H. Rept. 108-221 - 108th Congress (2003-2004)
July 21, 2003, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

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House Report 108-221 - DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, FISCAL YEAR 2004




[House Report 108-221]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



108th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    108-221
======================================================================
 
DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
             AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, FISCAL YEAR 2004

                                _______
                                

 July 21, 2003.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

            Mr. Wolf, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2799]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and 
State, the Judiciary, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2004.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page Number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of Justice.............................     2
                                                                      7
Title II--Department of Commerce and Related Agencies......    40
                                                                     63
        Office of the United States Trade Representative...    40
                                                                     63
        International Trade Commission.....................    40
                                                                     66
        Department of Commerce.............................    41
                                                                     66
Title III--The Judiciary...................................    59
                                                                    113
Title IV--Department of State and Related Agency...........    66
                                                                    120
        Department of State................................    66
                                                                    120
        Broadcasting Board of Governors....................    76
                                                                    141
Title V--Related Agencies..................................    79
                                                                    145
        Antitrust Modernization Commission.................    79
                                                                    145
        Commission for the Preservation of America's 
            Heritage Abroad................................    79
                                                                    145
        Commission on Civil Rights.........................    79
                                                                    145
        Commission on International Religious Freedom......    80
                                                                    146
        Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe...    80
                                                                    146
        Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's 
            Republic of China..............................    80
                                                                    146
        Equal Employment Opportunity Commission............    81
                                                                    147
        Federal Communications Commission..................    81
                                                                    147
        Federal Trade Commission...........................    83
                                                                    148
        Legal Services Corporation.........................    85
                                                                    150
        Marine Mammal Commission...........................    86
                                                                    150
        National Veterans Business Development Corporation.    86
                                                                    150
        Securities and Exchange Commission.................    86
                                                                    150
        Small Business Administration......................    88
                                                                    152
        State Justice Institute............................    92
                                                                    156
Title VI--General Provisions...............................    92
                                                                    156
Title VII--Rescissions.....................................   103
                                                                    159

                Summary of Estimates and Recommendations

    The Committee recommends a total of $37,914,000,000 in 
discretionary budget authority for the departments and agencies 
funded in this bill. The recommendation is $237,344,000 above 
the request and $700,252,000 above the amounts enacted for the 
current fiscal year. The Committee also recommends $648,536,000 
for mandatory programs funded within this bill.
    The following table provides a comparison of the new budget 
authority and outlays recommended in the accompanying bill with 
the amounts appropriated for fiscal year 2003, and the budget 
request for fiscal year 2004:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2004 recommendation
                                                                                           compared with
                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004    -------------------------------
                                      enacted         request       recommended       FY 2003         FY 2004
                                                                                      enacted         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary...................          37,214          37,677          37,914            +700            +237
Mandatory.......................             669             649             649             -20  ..............
                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total.....................          37,883          38,326          38,563            +680            +237
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Highlights of the Bill

    Major initiatives and highlights contained in the 
recommendation follow:

                                         TITLE I.--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2004 recommendation
                                                                                           compared with
                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004    -------------------------------
                                      enacted         request       recommended       FY 2003         FY 2004
                                                                                      enacted         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary \1\...............          19,429          18,807          19,957            +528          +1,149
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ FY 2003 Enacted amounts includes $479,442,000 in supplemental appropriations.

    --$20 billion in discretionary funding for the Department 
of Justice, $528 million above the fiscal year 2003 level and 
$1.2 billion above the President's request;
    --$424 million increase for the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation to fight terrorism, cybercrime, 
counterintelligence, and upgrade information technology 
systems;
    --$81 million increase for the Drug Enforcement 
Administration to maintain and enhance Federal law 
enforcement's ability to fight the war on drugs;
    --$3.5 billion to assist State and local law enforcement to 
fight crime, $1.16 billion above the request including: the 
Edward Byrne Memorial Formula program ($500 million), the Local 
Law Enforcement Block Grant program ($400 million), the State 
Criminal Alien Assistance Program ($400 million), juvenile 
justice and accountability programs ($462 million), law 
enforcement technologies ($100 million), the DNA backlog 
elimination program ($174 million), and violence against women 
prevention and prosecution programs ($387 million).

                             TITLE II.--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2004 recommendation
                                                                                           compared with
                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004    -------------------------------
                                      enacted         request       recommended       FY 2003         FY 2004
                                                                                      enacted         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary \1\...............           5,799           5,817           5,259            -540            -558
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ FY 2003 Enacted amount includes $68,300,000 in supplemental appropriations.

    --$319 million for the Economic Development Assistance 
programs;
    --$1.24 billion for the Patent and Trademark Office;
    --$494.17 million for the international trade agencies;
    --$3.055 billion for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration;
    --$786 million for the National Weather Service.

                                            TITLE III.--THE JUDICIARY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2004 recommendation
                                                                                           compared with
                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004    -------------------------------
                                      enacted         request       recommended       FY 2003         FY 2004
                                                                                      enacted         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary \1\...............           4,585           5,121           4,885            +300            -236
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ FY 2003 Enacted amount includes $2,558,000 in supplemental appropriations.

    --$4 billion for the on-going activities of the Federal 
courts and probation and pretrial services offices, an increase 
of $227 million above the fiscal year 2003 level and $184 
million below the request;
    --an increase of $80 million for Defender Services for 
workload increases;
    --an increase of $22 million for Court Security 
requirements;
    --$10.6 million for the continuation of the Supreme Court 
building renovation.

                                TITLE IV.--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2004 recommendation
                                                                                           compared with
                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004    -------------------------------
                                      enacted         request       recommended       FY 2003         FY 2004
                                                                                      enacted         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary \1\...............           8,040           8,509           8,286            +246            -223
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ FY 2003 Enacted amount includes $328,420,000 in supplemental appropriations.

    --Provides an 8.7 percent increase over fiscal year 2003 
for the basic operations of the Department;
    --provides the third consecutive year of significant 
staffing increases, including funding to support the creation 
of 601 new positions Department-wide to improve diplomatic 
security, border security, and diplomatic readiness;
    --provides over $1.5 billion for embassy security programs, 
an increase of $209 million over fiscal year 2003. This 
increase includes 85 new diplomatic security personnel and $120 
million for the first year costs of a capital security cost 
share program which will result in acceleration of the program 
to construct secure replacement facilities for American 
personnel serving overseas;
    --includes $1.01 billion to fully cover anticipated 
assessments for U.S. membership in the United Nations and other 
international organizations, including an increase of $71 
million for costs associated with United States accession to 
the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization;
    --includes $550 million for contributions for international 
peacekeeping activities, the full amount requested; and
    --includes $563.5 million for international broadcasting, 
including increases for radio and television broadcasting to 
the Middle East, the full amount requested.

                                           TITLE V.--RELATED AGENCIES
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2004 recommendation
                                                                                           compared with
                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004    -------------------------------
                                      enacted         request       recommended       FY 2003         FY 2004
                                                                                      enacted         request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary \1\...............           2,153           2,416           2,237             +83            -180
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ FY 2003 Enacted amount includes $26,000,000 in supplemental appropriations.

    --$183 million for the Federal Trade Commission including 
full funding for the National Do-Not-Call program;
    --$842 million in total budget authority for the Securities 
and Exchange Commission to protect investors and combat 
corporate fraud.

                              Right-Sizing

    The Committee strongly supports interagency efforts to 
right-size the overseas presence of the United States 
Government. The Committee understands the definition of right-
sizing to be the systematic and thorough review of all overseas 
missions and staffing levels and the reallocation of resources 
to achieve a leaner, streamlined, more agile, and more secure 
U.S. Government presence abroad. The Committee expects agencies 
funded in this bill to cooperate fully with all interagency 
efforts to achieve effective right-sizing.
    The 1998 terrorist attacks on two U.S. Embassies in Africa 
highlighted security deficiencies in diplomatic facilities. The 
recent bombings in Saudi Arabia, the assassination of a U.S. 
AID employee in Jordan, and the recent closure of the U.S. 
Embassy in Kenya underscore continued threats against U.S. 
personnel overseas. The attacks on the American Embassies in 
Africa prompted the creation of the Overseas Presence Advisory 
Panel, which proposed significant recommendations regarding 
right-sizing that have subsequently been embraced by this 
Committee, and included in the President's Management Agenda. 
In addition, the General Accounting Office (GAO) has studied 
right-sizing the Nation's overseas presence. The GAO reports 
found that U.S. agencies' staffing projections for new embassy 
compounds are developed without a systematic approach or 
comprehensive right-sizing analysis. In response, the GAO 
developed a framework of questions designed to link staffing 
levels to three critical elements of overseas diplomatic 
operations (1) physical/technical security of facilities and 
employees; (2) mission priorities and requirements; and (3) 
cost of operations. In light of continuing security 
vulnerability, the Committee intends to ensure that such a 
framework is established and followed.
    The Committee expects that the fiscal year 2005 budget 
request will reflect the application of a right-sizing 
methodology. Increases or expansions should be justified in 
terms of mission priorities both within the agency, and within 
the specific diplomatic mission, and should be, to the maximum 
extent possible, accompanied by offsetting decreases to 
maximize the allocation of scarce resources to emerging 
priorities. A proper plan should include a systematic analysis 
to bring about a reconfiguration of overseas staffing to the 
minimum level necessary to meet critical U.S. foreign policy 
goals. The Committee expects to receive this additional 
analysis prior to the establishment or expansion of any 
activities beyond those currently approved.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    The House and Senate reports accompanying the 
appropriations bills for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the Judiciary, and the Related Agencies for several 
years have contained language concerning the reprogramming of 
funds between programs and activities. This matter is addressed 
in section 605 of the General Provisions contained in the 
accompanying bill.
    The Committee expects each department and agency to follow 
closely the reprogramming procedures listed below, which are 
identical to provisions that applied in statute during fiscal 
year 2003. These procedures apply to funds provided under this 
Act, or provided under previous Appropriations Acts that remain 
available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal year 2004, or 
provided from any accounts in the Treasury available to the 
agencies funded by this Act.
    The Committee expects that the Chairman of the 
Appropriations Subcommittee on the Departments of Commerce, 
Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies will be 
notified by letter a minimum of 15 days prior to--
    (1) Reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or temporary, 
in excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, between 
programs or activities. This provision is also applicable in 
cases where several activities are involved with each receiving 
less than $500,000. In addition, the Committee is to be 
notified of reprogramming actions which are less than these 
amounts if such actions would have the effect of committing the 
agency to significant funding requirements in future years.
    (2) Increasing funds or personnel by any means for any 
project or activity for which funds have been denied or 
restricted.
    (3) Creating new programs, offices, agencies or commissions 
or substantially augmenting existing programs, offices, 
agencies or commissions.
    (4) Relocating offices or employees.
    (5) Reorganizing offices, programs, or activities.
    In addition, the Committee expects any department or agency 
funded in the accompanying bill that is planning to conduct a 
reduction-in-force to notify the Committee by letter 30 days in 
advance of the date of the proposed personnel action.
    The Committee also expects that any items that are subject 
to interpretation will be reported.
    The Committee is concerned that, in some instances, the 
departments or agencies funded within this Appropriations Act 
are not adhering to the Committee's reprogramming policy and 
procedures that are set forth in this report and in section 605 
of the accompanying bill. The Committee expects that each 
department and agency funded in the bill will follow these 
notification policies precisely and will not reallocate 
resources or reorganize activities prior to submitting the 
required notifications to the Committee. The Committee has 
provided each of the departments, the Judiciary, and the Small 
Business Administration with transfer authority, which is the 
same as the transfer authority provided in the fiscal year 2003 
Appropriations Act. The Committee believes such authority, 
together with the traditional reprogramming policy, gives each 
department, the Judiciary, and the Small Business 
Administration the needed flexibility to respond to 
unanticipated circumstances and requirements, which may arise 
throughout the fiscal year.

           Relationship With Budget and Comptroller's Offices

    Through the years the Appropriations Committee has 
channeled most of its inquiries and requests for information 
and assistance through the budget offices or comptroller 
organizations of the various departments, agencies, and 
commissions and the Judiciary. The Committee has often pointed 
out the natural affinity and relationship between these 
organizations and the Appropriations Committee that makes such 
a relationship imperative. The Committee reiterates its 
position that, while it reserves the right to call upon all 
organizations in the departments, agencies, and commissions and 
the Judiciary for information and assistance, the primary 
contact between the Committee and these entities must be 
through the budget offices and comptroller organizations. The 
Committee reserves the right to call upon all organizations 
throughout the agencies.
    The workload generated in the budget process is large and 
growing, and, therefore, a positive, responsive relationship 
between the Committee and the budget and/or comptroller offices 
is absolutely essential to the appropriations process to ensure 
that the information needs of the Committee are met in order to 
fulfill the Constitutional responsibilities of the Congress.

                Full Compliance With Telework Directive

    Advances in information and computer technology, the 
development of the Internet, and the growth of wireless and 
digital products have given some Federal employees the ability 
to telework--or work anytime from almost any place. Management 
considerations, such as productive and satisfied workers; 
environmental considerations, such as reduced traffic 
congestion and improved air quality; and quality of life 
considerations, such as accommodating the short- or long-term 
health needs of employees, require the establishment of 
telework programs.
    Policies on telework continue to evolve. Among the factors 
that contribute to successful programs are top management 
support and a clear telework agreement that includes 
expectations with measurable goals, accountability, and 
performance results. The Committee is committed to telework 
programs in the Federal government and is impressed by the 
efforts of some of the agencies under its jurisdiction. For 
example, nearly 2,000 employees at the U.S. Patent and 
Trademark Office now experience the benefits of telecommuting, 
representing about twenty-five percent of the total employees. 
However, full implementation of telecommuting policies remains 
to be achieved.
    The fiscal year 2004 Appropriations Act for the Departments 
of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary and Related 
Agencies includes a provision requiring that the Departments of 
Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and the Small 
Business Administration establish policies under which eligible 
employees can telecommute to the maximum extent possible 
without diminished performance. Within six months of enactment, 
these entities should ensure that telework policies are in 
place for 100 percent of the workforce. The Committee expects 
the departments, the Judiciary, and the Small Business 
Administration to be in full compliance with this timetable. In 
addition, an amount is designated for the departments, the 
Judiciary, and the Small Business Administration to implement 
telework policies, and these agencies should report to the 
Committee on the activities undertaken with these funds. 
Language is repeated from fiscal year 2003 requiring agencies 
to designate a Telework Coordinator, as some agencies have yet 
to comply with this requirement.

                     TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    In response to the September 11th terrorist attacks, the 
Congress has provided the Department of Justice with 
supplemental appropriations in fiscal years 2001, 2002, and 
2003 totaling $2,780,287,000. Despite severe funding 
limitations faced by the Committee in fiscal year 2004, the 
recommendation for the Justice Department reflects the 
overriding priority of the Committee to ensure that law 
enforcement at all levels has the latest technology, training, 
and equipment needed to fight traditional crimes and address 
the continuing threat of terrorism. The recommendation reflects 
the Committee's strong commitment to combating terrorism, 
espionage, cybercrime, violent crime, illegal drugs, and 
corporate fraud.
    The recommendation reflects the creation of the Department 
of Homeland Security and the corresponding reorganization of 
the Committee to create a new Homeland Security Subcommittee. 
Therefore, the Department of Justice recommendation no longer 
includes funding for the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, the National Infrastructure Protection Center, or 
first responder equipment, training and exercise grants. The 
recommendation provides funding for the Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which was formerly part of 
the Department of Treasury.
    The Committee recommends $20,153,758,000 in new budget 
authority in the accompanying bill for the Department of 
Justice for fiscal year 2004. This amount is $1,149,149,000 
above the budget request and is $506,207,000 above the FY 2003 
enacted level, excluding supplemental amounts.
    Of the total amount provided, $19,956,559,000 is derived 
from general purpose discretionary funds and $197,199,000 is 
scored as mandatory spending.
    For fiscal year 2004, increases of $423,596,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level, excluding supplemental amounts, are 
recommended to ensure that the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
(FBI) has the necessary resources to address national security 
threats, fight violent crime and white collar crime, and 
maintain progress on investments in information technology 
infrastructure.
    During fiscal year 2002, the Committee approved the FBI's 
restructuring plan which shifted the FBI's primary focus from 
crime investigations to preventing acts of terrorism. As part 
of this reorganization, the FBI reallocated some 567 FBI agents 
away from drug investigations, enabling them to focus on 
counterterrorism activities. To ensure that the Federal 
government can continue to fight drug-related crime, the 
Committee recommends increases totaling $50,554,000 for the 
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and recommends merging 
the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force program 
with the DEA and increasing program funding $14,621,000 above 
the request. The Committee believes that this consolidation of 
drug enforcement resources will enable the DEA to more 
effectively coordinate and target investigations and 
operations.
    In addition to providing increases for Federal law 
enforcement, the recommendation includes $3.5 billion to assist 
State and local law enforcement in fighting crime. This level 
is $1.2 billion above the request and includes funding for the 
Edward Byrne Memorial Formula program ($500 million), the Local 
Law Enforcement Block Grant program ($400 million), the State 
Criminal Alien Assistance Program ($400 million), juvenile 
justice and accountability programs ($462 million), law 
enforcement technologies ($100 million), the DNA backlog 
elimination program ($174 million), and violence against women 
prevention and prosecution programs ($387 million).

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends a total of $106,664,000 for 
General Administration for fiscal year 2004. This amount is 
$16,187,000 above the level provided in fiscal year 2003, 
excluding supplemental amounts, and $27,108,000 below the 
request.
    This account supports the development of policy objectives 
and the overall management of the Department of Justice. The 
recommendation provides inflationary adjustments to maintain 
the current operating level in fiscal year 2004, and includes 
an increase of $7,000,000 for the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer (CIO) to implement information security 
upgrades. The Committee remains concerned that several 
information technology programs are occurring throughout the 
Justice Department with little or no coordination, including 
LEO, RISS and the FBI's Operation Gateway. Toward that end, the 
Committee directs the Justice Management Division (JMD) to 
provide a report to the Committee by January 2, 2004, that 
catalogs all existing and planned information sharing projects. 
The Committee reminds the Justice Department that all 
information technology reprogrammings must be certified by the 
Department's CIO to ensure coordination of resources.
    The recommendation also includes an increase of $6,517,000 
for ongoing improvements to physical security at the RFK 
Justice Building. This funding is in addition to fiscal year 
2003 funding of $7,917,611 provided for contract guard costs, 
backup power supplies, and other building safety needs. The 
Committee has yet to receive the Justice Department's 
comprehensive security assessment.
    The Committee provided funding above the request to the 
Justice Department and other agencies within this bill in 
fiscal year 2003 to aggressively investigate and prosecute 
corporate fraud. The Justice Department is directed to submit a 
report by December 15, 2003, in consultation with the 
Securities and Exchange Commission, providing a status of joint 
efforts to combat corporate corruption.
    The Committee remains concerned with possible illegal 
activity associated with gambling casinos on Native American 
reservations, and directs the Justice Department to submit a 
report to the Committee by October 12, 2003 describing all 
ongoing Justice Department efforts with regard to this issue.
    The Committee continues to strongly support the 
counterterrorism efforts of the Department. In the aftermath of 
September 11th, the Congress has provided significant 
additional resources and broad new legal authorities to the 
Justice Department. However, the Committee is sensitive to 
concerns that this enhanced capability may potentially impinge 
on individual civil liberties. To ensure the continued 
effectiveness and efficiency of the Department's 
counterterrorism and law enforcement efforts, the Committee 
directs the Justice Department to designate a senior policy 
official to assume responsibility for developing appropriate 
civil rights safeguards specifically related to the war on 
terrorism and for coordinating the work of the Office of 
Inspector General, the Civil Rights Division, the U.S. 
Attorneys, and the various other Justice Department entities to 
ensure effective oversight of Departmental activities in this 
area. The Department is directed to consult with the Committee 
prior to beginning this effort.
    The Committee urges the Attorney General to posthumously 
award the Public Safety Officers Medal of Valor to the 414 
public safety officers who perished on September 11, 2001, as 
described in House Concurrent Resolution 243.
    The Committee directs JMD to conduct a comprehensive review 
of all training programs provided to State and local law 
enforcement. This review, to be submitted by February 4, 2004, 
shall include brief descriptions of the training offered, 
number of participants, costs to provide this training, and the 
benefits of such activities.
    The Committee expects the Department to use up to 
$15,000,000, to be derived from a transfer of retained earnings 
from the Working Capital Fund, to continue planning and 
implementing the Department's core financial management system. 
The Committee is concerned with the significant costs of this 
system, and directs the Justice Department to submit a report 
on the Financial Management System by December 8, 2003, to 
include milestones for migrating existing systems, component 
migration costs, and expected ongoing operations and 
maintenance costs. The Committee expects the Justice Department 
to comply with Section 605 requirements regarding this 
initiative.
    Consistent with direction included in the fiscal year 2003 
Appropriations Act, the recommendation includes necessary sums 
to continue efforts to replace locks used to store classified 
information.
    The Committee again reminds the Department and its 
components that the use of recoveries is subject to the 
requirements included in section 605 of this Act.
    The recommendation retains bill language proposed for 
deletion regarding the position and workyear limits for the 
Offices of Public Affairs and Legislative Affairs. The 
recommendation retains bill language, carried in previous 
years, which (1) makes up to $3,317,000 of this appropriation 
available until expended for Departmental building, renovation, 
maintenance, and security needs; (2) specifies the amount of 
funding provided for the Department Leadership Program; and (3) 
authorizes the Attorney General to transfer property to State 
or local government agencies to support community-based health 
and safety programs.

                   IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

    The Committee recommends a total of $20,677,000 for fiscal 
year 2004 to provide for the continued deployment of a Joint 
Automated Booking System (JABS) and for the planning, 
development, and deployment of an integrated fingerprint 
identification system. This amount is $20,677,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and $13,400,000 below the request. In 
fiscal year 2003, these programs were funded under separate 
headings.
    This funding level includes $15,577,000 for the continued 
operation of JABS, which enables Department of Justice law 
enforcement components to electronically share criminal arrest 
data, improves criminal identification response times and 
avoids duplication of booking data entry.
    The recommendation also includes $5,100,000 for continued 
integration of the FBI Automated Biometric Identification 
System (IAFIS) with other fingerprint identification systems 
now resident at the Department of Homeland Security.
    The Committee directs the Justice Department to develop and 
implement a memorandum of understanding, including cost-sharing 
agreements, with the Department of Homeland Security to ensure 
continued collaboration on these initiatives.
    The Committee includes requested bill language establishing 
this new account, modifies language from the request regarding 
availability of funds, and does not include requested bill 
language regarding funding for planning and management 
activities.

                   LEGAL ACTIVITIES OFFICE AUTOMATION

    The Committee recommends $30,136,000 in direct 
appropriations for Legal Activities Office Automation (LAOA) 
for fiscal year 2004, which is $3,104,000 below the request and 
$14,298,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2003. In 
addition, the Committee recommendation includes $33,000,000 to 
be derived from a transfer from the Working Capital Fund, for a 
total of $63,136,000 to be available for these activities. The 
recommendation places this funding under the ``General 
Administration'' sub-heading instead of under ``Legal 
Activities'' as requested.
    Last year the Committee directed that the Bureau of Prisons 
and the Office Of Justice Programs begin efforts to migrate 
onto this network. The Committee expects the Justice Department 
to include with the submission of the fiscal year 2005 budget 
request complete details regarding costs and implementation 
milestones to complete convergence of these two components into 
the LAOA system. This report should also include an expected 
final implementation date, and estimates for ongoing operations 
and maintenance costs for all components on the system.

                       NARROWBAND COMMUNICATIONS

    The Committee recommends $103,171,000 for Narrowband 
Communications for fiscal year 2004, which is $39,235,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 level and $36,912,000 below the request. 
The Committee notes that $88,446,000 remains unobligated in 
this account from prior year appropriations and that funds for 
new and replacement radios and related costs are also provided 
in the modular costs allotted to each of the law enforcement 
components. Language carried in previous Appropriations Acts is 
continued directing the Attorney General to transfer this 
component funding to the narrowband account. The Justice 
Department shall notify the Committee upon transfer of this 
funding.
    In a June 10, 2003, report to the Committee, the Justice 
Department reported high cost estimates to implement 
conversion. The Committee does not anticipate that such amounts 
will be available to the Justice Department and directs that 
program requirements be reestimated. This report also briefly 
described the Seattle/Blaine, Utah/Idaho and San Diego pilots, 
which have successfully proven the advantages of narrowbanding 
and employing a common infrastructure. The Committee expects to 
continue to receive regular updates on these pilots and on 
efforts to ensure collaboration with other Federal law 
enforcement components which also employ wireless 
communications. The Committee expects the Department to ensure 
that Justice law enforcement components will be compatible with 
other non-Justice law enforcement components and with other 
non-Federal law enforcement partners. The Committee is aware 
that Project Safecom is now managed by the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS), and expects the Justice Department to 
consult with DHS on this effort.
    The Committee is concerned that the Justice Wireless 
Management Office has shifted its focus from deploying 
interoperable radios for Justice and other Federal law 
enforcement officers to developing other forms of interoperable 
communication systems. The Committee reminds the Justice 
Department that its goal is to ensure that Federal law 
enforcement officers can effectively communicate via radio, and 
that the Justice Department meets National Telecommunications 
and Information Act conversion requirements.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue 
implementation of a consolidated, interagency Justice Wireless 
Network (JWN) to meet component needs and improve wireless 
capabilities, as such an approach will enhance interoperability 
and reduce costs associated with narrowband conversion. Amounts 
provided will be used to continue implementation of the JWN, 
operate and maintain legacy systems, expand the use of 
commercial services, and support the Wireless Management 
Office. The Committee continues to expect the Department to 
accommodate narrowband requirements without significant 
additional new resources. The Committee directs the Wireless 
Management Office to continue to submit status reports to the 
Committee as directed in Public Law 106-553, to include an 
operational plan for expenditure of funds.
    The Committee recommends bill language, as carried in 
previous years, regarding the costs of conversion to narrowband 
communications, the costs of operating and maintaining land 
mobile radio legacy systems, and directing transfer of 
component radio funding to this account.

                         COUNTERTERRORISM FUND

    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the 
Counterterrorism Fund to cover the extraordinary costs 
associated with a terrorist threat or incident. This amount is 
$7,000 above the level provided in fiscal year 2003, excluding 
supplemental amounts, and is $1,000,000 above the request. The 
recommendation, when combined with current unobligated balances 
and recoveries of $50,274,000 and $20,000,000 provided in 
Public Law 108-11, will result in a total of up to $71,274,000 
available in the Fund for fiscal year 2004.
    The Counterterrorism Fund was established in the 1995 
Supplemental Appropriations Act after the bombing of the Alfred 
P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City and is under the 
control and direction of the Attorney General. These funds may 
be used to reimburse any Department of Justice organization for 
costs incurred from the reestablishment of an office or 
facility damaged or destroyed as a result of a domestic or 
international terrorist incident, and to cover extraordinary 
expenses necessary to counter, investigate, or prosecute 
domestic or international terrorism activities. The Attorney 
General is required to notify the Committees on Appropriations 
of the House of Representatives and the Senate in accordance 
with section 605 of this Act prior to obligation of any funds 
from this account.
    The Committee recommends bill language, carried in previous 
Appropriations Acts, which makes funds available: (1) for costs 
incurred in reestablishing the operational capacity of an 
office or facility damaged or destroyed by a terrorist 
incident; and (2) for support to counter, investigate, or 
prosecute terrorism, including payments of rewards and 
detention costs in connection with these activities.

                   ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS

    The Committee recommends $193,530,000 for Administrative 
Review and Appeals for fiscal year 2004, which is an increase 
of $3,240,000 above fiscal year 2003 and $3,890,000 below the 
request. Of the total amount provided, $191,493,000 is for the 
Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR) and $2,037,000 is 
for the Office of the Pardon Attorney. The recommendation fully 
funds base adjustments and includes requested reductions for 
efficiencies realized as a result of changes to the Board of 
Immigration Appeals process.
    This appropriation supports the EOIR, which includes the 
Board of Immigration Appeals, Immigration Judges, and 
Administrative Law Judges who decide through administrative 
hearings on the admission or exclusion of aliens seeking to 
enter the country, and the transportation and adjustment of 
status of aliens whose status has been challenged; and the 
Office of the Pardon Attorney, which receives, investigates and 
considers petitions for all forms of Executive clemency.

