
coordinated for all three of its restoration goals. To achieve 
improved coordination, the Committee recommends that the 
Science Coordination Team (SCT), which was created by the South 
Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, be given clear 
direction about the products, including developing a science 
plan focused on gaps in information that is important for the 
restoration, to help the Task Force coordinate restoration 
efforts.
    The GAO also reported that coordination efforts were 
hindered by the lack of staff dedicated to the SCT and 
recommended that the Task Force undertake an analysis of the 
staffing needs of the SCT and provide for sufficient staff to 
carry out its necessary tasks. Given the large number of 
agencies participating in the restoration, the Committee agrees 
that sufficient staffing is needed to support coordination 
activities, particularly in the area of science.
    The Committee has had a longstanding interest in assuring 
that the restoration initiative is managed and coordinated to 
assure its success. For this reason, the Committee directs the 
South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force, through its 
SCT, to develop a science plan focused on the gaps in 
scientific information that are needed to further restoration 
efforts. This plan should be prepared in coordination with the 
biennial strategic plan prepared by the Task Force. Recognizing 
that staffing may hinder the development of such a plan, the 
Committee requests that the Task Force undertake an analysis of 
the staffing needs for the SCT and examine opportunities to 
allocate staff to this important function. This analysis should 
be provided to the Committee no later than February 2004.
    Within 90 days of the passage of this Act, the Secretary 
shall report to the Committee on Appropriations and the 
Committee on Resources regarding the feasibility, desirability, 
organization, costs and benefits associated with the 
establishment of a University-based National Parks Institute.

                       UNITED STATES PARK POLICE




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $77,921,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        78,859,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        78,859,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +938,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $78,859,000, the budget request, 
for the United States Park Police, an increase of $938,000 
above the enacted level.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

    The National recreation and preservation appropriation 
provides for the outdoor recreation planning, preservation of 
cultural and National heritage resources, technical assistance 
to Federal, State and local agencies, administration of 
Historic Preservation Fund grants and statutory and contractual 
aid.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $61,268,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        47,936,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        54,924,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -6,344,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +6,988,000


    The Committee recommends $54,924,000 for National 
recreation and preservation, an increase of $6,988,000 above 
the budget request and $6,344,000 below the enacted level.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimate by activity are shown in the following table:


    Recreation Programs.--The Committee recommends $855,000 for 
recreation programs, an increase of $307,000 above the enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    Natural Programs.--The Committee recommends $11,011,000 for 
natural programs, a decrease of $1,500,000 below the budget 
request and $134,000 above the enacted level. The Committee has 
not included the increase for the rivers and trails program.
    The Committee is concerned about the use of cooperative 
agreements in the rivers, trails and conservation assistance 
program. The Committee's surveys and investigative staff have 
been asked to conduct an evaluation of this practice and report 
its findings by September 2003.
    This program was designed to provide technical assistance 
to communities. The official guidance published last year by 
the Park Service, at the Committee's request, states that the 
Service does not provide financial assistance through this 
program. In fact, the Committee has data, which clearly 
indicates that there has been a longstanding practice of giving 
financial assistance to certain groups and communities. This 
results in sole source, non-competitive grants.
    The Committee has been very supportive of this program over 
the years. It has provided valuable assistance to many 
communities. However, there must be clear, published guidance 
regarding exactly what type of assistance is available and how 
to apply for that assistance. While the Committee has allowed 
the Service great flexibility in managing this program in the 
past, it cannot permit different rules for different groups 
without a compelling justification. Bill language is included 
which prohibits the use of competitive agreements and cash 
grants until the Committee has had an opportunity to review the 
surveys and investigative staff recommendations.
    Cultural Programs.--The Committee recommends $19,071,000 
for cultural programs, a reduction of $847,000 below the 
enacted level and the same as the budget request. Within 
available funds the Service should continue to provide $250,000 
for the Heritage Education initiative in cooperation with 
Northeastern State University in Louisiana.
    International Park Affairs.--The Committee recommends 
$1,626,000 for international park affairs, a reduction of 
$82,000 below the enacted level and the same as the budget 
request.
    Environmental and Compliance Review.--The Committee 
recommends $401,000 for environmental and compliance review, a 
$4,000 increase above the enacted level and the same as the 
budget request.
    Grant Administration.--The Committee recommends $1,595,000 
for grant administration, an increase of $20,000 above the 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    Heritage Partnership Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$13,894,000 for National Heritage Areas, a reduction of 
$386,000 below the enacted level and an increase of $6,154,000 
above the budget request. The Committee provides $13,770,000 
for individual areas and $124,000 for administrative support.
    Statutory or Contractual Aid.--The Committee recommends 
$6,471,000 for statutory or contractual aid, an increase of 
$2,334,000 above the budget request and $5,494,000 below the 
2003 enacted level.

                     URBAN PARK AND RECREATION FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................          $298,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................           305,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................           305,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................            +7,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $305,000 for urban park grant 
administration, an increase of $7,000 above the enacted level 
and the same as the budget request.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

    The Historic Preservation Fund supports the State historic 
preservation offices to perform a variety of functions, 
including State management and administration of existing grant 
obligations; review and advice on Federal projects and actions, 
determinations, and nominations to the National Register; Tax 
Act certifications; and technical preservation services. The 
States also review properties within States to develop data for 
planning use.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $68,552,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        67,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        71,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +2,448,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +4,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $71,000,000 for historic 
preservation fund programs, an increase of $2,448,000 above the 
enacted level and $4,000,000 above the budget request.
    The total amount provides $34,000,000 for state historic 
preservation offices, $3,000,000 for tribal grants, $30,000,000 
for Save America's Treasures and $4,000,000 for Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). The HBCU program will 
be a competitive program run by the National Park Service. The 
cost share on this program is 70 percent Federal, 30 percent 
private.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $325,712,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       327,257,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       303,199,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -22,513,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -24,058,000


    The Committee recommends $303,199,000 for construction, a 
decrease of $22,513,000 below the enacted level and $24,058,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
Acadia NP, ME (rehabilitation)..........................          $7,017
Badlands NP, SD (ADA deficiencies)......................           2,996
Big Bend NP, TX (Chisos Basin)..........................           1,946
Big Bend NP, TX (curatorial)............................             295
Blue Ridge Parkway, NC (reconstruction).................           3,186
Blue Ridge Parkway, NC (visitor center).................           1,000
Boston Harbor Islands NRA, MA (George's Island).........             727
Boston NHP, MA (USS Constitution rehabilitation)........           2,408
Bryce Canyon NP, UT (renovation)........................             859
Colonial NHP, VA........................................           7,611
Colonial NHP, VA (museum collection)....................             725
Cuyahoga NP, OH (rehabilitation)........................           3,000
Dayton Aviation NHP, OH (26 Williams)...................             430
Delaware Water Gap NRA, PA (cabin rehab.)...............             600
Everglades NP, FL (water system)........................          12,990
Frederick Douglass NHS, DC (rehabilitation).............             956
Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania NMP, VA (stabilization)...           1,560
Gateway NRA, NY (rehabilitation)........................           2,416
George Washington Carver NM, MO (rehabilitation)........           2,000
George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA (Iwo Jima 
    rehabilitation).....................................           3,383
George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA (rehabilitation).             400
Gettysburg NMP, PA (conservation).......................           2,000
Homestead NHS, NE (visitor center)......................             350
Hot Springs NP, AR......................................           1,012
Independence NHP, PA (rehabilitation)...................           1,750
Independence NHP, PA (security fence & screening 
    structure)..........................................           5,100
Indiana Dunes IN (cultural/historical reports)..........             225
Jefferson NM, MO (security).............................           4,339
Lake Mead NRA, NV (upgrades & waste water system).......           3,514
Lincoln Library, IL.....................................           6,000
Mammoth Cave NP, KY (upgrade electrical system).........           3,593
Mammoth Cave NP, KY (water system)......................           6,014
Mesa Verde NP, CO.......................................           1,207
Moccasin Bend NAD, TN (erosion).........................             500
Morristown NHP, NJ (rehabilitation).....................           1,789
Mount Rainier NP, WA (rehabilitation)...................           4,000
National Capital Parks-Central, DC (Jefferson Memorial).           4,858
National Capital Parks-Central, DC (Washington Monument)          20,000
Oklahoma City NM, OK (contingent).......................           1,000
Olympic NP, WA (Elwha River Ecosystem restoration)......          12,950
Organ Pipe Cactus NM, AZ................................           4,405
Petersburg NB, VA.......................................             781
Rock Creek Park, DC (Meridian Hill Park)................           2,891
San Francisco Maritime NHP, CA (rehabilitation).........           4,177
Sequoia and Kings Canyon NP, CA (replace water tanks)...           2,210
St Croix NSR, WI (administrative building)..............           4,900
Stones River NB, TN (trails)............................             300
SW Pennsylvanian Heritage Commission, PA................           3,000
Thomas Stone NHS, MD (restrooms, kiosk, office spaces)..             500
Timucuan Ecological & Historic Preserve, FL.............             765
Tuskegee Airmen NHS (AL)................................             500
White House, DC (rehabilitation)........................           6,443
Wind Cave NP, SD (wastewater treatment).................           3,909
Wrangell-St Elias NP&P;, AK (rehabilitation).............             933
Yellowstone NP, WY (Old House at Old Faithful Inn)......           5,973
Yellowstone NP, WY (West Entrance Station)..............           1,888
Yellowstone NP, WY (infrastructure improvements)........           2,892
Project Total...........................................         183,173
Emergency/Unscheduled...................................           5,500
Housing.................................................           8,000
Equipment replacement...................................          38,460
Planning, construction..................................          24,480
General management plans................................          13,420
Construction program management.........................          27,466
Dam safety..............................................           2,700
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Construction................................         303,199

    The Committee has included $295,000 to plan a curatorial 
storage facility at Big Bend National Park; $1,000,000 for a 
visitor facility on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina; 
$3,000,000 to continue rehabilitation work at Cuyahoga National 
Park, and $430,000 to initiate rehabilitation of 26 Williams 
Street within the Dayton Aviation NHP.
    Also included is $600,000 for cabin rehabilitation at the 
Delaware Water Gap NRA; $956,000 to complete critical 
rehabilitation work at Frederick Douglass NHS; $2,000,000 for 
rehabilitation work at George Washington Carver NM, and 
$400,000 for maintenance needs along the George Washington 
Memorial Parkway in Virginia.
    The Committee has provided $2,000,000 to continue 
conservation work at Gettysburg NMP; $350,000 to continue 
planning of a visitor facility at Homestead NHS, $225,000 for 
cultural and historic reports at Indiana Dunes NL, $6,000,000 
for the Lincoln Library, $4,900,000 to complete construction of 
an administrative building at St. Croix NSR, and $300,000 for 
trails work at Stones River NB.
    The Committee encourages the Carl Sandberg NHS to complete 
its master plan.
    The Committee has included $3,000,000 for work at SW 
Pennsylvania Heritage Commission; $500,000 for restrooms, 
kiosk, and office space at Thomas Stone NHS; $765,000 for 
structural analysis and improvements at Kingsley Plantation 
House and Kitchen House at Timucuan Ecological & Historic 
Preserve; and $500,000 to continue Federal project planning for 
the Tuskegee Airmen NHS in Alabama. The Committee has included 
$500,000 for erosion control at Moccasin Bend NAD.
    The Committee has included $1,000,000 for the Oklahoma City 
NM. These funds are subject to a change in authorization.
    The Committee has not provided funds to initiate planning 
for new facilities at Saratoga NHS until the park is able to 
identify non-facility alternatives to the operational issues 
associated with a dispersed park with non-contiguous 
properties.
    The Committee has not provided $15,000,000 for security 
improvements at Lafayette Square. These funds will be provided 
in the transportation appropriations bill for fiscal year 2004.
    Within available planning funds, the Committee directs the 
Service to prepare a heritage study for the newly authorized SW 
Campaign and Muscle Shoals areas. In addition $200,000 within 
available funds should be used to continue the Metacomet-
Monadnock-Mattabesett trail feasibility study.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

                              (RESCISSION)




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      -$30,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       -30,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       -30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends the rescission of $30,000,000 in 
the annual contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 4601-10a. 
This authority has not been used in years, and there are no 
plans to use it in fiscal year 2004.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $171,348,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       238,634,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       131,154,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -40,194,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................      -107,480,000


    The Committee recommends $131,154,000 for land acquisition 
and State assistance, a decrease of $107,480,000 below the 
budget request and $40,194,000 below the enacted level. This 
amount includes $14,000,000 for land acquisition projects, 
$11,654,000 for acquisition management, $4,000,000 for 
emergencies and hardships and $4,000,000 for inholdings. Also 
included is $97,500,000 for the stateside program, including 
$2,500,000 for administration. The Committee has retained the 
current allocation formula for stateside grants.
    Bill language is included under the Park Service land 
acquisition account dealing with unobligated balances for South 
Florida Restoration. This is explained in detail under the 
``Everglades'' heading in park operations.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
Federal land acquisition funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
Land Acquisition Projects...............................     $14,000,000
Acquisition Management..................................      11,654,000
Emergencies and Hardships...............................       4,000,000
Inholdings..............................................       4,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      33,654,000

    Any funds provided for Santa Monica Mountains National 
Recreation Area should be matched with non-Federal monies. This 
means new land or new dollars dedicated to protection of park 
lands within the recreation area's boundaries. By June 30th of 
each year, the Service should certify the level of non-Federal 
contributions to land acquisition at this site. The Service is 
encouraged to review non-Federal appraisals in certifying the 
non-Federal contribution.

                    United States Geological Survey

    The United States Geological Survey was established by an 
act of Congress on March 3, 1879 to provide a permanent Federal 
agency to conduct the systematic and scientific 
``classification of the public lands, and examination of the 
geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the 
National domain''. The USGS is the Federal Government's largest 
earth-science research agency, the Nation's largest civilian 
mapmaking agency, and the primary source of data on the 
Nation's surface and ground water resources. Its activities 
include conducting detailed assessments of the energy and 
mineral potential of the Nation's land and offshore areas; 
investigating and issuing warnings of earthquakes, volcanic 
eruptions, landslides, and other geologic and hydrologic 
hazards; research on the geologic structure of the Nation; 
studies of the geologic features, structure, processes, and 
history of other planets of our solar system; topographic 
surveys of the Nation and preparation of topographic and 
thematic maps and related cartographic products; development 
and production of digital cartographic data bases and products; 
collection on a routine basis of data on the quantity, quality, 
and use of surface and ground water; research in hydraulics and 
hydrology; the coordination of all Federal water data 
acquisition; the scientific understanding and technologies 
needed to support the sound management and conservation of our 
Nation's biological resources; and the application of remotely 
sensed data to the development of new cartographic, geologic, 
and hydrologic research techniques for natural resources 
planning and management, surveys, investigations, and research.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $919,272,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       895,505,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       935,660,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +16,388,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +40,155,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


     The Committee recommends $935,660,000 for surveys, 
investigations, and research, an increase of $40,155,000 above 
the budget request and $16,388,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level.
    For the third year in a row the Committee has restored a 
number of high-priority research programs that were proposed 
for reduction or elimination. The Department has placed a high-
priority on both cooperative programs and programs that are 
outsourced to the private sector. For the most part, the 
programs that are being proposed for reduction or elimination 
in fiscal year 2004 are the very programs that meet these 
criteria. More than any other Bureau in the Department, the 
Survey has been a leader in the development of cooperative 
programs and outsourcing its activities. The Committee believes 
that Bureaus that are successful in implementing these policies 
should be rewarded and not penalized.
    National Mapping Program.--The Committee recommends 
$130,221,000 for the national mapping program, $9,739,000 above 
the budget request and $2,984,000 below the 2003 enacted level 
including increases above the budget request of $4,444,000 to 
restore data collection activities through partnerships and 
contracts with the private sector, $1,250,000 for cooperative 
topographic mapping to expand and enhance initial National Map 
implementation through partnerships (to extend the geographic 
coverage and enhance data integration activities related to 
these implementation sites), $2,770,000 for research activities 
under geographic analysis and monitoring, $500,000 for the 
Tennessee GIS mapping project, and $775,000 as a science 
support adjustment.
    The Committee supports the Survey in its efforts to 
implement the National Map. This strategic project will 
establish a digital database that will provide up-to-date, 
consistent, reliable geospatial information and make these data 
easily accessible to a wide range of users. Building upon the 
historic investment of geographic data from the base 
topographic maps, the National Map is being designed to serve 
as the Nation's new topographic map, while also reducing 
redundant data being collected by multiple levels of 
government.
    The Nation's digital infrastructure is playing an ever-
expanding role in the U.S. economy. Many private sector 
companies have built successful businesses on value-added 
products made from government investments in geospatial data. 
Geospatial data are also used in economic and community 
development, land and natural resource management, ensuring 
public safety during times of both natural (wildfires, floods, 
earthquakes) and human-induced disasters, and is the foundation 
for studying and solving geographically based problems. 
Tremendous economic and productivity enhancements occur 
throughout the Nation as industries utilize these new 
technologies.
    The Survey has taken major steps to refocus and realign its 
activities to ensure the realization of the National Map. The 
Committee commends the Survey's efforts to restructure its 
mapping workforce so that resources can be available for 
building the National Map in partnership with other Federal 
agencies, State and local governments, the private sector, and 
universities. Partnership funds for State and local governments 
are a high priority because these funds are often leveraged 
three and four fold, allowing the National Map to be created 
more rapidly, with more partners, and at lower cost to the 
Federal government.
    The Survey's EROS Data Center is the repository of the 
world's largest collection of satellite imagery and is 
designated as a ``National Critical Infrastructure'' for 
purposes of homeland security. USGS archived data are critical 
to Federal, State, and local governments for protecting the 
homeland, natural disaster assessments, and understanding 
global climate change. With emerging technologies, the volume 
of collected, archived, and distributed data at the electronic 
data center (EDC) is growing exponentially. Accordingly, the 
Committee supports the USGS EDC requirement to convert its 
archived remote sensing data from outdated storage media to 
disk-based storage. Such a conversion will accommodate 
extremely high growth rates and provide access to users more 
efficiently and at lower cost. Further, the Committee supports 
the implementation of a continuity of operations capability for 
the EDC utilizing ``remote mirroring'' technology, which will 
eliminate a single point of failure for data storage 
infrastructure and ensure full recovery with zero data loss 
from any potential outage.
    Geologic Hazards, Resources and Processes.--The Committee 
recommends $231,435,000 for geologic hazards, resources, and 
processes, $9,860,000 above the budget request and $1,732,000 
below the 2003 enacted level, including increases above the 
budget request of $1,900,000 to restore funding for the 
advanced national seismic system, $750,000 to continue the 
study into the impact of global dust events, $500,000 for the 
Great Lakes geologic mapping project, $1,000,000 for the 
cooperative geologic mapping program, $2,000,000 to continue 
the implementation of the national coastal program consistent 
with the recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences, 
$1,300,000 for aggregate and industrial minerals, $9,122,000 to 
restore mineral research and assessments, and decreases of 
$4,000,000 for Everglades research and $2,712,000 as a science 
support adjustment.
    The Committee strongly disagrees with the proposed 
reduction in the Survey's mineral resources program. Minerals 
and mineral products are important to the U.S. economy with 
processed minerals accounting for over $370 billion to the 
economy in 2002. Mineral commodities are essential to both 
national security and infrastructure development. Mineral 
resources research and assessments are a core responsibility of 
the survey. Since the 1996 review by the National Academy, the 
Survey's mineral program has refocused its efforts to address 
better the Nation's need for more and better information 
regarding the regional, national, and global availability of 
mineral resources. For these reasons the Committee has restored 
the proposed cuts to this high-priority program.
    Water Resources Investigations.--The Committee recommends 
$215,178,000 for water resources investigations, $15,082,000 
above the budget request and $8,027,000 above the 2003 enacted 
level, including increases above the budget request of 
$6,500,000 to restore funding for the Water Resources Research 
Institutes, $2,419,000 to restore funding for the toxic 
substances hydrology program, $600,000 to continue work at Lake 
Ponchartrain and $900,000 for the Long Term Estuary Group 
(LEAG) in Louisiana, $500,000 for the continuation of the 
Spokane Valley/Rathdrum Valley Aquifer study begun last year, 
$500,000 for the Chesapeake Bay program, and $3,663,000 as a 
science support adjustment.
    The Committee has provided $900,000 for development and 
deployment of new instruments and studies in the lower 
Mississippi River. This effort is to be a collaborative 
relationship within the Long-Term Estuary Assessment Group 
(LEAG). Within this funding level $550,000 is to be provided to 
other LEAG partners and $350,000 is for the USGS work to 
fulfill LEAG objectives. The Committee requests that the USGS 
provide a report by January 31, 2004, detailing a five-year 
plan (2002-2006) for USGS involvement in LEAG. The report 
should describe the proposed work and show how it relates to 
the Survey's national program priorities. It should define the 
resources required to implement the plan through 2006.
    The Committee has provided $600,000 for water-quality 
studies within the Lake Ponchartrain basin. Within these funds, 
the Survey should provide sufficient funds to continue 
operation of new flow and water quality sensors deployed in the 
basin with the funds provided in fiscal year 2003. The USGS 
should develop its plans collaboratively with Southeastern 
Louisiana University to assure that the proposed work addresses 
local problems affecting the Lake Pontchartrain basin and its 
stakeholders and is relevant to the national mission of the 
USGS.
    Biological Research.--The Committee recommends $173,349,000 
for biological research, $4,474,000 above the budget request 
and $3,533,000 above the 2003 enacted level including increases 
above the budget request of $2,800,000 to restore the 
interagency cooperative fire science program, $500,000 for 
amphibian research, $1,000,000 for chronic wasting disease, 
$600,000 for Great Lakes research and operations, $400,000 for 
Great Lakes vessel operations, $400,000 for the new fish and 
wildlife cooperative research unit established in fiscal year 
2003 at the University of Nebraska, and $500,000 for manatee 
research in support of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
recovery efforts, and a decrease of $1,726,000 as a science 
support adjustment.
    Within the funding increase provided in the budget request 
for the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII), 
$500,000 is allocated for the Tennessee node and $500,000 is 
allocated for the Northeast node in New York.
    The Committee has realigned the Gap Analysis Program by 
shifting $3,900,000 from the biological research and monitoring 
subactivity into the biological information management and 
delivery subactivity. This realignment should result in 
management efficiencies for this high-priority program.
    Science Support.--The Committee recommends $91,529,000 for 
science support, the same as the budget request and $6,352,000 
above the 2003 enacted level.
    Facilities.--The Committee recommends $93,948,000 for 
facilities, $1,000,000 above the budget request and $3,192,000 
above the 2003 enacted level. The increase above the budget 
request is for the Tunison laboratory for Atlantic Salmon 
restoration research.
    The Committee is aware that the budget request may not 
contain sufficient funding for rent for some of the Survey's 
science centers. The Committee finds this unacceptable and 
expects that rent for all science centers will be covered 
within the funds provided to the Survey in its fiscal year 2004 
appropriation without jeopardizing ongoing science programs.

                      Minerals Management Service

    The Minerals Management Service is responsible for 
collecting, distributing, accounting and auditing revenues from 
mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands. In fiscal year 
2004, MMS expects to collect and distribute about $4 billion 
from more than 78,000 active Federal and Indian leases.
    The MMS also manages the offshore energy and mineral 
resources on the Nation's Outer Continental Shelf. To date, the 
OCS program has been focused primarily on oil and gas leasing. 
Over the past several years, MMS has been exploring the 
possible development of other marine mineral resources, 
especially sand and gravel.
    With the passage of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, MMS 
assumed increased responsibility for oil spill research, 
including the promotion of increased oil spill response 
capabilities, and for oil spill financial responsibility 
certifications of offshore platforms and pipelines.

                ROYALTY AND OFFSHORE MINERALS MANAGEMENT




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $264,477,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       264,446,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................      264,446,0000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................           -31,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $264,446,000 for royalty and 
offshore minerals management, the same as the budget request 
and $31,000 below the 2003 enacted level, of which $100,230,000 
is derived from receipts.