                           DETENTION TRUSTEE

    The Committee recommends $810,125,000 for the Federal 
Detention Trustee for fiscal year 2004, which is $41,547,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2003, excluding 
supplemental amounts, and is the same as the request. The 
recommendation includes an increase of $39,734,000 for 
prisoners in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service.
    The Committee provided $40,000,000 in fiscal year 2003 
supplemental appropriations to the Detention Trustee for 
additional requirements and approved several reprogrammings 
during fiscal year 2003. Recently, the Committee was advised by 
the Justice Department that the fiscal year 2004 funding 
request for this account is not sufficient to cover estimated 
expenses, but understands that no budget amendment will be 
submitted. Therefore, the Committee expects that at least 
$8,613,000 in recoveries in the Federal Prisoner Detention 
account will be transferred to the Detention Trustee account to 
address this anticipated shortfall.
    The Committee created the Detention Trustee to improve the 
management of prisoners in the custody of the Justice 
Department. However, the Committee is concerned that the 
Detention Trustee does not have a sound methodology to 
anticipate detention needs and costs. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Detention Trustee to establish a task force, to 
meet quarterly, to share arrest, prosecution and sentencing 
information to better forecast needs. This task force should, 
at a minimum, include a representative from the Justice 
Management Division, the U.S. Marshals, the Executive Office of 
the U.S. Attorneys, the Administrative Office of the U.S. 
Courts, and the Department of Homeland Security. This task 
force should also include a representative from the Bureau of 
Prisons who has expertise in developing bed space needs. The 
Detention Trustee is directed to report to the Committee no 
later than 30 days after enactment of this Act regarding 
establishment of this task force. As part of this effort, the 
Detention Trustee is directed to develop a memorandum of 
understanding with the Department of Homeland Security to 
contract on a reimbursable basis for the detention needs of 
their law enforcement components.
    The Committee is further dismayed that the Detention 
Trustee is attempting to address detention needs by contracting 
to construct a facility. The Committee never intended for the 
Detention Trustee to build a facility or to contract with 
another entity to construct a facility. The fiscal year 2003 
Appropriations Act language under this heading does not include 
construction as an allowable use of funds. Rather, the 
Detention Trustee was and is directed to utilize existing 
State, local, and private detention space to meet detention 
needs. This language is continued in the fiscal year 2004 
recommendation. If additional prisons are required to be 
constructed, then the Bureau of Prisons should request 
additional funding.
    The Committee (1) modifies language carried in previous 
Appropriations Acts regarding participating components; (2) 
retains language carried in previous years regarding the 
authorities of the Detention Trustee; and (3) provides that 
unobligated balances available in prior years from funds 
appropriated to the Federal Prisoner Detention account be 
transferred to the Detention Trustee account.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $56,245,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, which is $4,646,000 above the fiscal year 
2003 level, excluding supplemental amounts, and $5,784,000 
below the request. This amount fully funds base requirements. 
The Committee provided $2,500,000 in fiscal year 2003 
supplemental appropriations to allow the Inspector General to 
provide appropriate oversight of ongoing law enforcement 
efforts against terrorism. The Committee directs the Office of 
Inspector General to report to the Committee by January 2, 
2004, regarding efforts of the Justice Department to implement 
recommendations from the report on September 11th detainees.
    The Office of Inspector General conducts and supervises 
audits and investigations relating to the programs and 
operations of the Department of Justice. The Inspector General 
keeps the Attorney General and the Congress informed about 
problems and deficiencies relating to the administration of 
such programs and activities.
    The recommendation includes bill language to provide up to 
$10,000 to meet unforeseen emergencies, and deletes language as 
requested regarding the acquisition and operation of motor 
vehicles. These authorities are now provided in Public Law 107-
273.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $10,609,000 for the United States 
Parole Commission for fiscal year 2004, which is $189,000 above 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2003 and $442,000 below the 
request.
    The Commission is an independent body within the Department 
of Justice that makes decisions regarding requests for parole 
and supervision of Federal and District of Columbia (D.C.) Code 
prisoners. As a result of legislation that established 
sentencing guidelines, the Parole Commission is phasing down 
its Federal operations. In August 1998, the Commission assumed 
jurisdiction over D.C. felony prisoners and D.C. Code parolees. 
When the D.C. Board of Parole ceased to exist, the Commission 
inherited a parole revocation caseload with a significant 
backlog of warrant requests and revocation hearings. Public Law 
107-273 directed the Attorney General to submit a study 
presenting options for transferring the Commission to another 
entity outside the Justice Department. The Commission is 
directed to submit this report to the Committee as 
expeditiously as possible.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends a total of $620,533,000 for 
General Legal Activities for fiscal year 2004, which is 
$13,182,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2003 and 
$44,813,000 below the request.
    This appropriation supports the Attorney General through 
the establishment of litigation policy, conduct of litigation, 
and various other legal responsibilities. The recommendation 
provides for inflationary and other adjustments to base 
totaling $13,573,000. The distribution of funding provided is 
as follows:

                        GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               2004
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Solicitor General.......................................           7,973
Tax Division............................................          77,141
Criminal Division.......................................         133,636
Civil Division..........................................         199,665
Environment and Natural Resources Division..............          76,556
Office of Legal Counsel.................................           5,679
Civil Rights Division...................................         110,000
Interpol-USNCB..........................................           9,524
Office of Dispute Resolution............................             359
                                                         ---------------
      Total.............................................         620,533
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Criminal Division.--The recommendation provides a total of 
$133,636,000, 801 positions and 813 workyears for the Criminal 
Division, including requested adjustments to base of 
$5,951,000, to address cyber-terrorism, foreign legal 
assistance, foreign counterintelligence, and white collar 
crime. The Committee expects the Criminal Division to continue 
to aggressively prosecute cases of corporate corruption, and as 
noted elsewhere in this report, Justice is directed to submit a 
report to the Committee by December 15, 2003, regarding efforts 
to combat corporate fraud.
    Civil Division.--The recommendation provides a total of 
$199,665,000, 1,072 positions and 1,085 workyears for the Civil 
Division. This amount includes an increase of $2,671,000 for 
needs associated with increased immigration-related litigation.
    The Committee requests that the Office of the Special 
Master and the Civil Division submit a report to the Committee 
by October 6, 2003, regarding the status of awards provided 
from the September 11th Victims Compensation Fund, and 
estimates on when all of the claims will be settled.
    Radiation Exposure Compensation Fund Administration.--The 
recommended level for the Civil Division also includes an 
increase of $1,000,000, as requested, in addition to base funds 
of $1,996,000, to administer awards under the Radiation 
Exposure Compensation Act of 1990 to address a nearly five-fold 
increase in claims as a result of amendments enacted in 2000. 
This program was established to permit the payment of claims to 
individuals exposed to radiation as a result of atmospheric 
nuclear tests and uranium mining. The Committee expects the 
Civil Division to absorb any additional requirements for 
processing RECA claims from other resources available to the 
Civil Division.
    The Committee recommends bill language carried in previous 
Appropriations Acts allowing the Attorney General to provide 
additional resources to the Civil Division, if emergent 
circumstances warrant, through transfers of funds from other 
Department of Justice sources, subject to the requirements of 
section 605 of this Act. The Committee expects the Justice 
Department to submit a reprogramming for costs associated with 
continuing tobacco and other litigation activities, should 
funding be warranted.
    Civil Rights Division.--The recommendation includes a total 
of $110,000,000, 753 positions and 755 workyears for fiscal 
year 2004. This amount is $5,584,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2003 and $310,000 above the request for the 
Civil Rights Division to enforce voting rights, disability 
rights, and other civil rights policies.
    Trafficking.--An estimated 1 to 2 million people are 
trafficked worldwide each year, with women and children making 
up at least 700,000 of this total. It is estimated that 50,000 
of these women and children are trafficked into the United 
States annually by crime rings and loosely connected criminal 
networks. The Committee expects the Justice Department to 
continue coordination efforts with the State Department to 
investigate and prosecute these crimes. The Committee is 
concerned that State and local law enforcement are not aware of 
the Federal resources available to them with regard to working 
with victims of trafficking, and expects the Civil Rights 
Division to coordinate activities with the Violence Against 
Women Office and the Office of Victims of Crime. The Committee 
expects the Justice Department to continue submitting yearly 
updates regarding efforts to investigate and prosecute 
trafficking.
    Interpol.--The recommendation provides $9,524,000 for 
Interpol-U.S. National Central Bureau (USNCB), which includes 
$922,000 for increased Interpol dues. The USNCB is directed to 
submit a report to the Committee by September 8, 2003, fully 
describing its activities over the last three years and its 
coordination efforts with the FBI Legal Attaches and other 
Federal, State, and local law enforcement entities.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous fiscal years, which: (1) allows up to 
$20,000 for expenses of collecting evidence; (2) makes up to 
$10,000,000 for litigation support contracts available until 
expended; (3) makes up to $1,000 available to Interpol-USNCB 
for reception and representation expenses; and (4) allows the 
Attorney General to transfer funds to address emergent 
circumstances in the Civil Division. The recommendation does 
not include requested bill language making a portion of funds 
for certain activities available until expended.

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

    The Committee recommends a reimbursement of $4,028,000 for 
fiscal year 2004 from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust 
Fund to cover the Department of Justice's expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986. This represents the full amount requested 
and is $26,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2003.

               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

    The Committee recommendation includes $128,133,000 in 
budget authority for the Antitrust Division, which is 
$13,765,000 below the request and $5,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2003 appropriation. This appropriation is offset by 
$112,000,000 in pre-merger filing fee collections, resulting in 
a direct appropriation of $16,133,000.
    This Division acts on antitrust cases before the Supreme 
Court, represents the interests of the United States in cases 
brought under Federal antitrust laws, reviews decisions of 
regulatory commissions, and prepares and files amicus briefs. 
Appropriations for both the Division and the Federal Trade 
Commission are offset by Hart-Scott-Rodino Act pre-merger 
filing fee collections.
    The Committee understands that due to changes in the Hart-
Scott-Rodino fee structure and a reduction in merger activity, 
the number of pre-merger filings requiring review has declined 
by 76 percent between fiscal year 2000 and fiscal year 2002. 
The Committee further understands that as a result of this 
decline in workload, the Antitrust Division has not filled all 
of its authorized positions. The Committee commends the 
Antitrust Division for adjusting its staffing to reflect the 
level of merger activity.
    While the recommendation is $5,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2003 level, it will allow the Antitrust Division to 
increase on-board staff by approximately 45 positions, funded 
for half of the fiscal year, should merger activity increase 
during fiscal year 2004.
    The recommendation includes bill language that prohibits 
Antitrust Division staff from accepting payment from certain 
non-Federal sources to attend conventions, conferences, and 
meetings. The Committee recommends a funding level that is 
sufficient to complete mission-critical travel.
    The recommendation includes bill language for the Division, 
carried in previous years, that allows fees to be credited to 
this account and reduces appropriated funds as fees are 
collected. The recommendation also includes new bill language 
making funds available until expended.

             SALARIES AND EXPENSES, UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

    The Committee recommends a total of $1,526,253,000, 10,113 
positions and 10,298 work years for the U.S. Attorneys, which 
is $32,260,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level and $30,531,000 
below the request. The recommendation includes a total of 
$48,732,000 for pay and inflationary adjustments as requested. 
This appropriation supports the Executive Office of U.S. 
Attorneys and the 94 U.S. Attorney Offices, which serve as the 
principal litigators for the U.S. Government for criminal, 
civil, and debt collection matters.
    U.S. Attorneys Anti-Terrorism Task Forces.--The Committee 
continues to support efforts to combat domestic terrorism. Last 
year, the Committee directed that the FBI's Joint Terrorism 
Task Forces (JTTFs) play the lead role in coordinating multi-
agency counterterrorism efforts, and that the U.S. Attorneys 
should continue to participate in the JTTFs. JTTFs were 
established in 1980 and have since grown to be active in each 
of the 56 FBI field offices and include representatives of 
local, State, and Federal law enforcement, including U.S. 
Attorneys, as well as other relevant participants from each 
community. The Committee continues to believe that the U.S. 
Attorneys should continue to participate in these Task Forces 
rather than maintain a separate set of U.S. Attorney task 
forces. The Committee expects the Justice Department to ensure 
collaboration via the existing 66 JTTFs and the National Joint 
Terrorism Task Force.
    Cybercrime and Intellectual Property Enforcement.--Twenty-
five percent of the software produced in the United States has 
been copied illegally in violation of U.S. copyright laws. 
Other industries have suffered from similarly high rates of 
counterfeiting, including pharmaceuticals, videos, and music. 
The estimate of lost revenue to these industries exceeds $300 
billion annually. The Committee recommendation includes 
$10,000,000 for the continued vigorous pursuit of Federal 
copyright law violations and software counterfeiting crimes. 
The U.S. Attorneys shall report to the Committee by April 1, 
2004, on the number, type and location of copyright 
prosecutions undertaken in the preceding year, including those 
under Public Law 105-147.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, which: (1) makes up to 
$2,500,000 for debt collection purposes available through 
fiscal year 2005; (2) makes available up to $8,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses; (3) makes up to 
$10,000,000 for automated litigation support contracts 
available until expended; and (4) specifies the number of 
positions and workyears provided for the United States 
Attorneys.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$166,157,000 for the U.S. Trustees for fiscal year 2004, to be 
entirely funded from offsetting collections. The amount 
recommended is $10,421,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level and 
$9,015,000 below the request.
    The U.S. Trustee System provides administrative support to 
expeditiously move bankruptcy cases through the bankruptcy 
process and ensure accountability of private trustees appointed 
to administer bankruptcy estates. Public Law 99-554, the 
Bankruptcy Judges, U.S. Trustees, and Family Farmer Bankruptcy 
Act of 1986, established a U.S. Trustee System Fund in the U.S. 
Treasury and provided for the collection of fees into the Fund 
to finance program operations.
    The recommendation provides additional funds for pay and 
inflationary adjustments, including a $5,399,000 increase to 
restore carryover balances utilized in fiscal year 2003. The 
recommendation does not include the requested information 
technology program increase. The Committee recommends that the 
Department of Justice use the Working Capital Fund to address 
this requirement.
    The recommendation also includes bill language which: (1) 
allows deposits to the U.S. Trustee System Fund to be used to 
pay refunds due depositors; (2) allows $166,157,000 in 
offsetting collections to be retained and used for necessary 
expenses in this appropriation; and (3) reduces appropriated 
funds as such offsetting collections are collected.

      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

    The Committee recommends $1,205,000 for the Foreign Claims 
Settlement Commission for fiscal year 2004. This amount is 
$76,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2003 and 
$7,000 below the request.
    The Commission settles claims of American citizens arising 
out of nationalization, expropriation, or other takings of 
their properties and interests by foreign governments.
    The Committee directs the Commission to submit a report by 
January 15, 2004, regarding the number of claims adjudicated on 
behalf of U.S. nationals against foreign governments since 
2000, the amount of awards, by year and country, and the number 
and type of pending claims.

         SALARIES AND EXPENSES, UNITED STATES MARSHALS SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $678,672,000 for the United States 
Marshals Service (USMS) Salaries and Expenses account for 
fiscal year 2004. In addition, the Committee provides 
$41,105,000 under the Community Oriented Policing Services 
account for USMS activities associated with State and local law 
enforcement, bringing the total level of funding provided for 
the USMS to $719,777,000. This level is $1,029,000 below the 
request and $28,698,000 above the level provided under this 
heading in fiscal year 2003.
    The recommendation includes funding for the Witness 
Security program that was funded in the Fees and Expenses of 
Witnesses account in fiscal year 2003. The recommendation also 
includes funding for 106 supervisory deputy marshals for 
courthouse security. These costs were requested in the Federal 
Judiciary's fiscal year 2004 budget but are funded in this 
account, as they were in fiscal year 2003.
    The recommendation assumes $11,459,000 in requested base 
reductions and $13,667,000 in requested reductions for 
crosscutting efficiencies. The recommendation also provides the 
fiscal year 2002 current services level for vehicles and hand/
leg cuffs.
    The recommendation includes an increase of $18,039,000 for 
168 new positions to address shortfalls in the protection of 
the judicial process. These positions are to be allocated to 
those districts with the highest priority needs. The Committee 
understands that these resources are urgently needed to address 
the growing number of prisoners in the custody of the USMS, 
especially along the Southwest Border, and the growing number 
of high threat trials. The Committee also notes that fiscal 
year 2003 supplemental appropriations provided for 32 
additional deputy marshal positions for the protection of the 
judicial process.
    The recommendation includes $1,371,000 for construction as 
requested and $2,000,000 for courthouse security equipment. 
Courthouse security equipment funds are provided as direct 
appropriations instead of through the Working Capital Fund as 
requested.
    The recommendation includes an increase of $5,000,000 for 
Special Assignments to address extraordinary operational 
missions such as high threat or multi-defendant trials, 
judicial protection details, and participation in 
investigations.
    Finally, the recommendation includes an increase of 
$5,000,000 for information technology requirements. The 
Committee understands that the USMS information technology 
infrastructure is inadequate to address modern law enforcement 
requirements. Funds provided for information technology shall 
be used, with the assistance and concurrence of the Department 
of Justice Chief Information Officer, to provide immediate 
enhancements to the USMS information technology infrastructure 
and its booking, warrant and prisoner tracking applications.
    The recommendation includes bill language (1) making 
funding available for supervisory deputy marshals for 
courthouse security, (2) making funding available for official 
reception and representation, (3) making funding available for 
an automated prisoner information system, (4) making funding 
available for courthouse security equipment, (5) making funding 
available for construction of prisoner-holding space, and (6) 
designating the number of positions and full-time-equivalents 
provided in this Act.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

    The Committee recommends $156,145,000 for Fees and Expenses 
of Witnesses for fiscal year 2004, which is $19,500,000 below 
the amount provided in fiscal year 2003 and the same as the 
request. This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
scorekeeping purposes, provides for fees and expenses of 
witnesses who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in 
which the United States is a party, including fact and expert 
witnesses, mental competency examinations, and witness/
informant protection. Funds are also used to pay certain legal 
expenses of Federal employees.
    The Committee recommends bill language, included in 
previous Appropriations Acts, which allows: (1) up to 
$1,000,000 for the purchase and maintenance of armored vehicles 
for prisoner transportation; and (2) up to $5,000,000 for 
installation and operation of a secure automated network. The 
recommendation also includes $8,000,000 for protected witness 
safesites.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $9,526,000 for the Community 
Relations Service for fiscal year 2004, which is $114,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 appropriation and the same as the request. 
This amount will support requested pay and inflationary base 
adjustments. In addition, the recommendation continues a 
provision that allows the Attorney General to transfer up to 
$1,000,000 from funds made available to the Department of 
Justice to this account, thereby providing for a total funding 
level of $10,526,000.
    The Community Relations Service was established by Title X 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to provide assistance to 
communities in resolving disagreements arising from 
discriminatory practices.
    The Committee recommends bill language, identical to that 
included in previous years, which allows the Attorney General 
to provide additional resources for the Community Relations 
Service, if emergent circumstances exist, through the transfer 
of funds from other Department of Justice programs, subject to 
the requirements of section 605 of this Act.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

    The Committee recommends $21,759,000 for the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund for fiscal year 2004, which is the same level 
provided in fiscal year 2003 and $1,190,000 below the request.
    This account provides funds for additional investigative 
expenses of the FBI, DEA, and USMS, such as purchase of 
evidence, equipping of conveyances, and investigative expenses 
leading to seizures. Funds for these activities are provided 
from receipts in the Assets Forfeiture Fund resulting from the 
forfeiture of assets. Expenses related to the management and 
disposal of assets are also provided from these receipts in the 
Assets Forfeiture Fund by a permanent indefinite appropriation.
    The Committee includes requested changes in bill language 
regarding authorization citations.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation

    The Committee recommends a total of $4,639,569,000 for the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), which is the same as the 
request and $423,596,000 above the level provided last year, 
excluding supplemental appropriations. The Committee recommends 
funding in three separate accounts rather than one as requested 
by the Administration.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$4,576,730,000 for the Federal Bureau of Investigation salaries 
and expenses account for fiscal year 2004. This amount is 
$423,596,000 above the amount provided for fiscal year 2003, 
excluding supplemental appropriations, and $62,839,000 below 
the request.
    The recommendation includes increases of $162,181,000 for 
pay and inflationary adjustments to support staffing and 
operating levels, offset by a reduction of $189,536,000 for 
one-time fiscal year 2003 funding requirements. The 
recommendation identifies the funded position and FTE levels 
provided in the bill. These staffing levels are adjusted to be 
consistent with full base funding requested and program 
increases provided.
    The Committee is supportive of efforts to focus resources 
on national security issues but remains concerned that resource 
reallocations may have a negative impact on other FBI 
activities, including drug, violent crime, and public 
corruption investigations. Budget shortfalls and increased 
homeland security responsibilities at the State and local 
levels decrease the likelihood that those entities can fill a 
breach resulting from a Federal withdrawal from traditional 
crime fighting. To ensure that appropriate resources continue 
to be allocated to critical areas, the FBI is directed to 
submit its Time Utilization and Record Keeping report on a bi-
annual basis.
    The following distribution represents the Committee funding 
recommendation. The Committee reminds the FBI that changes in 
this distribution are subject to the reprogramming requirements 
in section 605 of this Act.

                        FBI SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                         [Dollars in thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Activity                  POS          FTE         Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Criminal, Security and Other
 Investigations:
    Organized Crime Enterprises..        3,189        3,020      446,750
    White Collar Crime...........        4,248        4,088      551,495
    Other Field Programs.........       13,451       12,462    1,916,533
                                  --------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Criminal,               20,888       19,570    2,914,778
       Security and Other
       investigations............
Law Enforcement Support:
    Training and Recruitment.....          942          917      163,724
    Forensic Services............          749          725      180,623
    Information Technology.......          396          383      252,398
    Technical Field Support and            772          727      461,628
     Services....................
    Criminal Justice Services....        1,871        1,882      209,924
                                  --------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Law Enforcement          4,730        4,634    1,268,297
       Support...................
Program Direction and                    2,760        2,601      393,655
 Administration..................
                                  --------------------------------------
        Total, Direct                   28,378       26,805    4,576,730
         Appropriations..........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The recommendation includes programmatic increases totaling 
$450,951,000 to protect the U.S. from terrorist attacks; from 
foreign intelligence operations and espionage; and from cyber 
attacks and high tech crimes. The recommendation also includes 
increases for fighting violent and white collar crime, and for 
continued investments in information technology. Specific 
funding increases are provided as follows:
    Counterterrorism.--The recommendation includes increases of 
$74,040,000 for counterterrorism operations, including 
$31,391,000 to enhance capabilities to investigate domestic 
security threats; $14,603,000 to hire additional analysts; and 
$28,046,000 for field investigation support. The Committee 
expects these enhancements will enable the FBI to develop a 
cadre of expert staff to collect, analyze, and prevent acts of 
domestic terror. The recommendation also includes funds for a 
mobile command center for the Los Angeles Field Office. The 
Committee provided $50,000,000 to the FBI in Public Law 107-117 
to address just such types of critical needs. To ensure that 
Field Office equipment needs are being adequately addressed, 
the FBI shall submit, concurrent with the fiscal year 2005 
budget request, an assessment of its mobile command centers 
nationwide. The Committee expects that any new vehicles 
required will be procured within existing funding levels. The 
Committee does not recommend funding for the VITAL program as 
few details were available regarding coordination with the 
Departments of Homeland Security and State.
    Terrorist Threat Integration Center.--The Committee 
supports efforts to integrate intelligence analysis 
capabilities at the Terrorist Threat Integration Center (TTIC). 
However, the Committee is concerned that the physical 
relocation of the Counterterrorism Division to the new site may 
have a negative impact on information sharing with other 
components within the FBI. Therefore, the Committee expects the 
FBI to remain in close contact with the Committee as this 
effort proceeds, and directs the FBI to submit a detailed 
proposal, no later than 60 days following enactment of this 
Act, regarding the specifics of the relocation of the FBI's 
Counterterrorism Division to the joint facility. The Committee 
also supports the need to authorize the TTIC in order to ensure 
adequate Congressional oversight and provide a framework for 
domestic surveillance activities.
    Joint Terrorism Task Forces.--The recommendation includes 
an increase of $6,548,000 to support the successful Joint 
Terrorism Task Force concept. The FBI shall submit a report on 
Operation Gateway to the Committee by October 31, 2003, prior 
to obligating this funding or expanding the program to other 
Field Offices.
    Counterintelligence.--The Committee recommends an increase 
of $60,338,000 to hire additional agents and analysts to 
improve the Bureau's counterintelligence functions. These 
additional resources will assist the Bureau in ensuring that 
its counterintelligence program is of the highest integrity. 
The Committee expects the newly established Executive Assistant 
Director for Intelligence (EADI) to provide regular updates to 
the Committee on efforts to maintain an aggressive intelligence 
program, with the first such briefing to occur within 30 days 
of enactment of this Act. The Committee expects that efforts of 
the EADI will be fully coordinated with all information 
technology initiatives and the Security Division.
    Criminal Investigations.--The Committee recommendation 
includes funding above the request to ensure that the FBI has 
adequate agent and analytical staff to remain solidly in the 
forefront of addressing drug-related crimes, violent crime, 
including gang-related crime, organized crime, child 
exploitation, public corruption and identity theft. The 
recommendation includes $16,000,000 above the request for an 
additional 118 positions, including 56 agents, and $14,603,000 
to hire 214 criminal analysts to maintain the FBI's ability to 
address traditional crimes as the Bureau also appropriately 
focuses increased resources on preventing acts of terrorism. 
The Committee expects the FBI to continue to bring a national 
focus to cases that cross jurisdictions, particularly the 
activities of violent criminal gangs across the United States.
    White Collar Crime.--The recommendation includes 
$16,000,000, and 118 positions, including 56 agents, for FBI 
efforts to investigate corporate corruption. The Committee 
believes that the FBI has the expertise and the national focus 
to investigate corporate corruption, and recommends this 
increase to strengthen the Federal government's ability to 
protect investors, employees and consumers. The Committee 
expects the FBI to contribute to the white collar corruption 
report requested under General Administration.
    FBI Reorganization.--On June 18, 2003, the Committee held a 
second hearing to review progress of the continuing 
reorganization of the FBI, at which the FBI Director, the 
National Academy of Public Administration, the General 
Accounting Office, and the FBI Agents Association discussed the 
Bureau's new focus on preventing acts of terrorism while 
maintaining a strong presence in investigating and prosecuting 
traditional crime and improving information technology. The 
Committee appreciates the efforts of these organizations in 
assisting Congressional oversight of the FBI reorganization. 
Reforming the FBI will remain a top priority of this Committee, 
as will the continued investment in information technology and 
security, and the correct mix of agents, analysts and support 
staff to ensure that the FBI can maintain its preeminence as 
the world's premier law enforcement agency. As part of this 
restructuring effort, the Committee encourages the FBI to 
review support programs in light of the new shift in focus of 
the FBI. Specifically, the Committee directs the FBI to develop 
a plan during fiscal year 2004 to shift all training programs 
to the Training Division to ensure that training is 
standardized and reflects the current mission of the FBI. The 
Committee also directs that the FBI conduct a thorough review 
of response capabilities to ensure that they are commensurate 
with existing and future threats. The Committee believes that 
these support programs need to be reevaluated and consolidated 
in light of the changing focus of the FBI. The Committee 
expects these reviews to be completed and presented to the 
Committee by February 1, 2004.
    Hazardous Devices School.--In keeping with efforts to focus 
FBI resources and expertise on high priorities, the 
recommendation transfers the Hazardous Devices School funding 
to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives 
(ATF). The Committee recommends that all explosives training 
for State and local law enforcement be consolidated under the 
ATF, and expects the ATF to continue all current operations and 
activities at the HDS. The Committee is aware that the Justice 
Department is undergoing a review to reduce possible areas of 
duplication among the various law enforcement components at 
Justice, and expects the Department to ensure that any such 
efficiencies are included in the fiscal year 2005 budget 
submission.
    Information and Lead Management.--The Committee recommends 
an increase of $4,977,000 for the hiring of 100 additional 
support personnel, to be distributed to the highest priority 
locations. The Committee is aware that the FBI currently has 
some 151 vacant support personnel positions and expects the FBI 
to fill these vacant positions expeditiously to allow agents 
and analysts to focus on investigative and analytical 
activities. The Committee anticipates that Trilogy will also 
streamline activities, reducing the FBI's clerical support 
personnel requirements.
    Language Translation Program.--The Committee remains 
concerned about the FBI language translation program. The 
recommendation includes an increase of $5,000,000 above the 
request to enable the FBI to aggressively reduce the backlog of 
documents that need to be translated and ensure the highest 
integrity in the program. The Committee believes that agents 
and analysts should receive intensive language training to 
reduce dependency on contract linguists who are in short 
supply. The Committee urges the FBI to develop a Memorandum of 
Understanding with the Foreign Service Institute in order to 
build this in-house capacity. The FBI should report to the 
Committee no later than 30 days following enactment of this Act 
regarding these efforts.
    Legal Attache Program.--The Committee recommendation 
includes an increase of $43,587,000 to support the important 
function of the Legal Attaches (Legats). This amount includes 
$10,500,000 for information infrastructure enhancements. The 
Committee expects that future information technology funding 
requirements for Legats will henceforth be included in any 
information technology refreshment programs requested by the 
FBI. The increase of $200,000 for representation funds is to 
support Legats in their official capacities abroad in 
establishing and maintaining relations with officials of 
foreign governments and appropriate members of local 
communities. The Committee expects the Justice Department to 
undertake a comprehensive right sizing review prior to 
expanding any overseas Department presence, including Legats.
    Training Programs.--The ongoing FBI restructuring plan 
revolves around a dramatic change in emphasis, shifting the 
FBI's focus from investigating crimes to preventing acts of 
terrorism. This change, coupled with a dramatic increase in 
resources in recent years, has resulted in significant 
additional training requirements. The Committee recommendation 
therefore includes an additional $24,027,000, which is 
$6,468,000 above the request, for cybercrime, counterterrorism, 
and intelligence analysis training requirements. This funding 
should support efforts of the College of Analytic Studies at 
Quantico, as well as the continuing education program 
established in fiscal year 2003 to provide senior FBI agents 
and support staff with the ability to earn advanced degrees in 
specialized areas that will broaden and enhance their on-the-
job effectiveness. The FBI should consult with the Navy 
regarding efforts in this area. The Committee continues to 
support the efforts of the FBI to provide counterterrorism 
training overseas, as appropriate, to foreign law enforcement 
partners.
    Advisory Board.--The Committee provided the FBI with 
$5,000,000 in fiscal year 2003 to establish an Advisory Board 
of outside experts to advise the FBI Director on matters 
relating to science, technology, research, engineering, 
information management, and other matters of special interest 
to the FBI. The Committee continues to believe that such a 
panel will enhance FBI reform by independently and regularly 
advising the Director on how to effectively exploit and apply 
science and technology to improve FBI operations, particularly 
with respect to information sharing, data mining and the 
analysis of information and evidence collected during 
investigations. The Committee is disappointed that this Board 
has not yet been established and urges the FBI to expeditiously 
act to appoint members, convene its first meeting, and decide 
on an agenda. The FBI shall report to the Committee when these 
tasks have been completed, which is expected to be no later 
than 30 days following enactment of this Act.
    Cyber Capabilities.--The Committee is aware of the critical 
need to safeguard the nation's cyber infrastructure, and is 
therefore providing $41,113,000 to enhance the FBI's ability to 
detect and disrupt cyber terrorists and cyber criminals. To 
ensure that these resources are completely integrated with 
other information technology improvement programs underway at 
the FBI, the Executive Assistant Director for Administration is 
directed to review all ongoing information technology products 
and activities of the cyber division, including the Special 
Technologies and Applications Section, to ensure that 
activities underway are consistent with the mission of the FBI 
and that the products and techniques being developed elsewhere 
in the FBI are shared with other law enforcement agencies, as 
appropriate. The FBI CIO shall prepare this review in 
consultation with the Justice CIO.
    Trilogy.--To date, the Committee has provided the FBI with 
$457,800,000 for Trilogy, $78,000,000 more than the original 
spending plan. The FBI has also recently submitted a proposal 
to reprogram $137,900,000 for additional Trilogy requirements. 
This will bring the total cost to design and deploy Trilogy to 
$595,700,000. The Committee expects the Trilogy Program Manager 
to continue to keep the Committee informed of the status of 
deployment given the importance of, and significant investment 
in, this program. The recommendation for fiscal year 2004 
includes an increase of $80,247,000 for refreshment needs, 
operations and maintenance. According to information provided 
in the June 2003 quarterly report, the Transportation Network 
Component/Information Presentation Component (TNC/IPC) has been 
successfully deployed, providing all field offices, Legal 
Attaches, resident agencies, and other off-site work locations 
with new workstations, desktop software, printers, scanners, 
Local Area Networks and Wide Area Networks. The User 
Application Component, or Virtual Case File (VCF), will 
transform the FBI's five most important investigative 
applications into a single web-based interface application, 
allowing users to gain access to information contained in these 
databases using modern techniques such as point and click 
technology. The VCF initial deployment will occur in December 
2003, with the second release to occur in June 2004. The Bureau 
shall continue to provide quarterly status reports to the 
Committee regarding Trilogy implementation. In addition, the 
FBI is directed to present the Committee with a plan by 
November 15, 2003, which includes a review of the FBI's 40-plus 
databases, with the goal of removing applications that have 
outlived their usefulness in order for the FBI to concentrate 
resources on the highest priority information technology needs.
    Information Technology Report.--To ensure that funding 
increases for information technology are being centrally 
coordinated to provide the greatest return on investment, the 
Committee expects the FBI to provide an updated information 
technology report. This report shall include a complete listing 
of all information technology projects; the stage of each 
project's development and deployment; base funding for each 
project, to include all sources of funding; and the outyear 
cost projections for each project, including recurring 
requirements for operations and maintenance of these systems. 
This report should also include a plan for ensuring regular 
technology refreshment replacement cycles, as well as estimated 
costs for these needs. This report is to be submitted no later 
than December 15, 2003.
    Trafficking.--The Committee supports the FBI's continued 
involvement in the Southeast European Cooperative Initiative. 
The recommendation fully funds FBI staffing needs associated 
with this program at fiscal year 2003 levels. The Justice 
Department is directed to continue submitting reports to the 
Committee on efforts to combat human trafficking.
    Quantico DNA Analysis.--The Committee is troubled by 
reports of lapses in the FBI Laboratory DNA Analysis program 
and therefore recommends an increase of $1,000,000 above the 
request for additional training and safeguards to ensure that 
analysis performed at the new lab is above reproach.
    FBI Tour.--The Committee is aware that the FBI tour remains 
closed to the public. Not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of this Act, the FBI shall submit a report to the 
Committee detailing the actions and resources required to 
revitalize and re-open the FBI tour. The Committee expects that 
these costs will be available within existing resources.
    The Committee includes bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts, which provides: (1) 
for purchase of new and replacement vehicles, without regard to 
general purchase price limitations, and the acquisition and 
operation of aircraft; (2) up to $70,000 for unforeseen 
emergencies; (3) up to $65,000,000 for automated data 
processing, telecommunications and technical equipment, and up 
to $1,000,000 for undercover operations to remain available 
until September 30, 2005; (4) not less than $490,104,000 for 
counterterrorism investigations, foreign counterintelligence, 
and national security activities; (5) not less than 
$153,812,000 for Joint Terrorism Task Force activities; (6) up 
to $10,000,000 to reimburse State and local police for 
assistance related to violent crime, terrorism and drug 
investigations; (7) up to $250,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses; and (8) a specific number of positions 
and workyears for the FBI. The recommendation does not include 
requested language to fund construction activities under this 
account.

                 FOREIGN TERRORIST TRACKING TASK FORCE

    The Committee recommendation includes $61,597,000 for the 
Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force (FTTTF) to ensure that 
foreign terrorists cannot enter the United States. The 
recommendation provides these funds in a separate account, 
rather than under the salaries and expenses account as 
requested.
    The Committee is concerned that information technology 
activities of the FTTTF are not coordinated with similar 
activities elsewhere in Justice. The FBI shall submit quarterly 
updates to the Committee regarding FTTTF technology initiatives 
and other activities, with the first such report due no later 
than 60 days following enactment of this Act.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,242,000 for FBI 
construction, which is the same level provided in fiscal year 
2003 and $1,242,000 above the request. The recommendation does 
not merge construction funding under the salaries and expenses 
account as proposed in the request.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration

    To ensure that limited Federal drug law enforcement 
resources are applied consistently and efficiently, the 
Committee recommendation provides funds to reimburse non-
Justice entities for their participation in the Interagency 
Drug Enforcement program, and also assumes that funding and 
management for these interagency task forces shall be managed 
within the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Total funding 
provided in this bill for drug law enforcement efforts is 
$2,157,792,000, which is $607,019,000 above the fiscal year 
2003 level and $599,049,000 above the request.
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a 
reorganization proposal to conform to this new funding 
arrangement no later than 60 days following enactment of this 
Act. The Committee expects that the IDE executive assistant 
director will report to the DEA Deputy Administrator, and will 
be at the same level in the organizational structure as the 
executive assistant directors for the Intelligence and 
Operations Divisions.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$1,719,888,000 for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) 
salaries and expenses account for fiscal year 2004, of which 
$118,561,000 is derived from fees deposited in the Diversion 
Control Fund, resulting in a direct appropriation of 
$1,601,327,000. The recommendation is $50,554,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and is $42,584,000 above the request.
    The recommended level provides for a net increase of 
$22,629,000, as requested, for pay and inflationary costs to 
maintain the current operating level, and $27,925,000 for 
program enhancements. The Committee is also aware that prior 
year recoveries are available and expects the DEA to submit a 
reprogramming proposal to cover one-time funding needs. The 
following distribution represents the Committee recommendation. 
The DEA is reminded that any changes to this distribution are 
subject to the reprogramming requirements in section 605 of 
this Act.

                        DEA SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                         [Dollars In thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Activity                  POS          FTE         Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enforcement:
    Domestic Enforcement.........        2,728        2,561      546,165
    Foreign Cooperative                    653          621      208,199
     Investigations..............
    Drug and Chemical Conversions          190          177       23,507
    State and Local Task Forces..        1,619        1,527      240,808
                                  --------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Enforcement......        5,190        4,886    1,018,679
                                  ======================================
Investigative Support:
    Intelligence.................          976          983      129,294
    Laboratory Services..........          466          456       72,856
    Training.....................           99           98       24,903
    Research, Engineering, and             596          591      122,266
     Technical Operations........
    Information Technology.......          126          122      138,976
                                  --------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Investigative            2,263        2,250      488,295
       Support...................
                                  ======================================
Management and Administration....          905          882       94,353
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total, Direct                      8,358        8,018    1,601,327
       Appropriations............
Division Control Fee Account.....          793          789      118,561
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total, Budget Authority....        9,151        8,807    1,719,888
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Additional Drug Enforcement Agents.--The Committee 
recommendation restores requested cuts to the DEA's base and 
provides program increases. The Committee believes that such 
cuts are ill-advised given the continuing influx of illegal 
drugs and drug-related crime in the United States. The 
recommendation includes a total increase of $46,274,000 to 
support 255 additional agents, 167 above the request, and 
support staff. The Committee commends the DEA for refocusing on 
higher priority targets, but expects the DEA to maintain 
cooperative agreements with State and local law enforcement. 
Toward that end, the Committee restores funding proposed for 
elimination for the Mobile Enforcement Teams. The Committee 
agrees with the request to eliminate the Regional Enforcement 
Teams and refocus these resources on the highest priority 
targets.
    Drug Intelligence Fusion Center.--According to State 
Department reports, 14 of 36 foreign terrorist organizations 
use illegal drug money to support terrorism. The Committee 
supports the efforts of the DEA to create a Drug Intelligence 
Fusion Center so law enforcement can share drug investigative 
information that may have a nexus with terrorism cases. The 
Committee directs the DEA to use $25,000,000 in available 
fiscal year 2003 balances for this effort. Prior to obligating 
any of this funding, the DEA is expected to provide a 
comprehensive report to the Committee no later than 45 days 
following enactment of this Act. This report shall include 
copies of MOUs with participating agencies, protocols for 
sharing information, and expected ongoing operations and 
maintenance funding costs. This report should also include a 
rejustification of all information technology programs taking 
place at the Special Operations Division (SOD) as well as 
recommendations for utilizing information platforms, such as 
Operation Gateway, developed by the FBI. The Committee also 
directs the DEA to rationalize the various drug intelligence 
collection and analysis entities, including the National Drug 
Intelligence Center, EPIC, and SOD, with the goal of blending 
these various entities within the Drug Enforcement 
Administrator to avoid duplicative effort. The Committee 
expects this analysis to be provided to the Committee no later 
than December 15, 2003. The Committee expects that this report 
will be reviewed by the Department of Justice CIO prior to 
submission to the Committee. The Committee also expects that 
the FBI EADI shall concur with plans for the fusion center, in 
recognition of similar activities ongoing at the FBI.
    Demand Reduction.--The Federal government spends more than 
$1 billion a year on demand reduction activities. The Committee 
commends the DEA for its historical role in demand reduction 
activities, but does not believe that the DEA, in a climate 
with limited law enforcement resources, should maintain its own 
in-house demand reduction program. The Committee believes that 
it is more logical to consolidate demand reduction programs 
under other agencies that specialize in these programs, and 
focus the attention of the DEA on law enforcement. The 
Committee recommendation redirects the resources previously 
devoted to demand reduction, which includes 40 special agents, 
to State and local law enforcement task force activities.
    Source and Transit Countries.--The Committee expects the 
DEA to continue to provide quarterly reports on the 
investigative workhours and funding, by type, within major 
source and transit countries, including the Caribbean, 
delineated by country and function. The DEA shall provide to 
the Committee by November 17, 2003, a trend analysis gleaned 
from information provided in these reports to ensure that 
resources are deployed appropriately.
    OxyContin.--The Committee continues to be concerned with 
the continuing availability of legal drugs that are diverted 
for illegal use, particularly the prescription drug OxyContin. 
This epidemic, originally impacting small, rural communities in 
Virginia, Kentucky, and West Virginia, has now gained a 
foothold in other areas of the country. The Committee has been 
extremely disappointed with the lack of action on the part of 
the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to address this problem, 
but expects that recent agreements between the DEA and FDA with 
regard to the marketing of OxyContin and other similar drugs 
will alleviate problems with continued diversion.
    Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.--To maintain progress 
toward establishing a nationwide prescription drug monitoring 
program, the Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 
under the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) to continue 
implementation of the Harold Rogers Prescription Drug 
Monitoring Program. The Committee expects the DEA to continue 
to work with OJP on the implementation of this program, and to 
continue to provide the Committee with regular updates 
regarding efforts to thwart the illegal diversion of OxyContin 
and other legal drugs.
    Methamphetamines.--The Committee is also concerned with the 
continuing problem of methamphetamine use across the United 
States, particularly since meth traffickers are sometimes also 
involved in the distribution of marijuana, cocaine and heroin. 
The Committee expects the DEA to continue working with OJP on 
implementation of methamphetamine programs, and with State, 
local, and other Federal law enforcement entities to combat 
this problem. The Committee expects the DEA to continue its 
participation in the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, 
particularly those operating in the Midwest, to combat the 
influx of methamphetamines. To ensure the DEA has the ability 
to effectively monitor clean-up of methamphetamine labs, the 
Committee includes an increase of $700,000 for contract 
oversight and management.
    Ecstasy.--The Committee is aware of efforts by the DEA to 
eradicate the illegal importation of ecstasy and other ``club 
drugs,'' and directs the DEA, in consultation with the State 
Department, to develop a comprehensive plan to work with Dutch 
and Belgian authorities, and those of other countries as 
appropriate, to coordinate interdiction efforts. The DEA is 
directed to submit this plan, with specific and achievable 
milestones, to the Committee no later than 60 days following 
enactment of this legislation.
    DEA Training.--The Committee expects the DEA to coordinate 
analytical training needs with the FBI and other appropriate 
Federal agencies instead of creating stand alone training 
programs that may be duplicative. Toward that end, the 
Committee expects that the DEA will utilize and provide input 
to the training programs being developed by the FBI at its 
College of Analytical Studies.
    Operation Containment.--The Committee expects to receive 
quarterly updates on Operation Containment activities in 
Afghanistan, with the first such report to be provided by 
December 1, 2003. The Committee expects the Department to 
ensure full interagency participation in this effort to stem 
the flow of illegal drugs from Afghanistan.
    Drug Diversion Control Fee Account.--The recommendation 
includes $118,561,000 for the DEA's Drug Diversion Control 
Program for fiscal year 2004, which is the full amount 
requested and $30,111,000 above the fiscal year 2003 amount. 
The recommendation assumes that balances in the Fee Account are 
sufficient to fully support diversion control programs in 
fiscal year 2004. The Committee expects that this funding level 
will enable the DEA to hire additional investigators to address 
the illegal diversion of OxyContin and other medications. To 
control the diversion, distribution, manufacture and abuse of 
legitimate pharmaceuticals, the DEA annually registers in 
excess of 900,000 drug handlers, of which over 1,670 are 
manufacturers, distributors, importers, exporters, and others 
handling large volumes of controlled substances. These 
registrants pay fees, which fully support the cost of this 
program.
    Illegal Diversion of OxyContin and other Pharmaceuticals.--
The Committee recommends an increase of $6,882,000, 63 
positions and 31 FTE to enhance the Internet Online 
Investigations Project, an effort aimed at shutting down the 
use of the Internet to sell diverted pharmaceuticals and 
controlled substances without a prescription. Funding is also 
recommended to develop and begin deployment of a system that 
will enable the on-line transfer of a prescription from a 
doctor to the pharmacy. These initiatives, along with the 
development of an electronic version of the DEA's order form 
used for the purchase of all Schedule II drugs, will complement 
the Committee's efforts to establish an on-line prescription 
drug monitoring program nationwide.
    Additional Drug Investigative Positions.--The Committee is 
aware that controlled pharmaceuticals account for 30 percent of 
all reported deaths and injuries associated with drug abuse. 
Expected fee increases of $24,616,000 will support an 
additional 133 positions and 66 FTE to strengthen the DEA's 
efforts with regard to the diversion of controlled substances, 
particularly OxyContin. The DEA is directed to review existing 
and planned enhancement positions to ensure that resources are 
deployed to the highest priority locations. The DEA is directed 
to submit this review and justification to the Committee by 
January 2, 2004.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts, which provides: (1) 
up to $70,000 for unforeseen emergencies; (2) a change in 
authorization citations; (3) for purchase of passenger vehicles 
without regard to general purchase price limitations, and 
acquisition and operation of aircraft; (4) up to $33,000 for 
permanent change of status costs; (5) up to $1,800,000 for 
research to remain available until expended; (6) up to 
$4,000,000 for evidence and information, up to $10,000,000 for 
automated data processing and telecommunications, up to 
$2,000,000 for laboratory equipment, $4,000,000 for technical 
equipment, and $2,000,000 for aircraft replacement parts to 
remain available until September 30, 2005; and (7) up to 
$50,000 for official reception and representation expenses. In 
addition, language is continued which specifies the number of 
positions and workyears provided to the DEA. Language proposed 
for retention is deleted regarding drug education and training 
programs.

                      INTERAGENCY DRUG ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee is determined to provide sufficient resources 
to Federal law enforcement to ensure a sustained level of 
effort to combat illegal drugs. Toward that end, the Committee 
recommends that funding for joint drug enforcement activities 
previously included under the Interagency Crime and Drug 
Enforcement account now be funded under the DEA. The Committee 
believes that this consolidation will enable the DEA to direct 
resources to the highest priority matters. Further, the 
Committee includes funding for continued participation of the 
Departments of Homeland Security and Treasury.
    The Committee recommends a total of $556,465,000 for fiscal 
year 2004, which is an increase of $186,753,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2003 appropriation and is $14,621,000 
above the request. The recommendation includes $24,153,000 for 
inflationary increases.
    The ICDE program was created in 1982 to ensure a 
coordinated, multi-agency approach to attacking and dismantling 
high-level drug enterprises. Through its nine regional task 
forces, this program utilizes the combined resources and 
expertise of its Federal agency members, in cooperation with 
State and local investigators and prosecutors, to target and 
destroy major narcotics trafficking and money laundering 
organizations. Amounts provided reimburse Federal agencies for 
their costs to participate in these task forces. The Committee 
reminds the DEA that changes to these levels are subject to 
section 605 of this Act.

                         REIMBURSEMENT BY AGENCY
                         [Dollars in thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                       POS          FTE         Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Law Enforcement:
    DEA..........................        1,304        1,228      168,539
    FBI..........................          806          780      114,700
    INS..........................          117          117       16,674
    USMS.........................           13           13        2,148
    ATFE.........................           54           54       11,483
    IRS..........................          494          476       73,301
    Customs......................          270          270       31,154
    Coast Guard..................  ...........  ...........          625
Drug Intelligence:
    DEA..........................           50           38        6,392
    FBI..........................          184          159       21,521
Prosecution:
    U.S. Attorneys...............          965          886      100,699
    Criminal Division............           18           18        2,717
    Tax Division.................           10            8          995
    Administrative Office........           14           14        5,517
      Total......................        4,299        4,061      556,465
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As the Committee has directed the DEA to use existing 
balances under salaries and expenses to develop the Drug 
Intelligence Fusion Center, the recommendation does not include 
funding requested under this account for this activity.
    Targeting Command and Control.--The Committee commends 
efforts to refocus this program on the highest level national 
and international drug trafficking organizations. The 
recommendation includes an increase of $23,127,000, 151 
positions and 76 FTE to expand investigations of these major 
command and control targets. In addition, $3,461,000 is 
provided to the U.S. Attorneys to ensure successful prosecution 
of targets.
    Continued FBI Involvement.--The FBI restructuring plan 
approved by the Committee directed 567 FBI agents away from 
drug investigations. However, the Committee strongly believes 
that FBI expertise represents a critical contribution to 
interagency drug investigations. The Committee therefore 
recommends an increase of $8,000,000, 53 positions and 27 
workyears above the request to maintain the FBI's 
participation. The Committee expects that these additional 
resources will enable the Federal government to aggressively 
pursue links between terrorists and drug organizations.
    Financial Investigations.--The recommendation includes an 
increase of $5,631,000, 37 positions and 19 FTE for money 
laundering activities, particularly offshore accounts that can 
be difficult to track. In addition, the recommendation includes 
$2,805,000 for U.S. Attorneys' participation.
    Drug Intelligence.--The Committee strongly believes that 
additional analytical support is needed to ensure that 
information collected as part of multi-agency drug 
investigations is thoroughly referenced against other criminal 
databases and other ongoing investigations, particularly with 
regard to terrorist organizations. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends increases of $3,764,000 for the DEA and $7,528,000 
for the FBI to increase analytical capacity. The Committee 
directs the DEA to consult with the Committee prior to 
distributing these resources, and expects that these resources 
will support efforts of the Special Operations Division and the 
Drug Intelligence Fusion Center.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts under a separate 
heading, which: (1) allows for inter-governmental agreements 
with State and local law enforcement agencies; (2) makes 
$50,000,000 available until expended; and (3) allows funds to 
be used under existing authorities available to participating 
organizations.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $831,199,000 for the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), 
which is $30,011,000 above the current year level and 
$20,788,000 below the request.
    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 established the Bureau of 
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives under the Department 
of Justice. As a result of the passage of the Homeland Security 
Act, regulatory and revenue collection functions relating to 
alcohol and tobacco were realigned to the newly created Alcohol 
and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) within the Department of 
Treasury; and the responsibilities for enforcement of Federal 
laws relating to alcohol, tobacco products, firearms, 
explosives, and arson were transferred to the Department of 
Justice.
    In keeping with efforts to streamline functions under the 
Department of Justice and ensure that Federal law enforcement 
resources are focused on core regulatory and criminal 
investigations, the Committee recommendation proposes changes 
to the ATF budget request. First, the recommendation includes 
consolidation of funding for Department of Justice explosives 
training functions under the ATF, and provides $6,100,000 for 
the operation of the Hazardous Devices School in Huntsville, 
Alabama. It is the Committee's expectation the ATF will 
continue all existing operations and programs. Second, the 
recommendation does not include funding for the Gang Resistance 
Education And Training program under this heading, and instead 
provides funding under the ``Juvenile Justice Programs'' 
heading. Historically, the Committee has funded State and local 
law enforcement grant programs under the Office of Justice 
Programs and Community Oriented Policing Services to ensure 
that grant programs are fully coordinated.
    Youth Crime Gun Interdiction Initiative(YCGII).--The 
Committee commends the efforts of the ATF to interdict the flow 
of illegal firearms to youths, as part of the YCGII. The 
Committee understands that the YCGII is currently operating in 
60 cities throughout the country. The Committee does not 
include proposed additional funding to expand this effort. In 
addition to amounts provided under this heading, the Committee 
includes resources for youth gun violence prevention programs 
under the Project Sentry initiative under the ``Juvenile 
Justice Programs'' heading.
    Administrative Expenses.--The Committee is aware that the 
ATF continues to provide administrative assistance to the TTB 
and is unable to accurately determine the actual costs for the 
operation of two distinct bureaus. Therefore, the Committee 
expects the Department to provide to the Committee a spending 
plan separately identifying such administrative costs sixty 
days from the enactment of this Act.
    Safe Explosives Act.--The Committee directs the Department 
to ensure adequate resources are available to fulfill the 
requirements of the Safe Explosives Act.

                         Federal Prison System


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends a fiscal year 2004 appropriation 
of $4,461,257,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Federal 
Prison System, which is $215,957,000 below the request and 
$416,469,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. The 
recommendation does not include funding for construction under 
this account as requested, but instead maintains a separate 
Buildings and Facilities account as in previous fiscal years. 
The recommendation provides $182,153,000 for adjustments to 
base, including annualization costs associated with the 
activation of new prisons. The Committee recommendation 
recognizes the critical importance of providing adequate space 
for the incarceration of sentenced and unsentenced Federal 
prisoners, and the need to activate newly constructed prison 
facilities.
    The Committee urges the Federal Bureau of Prisons to remain 
vigilant to prevent the exploitation of religious programming 
by groups seeking to espouse and promote violence and 
terrorism.
    Activation of New Prisons.--The Committee includes a total 
of $240,515,000, to be distributed as requested, for the 
activation costs of Victorville, CA FCI; Hazelton, WV USP; 
Forrest City, AR FCI; Herlong/Sierra, CA FCI; Williamsburg, SC 
FCI; Canaan, PA USP; and Terre Haute, IN USP. This amount will 
provide for the activation of 7,872 new beds. The 
recommendation also includes funding from FPI product sales to 
activate factories in these facilities.
    Contract Confinement.--The recommendation also includes an 
increase of $12,900,000 for contracts to accommodate the 
increasing prison population. The Bureau of Prisons is directed 
to meet bedspace needs using excess State, local, and private 
prison capacity, if these facilities meet Bureau of Prison 
standards.
    Transitional Drug Treatment Programs.--The Committee is 
aware that more than 50 percent of the Federal prison 
population is incarcerated because of illegal drug activity. 
The recommendation therefore includes an increase of $3,000,000 
above the request to support BOP's transitional drug treatment 
program. The BOP shall submit a report to the Committee by 
December 15, 2003, describing this program and efforts to 
ensure that as many inmates as possible can participate in this 
worthwhile endeavor.
    The Committee is aware that the Bureau of Prisons uses 
visible eye-safe lasers for marksmanship training systems, and 
encourages BOP to continue these efforts.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts, which provides: (1) 
for the purchase of motor vehicles for police-type use; (2) for 
the provision of technical advice to foreign governments; (3) 
for transfer of funds to the Health Resources and Services 
Administration; (4) for the Director to enter into contracts to 
furnish health care; (5) up to $6,000 for reception and 
representation expenses; (6) up to $20,000,000 for contract 
confinement expenses for the care and security of Cuban and 
Haitian entrants; and (7) for the Federal Prison System to 
enter into contracts and other agreements with private entities 
for multi-year periods for the confinement of Federal 
prisoners. The recommendation also includes a requested change 
in the number of new and replacement automobile purchases, and 
includes language, as requested, designating an amount to 
remain available for two fiscal years.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Committee recommends $202,840,000 for fiscal year 2004 
for the construction, modernization, maintenance and repair of 
prison and detention facilities housing Federal prisoners. The 
Committee recommends maintaining a separate account for 
construction activities instead of combining accounts as 
requested. This amount is $202,840,000 above the request and 
$193,792,000 below the fiscal year 2003 appropriation. In 
addition, the Committee recommendation does not include a 
requested rescission. The Committee continues to expect that 
all current construction projects will proceed as planned.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts, which allows: (1) for 
planning, acquisition of sites, and construction of facilities; 
(2) for acquisition, remodeling, and equipping facilities by 
contract or force account; (3) up to $14,000,000 to construct 
inmate work areas; (4) for use of prisoner labor; and (5) up to 
10 percent of this appropriation to be transferred to the 
salaries and expenses account upon notification under section 
605 of this act.

                FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED

                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

    The Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses of $3,429,000 for Federal Prison Industries, 
Incorporated, for fiscal year 2004, which is $22,000 above the 
amount designated for fiscal year 2003 and equal to the 
request. The Committee is dismayed that the Justice Department 
and the Administration have repeatedly failed to take an active 
stance to ensure that Federal Prison Industries, Inc. can 
continue to provide meaningful work opportunities for inmates. 
The Committee implores the Administration to continue to offer 
such opportunities to inmates while respecting the interests of 
small and medium-sized businesses. It is incumbent on our 
society to show compassion to those who are repaying their 
debts to society by providing them with opportunities to 
prepare themselves to re-enter society as functioning citizens. 
Termination of the FPI program would in fact result in the end 
of Federal prison work opportunities for those who participate, 
because recreating a similar program could not be achieved 
within the prevailing budget constraints.

                       Office of Justice Programs

    According to the FBI's most recent Uniform Crime Report, in 
fiscal year 2002 murder increased by 0.8 percent and forcible 
rape increased by 4.0 percent. At the same time, the FBI is 
diverting resources away from traditional crime fighting to 
strengthen its counterterrorism capabilities, leaving a void 
that only State and local law enforcement are positioned to 
fill. In this context, the Committee finds the Administration's 
budget request, which proposes a $1.3 billion, or 35 percent, 
reduction in funding for State and local law enforcement 
assistance to be ill-conceived and profoundly inadequate.
    In order to address State and local law enforcement 
requirements, the Committee recommends a total of 
$3,491,261,000 in new budget authority for crime fighting grant 
programs for fiscal year 2004, $1,160,029,000 above the 
Administration's request. In previous years, the Department of 
Justice provided domestic preparedness training, equipment, and 
exercise grants for first responders. In fiscal year 2004, 
these programs are no longer administered by the Department of 
Justice.
    The fiscal year 2004 budget request proposed merging all 
programs administered by the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) 
under the Justice Assistance heading. The Committee 
recommendation retains the account structure used in previous 
years and funds State and local law enforcement programs under 
seven appropriation accounts.
    The Committee expects the Department of Justice to 
coordinate its programs and grant application processes with 
other Federal agencies to ensure that grantees have knowledge 
of, and access to, the resources provided to State and local 
agencies throughout the Federal government. For example, OJP is 
expected to work with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
to ensure that OJP grants are complimentary but not duplicative 
of DHS programs. OJP is also expected to coordinate programs 
such as Drug Courts, Offender Re-entry, Project Safe 
Neighborhoods and Juvenile Justice, with the Department of 
Education's Safe and Drug Free Schools Program, the Office of 
National Drug Control Policy's Drug Free Communities and Drug 
Courts programs, and the Department of Health and Human 
Services Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant 
program. The Committee expects the Department to work in 
consultation with these other Federal agencies to develop 
comprehensive community strategies to deal with problems such 
as drug abuse, gangs and violence. The Committee directs the 
Department to submit a report to the Committee by June 1, 2004, 
describing its efforts to coordinate its programs with other 
Federal agencies.
    The Committee understands that many local law enforcement 
officials are not aware of the penalties prescribed in the 
Federal law for trafficking in persons, nor are they aware that 
special visa categories may be available for certain victims. 
The Committee directs the Violence Against Women Office (VAWO) 
and the Office of Victims of Crimes (OVC) to work with the 
Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division to expand their 
education program for State and local law enforcement personnel 
on the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 
2000. This training program should focus on improving local law 
enforcement's ability to identify victims of trafficking and 
persons engaged in trafficking, and on making referrals to 
Federal officers. The Committee believes that the Community 
Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Regional Community Policing 
Institutes could be used to help disseminate this information. 
The Committee directs the Department to submit a spending plan 
for an expanded training effort within 90 days of the enactment 
of this Act. The plan shall describe the resources being 
utilized from all Department entities, including, but not 
limited to, the Civil Rights Division, the VAWO, the OVC, and 
the COPS Office.

                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $209,131,000 for the Justice 
Assistance account for fiscal year 2004. The Justice Assistance 
program includes assistance to States and localities in the 
form of research, evaluation, statistics, information sharing, 
missing children assistance, and management and administration 
of grants provided through OJP. The budget proposed merging all 
OJP programs under this heading. The recommendation provides 
funding under this heading only for those programs previously 
funded in this account. The table below compares the fiscal 
year 2004 recommendation to funding provided in fiscal year 
2003 and the fiscal year 2004 request for those programs 
recommended under this account heading.