                           OIL SPILL RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $6,065,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         7,105,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         7,105,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +1,040,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $7,105,000 to be derived from the 
Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, to conduct oil spill research 
and financial responsibility and inspection activities 
associated with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, Public Law 101-
380. The Committee recommendation is equal to the budget 
request and $1,040,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
(OSM), through its regulation and technology account, regulates 
surface coal mining operations to ensure that the environment 
is protected during those operations and that the land is 
adequately reclaimed once mining is completed. The OSM 
accomplishes this mission by providing grants to those States 
that maintain their own regulatory and reclamation programs and 
by conducting oversight of State programs. Further, the OSM 
administers the regulatory programs in the States that do not 
have their own programs and on Federal and tribal lands.
    Through its abandoned mine land (AML) reclamation fund 
account, the OSM provides environmental restoration at 
abandoned coal mines using tonnage-based fees collected from 
current coal production operations. In their unreclaimed 
condition these abandoned sites may endanger public health and 
safety or prevent the beneficial use of land and water 
resources.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $104,681,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       106,699,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       106,699,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +2,018,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $106,699,000 for Regulation and 
technology, including the use of $275,000 in civil penalty 
collections as requested, and $2,018,000 above the 2003 level.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $190,498,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       174,469,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       194,469,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +3,971,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +20,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $194,469,000 for the abandoned 
mine reclamation fund, an increase of $20,000,000 above the 
request and $3,971,000 above the 2003 funding level. The 
Committee recognizes the great amount of reclamation work that 
remains to be done and has increased funding above the request 
for this program. The Committee has continued the authority for 
the Appalachian clean streams initiative at $10,000,000 and the 
emergency funding and authorities as in fiscal year 2003, and 
discontinued the special authority for Maryland.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs was created in 1824. Its 
mission is founded on a government-to-government relationship 
and trust responsibility that results from treaties with Native 
groups. The Bureau delivers services to over one million Native 
Americans through 12 regional offices and 83 agency offices. In 
addition, the Bureau provides education programs to Native 
Americans through the operation of 117 day schools, 54 boarding 
schools, and 14 dormitories. The Bureau administers more than 
45 million acres of tribally owned land, and 10 million acres 
of individually owned land and over 309,000 acres of Federally 
owned land, which is held in trust status.

                      OPERATION OF INDIAN PROGRAMS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................    $1,845,246,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................     1,889,735,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................     1,902,106,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +56,860,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +12,371,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


      The Committee recommends $1,902,106,000 for the operation 
of Indian programs, $12,371,000 above the budget request and 
$56,860,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    Tribal Priority Allocations.--The Committee recommends 
$778,809,000 for tribal priority allocations, $1,120,000 above 
the budget request and $6,328,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level. The increase above the budget request is to 
provide base funding for six new tribes.
    Other Recurring Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$609,293,000 for other recurring programs, $7,230,000 above the 
budget request and $11,569,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level including increases above the budget request of 
$4,000,000 for the restoration of timber-fish-wildlife program 
of which $920,000 is for the mass marking of hatchery fish as 
required by Public Law 108-7, $500,000 for shellfish management 
as required by the courts in the Bolt decision, $1,000,000 for 
Chippewa/Ottawa treaty fisheries to be allocated to the tribes 
based on the allocation in House Report 108-10, $630,000 for 
Lake Roosevelt management, $600,000 to restore the wetlands/
waterfowl (circle of flight) program, and $500,000 to restore 
funding for the inter-tribal bison program.
    The Committee fully supports the President's education 
reform efforts and agrees with the Department that tribes that 
want to manage their own schools should be given that 
opportunity. Therefore, the Committee has agreed to the 
inclusion of $3,000,000 for start-up administrative costs, and 
overhead as incentives for tribal school boards to begin to 
assume responsibility for the remaining schools that are still 
being managed by the Bureau. Based on this initiative, a 
separate fund would be established, similar to the Indian Self 
Determination Fund, to enable the conversion of Bureau operated 
schools without compromising funding for tribally operated 
schools.
    The Committee notes with approval the past participation of 
the Department of the Interior in the Washington Semester 
Indian Program (WINS), a collaborative effort whereby American 
University provides education, housing, meals, and other 
academic and social activities for participating American 
Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) students and places these students 
in a funded internship program. WINS, located in Washington, 
D.C., serves the educational and economic development needs of 
the AI/AN community by providing opportunities for AI/AN 
students to obtain academically supervised internships and 
supporting rigorous coursework designed to serve as the 
foundation for long-term career planning and development. The 
Committee believes that the WINS program is an excellent way to 
advance the goals of Executive Order 13270, which directs all 
Federal agencies to take steps to enhance access to Federal 
opportunities and resources for AI/AN students from tribal 
colleges and other post-secondary institutions. The Committee 
believes that there is great merit to expanding the WINS 
program and strongly urges the Department in fiscal year 2004, 
as part of its Three-Year plan pursuant to Executive Order 
13270, to expand the number of internship slots it makes 
available for the program and to accommodate participants in a 
second-year internship program.
    Non Recurring Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$73,843,000 for non recurring programs, $300,000 above the 
budget request and $1,358,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level. The increase above the budget request is for 
water management planning and predevelopment for the Seminole 
tribe to address water quality programs as part of Everglades 
restoration efforts.
    Central Office Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$94,861,000 for central office operation, $4,500,000 below the 
budget request and $25,282,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level, including an increase above the budget request 
of $500,000 to restore funding to the branch of acknowledgement 
and a decrease of $5,000,000 for ADP central program 
management.
    The Committee is aware of the significant information 
technology needs of the Bureau both from the perspective of 
managing their day-to-day operations and for the need to 
continue to move forward on its trust reform efforts. This 
reduction to the significant increase proposed in the budget 
request is a result of the current fiscal and budget situation 
and should not be viewed as a repudiation of the Bureau's 
information technology initiative. The Committee appreciates 
that the Bureau is taking a Bureau-wide comprehensive approach 
to its information technology needs.
    Regional Office Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$64,481,000 for regional office operations, the same as the 
budget request and $676,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted.
    Special Programs and Pooled Overhead.--The Committee 
recommends $280,819,000 for special programs and pooled 
overhead, $8,221,000 above the budget request and $11,647,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 enacted level including increases 
above the budget request of $3,500,000 for detention center 
operations for facilities that are constructed by the 
Department of Justice but operated by the Bureau, $3,000,000 
for the United Tribes Technical College, $521,000 for the 
national ironworkers training program, and $1,200,000 for the 
Crownpoint Institute of Technology.
    The Committee is concerned about the growing number of 
tribes with an existing reservation in one State that are 
attempting to claim reservation rights that would allow them to 
engage in gaming operations in States where they have no 
reservation or trust land status. For example, the Seneca-
Cayuga tribe of Oklahoma is attempting to open a gaming 
operation in the State of New York. Trust status for gaming 
purposes on non-contiguous lands requires that a tribe engage 
in a rigorous approval process requiring approval by the 
Governor of an affected State as well as input and support from 
the local community. The Committee expects the Department of 
the Interior and the National Indian Gaming Commission to 
implement fully the existing rules and regulations governing 
these types of gaming operations.
    Bill Language.--Bill language is included under operation 
of Indian programs establishing a separate fund similar to the 
Indian Self Determination Fund to enable the conversion of 
Bureau operated schools without compromising funding for 
tribally operated schools.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $345,988,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       345,154,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       345,154,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -834,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $345,154,000 for construction, the 
same as the budget request and $834,000 below the fiscal year 
2003 enacted level.
    Education.--The Committee recommends $292,634,000 for 
education construction, the same as the budget request and 
$1,161,000 below the fiscal year 2003 enacted level. The 
funding for replacement school construction is sufficient to 
build seven replacement schools.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The Committee recommends 
$5,044,000 for public safety and justice, the same as the 
budget request and $31,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted.
    Resources Management.--The Committee recommends $39,162,000 
for resources management, the same as the budget request and 
$244,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted.
    General Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$8,314,000 for general administration, the same as the budget 
request and $52,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted.

 INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIM SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $60,552,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        51,375,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        60,551,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................            -1,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +9,176,000


    The Committee recommends $60,551,000 for Indian land and 
water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to Indians, 
$9,176,000 above the budget request and $1,000 below the 2003 
enacted level. Funding includes $629,000 for White Earth, 
$252,000 for Hoopa-Yurok, $21,467,000 for the Ute settlement, 
$143,000 for Pyramid Lake, $33,000 for Rocky Boys, $123,000 for 
the Schiviwtz Band, $9,884,000 for Santo Domingo Pueblo, 
$8,052,000 for Colorado Ute, $10,000,000 for Arkansas Riverbed, 
and $9,968,000 for the North Boundary Settlement Agreement of 
which $4,968,000 is derived by transfer from the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service land acquisition account.
    Bill Language.--Language is included providing $9,968,000 
for payment to the Quinault Indian Nation for the North 
Boundary Settlement Agreement of which $4,968,000 is derived by 
transfer from prior year appropriations to the U.S. the Fish 
and Wildlife Service land acquisition account.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $5,457,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         6,497,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         6,497,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +1,040,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $6,497,000 for the Indian 
guaranteed loan program account, the same as the budget request 
and $1,040,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted level.

                          Departmental Offices


                            Insular Affairs


                       ASSISTANCE TO TERRITORIES

    The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) was established on 
August 4, 1995 through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. The OIA has important responsibilities to help the 
United States government fulfill its responsibilities to the 
four U.S. territories of Guam, American Samoa, U.S. Virgin 
Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands 
(CNMI) and also the three freely associated States: the 
Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the 
Marshall Islands (RMI) and the Republic of Palau. The permanent 
and trust fund payments to the territories and the compact 
nations provide substantial financial resources to these 
governments.
    The existing authorities for permanent funding for the 
Compacts of free association with the FSM and the RMI expire in 
fiscal year 2003 although these two nations and the U.S. 
government have agreed to terms to extend the financial 
portions of the compacts. This requires new authorizing 
legislation, yet to be finalized. This Committee recommendation 
assumes that the new authorization will be completed on time 
and will provide funding for certain activities which in recent 
years were funded from annual accounts.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $75,903,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        71,343,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        74,343,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -1,560,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +3,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $74,343,000 for assistance to 
territories, $1,560,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level and 
$3,000,000 above the budget request.
    Territorial Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$23,523,000 for territorial assistance, $1,710,000 below the 
fiscal year 2003 level and $3,000,000 above the budget request. 
Increases to the budget request include $2,000,000 for urgent 
water system rehabilitation needed in the CNMI and $1,000,000 
for technical assistance, which should focus on financial 
management or economic development problems of all the 
territories.
    American Samoa.--The Committee recommends $23,100,000 for 
American Samoa as requested, an increase of $150,000 above the 
2003 level.
    Northern Mariana Islands/Covenant grants.--The Committee 
recommends $27,720,000 for CNMI covenant grants as requested 
and enacted in 2003, and the Committee directs the Office of 
Insular Affairs to implement the allocation in the budget 
request. This includes $11,000,000 for CNMI construction, 
$580,000 for disaster assistance, $5,000,000 for court mandated 
infrastructure improvements in the U.S. Virgin Islands, 
$1,000,000 for the CNMI law enforcement initiative, and 
$10,140,000 for American Samoa construction. The Committee 
directs the OIA to work with the governments of the CNMI, Guam, 
Palau, FSM and RMI, as well as with representatives of the 
Prior Service Benefits Board of Directors, to establish a 
funding mechanism through appropriate pension or social 
security systems, which would replace the prior service trust 
fund for the former employees of the Trust Territories.
    Guam.--The Committee notes that the new financial 
arrangements for the compacts will include the payment of 
$15,000,000 per year, split between Guam, Hawaii, and the CNMI, 
to compensate governments for the impact of migration from the 
compact nations.

                      COMPACT OF FREE ASSOCIATION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $20,926,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        16,125,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        16,354,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -4,572,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................          +229,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $16,354,000 for the compact of 
free association, $229,000 above the request and $4,572,000 
below the 2003 level. The Committee notes that this 
appropriation assumes that the new financial titles to the 
Compacts of Free Association will be signed into law before the 
end of fiscal year 2003. The new compact provisions provide 
additional financial assistance, and, over time, provide for 
the FSM and the RMI to fund trust funds, which will eventually 
provide substantial resources for important government 
functions.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $71,957,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        97,140,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        79,027,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +7,070,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -18,113,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $79,027,000 for departmental 
management, a decrease of $18,113,000 below the budget request 
and an increase of $7,070,000 above the 2003 enacted level. 
Changes from the budget request include an increase of $600,000 
for the transfer of the Public Lands Volunteers Program from 
the National Park Service, and decreases of $200,000 for 
promoting management excellence, $800,000 for strategic human 
capital management planning, $405,000 for the Office of 
Planning and Performance, $200,000 for collaborative action/
dispute resolution, $3,272,000 for DOI workers compensation 
costs, and $13,836,000 for the financial management system 
migration project. Departmental programs that are denied 
requested increases in this appropriation should not be 
augmented with staffing and funds from individual bureaus or 
any other source to achieve the requested level of activity.
    Given the budget constraints for fiscal year 2004, the 
Committee encourages the Department and the Office of 
Management and Budget to take a critical look at the amount of 
funding being spent to track and measure program performance. 
The Committee believes that much of that funding would be 
better used for critical agency programs that directly benefit 
the American public.
    The Committee is reluctantly taking the IT Security 
reductions proposed in the budget request, despite the fact 
that these reductions will not result in the reported savings 
in fiscal year 2004. The Committee is also concerned that the 
reductions were differentially applied to bureaus in the 
Department. The Department should report to the Committee by 
March 1, 2004, on how and when these savings will be achieved 
and the impact on bureau programs in fiscal year 2004.
    The Committee has not provided the requested amount to 
begin the conversion of DOI bureaus to a new financial 
accounting system due to budget constraints.
    The Committee has provided the requested increase for 
Departmental law enforcement. These funds are provided with the 
understanding that detailed bureau personnel will be returned 
to their original positions in the bureaus.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department has not 
complied with language in the report accompanying the 2003 
appropriations bill that directed that any unbudgeted funding 
requirements for airport operations at Midway Atoll National 
Wildlife Refuge be derived from departmental management funds. 
The Committee understands that a short-term contract for the 
operation of the airport has been secured. The Committee 
expects the Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
to terminate operation of the airport at the end of this 
contract if full funding from benefiting agencies and private 
entities for the operation of the airport is not available.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department's Office of 
Aircraft Safety (OAS) has not provided sufficient support to 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in replacing survey aircraft 
that are operating under safety waivers. The replacement of 
these aircraft with new or refurbished aircraft that meet the 
weight requirements for low level survey flights and have 
sufficient range for performing long distance surveys in remote 
areas should be a high priority for OAS. The Committee directs 
OAS to match the funding provided for aircraft replacement in 
the FWS budget with OAS replacement funds. The OAS and FWS 
should report annually to the Committee on progress in 
replacing these aircraft.
    The Committee further directs OAS to report on the progress 
made in addressing the negative findings from the recent GAO 
report, including progress on the strategic plan being 
developed by OAS. The Committee expects OAS to consider options 
for recovering the full replacement cost, with inflationary 
increases, for all new aircraft as they enter the fleet, 
including the option of allowing individual bureaus to manage 
independently their aircraft fleets. Additionally, the 
Committee expects bureaus that currently operate aircraft to 
adequately budget for the replacement of existing aircraft.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    The Committee recommends the cancellation of $20,000,000 in 
unobligated balances (as identified by the Inspector General) 
from the working capital fund.
    Over the past several years, the Committee has raised 
concerns about the oversight and management of the Working 
Capital Fund as well as noticeable increases in assessments to 
the bureaus either through the Working Capital Fund, 
reimbursable support agreements or other mandates from the 
Administration or the Department. In addition, the Committee 
believes that the Department is in violation of Section 305 of 
the Appropriations Act, which requires Committee notification 
of assessments not detailed in the budget.
    Last year, the Committee asked the Inspector General to 
review the Working Capital Fund. While this review was 
underway, the Committee did its own review of reimbursable 
support agreements and other mandates.
    The Inspector General report disclosed areas of concern 
including, but not limited to, a $20 million surplus that was 
unknown to the Department; the over and under charging of 
customers due to a system that cannot track costs and revenues 
by products and services; and no standardized billing process. 
The Inspector General also reported that the Working Capital 
Fund continues to function as three separate organizations 
using three separate billing methods, despite the fact that 
consolidation to achieve efficiencies was the chief reason the 
Committee agreed in 1999 to merge the three separate service 
centers into the Working Capital Fund.
    The Committee agrees with the Inspector General's concerns 
that the Department is not utilizing the two authorized reserve 
accounts for accrued annual leave and equipment replacement. 
The Committee is concerned that the Department feels that it 
has the authority to establish four other reserves. The 
Committee has included bill language under administrative 
provisions, which prohibits the establishment of other reserves 
without Committee approval.
    The GAO reports that the Working Capital Fund does not 
provide comprehensive reports to the bureaus that identify 
which services are mandatory or optional, the amount of the 
services being provided, or the methodology used to charge the 
bureaus. The Committee directs that such comprehensive reports 
be developed and made available to each bureau and the 
Committee at the beginning of each fiscal year.
    The Committee directs the Department to implement fully the 
nine recommendations made by the Inspector General and report 
to the Committee by February 1, 2004 on specific timetables for 
compliance.
    The Committee is also concerned about the possible overuse 
of reimbursable support agreements and other mandates. These 
are difficult fiscal times and there have been many expenses 
that the bureaus have had to absorb including pay, fixed 
expenses and costs associated with Homeland Security needs that 
have not been reimbursed by the Administration. The Committee 
cautions the Department not to impose additional assessments on 
the bureaus without advance justification and funding through 
the budget process.
    The Committee has carried for years bill language, which 
requires that the Department not impose assessments against 
programs, budget activities or subactivities without prior 
approval from the Committee. Because the Department has not 
enforced this provision, the Committee has rewritten the 
language to avoid any ambiguity.
    To summarize, bill language is included under Departmental 
Management Administrative Provisions, which prohibits the 
establishment of any additional reserve funds other than the 
two authorized by law. The Committee has modified reprogramming 
guidelines to make clear that the Department may not charge 
bureaus above the amounts listed in the budget justification or 
institute any additional assessments without formal approval. 
These revised guidelines are contained in the front of this 
report. The Committee has revised a long-standing provision 
carried in Title III dealing with notification of assessments 
to include charges or billings of any kind, without regard to 
whether or not the action benefits the individual bureaus. The 
Committee expects the Department to comply fully with the 
letter and the spirit of the law.

                       PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $218,570,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       200,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       225,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +6,430,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +25,000,000


    Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) provides for payments to 
local units of government containing certain federally owned 
lands. These payments are designed to supplement other Federal 
land receipt sharing payments that local governments may be 
receiving. The recipients may use payments received for any 
governmental purpose.
    The Committee recommends $225,000,000 for PILT, an increase 
of $25,000,000 above the budget request and $6,430,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 level.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $47,462,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        50,374,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        50,374,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +2,912,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $50,374,000 for the Office of the 
Solicitor, the same as the budget request and $2,912,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 enacted level.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $36,003,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        39,049,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        39,049,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +3,046,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $39,049,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General, the same as the budget request and 
$3,046,000 above the fiscal year 2003 enacted level.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians


                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

    The Office of Special Trustee for American Indians (OST) 
was established by the American Indian Trust Fund Management 
Reform Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-412). The Special Trustee is 
charged with general oversight of Indian trust asset reform 
efforts Department-wide to ensure proper and efficient 
discharge of the Secretary's trust responsibilities to Indian 
Tribes and individual Indians. The Office of the Special 
Trustee was created to ensure that the Department of the 
Interior establishes appropriate policies and procedures, 
develops necessary systems, and takes affirmative actions to 
reform the management of Indian trust funds. In carrying out 
the management and oversight of the Indian trust funds, the 
Secretary has a responsibility to ensure that trust accounts 
are properly maintained, invested and reported in accordance 
with the American Indian Trust Fund Management Reform Act of 
1994, Congressional action, and other applicable laws.
    The Special Trustee for American Indians also has 
responsibility for the related financial trust functions 
including deposit, investment, and disbursement of trust funds. 
The Department has responsibility for what may be the largest 
land trust in the world. Indian trust lands today encompass 
approximately 56 million acres of land--over 10 million acres 
belonging to individual Indians and nearly 45 million acres 
owned by Indian Tribes. On these lands, Interior manages over 
100,000 leases for individual Indians and Tribes. Leasing, use 
permits, sale revenues, and interest of approximately $226 
million per year are collected for approximately 230,000 
individual Indian money accounts, and about $530 million per 
year is collected for about 1,400 tribal accounts per year. In 
addition, the trust manages approximately $2.8 billion in 
tribal funds and $400 million in individual Indian funds.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $140,359,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       274,641,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       219,641,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +79,282,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -55,000,000


    The Committee recommends $219,641,000 for the office of 
special trustee for American Indians, $55,000,000 below the 
budget request and $79,282,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level.
    Executive Direction.--The Committee recommends $1,294,000 
for executive direction the same as the budget request and 
$244,000 below the 2003 enacted.
    Operation and Support.--The Committee recommends 
$52,424,000 for operations and support, the same as the budget 
request and $919,000 below the 2003 enacted level.
    Trust Accountability.--The Committee recommends $51,970,000 
for trust accountability, the same as the budget request and 
$6,346,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    Field Operations.--The Committee recommends $24,324,000 for 
field operations, the same as the budget request and 
$15,168,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    Trust Services.--The Committee recommends $14,629,000 for 
trust services, the same as the budget request and $172,000 
below the 2003 enacted level.
    Historical Accounting.--The Committee recommends 
$75,000,000 for historical accounting, a decrease of 
$55,000,000 below the budget request and an increase of 
$65,844,000 above the 2003 enacted level.
    The Committee approved the Department's proposed 
reorganization of the trust functions for the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs and Office of Special Trustee for American Indians by 
letter dated December 10, 2002. The Committee urges the 
Department to move as expeditiously as possible in implementing 
this reorganization so that trust reform can continue to move 
forward.
    Bill Language.--After six years of litigation in the Cobell 
v. Norton class action law suit, the Committee has appropriated 
hundreds of millions of dollars in litigation related 
activities. These funds could have been better used to fund 
health and education programs in Indian country or directed 
towards reforming the outdated trust systems in the Department.
    The Committee still faces the likelihood of appropriating 
hundreds of millions of dollars, or possibly billions, for a 
historical accounting. The result of this process will likely 
provide more and more money to accountants and lawyers with 
little benefit for the individual account holders. To date, not 
a single dollar has reached the Indian people.
    The Committee's concern is reinforced by the results of the 
recent Ernst and Young report on the historical accounting of 
the five named plaintiffs and their predecessors, and other 
studies that indicate the likely error rate for the more than 
300,000 individual Indian money accounts is not significant. 
These studies also provide insight into the Department's 
ability to conduct an historical accounting based on a sound 
statistical methodology.
    The Committee believes that this contentious litigation has 
prevented any rational resolution regarding the individual 
Indian money accounts. Accordingly, the Committee has included 
a legislative solution that would benefit Indian country and 
the United States by providing a prompt, fair, and just 
resolution to these longstanding claims.
    The Secretary would have the authority to resolve any 
claims through a voluntary settlement process with holders of 
individual Indian money accounts. All other accounting claims 
would be resolved using a sound statistical sampling 
methodology. Based on this statistical sampling, the Secretary 
would estimate a rate of past accounting error and apply that 
error rate to each account. This would conclusively resolve all 
claims regarding an account, subject to judicial review. 
Individual account holders would have the right to appeal 
account adjustments to the Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia. The Secretary would have four years to complete this 
accounting and would be required to report to the Congress 
annually.
    This process is similar to accounting solutions implemented 
elsewhere to solve complicated situations. Absent such a 
solution, all participants will suffer through years of 
continued litigation and millions of dollars will continue to 
be spent on a process that doesn't help Indian country.

                       INDIAN LAND CONSOLIDATION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $7,928,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        20,980,000
    Recommended, 2004.................................        20,980,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +13,052,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $20,980,000 for Indian land 
consolidation the same as the budget request and $13,052,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 enacted level.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration


                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

    The purpose of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund 
is to provide the basis for claims against responsible parties 
for the restoration of injured natural resources. Assessments 
ultimately will lead to the restoration of injured resources 
and reimbursement for reasonable assessment costs from 
responsible parties through negotiated settlements or other 
legal actions. Operating on a ``polluter pays'' principle, the 
program anticipates recovering over $44 million in receipts in 
fiscal year 2003, with the vast majority to be used for the 
restoration of injured resources. The program works to restore 
sites ranging in size from small town landfills to the Exxon 
Valdez oil spill of 1989 in Alaska.
    Prior to fiscal year 1999, this account was included under 
the United States Fish and Wildlife Service appropriation. The 
account was moved to the Departmental Offices appropriation 
because its functions relate to several different bureaus 
within the Department of the Interior.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $5,501,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         5,633,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         5,633,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +132,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $5,633,000, the budget request, 
for the natural resource damage assessment fund, an increase of 
$132,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.