                                            (In thousands of dollars)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004
                             Program                                  enacted         request     recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Institute of Justice...................................          59,490          73,301          59,000
Bureau of Justice Statistics....................................          32,125          35,085          33,731
National White Collar Crime Center..............................           9,170  ..............           4,500
Regional Information Sharing System.............................          28,812          36,448          35,000
Management and Administration...................................          37,753         119,638          40,000
Missing Children Program........................................          32,633          30,669          36,900
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total.....................................................         199,983  ..............         209,131
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Institute of Justice.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $59,000,000 for the National Institute 
of Justice (NIJ) for fiscal year 2004. In addition, as in 
previous fiscal years, NIJ will receive funding under the Local 
Law Enforcement Block Grant program, the Violence Against Women 
Prevention and Prosecution program, and the DNA Initiative for 
efforts associated with those programs.
    NIJ is the nation's primary source of research and 
development in the field of criminal justice. NIJ fosters 
innovation in law enforcement technologies and practices and in 
investigative causes and patterns of crime, and informs the 
public of research and development findings. The Committee 
encourages NIJ to work with Federal law enforcement agencies in 
the development of law enforcement technologies to ensure 
coordination of research and development efforts.
    The Committee continues to support the National Law 
Enforcement and Corrections Technology Centers, a network of 
facilities and capabilities that converts non-lethal defense 
technology to law enforcement use. The Centers provide actual 
casework assistance when highly specialized technologies are 
required, and help in identifying and locating high quality 
technologies and equipment for law enforcement use. The 
recommendation continues the current year level of funding for 
the Office of Law Enforcement Technology Commercialization, 
Inc., and for the Center for Rural Law Enforcement Technology 
and Training. The Committee understands that NIJ is currently 
conducting a review of the Center system. NIJ shall report the 
results of this study to the Committee, including its plans to 
expand or reduce the number of facilities in the Center system. 
The Committee also supports NIJ's efforts to develop through-
wall motion mapping.
    Bureau of Justice Statistics.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $33,731,000 for the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 
which is $1,606,000 above the current year appropriation and 
$1,354,000 below the request. The Bureau of Justice Statistics 
is responsible for the collection, analysis, and publication of 
statistical information on crime, criminal offenders, victims 
of crime, and the operations of the Nation's justice system.
    Missing Children.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$36,900,000 for the Missing Children Program for fiscal year 
2004, which is $6,231,000 above the request and $4,267,000 
above fiscal year 2003. This program provides funds to combat 
crimes against children, particularly kidnapping and sexual 
exploitation. The following table displays the Committee's 
funding recommendation:

                                            MISSING CHILDREN PROGRAM
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      FY 2003         FY 2004         FY 2004
                             Program                                  enacted         request     recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children..............          12,419          12,419          14,000
Jimmy Ryce Law Enforcement Training Center......................           2,980             981           3,000
Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.....................          12,419          12,500          12,500
Missing and Exploited Children Office...........................           2,331           2,269           2,400
AMBER Alert Program.............................................           2,484           2,500           5,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total.....................................................          32,633          30,669          36,900
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    OJP shall utilize AMBER program funds in accordance with 
the Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to end the 
Exploitation of Children Today Act of 2003.
    Regional Information Sharing System.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $35,000,000 for fiscal year 2004 for 
the Regional Information Sharing System (RISS), which is 
$6,188,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level and $1,448,000 
below the request.
    The RISS program maintains six regionally-based information 
sharing centers throughout the United States, which are 
connected electronically to form a nationwide network for the 
automated exchange of crime and terrorism information between 
Federal, State, and local agencies. The Committee is pleased 
with the Administration's efforts to integrate RISS with the 
Law Enforcement On-Line (LEO) program and with the proposed 
expansion of the RISS Anti-terrorism Information Exchange 
(ATIX) program and the Multi-State Anti-Terrorism Information 
Exchange (MATRIX) program. The Committee expects OJP to 
coordinate their efforts with other components of the 
Department of Justice and with the Department of Homeland 
Security to ensure that State and local agencies have 
electronic access to crime and terrorism information. The 
Committee remains concerned at the continuing proliferation of 
local, State, regional, and Federal information sharing 
initiatives that are being developed independently, with no 
apparent plan to integrate them with other systems operated by 
Federal law enforcement agencies and with RISS and LEO. The 
Committee directs the Department to ensure that inter-state 
information sharing systems funded by OJP and COPS utilize the 
existing communications infrastructure and are compatible with 
RISS and LEO.
    White Collar Crime Center.--The Committee recommends a 
total of $4,500,000 for the National White Collar Crime Center 
for fiscal year 2004, which is $4,670,000 below the fiscal year 
2003 appropriation and $4,500,000 above the request. This 
program provides training, technical assistance, and 
investigative support to State and local law enforcement to 
combat white-collar and economic crimes such as fraud and 
identify theft.
    Management and Administration.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $40,000,000 in direct appropriations 
for the management and administration of OJP programs, which is 
$2,347,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level. In addition, 
consistent with prior practice, reimbursable funding for 
management and administration costs will be made available from 
programs administered by OJP from the ``Community Oriented 
Policing Services'' account and the new ``Violence Against 
Women Prevention and Prosecution'' account. Furthermore, the 
Committee recommends that remaining management and 
administration funding be made available from the ``Juvenile 
Justice Programs'' and the ``State and Local Law Enforcement 
Assistance'' accounts and that these funds will be transferred 
to and merged with the ``Justice Assistance'' account. The 
recommendation assumes a total management and administration 
budget of $110,042,000. This is equal to the request, less 
management and administration funds requested for the Violence 
Against Women Office, which is funded under a separate heading. 
The budget request proposed funding management and 
administration as a separate line item without using 
reimbursable funding from the other OJP programs. The 
recommendation provides $40,000,000 in direct appropriations 
and directs OJP to submit a financial plan, within 60 days of 
the enactment of this Act, outlining the level of funding 
individual programs will contribute to management and 
administration requirements. The recommendation assumes that, 
at a minimum, the amounts appropriated for the following 
programs will not be reduced to fund management and 
administration: Bulletproof Vest Partnership, Police Corps, 
Offender Re-Entry, Project Sentry, Weed and Seed, DNA 
Initiative, Criminal Records Upgrade, and Public Safety Officer 
Benefits, as well as the Victims of Child Abuse programs funded 
under the Juvenile Justice account.
    As discussed in the Statement of Managers accompanying the 
fiscal year 2003 Act, the Department shall provide the 
Committee with detailed plans of competitive outsourcing 
efforts before proceeding with changes.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends a total of $1,640,861,000 for 
fiscal year 2004 for State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance 
programs. This amount is $1,640,861,000 above the request and 
$390,129,000 below fiscal year 2003. The Committee does not 
adopt the Administration's proposal to consolidate this 
appropriation under the Justice Assistance heading.
    The table below displays funding for programs recommended 
under this heading compared to the level of funds requested 
under the Justice Assistance account for the same activities. 
In previous years, violence against women prevention and 
prosecution programs were funded in this account. For fiscal 
year 2004, the Committee recommendation establishes a separate 
appropriation heading for these programs.

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       2004
                                                                 2003 enacted     2004 request    recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Local Law Enforcement Block Grant............................         397,400   ...............         400,000
    (Boys and Girls Clubs)...................................         (79,480)  ...............         (80,000)
    (USA Freedom Corps)......................................          (2,981)  ...............          (5,000)
    (National Institute of Justice)..........................         (19,870)  ...............         (20,000)
State Criminal Alien Assistance..............................         248,375   ...............         400,000
Cooperative Agreement Program................................           4,968   ...............           2,500
Indian Assistance............................................          17,883           $4,436           13,000
    (Tribal Prison Construction Program).....................          (4,968)  ...............  ...............
    (Indian Trial Courts Program)............................          (7,948)  ...............          (8,000)
    (Alcohol and Substance Abuse)............................          (4,967)          (4,436)          (5,000)
Edward Byrne Memorial Law Enf. Assistance....................         646,683   ...............         615,000
    (Formula Grants).........................................        (496,750)  ...............        (500,000)
    (Discretionary Grants)...................................        (149,933)  ...............        (115,000)
USA Freedom Corps............................................  ...............          14,669   ...............
Justice Assistance Grants....................................  ...............         585,990   ...............
    (Boys and Girls Clubs)...................................  ...............         (60,000)  ...............
    (Indian Tribal Courts Program............................  ...............          (5,921)  ...............
    (National Institute of Justice)..........................  ...............         (19,956)  ...............
Violence Against Women Grants \1\............................         387,629   ...............  ...............
Victims of Trafficking Grants................................           9,935   ...............          10,000
State Prison Drug Treatment..................................          64,577           74,233           70,000
Drug Courts..................................................          44,708           64,360           55,000
Juvenile Crime Block Grant \2\...............................         188,765   ...............  ...............
    (Project ChildSafe)......................................         (24,838)  ...............  ...............
Prescription Drug Monitoring.................................           7,451   ...............          10,000
Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution.......................          12,915   ...............          60,000
Terrorism Prevention and Response Training...................          14,902   ...............  ...............
Other Crime Control Programs:................................
    State and Local Training.................................  ...............           3,907            1,000
    Missing Alzheimer's Patients.............................             892   ...............             892
    Law Enforcement Family Support...........................           1,487   ...............           1,487
    Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention...........................           1,292   ...............  ...............
    Senior Citizens vs. Marketing Scams......................           1,982   ...............           1,982
Rescission...................................................         (20,854)         (11,622)  ...............
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Local Assistance......................       2,030,990   ...............       1,640,861
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ In FY 2004, the recommendation includes a separate account for Violence Against Women Prevention and
  Prosecution programs.
\2\ The FY 2004 recommendation funds the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant program under the Juvenile Justice
  heading.

    Local Law Enforcement Block Grant.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $400,000,000 for the Local Law 
Enforcement Block Grant program, which is $2,600,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 appropriation and $400,000,000 above the 
request. This program provides grants to local law enforcement 
agencies to reduce and prevent crime. These funds are available 
to local law enforcement to meet their highest priority needs, 
such as overtime, equipment, information technology and 
additional officers. Of the amount provided, $80,000,000 is for 
Boys and Girls Clubs, $20,000,000 is for NIJ to assist local 
units of government to identify, select, develop, modernize, 
and purchase new technologies for use by law enforcement, and 
$5,000,000 is for the USA Freedom Corps initiative for the 
expansion of Neighborhood Watch programs and the Volunteers in 
Policing program.
    State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.--The 
recommendation provides $400,000,000 for the State Criminal 
Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) for reimbursement to States 
for the costs of incarceration of criminal aliens. The budget 
request proposed the elimination of this program. The 
recommendation is $151,625,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
level.
    Cooperative Agreement Program.--The recommendation provides 
$2,500,000 for the improvement of State and local correctional 
facilities holding prisoners in custody of the U.S. Marshals 
Service. This amount is $2,500,000 above the request and 
$2,468,000 below the fiscal year 2003 appropriation.
    Indian Assistance.--The Committee recommends $13,000,000 in 
Indian assistance grants, of which $8,000,000 is for Indian 
tribal courts, and $5,000,000 is for alcohol and substance 
abuse grants.
    Edward Byrne Grants to States.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $615,000,000 for the Edward Byrne 
Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program, of 
which $115,000,000 is for discretionary grants and $500,000,000 
is for formula grants under this program. These grants help to 
improve the functioning of the criminal justice system with an 
emphasis on drugs, violent crime and serious offenders.
    Within the amounts appropriated for discretionary grants, 
the Committee expects OJP to examine each of the following 
proposals, to provide grants if warranted, and to submit a 
report to the Committee on its intentions for each proposal:
          
 Cook County Cold Case Homicide Unit;
          
 National Crime Prevention Council;
          
 Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) 
        program;
          
 City of Massillon, OH, Police Department for 
        law enforcement technologies and to combat gang and 
        drug-related activities;
          
 Operation UNITE for a drug enforcement, 
        treatment and education program;
          
 Rural Law Enforcement Technology and 
        Training Center;
          
 The Phoenix House for drug treatment 
        alternatives for offenders;
          
 Excelsior College for law enforcement 
        training programs;
          
 Transylvania County, NC, Sheriff's Citizens 
        Observer Patrol and Education Team;
          
 Search Group, Inc. and the National 
        Technical Assistance Program;
          
 New Orleans, LA, Police Department for crime 
        fighting initiatives;
          
 Orleans Parish, LA, District Attorney's 
        Office for crime fighting initiatives;
          
 Louisiana State Police for equipment to 
        assist in investigating crimes;
          
 Iberia Parish Sheriff's Department for 
        equipment to assist in investigating crimes;
          
 Calcasieu Parish Sheriff's Department for 
        equipment to assist in investigating crimes;
          
 Caddo Parish District Attorney's Office for 
        equipment to assist in investigating crimes;
          
 Jefferson Parish District Attorney's Office 
        for equipment to assist in investigating crimes;
          
 Washington Metropolitan Area Drug 
        Enforcement Task Force (MATF);
          
 Northern Virginia multi-jurisdictional anti-
        gang task force;
          
 Virginia Attorney General's Office for a 
        Computer Crime Unit, a gang task force, and the Triad 
        program;
          
 Mothers Against Drunk Driving for education 
        and victims assistance programs;
          
 Northern Virginia Criminal Justice Academy;
          
 Gospel Rescue Ministries;
          
 Fuller Theological Seminary for a conflict 
        resolution program;
          
 Virginia Commonwealth Attorneys Service 
        Council for the TOP GUN program to partner law 
        enforcement and prosecutors to combat violent crime 
        throughout Virginia;
          
 Pre-release and post incarceration services 
        programs for the Commonwealth of Virginia;
          
 The Doe Fund's Ready, Willing & Able 
        program;
          
 Tarrent County, TX, District Attorney's 
        Office for an Automated Fingerprint Identification 
        System;
          
 Court programs in the Commonwealth of 
        Virginia to combat drug use and drug related crimes;
          
 Virginia Community Policing Institute;
          
 Center for Court Innovation;
          
 Virtual Simulation Project for Clark State 
        Community College's Police Academy in Springfield, OH;
          
 Oakland County, MI, Sheriff's Department for 
        an Identification Based Information System (IBIS) 
        including portable hand-held digital fingerprint and 
        photo devices for patrol cars;
          
 Iowa State University for specialized 
        criminal justice research;
          
 Redlands, CA, Police Department for a crime 
        mapping project;
          
 Chattanooga and Nashville, TN, for programs 
        to combat drug offenses;
          
 National Center for Justice and the Rule of 
        Law at the University of Mississippi School of Law to 
        sponsor research and produce educational seminars and 
        training programs for judges, court personnel, 
        prosecutors, police agents, and attorneys;
          
 National Clearinghouse for Science, 
        Technology, and the Law at Stetson University College 
        of Law;
          
 Pinellas County, FL, Sexual Predator Unit;
          
 Kristen's Act;
          
 University of Houston to study in-car law 
        enforcement technologies;
          
 DuPage County State's Attorney's Office for 
        the Child Victim Witness Project for criminal 
        investigators;
          
 Kane County, IL, for a drug rehabilitation 
        court;
          
 Columbus, OH, Police Department for an 
        automated fingerprint identification system;
          
 The Women's Center in Vienna, VA;
          
 Ascension Parish Sheriff's Office for a 
        regional training center for cybercrime monitoring and 
        enforcement activities and for law enforcement 
        administration training;
          
 National Institute of Justice's Cyber 
        Science Laboratory in Rome, NY;
          
 National Association of Town Watch's 
        National Night Out crime prevention program;
          
 Savannah Impact Program for an offender re-
        entry program;
          
 Orange County, CA, for a mobile regional 
        gang enforcement team;
          
 Mercyhurst College in Erie, PA, for law 
        enforcement training;
          
 Gun Crimes Reduction Task Force in Ventura 
        County, CA;
          
 Rural Justice Institute at Alfred 
        University;
          
 Belmont Harrison Juvenile District for 
        female inmate programs;
          
 San Joaquin Valley Rural Crime Prevention 
        Program;
          
 Eddy County, NM, Detention Center for inmate 
        programs to reduce recidivism;
          
 Regional Counter Drug Training Academy for 
        law enforcement training;
          
 York County, PA, for a court records 
        improvement program;
          
 Stanislaus County, CA, Meth Gang Enforcement 
        Project;
          
 Police Athletic League;
          
 Men Ending Domestic Violence program in 
        Swansea, IL;
          
 Altoona, PA, for an offender re-integration 
        program;
          
 Norwich, CT, Police Department for a program 
        to investigate sexual predators on the Internet;
          
 Polaris Project;
          
 Kern County, CA, District Attorney for 
        equipment to assist in criminal gang investigations;
          
 Second Judicial District of New Mexico for a 
        gun violence reduction program;
          
 St. Louis County, MO, to enhance local law 
        enforcement efforts;
          
 California Department of Justice for the San 
        Francisco Bay area sexual assault screening program;
          
 Law enforcement information sharing center 
        in CA;
          
 Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education 
        Fund to conduct a study of the participation of Latinos 
        in the Federal criminal justice system;
          
 ``Sanctuary for Families'' for programs in 
        support of at-risk women and children;
          
 Urban Justice Center;
          
 Brown University for law enforcement 
        research;
          
 National Corrections and Law Enforcement 
        Training and Technology Center in Moundsville, WV;
          
 National White Collar Crime Center;
          
 Law enforcement agencies in the City of 
        Alexandria, VA, for increased operational costs;
          
 American Cities Foundation for a drug and 
        alcohol demand reduction program;
          
 Philadelphia District Attorney's Office for 
        criminal justice enhancements;
          
 New York Prosecutors Training Institute for 
        enhancement of the Spectrum Justice and Prosecutors 
        Case Management software systems;
          
 ``Urban Dreams'' in Des Moines, IA, for 
        programs in support of at-risk youths;
          
 Midamerica Nazarene University's (MNU) 
        Criminal Justice Program;
          
 Turtle Mountain Community College for 
        Project Peacemaker;
          
 National Children's Alliance Child Abuse 
        Case Tracking, Reporting and Management System;
          
 National Center for Rural Law Enforcement's 
        Internet Project;
          
 College of Mount Saint Vincent for criminal 
        justice research and development;
          
 Municipality of Barceloneta, PR, to expand 
        law enforcement efforts;
          
 Criminal justice research initiative in 
        Central Islip, NY;
          
 Milwaukee County, WI, Community Justice Day 
        Reporting Center to expand program activities;
          
 YouthServe, a project of the ``Builder for 
        the Family and Youth,'' to develop programs in support 
        of at-risk youths;
          
 Drug abuse prevention program in New York, 
        NY;
          
 The Fortune Society for the Community Re-
        entry program;
          
 Bexar County, TX, for the Jail Diversion 
        Program Model;
          
 Greater Woodhaven Development Corporation to 
        address quality of life crimes;
          
 North Las Vegas Police Department to enhance 
        law enforcement efforts;
          
 City of Baltimore, MD, to establish a Drug 
        Enforcement and Eradication Program;
          
 ``Home Again'' Offender Re-Entry Project in 
        Indianapolis, IN;
          
 Provident Counseling's Domestic Violence 
        Prevention Program;
          
 City of North Miami Beach, FL, for a law 
        enforcement initiative;
          
 The African Community Resource Center for a 
        domestic violence prevention program;
          
 County of Santa Clara, CA, for the Financial 
        Abuse Specialist Team;
          
 PAX New York for the SPEAK UP Hotline;
          
 City of Pittsburgh, PA, Police Bureau to 
        enhance the Witness Protection Program;
          
 San Jose, CA, Police Department for law 
        enforcement enhancements;
          
 National Institute on State Policy on 
        Trafficking of Women and Girls at the Center for Women 
        Policy Studies;
          
 City of Seattle, WA, Precinct Liaison 
        Program;
          
 White Earth Nation in White Earth, MN, for 
        criminal justice enhancements;
          
 Maine Rural Substance Abuse Partnership;
          
 Warren Urban Minority Alcohol and Drug Abuse 
        Program in Trumbull County, OH; and
          
 Programs as authorized under the Law 
        Enforcement Memorial Act.
    Victims of Trafficking.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $10,000,000 for victim services programs to provide 
assistance to victims of trafficking, as authorized by the 
Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000. 
This amount is $10,000,000 above the request and $65,000 above 
the current year appropriation.
    State Prison Drug Treatment.--The Committee recommends 
$70,000,000 for grants to States and units of local government 
for development and implementation of residential substance 
abuse treatment programs within State correctional facilities 
and certain local correctional and detention facilities. This 
amount is $4,233,000 below the request and $5,423,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 appropriation.
    Drug Courts.--The recommendation includes $55,000,000 for 
the Drug Courts grant program, which is $10,292,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and $9,360,000 below the request. This 
program provides grants, technical assistance and training to 
State, local, and Indian tribal governments to develop 
dedicated drug courts that subject non-violent offenders to an 
integrated mix of treatment, drug testing, incentives, and 
sanctions.
    Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.--The 
Committee's fiscal year 2004 recommendation includes 
$10,000,000 for the Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring 
Program to assist States in building or enhancing prescription 
drug monitoring systems, facilitating the exchange of 
information between States, and providing technical assistance 
and training on establishing and operating effective 
prescription drug monitoring programs.
    The Committee continues to be concerned with the abuse of 
prescription drugs, such as OxyContin, and the devastating 
impact they have on families and communities throughout the 
country. In order to address this problem, the Committee 
provided $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 and $7,451,000 in 
fiscal year 2003 for OJP to provide grants to States creating 
new prescription drug monitoring programs and to enhance 
current prescription drug monitoring programs.
    Prescription monitoring programs help prevent and detect 
the diversion and abuse of pharmaceutical controlled 
substances. States that have implemented prescription 
monitoring programs have the capability to collect and analyze 
prescription data much more efficiently than States without 
such programs, where the collection of prescription information 
requires the time consuming manual review of pharmacy files.
    Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution.--The Committee 
understands that experts have conservatively estimated that at 
least 13 percent of inmates in the United States have been 
sexually assaulted in prison and that many inmates have 
suffered repeated assaults. Under this estimate, nearly 200,000 
inmates now incarcerated have been, or will be, the victims of 
prison rape. The total number of inmates who have been sexually 
assaulted in the past twenty years likely exceeds 1,000,000. 
The Committee understands that prison rape contributes to the 
spread of sexually-transmitted diseases, such as HIV and AIDS. 
The Committee also recognizes that inmates with mental illness 
and juvenile inmates are particularly vulnerable to sexual 
victimization. The Committee further understands that most 
prison staff are not adequately trained or prepared to prevent, 
report, or treat inmate sexual assaults and that prison rape 
often goes unreported.
    In order to begin addressing this problem, the Committee 
provided $12,915,000 in fiscal year 2003 for a new prison rape 
prevention and prosecution program. This funding will be used 
to begin statistical data collection and analysis, and research 
and development of innovative prison rape prevention and 
prosecution programs. For fiscal year 2004, the Committee 
recommends $60,000,000 for continuation of this program. This 
funding shall be used to continue statistical data collection, 
analysis, and research. This funding will also be available to 
establish a national clearinghouse of information, through the 
National Institute of Corrections, provide training and 
technical assistance to Federal, State and local corrections 
and law enforcement agencies, and provide grants to States, 
local authorities, prisons, and prison systems to undertake 
prison rape prevention and prosecution projects.
    Safe Return Program.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$892,000 to continue the national program to locate missing 
Alzheimer's disease patients, the same level as in fiscal year 
2003 and $892,000 above the request.
    Law Enforcement Family Support programs.--The 
recommendation includes $1,487,000 for programs that provide 
support services to law enforcement officers and their 
families, the same level in the current year appropriation and 
$1,487,000 above the request.
    Senior Citizens Against Marketing Scams.--The 
recommendation includes $1,982,000, which is $1,982,000 above 
the amount requested and equal to the current year, for 
programs to assist law enforcement in preventing and stopping 
marketing scams against the elderly.
    Hate Crimes Training and Technical Assistance Program for 
State and Local Law Enforcement.--The recommendation includes 
$1,000,000 for a hate crimes technical assistance and training 
program. This level is $1,000,000 above the current year and 
$2,907,000 below the request. The Committee does not provide 
funding for training and technical assistance programs 
previously funded by the Office for Domestic Preparedness. The 
Office for Domestic Preparedness was transferred to the 
Department of Homeland Security.

                       WEED AND SEED PROGRAM FUND

    The recommendation provides $51,811,000 for the Weed and 
Seed program for fiscal year 2004, which is equal to the 
request and $6,731,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level. The 
budget proposed merging the Weed and Seed program under the 
Justice Assistance account. The recommendation maintains this 
program as a separate appropriation. The Committee expects the 
Weed and Seed Program to coordinate with the Department's 
Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). Within 6 months of enactment 
of this Act, OJP is directed to submit a report to the 
Committee on the coordination of the Weed and Seed program with 
PSN, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives 
Youth Crime Gun Interdiction Initiative and other Department of 
Justice and Federal programs. The management and administration 
costs of the program are funded within the Justice Assistance 
appropriation.

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $682,993,000 for the 
Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program for fiscal 
year 2004. The table below displays funding for programs 
recommended under this heading compared to the level of funds 
requested for the same activities under this heading and under 
the Justice Assistance account.

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2003          FY 2004         FY 2004
                            Program                                  enacted          request     recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hiring.........................................................         198,700   ..............  ..............
Training and Technical Assistance..............................          20,528           20,662          20,662
Tribal Law Enforcement.........................................          34,773           30,000          30,000
Meth Hot Spots.................................................          56,761           20,000          60,000
COPS Technologies..............................................         188,719           50,000         100,000
Interoperable Communications (w/sup.)..........................          74,620   ..............  ..............
Safe Schools Program...........................................          15,111   ..............  ..............
Police Integrity Grants........................................          16,853           16,963          17,000
Management and Administration..................................          32,782           26,130          26,130
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
Prior Year Balances (Rescission)...............................  ...............         (6,378)  ..............
      Sub-Total, COPS..........................................         638,847          157,377         253,792

               Programs Not Requested Under COPS

Bulletproof Vests..............................................          25,279           24,143          25,000
Police Corps...................................................          14,903           28,315          28,315
Criminal Records Upgrade.......................................          39,740           56,924          56,924
DNA/Crime Lab Initiative.......................................          81,009          174,353         174,353
Paul Coverdell Forensic Science................................          (4,968)  ..............           5,000
DC Superior Court and Fugitive Task Forces.....................  ...............  ..............          41,105
Crime Identification Technology Act............................          68,626   ..............  ..............
SW Border Prosecutor Program...................................          39,740           48,063          40,000
Gun Violence Reduction Assistance..............................          44,708           47,683          45,000
Offender Re-Entry..............................................          14,837           13,504          13,504
Project Sentry \1\.............................................           9,935   ..............  ..............
                                                                ------------------------------------------------
      Total....................................................         977,624   ..............         682,993
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Funding is provided under the Juvenile Justice heading.

    Training and Technical Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends $20,662,000 to provide training and technical 
assistance for the advancement of community policing through 
the regional community policing institutes. This is the same 
level as the request and $134,000 above the current year.
    Events of national or regional importance attended by large 
numbers of people--such as sporting events, concerts, and 
cultural exhibitions--present unique security concerns for 
local law enforcement officials. The Committee expects the COPS 
Office to develop a program to train law enforcement on how to 
effectively secure facilities where events of national or 
regional importance are taking place. Furthermore, the COPS 
Office is directed to report to the Committee no later than 180 
days from enactment of this Act on ``best practices'' developed 
by various law enforcement agencies to secure these types of 
events.
    Bulletproof Vests.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$25,000,000 for continuation of the Bulletproof Vest program to 
assist State and local law enforcement purchase bullet- and 
stab-resistant vests. This level is $857,000 above the request 
and $279,000 below the current year.
    Tribal Law Enforcement.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $30,000,000 for the Indian Country grant programs to 
fund officer hiring and technology programs. This level is the 
same as the request and $4,773,000 below the current year.
    Methamphetamine Enforcement and Clean-Up.--The Committee 
recommends $60,000,000 to combat methamphetamine production and 
distribution, to target drug ``hot spots,'' and to remove and 
dispose of hazardous materials at clandestine methamphetamine 
labs. This amount is $3,239,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
appropriation and $40,000,000 above the request. The Committee 
is aware that the production, trafficking, and usage of 
methamphetamine, an extremely destructive and addictive 
synthetic drug, continues to be a national problem.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee has included 
$20,000,000 to reimburse the Drug Enforcement Administration 
for assistance to State and local law enforcement for proper 
removal and disposal of hazardous materials at clandestine 
methamphetamine labs.
    Within the amount provided, the COPS Office is directed to 
develop a training and technical assistance program to assist 
communities to identify and shut down meth labs, arrest and 
prosecute meth distributors, safely eliminate environmental 
hazards, and other related activities that communities and 
families impacted by meth abuse must address. The remaining 
available funding shall be awarded on a competitive basis to 
those State and local communities with the largest meth 
problems and with effective strategies to reduce meth 
production and abuse. The Committee expects this program to be 
coordinated with the Department of Health and Human Services 
Prevention of Meth and Inhalant Abuse program, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, and other appropriate Federal 
agencies.
    In addition, within the amount provided, the Committee 
expects the COPS Program Office, in consultation with DEA, to 
examine each of the following proposals, to provide grants if 
warranted, and to submit a report to the Committee on its 
intentions for each proposal:
          
 Virginia State Police to assist their 
        efforts in combating methamphetamine;
          
 DeKalb, Cherokee, and Marion Counties, AL, 
        for initiatives to combat methamphetamine;
          
 California Department of Justice, Bureau of 
        Narcotic Enforcement, for the California 
        Methamphetamine Strategy (CALMS);
          
 Washington State law enforcement 
        methamphetamine initiative;
          
 Southeast Missouri Drug Task Force;
          
 Regional Methamphetamine Training Center in 
        Sioux City, IA;
          
 Methamphetamine enforcement and clean-up 
        initiatives in Kansas for the Cowley County, Montgomery 
        County, and Butler County Sheriffs' Departments;
          
 Methamphetamine Task Force in East 
        Tennessee, to fight the spread of meth labs in this 
        region, including a video conferencing program at the 
        Hamilton County District Attorney's Office;
          
 Chilton County, AL, Sheriff's Department to 
        combat production and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Henderson County, TN, Sheriff's Department 
        to combat production and distribution of 
        methamphetamine;
          
 Arkansas Methamphetamine Law Enforcement 
        Initiative;
          
 Riverside County, CA, Sheriff's Department 
        to combat production and distribution of 
        methamphetamine;
          
 Franklin County, MO, Sheriff's Department 
        for Operation CHEM;
          
 Daviess County, KY, Sheriff's Department to 
        combat production and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous 
        Drug Control, Clandestine Laboratory Enforcement 
        Program;
          
 Louisiana Local Law Enforcement Task Force 
        to combat the production and distribution of 
        methamphetamine;
          
 Kansas Bureau of Investigation to combat the 
        production and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Nebraska State Patrol to combat the 
        production and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Henderson, NV, Police Department for 
        equipment and technologies to combat the production and 
        distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Indiana State Police to combat the 
        production and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Pennyrile Narcotics Task Force in KY;
          
 Philadelphia, PA, Operation Safe Streets 
        Initiative;
          
 Lawrence County, AL, Sheriff's Office to 
        assist their efforts against methamphetamine and 
        narcotics production and distribution;
          
 Phoenix House for methamphetamine programs 
        in Los Angeles, CA;
          
 Marion County, OR, to combat the production 
        and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Lincoln County, OR, to combat the production 
        and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 City of Columbia, SC, to combat the 
        production and distribution of methamphetamine;
          
 Buffalo Trace/Gateway Narcotics Task Force, 
        to support a multi-jurisdictional task force 
        methamphetamine training program;
          
 FIVCO Area Drug Enforcement Task Force, to 
        support a multi-jurisdictional task force 
        methamphetamine training program;
          
 Choctaw Nation in Oklahoma for efforts to 
        combat methamphetamine;
          
 Minot State University Rural Methamphetamine 
        Education Demonstration Project; and
          
  State of Hawaii, including Oahu, Maui 
        County, and Kaua'i County, to combat the production and 
        distribution of methamphetamine.
    Police Corps.--The Committee recommends $28,315,000 for the 
Police Corps program. This is a $13,412,000 increase over the 
fiscal year 2003 appropriation and equal to the request. The 
Committee has provided funding for Police Corps program 
management and administration costs under the Justice 
Assistance heading. The Committee recognizes that every State 
will not implement a Police Corps program and that the vast 
majority of law enforcement training will not be performed in 
Police Corps programs. The Committee directs OJP to work with 
State and local law enforcement departments to incorporate 
successful Police Corps training techniques into State and 
local law enforcement academy training programs in order to 
maximize the number of recruits that receive this advanced 
training. OJP shall submit a financial plan to the Committee no 
later than 45 days after enactment of this Act outlining how 
the program will be implemented within the limited level of 
funding provided.
    Law Enforcement Technology Program.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $100,000,000 for continued development 
of technologies and automated systems to assist State and local 
law enforcement agencies in investigating, responding to and 
preventing crimes, and gathering and analyzing information. In 
particular, the Committee recognizes the importance that 
sharing information among State and local law enforcement 
agencies can have in preventing crimes and in identifying and 
apprehending criminals.
    This funding is provided to address the specific crime 
fighting needs of law enforcement. Funding to address the 
communications and interoperability needs of first responders, 
including fire, hazmat, emergency medical services, and law 
enforcement is not provided under this Act.
    In examining all grant applications under this program, the 
COPS Office is directed to ensure that proposals meet equipment 
standards adopted by the National Institute of Justice and the 
Bureau of Justice Assistance within the Office of Justice 
Programs, and the Office of Law Enforcement Standards within 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee expects the COPS 
Office to examine each of the following proposals, to provide 
grants if warranted, if each application complies with the 
direction provided above, and to submit a report to the 
Committee on its intentions for each proposal.
          
 Regional Law Enforcement Technologies 
        Program in Kentucky;
          
 Simulated Prison Environment Crisis Aversion 
        Tools for programs in Alabama, North Carolina and 
        Pennsylvania;
          
 New Orleans Metropolitan Crime Commission;
          
 North Shenandoah Valley Regional law 
        enforcement agencies for law enforcement technologies;
          
 Criminal Information Sharing Alliance 
        Network;
          
 Florida Department of Corrections for a 
        system to electronically monitor criminal probationers 
        and link their location to crime events;
          
 I-SAFE America;
          
 Southside Virginia law enforcement agencies 
        for law enforcement technologies;
          
 Great Cities University Coalition to improve 
        criminal justice data systems;
          
 East Valley Community Justice Center in CA;
          
 Idaho State Police for mobile data 
        computers;
          
 National Training and Information Center 
        (NTIC);
          
 Law Enforcement On-Line;
          
 Center for Criminal Justice Technology;
          
 Maryland State Police Department for an 
        integrated police vehicle technology system;
          
 Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police Force;
          
 State of Delaware for the Courts Organized 
        to Serve project;
          
 Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and 
        Delinquency for integrated justice data hubs;
          
 California University of Pennsylvania for 
        support of the Crime Mapping Center;
          
 Arkansas State Police for law enforcement 
        technologies;
          
 Georgia State University to implement an 
        Improved Crime Data system;
          
 ``A Child Is Missing'' for telephony 
        research to locate missing persons;
          
 California Highway Patrol for in-car law 
        enforcement technologies;
          
 University of Southern California Advanced 
        Simulation Training for law enforcement research;
          
 Minnesota Association of County Probation 
        Officers for law enforcement technologies;
          
 West Virginia High Technology Consortium 
        Foundation for the AMBER VIEW project;
          
 Worcester Polytechnic Institute for the 
        development of law enforcement technologies;
          
 Missouri Police Chief's Association for law 
        enforcement technology upgrades; and
          
 Grants for technology improvements to police 
        and sheriff's departments in communities that are in 
        need of modernizing their equipment to improve their 
        crime prevention and investigative capabilities and for 
        which alternative sources of funding are not available, 
        including: Tucson and Cochise County, AZ; Stark County, 
        OH; Loudoun County, VA; Herndon, VA; Key West, FL; 
        Fairfax County, VA; Fauquier County, VA; Carlsbad, CA; 
        Morris County, NJ; Placer County, CA; Pickaway County, 
        OH; Scott County and Winchester, IL; San Bernardino, 
        CA; Anchorage, KY; Audubon Park, KY; Jeffersontown, KY; 
        Onondaga County, NY; Syracuse, NY; Clearwater, FL; 
        Largo, FL; Pinellas County, FL; Los Angeles County, CA; 
        Wyoming County and Livingston County, NY; Greene 
        County, MO; Greater Harris County, TX; St. Charles, IL; 
        St. Clair County, AL; Jefferson County, AL; Frederick 
        County, MD; Hanover County, VA; Culpeper, VA; Louisa 
        County, VA; Page County, VA; Prince William County, VA; 
        York and Stafford Counties, VA; Murrieta, CA; Charles 
        Town, WV; Cincinnati, OH; Lubbock, TX; Loudon County, 
        TN; Hillsborough, NJ; Clark County, KY; Chesterfield 
        County, VA; Suffolk, VA; Chesapeake, VA; Cobb County, 
        GA; Rockingham County and Harrisonburg, VA; Lumber 
        River, NC; Cape Fear, NC; Greenville, NC; Madison 
        Township, OH; Sacramento County, CA; Lancaster, PA; 
        County of Contra Costa, CA; Navajo Nation in Arizona; 
        San Carlos Apache Nation in Arizona; Bayamon and 
        Guaynabo, PR; Stamford, CT; Gainesville and Alachua, 
        FL; Northampton County, VA; Accomack County, VA; 
        Virginia Beach, VA; Kalamazoo County, MI; Kankakee 
        County, IL; Harrison County, WV; Sandy City, UT; 
        Calvert County, MD; San Francisco, CA; Bastrop, LA; 
        Suffolk County, NY; Des Moines, IA; Whitpain Township, 
        PA; Philadelphia, PA; Clackamas County, OR; Luzerne 
        County, PA; Sumas, Lynden, and Blaine, WA; Snohomish 
        County, WA; Macon, GA; Abilene, TX; Newport, RI; 
        Cumberland, RI; North Providence, RI; Minneapolis, MN; 
        Hennepin County, MN; Kitsap County, WA; Erie County, 
        OH; Lucas County, OH; Greenburgh, NY; Haverstraw, NY; 
        Rye Brook, NY; Tuckahoe, NY; Westchester County, NY; 
        Somerset, Fayette, Greene and Washington Counties, PA; 
        West Springfield, MA; Worcester County, MA; Pittsfield, 
        MA; Gary, IN; Lake County, IN; Porter County, IN; 
        Bamberg County, SC; Marion County, SC; Shelton, CT; 
        Woodbridge, CT; Dallas, TX; Tompkins County, NY; 
        Phoenix, AZ; Cary, NC; Madison, WI; Milwaukee County, 
        WI; Pomona, CA; El Paso, TX; Lakewood, CA; City of 
        Fullerton, CA; Rosemead, CA; West Covina, CA; 
        Henderson, NC; Portland, OR; San Luis Obispo County, 
        CA; Virgin Islands; Detroit, MI; Austin, TX; Borough of 
        Spotswood, NJ; West Windsor Township, NJ; Grand Coteau, 
        LA; Lafayette, LA; Sunset, LA; Jefferson County, TX; 
        Jackson County, MO; St. Paul, MN; Baltimore, MD; 
        Jackson, TN; Jackson County, MS; City of Jackson, MS; 
        Essex County, MA; Rockville, MD; Tacoma, WA; Hudson 
        County, NJ; Haverhill, MA; Evanston, IL; Milburn, NJ; 
        Sumner, Macon, Bedford, Robertson, Wilson, and Putnam 
        Counties, TN.
    Criminal Records Upgrade.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $56,924,000 for the Criminal Records Upgrade program. 
This is an increase of $17,184,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
level and equal to the request. The goal of this program is to 
ensure that accurate records are available for use in law 
enforcement, including sex offender registry requirements, and 
to permit States to identify ineligible firearm purchasers, 
persons ineligible to hold positions involving children, the 
elderly, or the disabled, and persons subject to protective 
orders or wanted, arrested, or convicted of stalking and/or 
domestic violence. This program helps States build their 
infrastructure to connect to national record check systems both 
to supply information and to conduct the requisite checks.
    DNA Initiative.--The Committee recommendation is 
$174,353,000 for the Administration's DNA Initiative, which is 
$93,344,000 above the current year level and equal to the 
request. The Committee has provided funding for the management 
and administration of this program under the Justice Assistance 
heading.
    The recommendation fully funds the first year of the 
Administration's initiative to eliminate the DNA backlog in 
five years. The Committee recognizes that DNA technology will 
allow law enforcement to identify certain criminals quickly and 
accurately, solve more crimes, especially violent crimes such 
as murder and rape, and identify persons mistakenly accused or 
convicted of crimes. Further, the Committee understands that 
NIJ estimates a nationwide DNA backlog of 350,000 rape and 
homicide samples that have yet to be tested.
    In order to address this backlog and enhance law 
enforcement's ability to uphold justice, the recommendation 
includes funding to (1) reduce the backlog of DNA casework and 
``no suspect'' DNA evidentiary samples; (2) reduce the backlog 
of convicted offender DNA samples, (3) increase the capacity of 
our nation's crime labs; and (4) support enhanced DNA-related 
research, program evaluation, and training.
    Within the level of funding provided, not less than 
$35,000,000 is provided for automation and equipment upgrades 
to enhance crime lab capacities, and $10,000,000 is provided 
for DNA-related training, technical assistance, research, 
statistical collection and analysis, and program evaluation and 
demonstrations.
    Funding under this program shall be distributed on a 
formula basis to most effectively address the DNA backlog. The 
Committee expects each State to receive funding under this 
program and that units of local government will be eligible to 
receive funding. The Committee directs OJP to provide a 
financial plan to the Committee no later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act, describing how this funding is proposed 
to be allocated to State and local agencies.
    The Committee expects NIJ to support DNA external audit 
programs to ensure continuing quality of analytical services. 
The Committee expects NIJ to evaluate the necessity and 
feasibility of establishing regional forensics science training 
centers.
    Paul Coverdell Forensics Science Improvements Grants.--In 
addition to the $174,353,000 provided specifically to address 
the DNA backlog, the recommendation includes $5,000,000 for 
Paul Coverdell Forensics Science Improvement Grants, which is 
$5,000,000 above the request and $32,000 above the current 
year. These funds are provided for crime labs and medical 
examiners to improve the quality and timeliness of forensic 
science or medical examiner services and are available for 
expenses related to personnel, computerization, equipment, 
supplies, accreditation, certification, education, and 
training.
    Southwest Border Prosecutions.--The Committee recommends 
$40,000,000 to assist State and local law enforcement agencies, 
including prosecutors, probation officers, courts, and 
detention facilities along the southwest border with the 
handling and processing of drug and alien cases referred from 
Federal arrests. The Committee directs the Department of 
Justice to study whether a similar number of cases are being 
referred to local prosecutors from Federal arrests along the 
Northern border. The Department shall report its findings to 
the Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Project Safe Neighborhoods.--The Committee recommends 
$45,000,000 for Project Safe Neighborhoods. This program 
provides grants to address gun violence and gang and drug-
related crime by working in partnership with communities and 
law enforcement agencies. In addition, $20,000,000 is provided 
for Project Sentry under the Juvenile Justice heading for a 
companion program to combat youth gun violence and gang and 
drug-related crimes. The Committee expects these programs to be 
closely coordinated with the Weed and Seed program, the Offices 
of the United States Attorneys, and the Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Youth Crime Gun Interdiction 
Initiative.
    Police Integrity Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$17,000,000 for the Police Integrity Grants program. This level 
is $147,000 above the current year and $37,000 above the 
request. The program promotes police integrity, the appropriate 
use of police authority, and community policing through 
delivering training and technical assistance to local 
communities, as well as by providing innovative grants that 
will help agencies create or strengthen local programs that 
build trust between police and their communities.
    D.C. Superior Court and Fugitive Apprehension.--The 
recommendation includes $28,519,000 for the U.S. Marshals 
Service to provide services to the D.C. Superior Court. In 
addition, the recommendation includes $12,586,000 for U.S. 
Marshals Service Fugitive Apprehension Task Forces with State 
and local law enforcement. These task forces team up Federal, 
State, and local law enforcement to concentrate apprehension 
efforts on violent fugitive felons and drug offenders. The 
recommendation provides funding for the four existing task 
forces and provides funds to establish two additional task 
forces in the areas of the country with the greatest fugitive 
apprehension needs. The Committee expects to be consulted on 
the establishment of these additional task forces.
    Offender Reentry.--The Committee recommends $13,504,000 for 
the law enforcement costs related to establishing offender 
reentry programs. Offender reentry programs establish 
partnerships among institutional corrections, community 
corrections, social services programs, community policing, and 
community leaders to prepare for the successful return of 
inmates to their home neighborhoods. The amount recommended is 
provided to fund law enforcement participation and coordination 
of offender reentry programs. The Committee is pleased that the 
OJP is working in collaboration with the Departments of Labor, 
Health and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, and 
Education in the execution of this program.
    Management and Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$26,130,000 for management and administration. This level is 
equal to the request.

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $387,629,000 to support grants 
under the Violence Against Women Act, which is the same level 
as fiscal year 2003 and $14,142,000 above the request. These 
programs were previously funded under the State and Local Law 
Enforcement Assistance account.
    Grants provided under this recommendation are for the 
following programs:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       2004
                                                               FY 2003 enacted  FY 2004 request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOP Grants..................................................         183,334          179,599          183,334
    (National Institute of Justice--R&D).....................          (5,166)          (5,200)          (5,200)
    (Safe Start Program).....................................          (9,935)         (10,000)         (10,000)
    (Bureau of Justice Statistics)...........................            (994)  ...............  ...............
    (Transitional Housing Assistance)........................  ...............  ...............         (15,000)
CASA (Special Advocates).....................................          11,897           11,334           11,897
Training for Judicial Personnel..............................           2,281            1,940            2,281
Grants for Televised Testimony...............................             994              659              994
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies..........................          64,503           62,637           64,503
Rural Domestic Violence Assistance Grants....................          39,685           37,971           39,685
Training Programs............................................           4,957            4,109            4,957
Stalking Database............................................           2,981            2,635            2,981
Violence on College Campuses.................................           9,935            8,894            9,935
Civil Legal Assistance.......................................          39,740           38,026           39,740
Elder Abuse Grant Program....................................           4,968            4,447            4,968
Safe Haven Project...........................................          14,903           14,321           14,903
Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims...........           7,451            6,915            7,451
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................................         387,629          373,487          387,629
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Funding included for Violence Against Women Act programs 
will continue to provide resources to expand units of law 
enforcement officers and prosecutors specifically targeted at 
crimes against women; to develop and implement effective arrest 
and prosecution policies to prevent, identify and respond to 
violent crimes against women; and to provide much needed 
victims services including specialized domestic violence court 
advocates to obtain protection orders.
    Language is included to allow management and administration 
funding to be transferred to the appropriate accounts.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$462,282,000 for Juvenile Justice Programs for fiscal year 
2004. The budget request proposes to fund juvenile justice 
programs under the Justice Assistance heading. The Committee 
recommendation is $195,098,000 above the request for similar 
juvenile justice programs.
    The table below displays the Committee's recommendation 
compared to the levels requested under the Justice Assistance 
heading for the same programs.

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             FY 2004
                Program                 FY 2004 request   recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
 Prevention Act:
    Part A--Concentration of Federal               200            7,000
     Efforts..........................
    Part B--Formula Grant Program.....          88,804           90,000
    Part C--Juvenile Delinquency Block          37,917           40,000
     Grants...........................
    Part D--Research, Eval., Tech.               7,000            7,000
     Assist. & Training...............
    Part E--Developing New Initiatives           3,000           50,000
Title V--Incentive Grants.............          77,291           92,282
    Tribal Youth......................         (12,500)         (12,500)
    Gang Prevention...................  ...............         (20,000)
    Alcohol Prevention................  ...............         (25,000)
Project Sentry........................          19,484           20,000
Secure Our Schools Act................  ...............          20,000
Project Childsafe.....................          25,007           25,000
Victims of Child Abuse Programs.......           8,481           11,000
Juvenile Accountability Block Grant...  ...............         100,000
                                       ---------------------------------
      Total...........................         267,184          462,282
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The recommendation funds juvenile delinquency prevention 
and accountability programs in accordance with Public Law 107-
273, which reauthorizes Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention Act and the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant 
programs.
    The Committee is concerned about recent reports concerning 
incidents of violent ``hazing'' activities in schools. The 
Office of Justice Programs is directed within 180 days to 
report on the prevalence of such incidents and on strategies 
that can be used by school and law enforcement officials to 
address these problems.
    Within the overall amounts recommended under Part E, OJP is 
directed to review the following proposals, provide a grant if 
warranted, and submit a report to the Committee on its 
intentions regarding:
          
 Northwestern University's Juvenile Project;
          
 World Vision for at-risk youth programs;
          
 Parents Anonymous;
          
 National Council of Juvenile and Family 
        Courts, which provides continuing legal education and 
        family and juvenile law;
          
 Teens, Crime and Community program;
          
 Family, Career, and Community Leaders of 
        America ``Stop the Violence'' program;
          
 Prevent Child Abuse America for the programs 
        of the National Family Support Roundtable;
          
 Partnership for Prevention for juvenile 
        delinquency prevention programs;
          
 National coordinated law related education 
        program;
          
 Learning for Life;
          
 Virginia Attorney General's Office for Class 
        Action and other educational programs in Virginia 
        schools;
          
 Hamilton Fish National Institute on School 
        and Community Violence;
          
 Farmington Children's Home for delinquency 
        prevention programs;
          
 Comin' Up youth gang prevention program;
          
 Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries for a 
        youth corrections program;
          
 Gambling Addiction Prevention Program for 
        at-risk youth in Peoria, IL;
          
 IMPACT/Night Light Program in San Bernardino 
        County, CA, to team police officers with probation 
        officers to reduce juvenile crime;
          
 Child Endangerment Response Coalition in 
        Spokane, WA;
          
 Center for Women and Children, Inc. for a 
        child abuse prevention program;
          
 Healing Tree Program for collaborative 
        efforts with law enforcement to prevent child abuse;
          
 Best Friends Foundation for delinquency 
        prevention programs;
          
 Community Prosecuting Attorney Service 
        System--Safe School Initiative;
          
 St. Petersburg, FL, for a delinquency 
        prevention program;
          
 YMCA of Suncoast in Dunedin, FL, for an at-
        risk youth program;
          
 Eisenhower Foundation for the Youth Safe 
        Havens program;
          
 Pinellas County, FL, Police Athletic League;
          
 First Tee;
          
 Florida Gulf Coast University Interagency 
        Family Assessment Team program for at-risk youth;
          
 Project Challenge for a program to reduce 
        youth recidivism in North Carolina;
          
 Will County, IL, Children's Advocacy Center;
          
 Gracious Promise Foundation for Project 
        Incarceration Cycle Escape for Kids;
          
 Girls and Boys Town USA;
          
 University of South Alabama for youth 
        violence prevention research;
          
 ARISE Foundation;
          
 At-risk youth program in Allegheny County, 
        PA;
          
 University of Connecticut for a juvenile 
        delinquency prevention program;
          
 Juvenile re-entry program in Michigan;
          
 Residential Care Consortium for delinquency 
        prevention programs;
          
 Yellowstone Boys and Girls Ranch for 
        delinquency prevention programs;
          
 Monroe County, NY, for a juvenile justice 
        integration initiative;
          
 Family & Children Services of Tulsa, OK, to 
        expand programs to assist at-risk youth;
          
 Casita Maria After-School Program and Day 
        Camp for at-risk youth;
          
 Mary Mitchell Family and Youth Center to 
        fund programs for at-risk youth;
          
 Suffolk County, NY, for the District 
        Attorney's anti-gang initiative;
          
 City of Florence, KY, for the SAFE Schools 
        Model City program;
          
 Granite, UT, COALITIONS Project for at-risk 
        youth;
          
 Pine Tree Legal Center's Children's Law 
        Project (CLP) for the State of Maine;
          
 Girls Incorporated of Huntsville, AL, to 
        work with at-risk youth;
          
 National Children's Advocacy Center;
          
 Northwest Alabama Children's Advocacy Center 
        in Florence, AL;
          
 ``The Teen Shelter'' in Huntsville, AL, to 
        work with at-risk youth;
          
 ``Philadelphia Safe & Sound'' to expand its 
        Youth Violence Reduction Partnership in Philadelphia, 
        PA;
          
 Father's Day Rally Committee of 
        Philadelphia, PA, to support youth violence 
        interdiction programs;
          
 Lucas County, OH, for the Community 
        Mentoring Partnership for Juveniles;
          
 Appalachia Juvenile and Family Rural and 
        Mining Crisis Program;
          
 Fitchburg, MA, for the Montachusett 
        Opportunity Council Program for At-Risk Youth;
          
 Orange, MA, for the Quabbin Mediation Youth 
        Violence Prevention Project;
          
 State of Indiana for the ``No Workshops, No 
        Jumpshots'' Program for at-risk youth;
          
 Big Brothers and Big Sisters of South 
        Georgia; Albany, GA, for ``Buddies in School'';
          
 Americus/Sumter County, GA, for the 
        ``Visions for Sumter'' program;
          
 Urban League of Greater Columbus, GA, for 
        the Chattahoochee Court Appointed Special Advocate 
        Program;
          
 Youth Crime Watch of America;
          
 City of Macon, GA, for services for first-
        time juvenile offenders and to address crime, gang, and 
        drug problems;
          
 Valdosta Technical College for programs to 
        support at-risk youth;
          
 Overtown Youth Center in Miami, FL, for 
        programs to support at-risk youth;
          
 Chicago, IL, ``After-School Counts'' and 
        ``After-School Matters'' programs to assist at-risk 
        youth;
          
 The Erikson Institute Fund for delinquency 
        prevention programs in Chicago, IL;
          
 Village of Riverdale, IL, for the Youth 
        Intervention Program;
          
 ``Operation Quality Time'' program for at-
        risk youth in Phoenix, AZ;
          
 Little Ferry, NJ, for a school safety 
        program;
          
 Secaucus, NJ, for a school safety program;
          
 City of Downey, CA, for an anti-gang 
        program;
          
 Demonstration project to examine racial 
        disparities in local juvenile justice systems under 
        Part D and Part E of the JJDPA;
          
 Huntington Park, CA, for juvenile assistance 
        activities at the Police Department Regional Youth 
        Center;
          
 Los Angeles, CA, BEST for delinquency 
        prevention programs;
          
 Long Island University for programs to 
        assist at-risk children;
          
 City of Rialto, CA, for the Police 
        Activities League program;
          
 Studio LAB in Los Angeles, CA, for programs 
        for at-risk youth;
          
 Cypress Park Youth and Family Center in Los 
        Angeles, CA, for programs for at-risk youths;
          
 Echo Park, CA, for El Centro Del Pueblo 
        youth programs;
          
 A Place Called Home in Los Angeles, CA, for 
        a delinquency prevention program;
          
 Soundview Community in Action to expand and 
        develop additional outreach programs for at-risk youth 
        in the South Bronx;
          
 Long Island City/Vanderbilt delinquency 
        prevention programs for at-risk youth;
          
 Queens, NY, for a youth development program 
        to help at-risk youth;
          
 ``Dispelling Problem Behaviors in 
        Adjudicated Teens and At-Risk Youth'' initiative in the 
        Barrio of Corpus Christi, TX;
          
 Brooklyn Academy of Music for programs in 
        support of at-risk youth;
          
 Brooklyn Public Library for ``Library Cadet 
        Program'' in support of at-risk youth;
          
 Hacienda-La Puente, CA, Unified School 
        District for the Seniors With Interests in New 
        Generations Delinquency Prevention Program;
          
 City of Detroit, MI, for the Mayor's Time 
        Public Safety and Public Service Academies in support 
        of at-risk youth;
          
 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
        to implement a juvenile delinquency prevention program 
        for middle school aged children;
          
 Caribbean American Steel Pan Education 
        Center in New York for COMMUNITYSAFE;
          
 Boricua College to implement ``Project 
        Success'';
          
 State of Hawaii for the Juvenile Justice 
        Information System;
          
 Santa Barbara, CA, Police Department for the 
        Police Activities League;
          
 Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts for 
        programs in support of at-risk youth;
          
 Baltimore, MD, to develop alternative 
        education centers for at-risk youth;
          
 Lane County, OR, for the ``Breaking the 
        Cycle'' program for juveniles;
          
 The Gateway Foundation for programs in 
        support of at-risk youth;
          
 Rock Island County, IL, Youth Mentoring 
        Program.
          
 National Institute for Law and Equity for a 
        research project on at-risk juveniles;
          
 Institute for International Sport for 
        projects to prevent youth crime;
          
 Southern Christian Leadership Conference for 
        juvenile delinquency and mentoring programs;
          
 Suffolk University Law School for the 
        Juvenile Justice Center;
          
 Union County College for the ``College for 
        Teens'' program for at-risk youth.
          
 Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center in 
        Houston, TX, for juvenile crime prevention programs;
          
 Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory 
        for an after-school program for at-risk youth;
          
 Birmingham, AL, Educational Technology 
        Center for programs to support at-risk youth and 
        prevent delinquency;
          
 Richmond, VA, ``No Workshops, No Jumpshots'' 
        for at-risk youth;
          
 Martin Luther King, Jr. Freedom Center in 
        Oakland, CA, to promote conflict resolution and 
        decrease youth violence; and
          
 FUSE in Texarkana, AR, for programs in 
        support of at-risk youth.
    Gang Prevention.--The recommendation includes $20,000,000, 
within Title V grants, for OJP to administer a gang resistance 
and education program in conjunction with the Bureau of 
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF). In prior 
years, ATF administered a gang resistance program through local 
school systems to teach middle school age children to resist 
gangs, peer pressure, and youth violence by teaching skills to 
make responsible decisions, set goals for themselves, and 
resolve conflicts without resorting to violence. The Committee 
directs OJP, using its expertise in gang prevention programs, 
to work with ATF and build upon their program to enhance the 
Department's gang resistance efforts. These funds shall be 
available to continue the anti-gang education programs in 
schools and to work with communities, including U.S. Attorney's 
Offices, to develop comprehensive anti-gang strategies. The 
Committee directs OJP to submit a financial plan for this 
program within 45 days of enactment of this Act.
    Secure Our Schools Act.--The recommendation includes 
$20,000,000 for expenses authorized by the Secure Our Schools 
Act (Public Law 106-386), such as metal detectors, locks, 
lighting and other deterrent measures; security assessments; 
security training of personnel and students; and coordination 
with local law enforcement. This amount is $20,000,000 above 
the request and $15,033,000 above the current level.
    Project Childsafe.--The recommendation provides $25,000,000 
for the continuation of Project Childsafe to purchase and 
deliver child safety locks for handguns across America. The 
Committee directs that none of funds provided by this Act for 
Project Childsafe be obligated until a final lock standard is 
adopted.
    Juvenile Accountability Block Grants.--The recommendation 
provides $100,000,000 for the Juvenile Accountability Block 
Grants program as authorized by Public Law 107-273. The 
Administration proposed the elimination of this program. The 
Committee has partially restored funding for this program to be 
administered under the new authorization. These funds shall be 
available for the following purposes:
          (1) developing, implementing, and administering 
        graduated sanctions for juvenile offenders;
          (2) building, expanding, renovating, or operating 
        temporary or permanent juvenile correction, detention, 
        or community corrections facilities;
          (3) hiring juvenile court judges, probation officers, 
        and court-appointed defenders and special advocates, 
        and funding pretrial services (including mental health 
        screening and assessment) for juvenile offenders, to 
        promote the effective and expeditious administration of 
        the juvenile justice system;
          (4) hiring additional prosecutors, so that more cases 
        involving violent juvenile offenders can be prosecuted 
        and case backlogs reduced;
          (5) providing funding to enable prosecutors to 
        address drug, gang, and youth violence problems more 
        effectively and for technology, equipment, and training 
        to assist prosecutors in identifying and expediting the 
        prosecution of violent juvenile offenders;
          (6) establishing and maintaining training programs 
        for law enforcement and other court personnel with 
        respect to preventing and controlling juvenile crime;
          (7) establishing juvenile gun courts for the 
        prosecution and adjudication of juvenile firearms 
        offenders;
          (8) establishing drug court programs for juvenile 
        offenders that provide continuing judicial supervision 
        over juvenile offenders with substance abuse problems 
        and the integrated administration of other sanctions 
        and services for such offenders;
          (9) establishing and maintaining a system of juvenile 
        records designed to promote public safety;
          (10) establishing and maintaining interagency 
        information-sharing programs that enable the juvenile 
        and criminal justice systems, schools, and social 
        services agencies to make more informed decisions 
        regarding the early identification, control, 
        supervision, and treatment of juveniles who repeatedly 
        commit serious delinquent or criminal acts;
          (11) establishing and maintaining accountability-
        based programs designed to reduce recidivism among 
        juveniles who are referred by law enforcement personnel 
        or agencies;
          (12) establishing and maintaining programs to conduct 
        risk and need assessments of juvenile offenders that 
        facilitate the effective early intervention and the 
        provision of comprehensive services, including mental 
        health screening and treatment and substance abuse 
        testing and treatment to such offenders;
          (13) establishing and maintaining accountability-
        based programs that are designed to enhance school 
        safety;
          (14) establishing and maintaining restorative justice 
        programs;
          (15) establishing and maintaining programs to enable 
        juvenile courts and juvenile probation officers to be 
        more effective and efficient in holding juvenile 
        offenders accountable and reducing recidivism; or
          (16) hiring detention and corrections personnel, and 
        establishing and maintaining training programs for such 
        personnel to improve facility practices and 
        programming.
    Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws.--In order to address the 
Committee's concerns with the use of alcohol by minors and the 
accessibility of alcohol to minors, the Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 to assist States to develop comprehensive and 
coordinated initiatives to enforce State laws that prohibit 
alcoholic beverage sales to, or consumption by, minors.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee recommends a 
total of $11,000,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act (VOCA).
          