             GENERAL PROVISIONS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    The Committee recommends continuing several provisions 
carried in previous bills as follows. Sections 101 and 102 
provide for emergency transfer authority with the approval of 
the Secretary. Section 103 provides for warehouse and garage 
operations and for reimbursement for those services. Section 
104 provides for vehicle and other services. Section 105 
provides for uniform allowances. Section 106 provides for 
twelve-month contracts. Sections 107 through 110 prohibit the 
expenditure of funds for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leasing 
activities in certain areas. These OCS provisions are addressed 
under the Minerals Management Service in this report. Section 
111 limits the investment of Federal funds by tribes and tribal 
organizations to obligations of the United States or 
obligations insured by the United States. Section 112 prohibits 
the National Park Service from reducing recreation fees for 
non-local travel through any park unit. Section 113 permits the 
transfer of funds between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the 
Office of Special Trustee for American Indians.
    Section 114 provides for the renewal of grazing permits 
under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 as 
amended until the Department completes its environmental 
analysis.
    Section 115 continues a provision allowing the hiring of 
administrative law judges to address the Indian probate 
backlog.
    Section 116 continues a provision permitting the 
redistribution of tribal priority allocation and tribal base 
funds to alleviate funding inequities.
    Section 117 continues a provision requiring the allocation 
of Bureau of Indian Affairs postsecondary schools funds 
consistent with unmet needs.
    Section 118 continues a provision limiting the use of the 
Huron Cemetery in Kansas City to religious purposes.
    Section 119 continues a provision permitting the conveyance 
of the Twin Cities Research Center of the former Bureau of 
Mines for the benefit of the National Wildlife Refuge System.
    Section 120 continues a provision authorizing a cooperative 
agreement with the Golden Gate National Parks Association.
    Section 121 continues a provision permitting the Bureau of 
Land Management to retain funds from the sale of seeds and 
seedlings.
    Section 122 continues a provision permitting the sale of 
improvements and equipment at the White River Oil Shale Mine in 
Utah and the retention and use of those funds by the Bureau of 
Land Management and the General Services Administration.
    Section 123 continues a provision authorizing the Secretary 
of the Interior to use helicopter or motor vehicles to capture 
and transport horses and burros at the Sheldon and Hart 
National Wildlife Refuges.
    Section 124 authorizes federal funds for Shenandoah Valley 
Battlefield NHD and Ice Age NST to be transferred to a State, 
local government, or other governmental land management entity 
for acquisition of lands.
    Section 125 continues a provision prohibiting the closure 
of the underground lunchroom at Carlsbad Caverns NP, NM.
    Section 126 continues a provision preventing the demolition 
of a bridge between New Jersey and Ellis Island.
    Section 127 continues a provision prohibiting the posting 
of signs at Canaveral National Seashore as clothing optional 
areas if it is inconsistent with county ordinance.
    Section 128 continues a provision limiting compensation for 
the Special Master and Court Monitor appointed by the Court in 
Cobell v. Norton to 200 percent of the highest Senior Executive 
Service rate of pay.
    Section 129 continues a provision allowing the Secretary to 
pay private attorney fees for employees and former employees 
incurred in connection with Cobell v. Norton.
    Section 130 continues a provision dealing with the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service's responsibilities for mass marking 
of salmonid stocks.
    Section 131 continues a provision permitting the transfer 
of Departmental Management funds for operational needs at the 
Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge airport.
    Section 132 continues a provision prohibiting the use of 
funds to study or implement a plan to drain or reduce water 
levels in Lake Powell.
    Section 133 amends section 122 of Division F of Public Law 
108-7 to allow schools that are not funded by the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs to participate in the tribal school 
demonstration program with the understanding that only 
construction funds and no funding for school operations or 
facilities operations and maintenance will be provided to these 
schools.
    Section 134 requires the Secretary of the Interior to 
report to the Committee within 180 days of enactment on the 
educational facilities of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians 
and land availability for new or replacement facilities.
    Section 135 provides for a land exchange at the Mojave 
National Preserve.
    Section 136 establishes the Blue Ridge National Heritage 
Area.
    Section 137 establishes a resolution process regarding 
individual Indian money account claims. Claims would be 
resolved either through a voluntary settlement process with 
account holders, or by using a sound statistical methodology to 
estimate a rate of past accounting error, which would be 
applied to each account. In no case would there be any downward 
adjustment to any account and account holders would have the 
right to appeal any account adjustment to the Court of Appeals 
for the District of Columbia.
    Section 138 limits the use of funds for the Klamath Fishery 
Management Council. The Council has overstepped its legislative 
mandate by advocating policy positions that are outside the 
scope of its authority.
    Section 139 permits the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to 
use funds to encourage public participation in Service programs 
and for contracts for employment-related legal services.

                       TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES


                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service manages 192 million acres of public 
lands for multiple use Nationwide, including lands in 44 States 
and Puerto Rico, and cooperates with States, other Federal 
agencies, Tribes and others to sustain the Nation's forests and 
grasslands. The Forest Service administers a wide variety of 
programs, including forest and rangeland research, State and 
private forestry assistance, wildfire suppression and fuels 
reduction, cooperative forest health programs, and human 
resource programs. The National Forest System (NFS) includes 
155 National forests, 20 National grasslands, 20 National 
recreation areas, a National tallgrass prairie, 5 National 
monuments, and 6 land utilization projects. The NFS is managed 
for multiple use, including timber production, recreation, 
wilderness, minerals, grazing, fish and wildlife habitat 
management, and soil and water conservation.
    The Committee notes that February 1, 2005 will be the 
centennial of the transfer of the forest reserves from the 
General Land Office in the Department of the Interior to the 
newly named, U.S. Forest Service in the Department of 
Agriculture. At its inception, President Theodore Roosevelt 
convened the Joint Conservation Congress to provide guidance to 
the Forest Service as it formed the multiple use mission which 
continues to guide it today. The Committee recognizes this 
historic past, and encourages the Forest Service to continue 
its plans to commemorate appropriately this centennial with a 
forward-looking process utilizing the historic sites so 
relevant in the development of the agency mission. During 
fiscal year 2004, the Committee expects the Administration to 
establish a consensus-based approach analogous to that original 
session to discuss and help determine a vision and strategic 
plan, on a cooperative basis with the American public, for the 
management of the Nation's forests and rangelands over the next 
century. The Forest Service shall keep the Committee informed 
in a timely manner of plans to accomplish this, resource needs 
which may become apparent, and a strategy to involve a wide 
array of the public and partners to help determine future goals 
for the national forest system and the role of the Forest 
Service in the Nation's natural resource and conservation 
fabric. The Committee expects that the Forest Service, along 
with its partners, will treat the centennial as an important 
milestone deserving appropriate celebration and recognition.

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

    Forest and rangeland research and development sponsors 
basic and applied scientific research. This research provides 
both credible and relevant knowledge about forests and 
rangelands and new technologies that can be used to sustain the 
health, productivity, and diversity of private and public lands 
to meet the needs of present and future generations. Research 
is conducted across the U.S. through six research stations, the 
Forest Products Laboratory, and the International Institute of 
Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico as well as cooperative 
research efforts with many of the Nation's universities. The 
Committee stresses that this research and development should 
support all of the Nation's forests and rangelands and that 
technology transfer and practical applications are vital.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $250,049,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       252,170,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       267,230,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +17,181,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +15,060,000


    The Committee recommends $267,230,000 for forest and 
rangeland research, $15,060,000 above the budget request and 
$17,181,000 above the 2003 funding level. This funding level 
includes a transfer of $6,200,000 from the NFS appropriation 
for the forest inventory and analysis (FIA) program as well as 
$3,100,000 for partial payment of fixed cost increases. The 
Committee does not accept the proposed budget; allocations are 
presented relative to the final fiscal year 2003 enacted 
levels.
    The Committee has consolidated funding for the FIA program 
and also provided bill language clarifying the precise level 
for this program under this heading. FIA funding within the 
research account is $49,428,000, which includes a transfer of 
$6,200,000 from the inventory and monitoring activity within 
the NFS account and a program increase of $2,000,000. 
Additional FIA funding consolidation is also recommended within 
the State and private forestry account as discussed under that 
heading. That account includes a total of $9,000,000 for the 
forest resource information and analysis activity of the FIA 
program, bringing the overall total for the Federal 
contribution to the FIA program to $58,448,000. The Committee 
encourages States and commercial users to help cost-share the 
program.
    The overall allocation maintains the fiscal year 2003 
enacted research projects except the Morgantown, WV and 
Baltimore, MD increases are discontinued and the funding for 
the International Arid Lands Consortium has been consolidated 
under the State and private forestry heading. Funding for the 
projects added in fiscal year 2003 should be: $500,000 for the 
Joe Skeen Institute for Rangeland Research, NM, $500,000 for 
global climate change research in the northeast, $1,500,000 for 
the advanced housing research consortium, $1,500,000 for 
adelgid and other insects research in the east, $2,000,000 for 
sudden oak death research, and $528,000 for the PNW 
administrative alignment (which should hereafter be part of the 
PNW station base). The Committee also has included increases of 
$1,300,000 for invasive species research described in the 
request, $300,000 for hemlock wooly adelgid research at 
Coweeta, NC, $300,000 for technology transfer at Coweeta, NC, 
$300,000 for Cumberland plateau silviculture research through 
the Bent Creek project, NC, and $1,500,000 for the southern 
pine beetle initiative. The Committee directs that $1,000,000 
be provided for forestry related aspects of the biotechnology 
initiative at Western Carolina University.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

    Through cooperative programs with State and local 
governments, forest industry, conservation organizations, and 
non-industrial private forest landowners, the Forest Service 
supports the protection and management of the nearly 500 
million acres of non-Federal forests in the country. Technical 
and financial assistance is offered to improve wildland fire 
management and protect communities from wildfire; control 
insects and disease; improve harvesting and processing of 
forest products; conserve environmentally important forests; 
and enhance stewardship of urban and rural forests. The Forest 
Service provides special expertise and disease suppression for 
all Federal and tribal lands, as well as cooperative assistance 
with the States for State and private lands.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $284,712,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       315,823,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       290,758,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +6,047,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -25,065,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $290,758,000 for State and private 
forestry, $25,065,000 below the budget request and $6,047,000 
above the 2003 funding level. All funding for this 
appropriation should follow the fiscal year 2003 enacted levels 
unless otherwise directed.
    Forest Health Management.--The Committee recommends 
$103,000,000 for forest health management, $20,981,000 above 
the request and $22,117,000 above the enacted level. The 
Committee emphasizes its concern with forest health in the 
broad sense and has added bill language to clarify that forest 
health activities may include treatments to restore and 
rehabilitate forests damaged by pests or invasive plants. The 
Committee once again rejects the request for an emerging pest 
fund that came with unrealistic restrictions. Instead, the 
Committee has added this funding to the base program. This 
should fully fund the slow-the-spread gypsy moth program and 
provide additional resources for work to control and manage the 
Asian long-horned beetle, emerald ash borer and other pests in 
urban settings and adelgids in the east, as well as various 
mountain pine beetles throughout the Rockies and the west. The 
previous funding within this activity for the FIA program 
($2,810,000) has been transferred to the forest resource 
information and analysis program as described below. Funding is 
not provided for the Vermont forest health cooperative program 
funded in fiscal year 2003. The Committee is concerned about 
invasive exotic pests, which have proven to have huge impacts 
on American forests and trees. Some funds may be retained at 
headquarters in order to respond to new, urgent pest problems. 
The Forest Service should expand its joint early detection 
network with the APHIS to cover more ports and more pests, and 
work with the research program and the international program to 
expand cooperative projects overseas, especially in eastern 
Asia, to deal with forest pests.
    The Committee has added $10,000,000 for southern pine 
beetle forest health activities, including forest 
rehabilitation, disease prevention, and education. This 
consists of $3,000,000 within the Federal lands activity and 
$7,000,000 within the cooperative lands activity for help with 
State and private forests. The Committee expects that the 
Forest Service will establish a priority setting system to 
direct southern pine beetle initiative funds to the most urgent 
areas, as well as performance criteria which favor areas with 
proven success. Use of this funding should be closely 
coordinated with the complementary allocation within research 
and development. In addition, the Committee is very concerned 
about the condition of forests in the mountains of southern 
California and expects this area to be given special 
consideration with both Federal and cooperative forest health 
funding. Discreet allocations for this urgent situation are 
also provided within State fire assistance and hazardous fuels.
    The recommendation of $56,000,000 for Federal lands forest 
health management, includes the 2003 enacted funding (minus the 
FIA transfer of $1,405,000) plus $1,447,000 for fixed cost 
increases, $3,000,000 for the southern pine beetle initiative 
described above, and a general increase of $2,911,000. The 
recommendation of $47,000,000 for cooperative lands forest 
health management, includes the 2003 enacted funding (minus the 
FIA transfer of $1,405,000) plus $585,000 for fixed cost 
increases, $7,000,000 for the southern pine beetle initiative 
described above, and a general increase of $9,984,000.
    Cooperative Fire Protection.--The Committee recommends 
$41,100,000 for cooperative fire protection in the State and 
private forestry account, $10,672,000 above the request and 
$10,607,000 above the 2003 funding level. The Committee has 
included an increase of $10,514,000 above the enacted level for 
State fire assistance. Within this increase is $5,000,000 to 
cost-share treatments in the mountains of southern California, 
especially on State and private lands near the San Bernardino 
NF, where a terrible pest outbreak has created an extremely 
dangerous situation. Other funding for the southern California 
situation is provided for work on Federal lands within the 
wildland fire management account. The remainder of the increase 
for State fire assistance above the fiscal year 2003 level 
includes $485,000 for fixed cost increases and a program 
increase of $5,029,000, which should focus on national fire 
plan activities. No special allocation is provided for the Cook 
Inlet Tribal Council. The recommendation includes $5,100,000 
for volunteer fire assistance, an increase of $93,000 above the 
enacted level. The Committee also notes that the cooperative 
fire portion of the national fire plan within the wildland fire 
management account includes a total of $51,000,000 for State 
fire assistance and $8,240,000 for volunteer fire assistance.
    Cooperative Forestry.--The Committee recommends 
$140,658,000 for cooperative forestry, $57,659,000 below the 
budget request and $26,965,000 below the 2003 funding level.
    Forest Stewardship.--The Committee recommends $32,683,000 
for forest stewardship, $32,926,000 below the request and 
$671,000 above the enacted level. The proposed new initiatives 
are not funded with discretionary appropriations. Instead, the 
Committee has put healthy forest initiative funding increases 
within the forest health management, State fire assistance, and 
hazardous fuels activities. The Committee notes the large 
infusion of new mandatory funding from the Farm Security and 
Rural Investment Act of 2002, which includes $25,000,000 in 
2003 and $20,000,000 in 2004 for the Forest Land Enhancement 
program. The Committee expects that the Forest Service and the 
State foresters will collaborate to use these funds for the 
purposes of the healthy forests initiative. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to include in its subsequent budget 
justifications a clear exposition, within the discussion on 
cooperative forestry, of plans for integrating this mandatory 
funding with other important cooperative forestry 
appropriations. Within the allocation for forest stewardship, 
the Committee continues funding of $500,000 for watershed 
activities in the New York City watershed and $750,000 for the 
Chesapeake Bay program but other earmarks added in fiscal year 
2003 are discontinued.
    Forest Legacy Program.--The Committee recommends 
$45,575,000 for the forest legacy program, $45,234,000 below 
the request and $22,805,000 below the enacted level. The 
allocation also includes an additional $5,000,000 from prior 
year funds; several previously designated projects have either 
failed or received funding from other sources. The Committee 
recommends the following distribution of funds:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
   State          Project name         FY04 request      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AL           Mobile Tensaw Delta..         $3,300,000         $3,300,000
CA           Dofflemeyer Ranch....          2,500,000          2,500,000
CA           Six Rivers to the Sea          1,350,000          1,350,000
CT           Peaceful Hill........            200,000            200,000
CT           Nipmuck..............            350,000            350,000
DE           Green Horizons.......          2,000,000          2,000,000
GA           Rocky Creek at                 1,500,000          1,500,000
              Broxton Rocks.
IA           Canyons..............            290,000            290,000
ID           St. Joe Basin/Mica             3,000,000          3,000,000
              Creek Phase I.
IL           Byron Rock River.....          1,200,000          1,200,000
IN           Shawnee Hills........          3,150,000          2,000,000
MA           Belmont Springs......          1,400,000          1,400,000
MA           Bush Hill............            227,000            227,000
ME           Machias River Project          2,000,000          2,000,000
              Phase I.
MN           Lester River.........            500,000            500,000
NC           Cool Springs.........          1,500,000          1,500,000
NH           Pillsbury/Sunapee              2,530,000          2,530,000
              Highlands.
NJ           Upper Delaware River           5,500,000          5,125,000
              Watershed.
NM           Lagunas Bonitas......          3,000,000          3,000,000
RI           Great Grass Pond.....             28,000            328,000
SC           Cooper River Corridor         10,000,000          4,000,000
TN           Ray Gettelfinger               1,000,000          1,000,000
              (Rugby).
UT           Chalk Creek/South              2,700,000            800,000
              Fork.
UT           Cedar Project........          1,550,000          1,550,000
VA           Dragon Run...........          3,000,000          3,000,000
VA           The Cove.............          1,125,000          1,125,000
WA           Raging River Forest            1,000,000          1,000,000
              Headwaters.
             Other requested               30,782,000  .................
              projects.
                                   -------------------------------------
               Project Subtotal...         86,982,000         46,775,000
             Admin, Acq Mgment &            3,827,000          3,800,000
              AON Planning.
             Use of prior year      .................         -5,000,000
              funds.
                                   -------------------------------------
               Total..............         90,809,000         45,575,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has examined the forest legacy program 
closely and has evaluated the progress being made on the 
management problems described last year. The Forest Service has 
made substantial progress but it is too soon to determine if 
reforms are being effectively implemented. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to continue with the reforms begun 
last year. The Committee remains particularly concerned about 
potential problems with cost-share contributions being obscured 
and with proper appraisal for interests in lands. The Committee 
is committed to maintaining public access to lands protected 
with public funds. The Committee believes it is imperative that 
a transparent project selection process be maintained, and that 
funding be favored for projects of national significance. 
Funding for new States is not provided because the forest 
legacy program has grown too quickly and should not be expanded 
until a proven record of accomplishment is established. The 
Committee notes that there is already over $100,000,000 in 
previously appropriated funds for forest legacy projects which 
have not been expended to date.
    Urban and Community Forestry.--The Committee recommends 
$36,000,000 for urban and community forestry, $1,893,000 below 
the request and $1,000 above the 2003 funding level. This 
recommendation includes $700,000 to support the northeastern 
Pennsylvania community forestry program but other previous 
Congressional allocations are discontinued. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to devise a new and different 
funding allocation method for this program. The existing system 
discriminates against States with large urban areas and directs 
funds to States with many tiny communities, and it has no 
performance based allocation criteria. The Committee directs 
the new methodology used by the Forest Service to consider 
State population and metropolitan area statistics, consider the 
increased demand for assistance to large urban centers, as well 
as devise performance criteria which help determine State 
allocations. The Committee also directs that the new allocation 
methodology should include competitive funding for nationally 
or regionally significant projects. The Committee directs the 
Forest Service to notify the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, in writing, of this new allocation methodology 
prior to allocating fiscal year 2004 funds. The Committee feels 
that, after 11 years, this program no longer needs to require 
certain specific staffing levels by a State as a condition to 
getting a grant, and the Forest Service and the State foresters 
should evaluate whether or not minimum State allocations should 
be continued.
    Economic Action Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$17,400,000 for economic action programs, $8,868,000 below the 
2003 level. This program was not included in the request. 
Within the economic action program the Committee recommends the 
following distribution of funds:

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
         Program component             2003 enacted      recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic recovery base program....             $4,967             $5,000
Rural development base program....              3,974              4,700
Forest products, conservation &                 1,291              1,300
 recycling........................
Wood in transportation............                993                  0
                                   -------------------------------------
      Programs subtotal...........             11,225             11,000
                                   =====================================
Special projects:
    Alabama rural economic action.                  0                600
    Arid Lands Research Consortium                298                400
    Cradle of Forestry conserv.                   586                650
     ed, NC.......................
    Gonzaga Univ. Inland NW                       894                625
     Natural Resources Center, WA.
    KY mine waste reforestation...                993                750
    Lake Tahoe erosion control                  2,484              1,000
     grants, CA NV................
    Education & Research                            0              1,000
     Consortium of Western NC.....
    Rural forestry technology for                 596                625
     State of WA..................
    Woody biomass applications,                     0                750
     SUNY Syracuse, NY............
    Wood Education & Resource                   2,681                  0
     Center, WV...................
Other items.......................              6,511                  0
                                   -------------------------------------
      Subtotal special projects...             15,043              6,400
                                   =====================================
      Total economic action.......             26,268             17,400
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee disagrees with the Administration's proposal 
to eliminate entirely the economic action programs. These cost-
share efforts provide vital capacity building for rural 
communities, which can greatly aid forest dependent 
communities. This forestry capacity building is important as it 
complements the national fire plan and the healthy forest 
initiative. The conservation education funding for the Cradle 
of Forestry is for the Education and Research Consortium of 
Western North Carolina, of which $250,000 is for the Pisgah 
Forest Institute and $400,000 is for the Cradle of Forestry, 
USDA Forest Service. The funds for the Education and Research 
Consortium of Western NC are for a new, Pisgah Forest 
Institute, national earth and environmental education 
initiative to teach educators by using several regional forest 
locations as labs for instruction.
    Forest Resource Information and Analysis.--The Committee 
recommends $9,000,000 for forest resource information and 
analysis, $4,994,000 above the request and $4,036,000 above the 
2003 enacted level. This includes transfers of $1,405,000 from 
both the Federal and cooperative forest health accounts, and a 
program increase of $1,304,000 for this activity. This 
consolidates all FIA activities in this activity, and in one 
account within the research and development account. These 
funds should be used in partnership with the State foresters 
and others to enhance the forest inventory and analysis 
program, which is managed within the forest research and 
development branch. The funds should be used to accelerate the 
inventory cycle time.
    International Program.--The Committee recommends $6,000,000 
for the international program, $941,000 above the request and 
$287,000 above the fiscal year 2003 funding level. The 
Committee is encouraged by the successful partnerships in the 
international program and the growing importance of maintaining 
expertise in this arena.

                         NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM

    Within the National Forest System, which covers 192 million 
acres, there are 51 Congressionally designated areas, including 
20 National recreation areas, and 7 National scenic areas. The 
NFS includes a substantial amount of the Nation's softwood 
inventory. In fiscal year 2002 over 208,000 acres of national 
forest vegetation was managed through timber sale activities, 
which produced 1.7 billion board feet of timber products. 
Nearly 8,800 farmers and ranchers pay for permits to graze 
cattle, horses, sheep and goats on 90 million acres of 
grassland, open forests, and other forage-producing acres of 
the National forest system. The NFS includes over 133,000 miles 
of trails and 23,000 developed facilities, including 4,389 
campgrounds, 58 major visitor centers, and about one-half of 
the Nation's ski-lift capacity. Wilderness areas cover 35 
million acres, nearly two-thirds of the wilderness in the 
contiguous 48 States. The Forest Service also has major habitat 
management responsibilities for more than 3,000 species of 
wildlife and fish, and 10,000 plant species and provides 
important habitat and open space for over 400 threatened or 
endangered species. Half of the Nation's big game habitat and 
coldwater fish habitat, including salmon and steelhead, is 
located on National forest system lands and waters. In 
addition, in the 16 western States, where the water supply is 
sometimes critically short, about 55 percent of the total 
annual yield of water is from National forest system lands.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................    $1,353,444,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................     1,369,573,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................     1,400,792,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +47,348,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +31,219,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