 $2,000,000 to Regional Children's Advocacy 
        Centers, as authorized by section 213 of VOCA;
          
 $6,603,000 to establish local Children's 
        Advocacy Centers, as authorized by section 214 of VOCA;
          
 $1,497,000 for a continuation grant to the 
        National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse for 
        specialized technical assistance and training programs 
        to improve the prosecution of child abuse cases, as 
        authorized by section 214a of VOCA; and
          
 $900,000 for a continuation grant to the 
        National Children's Alliance for technical assistance 
        and training, as authorized by section 214a of VOCA.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$56,554,000, the amount requested for these programs. The 
budget proposed to consolidate these programs under the Justice 
Assistance heading. The recommendation includes $49,054,000 for 
death benefits to eligible survivors of Federal, State, and 
local public safety officers whose death was the direct and 
proximate result of traumatic injury sustained in the line of 
duty. This program is considered mandatory for scorekeeping 
purposes.
    The recommendation also includes $3,500,000 for the Public 
Safety Officers Educational Assistance Program and $4,000,000 
for disability benefits for fiscal year 2004.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee has included the following general provisions 
for the Department of Justice in this bill:
    Section 101 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, which makes up to $45,000 of the funds 
appropriated to the Department of Justice available to the 
Attorney General for reception and representation expenses.
    Section 102 provides language, included in Appropriations 
Acts for the last seven years and prior to 1994, which 
prohibits the use of funds to perform abortions in the Federal 
Prison System.
    Section 103 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, which prohibits use of the funds in this 
bill to require any person to perform, or facilitate the 
performance of, an abortion.
    Section 104 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, which states that nothing in the previous 
section removes the obligation of the Director of the Bureau of 
Prisons to provide escort services to female inmates who seek 
to obtain abortions outside a Federal facility.
    Section 105 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, which allows the Department of Justice to 
spend up to $10,000,000 for rewards for information regarding 
criminal acts and acts of terrorism against a United States 
person or property at levels not to exceed $2,000,000 per 
award.
    Section 106 provides language similar to language included 
in previous Appropriations Acts, which allows the Department of 
Justice, subject to the Committee's reprogramming procedures, 
to transfer up to 5 percent between any appropriation, but 
limits to 10 percent the amount that can be transferred into 
any one appropriation.
    Section 107 provides language to continue section 114 of 
Public Law 107-77 during fiscal year 2004.
    Section 108 provides language to continue authorities 
contained in P.L. 107-273 until a subsequent Justice Department 
authorization act is enacted.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$5,258,561,000 in general purpose discretionary funds for the 
programs of the United States Trade Representative, the 
International Trade Commission and the Department of Commerce 
for fiscal year 2004, $471,903,000 below the current year 
level, excluding supplemental amounts, and $558,283,000 below 
the request.

                  Trade and Infrastructure Development


                            RELATED AGENCIES


            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $41,994,000 for the Office of the 
United States Trade Representative (USTR) for fiscal year 2004, 
which is $7,222,000 above the current year, and $5,000,000 
above the request.
    The Committee is deeply concerned that the United States 
trade deficit with other nations has reached an historic high. 
In 2002, the United States imported $103 billion more in goods 
and services from the People's Republic of China (PRC) than the 
PRC imported goods and services from the United States. At the 
same time, the Committee has received serious complaints from 
small and medium-sized American businesses perceiving that 
Chinese companies and their representatives have had undue 
influence on the decisions of the United States Government with 
regard to trade. As a result of this information, the Committee 
held a public hearing to oversee the efforts of the Office of 
the United States Trade Representative, the Bureau of Customs, 
and the International Trade Administration to enforce current 
trade laws with respect to the experiences of many U.S. 
businesses.
    One company official asserted that the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative refused to meet with the American 
company's representative but met with PRC representatives on 
more than one occasion. After the hearing, the USTR submitted 
information detailing one meeting with the petitioner and five 
telephone calls, and four meetings with PRC officials and one 
telephone conversation with the Vice Minister of the Ministry 
of Foreign Trade and Economic Cooperation.
    The Committee remains deeply concerned that American 
businesses and their representatives may be marginalized in 
trade negotiations, and directs the USTR to improve 
responsiveness to American small- and medium-sized businesses.
    The Committee directs the USTR to provide a report 
detailing steps taken by the PRC Government toward meeting its 
WTO obligations, no later than six months after the enactment 
of this Act.
    The Committee strongly urges the USTR to make use of all 
available mechanisms, including the safeguards delineated under 
the Trade Act of 1974, including Sections 301 and 421, to 
address the disruptions resulting from trade with the PRC.
    The recommendation includes language designating funding 
for negotiations regarding the PRC. The Committee 
recommendation includes an additional $2,000,000 to provide 
three negotiator positions in the Office of North Asian 
Affairs, three attorney positions in the Office of Monitoring 
and Enforcement, one position for the Office of Services, 
Investment, and Intellectual Property to be solely dedicated to 
PRC's intellectual property rights practices, one position for 
the Office of Industry, Market Access and Telecommunications to 
address market access issues, and one position to address 
China-related matters at the WTO in Geneva, Switzerland. The 
Committee directs the USTR to increase the number of positions 
dedicated to enforcing the commitments made by the PRC 
Government upon accession to the WTO.
    Inadequate Budget Requests.--The Committee remains 
concerned that, as in the current year, the Administration's 
request for fiscal year 2004 is insufficient to meet the 
operational requirements of the Office. In the current year, 
the Committee provided an additional $2,000,000 above the 
request for the operations of the Office. Given the expansive 
trade agenda recently announced by the Administration, the 
Committee recommendation provides additional resources to 
maintain the operations of the Office and to pay for the 
increased costs of ongoing and future trade negotiations. The 
Committee expects the USTR to ensure resources requested in the 
fiscal year 2005 request are sufficient to cover the operations 
of the USTR.
    Free Trade Agreements and WTO Negotiations.--Given the 
Administration's commitment to additional trade agreements, 
including the Middle East Initiative, the Committee 
recommendation includes funding for new positions, including 
one negotiator for the Middle East/North Africa within the 
Office of Europe and the Mediterranean; one negotiator within 
the Office of Services, Investment & Intellectual Property; one 
new market access negotiator, and a new Assistant Director for 
steel policy; an international customs negotiator and a 
negotiator for industry subsidies within the World Trade 
Organization (WTO) and Multilateral Affairs Office; and one 
additional attorney position for the Office if Monitoring and 
Enforcement.
    The Committee understands that increased Free Trade 
Agreement negotiations, and intensified negotiations under the 
Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) and the World Trade 
Organization global negotiations are scheduled to conclude by 
January 2005. To meet this requirement, the Committee includes 
an additional $800,000 for increased travel to negotiating 
venues, and $600,000 for interpretation, translation, 
videoconferencing, and related logistical expenses in support 
of the increased trade negotiating agenda.
    In addition, the Committee recommendation includes $700,000 
for the increased costs of office support in the Geneva, 
Switzerland, office, and for additional office equipment, 
telephones, and space costs for additional personnel; and 
$600,000 to cover anticipated costs of printing completed trade 
agreements in the Federal Register.
    Reporting Requirements.--The Committee directs the USTR to 
provide a spending plan for all funding provided under this 
heading. This report should include personnel costs, travel 
expenses, overhead costs for the Washington, D.C. facility, 
overhead costs associated with USTR presence in Geneva, 
Switzerland, and the costs associated with ensuring greater 
transparency of the process including the timely publication of 
reports and trade agreements. Further, this report should 
identify costs associated with each programmatic office as 
outlined in the 2003 organizational chart, including the Office 
of North Asian Affairs. This spending plan should be provided 
to the Committee on Appropriations no later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act. Further, the Committee expects this 
plan to be updated to reflect the obligation of funds on a 
monthly basis, beginning with the second quarter of fiscal year 
2004.
    FTAA Permanent Secretariat.--The Committee supports the 
efforts of the USTR to bring the Permanent Secretariat of the 
Free Trade Area of the Americas to the United States. The 
Committee applauds the actions taken by the business community 
of Miami, Florida, to support this effort.
    WTO Fund.--The Trade Act of 2002 established a fund for the 
payment of total or partial settlement of any dispute before 
the World Trade Organization. No funds have been provided in 
this or any other Act to capitalize the fund. Public Law 108-11 
included a lump-sum payment to the European Communities to 
cover a three-year period in a music-licensing dispute. 
However, this was intended as a one-time only appropriation. 
There is a long-established practice of using suspension of 
tariff concessions to resolve trade disputes and the Committee 
does not intend to appropriate funds to settle these matters. 
The Committee cautions U.S. negotiators that there should be no 
commitments made within trade agreements to use funds from the 
U.S. Treasury that have neither been requested nor appropriated 
to resolve trade disputes.
    WTO Negotiations.--Over the last three years, the United 
States has lost approximately 85 percent of all cases involving 
U.S. antidumping, countervailing duty and safeguard measures 
brought against it in the World Trade Organization (WTO). If 
this record continues, our workers, farmers and companies may 
have no effective remedy against unfair and injurious foreign 
trade practices. Although the responsibility of U.S. 
representation at the WTO statutorily resides with the USTR, 
the Committee directs the USTR to leverage the expertise of the 
ITA in support of trade negotiations to improve our success in 
WTO litigation and negotiations and to better protect American 
interests.
    The Committee recommendation provides an increase in 
official reception and representation funds to enable USTR to 
perform official liaison duties with an increasing number of 
trading partners. This increase represents the first such 
increase in more than 12 years.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $57,000,000 for the International 
Trade Commission (ITC) for fiscal year 2004, which is 
$3,351,000 above the amount provided in the current year, and 
$1,295,000 below the request. Of the amounts provided, 
$1,050,000 is for costs associated with two trade data 
automation systems funded in previous years, and $2,301,000 is 
for personnel costs due to increasing workload estimates.
    The International Trade Commission is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations; providing the Congress and the President with 
independent, expert technical advice to assist in the 
development and implementation of U.S. international trade 
policy; responding to the Congress and the President on various 
matters affecting international trade; maintaining the 
Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System of 
internationally accepted product nomenclature; providing 
technical assistance to eligible small businesses seeking 
remedies and benefits under the trade laws; and performing 
other specific statutory responsibilities ranging from research 
and analysis to quasi-judicial functions on trade-related 
matters.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommendation includes $395,123,000 in total 
resources for the programs of the International Trade 
Administration (ITA) for fiscal year 2004, which is $27,285,000 
above the current year level, and the same as the request. Of 
the amounts provided, $13,000,000 is to be derived from fee 
collections.
    The mission of the ITA is to create economic opportunity 
for U.S. workers and firms by promoting international trade, 
opening foreign markets, ensuring compliance with trade laws 
and agreements, and supporting U.S. commercial interests at 
home and abroad. Recently, the Committee has heard complaints 
from small- and medium-sized businesses concerned that the ITA 
is failing to ensure that foreign countries are in compliance 
with trade laws and agreements. Manufacturers and growers have 
alleged that ITA actions, particularly with regard to the 
People's Republic of China (PRC), have been detrimental to 
American business interests.
    The Committee held a public hearing on May 22, 2003, to 
assess the efforts of the International Trade Administration, 
the Bureau of Customs, and the Office of the United States 
Trade Representative to support U.S. businesses. Based on the 
testimony at this hearing, the Committee directs the trade 
agencies to focus greater resources on the efforts of American 
small- and medium-sized businesses to adapt to a rapidly 
changing global economy.
    The Committee understands the difficulties of attempting to 
balance both the positive and the negative effects of a free 
trade agenda. The Committee is steadfast in its support of 
America's trade policy to create growth and raise living 
standards around the globe, and in return to increase the 
benefits to U.S. workers, farmers, consumers, and businesses. 
Yet, the U.S. Government must uphold its responsibility to 
enforce trade laws, particularly with China. If trading 
partners do not abide by the rules that are set in the global 
trading system, then U.S. firms are not competing on a level 
playing field.
    The United States government has an obligation to ensure 
American companies are not forced to compete with foreign 
companies that are engaged in unfair trading practices.
    Trade Policy Body Review.--In light of the concerns 
outlined by the Committee, the Committee is requesting that the 
General Accounting Office (GAO) monitor the efforts of the U.S. 
Government agencies responsible for ensuring a free and fair 
trade process and provide the Committee with an alternative 
assessment of performance. The Committee expects the GAO to 
consult with the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review 
Commission in this review. The GAO review should also address 
efforts of the U.S. Government agencies to allow for public 
discourse regarding the effects of U.S trade policy on the U.S. 
economy and security for the next decade.
    Reports.--The Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce, 
in consultation with the U.S.-China Economic and Security 
Review Commission, as appropriate, to research and report back 
to the Committee regarding the following:
        
 China's industrial policies, including 
        ``pillar'' sectors, technology acquisitions through 
        joint ventures, various forms of subsidization, and the 
        short and long-term implications of the modernization 
        of those industries for the U.S. economy, industry, and 
        employees;
        
 Exports from China's state enterprises, the 
        types and amounts of subsidies provided, and the 
        longer-term effects of such exports/subsidies on 
        specific U.S. industries;
        
 Various means to compensate losses of U.S. 
        intellectual property holders created by China's 
        inability to meet its WTO intellectual property 
        commitments;
        
 Shifts of research and development from the 
        United States to China, the nature of the 134 major 
        foreign research and development corporate complexes 
        now identified by the People's Republic of China, the 
        prospects for future European Union, Japanese, and 
        United States research and development shifts to China, 
        and the resulting implications to U.S. capacities;
        
 Items on the U.S.-China Advanced Technology 
        Trade list cross-referenced to the items on the 
        Department of Defense's Critical Technology List, and 
        what part of total U.S. purchases of these items are 
        imported from China;
        
 An analysis of the extent of professional 
        service outsourcing that now exists and is projected 
        from the United States, the ultimate location of that 
        outsourcing, and quantifications of the longer-term 
        consequences to affected U.S. professions, such as 
        software engineering;
        
 A survey of business groups on the extent to 
        which U.S. manufacturers and their supply chains are 
        relocating to China.
    The Committee expects this report to be provided to the 
Committee no later than March 17, 2004.
    The Committee directs the National Academy of Sciences to 
conduct a study regarding foreign content in U.S. exports and 
U.S. content in foreign imports. Within the amounts provided, 
the National Academy of Sciences is expected to make its best 
assessment of the readily available information and, if 
necessary, to identify proxy measures. Of the amounts provided, 
$300,000 is for this purpose.
    Reorganization.--After review of information provided to 
the Committee, the Committee has determined that the ITA 
organizational structure does not support the requirements of 
the ITA mission. It has been nearly two decades since the 
organizational structure has been adapted to reflect the 
changing economic climate. In 1980, the U.S. had a trade 
deficit of $19.4 billion. In 2002, the U.S. had a trade deficit 
of $418.4 billion.
    The Committee recommendation includes a proposal to realign 
resources to reflect the changing trading landscape. The 
Committee has realigned resources of the agency to better 
enable the agency to perform. Overall, the reorganization 
clarifies the mission of each Assistant Secretary and realigns 
resources to strengthen new priorities in manufacturing and 
services to improve customer service, to create a better 
analytic basis for U.S. trade policies and negotiations, and to 
address the root causes of unfair trade practices.
    The proposed structure would enable ITA to consolidate all 
trade promotion efforts under the Assistant Secretary for Trade 
Promotion to focus efforts on adapting the domestic industry to 
the global market; to consolidate analytical resources under an 
Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services, to dedicate 
more resources to China, the largest subject of trade 
complaints; and to strengthen the tools necessary to stamp out 
the root causes of unfair trade through an enhanced policy and 
negotiations unit.
    Trade Promotion.--The Committee understands that as part of 
the President's Management Agenda, the Secretary of Commerce 
has tasked key export promotion agencies--through the Trade 
Promotion Coordinating Committee--to respond more directly to 
their clients by developing programs that represent global best 
practices in terms of efficient delivery and quality of 
service. The Committee understands the Export-Import Bank and 
the Overseas Private Investment Corporation have responded to 
that challenge, streamlining their operations and procedures to 
improve customer service. The Committee's proposal will 
streamline the ITA's operations and procedures to enable the 
promotion of U.S. goods and services. Specifically, the 
proposal would allow for the following:
          
 The combination of all market research, 
        counseling, and matchmaking services under the 
        Assistant Secretary for Trade Promotion, thereby 
        providing clients with a ``one-stop shop'';
          
 The integration of all call centers with the 
        domestic field personnel staff to improve client 
        referral and management;
          
 The provision of trade finance advice to 
        small businesses and better leveraging the services of 
        other finance agencies in the domestic field offices; 
        and
          
 The integration of the Advocacy Center under 
        this heading to establish closer links to the overseas 
        posts to facilitate early project identification, to 
        increase project competition support, and to improve 
        post-transaction assistance.
    The Committee recommendation includes $217,040,000 for the 
Trade Promotion unit, including a transfer of $1,500,000 for 
the Advocacy Center and $2,100,000 for the Trade Information 
Center from the Trade Development unit. Of the amounts 
provided, $2,100,000 is to establish a Middle East Business 
Information Center and a China Business Information Center. The 
Committee commends the exemplary work of the employees at the 
Trade Information Center.
    American Trading Centers.--Manufacturing and service 
industries need assistance to export their goods and services 
to China. The Committee has determined that additional 
resources are required in China to aggressively promote U.S. 
exports to China and enforce the commitments made as part of 
the China's WTO accession agreement. The Committee, after 
consultation with industry and the ITA, has determined that a 
rapid increase in export promotion to China is necessary. The 
creation of American Trading Centers in major Chinese 
commercial centers is one way to improve export promotion. 
These centers will enable U.S. exporters to receive assistance 
while in the country and provide for on the ground expertise, 
including market research capabilities.
    Of the amounts provided, the Committee expects that no less 
than six positions in China will support the American Trading 
Centers initiative. Positions should be filled with personnel 
with market access compliance experience, as well as export 
promotion experience. The Committee directs the ITA to submit a 
plan to establish export centers in China, consistent with 
interagency review processes, by no later than 90 days after 
the enactment of this Act.
    The Committee directs the ITA to continue its efforts 
regarding El Salvador, the Caribbean Basin and the Global 
Diversity initiatives, and the rural export program, as in 
fiscal year 2003.
    Manufacturing and Services.--The U.S. manufacturing sector 
continues to face daunting challenges. This sector has lost 
more than 2.6 million jobs since July 2000, and the trend is 
expected to continue. Increasing imports from foreign 
countries, including China, are contributing to this trend. The 
Committee commends the Under Secretary for ITA's involvement in 
a series of manufacturing roundtables to listen to small- and 
medium-sized manufacturers. The ITA must be an advocate for the 
interests of this sector and must develop policies--both 
domestic and international--to promote the expansion of this 
sector. In an effort to address the range of factors, both 
domestic and international, that have direct bearing on the 
competitiveness of the U.S. manufacturing and services sectors, 
the Committee recommendation assumes the creation of an 
Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services. In 
addition, the recommendation assumes the creation of one Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for manufacturing, one Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for Services, and one Deputy Assistant Secretary for 
Industry Analysis.
    Specifically, the Committee expects the Assistant Secretary 
for Manufacturing and Services to do the following:
          
 Develop analytical tools and expertise to 
        assess industry structure, trends in employment and 
        productivity, and the impact of trade agreements on the 
        manufacturing and services sectors;
          
 Develop strategies that help the American 
        manufacturing sector expand and face challenges to its 
        competitiveness;
          
 Work with an interdepartmental advisory 
        committee on manufacturing to identify challenges 
        facing American manufacturers and coordinate 
        initiatives that take advantage of the full array of 
        policy tools available;
          
 Advocate more strongly for the interests of 
        the manufacturing sector to maintain an adequate 
        manufacturing base in the U.S; and
          
 Redirect industry experts from headquarters 
        to the field where resources may be more effectively 
        focused on the specific needs of local industries.
    The Committee recommendation includes $46,669,000 for the 
Manufacturing and Services unit. Funding for the Advocacy 
Center, the Trade Information Center, Office for Export 
Assistance, and the Office of Planning, Coordination, and 
Management are transferred from this heading to the Trade 
Promotion heading.
    The overall reorganization refocuses resources on analyzing 
trend data to determine the ability to provide greater clarity 
as to the impact of a declining manufacturing base.
    Of the amounts provided, the Committee expects the National 
Textile Centers, Textile/Technology Center (TC2); and the 
international competitiveness program to be funded at the 
fiscal year 2003 level.
    The Committee expects the Office of Textiles to remain at 
the fiscal year 2003 level.
    Import Administration.--Since 1997, the Committee has 
increased funding for the Import Administration (IA) by 70 
percent to enforce anti-dumping (AD) and countervailing (CV) 
duty laws. Yet, the number of AD/CV investigations conducted by 
the Import Administration has decreased significantly. For 
example, in 2001 the IA conducted 95 AD/CV investigations and 
in 2002 it conducted 22 investigations. Of the investigations 
conducted in 2001, a total of 30 investigations were related to 
steel imports, 32 percent of the total investigations conducted 
in 2001.
    Upon consideration of the complaints to the Committee, and 
workload statistics prepared by the IA, the Committee remains 
skeptical of the level of effort the IA has devoted to 
investigating AD/CV cases. The Committee expects the IA to 
strengthen such efforts in response to the changing global 
marketplace. With the entry of China into the global 
marketplace, U.S. industries have been exposed to trade flows 
that are often the result of over-production and market 
distortions, but in some cases are the result of fraudulent 
activity.
    The Committee has determined that the IA would benefit from 
the consolidation of all AD case processing under one Deputy 
Assistant Secretary (DAS) position, the creation of one DAS for 
CV case processing, and the creation of one DAS for Policy and 
Negotiations.
    Investigations/Operations.--The recommendation includes a 
total of 260 full-time equivalents for AD/CV case processing. 
In light of the increasing complexities of the cases and the 
increasing use of fraudulent documentation and misleading 
information, the role of the investigator has never been more 
vital to the process. For the global trading mechanism to 
continue to function effectively, exporters and importers need 
to have confidence in the integrity of the process. The IA 
investigators play a critical role in this process.
    The Committee remains concerned that findings in AD/CV 
cases of very low or zero dumping margins may have resulted 
from a flawed process. During the public hearing held by the 
Committee, witnesses spoke of cases in which a foreign company 
submitted fraudulent documentation to the Department, and of 
cases in which incomplete information was provided to the 
Department. Therefore, the Department used the ``best 
information'' available. The Committee strongly urges the 
Department to take action to deter such practices.
    Further, the Committee is aware of concerns regarding the 
conduct of proceedings involving foreign companies located in 
non-market economies. Special attention must be given to ensure 
the selection of appropriate surrogate producers, including the 
calculation of selling, general, and administrative expenses. 
For example, the costs of water and electricity should be 
consistent across all proceedings involving the same surrogate 
country.
    The Committee directs the ITA to establish a team to re-
examine all cases closed within the past three fiscal years. 
The Committee expects a status report on the progress of such 
review no later than September 5, 2003, and the final review is 
to be completed and provided to the Committee no later than 
December 15, 2003.
    Office of China Compliance.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $3,000,000 to establish an Office of China Compliance 
to specifically focus on issues affecting small- and medium-
sized businesses. Bill language is included designating funding 
for this purpose. This Office should be designed to specialize 
in AD cases involving China, with special attention on small- 
and medium-sized domestic businesses. This Office should 
consist of experienced investigators, accountants, trade 
analysts, and technical experts to aggressively investigate AD 
cases.
    Policy and Negotiations.--The Committee expects the IA to 
preemptively analyze market trends to anticipate unfair trade 
practices and consult with foreign governments to pre-empt the 
requirement for an unfair trade case, whenever practicable. 
This would enable the ITA to self-initiate investigations. 
Further, the reorganization would include the creation of a DAS 
position for Policy and Negotiations. The Committee directs 
that not more than 118 full-time equivalents are available for 
this function.
    New Shipper Review Process.--The Committee has heard many 
complaints that the new shipper review process has resulted in 
irreparable harm to domestic companies. The Committee directs 
the IA to review the process to determine if it results in 
quantifiable benefits for the U.S. economy. In addition, this 
review should address the economic effects the process has on 
the domestic industry, and the effects projected for five 
years.
    The Committee recommendation includes $68,160,000 for the 
Import Administration unit.
    Market Access and Compliance.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $38,204,000 for this purpose. From the existing 
complement of positions, the Committee directs the ITA to 
establish an office of enforcement within the Market Access 
Compliance unit, to be staffed with attorneys, paralegals, and 
experienced investigators to aggressively enforce trade 
agreements.
    Executive Direction/Administration.--The Committee recom-
mendation includes $25,050,000 for the administrative and 
policy functions of ITA.
    Human Rights Training.--The advancement of human rights and 
the development of economies are not mutually exclusive goals. 
The Committee applauds efforts made by the ITA to promote human 
rights, including launching a new human rights training program 
in May of this year. The Committee understands another program 
is planned in Johannesburg, South Africa, in August and in 
Beijing, China, in September. In addition, the Commercial 
Service is developing an on-line human rights training program 
to be available for access by all ITA employees by September 
2003. The Committee continues funding of $500,000 to ensure 
that, when counseling U.S. businesses on market conditions 
within a particular country, employees must include information 
on human rights, in addition to information on rule of law 
issues and corporate responsibility. Further, the Committee 
continues to direct ITA to provide to the Committee quarterly 
reports on the progress of the human rights training program.
    In addition, language is included in the bill designating 
the amounts available for each unit within ITA. The Committee 
reminds ITA that any deviation from the funding distribution 
provided in the bill and report, including carryover balances, 
is subject to reprogramming procedures set forth in section 605 
of this Act. In addition, ITA is directed to submit to the 
Committee, not later than 60 days after the enactment of this 
Act, a spending plan for all ITA units that incorporates any 
carryover balances from prior fiscal years.
    Trade Missions.--The Committee directs that all trade 
missions involving Department of Commerce agencies must be 
initiated, coordinated and administered through ITA.
    Foreign Currency Valuation.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Commerce to report back to the Committee on 
Appropriations, no later than October 6, 2003, on the trade and 
U.S. employment impact of the currency valuation of our trading 
partners including, China, Japan, Vietnam, South Korea, Taiwan, 
the Ukraine, and Indonesia.
    International Standards.--The Committee supports the 
Department's plan to focus efforts to ensure that U.S. business 
interests are represented in international standards 
negotiations. The Committee agrees with the Department that 
foreign standards and testing requirements are keeping American 
products out of foreign markets, thereby reducing efficiencies, 
limiting competition, and increasing prices for consumer goods. 
Divergent standards, redundant testing and compliance 
procedures, as well as unilateral and nontransparent standard 
setting may be impediments to free trade. The Committee 
endorses the specifics of the plan, including the creation of 
an international standards position to liaison with U.S. 
industry. The Committee recommendation includes up to 
$1,000,000 to be available to implement the Department's plan 
to ensure U.S. businesses are competitive in overseas markets. 
The Committee continues to direct ITA to collaborate with NIST, 
the USTR, and the State Department to reduce trade barriers to 
U.S. business exports. The Committee expects the Secretary of 
Commerce to report to the Committee no later than February 4, 
2004, on the steps taken to implement the international 
standards plan.
    Travel Expenditures.--The Department has strongly refuted 
claims that it is not aggressively pursuing investigations of 
unfair trade practices by foreign countries, in particular by 
China. The Committee has heard concerns that the Department is 
not sending a sufficient number of teams to China, the source 
of most trade complaints, to verify documentation of 
information provided by foreign companies. The Committee has 
reviewed ITA travel expenditures for the first two quarters of 
fiscal year 2003. These expenditures totaled $4,870,000 for 
business-related travel expenses, a total of 4,592 trips. Of 
these, 182 trips were made to China, approximately four percent 
of the total. Of the 182 trips taken to China, only 57 were 
related to verification of ongoing investigations. Of all the 
travel taken by ITA personnel, only 1.2 percent was for actual 
investigative work in China. The Committee expects ITA to 
increase resources to aggressively pursue complaints by 
American companies regarding unfair trading practices. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce to provide to the 
Committee a quarterly report of all travel expenditures by the 
ITA, beginning with the fourth quarter of the current year.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommendation includes a total operating 
level of $70,150,000 for the operations and administration of 
the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), which includes 
$61,000,000 on operations and administration, $7,203,000 for 
the Convention for Chemical Weapons enforcement, and $1,947,000 
is from prior year unobligated balances. Within the total 
amount available, the recommendation includes the following:
    Export Administration.--$33,399,000 is for export 
administration activities, of which $250,000 is from prior year 
unobligated balances. The recommendation continues funding for 
additional export licensing personnel provided in fiscal year 
2003. The recommendation does not include a new office of 
evaluation as proposed.
    Export Enforcement.--$30,372,000 is for export enforcement 
activities. The Committee supports BIS's export control efforts 
overseas to conduct end-use checks. In fiscal year 2002, the 
Committee provided funding for new attache positions in Abu 
Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and Cairo, Egypt, as requested. 
The Committee understands that the attache position in Cairo, 
Egypt, has not been filled, and the BIS and the State 
Department have determined the assignment of personnel in 
Cairo, Egypt, is unnecessary at this time.
    The Committee directs the BIS to provide a detailed report 
to the Committee detailing the location and responsibilities of 
each attache. Additionally, the report should detail current 
and planned facilities requirements of overseas staff and the 
right-sizing methodology followed to determine the appropriate 
size and location of the Bureau's overseas presence.
    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
new computer evidence staff and urges BIS to seek assistance 
from the Department of Justice, including the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, for computer evidence support, as necessary.
    Management and Policy Coordination.--$6,379,000 is for 
Management and Policy Coordination, of which $1,697,000 is from 
prior year unobligated balances. The recommendation continues 
fiscal year 2003 funding for the information technology 
initiative. The recommendation does not continue funding for a 
one-time-only project.
    In addition, the Committee reminds BIS of the requirements 
of section 605 of this Act.