    The Committee recommends $1,400,792,000 for the National 
forest system, $31,219,000 above the budget request and 
$47,348,000 above the 2003 funding level.
    Land Management Planning.--The Committee recommends 
$73,929,000 for land management planning, $3,061,000 above the 
request and $2,203,000 above the 2003 level. The Committee 
remains concerned that forest plans need to be updated, but 
that management activities should not be unduly delayed further 
due to process-oriented litigation dealing with the age of a 
forest plan. Bill language in Title III addresses this 
situation.
    Inventory and Monitoring.--The Committee recommends 
$173,496,000 for inventory and monitoring, $4,300,000 below the 
request, and $720,000 below the 2003 level. The Committee notes 
that $6,200,000 has been transferred to the research and 
development appropriation account for FIA activities, which 
were previously funded under this heading. Within the 
allocation, the Committee has included $500,000 for watershed 
assessments and adaptive management activities at the Lake 
Tahoe Basin, and $180,000 for the National Forests of North 
Carolina for inventories of potentially harvestable plants. The 
Committee notes that bill language is included in Title III 
amending and extending the pilot forest botanical product 
harvest program established in fiscal year 2000 but never 
implemented. The Committee recommends that botanists and other 
inventory specialists help implement this program so it can 
actually be started to aid sustainable management of plant 
resources.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The Committee 
recommends $262,282,000 for recreation heritage and wilderness, 
$7,341,000 above the request and $9,740,000 above the 2003 
level. Volunteer work and contributions by the recreation 
community are impressive and accordingly the Committee has 
provided funding increases in support of these efforts. Within 
the increase, the Committee has included $100,000 for the 
Colville NF, WA, for an EIS on the 49 Degrees North Ski Hill, 
and $150,000 for the Finger Lakes NF, NY, for an EIS covering 
potential building for visitor services.
    The Committee directs continued funding above the request, 
and reporting requirements, for national scenic and historic 
trails as in fiscal year 2003, including $1,500,000 for trails 
where the Forest Service has prime responsibility and $400,000 
for trails where the Forest Service shares responsibility. In 
addition, the Forest Service should maintain a full time 
Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) manager, provide funds to work with 
the Pacific Crest Trail Association, and aid PCT trail 
relocation reviews. The Forest Service should make every effort 
to work with volunteer groups, which contribute work, time, and 
money to enhance Federal resources.
    The Committee is particularly concerned about the situation 
affecting outfitting and guide operations on national forest 
system wilderness areas in the High Sierra range on the Inyo 
and Sierra National Forests, CA. Outfitting and guide 
operations provide an important service to the public. The 
Forest Service should work to assure that these activities are 
managed at sustainable levels to achieve an appropriate balance 
of recreation opportunities for both the guided and non-guided 
public. The Forest Service should use an appropriate amount of 
the funding increase for recreation and wilderness to support 
and continue outfitter and guide operations on these two 
forests for the benefit of the public. Forest managers should 
work closely with the outfitters and others to see that permits 
are renewed as fast as possible and that public use of 
wilderness is not diminished. Bill language is included within 
Administrative provisions to require a report which will aid 
the outfitter and guide permitting process on these two 
national forests.
    The Committee appreciates the efforts of the Bureau of Land 
Management (BLM) and the Forest Service to assess the current 
status of access to the lands that they manage. The Committee 
feels strongly that the agencies should continue to take 
proactive steps to provide adequate public access for 
recreation. Therefore, the Committee directs the BLM and the 
Forest Service to submit to the Committee, by May 30, 2004, a 
coordinated strategic plan which indicates how the agencies 
will: (1) inventory and identify the ownership of roads, 
trails, access points and existing public rights-of-way within 
their units; (2) identify a priority list of perpetual access 
easements needed to provide adequate permanent legal access to 
enhance the recreation potential of public lands; and (3) 
establish a process and timeline for developing up-to-date 
recreational access plans for individual forest and public land 
units.
    Wildlife and Fish Habitat Management.--The Committee 
recommends $138,325,000 for wildlife and fish habitat 
management, an increase of $3,531,000 above the request and 
$5,389,000 above the 2003 level. Included in the increase above 
the request is $150,000 to continue the threatened, endangered 
and sensitive species inventory work on the National Forests in 
North Carolina; the remainder is for fixed costs.
    Grazing Management.--The Committee recommends $46,871,000 
for grazing management, $3,691,000 above the request and 
$6,287,000 above the 2003 funding level. The Committee has 
provided this large increase to help the forests get on track 
with NEPA work required for updating allotment management plans 
and for providing important rangeland project inventories. 
Within Title III--General Provisions, the Committee has 
included bill language which provides continuity for permitees 
while these environmental assessments are being completed.
    Forest Products.--The Committee recommends $273,504,000 for 
forest products, $5,485,000 above the request and $9,876,000 
above the 2003 funding level. The increase includes a $300,000 
increase to the base program on the National Forests in North 
Carolina. The Committee encourages the Forest Service to use 
the expanded stewardship end-result contracting authority as an 
important tool to help manage and improve forestland. As the 
service expands this implementation, it should keep track of 
these projects and report regularly to the Congress, and the 
Service should include provisions for independent, outside 
second party monitoring.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The Committee 
recommends $198,387,000 for vegetation and watershed 
management, $5,781,000 above the budget request and $8,684,000 
above the 2003 funding level. The increase above the request 
includes $1,000,000 for watershed recovery efforts on the Wayne 
NF, OH, $1,000,000 for priority forest improvement work on the 
Colville NF, WA, $300,000 for noxious weed work in eastern 
Washington, $200,000 to complete the Waldo Lake, OR, scientific 
watershed assessment, and $600,000 for watershed improvement 
activities in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Managers on the Colville NF 
are encouraged to use categorical exclusions for projects using 
this new funding.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The Committee recommends 
$54,065,000 for minerals and geology management as requested, 
an increase of $1,772,000 above the 2003 funding level.
    Land Ownership Management.--The Committee recommends 
$95,337,000 for land ownership management, $3,645,000 above the 
request and $2,926,000 above the 2003 funding level. The 
Committee provides this increase because of the huge 
operational backlog and shortfall in this program area, which 
provides vital, basic public service. The Committee expects the 
Forest Service to maintain the full-time lands team to work on 
the Pacific Crest Trail project and other similar projects.
    Law Enforcement Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$83,612,000 for law enforcement operations, $2,984,000 above 
the budget request and $3,337,000 above the 2003 funding level. 
This funding allocation should maintain funding at the fiscal 
year 2003 levels for the Daniel Boone National Forest, KY, and 
the Mark Twain NF, MO.
    Other.--The Committee has provided $984,000 as requested 
for management of the Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM, but 
notes that if there are specific infrastructure needs, such 
funding should be requested under the capital improvement and 
maintenance appropriation and compete with other Forest Service 
projects.
    The Committee directs that overall funding for Land Between 
the Lakes NRA (KY and TN) be no less than $8,400,000. The 
Forest Service should determine the appropriate funding mix 
from all accounts, not just the NFS appropriation.
    The Committee recommendation includes the full funding 
requested by the Administration for the Quincy Library Group 
project in California.
    Challenge Cost Share Program.--The Committee remains 
concerned that the Forest Service has allowed the partnership 
activities of the Challenge Cost Share program and similar 
efforts to languish. The Committee directs the Forest Service 
to continue implementing the instructions provided in fiscal 
year 2003 for these activities, including incorporating such 
work into the budget, by budget line item, and displaying this 
in subsequent budget justifications.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................    $2,006,968,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................     1,541,775,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................     1,624,632,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................      -382,336,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +82,857,000


    The Committee recommends $1,624,632,000 for wildland fire 
management, $82,857,000 above the budget request and 
$382,336,000 below the 2003 funding level (which included 
$636,000,000 to repay partially previous emergency fire 
suppression expenditures). The Committee recognizes the serious 
situation concerning wildland fire management and the need for 
a sustained commitment of resources and talent throughout the 
Nation to implement the National fire plan. This effort 
requires an integrated approach utilizing skills across the 
entire spectrum of the agency and from many partners, 
especially the States.
    The national fire plan directed by the Congress and agreed 
to by the Administration and the Nation's governors includes 
four major areas of focus, as well as the need for 
accountability and research and development for all aspects. 
The Administration's budget request recognizes only two 
aspects, fighting fires and reducing hazardous fuels; the 
request nearly ignores the other two critical aspects: 
restoration and rehabilitation, and community assistance. The 
Committee has used the scarce resources available to support 
these latter aspects, as well as insist on adequate 
accountability and support for research and development for 
this multi-billion dollar endeavor.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has continued bill language 
from fiscal year 2003, which provides expanded contracting and 
cooperative agreement authorities that facilitate wildfire 
management and hazardous fuels reduction activities, especially 
in the wildland-urban interface. The Committee has also 
included bill language allowing the transfer between the 
Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior of 
up to $12,000,000 to facilitate joint projects. The Committee 
remains very concerned that the Knutson-Vandenberg (KV) 
reforestation fund has been used to fund emergency fire 
suppression operations and that these funds have not been 
repaid. The Committee expects the Administration to make a good 
faith effort to repay the KV-fund so that vital reforestation 
and land improvement activities are not put at jeopardy.
    Wildfire Preparedness.--The Committee recommends 
$698,000,000 for wildfire management preparedness, an increase 
of $88,253,000 above the request and $20,004,000 above the 
enacted level. The Committee notes that the Forest Service with 
Congressional encouragement reprogrammed $66,000,000 into this 
account from the suppression activity, in order to maintain an 
adequate fire-fighting work force and initial attack 
capability. The Committee understands that it is imperative to 
maintain fire-fighting readiness so that initial attack has a 
greater chance of putting fires out while they are small, less 
destructive and less expensive to suppress. Accordingly, the 
Committee has realigned some of the fire suppression funding 
into the preparedness activity in order to help prevent run-
away, large fire incidents which command so much emergency 
funding and are so destructive to the environment, property, 
and lives.
    The Committee is concerned that the allocation of funds 
between preparedness and suppression operations may not 
maintain the levels of readiness needed for public safety that 
were established in fiscal years 2001 and 2002. The Committee 
believes that decisive action is necessary to manage escalating 
fire suppression costs. An important component of reducing such 
costs is maintaining initial attack capability so that more 
fires can be contained before they escape and cause serious 
loss of life and property as well as natural resource damage. 
Accordingly, the Committee directs the Forest Service to 
analyze current readiness levels to determine whether 
maintaining preparedness resources in the field at a level not 
less than that established in fiscal year 2002, will, based on 
the best information available, result in lower overall 
firefighting costs. If the agency makes such a determination, 
the Committee directs the Forest Service to adjust the levels 
for preparedness and suppression funding accordingly and report 
on these adjustments to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations. The Department should advise the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations in writing prior to their 
decision.
    Wildfire Suppression Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$520,000,000 for wildfire suppression operations, $84,580,000 
below the request but an increase of $168,036,000 above the 
non-emergency funding for this activity in fiscal year 2003.
    The Committee remains concerned about rising suppression 
costs and the lack of incentives to consider costs during 
large-fire incidents. The Forest Service, along with the 
Department of the Interior, should be sure that cost 
containment is an important priority when suppressing wildland 
fires. Therefore, the Committee directs the Forest Service and 
the Department of the Interior to continue reports directed in 
fiscal year 2003, and also to contract with the National 
Academy of Public Administration to continue their work to help 
reform fire procurement procedures and develop joint planning 
with States and regions which are coordinated with Department 
of Homeland Security emergency procedures.
    The Committee is encouraged by the Forest Service's use of 
a private contract with commercial providers of off-duty or 
trained personnel with law enforcement backgrounds to provide 
security services in firefighting camps. The Committee believes 
that a long-term contract for fire camp security services is 
desirable from an operational and cost perspective. Such a 
contract would go to an experienced commercial provider of such 
personnel, and it should include a base level deployable 
security team and additional on-call or standby security teams 
as needed in fire camps.
    Other Wildfire Operations.--The Committee recommends 
$406,632,000 for other wildfire operations, an increase of 
$79,184,000 above the request and an increase of $65,624,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 level. The Committee recommends the 
following distribution of funds for these vital portions of the 
national fire plan:

                        OTHER WILDFIRE OPERATIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                         Request         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hazardous Fuels...................           $231,392           $246,392
Rehabilitation and restoration....                  0             40,000
Fire Facilities Backlog...........                  0                  0
Research and Development..........             21,427             22,000
Joint Fire Science................              8,000              8,000
State Fire Assistance.............             46,455             51,000
Volunteer Fire Assistance.........              8,240              8,240
Forest Health--Federal Lands......              6,955             10,000
Forest Health--Cooperative Lands..              4,979             15,000
Economic Action Programs..........                  0              6,000
                                   -------------------------------------
      Subtotal--Other Wildfire                327,448            406,632
       Operations.................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has provided $246,392,000 for hazardous fuels 
reduction work, an increase of $15,000,000 above the budget 
request and an increase of $19,765,000 above the fiscal year 
2003 level. The Committee has included an increase above the 
base of $5,000,000 for urgent treatments on the San Bernardino 
NF, CA, caused by drought and a catastrophic bark beetle 
outbreak. The overall allocation also continues the previous 
funding of $5,000,000 for the Community Forest Restoration Act 
and up to $15,000,000 for use on adjacent non-Federal lands 
when hazard reduction activities are planned on national forest 
system lands, and no less than $3,500,000 for work in Arizona.
    The Committee has also restored $40,000,000 for the burned 
area rehabilitation and restoration program first proposed in 
fiscal year 2001. The Committee expects the Forest Service, in 
close partnership with the Department of the Interior, to 
continue the native plant program with at least $2,000,000. 
This expanded program is designed to go beyond emergency 
stabilization to include the reintroduction of native plants 
into these burned over areas before exotic species can gain a 
foothold, and to encourage rural industries to produce plant 
materials.
    The Committee has provided $8,000,000 for the joint fire 
science program, the same as the enacted level. This program is 
producing important scientific and technical information, often 
in collaboration with the Nation's forestry schools, that is 
needed to support the large effort concerning hazardous fuels 
and other fire management issues. The Committee has also 
provided funding for research and development activities within 
the national fire plan.
    The Committee has provided $51,000,000 for State fire 
assistance, $4,545,000 above the request and $4,748,000 above 
the enacted level. This funding is in addition to the 
$36,000,000 provided under the State and private forestry 
heading. The Committee has also included $8,240,000 for 
volunteer fire assistance as requested; this brings the 
volunteer fire funding to a total of $13,340,000. Other 
community assistance funding provided in support of the 
national fire plan is $6,000,000 for economic action programs; 
this funding was not requested by the Administration but it 
supports important forestry capacity building to help develop 
markets for wood products.
    The Committee has provided $25,000,000 for the forest 
health portion of the national fire plan, including $10,000,000 
for Federal lands and $15,000,000 for cooperative efforts with 
the States and others. This funding level is $13,066,000 above 
the request and $8,176,000 above the enacted level. This 
funding should be used in conjunction with the similar funding 
in State and private forestry to establish a more integrated 
approach to forest health, including prevention, and 
restoration and rehabilitation of forests and rangelands. The 
Committee expects the Forest Service to focus on major 
problems, such as southern pine beetles, western mountain bark 
beetles, adelgids, and other pests and pathogens, which harm 
forests and subsequently increase wildfire hazards.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $548,450,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       524,571,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       560,473,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +12,023,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +35,902,000


    The Committee recommends $560,473,000 for capital 
improvement and maintenance, $12,023,000 above the enacted 
level and $35,902,000 above the request.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
funds:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             FY 2003    2004 budget     Committee    Change from
                   Activity or project                       enacted      request    recommendation    request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facilities:
    Maintenance..........................................      $93,315      $97,942        $97,942             0
    Capital improvement..................................       85,441      102,934         93,993       -$8,941
    Congressional priorities:
        Allegheny NF recreation projects, PA.............  ...........  ...........            975           975
        Bradford RD office completion, PA................  ...........  ...........            190           190
        Cherokee NF, Chilhowee rec area I & II, TN.......  ...........  ...........            674           674
        Cradle Forestry rehab & exhibits, NC.............  ...........  ...........            175           175
        D. Boone NF, recreation improvements, KY.........  ...........  ...........            795           795
        Nantahala NF Santeetlah Lake boat ramp             ...........  ...........          1,250         1,250
         improvements, NC................................
        Nantahala NF Jackrabbit rec area, NC.............  ...........  ...........          1,030         1,030
        Pisgah NF, Lake Powhatan cmpgrd rehab, NC........  ...........  ...........          1,660         1,660
        Pisgah NF, Mortimer Recreation Area, NC..........  ...........  ...........            200           200
        San Bernardino NF sanitation rehab, CA...........  ...........  ...........            725           725
        Southern Research Station, global change bldg p&d;  ...........  ...........            500           500
        Waldo Lake sanitation improvements, OR...........  ...........  ...........            450           450
    Subtotal Congressional priorities....................       23,556            0          8,624         8,624
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Facilities................................      202,312      200,876        200,559          -317
                                                          ======================================================
Roads:
    Maintenance..........................................      152,361      160,568        157,000        -3,568
    Capital improvement..................................       70,538       84,790         79,000        -5,790
        Caribbean NF emergency repairs, PR...............  ...........  ...........            525           525
        Chattahooche NF Rich Mtn rd, GA..................  ...........  ...........            318           318
        Coweeta research center improvements, NC.........  ...........  ...........            125           125
        Lake Tahoe basin, rehab & decommissioning, CA NV.  ...........  ...........          1,350         1,350
        Mt. Hood NF, Cloud Cap & Hood River Meadows, OR..  ...........  ...........            396           396
    Subtotal Congressional priorities....................        8,445  ...........          2,714         2,714
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Roads.....................................      231,344      245,358        238,714        -6,644
                                                          ======================================================
Trails:
    Maintenance..........................................       36,426       42,592         39,000        -3,592
    Capital improvement..................................       29,969       35,745         33,000        -2,745
    Congressional priorities:
        D. Boone NF, Cave Run & Laurel Lake horse trails,  ...........  ...........            500           500
         KY..............................................
        Florida National scenic trail....................  ...........  ...........            500           500
        Pacific Crest trail improvements, CA OR WA.......  ...........  ...........            850           850
        Mount Yonah and Pinhoti Trails, GA...............  ...........  ...........            350           350
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
    Subtotal Congressional priorities....................        2,831  ...........          2,200         2,200
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Trails....................................       69,226       78,337         74,200        -4,137
                                                          ======================================================
Infrastructure Improvement:
    Fish passage barriers................................        4,968            0          7,000         7,000
    Deferred Maintenance.................................       40,600            0         40,000        40,000
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Infrastructure Improvement................       45,568            0         47,000        47,000
                                                          ======================================================
      Total..............................................     $548,450     $524,571       $560,473       $35,902
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Facilities.--The Committee recommends $200,559,000 for 
facilities maintenance and capital improvement, $317,000 below 
the request and $1,753,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level. 
The Committee has fully funded the request for facility 
maintenance. The Committee has funded the capital improvement 
request but no funding is provided for the Rapid City, SD or 
Juneau/ANM, AK buildings. The recreation projects on the 
Allegheny NF, PA, include $150,000 to finish the Buckaloons 
campground, $400,000 to rehabilitate the Kiasatha campground, 
$300,000 to update the Red Bridge campground, and $125,000 for 
the Kinzua dam recreational pier. The recreation improvements 
on the Daniel Boone NF, KY, include $325,000 for the Cave Run-
Caney site, $270,000 for the Natural Arch scenic area, and 
$200,000 for the wilderness gateway and canoe launch.
    The Forest Service is encouraged to negotiate with the Air 
Force or the Inland Valley Development Agency to establish a 
lease for Building 3 (Norton) for the headquarters of the San 
Bernardino NF, CA.
    Roads.--The Committee recommends $238,714,000 for road 
maintenance and capital improvement, $6,644,000 below the 
request and $7,370,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. The 
Committee has maintained the road decommissioning authority at 
$15,000,000. Funds provided for emergency repairs on the 
Caribbean NF, PR, may be transferred to the national forest 
system appropriation as needed for environmental assessments 
required for this purpose. The Committee expects to continue to 
receive regular updates, and a continued display in the budget 
justification, on progress in addressing the huge backlog of 
deferred maintenance and repair, especially as it relates to 
the activities funded through the road and trails fund, the 
pilot conveyance authority and the infrastructure improvement 
funds provided in the conservation spending category.
    Trails.--The Committee recommends $74,200,000 for trails 
maintenance and capital improvement, $4,137,000 below the 
request and $4,974,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. Under 
the national forest system account specific directions are 
included for National scenic and historic trails operations.
    Infrastructure Improvement.--The Committee has included 
$47,000,000 for infrastructure improvement, which was not 
requested this year, $1,432,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
enacted level. This includes $40,000,000 for deferred 
maintenance, a decrease of $600,000 from the enacted level. The 
Committee also recommends $7,000,000 to continue the program to 
help remediate salmonid fish passage problems at road 
crossings. This funding should be allocated for priority 
projects in regions 6 and 5, and activities should be 
coordinated with States, other Federal agencies, watershed 
councils and others to help determine priority projects.

                            LAND ACQUISITION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $132,945,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        44,130,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        29,288,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................      -103,657,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -14,842,000


    The Committee recommends $29,288,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $14,842,000 below the budget request and 
$103,657,000 below the enacted level. This amount includes 
$11,000,000 for land acquisition projects, $14,914,000 for 
acquisition management, $1,374,000 for cash equalization, and 
$2,000,000 for inholdings.
    The Committee is concerned with the expenditure of land 
acquisition management funds in the National Forest Service. 
The Committee directs the Forest Service to provide a detailed 
report by March 1, 2004 that includes all expenditures 
including overhead, salaries, appraisals, survey and other 
acquisition related costs paid for by acquisition management 
funds for the last three fiscal years. In addition, the report 
should include details of any other funding sources used to pay 
land acquisition management and support costs.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
Land Acquisition Projects...............................     $11,000,000
Acquisition Management..................................      14,914,000
Cash Equalization.......................................       1,374,000
Inholdings..............................................       2,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      29,288,000

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $1,062,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         1,069,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         1,069,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................            +7,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $1,069,000 for acquisition of 
lands for National forests, special acts, as requested. These 
funds are used pursuant to several special acts, which 
authorize appropriations from the receipts of specified 
National forests for the purchase of lands to minimize erosion 
and flood damage to critical watersheds needing soil 
stabilization and vegetative cover.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................          $232,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................           234,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................           234,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................            +2,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $234,000 as requested for 
acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges under the Act 
of December 4, 1967 (16 U.S.C. 484a). Under the Act, deposits 
made by public school districts or public school authorities to 
provide for cash equalization of certain land exchanges can be 
appropriated to acquire similar lands suitable for National 
forest system purposes in the same State as the National forest 
lands conveyed in the exchanges.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $3,380,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         3,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         3,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -380,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $3,000,000, as requested, for the 
range betterment fund, to be derived from grazing receipts from 
the National forests (Public Law 94-579, as amended) and to be 
used for range rehabilitation, protection, and improvements 
including seeding, reseeding, fence construction, weed control, 
water development, and fish and wildlife habitat enhancement in 
16 western States.

    GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................           $91,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................            92,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................            92,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................            +1,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $92,000, the budget estimate, for 
gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland 
research, an increase of $1,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
level. Authority for the program is contained in Public Law 95-
307 (16 U.S.C. 1643, section 4(b)). Amounts appropriated and 
not needed for current operations may be invested in public 
debt securities. Both the principal and earnings from the 
receipts are available to the Forest Service.

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $5,506,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         5,535,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         5,535,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................           +29,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $5,535,000, the same as the 
request and $29,000 above the enacted level, for the management 
of national forest lands for subsistence uses in Alaska.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, FOREST SERVICE

    The Committee has retained administrative provisions 
contained in previous years. The Committee has provided for a 
program of $2,000,000 for the Youth Conservation Corps. The 
Committee has also continued the authority for transfers to the 
National Forest Foundation and the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation. The Committee is encouraged by these partnership 
efforts. The Committee is allowing $300,000 in administrative 
funds to be used by the National Forest Foundation for one more 
year despite the Administration's request to end this support. 
The Committee has also continued the wildland fire transfer 
authority, which allows use of funds from other accounts 
available to the Forest Service during wildfire emergencies 
when other wildfire emergency funds are not available. The 
Committee expects the Administration to prepare promptly 
supplemental budget requests when they transfer funds from 
other appropriations during wildfire emergencies.
    The Committee is very concerned by the recent announcement 
by the Department of Labor that it intends to reduce the 
allocation of Title V Older Worker Employment funds for the 
Forest Service. The June 5, 2003 announcement proposed a 
funding level of $20,500,000, approximately a 25 percent 
reduction below current staffing levels for this long-standing 
and successful partnership. Such an allocation would 
dramatically reduce the number of senior citizens in the 
National Forest System and would significantly affect services 
to the public. The Committee urges the Labor Department to 
reconsider this proposal as it completes its fiscal year 2003 
funding plans for the Older Workers Employment program.
    The Committee is very concerned about the Forest Service 
implementation of the Administration's ``Competitive Sourcing'' 
initiative. This issue is discussed in general terms in the 
front of this report and bill language is included under Title 
III--General Provisions limiting the use of funds for 
competitive sourcing to those currently underway. In 
particular, the Committee is concerned that the Department of 
Agriculture has moved much too quickly, spent large sums which 
should have gone for resource programs, and has paid inadequate 
attention to a previous Committee directive on this issue. 
House Report 107-564, which was supported by the statement of 
the managers for the Omnibus Appropriations Act for 2003 (House 
Report 108-10), specifically directed the Forest Service to re-
do the Field Decisions Leadership Initiative which had directed 
specific, annual reductions in FTEs. The Committee understands 
that the Forest Service has continued on its proposed path, 
despite the proposal being rejected by the Congress, and 
expects to expend $10 million during fiscal year 2003 on direct 
contracts for competitive sourcing studies. Furthermore, the 
Committee understands that all forests and most contracting 
officers are heavily impacted by this work effort at a time 
when they should concentrate their attentions to responding to 
the disruption caused by last year's severe fiscal situation 
when most available funds were borrowed for emergency 
firefighting.
    Another Committee concern deals with the issue of primary 
and ancillary duties of the Federal workforce of this land 
managing agency. Many of these employees perform their primary 
job, which may include several unrelated tasks, for most of the 
year, but during the wildland fire season they are shifted into 
wildfire related activities. All outsourcing studies need to 
take a government-wide perspective so potential adverse impacts 
to the government's emergency response capability are fully 
considered.
    In addition to these issues, concerns have been raised to 
the Committee about the affect this competitive sourcing 
initiative may have on employment levels in rural economies, 
particularly in the west.
    The Forest Service should follow the bill-wide instructions 
presented in the front of this report, and in addition, should 
update the ``Forest Service Strategy for Improving Organization 
Efficiency'' so it reflects this direction and does not follow 
any arbitrary targets for outsourcing studies. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to provide the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations quarterly reports detailing 
competitive sourcing expenditures and activities, including 
costs of contracts and costs of agency personnel time, by 
budget line item, and include explanations of the resource 
programs which are not being implemented due to this increase 
in indirect costs. The Forest Service should provide local, 
public notice at least 30 days before beginning competitive 
sourcing studies, which could reduce staffing by less than 65 
persons in any single, rural office.