                  Economic Development Administration

    The Committee includes of $318,680,000 for the programs and 
administrative expenses of the Economic Development 
Administration (EDA) for fiscal year 2004, as described below:

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

    A total of $288,115,000 is included for fiscal year 2004 
for Economic Development Assistance Programs. The Committee 
continues the traditional programs of the EDA to provide needed 
assistance to communities struggling with long-term economic 
dislocation, as well as sudden and severe economic dislocation. 
Of the amounts provided, $203,115,000 is for Public Works and 
Economic Development, $40,900,000 is for Economic Adjustment 
Assistance, $24,000,000 is for planning, $9,100,000 is for 
technical assistance, including university centers, $10,500,000 
is for trade adjustment assistance, and $500,000 is for 
research.
    The Committee expects EDA to continue to assist communities 
impacted by economic dislocations related to coal and timber 
industry downturns due to environmental concerns at no less 
than the fiscal year 2003 level.
    The Committee continues to direct EDA to ensure that funds 
provided under this account are targeted to the most severely 
distressed areas, which, absent the assistance provided by the 
EDA, would have little or no access to resources for 
infrastructure development and capacity building. This puts the 
program on firm ground to carry out its purpose to provide the 
``seed capital'' to distressed areas to allow local communities 
to increase their ability to create new economic opportunities 
and jobs in accordance with local priorities.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,565,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the EDA. The Committee continues to 
direct the EDA to aggressively pursue all opportunities for 
reimbursement, deobligations and use of non-appropriated 
resources, including the care and protection of collateral 
accounts, to maximize the operating level.
    The Committee continues to direct that no funding be 
provided for a special headquarters reserve fund.
    The Committee lauds the EDA for its continued efforts to 
strengthen private sector business activity and development on 
Indian lands.
    The Committee reminds the EDA of the agency's commitment 
regarding the involuntary termination of employees or 
increasing the current number of political appointees as a 
result of reorganization efforts.
    In addition, the Committee reminds EDA of the requirements 
under section 605 of this Act regarding reorganization 
proposals.
    The recommendation retains language in the bill to provide 
the authority to use this appropriation to monitor projects 
approved under Title I of the Public Works Employment Act of 
1976, Title II of the Trade Act of 1974, and the Community 
Emergency Drought Relief Act of 1977.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommendation includes $29,000,000 for the 
Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA) for fiscal year 
2004. The recommendation is $282,000 above fiscal year 2003 and 
$487,000 below the request. The Committee recommendation 
assumes that the Entrepreneurial Technology Apprenticeship 
Program (ETAP) will continue to be supported at the fiscal year 
2003 level.

                Economic and Information Infrastructure

    The Committee recommendation includes under this section 
the Department of Commerce agencies responsible for the 
nation's basic economic and technical information 
infrastructure, as well as the administrative functions to 
oversee the development of telecommunications policy.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $75,000,000, which is 
$3,311,000 above the current year and $9,756,000 below the 
request, for the economic and statistical analysis programs of 
the Department of Commerce, including the Bureau of Economic 
Analysis (BEA), for fiscal year 2004. The Committee has 
provided programmatic increases over the past three years to 
ensure that policy makers have access to more accurate and 
timely economic data.
    The Economic and Statistics Administration (ESA) is 
responsible for the collection, tabulation and publication of a 
wide variety of economic, demographic and social statistics and 
provides support to the Secretary of Commerce and other 
Government officials in interpreting the state of the economy 
and in developing economic policy.

                          Bureau of the Census

    The Committee recommendation includes a total operating 
level of $661,961,000 for the Bureau of the Census, which is 
the same as the request and $111,083,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2003.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $220,908,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Bureau of the Census for fiscal 
year 2004, which includes $156,282,000 for current economic 
statistics, $60,083,000 for current demographic statistics, and 
$4,543,000 for survey development and data services. The 
Committee directs the Bureau to continue to streamline and 
prioritize programs to ensure the highest priority core 
activities are supported. The Committee expects the Bureau to 
be fully reimbursed for any non-core survey by any other 
Federal agency or private organization.
    North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).--Of 
the amounts provided, up to $90,000 is available for the Census 
Bureau to produce the monthly Export-Import and Trade Balance 
statistics on a NAICS basis. The Committee understands that 
this information will not be seasonally adjusted.
    Advanced Technology.--Of the amounts provided, up to 
$90,000 is available to the Census Bureau to produce the 
Advanced Technology Trade Imports, Exports, and Net balance by 
country in its monthly reports. In addition, the Committee 
expects this information to be provided by item on an annual 
basis. The Committee understands that this information will not 
be seasonally adjusted.
    In addition, the Committee expects that key reports on 
manufacturing, general economic and foreign trade statistics 
will be maintained and issued on a timely basis.
    This recommendation provides for the current statistical 
programs of the Bureau of the Census, which includes 
measurement of the Nation's economy and the demographic 
characteristics of the population. These programs are intended 
to provide a broad base of economic, demographic, and social 
information used for decision-making by governments, private 
organizations, and individuals.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$441,053,000 for all periodic censuses and related programs in 
fiscal year 2004, which is $71,986,000 above the fiscal year 
2003 level and the same as the request.
    2010 Short-Form Census Program.--Of the amounts provided, 
the recommendation includes $112,090,000 for the short-form 
only Census in 2010. The Committee supports the 
Administration's efforts to establish an early design and 
planning process to allow sufficient time to test the major 
elements of a simplified, streamlined short-form census. This 
new approach should allow the Census Bureau to fulfill 
important constitutional and legal mandates more accurately. 
The recommendation includes the following:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Decennial Census 2010:
    Operational Design Strategy.........................           8,605
    Data Collection Design..............................          18,559
    Questionnaire & Content Design......................          16,969
    System Design & Software............................          22,287
    Address List Updates................................           3,900
    Test/Evaluation.....................................          41,770
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Re-engineered Design Process........................         112,090

    American Community Survey (ACS).--The Committee supports 
the Administration's efforts to collect long-form data on an 
on-going basis rather than waiting for once-a-decade decennial 
long-form data. The recommendation of $64,800,00 provides the 
full request for this program and is $7,669,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level. The recommendation includes the 
following:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Initial Mail Collection.................................          14,875
Telephone Non-Response Follow-up........................           7,165
Personal Visit Non-Response Follow-up...................          22,394
IT Infrastructure.......................................           2,700
Data Processing, Weighting & Review.....................          10,968
Data Dissemination......................................           3,931
Project Management......................................           2,767
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      American Community Survey.........................          64,800

    Master Address File (MAF)/Topologically Integrated 
Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER).--The Committee 
supports efforts to enhance the MAF/TIGER to include street and 
address information from States, localities, and tribal 
governments. It is in the best interest of the Federal, State, 
local, and tribal communities to make available all existing 
information to the Census Bureau to result in the most accurate 
database. The Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce to 
take all necessary measures to reduce the payment for 
information currently available from certain governments. 
Further, the Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce to 
utilize global positioning system technology and aerial 
photography to update existing information only if these 
measures are shown to be cost effective. The recommendation 
includes the following:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Modern Processing Environment...........................          13,489
Geographic Partnership Programs.........................           5,447
Evaluations.............................................           7,629
Street Address Location Corrections & GPS...............          49,245
Address Updating System.................................           7,500
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      MAF/TIGER Re-Engineering..........................          83,310

    The Committee recommendation includes $180,853,000 for the 
non-decennial census periodic programs.

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Periodic Censuses:
    Other Periodic Programs:
        Economic Censuses...............................          73,749
        Census of Governments...........................           6,333
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
          Subtotal, Economic Programs...................          80,082
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Demographic Statistics Programs:
        Intercensal Demographic Estimates...............           9,455
        Demographic Survey Sample Design................          13,113
        Electronic Information Collection...............           6,541
        Geographic Support..............................          40,563
        Data Processing Systems.........................          31,099
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
          Subtotal, Demographic Programs................         100,771

    Subgroup Enumeration.--The Committee commends the efforts 
of the Census Bureau to work with interested parties to ensure 
that necessary measures will be taken to ensure accuracy in 
enumerating Hispanic subgroups.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$32,544,000 for the National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration (NTIA) for fiscal year 2004, which is 
$11,137,000 above the request, and $40,735,000 below the fiscal 
year 2003 appropriation.
    NTIA is responsible for developing domestic and 
international telecommunications and information policy for the 
Executive Branch, ensuring the efficient and effective use of 
the Federal radio spectrum, and administering Federal programs 
that support telecommunications facilities for public 
broadcasting.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $14,604,000 for the 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation of the National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), which 
is $4,265,000 below the request and the same as the fiscal year 
2003 level.
    The Committee strongly supports the President's new 
Spectrum Policy for the 21st Century Initiative to address the 
challenges and opportunities facing the nation with regard to 
radio frequency spectrum. This vital and limited national 
resource contributes to significant technological innovation, 
job creation and economic growth.
    The Committee notes the efforts of the NTIA to encourage 
more efficient use of electromagnetic spectrum. The Committee 
directs NTIA to issue a report by March 17, 2004, on further 
actions needed in the allocation of spectrum to the civilian 
sector for the effective deployment of third generation 
wireless devices in the United States.
    The Committee continues to direct the Administration to 
aggressively pursue all opportunities for reimbursement, 
deobligations, and use of non-appropriated resources, to 
maximize the operating level for this purpose.
    The Committee recommendation assumes an additional 
$25,712,000 will be available to the NTIA in fiscal year 2004 
through reimbursements from other agencies for the costs of 
providing spectrum management, analysis and research services.

    PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,538,000, which is 
the same as the request, and $40,735,000 below the current 
year, to provide program management of existing planning and 
construction grants for public television, radio, and non-
broadcast facilities.
    The Federal Communications Commission's adoption of the 
Fifth Report and Order in April 1997 required that all public 
television stations begin the broadcast of a digital signal by 
May 1, 2003. The Administration's budget proposed to suspend 
this program due to the current level of funding available for 
digital conversion grant funding from the Corporation for 
Public Broadcasting (CPB). The Committee understands that as of 
June 2003, 172 of the 355 public television stations were 
transmitting a digital signal. Based on the coverage areas of 
these stations, over half the U.S. population lives in a 
television market with a digital public television signal. 
Further, the Committee understands that an additional 100 
stations are now in various phases of construction and 
installation. Further, funding appropriated in the current year 
for CPB would support the digital transition of another 60 
public television stations. Therefore, by May 2004, 332 of the 
335 public television stations, or ninety-three percent of all 
stations, should be transmitting a digital signal.
    The Committee understands that although a station is able 
to transmit a digital signal, it may not be able to broadcast 
in digital. The Committee remains concerned that the challenges 
are particularly great for those broadcasters located in, or 
serving, largely rural areas.

                   INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE GRANTS

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,402,000 for the 
Information Infrastructure Grant program account, the same as 
the current year, and $15,402,000 above the request. The 
Administration's budget request proposed to eliminate this 
program.
    The Committee expects NTIA to give preference to 
applications relating to the expansion of commercial entities 
to enable local communities to attract commercial investment to 
spur growth of American jobs. The Committee expects NTIA to 
work with the Economic Development Administration to ensure 
resources are leveraged to result in the largest benefit to 
local communities suffering from economic downturns.
    The Committee retains language making the funds provided 
under this heading available for program administration and 
related program support activities at the fiscal year 2003 
level. The bill also includes language carried in previous 
Appropriations Acts, to allow up to five- percent of this 
appropriation to be available for telecommunications research 
activities directly related to the development of a national 
information infrastructure.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,238,700,000 for 
the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) for 
fiscal year 2004, which is $56,700,000 above the current year 
level, and $156,355,000 below the request. Of this amount, 
$1,138,700,000 is to be derived from offsetting fees collected 
in fiscal year 2004, and $100,000,000 is to be derived from 
prior year collections.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Congressionally-
directed five-year Strategic Plan for the PTO has not been 
implemented. This plan calls for some of the most sweeping 
changes to the patent review process in 200 years, and the 
Committee supports these recommendations. The three core 
objectives of the plan are: (1) to prepare the agency to handle 
the workload associated with the 21st century economy, (2) to 
improve patent quality, and (3) to reduce patent and trademark 
pendency. However, the Committee is concerned that a number of 
improvements proposed in the Strategic Plan will not be 
implemented. The Committee is not convinced of the prudence of 
appropriating additional resources for a process that is in 
need of and is undergoing a systematic overhaul.
    The Committee understands that there is broad agreement 
that the patent process is in dire need of reform. Yet, the 
Committee notes that the Administration's legislative fee 
proposal, which includes many changes based on the reform plan, 
has not been enacted.
    Within the amounts available, the Committee expects that 
the PTO will continue its relationships with the National 
Inventor's Hall of Fame and Inventure Place, and the 
International Intellectual Property Institute at least at the 
same levels as in fiscal year 2003.
    The Committee reminds the PTO that any changes from the 
funding distribution provided in the bill and report, including 
carryover balances, are subject to the reprogramming procedures 
set forth in section 605 of this Act.
    In addition, PTO is directed to submit to the Committee, 
not later than three months after the enactment of this Act, a 
spending plan, which incorporates any carryover balances from 
previous fiscal years and any changes to the patent or 
trademark fee structure.
    The Committee supports the efforts of the PTO to 
aggressively pursue stringent intellectual property protections 
for American businesses in international negotiations.
    Telework.--The Committee commends PTO for its successful 
telework program. The Committee understands that 110 trademark 
examining attorneys, or 44 percent of the examining corps, are 
working from home. Further, the Committee lauds the cooperative 
efforts to establish the Patents Telework Program on April 7, 
2003. The Committee understands that approximately 700 patent 
professionals are participating in the program. The Committee 
commends the PTO and its nearly 2,000 employees, or twenty-five 
percent of the total workforce, who now experience the benefits 
of telecommuting.
    The PTO is charged with administering the patent and 
trademark laws of the United States. PTO examines patent 
applications, grants patent protection for qualified 
inventions, and disseminates technological information 
disclosed in patents. The PTO also examines trademark 
applications and provides Federal registration to owners of 
qualified trademarks. The PTO advises the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative on enforcement issues in connection 
with free trade agreements and participates in consultations 
with numerous foreign governments on a broad range of issues 
related to the enforcement of intellectual property rights.

                         Science and Technology

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,522,394,000 in 
direct appropriations for the Science and Technology programs 
of the Department of Commerce, including the National Institute 
of Standards and Technology and the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, which is $365,667,000 below the 
current year, excluding supplemental amounts, $301,285,000 
below the request.

                       Technology Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $7,822,000 for necessary 
expenses of the Under Secretary for Technology Policy and the 
Office of Technology Policy.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

    The Committee includes $460,059,000 for the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for fiscal year 
2004, which is $247,446,000 below the current year and 
$6,759,000 below the request.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $357,862,000 for the 
Scientific and Technical Research and Services (core programs) 
of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, which is 
$787,000 above the current year, and $21,987,000 below the 
request. The following is a breakdown of the amounts provided 
under this account by activity.

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                        Fiscal year 2004
                                                          recommendation
Electronics & Electrical................................          45,731
Manufacturing Engineering...............................          21,811
Chemical................................................          42,324
Physics.................................................          42,950
Building and Fire Research..............................          18,142
Materials Science & Engineering.........................          56,532
Computer & Applied Mathematics..........................          53,247
Technology Assistance...................................          17,679
Baldridge & Other Awards................................           5,205
Research Support........................................          54,241
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Total, STRS.......................................         357,862

    Under the Building and Fire Research heading, the 
recommendation includes $2,000,000 for research efforts related 
to homeland security standards.
    Under the Computer and Applied Mathematics heading, the 
recommendation includes $1,000,000 to provide standard methods 
for measurement of the accuracy of biometric identification 
systems in compliance with the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, as 
proposed.
    Under the Chemical Program heading, the recommendation 
includes $1,000,000 to provide the advanced measurements, 
standards, and data that health care providers and researchers 
need to improve health care quality, as proposed.
    Under the Physics heading, $750,000 is for the necessary 
critical back-up elements for NIST time scale and time 
dissemination services; $1,450,000 is for research to develop 
measurements and standards for nanotechnology-based products, 
including semiconductors; $2,000,000 is for research to 
strengthen radiation measurements for nuclear and radiological 
detection capabilities; and $1,500,000 is for research to 
improve measurements in the development of quantum information 
technology with applications to homeland security.
    In addition, under the Research Support heading, the 
recommendation continues funding of $2,400,000 for a telework 
project, and $6,500,000 is for a certain critical 
infrastructure program.
    The recommendation does not include a requested increase to 
the amount to be transferred to the working capital fund.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $39,607,000 for the 
Industrial Technology Services appropriation of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, which is the same as the 
request and $245,153,000 below the current year.
    Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Program.--Recent 
economic downturns have had a devastating effect on the 
manufacturing sector. In an effort to ameliorate some of these 
negative effects, the Committee recommendation includes 
$39,607,000 for this program in fiscal year 2004, which is 
$27,007,000 above the request and $66,393,000 below the amount 
in the current year. Federal support for the MEP program, 
combined with State and private sector funding, have translated 
into more jobs, more tax revenue, more exports, and a more 
secure supply source of consumer and defense goods in this 
country. The Committee understands that NIST has requested the 
National Association of Public Administration (NAPA) to conduct 
a study on the continued requirements of the MEP program.
    Advanced Technology Program.--The Committee does not 
include funding for this program.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $62,590,000 for the 
construction and major renovations of the NIST campuses at 
Boulder, Colorado, and Gaithersburg, Maryland.
    The Committee directs NIST to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the progress of these construction projects 
on a quarterly basis beginning with the second quarter of 
fiscal year 2004.
    This account supports all NIST activities by providing 
state of the art facilities necessary to carry out the NIST 
mission.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,054,513,000 for 
the operations of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), which is $116,221,000 below the current 
year, excluding supplemental amounts, and $264,333,000 below 
the request.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,180,454,000 for 
the coastal, fisheries, marine, weather, satellite, and other 
NOAA programs funded in this account. In addition, the 
agreement includes a transfer of $79,251,000 from balances in 
the account entitled, ``Promote and Develop Fishery Products 
and Research Pertaining to American Fisheries''. The 
recommendation assumes deobligations of $17,000,000, as 
proposed. The Administration's request includes a proposal to 
transfer $3,000,000 from prior year receipts relating to the 
coastal zone management program. The recommendation does not 
include this proposal.
    The recommendation does not continue current year language 
regarding the conservation funding category. However, the 
Committee intends to meet the conservation funding level for 
fiscal year 2004, as established in Title VII of the Interior 
and Related Agencies Appropriation Act of 2001.
    The bill continues language to allow NOAA to retain gifts 
and contributions made under the Marine Sanctuary Program. The 
Committee continues to direct NOAA to fully utilize the 
authorities provided for this program, and include with the 
2005 budget request a report summarizing all gifts and 
contributions made under this program.
    Language is also included in the bill specifying the total 
amount of direct obligations available for each of the NOAA 
line offices and other related activities funded through this 
account. The Committee continues to take this action to provide 
greater clarity and accountability in budgeting and management 
for the diverse activities funded in this account. In addition, 
the bill also retains language regarding the practice of 
assessing NOAA line organizations, programs, projects, and 
activities, to support NOAA and line office overhead and 
programs over and above the amounts specifically provided, and 
regarding the funding and personnel in Executive Direction and 
Administration. The Committee reminds NOAA that administrative 
charges levied against certain activities assigned in the bill 
are limited to no more than five percent. The Committee 
recommendation continues to limit the administrative expenses 
of NOAA to $243,000,000. NOAA is directed to submit a spending 
plan to the Committee for these expenses at a level of detail 
comparable to that of the tables included in this report. The 
plan shall be delivered not later than 60 days after the 
enactment of the Act.
    In addition, language is also included regarding use of 
deobligations in excess of amounts estimated in the budget.
    The Committee directs NOAA to comply with reprogramming and 
transfer requirements under sections 204 and 605 of this Act.
    The following identifies the activities, sub-activities, 
and projects funded in this appropriation:

                         NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$363,239,000 for activities of the National Ocean Service (NOS) 
for fiscal year 2004, which is $27,793,000 below the request 
and $66,504,00 below the current year.
    Mapping and Charting.--The recommendation includes 
$62,393,000 for mapping and charting activities. The Committee 
provides $20,450,000 to address the hydrographic survey backlog 
detailed in the National Survey Plan. The recommendation is 
consistent with the long-standing decision that at least 50 
percent of hydrographic surveying should be contracted out to 
private companies. The Committee directs NOAA to report to the 
Committee within six months after the enactment of this Act on 
the progress being made to reduce the backlog.
    Long-Term Vessel Charter.--In the current year, the 
Committee directed NOAA to lease or charter a purpose-built 
U.S. flag hydrographic survey vessel capable of performing the 
full scope of necessary hydrographic services, by no later than 
April 11, 2003. To date, no contract has been awarded. The 
Committee is aware that a total of $14,000,000 is available 
from prior year funding for this purpose, of which the first 
year operational estimates are $5,500,000, including 
administrative costs. The Committee would entertain a 
reprogramming of funds for this purpose, should requirements 
change from current estimates.
    Tide and Current Data.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $20,302,000 for this activity. The recommendation will 
enable NOS to implement and maintain the necessary quality 
controls for real-time tide and current data systems. Funding 
is included to continue implementation of the Physical 
Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) program and to continue 
the National Water Level Operation Network (NWLON) and expands 
efforts in the Great Lakes.
    Ocean and Coastal Assessment.--Of the amounts provided 
under this heading, $1,250,000 is for coastal ocean monitoring 
and prediction efforts for West Florida.
    Coral Reefs.--The Committee recognizes and supports the 
work of NOAA and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (CRTF) to 
protect and preserve coral reefs. Coral reefs are the most 
complex, species-rich and productive marine ecosystems. Reefs 
cover two-percent of the ocean's floor, yet they support one-
third of all marine fish species and tens of thousands of other 
marine species, providing essential fish habitat for endangered 
and threatened species, and harboring protected marine mammals 
and turtles. Coral reef fisheries yield 6 million metric tons 
of fish catch annually, with one-quarter of total worldwide 
fish production occurring in developing countries with coral 
reefs. NOAA and the CRTF are developing and implementing 
coordinated efforts to map and monitor U.S. coral reefs, 
research coral reef degradation, reduce and mitigate coral reef 
degredation from pollution and other causes, and carry out 
strategies to promote conservation and sustainable use of coral 
reefs internationally. The Committee recommendation continues 
funding at the fiscal year 2003 level.
    Aquatic Resources Initiative.--Of the amounts available 
under this heading, up to $750,000 is for Bluegrass Pride, Inc.
    Coastal Zone Management.--A total of $70,518,000 is 
provided to assist coastal states in implementing this program. 
The Committee continues language in the current year regarding 
performance measures.
    Marine Sanctuary Program.--A total of $33,537,000 is 
provided for this program, which is $5,000 below the current 
year and $2,300,000 below the request. Under this heading, the 
recommendation includes $750,000 for the activities of the 
Northwest Straits Citizens Advisory Commission. This Commission 
was established to provide an ecosystem focus on the marine 
resources in the area, mobilize science and support marine 
resource committees, and establish a forum for coordination and 
consensus-building, in lieu of Federal designation of the area 
as a Marine Sanctuary. The Committee continues to believe that 
such a consensus-based approach is an innovative and novel way 
to promote marine conservation, the goal of the Marine 
Sanctuary Program.
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                   NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    The Committee recommendation includes $545,072,000 for the 
operations of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), 
which is $131,250,000 below the current year and $75,885,000 
below the request.
    Expand Stock Assessments.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $16,890,000 for stock assessments, which is $1,984,000 
above the amount in the request and the same level as in the 
current year. Of the amounts provided, $1,000,000 is for 
implementation of a West Coast in-season harvest data 
collection system, as in the current year.
    The Pacific Fishery Management Council recently voted to 
change the Pacific Sardine Allocation Framework within the 
Coastal Pelagic Species Fishery Management Plan. In considering 
revisions to the Pacific Sardine Allocation Framework, the 
Secretary should take steps to prevent over-capitalization of 
the fleet and over-exploitation of sardine stocks.
    Regulatory Streamlining.--The Committee is concerned about 
the lack of uniform standards for aquaculture facilities in the 
coastal and marine environments. The Committee understands that 
the Department of Commerce, in conjunction with its Federal 
partners, has developed a Code of Conduct for Aquaculture 
Development in the Exclusive Economic Zone. The Committee 
encourages the agency to work with the states and the 
aquaculture industry to implement the standards prescribed. The 
Committee expects NOAA to report on its efforts to implement 
national guidelines for aquaculture practices by December 31, 
2003.
    Fisheries Observers.--The Committee is concerned that NMFS 
has not provided adequate observer coverage for the New England 
groundfish fishery and recommends $17,028,000, which is 
$3,262,000 above the current year, for fishery observers. The 
Committee expects NMFS to allocate sufficient funds to achieve 
10 percent observer coverage in the directed fishery, and in 
the non-directed fishery to the extent practicable, by no later 
than May 1, 2004.
    Northern Right Whale Protection.--The Committee includes a 
total of $12,621,000, which is $2,685,000 above the fiscal year 
2003 level and $5,771,00 above the request, for North Atlantic 
right whale research, management activities, and Atlantic 
coastal States' implementation of cooperative Federal-State 
right whale recovery plans. Funding is included to assist NMFS 
and its partners to expedite right whale recovery in 
consultation with the Implementation Team and the Take 
Reduction Team. Priority should be given for efforts to reduce 
ship strikes, the leading cause of death of these whales. Of 
the amounts provided, $685,000 is for lobster-gear replacement 
efforts by the NFWF. Of the amounts provided, $800,000 is for 
the Center for Coastal Studies. Of the funding provided for the 
Center, the Committee expects the final funding allocation to 
be based on recommendations of the right whale program 
coordinator.
    The Committee directs NMFS to continue efforts with regard 
to California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation cruises.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee expects NOAA to report to 
the Committee by no later than September 15, 2003, on the 
establishment of an office in Virginia to better focus NOAA 
resources on Virginia issues in the Chesapeake Bay region, 
which was funded in fiscal year 2003.
    Of the funding for Chesapeake Bay oyster research, 
$1,000,000 is for oyster reef restoration efforts in Virginia.
    Habitat Conservation and Management.--The Committee is 
deeply concerned that a significant percentage of habitat 
conservation grants made by NOAA are for restoration of Pacific 
coastal salmon habitat. The Committee reminds NOAA that it has 
included $90,000,000 for this purpose under the ``Pacific 
Coastal Salmon Recovery'' heading. Therefore, the Committee 
directs NOAA to emphasize other habitat restoration efforts 
under this heading, including Chesapeake Bay and Great Lakes 
habitat restoration efforts.
    Enforcement and Surveillance.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $34,343,000 for enforcement and surveillance services, 
which is $11,827,000 above the current year level and 
$16,358,000 below the request.
    NMFS Facilities Maintenance.--Of the amounts provided, 
$325,000 is for additional costs related to the Santa Cruz 
laboratory.
    Pacific Salmon Funding.--The Committee notes the lack of 
accountability and performance standards for resources 
distributed to restore endangered and threatened salmon through 
the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund. The Committee 
continues to allow up to one percent of these amounts to be 
made available to NOAA to improve the measurement of program 
performance.
    Saltonstall-Kennedy (S-K).--The Committee understands that 
NOAA has refocused the S-K program to address the needs of 
fishing communities as defined by the Magnuson-Stevens Act. The 
Committee directs NOAA to eliminate the duplication between 
this program and the program priorities funded in the 
accompanying NMFS table. Given the austere budget constraints 
that the Committee is operating within, the Committee expects 
NMFS to award S-K grants based on priorities and geographic 
areas that are not receiving funding from other NOAA programs.
    The Committee directs NOAA to assign high priority to 
proposals for research and education efforts directed at the 
protection of high-risk consumers from naturally occurring 
bacteria associated with raw molluscan shellfish. Of the 
amounts available, no less than $250,000 should be provided to 
the Gulf and Atlantic Foundation for their education efforts 
regarding Vibrio vulnificus.
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                    OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