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY


                         CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY

                               (DEFERRAL)

    The Committee recommends the deferral of $86,000,000 in 
clean coal technology funding until fiscal year 2005. These 
funds are needed for the successful conclusion of existing 
clean coal projects but will not be required for obligation in 
fiscal year 2004.
    The Committee has directly appropriated funding for the 
continued administration of this program and the follow-on 
clean coal power initiative under the fossil energy research 
and development account. It is important that these funds 
become a part of the recurring base budget for fossil energy 
research and development.
    The Committee continues to support the U.S./China Energy 
and Environmental Center, which supports and assists the 
efforts of U.S. companies to promote the use of American clean 
energy technology in China. This technology will greatly reduce 
emissions and improve energy efficiency. Up to $1,000,000 in 
clean coal technology funding may be used for this purpose in 
fiscal year 2004.

                 FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    Fossil energy research and development programs make 
prudent investments in long-range research and development that 
help protect the environment through higher efficiency power 
generation, advanced technologies and improved compliance and 
stewardship operations. These activities safeguard our domestic 
energy security. This country will continue to rely on 
traditional fuels for the majority of its energy requirements 
for the foreseeable future, and the activities funded through 
this account ensure that energy technologies continue to 
improve with respect to emissions reductions and control and 
energy efficiency.
    Fossil fuels, especially coal, are this country's most 
abundant and lowest cost fuels for electric power generation. 
They are why this country enjoys the lowest cost electricity of 
any industrialized economy. The prospects for technology 
advances for coal and other fossil fuels are just as bright as 
those for alternative energy sources such as solar, wind, and 
geothermal. The power generation technology research funded 
under this account has the goal of developing virtually 
pollution-free power plants within the next 15 or 20 years and 
doubling the amount of electricity produced from the same 
amount of fuel.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $620,837,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       514,305,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       609,290,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -11,547,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +94,985,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table: 


      The Committee recommends $609,290,000 for fossil energy 
research and development, an increase of $94,985,000 above the 
budget request and a decrease of $11,547,000 below the fiscal 
year 2003 level. The increase above the budget request is due, 
in part, to the fact that the budget assumed the use of 
$19,000,000 in prior year funds that are not available and did 
not include $15,000,000 for administration of the clean coal 
power initiative and its predecessor programs. Changes to the 
budget request are detailed below.
    Clean Coal Power Initiative.--The Committee recommends 
$130,000,000, the budget request for the clean coal power 
initiative. The Committee is concerned that the $20,000,000 
reduction to this program may delay achievement of program 
goals and asks the Department and the Administration to 
consider carefully a substantial increase for the program in 
fiscal year 2005.
    Fuels and Power Systems.--The Committee recommends 
$268,860,000 for fuels and power systems including an increase 
of $5,000,000 for advanced systems/combustion systems including 
hybrids to replace the pressurized fluidized bed program. In 
sequestration research, there is a decrease of $21,200,000 
including decreases of $8,000,000 for the ongoing fossil energy 
climate change programs and $13,200,000 for the proposed 
National climate change technology initiative. In 
transportation fuels and chemicals, increases include 
$6,000,000 for syngas membrane technology and $10,500,000 for 
the ultra clean fuels program. In solid fuels and feedstock, 
increases include $1,000,000 for premium carbon products, 
$3,000,000 for advanced separation technology, $2,000,000 for 
coal-derived jet fuels, and $60,000 for program support. In 
advanced fuels research there is an increase of $3,000,000 
including $2,000,000 for the C-1 chemistry program. In advanced 
research, there is an increase of $2,000,000 in technology 
crosscut for the focus area for computational energy science 
and decreases of $2,000,000 for university coal research and 
$1,000,000 for historically black colleges and universities 
education and training. In distributed generation systems there 
is an increase of $23,000,000 including increases of $3,000,000 
for fuel cell systems development to continue the molten 
carbonate program including the hybrid program, $8,000,000 for 
the vision 21 hybrids program to continue solid oxide fuel cell 
development including the hybrid program, and $12,000,000 for 
innovative systems to continue solid state energy conversion 
alliance programs.
    Natural Gas Technologies.--The Committee recommends 
$36,480,000 for natural gas technologies. In exploration and 
production, there is a net increase of $5,480,000 including 
increases of $10,000,000 for advanced drilling, completion and 
stimulation, $4,000,000 for advanced diagnostics and imaging 
systems, $2,000,000 for National laboratory/industry 
partnerships, $1,200,000 for stripper well revitalization, 
$500,000 for technology transfer, $1,500,000 for Deep Trek, and 
$140,000 for program support, and a decrease of $13,860,000 for 
sustainable supply. The Committee notes that all of the 
existing programs support sustainable supply. Other increases 
include $2,000,000 for the gas hydrates program and $9,000,000 
in natural gas infrastructure including $2,000,000 for storage 
technology and $7,000,000 for delivery reliability. There is 
also a decrease of $6,555,000 in emerging processing technology 
for research on producing hydrogen from natural gas.
    Oil Technology.--The Committee recommends $32,200,000 for 
oil technology. In exploration and production supporting 
research, increases include $2,000,000 for advanced drilling, 
completion and stimulation, $5,000,000 for advanced diagnostics 
and imaging systems, $2,000,000 for National laboratory/
industry partnerships, $5,000,000 for reservoir efficiency 
processes, $1,000,000 for cooperative research with Russia, and 
$200,000 for program support. There is also an increase of 
$2,000,000 for the reservoir life extension program.
    Other.--The Committee recommends increases of $2,000,000 
for cooperative research and development, $15,000,000 for 
administration of the clean coal power initiative and its 
predecessor programs (to be divided appropriately between 
headquarters program direction and field office (National 
Energy Technology Laboratory) program direction), $14,000,000 
because prior year funds (as proposed for us by the 
Administration to offset 2004 requirements) are not available, 
$5,000,000 because funds are not available to transfer from the 
Strategic Petroleum Reserve petroleum account and $500,000 for 
ongoing program reviews by the National Academy of Sciences.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Committee recognizes the importance of research 
competitions involving university students as a cost effective 
strategy, and expects the Department to incorporate this 
strategy in its fossil energy fuel cells research programs and 
other important research areas. The Department should establish 
such university competitions to stimulate private sector 
research, innovation, and technology deployment to enhance the 
accomplishments of mission-essential, core technology goals.
    2. The Administration's recently announced ``Future Gen'' 
program is an interesting concept, but it needs to be fully 
justified in future budgets before it can be considered for 
funding by the Committee. The funding for this program cannot 
come at the expense of other import fossil energy research and 
development programs.
    3. Funds for administration of the remaining clean coal 
technology projects and the new clean coal power initiative 
projects need to remain in the base budget for fossil energy 
research and development. The $15,000,000 recommended by the 
Committee should be appropriately divided between headquarters 
and field office (NETL) program direction.
    4. Oil and natural gas research is critical to improving 
current technology and ensuring the best use of our domestic 
oil and gas reserves. These research areas need more serious 
consideration in future budgets.
    5. The Russia technology program should include the 
expansion of seismic data from four Arctic basins, the 
identification of potential reservoir classes where 
technologies could add the greatest volumes of economically 
recoverable oil, and the development of operational practices 
for production, transportation, and export that adhere to 
international standards.
    6. In general plant projects, $2,000,000 is provided for 
NETL and $1,000,000 is for the Albany, OR research center.
    7. The proposed use of prior year funds and the transfer of 
Strategic Petroleum Reserve account funds to offset fossil 
energy research and development requirements in fiscal year 
2004 are not agreed to. Congress rescinded the SPR account 
funds in fiscal year 2003.
    8. The National Climate Change Technology Initiative is not 
recommended for funding. NCCTI should be more clearly defined. 
The concerns expressed in the recent National Academies review 
should be addressed and the program should be fully justified 
and funding requested in future budgets as a separate account 
in the Energy and Water appropriations bill.
    9. Several programs funded in the energy conservation 
account need to be closely coordinated with fossil energy 
programs so that the highest priority energy research projects 
are funded. They include the cooperative programs with States 
and the energy efficiency science initiative. Half of the 
funding for the energy efficiency science initiative is managed 
by fossil energy, as legislated in the fiscal year 2003 
Interior and Related Appropriations Act, so that the highest 
priority energy research projects are funded. This same 
direction applies to the mining industry of the future program, 
the industrial gasification program and the reciprocating 
engines program.
    10. The $500,000 for the National Academy of Sciences 
review of programs should remain in the base for a continuing 
annual review by the Academy of programs, using the Academy's 
matrix, to measure the relative benefits expected to be 
achieved and to inform decision making on what programs should 
be continued, expanded, scaledback, or eliminated.

                 NAVAL PETROLEUM AND OIL SHALE RESERVES

    The Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves are managed by 
the Department of Energy to achieve the greatest value and 
benefit to the Government. In fiscal year 1998, NPR-1 (Elk 
Hills) was sold as mandated by the National Defense 
Authorization Act for fiscal year 1996. That Act also directed 
the Department to conduct a study of the remaining properties--
3 Naval Oil Shale Reserves and NPR-2 and NPR-3. The National 
Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1998 directed the 
transfer of two of the oil shale reserves (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) 
to the Department of the Interior. On January 14, 2000, the 
Department announced it would return a portion of the NOSR-2 
property in Utah to the Ute Indian Tribe. Two properties remain 
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Energy. They are 
NPR-2 in Kern County, CA and NPR-3 in Natrona County, WY. The 
DOE continues to be responsible for routine operation and 
maintenance of NPR-3, management of the Rocky Mountain Oilfield 
Testing Center at NPR-3, lease management at NPR-2, and 
continuing environmental and remediation work at Elk Hills. For 
several years after the sale of Elk Hills, these programs were 
operated largely with prior year unobligated balances. Those 
balances were mostly exhausted by fiscal year 2003 and 
appropriations to the account were restored in that year.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $17,715,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        16,500,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        20,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +2,785,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +4,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $20,500,000 for the operation of 
the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves, an increase of 
$4,000,000 above the budget request and $2,785,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level. The increase to the budget is to 
restore funding for the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center, 
including $3,000,000 for production and operations and 
$1,000,000 for management.

                      ELK HILLS SCHOOL LANDS FUND

    Payment to the Elk Hills school lands fund was part of the 
settlement associated with the sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve 
Numbered 1. Under the settlement, payments to the fund are to 
be made over a period of seven years.
    The Committee recommends $36,000,000 for the Elk Hills 
school lands fund, which is equal to amount available for 
fiscal year 2003. The Committee recommends that these funds be 
made available on October 1, 2004, rather than on October 1, 
2003 as proposed in the budget. The Committee's recommendation 
is consistent with the payment of these funds in each of the 
past few years. This represents the sixth of seven payments to 
the fund, which was established as a part of the sale of the 
Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (to settle 
school lands claims by the State).

                          ENERGY CONSERVATION

    The energy conservation program of the Department of Energy 
conducts cooperative research and development projects aimed at 
sustaining economic growth through more efficient energy use. 
Activities financed through this program focus on improving 
existing technologies and developing new technologies related 
to residential, commercial, industrial and transportation 
energy use. In fiscal year 2001, funds and programs were 
transferred from the building sector and industry sector 
research activities to establish a new distributed generation 
activity that addresses critical energy needs for next 
generation clean, efficient, fuel flexible technologies for 
industrial, commercial and institutional applications. These 
technologies use the waste heat energy rejected during 
electricity generation from microturbines, reciprocating 
engines, and fuel cells in the form of cooling, heating and 
power. This waste heat utilization is referred to as ``combined 
heat and power''. Also funded under the energy conservation 
heading are the Federal energy management program, which 
focuses on improving energy efficiency in Federal buildings, 
the low-income weatherization assistance program, and State 
energy program grants.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $891,769,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       875,793,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       879,487,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       -12,282,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +3,694,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $879,487,000 for energy 
conservation, an increase of $3,694,000 above the budget 
request and a decrease of $12,282,000 below the fiscal year 
2003 level. Changes to the budget request are detailed below.
    Vehicle Technologies.--The Committee recommends 
$184,423,000 for vehicle technologies. There is an increase of 
$500,000 in innovative concepts for graduate automotive 
technology education and a decrease of $5,000,000 in hybrid and 
electric propulsion/energy storage for exploratory technology. 
In advanced combustion engine, increases include $9,000,000 for 
combustion and emissions control in light and heavy-duty 
vehicles, $6,000,000 for heavy truck engines, and $3,500,000 
for off-highway vehicles. There is an increase of $1,600,000 in 
materials technology for the High Temperature Materials 
Laboratory. In fuels technology, increases include $9,400,000 
for advanced petroleum based fuels, $3,000,000 for 
environmental impacts, and a net increase of $1,100,000 for 
non-petroleum fuels including increases of $500,000 for medium 
trucks, $600,000 for heavy trucks, and $800,000 for fueling 
infrastructure, and a decrease of $800,000 for renewable and 
synthetic fuels. In technology introduction, there are 
decreases of $800,000 for legislative and rulemaking 
activities, $500,000 for testing and evaluation, and $100,000 
for advanced vehicle competitions. There is also a decrease of 
$900,000 for the biennial FreedomCAR peer review.
    Fuel Cell Technologies.--The Committee recommends 
$56,500,000 for fuel cell technologies including decreases of 
$1,000,000 for transportation systems, $5,000,000 for stack 
component research, and $15,000,000 for technology validation/
demonstrations.
    Weatherization and Intergovernmental Activities.--The 
Committee recommends $307,642,000 for weatherization and 
intergovernmental activities including a decrease of 
$63,200,000 for weatherization assistance and increases of 
$6,202,000 for State energy programs and $7,500,000 for gateway 
deployment of which $2,000,000 is for Rebuild America, 
$4,000,000 is for clean cities, and $1,500,000 is for 
inventions and innovations.
    Distributed Energy Resources.--The Committee recommends 
$64,284,000 for distributed energy resources including 
increases of $1,500,000 for industrial gas turbines, $6,000,000 
for advanced reciprocating engines, $2,000,000 for advanced 
materials and sensors, and $3,000,000 for thermally activated 
technology.
    Building Technologies.--The Committee recommends 
$58,963,000 for building technologies. There are decreases of 
$2,000,000 for residential buildings research (formerly 
Building America) and $500,000 for commercial buildings 
research. In emerging technologies, there are increases of 
$1,500,000 for lighting, $2,700,000 for space conditioning and 
refrigeration, $500,000 for appliances and emerging technology, 
and $3,200,000 for building envelope research of which 
$1,700,000 is for thermal insulation and building materials and 
$1,500,000 is for windows including electrochromics, which 
should be funded at the 2003 level. There is also an increase 
of $1,000,000 in equipment and analysis for appliance 
standards.
    Industrial Technologies.--The Committee recommends 
$97,729,000 for industrial technologies. In industries of the 
future (specific) increases include $4,100,000 for forest and 
paper products, $3,400,000 for steel, $3,400,000 for aluminum, 
$2,100,000 for metalcasting, $1,700,000 for glass, $6,700,000 
for chemicals, and $2,400,000 for mining. In industries of the 
future (crosscutting), increases include $7,500,000 to continue 
the black liquor gasification programs and $2,000,000 to 
continue the program on robotics to replace repetitive 
manufacturing tasks.
    Biomass and Biorefinery Systems.--The Committee recommends 
no funding for biomass and biorefinery systems, a decrease of 
$8,808,000 below the budget request. These programs should be 
funded through the energy and water appropriations bill. The 
Committee has provided $7,500,000 in the industries of the 
future (crosscutting) program to continue black liquor 
gasification programs.
    Federal Energy Management Program.--The Committee 
recommends $19,962,000, the budget request, for the Federal 
energy management program.
    National Climate Change Technology Initiative.--The 
Committee recommends no funding for the National Climate Change 
Technology Initiative, a decrease of $9,500,000 below the 
budget request. This program is addressed briefly below and 
under the fossil energy research development account.
    Program management.--The Committee recommends $90,164,000 
for program management including increases of $500,000 for the 
National Academy of Sciences program review, $3,000,000 for 
cooperative programs on technology transfer from National 
Laboratories with the Energy and Research Consortium of the 
Western Carolinas, $5,000,000 for cooperative programs with 
States, and $5,000,000 for the energy efficiency science 
initiative.
    Bill Language.--Bill Language is recommended earmarking 
$225,000,000 for the weatherization assistance program and 
$45,000,000 for State energy programs. These levels are 
slightly above the fiscal year 2003 levels for those programs.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Committee continues to expect that several positions 
will be eliminated as a result of the consolidation of budget 
and administration functions in last year's reorganization.
    2. The National Academy of Public Administration is 
conducting a continuing review of last year's reorganization 
and its recommendations should be implemented fully as soon as 
possible after receipt.
    3. The budget justification for fiscal year 2005 should 
include the program specific table provided separately to the 
Committee for 2004. The official budget detail table should 
contain stub entries for sub-activities within each of the 
program areas. A few examples include, but are not limited to, 
each of the industries of the future (specific) and 
(crosscutting) programs, microcogeneration, advanced 
reciprocating engines, thermally activated technologies, and 
each of the major building, vehicle technology, and fuel cell 
areas. The Department should consult with the Committee on the 
budget presentation for fiscal year 2005 as soon as possible.
    4. Vehicle combustion and emission control research should 
focus on continuing critical homogenous charge compression 
ignition programs.
    5. The State Technologies Advancement Collaborative, a 
cooperative program between the States and the Department of 
Energy, should be continued. The $5,000,000 provided for 
cooperative programs with States and $5,000,000 for the energy 
efficiency science initiative should be supplemented with other 
program funds where the States and the Department agree that 
this collaborative will effectively leverage program funds and 
reduce bureaucratic delay. One example of such a program is the 
Rebuild America program. The Department should report to the 
Committee no later than January 15, 2004, on what programs will 
be included as part of the collaborative in fiscal year 2004.
    6. The cooperative programs with the States and the energy 
efficiency science initiative should be closely coordinated 
with the fossil energy research and development program to 
ensure the highest priority research needs across both the 
fossil energy and energy conservation accounts are addressed. 
Half of the funding for the energy efficiency science 
initiative is to be managed by fossil energy as legislated in 
the Interior Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2002. The 
mining industry of the future program, the industrial 
gasification program, and the reciprocating engines program 
should also be coordinated closely with fossil energy.
    7. The National climate change technology initiative is not 
recommended for funding. NCCTI should be more clearly defined. 
The concerns expressed in the recent National Academies review 
should be addressed and the program should be fully justified 
and funding requested in future budgets as a separate account 
in the energy and water appropriations bill.
    8. The $500,000 for the National Academy of Sciences review 
of programs should remain in the base for a continuing annual 
review by the Academy of programs, using the Academy's matrix, 
to measure the relative benefits expected to be achieved and to 
inform decision making on what programs should be continued, 
expanded, scaled-back, or eliminated.
    9. Funding for the industries of the future programs have 
been only partially restored and the Committee expects the 
Department to work closely with industry to determine how best 
to use the limited funds.

                          ECONOMIC REGULATION

    The economic regulation account funds the independent 
Office of Hearings and Appeals, which is responsible for all of 
the Department's adjudication processes except those that are 
the responsibility of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 
The amount funded by this Committee is for those activities 
specific to this bill: mainly those related to petroleum 
overcharge cases. All other activities are funded on a 
reimbursable basis from the other elements of the Department of 
Energy. Prior to fiscal year 1997, this account also funded the 
Economic Regulatory Administration.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $1,477,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         1,047,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         1,047,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -430,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $1,047,000, the budget request, 
for economic regulation, a decrease of $430,000 below the 2003 
level. The Committee expects the Department to complete the 
phasing out of direct funding for the Office of Hearings and 
Appeals from the Interior bill no later than fiscal year 2005. 
The Committee continues to be concerned about the high cost of 
employees in this office and concerned that the casework, 
funded by the Interior and related agencies appropriation, has 
not been brought to a timely completion.

                      STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created by the Energy 
Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 to provide the United 
States with adequate strategic and economic protection against 
disruptions in oil supplies. The SPR program was established as 
a 750 million-barrel capacity crude oil reserve with storage in 
large underground salt caverns at five sites in the Gulf Coast 
area. It is connected to major private sector distribution 
systems and maintained to achieve full drawdown rate capability 
within fifteen days of notice to proceed with drawdown. Storage 
capacity development was completed in September 1991, providing 
the capability to store 750 million barrels of crude oil in 
underground caverns and to be ready to deploy at the 
President's direction in the event of an emergency. As a result 
of the decommissioning of the Weeks Island site in 1999, the 
Reserve lost 70 million barrels of capacity. However, the 
Department reassessed the capacities of the remaining storage 
sites and estimates that those sites are currently capable of 
storing a total of 700 million barrels. During 1998, an 
inventory of 561 million barrels provided 60 days of net import 
protection. In 2003, 628 million barrels provide 54 days of net 
import protection. The decline in days of net import protection 
is the result of the growth of U.S. requirements for imported 
crude oil and the decline in domestic oil production.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $171,732,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       175,081,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       175,081,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +3,349,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $175,081,000, the budget request, 
for operation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, an increase 
of $3,349,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.

                   NORTHEAST HOME HEATING OIL RESERVE

    The acquisition and storage of heating oil for the 
Northeast began in August 2000 when the Department of Energy, 
through the Strategic Petroleum Reserve account, awarded 
contracts for the lease of commercial storage facilities and 
acquisition of heating oil. The purpose of the reserve is to 
assure home heating oil supplies for the Northeast States 
during times of very low inventories and significant threats to 
immediate supply of heating oil. The Northeast Home Heating Oil 
Reserve was established as a separate entity from the Strategic 
Petroleum Reserve on March 6, 2001. The 2,000,000 barrel 
reserve is stored in commercial facilities in New York Harbor, 
Rhode Island, and New Haven, Connecticut.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $5,961,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         5,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -961,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $5,000,000, the budget request, 
for the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve, a decrease of 
$961,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level.
    The Congress created the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve 
to address heating oil shortages that have been experienced 
over the years during the winter heating season in the 
Northeast. To date, the reserve has never been used. While the 
Committee appreciates that the heating oil reserve is for 
addressing supply disruptions and not price spikes, it is 
concerned that the Department of Energy may be defining the 
term ``supply disruption'' too narrowly. Therefore, the 
Committee asks that the Department report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on the circumstances under 
which the reserve will be used. The Department should submit 
the report no later than December 1, 2003, and it should 
provide various scenarios and the underlying assumptions for 
each of those scenarios.

                   ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

    The Energy Information Administration is a quasi-
independent agency within the Department of Energy established 
to provide timely, objective, and accurate energy-related 
information to the Congress, executive branch, State 
governments, industry, and the public. The information and 
analysis prepared by the EIA is widely disseminated and the 
agency is recognized as an unbiased source of energy 
information by government organizations, industry, professional 
statistical organizations and the public.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $80,087,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        80,111,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        82,111,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +2,024,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +2,000,000


    The Committee recommends $82,111,000 for the Energy 
Information Administration, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 
budget request and $2,024,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. 
The increase above the request is to cover partially fixed cost 
increases and to make necessary data and analysis improvements 
to maintain the quality of EIA products.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service


                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

    The provision of Federal health services to Indians is 
based on a special relationship between Indian tribes and the 
U.S. Government first set forth in the 1830s by the U.S. 
Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall. Numerous 
treaties, statutes, constitutional provisions, and 
international law have reconfirmed this relationship. Principal 
among these is the Snyder Act of 1921, which provides the basic 
authority for most Indian health services provided by the 
Federal Government to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The 
Indian Health Service (IHS) provides direct health care 
services in 36 hospitals, 58 health centers, 4 school health 
centers, and 44 health stations. Tribes and tribal groups, 
through contracts with the IHS, operate 13 hospitals, 161 
health centers, 3 school health centers, and 249 health 
stations (including 170 Alaska Native village clinics). The 
IHS, tribes and tribal groups also operate 11 regional youth 
substance abuse treatment centers and 2,252 units of staff 
quarters.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................    $2,475,916,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................     2,502,393,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................     2,556,082,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +80,166,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +53,689,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $2,556,082,000 for Indian health 
services, an increase of $53,689,000 above the budget request 
and $80,166,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. Changes to 
the budget request are discussed below.
    Hospitals and Clinics.--The Committee recommends an 
increase of $71,923,000 for hospital and health clinic 
programs, including increases of $31,317,000 to restore base 
program funding, $30,170,000 to restore the budget assessments 
for management and information savings, $6,436,000 for 
increased payments to the Department of Health and Human 
Services for the unified financial management system, 
$2,500,000 for the Indian health care improvement fund, and 
$1,500,000 to complete the phase-in of new staffing at the 
Lawton, OK hospital.
    Dental Health.--The Committee recommends an increase of 
$251,000 for dental health to expand the volunteer program.
    Contract Health Care.--The Committee recommends a decrease 
of $15,000,000 below the budget request for contract health 
care services, which leaves an increase of more than $3,000,000 
for these services in fiscal year 2004.
    Urban Health Programs.--The Committee recommends an 
increase of $446,000 for urban health programs to restore the 
``management savings'' assessment proposed in the budget 
request.
    Indian Health Professions.--The Committee recommends a 
decrease of $4,259,000 for Indian health professions, which 
continues the program level provided in fiscal year 2003.
    Direct Operations.--The Committee recommends an increase of 
$4,864,000 for direct operations, which continues the fiscal 
year 2003 program level.
    Self-Governance.--The Committee recommends a decrease of 
$4,536,000 for self-governance, which continues the fiscal year 
2003 program level.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Committee has not agreed with the unrealistic 
management and information savings proposed in the budget, 
which could only be achieved at the expense of critical, 
ongoing health services and the Committee urges the Department 
to refrain from proposing such reductions in the future.
    2. The funding increase for the Lawton, OK hospital 
staffing completes the phase-in of new staffing and operations 
costs, which was begun last year.
    3. Any costs paid by the Indian Health Service to any 
entity within the Department of Health and Human Services 
should be fully justified and explained in the budget request. 
The Service should not be required to ``absorb'' any increases 
in such costs.
    4. The Committee should be kept fully informed of 
consolidation efforts in HHS that affect the Indian Health 
Service. Given the fact that the Indian Health Service's 
staffing is far from adequate, the Committee does not agree 
with FTE reductions for the Service. The current proposal to 
consolidate human resources functions has not been sufficiently 
explained or justified. Indeed, the Department has been unable 
to identify the costs to the Service of the consolidation for 
fiscal years 2003 or 2004. The Service should not pay any bills 
to the Department for the consolidation of human resources 
functions without Committee approval through the reprogramming 
process. The cost to the Service of the consolidation should 
not exceed what it currently costs to operate human resources 
functions within the Indian Health Service.
    5. Funds for the pharmacy residency program remain in the 
base for fiscal year 2004.
    6. The fiscal year 2001 direction on the use of loan 
repayment program funding should continue to be followed in 
fiscal year 2004.
    7. The Service should consider expanding the use of Joslin 
diabetes programs using the increase provided separately for 
special diabetes program funding.
    Bill language is recommended, under Title III--General 
Provisions, continuing the demonstration program of the 
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe in South Dakota, which provides 
bonus payments to health professionals. The Committee has not 
received a report on the effectiveness of this program even 
though the Service was required to submit one by April 1, 2004.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

    The need for new Indian health care facilities has not been 
fully quantified but it is safe to say that many billions of 
dollars would be required to renovate existing facilities and 
construct all the needed new hospitals and clinics. Safe and 
sanitary water and sewer systems for existing homes and solid 
waste disposal needs currently are estimated to amount to over 
$876 million for those projects that are considered to be 
economically feasible.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $373,745,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       387,269,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       392,560,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +18,815,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +5,291,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $392,560,000 for Indian health 
facilities, an increase of $5,291,000 above the budget request 
and $18,815,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. Changes to 
the budget request include increases of $2,176,000 for 
maintenance and improvement, $1,000,000 for equipment, and 
$22,115,000 for hospital and clinic construction, and a 
decrease of $20,000,000 for sanitation facilities construction.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
hospital and clinic construction funds:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                        Project                             2004 request      recommendation       Difference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Pinon, AZ clinic.......................................        $21,573,000        $19,577,000        -$1,996,000
Red Mesa, AZ clinic....................................         30,000,000         30,000,000
St. Paul, AK clinic....................................                  0          6,520,000          6,520,000
Metlakatla, AK clinic..................................         14,511,000          9,205,000         -5,306,000
Sisseton, SD clinic....................................          3,863,000         17,960,000         14,097,000
Eagle Butte, SD clinic.................................                             2,800,000          2,800,000
Bethel, AK staff quarters..............................                             5,000,000          5,000,000
Dental units...........................................                             1,000,000          1,000,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total............................................        $69,947,000        $92,062,000        $22,115,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The funding recommended for the Bethel, St. Paul, and 
Metlakatla, AK projects and for the Pinon, AZ clinic will 
complete those construction projects. The funding recommended 
for the Eagle Butte, SD clinic is for design.
    2. The maintenance program funding increase needs to remain 
in the base budget for 2004 and beyond. Further increases will 
be necessary as existing facilities get older and as more 
hospitals and clinics are built and expanded.
    3. The increase for equipment should be focused on 
replacing outdated analog medical devices with digital medical 
devices and telemedicine equipment and should remain in the 
base budget. Further increases will be necessary as existing 
equipment becomes outdated and as more hospitals and clinics 
are built and expanded.
    4. The Service should continue to work on needed 
improvements to the facilities priority system so that the full 
range of need for facilities in Indian country is given 
appropriate consideration.
    5. The methodology used to distribute facilities funding 
should address the fluctuating annual workload and maintain 
parity among IHS areas and tribes as the workload shifts.
    6. Funds for sanitation facilities for new and renovated 
housing should be used to serve housing provided by the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs Housing Improvement Program, new homes and 
homes renovated to like-new condition. Onsite sanitation 
facilities may also be provided for homes occupied by the 
disabled or sick who have physician referrals indicating an 
immediate medical need for adequate sanitation facilities at 
home.
    7. Sanitation funds should not be used to provide 
sanitation facilities for new homes funded by the housing 
programs of the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 
The HUD should provide any needed funds to the IHS for that 
purpose.
    8. The IHS may use up to $5,000,000 in sanitation funding 
for projects to clean up and replace open dumps on Indian lands 
pursuant to the Indian Lands Open Dump Cleanup Act of 1994.
    Bill language is included to complete the Bethel, AK staff 
quarters project. Fiscal year 2004 is the final year of a four-
year commitment to this construction project.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The dispute between the Hopi and Navajo tribes is 
centuries-old. The Hopi trace their origin on the land back to 
the Anasazi race whose presence is recorded back to 1150 A.D. 
Later in the 16th century Navajo settlement led to the 
isolation of the Hopi Reservation as an island within the area 
occupied by the Navajo reservation. In 1882, President Arthur 
issued an Executive Order which granted the Hopi a 2.5 million 
acre reservation to be occupied by the Hopi and such other 
Indians as the Secretary of the Interior saw fit to resettle 
there. Intertribal problems arose between the Navajo tribe and 
the Hopi tribe revolving around the question of the ownership 
of the land as well as cultural differences between the two 
tribes. Efforts to resolve these conflicts were not successful 
and led Congress to pass legislation in 1958 which authorized a 
lawsuit to determine ownership of the land. When attempts at 
mediation of the dispute as specified in an Act passed in 1974 
failed, the district court in Arizona partitioned the Joint Use 
Area equally between the Navajo and Hopi tribes under a decree 
that has required the relocation of members of both tribes. 
Most of those to be relocated are Navajo living on the Hopi 
Partitioned Land.
    At this time approximately 190 households remain to be 
relocated, of which 16 are full-time residents on the Hopi 
Partitioned Land. A total of 3,328 families have been relocated 
from the Hopi Partitioned Land.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $14,397,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        13,532,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        13,532,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -865,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $13,532,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, 
the same as the budget request and $865,000 below the 2003 
enacted level.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development


                        PAYMENT TO THE INSTITUTE




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $5,454,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         5,250,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         5,250,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -204,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $5,250,000 for the Institute of 
American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development, 
the same as the budget request and $204,000 below the 2003 
enacted level.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    The Smithsonian Institution is unique in the Federal 
establishment. Established by the Congress in 1846 to carry out 
the trust included in James Smithson's will, it has been 
engaged for over 150 years in the ``increase and diffusion of 
knowledge among men'' in accordance with the donor's 
instructions. For some years, it used only the funds made 
available by the trust. Then, before the turn of the century, 
it began to receive Federal appropriations to conduct some of 
its activities. With the expenditure of both private and 
Federal funds over the years, it has grown into one of the 
world's great scientific, cultural, and intellectual 
organizations. It operates magnificent museums, outstanding art 
galleries, and important research centers. Its collections are 
among the best in the world. Its traveling exhibits bring 
beauty and information throughout the country.
    The Smithsonian attracted approximately 25,000,000 visitors 
in 2002 to its museums, galleries, and zoological park. 
Additional millions also view Smithsonian traveling 
exhibitions, which appear across the United States and abroad, 
and the annual Folklife Festival. As custodian of the National 
Collections, the Smithsonian is responsible for more than 140 
million art objects, natural history specimens, and artifacts. 
These collections are displayed for the enjoyment and education 
of visitors and are available for research by the staff of the 
Institution and by hundreds of visiting students, scientists, 
and historians each year. Other significant study efforts draw 
their data and results directly from terrestrial, marine, and 
astrophysical observations at various Smithsonian 
installations.
    The Smithsonian complex presently consists of 15 exhibition 
buildings in Washington, DC and New York City in the fields of 
science, history, technology and art; a zoological park in 
Washington, DC and an animal conservation and research center 
in Front Royal, Virginia; the new Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, 
the companion facility to the National Air and Space Museum 
opening in December at Dulles International Airport; the 
Anacostia Museum, which performs research and exhibit 
activities in the District of Columbia; a preservation, storage 
and air and spacecraft display facility in Suitland, Maryland; 
a natural preserve in Panama and one on the Chesapeake Bay; an 
oceanographic research facility in Fort Pierce, Florida; 
astrophysical stations in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Mt. 
Hopkins, Arizona and elsewhere; and supporting administrative, 
laboratory, and storage areas.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $446,096,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       476,553,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       489,748,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +43,652,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       +13,195,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $489,748,000 for salaries and 
expenses, an increase of $13,195,000 above the budget request 
and $43,652,000 above the enacted level. The Committee has 
included the $12,795,000 increase to the base in fiscal year 
2003 and the $400,000 base increase for the National Zoological 
Park.

                           FACILITIES CAPITAL




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $98,779,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        89,970,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        93,970,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -4,809,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +4,000,000


    The Committee recommends $93,970,000 for facilities 
capital, a decrease of $4,809,000 below the enacted level and 
$4,000,000 above the budget request. This account combines the 
former construction and repair, restoration and alteration of 
facilities accounts; bill language is recommended to permit the 
merger of funds from the former accounts into this new account.

           ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

    Bill language is included under Administrative Provisions, 
granting the Smithsonian authority to conduct a voluntary 
separation incentive program similar to the program established 
under section 1313(a) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

                        National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art is one of the world's great 
galleries. Its magnificent works of art are displayed for the 
benefit of millions of visitors from across this Nation and 
from other nations. The National Gallery of Art serves as an 
example of a successful cooperative endeavor between private 
individuals and institutions and the Federal Government. The 
many special exhibitions shown in the Gallery and then 
throughout the country bring great art treasures to Washington 
and the Nation. In 1999, the Gallery opened a sculpture garden, 
which provides a wonderful opportunity for the public to have 
an outdoor artistic experience in a lovely, contemplative 
setting.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $76,717,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        88,849,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        88,849,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +12,132,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $88,849,000, the budget request, 
for salaries and expenses of the National Gallery of Art, an 
increase of $12,132,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $16,125,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        11,600,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        11,600,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -4,525,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $11,600,000, the budget request, 
for repair, restoration and renovation of buildings at the 
National Gallery of Art, a decrease of $4,525,000 below the 
fiscal year 2003 level.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is a 
living memorial to the late President Kennedy and is the 
National Center for the Performing Arts. The Center consists of 
over 1.5 million square feet of usable floor space with 
visitation averaging 10,000 on a daily basis.

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $16,204,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        16,560,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        16,560,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +356,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $16,560,000 for operations and 
maintenance, the same as the budget request and $356,000 above 
the 2003 enacted level.

                              CONSTRUCTION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $17,486,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        16,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        16,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        -1,486,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $16,000,000 for construction, the 
same as the budget request and $1,486,000 below the enacted 
2003 level.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is a 
unique institution with a special mission to serve as a living 
memorial to President Woodrow Wilson. The Center performs this 
mandate through its role as an international institute for 
advanced study as well as a facilitator for discussions among 
scholars, public officials, journalists and business leaders 
from across the country on major long-term issues facing 
America and the world.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $8,433,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         8,604,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         8,604,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +171,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $8,604,000 for salaries and 
expenses, the same as the budget request and $171,000 above the 
2003 enacted level.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $115,732,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       117,480,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       117,480,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +1,748,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with 
estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $117,480,000 for the National 
Endowment for the Arts, an increase of $1,748,000 above the 
2003 enacted level and equal to the budget request when the 
Challenge America Arts Fund is included. The funding increase 
above the enacted level is to offset partially fixed cost 
increases. The Committee has continued to include the Challenge 
America Arts Fund within the NEA appropriation as in fiscal 
year 2003, for a total of $17,000,000. The Challenge America 
grants include $6,800,000 for the State partnership portion and 
$10,200,000 for the grants portion. The Committee expects that 
the NEA will continue its recent progress with outreach to more 
areas of the nation and for underserved populations, and will 
include enhancements to arts education and youth involvement. 
The Committee has not provided funding for an office move, so 
the Committee expects to see a supplemental budget request if 
the General Services Administration proceeds with such an 
action and additional funds are required.
    Bill language is once again recommended under Title III--
General Provisions, retaining provisions in last year's bill 
regarding restrictions on individual grants, subgranting, and 
seasonal support (Sec. 309); and authority to solicit and 
invest funds (Sec. 310); priority for rural and underserved 
communities, priority for grants that encourage public 
knowledge, education, understanding, and appreciation of the 
arts, designation of a category for grants of national 
significance, and a 15-percent cap on the total amount of grant 
funds directed to any one State (Sec. 311).

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

    The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) was created 
in 1965 to encourage and support National progress in the 
humanities. The NEH provides, through a merit-based review 
process, grants in support of education, research, document and 
artifact preservation, and public service in the humanities.

                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................      $108,919,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................       135,878,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................       120,878,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................       +11,959,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................       -15,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $120,878,000 for grants and 
administration, $11,959,000 above the 2003 level and 
$15,000,000 below the budget request. The Committee has 
included a total of $10,000,000 of the $25,000,000 requested 
for the new ``We the People'' American history initiative. The 
allocation also includes $1,374,000 to partially off-set 
increases to fixed costs of administration. The Committee has 
not provided funding for an office move, so the Committee 
expects to see a supplemental budget request if the General 
Services Administration proceeds with such an action and 
additional funds are required.

                            MATCHING GRANTS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $16,017,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        16,122,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        16,122,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +105,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $16,122,000 for matching grants as 
requested, an increase of $105,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
level.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to meet 
the need for a permanent body to advise the government on 
matters pertaining to the arts, and particularly, to guide the 
architectural development of Washington, DC. Over the years the 
Commission's scope has been expanded to include advice on areas 
such as plans for parks, public buildings, location of National 
monuments and development of public squares. As a result, the 
Commission annually reviews approximately 500 projects. In 
fiscal year 1988 the Commission was given responsibility for 
the National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $1,216,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         1,422,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         1,422,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +206,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $1,422,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Commission of Fine Arts as requested, an 
increase of $206,000 over the enacted funding level. This 
increase partially offsets fixed cost increases. The Committee 
encourages the Commission to work with Federal agencies, 
including the National Capital Planning Commission, and the 
District of Columbia government when those entities are 
designing new facilities, especially anti-terrorism related 
structures.

               NATIONAL CAPITAL ARTS AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $6,954,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         5,000,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         7,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................           +46,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................        +2,000,000


    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established in Public Law 99-190 to support artistic and 
cultural programs in the Nation's Capital. The Committee 
recommends $7,000,000, an increase of $46,000 above the 2003 
level and $2,000,000 above the budget request.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    The Committee once again rejects the administration's 
proposal to alter drastically this successful program. 
Accordingly, to prevent the further waste of agency staff time 
and resources on such initiatives, the Committee has continued 
bill language from last year. This provision prevents any funds 
to be expended to examine proposals to alter the National 
Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program except funds provided 
to the Office of Management and Budget, which may spend its own 
funds on this matter if the office continues to feel such 
changes are worth pursuing despite repeated, clear, 
Congressional disapproval.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. The Advisory 
Council was reauthorized as part of the Omnibus Parks and 
Public Lands Management Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-333). The 
Council's mandate is to further the National policy of 
preserving historic and cultural resources for the benefit of 
present and future generations. The Council advises the 
President and Congress on preservation matters and provides 
consultation on historic properties threatened by Federal 
action.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $3,643,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         4,100,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         4,100,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +457,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $4,100,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation as 
requested, an increase of $457,000 above the 2003 level. The 
funding increase is to offset partially fixed cost increases 
and continue ongoing programs.

                  National Capital Planning Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated the 
National Capital Planning Commission as the central planning 
agency for the Federal government in the National Capital 
Region. The three major functions of the Commission are to 
prepare and adopt the Federal elements of the National Capital 
Comprehensive Plan, prepare an annual report on a five-year 
projection of the Federal Capital Improvement Program, and 
review plans and proposals submitted to the Commission.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................        $7,206,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................         8,230,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................         7,730,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          +524,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................          -500,000


    The Committee recommends $7,730,000, for salaries and 
expenses of the National Capitol Planning Commission, a 
decrease of $500,000 below the budget request and an increase 
of $524,000 above the enacted level. The Committee discourages 
funding the proposal for a new study on railroad locations 
unless the Department of Homeland Security or other Federal 
security agencies require such an effort. The Committee 
encourages the security agencies to consider and fund such 
important planning needs on a broad, multi-year basis. The 
Committee welcomes the involvement of the NCPC in such efforts, 
but major commitments of staff time should be contributed on a 
reimbursable basis.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


                       HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

    In 1980 Congress passed legislation creating a 65 member 
Holocaust Memorial Council with the mandate to create and 
oversee a living memorial/museum to victims of holocausts. The 
museum opened in April 1993. Construction costs for the museum 
came solely from donated funds raised by the U.S. Holocaust 
Memorial Museum Campaign and appropriated funds were used for 
planning and development of programmatic components, overall 
administrative support, and annual commemorative observances. 
Since the opening of the museum, appropriated funds have been 
provided to pay for the ongoing operating costs of the museum 
as authorized by Public Law 102-529 and Public Law 106-292.




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $38,412,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        39,997,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        39,997,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................        +1,585,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $39,997,000 for the Holocaust 
Memorial Museum, the same as the budget request and $1,585,000 
above the 2003 enacted level.

                             Presidio Trust


                          PRESIDIO TRUST FUND




Appropriation enacted, 2003...........................       $21,188,000
Budget estimate, 2004.................................        20,700,000
Recommended, 2004.....................................        20,700,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2003...............................          -488,000
    Budget estimate, 2004.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $20,700,000 for the Presidio trust 
fund, the same as the budget request and $488,000 below the 
2003 enacted level.

                     TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Section 301 continues a provision providing for public 
availability of information on consulting services contracts.
    Section 302 continues a provision prohibiting activities to 
promote public support or opposition to legislative proposals.
    Section 303 continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this Act.
    Section 304 continues a provision limiting the use of 
personal cooks, chauffeurs or servants.
    Section 305 revises a provision regarding the Committee's 
concern that agencies funded in the Interior and Related 
Agencies appropriations bill have not rigorously complied with 
the previous prohibition on program assessments. To ensure 
compliance with the intent of this provision, the Committee has 
revised the text of this section to require that assessments, 
charges and billings levied against any program, budget 
activity, subactivity, or project be presented to and approved 
by the Committees on Appropriations. This requirement includes, 
but is not limited to, working capital fund charges, billings 
under intra-agency reimbursable support agreements, and any 
charges or deductions, reserves or holdbacks from program 
funding to support governmentwide, departmental, agency, or 
bureau administrative functions or headquarters, regional or 
central office operations.
    Each department, agency and bureau should clearly delineate 
proposed assessments, charges or billings in annual budget 
justifications. For fiscal year 2004, any anticipated 
assessments, charges or billings not so presented must be 
submitted to the Committees for consideration within 30 days of 
the date of enactment of this Act. Any additional fiscal year 
2004 assessments, charges or billings proposed after this 
initial report must be promptly submitted through the 
established reprogramming procedures printed in the front of 
this report.
    Section 306 continues a provision limiting the sale of 
giant sequoia.
    Section 307 continues a limitation on accepting and 
processing applications for patents and on the patenting of 
Federal lands; permits processing of grandfathered 
applications; and permits third-party contractors to process 
grandfathered applications.
    Section 308 continues a provision limiting payments for 
contract support costs in past years to the funds available in 
law and accompanying report language in those years for the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service.
    Section 309 continues provision specifying reforms and 
limitations dealing with the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 310 continues a provision permitting the collection 
and use of private funds by the National Endowment for the Arts 
and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
    Section 311 continues direction to the National Endowment 
for the Arts on funding distribution.
    Section 312 continues a limitation on completing and 
issuing the five-year program under the Forest and Rangeland 
Renewable Resources Planning Act.
    Section 313 continues a provision prohibiting the use of 
funds to support government-wide administrative functions 
unless they are justified in the budget process and approved by 
the House and Senate Appropriations Committees.
    Section 314 prohibits the use of funds for GSA 
Telecommunication Centers.
    Section 315 permits the Secretaries of Agriculture and 
Interior to limit competition for watershed restoration project 
contracts under the ``Jobs in the Woods'' program.
    Section 316 continues a provision which permits the Forest 
Service to use the roads and trails fund for backlog 
maintenance and priority forest health treatments.
    Section 317 continues a provision limiting the use of 
answering machines during core business hours except in case of 
emergency and requires an option of talking to a person. The 
American taxpayer deserves to receive personal attention from 
public servants.
    Section 318 continues a provision carried last year 
regulating the export of western redcedar from National forest 
system lands in Alaska.
    Section 319 continues a provision prohibiting the Forest 
Service from using projects under the recreation fee 
demonstration program to supplant existing concessions.
    Section 320 continues a provision clarifying the Forest 
Service land management planning revision requirements.
    Section 321 continues a provision limiting preleasing, 
leasing and related activities within the boundaries of 
National monuments.
    Section 322 extends the Forest Service Conveyances Pilot 
Program.
    Section 323 continues for 2004 and thereafter a provision 
providing authority for the staff of Congressionally 
established foundations to use GSA contract airfare rates and 
Federal government hotel accommodation rates when on official 
business.
    Section 324 continues, with minor technical changes, a 
provision providing the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture the authority to enter into reciprocal 
agreements with foreign nations concerning the personal 
liability of firefighters.
    Section 325 continues a provision, as amended in the 2003 
supplemental Appropriations Act, dealing with processing 
expired grazing permits by the Bureau of Land Management and 
the Forest Service.
    Section 326 continues a provision authorizing a 
demonstration program for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, which 
permits the Eagle Butte service unit to pay higher salaries and 
bonuses to attract health professionals, if they can do so at 
no additional cost. The tribe has reported that part-time 
contract employees currently are costing more than it would 
cost the tribe to hire full-time permanent employees under this 
demonstration program.
    Section 327 continues a provision prohibiting the transfer 
of funds to other agencies other than provided in this Act.
    Section 328 continues a legislative provision limiting 
funds for oil or gas leasing or permitting on the Finger Lakes 
National Forest, NY.
    Section 329 continues a provision limiting the use of funds 
for the planning, design, or construction of Pennsylvania 
Avenue in front of the White House.
    Section 330 continues a provision which authorizes the 
Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to 
give consideration to rural communities, local and non-profit 
groups, and disadvantaged workers in entering into contracts 
for hazardous fuel and watershed projects.
    Section 331 continues a provision which limits the use of 
funds for filing of declaration of takings or condemnations. 
This provision does not apply to the Everglades National Park 
Protection and Environmental Act.
    Section 332 extends the Recreation Fee Demonstration 
program for two years.
    Section 333 extends hereafter existing procurement 
authorities for the Land Between the Lakes NRA, KY and TN.
    Section 334 amends and extends the pilot program for the 
harvest of botanical products on Forest Service lands.
    Section 335 limits the use of funds for competitive 
sourcing studies to those already initiated in fiscal years 
2002 and 2003. An in-depth report should be submitted by each 
agency no later than March 1, 2004, detailing the results of 
completed studies, including schedules, plans, and cost 
estimates for future outsourcing competitions.

                              Rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

          
          
        Department and activity       Amounts recommended for rescission
Department of the Interior: Land and Water Conservation 
    Fund (contract authority)...........................     $30,000,000

                           Transfers of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfers of funds provided in the accompanying 
bill.

             APPROPRIATION TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               Account to
 Account from which transfer      Amount     which transfer     Amount
        is to be made                        is to be made
------------------------------------------------------------------------
United States Fish and          $4,968,000  Bureau of         $4,968,000
 Wildlife Service, Land                      Indian
 Acquisition.                                Affairs,
                                             Indian Land
                                             and Water
                                             Claim
                                             Settlements
                                             and
                                             Miscellaneous
                                             Payments to
                                             Indians.
National Park Service, Land      5,000,000  United States      5,000,000
 Acquisition and State                       Fish and
 Assistance.                                 Wildlife
                                             Service,
                                             Resource
                                             Management.
National Park Service, Land     Indefinite  U.S. Army Corps   Indefinite
 Acquisition and State                       of Engineers,
 Assistance.                                 Construction,
                                             General.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Changes in Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3, rule XIII of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, the following Statements are submitted 
describing the effect of provisions in the accompanying bill, 
which directly or indirectly change the application of existing 
law. In most instances these provisions have been included in 
prior appropriations Acts.
    The bill provides that certain appropriations items remain 
available until expended or extends the availability of funds 
beyond the fiscal year where programs or projects are 
continuing in nature under the provisions of authorizing 
legislation but for which that legislation does not 
specifically authorize such extended availability. This 
authority tends to result in savings by preventing the practice 
of committing funds at the end of the fiscal year.
    The bill includes, in certain instances, limitations on the 
obligation of funds for particular functions or programs. These 
limitations include restrictions on the obligation of funds for 
administrative expenses, travel expenses, the use of 
consultants, and programmatic areas within the overall 
jurisdiction of a particular agency.
    The Committee has included limitations for official 
entertainment or reception and representation expenses for 
selected agencies in the bill.
    Language is included in the various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities of those Federal agencies, which 
require annual authorization or additional legislation which to 
date, has not been enacted.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Management of lands and resources, permitting the use of 
receipts from the Land and Water Conservation Act of 1965; 
providing funds to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
under certain conditions; permitting the use of fees from 
communication site rentals; limiting the use of funds for 
destroying wild horses and burros; and permitting the 
collection of fees for processing mining applications and for 
certain public land uses; permitting the use of these fees for 
program operations, and providing for a Youth Conservation 
Corp.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Wildland fire management, permitting the use of funds from 
other accounts for firefighting; permitting the use of funds 
for lodging and subsistence of firefighters; permitting the 
acceptance and use of funds for firefighting; permitting the 
use of grants, contracts and cooperative agreements for 
hazardous fuels reduction, including cost-sharing and local 
assistance; permitting reimbursement to the Fish and Wildlife 
Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service for 
consultation activities under the Endangered Species Act; 
permits the use of firefighting funds for the leasing of 
properties or the construction of facilities; providing for the 
transfer of funds between the Department of the Interior and 
the Department of Agriculture; and providing funds for support 
of Federal emergency response actions.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Central hazardous materials fund, providing that sums received 
from a party for remedial actions shall be credited to the 
account, and defining non-monetary payments.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Oregon and California grant lands, authorizing the transfer of 
receipts to the Treasury.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Forest ecosystems health and recovery fund, permitting the use 
of salvage timber receipts.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Service charges, deposits, and forfeitures, allowing the use of 
funds on any damaged public lands.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Administrative provisions, permitting the payment of rewards 
for information on violations of law on Bureau lands; providing 
for cost-sharing arrangements for printing services; and 
permitting the use of fees offsetting the cost of mining law 
administration.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Resource management, allowing for the maintenance of 
the herd of long-horned cattle on the Wichita Mountains 
Wildlife Refuge. Without this language, the long-horned cattle 
would have to be removed from the refuge. Language also is 
included providing for the Natural Communities Conservation 
Planning program and for a Youth Conservation Corps; limiting 
funding for certain Endangered Species Act listing programs; 
permitting payment for information or rewards in the law 
enforcement program; and earmarking funds for contaminant 
analysis.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Land acquisition, prohibiting the use of project funds 
for overhead expenses.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Landowner incentive program, providing matching grants 
to States and territories.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Stewardship grants, providing for grants for private 
conservation efforts.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, State and tribal wildlife grants, specifying the 
distribution formula and planning and cost-sharing requirements 
and requiring that funds unobligated after two years be 
reapportioned.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Administrative provisions, providing for repair of 
damage to public roads; providing options for the purchase of 
land not to exceed $1; providing for installation of certain 
recreation facilities; and permitting the maintenance and 
improvement of aquaria and other facilities, the acceptance of 
donated aircraft, and cost-shared arrangements for printing 
services. Language also is included limiting the use of funds 
for establishing new refuges.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Operation 
of the National park system, allowing road maintenance service 
to trucking permittees on a reimbursable basis. This provision 
has been included in annual appropriations Acts since 1954. 
Language also is included providing for a Youth Conservation 
Corps program, and permitting reimbursement to the Park Police 
for special events under limited circumstances.
    Language is included under National Park Service, National 
recreation and preservation, prohibiting the use of cooperative 
agreements and any form of cash grant for the rivers, trail, 
and conservation assistance program.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Historic 
preservation fund, providing grants for Save America's 
Treasures to be matched by non-Federal funds; individual 
projects are only eligible for one grant and are subject to 
prior approval; and funds for Federal projects are available by 
transfer to individual agencies.
    Language is included under National Park Service, 
construction, limiting salaries to no more than 160 FTE's for 
the Denver Service Center; requiring approval of new facilities 
in excess of $5,000,000; and conditioning moneys available for 
modified water deliveries project.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Land and 
water conservation fund, rescinding $30,000,000 in contract 
authority.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Land 
acquisition and State assistance, permitting the use of funds 
to assist the State of Florida with Everglades restoration; 
making the use of funds for Everglades contingent on certain 
conditions; limiting the use of funds to establish a 
contingency fund for State grants; and redirecting previously 
appropriated grants to the State of Florida for environmental 
projects for the South Florida Restoration Initiative.
    Language is included under National Park Service, 
Administrative provisions, preventing the implementation of an 
agreement for the redevelopment of the southern end of Ellis 
Island; limiting the use of funds for the United Nation's 
Biodiversity Convention; permitting the use of funds for 
workplace safety needs; and authorizing reimbursable agreements 
in advance of receipt of funds.
    Language is included under U.S. Geological Survey, Surveys, 
investigations and research, providing for two-year 
availability of funds for biological research and for the 
operations of cooperative research units; prohibiting the 
conduct of new surveys on private property without permission; 
and requiring cost sharing for cooperative topographic mapping 
and water resource data collection activities.
    Language is included under U.S. Geological Survey, 
Administrative provisions, permitting contracting for certain 
mapping and surveys; permitting construction of facilities; 
permitting acquisition of land for certain uses; allowing 
payment of expenses for the National Committee on Geology; 
permitting payments to interstate compact negotiators; 
permitting the use of certain contracts, grants, and 
cooperative agreements; and allowing cooperative agreements for 
research with Federal, State, and academic partners including 
the use of space and cooperator facilities.
    Language is included under Minerals Management Service, 
Royalty and offshore minerals management, permitting the use of 
excess receipts from Outer Continental Shelf leasing 
activities; providing for reasonable expenses related to 
volunteer beach and marine clean-up activities; providing for 
refunds for overpayments on Indian allottee leases; providing 
for collecting royalties and late payment interest on amounts 
received in settlements associated with Federal and Indian 
leases; permitting the use of revenues from a royalty-in-kind 
program; and provides that royalty-in-kind be equal to, or 
greater than, royalty-in-value.
    Language is included under Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, Regulation and technology, 
permitting the use of moneys collected pursuant to assessment 
of civil penalties to reclaim lands affected by coal mining 
after August 3, 1977 and permitting payment to State and tribal 
personnel for travel and per diem expenses for training.
    Language is included under Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, Abandoned mine reclamation fund, 
limiting the amounts available for emergency reclamation 
projects; allowing the use of debt recovery to pay for debt 
collection; and earmarking funds for acid mine drainage.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Operation of Indian programs, limiting funds for contract 
support costs and for administrative cost grants for schools; 
permitting the use of tribal priority allocations for general 
assistance payments to individuals, for contract support costs, 
and for repair and replacement of schools; allowing the 
transfer of certain forestry funds; and providing for an Indian 
self-determination fund.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Construction, providing that six percent of Federal Highway 
Trust Fund contract authority may be used for management costs; 
providing for the transfer of Navajo irrigation project funds 
to the Bureau of Reclamation; providing Safety of Dams funds on 
a non-reimbursable basis; requiring the use of administrative 
and cost accounting principles for certain school construction 
projects and exempting such projects from certain requirements; 
requiring conformance with building codes and health and safety 
standards; and specifying the procedure for dispute resolution.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Administrative provisions, prohibiting funding of Alaska 
schools; limiting the number of schools and the expansion of 
grade levels in individual schools; limiting the use of funds 
for contracts, grants and cooperative agreements; and allows 
tribes to return appropriated funds for distribution to other 
tribes.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Insular 
Affairs, Assistance to Territories, requiring audits of the 
financial transactions of the Territorial governments by the 
General Accounting Office; providing grant funding under 
certain terms of the Agreement of the Special Representatives 
on Future United States Financial Assistance for the Northern 
Mariana Islands; providing a grant to the Close-Up foundation; 
allowing appropriations for disaster assistance to be used as 
non-Federal matching funds for hazard mitigation grants; and 
providing for capital infrastructure in various Territories.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, 
Departmental management, salaries and expenses, permitting 
payments to former Bureau of Mines workers; limiting the 
establishment of additional reserves in the working capital 
fund, and cancelling $20,000,000 in unobligated balances in the 
working capital fund.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Payments 
in lieu of taxes, to exclude any payment that is less than 
$100.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Office of 
special trustee for American Indians, specifying that the 
statute of limitations shall not commence on any claim 
resulting from trust funds losses; exempting quarterly 
statements for accounts less than $1; requiring annual 
statements and records maintenance; and permitting the use of 
recoveries from erroneous payments.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Indian 
land consolidation, permitting transfers of funds for 
administration and permitting cooperative agreements with 
tribes to acquire fractional interests.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, 
Administrative provisions, prohibiting the use of working 
capital or consolidated working funds to augment certain 
offices and allowing the acquisition of aircraft through 
various means and the sale of existing aircraft with proceeds 
used to offset the purchase price of replacement aircraft.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, allowing transfer of funds in certain 
emergency situations and requiring replacement with a 
supplemental appropriation request and designating certain 
transferred funds as ``emergency requirements'' under the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, permitting the Department to consolidate 
services and receive reimbursement for said services. Language 
also is included providing for uniform allowances.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, allowing obligations in connection with 
contracts issued for services or rentals for periods not in 
excess of 12 months beginning at any time during the fiscal 
year.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, restricting various oil and gas preleasing, 
leasing, exploration and drilling activities within the Outer 
Continental Shelf in the Georges Bank-North Atlantic planning 
area, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning area, Eastern 
Gulf of Mexico planning area, North Aleutian Basin planning 
area, Northern, Southern and Central California planning areas, 
and Washington/Oregon planning area.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, limiting the investment of Federal funds by 
Indian tribes, and prohibiting fee exemptions for non-local 
traffic through National Parks.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, permitting the transfer of funds between the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Office of Special Trustee for 
American Indians; allowing for the renewal of grazing permits 
based on certain terms and conditions; providing for 
administrative law judges to handle Indian issues; permitting 
the redistribution of certain Indian funds with limitations; 
directing allocation of funds for Bureau of Indian Affairs 
funded post-secondary schools; limiting the use of the Huron 
Cemetery to religious and cultural activities; permitting the 
conveyance of the Twin Cities Research Center; authorizing a 
cooperative agreement with the Golden Gate National Parks 
Association; permitting the Bureau of Land Management to retain 
funds from the sale of seeds and seedlings; permitting the sale 
of equipment and interests at the White River Oil Shale Mine in 
Utah and the retention of receipts; and allowing the use of 
helicopters and motor vehicles on Sheldon and Hart National 
Wildlife refuge; authorizing funding transfers for Shenandoah 
Valley Battlefield NHD and Ice Age NST; prohibiting the closure 
of the underground lunchroom at Carlsbad Caverns NP.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, prohibiting demolition of the bridge between 
New Jersey and Ellis Island; prohibiting posting of clothing 
optional signs at Canaveral NS; limiting compensation for the 
Special Master and Court Monitor for the Cobell v. Norton 
litigation; allowing payment of attorney fees for Federal 
employees related to the Cobell v. Norton litigation; requiring 
the Fish and Wildlife Service to mark hatchery salmon; and 
allowing for the transfer of certain Departmental Management 
funds to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Midway Island 
Refuge airport; and preventing funds to study or reduce the 
water level at Lake Powell.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, providing for expansion of a tribal school 
demonstration program; requiring the Secretary of the Interior 
to report to the Committee on educational facilities for the 
Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians; providing for a land exchange 
at the Mojave National Preserve; establishing the Blue Ridge 
National Heritage Area in North Carolina; establishing a 
resolution process regarding individual Indian money account 
claims so that claims would be resolved either through a 
voluntary settlement process or through a historical 
accounting.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, limiting the use of funds for the Klamath 
Fishery Management Council and permitting the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service to use funds to encourage public participation 
in Service programs and for contracts for employment-related 
legal services.
    Language is included under Forest Service, State and 
private forestry, requiring House and Senate Appropriations 
Committee notification before releasing forest legacy project 
funds; requiring that each forest legacy grant be for a 
specific project or task; and requiring that States demonstrate 
cost-share on forest legacy grants.
    Language is included under Forest Service, National forest 
system, allowing 50 percent of the fees collected under the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act to remain available until 
expended; requiring the fiscal year 2005 budget justification 
to display unobligated balances available at the start of 
fiscal year 2005; and permitting the transfer of funds to the 
Bureau of Land Management for wild horse and burro management 
and for cadastral surveys.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Wildland fire 
management, allowing the use of funds to repay advances from 
other accounts and requiring 50 percent of any unobligated 
balances remaining at the end of fiscal year 2003, excepting 
hazardous fuels funding, to be transferred to the Knutson-
Vandenberg Fund as repayment for past advances; permitting the 
use of funds for the Joint Fire Science program; providing for 
grants and cooperative agreements with local communities; 
providing for use of funds on adjacent, non-Federal lands for 
hazard reduction; providing contract authority for fuel 
reduction projects; and providing for the transfer of funds 
between the Department of Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Capital 
improvement and maintenance, allowing funds to be used for road 
decommissioning and requiring that no road decommissioning be 
funded until notice and an opportunity for public comment has 
been provided.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Range betterment 
fund, providing that six percent of the funds may be used for 
administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, providing that proceeds from the sale of aircraft 
may be used to purchase replacement aircraft; permitting the 
transfer of funds for emergency firefighting from other Forest 
Service accounts under certain circumstances; and allowing 
funds to be used through the Agency for International 
Development and the Foreign Agricultural Service for work in 
foreign countries and to support other forestry activities 
outside of the United States.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, prohibiting the following without advance approval: 
(1) the transfer of funds under the Department of Agriculture 
transfer authority; (2) reprogramming of funds; and (3) 
transfer of funds in excess of the level transferred during 
fiscal year 2000 to the working capital fund of the Department 
of Agriculture.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, providing for a Youth Conservation Corps program; 
providing for matching funds and administrative expenses for 
the National Forest Foundation and also matching funds for the 
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; providing funds for 
sustainable rural development; providing payments to counties 
within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area; dealing 
with a report on special use permits for outfitters and guides 
on the Inyo and the Sierra National Forests; permitting limited 
reimbursements to the Office of General Counsel in USDA; 
allowing the limited use of funds for law enforcement 
emergencies; authorizing the sale of buildings and facilities 
on the Green Mountain National Forest; allowing the transfer of 
funds to the Department of the Interior for endangered species 
consultation; and providing Federal employee status for certain 
individuals employed under the Older American Act of 1965.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Clean coal 
technology, deferring certain funding for one year.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Fossil 
energy, specifying certain conditions for the Clean Coal Power 
Initiative; limiting the field testing of nuclear explosives 
for the recovery of oil and gas; and permitting the use of 
funds from other programs accounts for the National Energy 
Technology Laboratory.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Naval 
petroleum and oil shale reserves, permitting the use of 
unobligated balances.
    Language is included under the Department of Energy, Energy 
conservation, providing allocations of grants for 
weatherization and State energy conservation.
    Language is included under Administrative provisions, 
Department of Energy, providing for vehicle and guard services 
and uniform allowances; limiting programs of price supports and 
loan guarantees to what is provided in appropriations Acts; 
providing for the transfer of funds to other agencies of the 
Government; providing for retention of revenues by the 
Secretary of Energy on certain projects; requiring certain 
contracts be submitted to Congress prior to implementation; 
prohibiting issuance of procurement documents without 
appropriations; and permitting the use of contributions and 
fees for cooperative projects.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, Indian 
health services, providing that certain contracts and grants 
may be performed in two fiscal years; exempting certain tribal 
funding from fiscal year constraints; limiting funds for 
catastrophic care, loan repayment and certain contracts; 
capping contract support cost spending; providing for use of 
collections under Title IV of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act; and permitting the use of Indian Health Care 
Improvement Fund monies for facilities improvement.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, Indian 
health facilities, providing that funds may be used to purchase 
land, modular buildings and trailers; providing for certain 
staff quarters construction in Alaska; providing for certain 
purchases and for a demolition fund; and providing authority 
for contracts for small ambulatory facilities.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, providing for payments for telephone 
service in private residences in the field, purchase of 
reprints, and purchase and erection of portable buildings and 
allowing deobligation and reobligation of funds applied to 
self-governance funding agreements.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, providing that health care may be 
extended to non-Indians at Indian Health Service facilities and 
providing for expenditure of funds transferred to IHS from the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, preventing the Indian Health Service 
from billing Indians in order to collect from third-party 
payers until Congress has agreed to implement a specific 
policy.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, allowing payment of expenses for 
meeting attendance; specifying that certain funds shall not be 
subject to certain travel limitations; prohibiting the 
expenditure of funds to implement new eligibility regulations; 
providing that funds be apportioned only in the appropriation 
structure in this Act; prohibiting changing the appropriations 
structure without approval of the Appropriations Committees; 
and permitting the sale of goods and services for fees and for 
the use of those fees.
    Language is included under Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian 
Relocation, Salaries and expenses, defining eligible 
relocatees; prohibiting movement of any single Navajo or Navajo 
family unless a new or replacement home is available; limiting 
relocatees to one new or replacement home; and establishing a 
priority for relocation of Navajos to those certified eligible 
who have selected and received homesites on the Navajo 
reservation or selected a replacement residence off the Navajo 
reservation.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, 
Salaries and expenses, allowing for advance payments to 
independent contractors performing research services or 
participating in official Smithsonian presentations; providing 
that funds may be used to support American overseas research 
centers; and permitting the use of certain funds for the Victor 
Building.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, 
facilities capital, permitting the Smithsonian Institution to 
select contractors for certain purposes on the basis of 
contractor qualifications as well as price.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, 
Administrative provisions, precluding any changes to the 
Smithsonian science program without prior approval of the Board 
of Regents; limiting the design or expansion of current space 
or facilities without prior approval of the Committee; limiting 
reprogramming of funds and the use of funds for the Holt House; 
and establishing a voluntary separation incentive program.
    Language is included under National Gallery of Art, 
Salaries and expenses, allowing payment in advance for 
membership in library, museum, and art associations or 
societies; providing uniform allowances and for restoration and 
repair of works of art by contract without advertising; and 
providing no-year availability of funds for special 
exhibitions.
    Language is included under National Gallery of Art, Repair, 
restoration and renovation of buildings, permitting the Gallery 
to perform work by contract or otherwise and to select 
contractors for certain purposes on the basis of contractor 
qualifications as well as price.
    Language is included under National Endowment for the 
Humanities, Matching grants, allowing obligation of current and 
prior year funds of gifts, bequests, and devises of money for 
which equal amounts have not previously been appropriated.
    Language is included under National Foundation on the Arts 
and the Humanities, Administrative provisions, requiring 
certain language in contracts and grants permitting the use of 
non-appropriated funds for reception expenses, and allowing the 
chairperson of the NEA to approve small grants under limited 
circumstances.
    Language is included under Commission of Fine Arts, 
Salaries and expenses, permitting the charging and use of fees 
for its publications.
    Language is included under National Capital Arts and 
Cultural Affairs, Administrative Provisions, limiting the use 
of funds to study the alteration or transfer of this program.
    Language is included under Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, Salaries and expenses, restricting hiring at 
Executive Level V or higher.
    Language is included under National Capital Planning 
Commission, Salaries and expenses, providing a daily equivalent 
pay level at the rate of Executive Level IV for all appointed 
members for fiscal year 2004 and thereafter.
    Language is included under Holocaust Memorial Council, 
providing no-year funding availability for repair and 
rehabilitation and museums exhibitions.
    Language is included under Title III--General Provisions, 
providing for availability of information on consulting 
services contracts; prohibiting the use of funds to distribute 
literature either to promote or oppose legislative proposals on 
which Congressional action is incomplete; prohibiting the use 
of funds to provide personal cooks, chauffeurs or other 
personal servants to any office or employee; specifying that 
funds are for one year unless provided otherwise; prohibiting 
assessments against programs funded in this bill; and 
prohibiting the sale of giant sequoia trees in a manner 
different from 2002.
    Language is included under Title III--General Provisions, 
continuing a limitation on accepting and processing 
applications for patents and on the patenting of Federal lands; 
permitting processing of grandfathered applications; and 
permitting third-party contractors to process grandfathered 
applications.
    Language is included under Title III--General Provisions, 
limiting the use of funds for contract support costs on Indian 
contracts.
    Language is included under Title III--General Provisions, 
making reforms in the National Endowment for the Arts, 
including funding distribution reforms; permitting the National 
Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities to collect, invest 
and use private donations; limiting funds for completing or 
issuing the five-year program under the Forest and Rangeland 
Renewable Resources Planning Act; limiting the use of funds for 
any government-wide administrative functions; permitting the 
use of Forest Service road and trail funds for maintenance and 
forest health; limiting the use of telephone answering 
machines; and limiting the sale for export of western red cedar 
in Alaska.
    Language is included under Title III--General Provisions, 
prohibiting the Forest Service from using projects under the 
recreation fee demonstration program to supplant existing 
concessions and permitting the use of Forest land management 
plans pending completion of required revisions.
    Language is included under Title III--General Provisions, 
limiting leasing and preleasing activities within National 
Monuments; extending and expanding the pilot program allowing 
the Forest Service to dispose of certain excess structures and 
reinvest the proceeds for maintenance and rehabilitation; 
providing authority hereafter for the staff of Congressionally 
established foundations to use GSA contract airfare rates and 
Federal government hotel accommodation rates when on official 
business; providing the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture the authority to enter into reciprocal 
agreements with foreign nations concerning the personal 
liability of firefighters; providing for processing expired 
grazing permits by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest 
Service; authorizing a demonstration program for the Cheyenne 
River Sioux Tribe, which permits the Eagle Butte service unit 
to pay higher salaries and bonuses to attract health 
professionals; prohibiting the transfer of funds to other 
agencies other than provided in this Act; and limiting the use 
of funds to prepare or issue a permit or lease for oil or gas 
drilling in the Finger Lakes National Forest, NY.
    Language is included under Title III, General Provisions 
limiting funds on planning, design, and construction to 
Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House; providing 
contracting and grant authority for hazardous fuel projects in 
forest-dependent rural communities; certain limitation on funds 
for Federal land takings excluding Everglades National Park 
Protection and Expansion Act; extending recreation fee program; 
continues existing procurement authorities at the Land Between 
the Lakes NRA; and extending a pilot botanical forest product 
harvest program.
    Language is included under Title III, General Provisions 
limiting the use of funds for competitive sourcing studies to 
those already initiated in fiscal years 2002 and 2003.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Appropriations
                                         Last year of                              in last year   Appropriations
                                        authorization     Authorization level           of         in this bill
                                                                                   authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Endowment for the Arts.......          1993   ``Such sums as may be            $174,460        $117,480
                                                        necessary''.
National Endowment for the Humanities.          1993   ``Such sums as may be             177,413         137,000
                                                        necessary''.
Office of Navajo & Hopi Indian                  2000   $30,000..................           8,000          13,532
 Relocation.

     U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Resources Management:
    Endangered Species Act Amendments           1992   $41,500..................          35,721         134,469
     of 1988.
    Marine Mammal Protection Act                1999   $10,296..................           2,008
     Amendments of 1994.

         Department of Energy

Energy Information Administration 1992            NA   76,300...................          82,111
Office of Fossil Energy:
    Coal..............................          1997   ``Such sums as may be             149,629         198,860
                                                        necessary''.
    Enhanced Oil Recovery.............          1997   NA.......................          45,937          32,200
    Natural Gas.......................          1997   NA.......................          23,614          36,480
    Fuel Cells........................          1997   NA.......................          50,117          70,000
Energy Efficiency and Renewable
 Energy:
    Transportation R&D................;          1994   $160,000.................         176,000         240,923
    Buildings, Industry...............          1994   $275,000.................         255,700         528,438
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee notes that authorizing legislation for many 
of these programs is in various stages of the legislative 
process and these authorizations are expected to be enacted 
into law later this year.

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of 
the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, are 
printed below: there were no recorded votes.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

     SECTION 1222 OF DIVISION F OF PUBLIC LAW 108-7 TRIBAL SCHOOL 
                         DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    Subsections (a)(4), (b)(1), and (c) of Sec.1222 of Division 
F of Public Law 108-7 are amended as follows:
    (a)(4) [Tribally Controlled School.--The term ``tribally 
controlled school'' has the meaning given that term in section 
5212 of the Tribally Controlled School Act of 1988 (25 U.S.C. 
2511).] Tribally Controlled School._The term ``tribally 
controlled school'' means a school that currently receives a 
grant under the Tribally Controlled Schools Act of 1988, as 
amended (25 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.) or is determined by the 
Secretary to meet the eligibility criteria of section 5205 of 
the Tribally Controlled Schools Act of 1988, as amended (25 
U.S.C. 2504).
    (b)(1) In General.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations, in carrying out the demonstration program under 
subsection (b), the Secretary shall award a grant to each 
Indian tribe that submits an application that is approved by 
the Secretary under paragraph (2). [The Secretary shall ensure 
that an Indian tribe that agrees to fund all future operation 
and maintenance costs of the tribally controlled school 
constructed under the demonstration program from other than 
federal funds receives the highest priority for a grant under 
this section.] The Secretary shall ensure that applications for 
funding to replace schools currently receiving funding for 
facility operation and maintenance from the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs receive the highest priority for grants under this 
section. Among such applications, the Secretary shall give 
priority to applications of Indian tribes that agree to fund 
all future facility operation and maintenance costs of the 
tribally controlled school funded under the demonstration 
program from other than Federal funds.
    (c) Effect of a Grant.--(1) Except as provided in paragraph 
(2) of the subsection. A grant received under this section 
shall be in addition to any other funds received by an Indian 
tribe under any other provision of law. The receipt of a grant 
under this section shall not affect the eligibility of an 
Indian tribe receiving funding, or the amount of funding 
received by the Indian tribe, under the Tribally Controlled 
Schools Act of 1988 (25 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.) or the Indian 
Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450 
et seq).
    (2) A tribe receiving a grant for construction of a 
tribally controlled school under this section shall not be 
eligible to receive funding from the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
for that school for education operations or facility operation 
and maintenance if the school that was not at the time of the 
grant (i) a school receiving funding for education operations 
or facility operation and maintenance under the Tribally 
Controlled Schools Act or the Indian Self-Determination and 
Education Assistance Act or (ii) a school operated by the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs.''

 SECTION 28(a) OF TITLE 30 UNITED STATES CODE HARD ROCK MINING HOLDING 
                                  FEE

    Section 28f(a) of title 30 U.S.C. is amended as follows:
    (a) Claim Maintenance Fee.--The holder of each unpatented 
mining claim, mill, or tunnel site, located pursuant to the 
mining laws of the United States, whether located before, on or 
after enactment of this Act, shall pay to the Secretary of the 
Interior, on or before September 1 of each year for years [2002 
through 2003] 2004 through 2008, a claim maintenance fee of 
$100 per claim or site.
    Section 28g of title 30 U.S.C. is amended as follows:
    Location Fee.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
for every unpatented mining claim, mill or tunnel site located 
after August 10, 1993, and before September 30, [2003] 2008, 
pursuant to the mining laws of the United States, the locator 
shall, at the time the location notice is recorded with the 
Bureau of Land Management, pay to the Secretary of the Interior 
a location fee, in addition to the claim maintenance fee 
required by section 28f of this title, of $25.00 per claim.

  SECTION 315 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1996


SEC. 315. RECREATIONAL FEE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM.

    (a) * * *
    (f) The authority to collect fees under this section shall 
end on September 30, [2004] 2006. Funds in accounts established 
shall remain available through September 30, [2007] 2009.

    SECTION 551 OF THE LAND BETWEEN THE LAKES PROTECTION ACT OF 1998


SEC. 551. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) * * *
    [(c) Transition.--Until September 30, 2004, the Secretary 
of Agriculture may expend amounts appropriated or otherwise 
made available to carry out this title in a manner consistent 
with the authorities exercised by the Tennessee Valley 
Authority, before the transfer of the Recreation Area to the 
administrative jurisdiction of the Secretary, regarding 
procurement of property, services, supplies, and equipment.]
    (c) Use of Funds.--The Secretary of Agriculture may expend 
amounts appropriated or otherwise made available to carry out 
this title in a manner consistent with the authorities 
exercised by the Tennessee Valley Authority before the transfer 
of the Recreation Area to the administrative jurisdiction of 
the Secretary, including campground management and visitor 
services, paid advertisement, and procurement of food and 
supplies for resale purposes.

  SECTION 339 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2000


SEC. 339. PILOT PROGRAM OF CHARGES AND FEES FOR HARVEST OF FOREST 
                    BOTANICAL PRODUCTS.

    (a) * * *
    (b) Recovery of Fair Market Value for Products.--The 
Secretary of Agriculture shall develop and implement a pilot 
program to charge and collect [not less than the fair market 
value] fees under subsection (c) for forest botanical products 
harvested on National Forest System lands. [The Secretary shall 
establish appraisal methods and bidding procedures to ensure 
that the amounts collected for forest botanical products are 
not less than fair market value.] The Secretary shall establish 
appraisal methods and bidding procedures to determine the fair 
market value of forest botanical products harvested under the 
pilot program.
    (c) Fees.--
          [(1) Imposition and Collection.--Under the pilot 
        program, the Secretary of Agriculture shall also charge 
        and collect fees from persons who harvest forest 
        botanical products on National Forest System lands to 
        recover all costs to the Department of Agriculture 
        associated with the granting, modifying, or monitoring 
        the authorization for harvest of the forest botanical 
        products, including the costs of any environmental or 
        other analysis.]
          (1) Imposition and collection.--Under the pilot 
        program, the Secretary of Agriculture shall charge and 
        collect from a person who harvests forest botanical 
        products on National Forest System lands a fee in an 
        amount established by the Secretary to recover at least 
        a portion of the fair market value of the harvested 
        forest botanical products and a portion of the costs 
        incurred by the Department of Agriculture associated 
        with granting, modifying, or monitoring the 
        authorization for harvest of the forest botanical 
        products, including the costs of any environmental or 
        other analysis.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) Waiver Authority.--
          (1) Personal use.--The Secretary of Agriculture shall 
        establish a personal use harvest level for each forest 
        botanical product, and the harvest of a forest 
        botanical product below that level by a person for 
        personal use shall not be subject to [charges and fees 
        under subsections (b) and] a fee under subsection (c).
    (f) Deposit and Use of Funds.--
          (1) Deposit.--Funds collected under the pilot program 
        in accordance with [subsections (b) and] subsection (c) 
        shall be deposited into a special account in the 
        Treasury of the United States.
          (2) Funds available.--Funds deposited into the 
        special account in accordance with paragraph (1) [in 
        excess of the amounts collected for forest botanical 
        products during fiscal year 1999] shall be available 
        for expenditure by the Secretary of Agriculture under 
        paragraph (3) without further appropriation, and shall 
        remain available for expenditure until the date 
        specified in subsection (h)(2).
          (3) Authorized uses.--The funds made available under 
        paragraph (2) shall be expended at units of the 
        National Forest System in proportion to the [charges 
        and fees collected at that unit under the pilot program 
        to pay for--
                  [(A) in the case of funds collected under 
                subsection (b), the costs of conducting 
                inventories of forest botanical products, 
                determining sustainable levels of harvest, 
                monitoring and assessing the impacts of harvest 
                levels and methods, and for restoration 
                activities, including any necessary vegetation; 
                and
                  [(B) in the case of fees collected under 
                subsection (c), the costs described in 
                paragraph (1) of such subsection.] fees 
                collected at that unit under subsection (c) to 
                pay for the costs of conducting inventories of 
                forest botanical products, determining 
                sustainable levels of harvest, monitoring and 
                assessing the impacts of harvest levels and 
                methods, conducting restoration activities, 
                including any necessary vegetation, and 
                covering costs of the Department of Agriculture 
                described in subsection (c) (1).
          (4) Treatment of fees.--Funds collected under 
        [subsections (b) and] subsection (c) shall not be taken 
        into account for the purposes of the following laws:
                  (A) * * *
    (g) Reporting Requirements.--As soon as practicable after 
the end of each fiscal year in which the Secretary of 
Agriculture collects [charges and fees under subsections (b) 
and] fees under subsection (c) or expends funds from the 
special account under subsection (f), the Secretary shall 
submit to the Congress a report summarizing the activities of 
the Secretary under the pilot program, including the funds 
generated under [subsections (b) and] subsection (c), the 
expenses incurred to carry out the pilot program, and the 
expenditures made from the special account during that fiscal 
year.
    (h) Duration of Pilot Program.--
          [(1) Charges and fees.--The Secretary of Agriculture 
        may collect charges and fees under the authority of 
        subsections (b) and (c) only during fiscal years 2000 
        through 2004.]
          (1) Collection of fees.--The Secretary of Agriculture 
        may collect fees under the authority of subsection (c) 
        until September 30, 2009.

  SECTION 329 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2002

    Sec. 329. (a) * * *
    (b) Limitation.--Conveyances on not more than [20] 30 sites 
may be made under the authority of this section, and the 
Secretary of Agriculture shall obtain the concurrence of the 
Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate in advance of 
each conveyance.
    (c) Use of Proceeds.--The proceeds derived from the sale of 
a building or other structure under this section shall be 
retained by the Secretary of Agriculture and shall be available 
to the Secretary, without further appropriation until expended, 
for maintenance and rehabilitation activities within the Forest 
Service Region in which the building or structure is located. 
Additionally, proceeds from the sale of conveyances on no more 
than [3] eight sites shall be available for construction of 
replacement facilities.
    (d) Duration of Authority.--The authority provided by this 
section expires on September 30, [2006] 2007.

                    Five-Year Projection of Outlays

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:

                              [In millions]

Budget authority (discretionary)........................          19,627
Outlays:
    Fiscal year 2004....................................          13,224
    Fiscal year 2005....................................           4,105
    Fiscal year 2006....................................           1,463
    Fiscal year 2007....................................             632
    Fiscal year 2008 and future years...................             253

               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:

                              [In millions]

New budget authority....................................           2,561
Fiscal year 2004 outlays resulting therefrom............           1,564
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of 
the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, are 
printed below:

                             ROLLCALL NO. 1

    Date: June 25, 2003.
    Measure: Department of the Interior and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Bill, FY 2004.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To increase certain conservation 
spending category programs by $568.6 million; increases are 
offset by a reduction to tax cuts for certain income groups.
    Results: Rejected 26 yeas to 32 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Berry                           Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Bishop                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Crenshaw
Mr. Clyburn                         Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Doolittle
Ms. DeLauro                         Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Dicks                           Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Goode
Mr. Fattah                          Ms. Granger
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Istook
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Kingston
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Kennedy                         Mr. LaHood
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Latham
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Moran                           Mrs. Northup
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Peterson
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Regula
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Rogers
Mr. Price                           Mr. Sherwood
Mr. Rothman                         Mr. Simpson
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Sweeney
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Taylor
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Tiahrt
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Vitter
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Dr. Weldon
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young
                                    
                                    

            ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF DAVID OBEY AND NORMAN DICKS

    We appreciate that the FY 2004 Interior Appropriations bill 
reported by the Committee includes important increases in 
certain areas. The $335 million increase over the FY 2003 base 
funding for the National Fire Plan is critically important. 
These funds will improve this nation's ability to both fight 
and prevent catastrophic forest fires. Likewise, the $243 
million increase for Indian health, education and trust reform 
efforts, while still less than is needed, is to be commended. 
Funding to address the most urgent needs within Indian Country 
represents a shared priority of all members of the Committee. 
Beyond these two specific areas, the bill also has made a 
commendable effort to provide funding to at least partially 
offset the uncontrollable costs, principally pay and rent, for 
the agencies under its jurisdiction.
    Beyond funding, we also endorse a number of policy 
initiatives in this bill. The limitation in section 335 of the 
bill on the Administration's poorly designed competitive 
sourcing programs, in particular those at the National Park 
Service and the U.S. Forest Service, will stop an irrational 
and costly process until it can be redesigned and further 
justified to the Congress. Section 137 attempts to address the 
longstanding problems created by the Cobell v. Norton 
individual Indian trust accounts court case by encouraging a 
settlement process which we hope will direct scarce resources 
away from lawyers and accountants to the benefit of Native 
American peoples through a responsible and responsive system of 
Indian trust management. While this language is controversial 
and may require further amendment after consultation with the 
authorizing Committees of both the House and the Senate, the 
effort to move the process towards settlement and away from an 
enormously costly and unproductive litigation process is 
clearly the right policy and should be encouraged.
    Unfortunately, despite the positive aspects of this 
Interior bill, it is our view that the FY 2004 appropriations 
bill reported by the Committee remains critically flawed in 
many areas. These failings, which are discussed in more detail 
later in these remarks, include, principally:
           A wholesale retreat from the Committee's 
        previous commitment to adequately fund conservation 
        programs to protect public lands and cultural 
        artifacts, to preserve endangered and threatened 
        species, and to assist States in their own conservation 
        and recreation programs. These conservation programs 
        are funded at a level $208 million below the current 
        year and $569 million below the level authorized in the 
        conservation trust agreement less than three years ago;
           Failure to provide adequate funds to address 
        funding shortfalls for the FY 2002 and FY 2003 
        firefighting seasons. The bill fails, for instance, to 
        repay any of the $373 million borrowed from other 
        Forest Service and Interior Department programs during 
        the fiscal year 2002 fire seasons;
           A continuing policy of freezing funding for 
        the National Endowment for the Arts at levels 30 
        percent less than provided a decade ago, despite 
        repeated votes on the floor of the House in support of 
        increased funding; and
           Rejection of the president's request to 
        increase funding for the Department of Energy's 
        weatherization program, which is critical in helping 
        poor families reduce their energy costs. This program 
        is funded at a level $63 million below the president's 
        request of $288 million.

                     CONSERVATION FUNDING SHORTFALL

    Our greatest concern with the bill as reported is that it 
completely abandons the conservation trust agreement which the 
leadership of the House and Senate and the leadership of this 
Committee voted for 3 years ago as a part of the FY 2001 
Interior Appropriations Act. That agreement was reached and 
enacted into law in response to the 315 Members of the House 
who voted for the CARA legislation (H.R. 701) during the1 106th 
Congress as a statement of commitment to preserving the great 
lands and places of America, to saving endangered and 
threatened species, and to helping States and local communities 
with their conservation and recreation programs through 
creative partnerships. While it is true that no Congress may 
bind a future Congress, we believe the conservation trust 
agreements which was included in the 2001 bill represented a 
promise by the Congress and this Committee that conservation 
programs would be given their highest priority. Unfortunately, 
the FY 2004 Interior bill reported by the Committee 
insteadgives conservation spending its lowest priority. If anyone 
doubts this evaluation of the Committee bill, the numbers speak for 
themselves:
     Conservation spending.--The Committee bill funds 
conservation related programs in FY 2004 at a level of $991 
million--$569 million below the $1,560 million authorized for 
FY 2004, $208 million below 2003 and approximately $200 million 
below the president's 2004 request. (See conservation spending 
table below.)
     Federal land acquisition.--Federal land 
acquisition programs, a critical part of our conservation 
commitment, are funded at only $100 million, the lowest level 
in two decades. This is $213 million below the 2003 level and 
$87 million below the president's request. Members may be 
tempted to think of this as an abstract argument about vast 
lands in the undeveloped West or about places which only a few 
people care about. But it is very real. It is the nine acre 
tract in the middle of Valley Forge, which will be developed 
next year if we don't buy it; it is Yellowstone and Grant 
Teton; it is the Great Smoky Mountains and the Blue Ridge 
Parkway. It is the national park, wildlife refuge or forest in 
each Member's Congressional District.
    In honesty this cut is no surprise. The Chairman of the 
Interior Subcommittee has clearly stated his opposition to 
Federal ownership of land. But we do not believe that most 
Members of the House agree with that policy. We urge Members 
during the amendment process on the floor to reject the 
implicit policy of the bill as currently drafted that the 
Federal government largely abandon its efforts to preserve the 
great spaces of America for our children and our grandchildren.
     Forestry Legacy.--The retreat from preserving 
public land does not stop with our national parks and refuges. 
93 Members of the House wrote the Committee in support of the 
Forest Legacy program which helps States preserve forest lands 
threatened by development. These 93 Members asked for an 
increase from $68 million to $150 million. This bill instead 
funds Forest Legacy grants to States at $45 million, a level 
almost 30 percent lower than last year and $41 million below 
the president's budget.
     North American Wetlands Conservation Fund.--225 
Members of the House wrote this Committee and encouraged us to 
increase funding for the North American Wetlands Conservation 
program. In response the bill funds this small but important 
program at a level of $25 million, 35 percent below the current 
year and less than half of the president's request. Instead of 
increasing this program modestly as requested by 225 Members of 
both parties, the Committee bill cuts it by a third. This 
doesn't make any sense.
     Statewide assistance.--The National Park Service's 
Stateside assistance grants which support state recreation and 
conservation programs are funded at a level of $98 million, $63 
million below the president's request.
     Urban parks.--The urban parks program receives no 
funding despite requests by 104 Members that it be restored.
    The shortfalls in funding for conservation are displayed in 
more detail on the following table. This table shows all 
conservation funding in the bill based on the definitions 
established by the Committee in the FY 2001 Interior 
Appropriations Act. The first section of the table displays the 
subset of these programs which are financed from the Land and 
Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). This fund was created in 1964 
to channel receipts from the then newly authorized oil and gas 
leases on the Outer Continental Shelf into conservation 
programs with a guarantee that at least $900 million be spent 
each year on Federal land acquisition and state recreation and 
conservation assistance programs as defined in the 1964 Act. 
Because the LWCF programs have never been fully funded, the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund has accumulated an unexpended 
balance of $13.2 billion:

                                  CONSERVATION SPENDING--FY 2004 COMMITTEE BILL
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                          FY 2004      Cmmittee
 Subcategory/appropriation account    FY 2000      FY 2001      FY 2002      FY 2003     Committee      vs. 03
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 Lands and Water Conservation Fund

Federal Land Acquisition:
    BLM Federal Land Acquisition..       15,500       47,265       49,920       33,233       14,000      -19,233
    FWS Federal Land Acquisition..       50,513      121,188       99,135       72,893       23,058      -49,835
    NPS Federal Land Acquisition..       78,700      124,840      130,117       73,984       33,654      -40,330
    FS Federal land Acquisition...       79,835      150,872      149,742      132,945       29,288     -103,657
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Land            224,548      444,165      428,914      313,055      100,000     -213,055
       Acquisition................
NPS Stateside LWCF Grants.........       21,000       90,301      144,000       97,364       97,500          136
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal and State       245,548      534,466      572,914      410,419      197,500     -212,919
       LWCF.......................
                                   =============================================================================
   State and Other Conservation
             Programs

State Wildlife Grants.............            0       49,890       85,000       64,577       75,000       10,423
FWS Incentive Grant Programs......            0  ...........            0       39,740       40,000          260
FWS Stewardship Grants Program....            0  ...........            0        9,935       10,000           65
FWS Coop. Endangered Species             23,000      104,694       96,235       80,473       86,614        6,141
 Conserv. Fund....................
FWS North American Wetlands              14,957       39,912       43,500       38,309       24,560      -13,749
 Conserv. Fund....................
FWS Neotropical Migratory bird                0            0        3,000        2,981        5,000        2,019
 fund.............................
FWS Multinational species fund....        2,391        3,243        4,000        4,768        5,000          232
USGS State Planning Partnerships..       24,945       24,945       25,000       19,976       19,976            0
Cooperatrive Conservation Init.,
 BLM, FWS, NPS:
    BLM Challenge Cost Share......            0            0        4,968       13,882       16,882        3,000
    FWS Challenge Cost Share......            0            0        4,968        6,831        9,831        3,000
    NPS Challenge Cost Share......            0            0        6,980       11,902       14,902        3,000
FS, Forest Legacy.................       30,896       59,868       65,000       68,380       45,575      -22,805
FS, inventory and monitoring NFS..  ...........       19,956  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, State and Other          96,189      302,508      338,651      361,754      353,340       -8,414
       Conserv....................
                                   =============================================================================
  Urban and Historic Preservation
             Programs

NPS Historic Preservation Fund....       74,793       94,239       75,500       68,552       71,000        2,448
NPS Urban Parks & Recreation              2,000       29,934       30,000          298          305            7
 Recovery Grants..................
FS Urban and Community Forestry...       30,896       35,642       36,000       35,999       36,000            1
BLM Youth Conservation Corps......        1,000        1,000        1,000        1,000        1,000            0
FWS Youth Conservation Corps......        1,000        1,000        2,000        2,000        2,000            0
NPS Youth Conservation Corps......        2,000        2,000        2,000        2,000        2,000            0
FS Youth Conservation Corps.......        2,000        2,000        2,000        2,000        2,000            0
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Urban & Historic..      113,689      165,815      147,500      111,849      114,305        2,456
                                   =============================================================================
Payments in Lieu of Taxes--BLM      ...........       64,980       65,000       74,610       90,000       15,390
 Increase.........................
                                   =============================================================================
Federal Infrastructure Improvement
             Programs

BLM--Mgmt. of Lands & Resources               0       24,945       28,000       31,422       29,913       -1,509
 increase.........................
FWS--Resource Management increase.            0       24,945       29,000       45,542       52,664        7,122
NPS--Construction increase........            0       49,890       66,851       85,538       61,025      -22,513
FS--Capital Improvement and Maint.            0       49,890       61,000       79,882       91,905       12,023
 increase.........................
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fed.                          0      149,670      184,851      240,384      235,507       -4,877
       Infrastructure Improvement.
                                   =============================================================================
      Total, Conservation Spending      455,426    1,217,439    1,308,916    1,199,016      990,652     -208,364
       Category, comm.............
                                   =============================================================================
      Total, Conservation Spending  ...........    1,200,000    1,320,000    1,440,000    1,560,000  ...........
       Category authorization.....
      Committee vs. authorization.  ...........       17,439      -11,084     -240,984      569,348  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       FISCAL YEAR 2002 AND 2003 FIREFIGHTING FUNDING SHORTFALLS

    During Committee consideration of the bill, an amendment 
was offered by Mr. Dicks to add $550 million for the additional 
cost of fighting forest fires during the FY 2003 fire season. 
The Committee was informed by the U.S. Forest Service in early 
June that these costs would likely exceed currently available 
appropriations for firefighting by this amount, thus triggering 
another round of disruptive borrowing of funds from other 
Department of Interior and Forest Service programs. During the 
debate on the amendment, the Chairman of the Committee 
expressed support for the additional amounts in 2003 but asked 
that consideration be postponed until it could be considered in 
the context of a FY 2003 Supplemental. Given these assurances, 
the amendment was withdrawn but we wish to make clear that we 
consider enactment of this supplemental to be the highest 
priority in order to avoid another disastrous round of 
borrowing to pay emergency firefighting costs.

   SUPPORT OF THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENTS FOR THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES

    We are pleased that the Committee bill includes a $10 
million increase for the president's ``We the People'' 
initiative at the National Endowment for the Humanities to 
improve knowledge of U.S. history and civics. While not the 
full $25 million requested by the president, we appreciate that 
the Committee has chosen to begin this important educational 
effort and to provide the NEH with its largest increase in its 
history. At the same time, however, we were dismayed that the 
Committee failed to provide even a modest programmatic increase 
for the National Endowment for the Arts, despite roll call 
votes in the House on June 15, 2000, June 21, 2001, and July 
17, 2002 in favor of such increases. We believe that the NEA 
has implemented all of the reforms requested by the Congress, 
that its leadership is strong and responsible, and that the 
programs of the NEA are widely valued by the people of this 
country. There is no longer any excuse for keeping funding at 
the NEA at a level 30 percent below the FY 1994 level. We 
encourage Members to support efforts on the floor to provide a 
modest real increase for the NEA and to more adequately fund 
NEH's new ``We the People'' program.

                             WEATHERIZATION

    We have been pleased to see the president's leadership in 
making the Department of Energy's weatherization program a 
priority and for his commitment to increasing the program in 
each of the three budgets which he has presented to the 
Congress. His request to increase funding for weatherization in 
FY 2004 to $288 million from its current funding level of $223 
million would have permitted an additional 25,000 poor and 
elderly families to be served. It is estimated that each home 
weatherized will generate $275 in annual saving and $4,650 of 
life-cycle savings per household. These savings are critical 
for families living near or below the federal poverty level. 
Given these savings and given the strong support from the 
president, we do not understand why the Committee has chosen to 
fund this program at a level $63 million below the president's 
FY 2004 budget request.

                               CONCLUSION

    We believe that the shortfalls in funding which we have 
enumerated represented a serious retreat from the priorities 
which Congress has supported in the past and which in many 
cases the president has supported in his FY 2004 budget 
request. We do not have an easy answer for how to fix these 
problems, but we do not believe the bill as reported by the 
Appropriations Committee represents the true will of the House. 
During floor consideration of the Interior bill, we, as well as 
other Members of the House, expect to offer amendments to more 
adequately fund conservation programs, to increase support for 
the arts and the humanities and to assist more poor and elderly 
families with the weatherization program. The cost will be 
offset by an amendment offered unsuccessfully in Committee that 
would scale back the tax cut going to high-income individuals, 
those with adjusted gross income above $1 million, by $3,000 
per year. This means that the tax cut enacted earlier this year 
would be reduced from $88,000 to $85,000 for these very high-
income families. Surely this represents a reasonable 
realignment of priorities. We urge Members of both parties to 
think of your own values and those of your constituents when 
you consider these amendments. The House of Representatives is 
not a parliamentary system where Members are required to vote 
the party line. Each of us has our own election certificate and 
a duty to our own constituents which comes above party loyalty. 
We urge all Members to cast their votes based on what they 
truly see as the best interest of their constituents.

                                   Dave Obey.
                                   Norm Dicks.