    The Committee recommendation includes $306,443,000 for the 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research line office, which is 
$65,878,000 below the current year level and $60,058,000 below 
the amount in the request.
    The Committee supports NOAA's efforts to provide national 
and international leadership on critical environmental issues, 
and to address the environmental research and development needs 
of internal NOAA customers, States, industry, and other Federal 
agencies. The Committee strongly urges NOAA to prioritize 
research efforts that have truly operational benefits.
    In recognition of current resource limitations the 
Committee is forced to operate within, the Committee directs 
NOAA to review the continued requirements for twelve separate 
research laboratories, six of which are located in Boulder, 
Colorado. The Committee directs NOAA to submit a laboratory 
consolidation plan to the Committee by March 15, 2004.
    Climate Research.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$158,460,000 for climate research efforts, which is $6,782,000 
below the current year and $26,322,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the 
Climate Change Research Initiative, including funding for the 
Atmospheric Brown Cloud initiative.
    Of the amounts provided under the climate research heading, 
$2,900,000 is for the Analytical Center for Climate and 
Environmental Change to enhance existing capabilities.
    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000 to expand 
efforts of the Cooperative Sensor Development Laboratory in 
cooperation with the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological 
Laboratory and the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory.
    The Committee expects funding for the International 
Research Institute Climate Prediction program to be continued 
at no less than the current year level.
    National Sea Grant Program.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $61,961,000 for the National Sea Grant program, which 
is $1,941,000 above the current year and $4,561,000 above the 
request.
    Within the amounts provided, $2,981,000 is for zebra mussel 
research in accordance with the Non-Indigenous Aquatic Nuisance 
Prevention and Control Act; $1,941,000 is for fisheries 
extension programs; and $2,980,000 is for oyster disease 
research, including $993,000 to continue the Gulf of Mexico 
initiative on oyster-related human health risks.
    Great Lakes Research.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $500,000 to expand the efforts of the Great Lakes 
Environmental Research Laboratory and the University of Notre 
Dame to conduct pro-active environmental assessments of new 
ionic liquids.
    Ballast Water Demonstrations.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $1,825,0000 for this program. The Committee expects 
special attention to be given to the concerns of the Chesapeake 
Bay and the Great Lakes.
    Ocean and Coastal Observing Systems.--The Committee 
continues to support the establishment of an integrated 
interagency ocean and coastal observing system that will 
provide critical information to a wide variety of users of 
ocean and coastal information and services. Adequate predictive 
capability is a prerequisite for the development of sound 
policies at the national and regional levels, policies ranging 
from maritime commerce to public health, from fisheries to 
safety of life and property, and from climate change to 
national security. In the current year, NOAA was directed to 
work with the Office of Science and Technology Policy to 
develop an interagency plan for research, technology 
demonstration, and, ultimately, implementation of an integrated 
ocean observing network, and to provide a report to the 
Committee. The Committee understands that this report may not 
be completed until July 30, 2003, one month after the 
Committee's deadline.
    To ensure that regional coordination and technical support 
are available for the development of integrated regional 
systems with a national observing focus, the Committee 
recommends that funding be coordinated within one Federal 
agency. Therefore, the Committee has provided a total of 
$16,028,000 for the ocean and coastal observing program. The 
Committee allows up to three percent of the funding to be used 
by NOAA for data management functions. The Committee expects 
NOAA to limit participation in the program to entities of the 
National Federation of Regional Associations. The Committee 
expects NOAA to review applications for the following programs, 
and provide grants if warranted: Center for Integrated Marine 
Technologies, Alliance for Coastal Technologies, Center for 
Coastal Ocean Observation and Analysis, Coastal Marine Research 
and Monitoring Program, Carolina Coastal Ocean Observing and 
Prediction, Long Island Sound Integrated Coastal Observing 
System, Coastal Restoration and Enhancement through Science and 
Technology, Center for Integrative Coastal Observation, 
Research and Education, Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System, 
and Southeastern Coastal Ocean Observing Program.
    Bill language is included requiring an equal match of 
Federal funding from non-Federal sources, including State and 
local government agencies, the private sector, academia, non-
governmental organizations, and the public.
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                        NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

    The Committee recommendation includes $713,791,000 for the 
operations of the National Weather Service (NWS) for fiscal 
year 2004, which is $19,516,000 above the current year and 
$24,240,000 below the request.
    Local Warnings and Forecasts.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $578,571,000 for local warnings and forecasts, which 
is $14,141,000 above the current year and $6,077,000 below the 
request. Of this amount, $4,272,000 is a transfer from the 
``Oceanic and Atmospheric Research'' heading for tsunami 
mitigation efforts.
    Within the amounts provided, $2,500,000 is to fund the 
second year of a seven-year initiative to improve the accuracy 
and timeliness of aviation warnings and forecasts.
    Pacific Island Nations Weather Offices.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $3,550,000 for the costs of the 
operations of five Micronesian weather service offices located 
at Pohnpei, Yap, Chuuk, Koror, and Majuro, as proposed. The 
Committee understands that the Department of the Interior will 
no longer reimburse NOAA for the costs of services provided 
under the Compact of Free Association (COFA) as the COFA 
agreement expires in 2003.
    Hurricane Research.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 for the development and implementation of a strong, 
coherent and united research agenda focusing on hurricane loss 
reduction with the International Hurricane Research Center. The 
Committee directs NOAA to work with the Center to forge an 
integrated multi-year, multi-disciplinary cooperative research 
effort.
    The Committee recommendation includes sufficient funding to 
continue operations of the Huntsville, Alabama center.
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    NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA, AND INFORMATION SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $146,334,000 for the operational 
and research and development programs of the National 
Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service 
(NESDIS), which is $3,310,000 below the current year and 
$3,983,000 below the request.
    Commercial Remote Sensing Licensing & Enforcement.--The 
Committee recommendation includes $1,224,000 for this program, 
as proposed. The Secretary of Commerce, through the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is responsible 
for licensing and regulating the U.S. commercial remote sensing 
space industry, pursuant to the Land Remote Sensing Policy Act 
of 1992, as amended, and other applicable legal authorities. 
The Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State are 
responsible for determining the conditions necessary to protect 
national security and foreign policy concerns, respectively. 
NOAA, in coordination with other affected agencies and in 
consultation with industry, as appropriate, is responsible for 
developing, publishing, and periodically reviewing the 
licensing regulations and associated timelines governing U.S. 
commercial remote sensing space systems.
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                            PROGRAM SUPPORT

    The Committee recommendation includes $201,844,000 for the 
Program Support line office, which is $29,564,000 above the 
current year and $30,698,00 below the request.
    Corporate Services.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$87,263,000 for Corporate Services of NOAA, which is 
$17,832,000 above the current year level and $6,693,000 below 
the request. Of the amounts provided, the Committee includes 
$2,000,000 for the Program Planning and Integration Office, as 
requested.
    Due to funding constraints, the Committee recommendation 
does not include funding for E-government and IT security 
program increases.
    The Committee recommendation includes $15,229,000 for the 
Commerce Administrative Management System, as proposed.
    Facilities.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$3,204,000 for Maintenance, Repairs, and Safety, the same as in 
the current year and $11,746,000 below the request.
    Project Planning and Execution.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $9,936,000 for this account, the same 
as the current year and $4,614,000 below the request.
    Grant Making Process.--The Committee appreciates the 
efforts NOAA has taken to improve the grant making and 
notification processes.
    Marine Operations & Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $83,174,000 for the operations and 
maintenance of NOAA's fleet, which is $8,113,000 above the 
current year and $6,500,000 below the request.
    The recommendation includes $2,500,000 for additional days 
at sea for the West Coast and $600,000 for the vessel AGATE 
PASS.
    Aviation Operations.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$18,267,000 for the aviation operations of NOAA, which is 
$2,569,000 above the current year and the same as the request.
    Office Relocations.--The Committee directs the Department 
to submit quarterly reports providing details of all office 
moves, openings, reductions and closings. The Committee expects 
to be notified of office relocations 30 days prior to such 
relocations.
    Pribilof Island Cleanup.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $7,949,000 for Pribilof Island cleanup, which is the 
same as the current year and $2,051,000 below the request. In 
2000, Congress passed the Pribilof Islands Transition Act, 
which created the framework under which NOAA was to complete 
the environmental cleanup of the property that is currently or 
was formerly owned on the islands, and to complete the transfer 
of that property to the designated local entities.
    Minority Serving Institutions.--The Committee continues to 
support NOAA's efforts with minority serving institutions.
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               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION

    The recommendation includes a programmatic level of 
$794,059,000 for fiscal year 2004, which is $48,340,000 below 
the request and $39,963,000 below the current year, excluding 
supplemental appropriations. The Committee recommendation 
assumes $7,000,000 from prior year deobligations. This account 
funds capital assets acquisition activities, including system 
and land acquisition, marine sanctuary and estuarine reserve 
construction, aircraft and vessel systems, and equipment.
    The recommendation does not continue current year language 
regarding the conservation funding category; however, the 
Committee intends to meet the conservation funding level for 
fiscal year 2004, as indicated in Title VII of the Interior and 
Related Agencies Appropriation Act of 2001.
    The following distribution reflects the activities funded 
within this account:
    Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program (CELP).--
The Committee recommendation includes $7,000,000 for the land 
acquisition program, which is $30,422,000 below the current 
year and $7,000,000 above the request. Bill language is 
continued to require an equal match for all Federal funds 
provided for this program. The Committee supports the efforts 
of NOAA to ensure the viability of this program. This program 
is intended to protect those coastal and estuarine areas with 
significant conservation, recreation, ecological, historical, 
or aesthetic value.
    Marine Sanctuaries Construction.--The Committee 
recommendation does not provide for any new construction or 
acquisition of property. The funding provided is for necessary 
exhibits as defined in the request. The Committee urges NOAA to 
continue to work with non-governmental organizations, the 
public, and other governmental agencies on certain exhibits.
    National Marine Fisheries Service.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the aquatic resource 
program.
    The Committee expects that NMFS, within existing resources, 
will build the sea water system in the Santa Cruz NMFS 
facility.
    Construction.--The Committee notes that the final five-year 
facilities plan requested by the Committee has not yet been 
provided. The Committee remains concerned that NOAA has not 
taken necessary efforts to propose consolidation of existing 
facilities or disposal of certain facilities, and expects that 
the plan will address these concerns.
    Geostationary Systems.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $277,554,000 to continue post-launch requirements for 
GOES I-M; and to continue procurement of GOES -N series 
satellites, instruments, ground systems, and necessary systems 
support to maintain continuity, as proposed.
    Polar Orbiting Systems.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $391,083,000, as proposed. The recommendation includes 
language to continue the cost-sharing arrangement with the 
Department of Defense for the National Polar Orbiting 
Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS).
    The Committee directs the Department of Commerce to submit 
a spending plan for all NOAA satellite programs prior to 
obligation of funds provided for fiscal year 2004. The 
Committee continues to expect the Department to inform the 
Committee regarding any deviation from the spending plan, in 
accordance with the guidelines contained in Section 605 of this 
Act.
    Gulfstream IV.--The Committee provides $4,600,000 for the 
Gulfstream IV aircraft to support remote-sensing equipment 
including installation, testing, and certification. When 
combined with $8,400,000 provided in fiscal year 2003, a total 
of $13,000,000 is available for a complete upgrade of the 
instrumentation aboard the aircraft. This instrumentation 
upgrade will enable NOAA to improve storm-tracking forecasts, 
as proposed.
    WP-3D Navigation Upgrade.--The Committee recommendation 
includes the full amount requested, $1,645,000, for the 
engineering, design and installation of updated systems on one 
of the two WP-3D aircraft.
    Turbo Commander Replacement.--The Committee recommendation 
includes the full amount requested, $1,550,000, to extend the 
platform required for the NWS Airborne Snow Survey program.
    Aircraft Regulatory and Safety Upgrades.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $1,000,000 to satisfy Federal Aviation 
Administration and International Civil Aviation Organization 
safety regulations.
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                    PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY

    The Committee recommendation includes $90,000,000, which is 
the same as the current year and the request, for salmon 
restoration grants. Of the amounts provided to the State of 
Washington, $4,000,000 is for the Washington State Department 
of Natural Resources and other State and Federal agencies for 
purposes of implementing the State of Washington's Forest and 
Fish report, and $1,600,000 is for the purchase of mass marking 
equipment used at federal hatcheries in Washington State to 
promote selected fisheries and protect threatened and 
endangered species.
    The Committee notes that the authorization for this program 
has expired. The Committee recommendation provides funds 
according to the most recent authorization. The Committee would 
entertain a reprogramming of funds under this heading, should 
new authorization language be enacted, to include the State of 
Idaho.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee notes that an appropriation is not necessary 
to support loan programs under the fisheries finance program 
account. The Committee recommendation will support up to 
$59,000,000 to finance fishing capacity reduction loan 
programs, including individual fishing quotas, reconditioning 
of fishing vessels for the purpose of reducing by-catch or 
reducing capacity in an overfished or over-capitalized fishery, 
and the purchase of assets sold at foreclosure instituted by 
the Secretary.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $44,662,000 for costs 
of managing the Department of Commerce, the same amount as in 
the current year and $12,529,000 below the request. The 
recommendation includes language designating $1,621,000 and 11 
full-time equivalents for the legislative affairs function of 
the Department.
    The recommendation does not include the transfer of 
$1,668,000 for the costs associated with the White House 
Liaison and External Affairs Offices nor $485,000 for the 
Government Performance and Results Act from the Advances and 
Reimbursement (A&R) fund to this heading, as proposed. The 
recommendation also does not include $993,000 to establish a 
Renovations Project Management Office, nor does it include 
$4,157,000 for E-Government Initiatives, as proposed.
    This appropriation provides for the Office of the Secretary 
and for staff offices of the Department, which assist in the 
formulation of policy, management, and administration.
    Office Relocations.--The Committee continues to direct the 
Department to submit quarterly reports providing details of all 
office moves, openings, reductions and closings, and the costs 
associated with all moves. The Committee reminds the Department 
of the requirements to submit reprogramming notifications under 
section 605 of the Act.
    Seafood Inspection Program.--The Department is considering 
an appeal of NOAA's May 20, 2003, decision to designate the 
work of the Seafood Inspection Program as ``commercial''. The 
Committee is concerned that outsourcing may undermine the 
credibility of the program without producing intended savings 
or achieving the goals of the Federal Activities Inventory 
Reform Act.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee includes $22,000,000 for the Inspector 
General for fiscal year 2004, which is $1,499,000 above the 
current year level and $1,378,000 below the request.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the Department of Commerce, similar to provisions that were 
included in the fiscal year 2003 Appropriations Act:
          Section 201 of the bill making Department of Commerce 
        funds available for advanced payments only upon 
        certification of officials designated by the Secretary 
        that such payments are considered to be in the public 
        interest;
          Section 202 making appropriations for the Department 
        in the bill for Salaries and Expenses available for 
        hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for services, 
        uniforms and allowances as authorized by law;
          Section 203 modified from the current year to make it 
        permanent, prohibiting any of the funds for NOAA to be 
        used to support hurricane reconnaissance aircraft and 
        activities that are under the control of the United 
        States Air Force or the United States Air Force 
        Reserve;
          Section 204 providing the authority to transfer funds 
        between Department of Commerce appropriation accounts 
        and requiring notification to the Committee of certain 
        actions;
          Section 205 providing that any costs incurred by the 
        Department in response to funding reductions shall be 
        absorbed within the total budgetary resources available 
        to the Department and shall not be subject to the 
        reprogramming limitations set forth in this Act; and
          Section 206 allowing the Department of Commerce 
        franchise fund to retain earnings from services.

                        TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

    The funds recommended by the Committee in Title III of the 
accompanying bill are for the operation and maintenance of 
United States Courts and include the salaries of judges, 
magistrates, probation and pretrial services officers, and 
supporting personnel and other expenses of the Federal 
Judiciary.
    The appropriations request submitted by the Administration 
for fiscal year 2004 for the Judiciary totals $5,430,009,000. 
However, the Administration's budget request applies a 
$288,000,000 negative allowance to certain pass-through 
agencies to reflect Presidential priorities. The fiscal year 
2004 budget request was submitted prior to the President 
signing the fiscal year 2003 appropriations bill into law. The 
Judiciary attempted to submit several technical changes to its 
fiscal year 2004 request after the fiscal year 2003 
appropriations bill was enacted. However, the Committee 
understands the Administration declined to transmit these 
changes to the Congress.
    The Committee expects the Administration to avoid actions, 
including the application of negative allowances to certain 
pass-through agencies, and failure to transmit budget 
amendments, that do not accurately reflect the Federal 
Judiciary's funding requirements in the budget the 
Administration requests from the Congress.
    The Committee's recommendation provides $5,194,377,000, 
which is an increase of $306,964,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
level, excluding supplemental amounts, and $235,632,000 below 
the request. Of the total provided, $4,885,019,000 is derived 
from general purpose discretionary funds and $309,358,000 is 
scored as mandatory spending. The recommendation includes 
increases for inflationary pay and benefit adjustments for 
court support staff; continuation of increased security 
measures implemented after September 11th; additional positions 
to handle workload increases primarily in the areas of 
probation and bankruptcy; and additional funding for the 
restoration of the Supreme Court building.
    In addition to direct appropriations, the Judiciary 
collects fees and has various carryover authorities. The 
Judiciary uses these non-appropriated funds to offset its 
direct appropriation requirements. The Judiciary's fiscal year 
2004 budget identified a total of $348,917,000 in fees, 
reimbursables, and carryover to be available to reduce 
appropriation requirements. Consistent with prior year 
practices, the Committee expects the Judiciary to submit a 
financial plan, allocating all sources of available funds 
including appropriations, fee collections, and carryover 
balances. The Judiciary should consider this financial plan to 
be the baseline for reprogramming and the Committee expects the 
plan to be submitted within 45 days after enactment of this 
Act.

                   Supreme Court of the United States


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $55,360,000 
for fiscal year 2004 for the salaries and expenses of the 
Justices and their supporting personnel, and the cost of 
operating the Supreme Court, excluding the care of the building 
and grounds. The recommendation is $9,902,000 above the fiscal 
year 2003 appropriation, excluding supplemental amounts, and is 
$2,117,000 below the Administration's request for this account. 
However, the Committee understands that the Administration 
declined to transmit a budget amendment for the Court reducing 
its request to $56,585,000.
    The recommendation fully funds the Court's request less the 
security enhancements that were provided in the fiscal year 
2003 supplemental and an inflationary pay adjustment for 
Justices which is deferred at this time.
    The Committee is aware of continued concerns about minority 
hiring and diversity among law clerks at the Supreme Court. The 
Committee encourages the Court and the Judicial Conference of 
the United States to continue to make progress in this matter.
    Section 304 provides the Court with authority to repay 
Supreme Court law clerk student loans up to $6,000. The 
recommendation includes $210,000 to fund this initiative.

                    CARE OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,591,000 
for fiscal year 2004 for personnel and other services relating 
to the Supreme Court building and grounds, which is supervised 
by the Architect of the Capitol (AoC). The recommendation is 
$5,933,000 above the request and $30,764,000 below fiscal year 
2003. However, the Committee understands that the 
Administration declined to transmit a budget amendment 
necessary to adequately address the Supreme Court's building 
renovation project. The recommendation fully funds the Court's 
estimated fiscal year 2004 requirements for the building 
renovation project.
    The Committee directs the Supreme Court and the AoC to 
study the feasibility of establishing a visitor screening site 
outside of the Supreme Court building and report to Committee 
within 90 days of enactment of this Act.
    Language in the bill allows the full amount of the 
appropriation to remain available until expended.

         United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,665,000 
for fiscal year 2004 for the salaries and expenses of the 
United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The 
Committee recommendation is $470,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
appropriation, excluding supplemental amounts, and $1,757,000 
below the request.
    The Committee directs the U.S. Marshals Service to ensure 
that the Court Security Inspector for the District of Columbia 
works with the Court to address concerns regarding the 
coordination and oversight of facility security and the need 
for a supervisory level security position. The Committee notes 
the fiscal year 2003 supplemental appropriation provided the 
Court with 13 additional court security officers to address the 
Court's immediate security deficiencies. No funding is provided 
to establish a deputy circuit executive position.

               United States Court of International Trade


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $14,068,000 
for fiscal year 2004 for the salaries and expenses of the 
United States Court of International Trade. The Committee 
recommendation is $138,000 below the request and $459,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 appropriation, excluding supplemental 
amounts.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,004,176,000 
for the operations of the regional courts of appeals, district 
courts, bankruptcy courts, the Court of Federal Claims, and 
probation and pretrial services offices. The recommendation is 
$184,176,000 below the request, and $227,161,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 appropriation.
    The recommendation includes an increase of $13,208,000 for 
200 additional court support staff to address workload 
increases, including all-time high levels in bankruptcy filings 
and offenders under the supervision of probation officers. The 
Committee understands that the Judiciary's staffing, operations 
and maintenance, and information technology resources are 
allocated to the courts according to formulas used to equitably 
distribute resources based on the actual workload of each 
district. The Committee believes this is the optimal method of 
making such allocations and expects the Judiciary to continue 
to allocate its resources using the formulas approved by the 
Judicial Conference. The Committee also expects the 
Administrative Office to periodically update the formulas to 
ensure their accuracy.
    The Committee's recommendation includes an increase of 
$4,199,000 for 10 additional magistrate judges and related 
support staff and expenses as requested by the Judicial 
Conference.
    The recommendation also includes an increase of $7,369,000 
for probation and pretrial services offices to fund additional 
costs associated with drug testing and treatment, alternatives 
to pretrial detention, mental health treatment, electronic 
monitoring, and other related contract costs. The Committee 
recognizes that the number of offenders living in our 
communities under supervision of probation officers continues 
to increase. The Committee also recognizes that the number of 
high-risk offenders under supervision after serving prison 
terms has also increased. The Committee's recommendation 
provides these funds along with funding for additional 
positions to enhance the Judiciary's ability to supervise 
offenders living in our nation's communities.
    The Committee expects the fee for the Electronic Public 
Access program to provide for Case Management/Electronic Case 
Files system enhancements and operational costs.
    Bill language is included permitting $27,817,000 to remain 
available until expended for space alteration projects and for 
furniture costs related to new space alteration or construction 
projects.

                 VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION TRUST FUND

    The Committee recommends a reimbursement of $3,293,000 for 
fiscal year 2004 from the Special Fund to cover expenses of the 
Claims Court associated with processing cases under the 
National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. This amount is 
$527,000 above the amount available in fiscal year 2003 and 
equal to the request. The recommendation provides for two 
additional special masters to address an increase in case 
filings.

                           DEFENDER SERVICES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $613,948,000 
for fiscal year 2004. The recommendation is $78,987,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 level and $21,533,000 below the request.
    This account provides funding for the operation of the 
Federal Public Defender and Community Defender organizations 
and for compensation and reimbursement of expenses of panel 
attorneys appointed pursuant to the Criminal Justice Act (CJA) 
for representation in criminal cases.
    The recommendation includes an increase of $13,422,000 for 
inflationary and other adjustments, including $989,000 to 
increase the non-capital panel attorney rate from $90 to $92 
per hour effective April 1, 2004, and $258,000 to increase the 
capital panel attorney rated from $125 to $128 per hour 
effective April 1, 2004. These rate increases shall only be 
implemented if the Judiciary is able to fully fund the panel 
attorney program in the fiscal year 2004 financial plan. The 
recommendation also includes an increase of $41,748,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 appropriation for additional 
representations. Finally, the recommendation provides an 
increase of $23,817,000 to account for carryover balances used 
to fund the fiscal year 2003 program.
    While the recommendation provides panel attorneys with an 
inflationary rate increase, the recommendation rejects the 
Judiciary's request to increase non-capital panel attorney 
rates to $113 per hour. As described in the Statement of 
Managers accompanying the fiscal year 2003 Act, the Committee 
expects the Judiciary to document the impact that the 
$45,000,000 increase provided in fiscal years 2002 and 2003 has 
had on the Judiciary's ability to attract and retaining 
adequate counsel for CJA representations. Further, the 
Committee understands that there continue to be disparities 
throughout the country in the costs to attract and retain 
counsel. However, the Judiciary continues to propose a single 
hourly rate to be implemented nationally. The Committee expects 
that any future request for panel attorney rate increases above 
inflation shall fully address these matters.

                    FEES OF JURORS AND COMMISSIONERS

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $53,181,000. 
This amount is $1,100,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level and 
equal to the request.

                             COURT SECURITY

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $288,941,000 
for Court Security for fiscal year 2004 to provide for 
necessary expenses of security and protective services for the 
United States Courts in courtrooms and adjacent areas. This is 
an increase of $22,286,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
appropriation, and is $22,230,000 below the request.
    The recommendation provides for inflationary increases, for 
additional equipment and security systems, and for new contract 
court security officers. The recommendation, under the United 
States Marshals Service, Salaries and Expenses account, 
provides funding for the 106 supervisory deputy marshals for 
courthouse security initially requested in this account. The 
recommendation also does not fund the program increase for four 
additional administrative FTE that the Committee funded in 
fiscal year 2003.
    The Committee remains concerned about the administration of 
this program by the United States Marshals Service (USMS) and 
the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AO). The 
Statement of Managers accompanying the fiscal year 2003 Act 
directed that future budget requests clearly display the level 
and types of court security equipment and systems requested 
compared to the current year. This information was not provided 
in the fiscal year 2004 budget justifications nor was it 
provided in a timely manner after the submission of the budget 
request. The Committee is baffled that the USMS, the AO and the 
Judicial Conference of the United States can submit a budget 
request to the Congress without having documentation to support 
the request for such a critical security program. The USMS and 
the AO are directed to submit monthly reports to the Committee 
on courthouse security equipment and systems spending 
throughout fiscal year 2004.
    The Committee eagerly awaits the submission of the 
management study required in the Statement of Managers 
accompanying the fiscal year 2003 Act and hopes that this study 
will include recommendations to improve the administration of 
this program and the timeliness of information provided to the 
Committee.
    As in previous years, bill language is included allowing up 
to $10,000,000 to remain available until expended.

            Adminstrative Office of the United States Courts


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $66,968,000 
for the salaries and expenses of the Administrative Office of 
the United States Courts (AO), which is $3,881,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 appropriation and $4,940,000 below the 
request.
    The AO provides administrative and management support to 
the United States Courts, including the probation and 
bankruptcy systems. It also supports the Judicial Conference of 
the United States in determining Judiciary policies, developing 
methods to allow the courts to conduct business efficiently and 
economically, and enhancing the use of information technology 
in the courts.

                         Federal Judical Center


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $21,440,000 
for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Judicial Center 
for fiscal year 2004, which is $720,000 above fiscal year 2003 
and $220,000 below the request.
    The Center improves the management of Federal judicial 
dockets and court administration through education for judges 
and staff, and research, evaluation, and planning assistance 
for the courts and the Judicial Conference.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds


                    PAYMENT TO JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee provides $29,000,000 for payments to the 
Judicial Officers' Retirement Fund, the Judicial Survivors' 
Annuities Fund, and the Claims Court Judges Retirement Fund for 
fiscal year 2004. This amount is equal to the budget request 
and $6,300,000 below the fiscal year 2003 level. These payments 
are considered mandatory for budget scorekeeping purposes.
    These Funds cover the estimated annuity payments to be made 
to retired bankruptcy judges, magistrate judges, Claims Court 
judges, and spouses and dependent children of deceased judicial 
officers.

                  United States Sentencing Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $12,746,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the United States Sentencing Commission for fiscal 
year 2004, which is $735,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
appropriation and $454,000 below the request.
    The purpose of the Commission is to establish, review and 
revise sentencing guidelines, policies and practices for the 
Federal criminal justice system. The Commission is also 
required to monitor the operation of the guidelines and to 
identify and report necessary changes to the Congress.
    Currently, the Commission is undertaking a review of 15 
years of the Sentencing Guidelines. One part of this review was 
to survey Article III judges regarding the guidelines. The 
Committee understands that the survey found that both district 
and circuit judges believed that the guidelines have been 
relatively effective in (1) providing punishment levels that 
reflect the seriousness of the offense; (2) providing adequate 
deterrence to criminal conduct; (3) protecting the public from 
further crimes of the defendant; and (4) avoiding unwarranted 
sentencing disparities among defendants with similar records 
who have been found guilty of similar conduct. The survey also 
found that a majority of both district and circuit judges 
indicated two areas in which the guidelines could be improved 
including (1) providing defendants with training, medical care, 
or treatment in the most effective manner, where rehabilitation 
was appropriate; and (2) maintaining sufficient flexibility to 
permit individualized sentences when warranted by mitigating or 
aggravating factors.
    The Committee understands that the Commission is currently 
conducting the following studies: (1) ``How Well is the Federal 
Criminal Justice System Achieving the Goals of Sentencing 
Reform?''; (2) ``Mandatory Minimum Penalties in the Federal 
Criminal Justice System''; and (3) ``Departures from the 
Federal Sentencing Guidelines''. The Committee is pleased that 
the Commission is studying these issues and expects to be kept 
informed of progress on these studies. The Commission plays an 
important role in keeping the Congress, the Administration, and 
the public informed on the effectiveness of sentencing 
guidelines.
    The Committee's recommendation provides for certain 
inflationary adjustments and one additional position.

                   General Provisions--the Judiciary

    The Committee has included the following general provisions 
in the bill for the Judiciary:
          Section 301 includes language, included in previous 
        Appropriations Acts, to permit funds in the bill for 
        salaries and expenses for the Judiciary to be available 
        for employment of experts and consultant services as 
        authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
          Section 302 includes language, included in previous 
        Appropriations Acts, which permits up to 5 percent of 
        any appropriation made available for fiscal year 2004 
        to be transferred between Judiciary appropriations 
        accounts provided that no appropriation shall be 
        decreased by more than 5 percent or increased by more 
        than 10 percent by any such transfer except in certain 
        circumstances. In addition, the language provides that 
        any such transfer shall be treated as a reprogramming 
        of funds under section 605 of the accompanying bill and 
        shall not be available for obligation or expenditure 
        except in compliance with the procedures set forth in 
        that section.
          Section 303 includes language authorizing not to 
        exceed $11,000 to be used for official reception and 
        representation expenses incurred by the Judicial 
        Conference of the United States.
          Section 304 provides the Supreme Court with authority 
        to repay Supreme Court law clerk student loans up to 
        $6,000.

            TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

    The recommendation in this Title for the Department of 
State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors totals 
$8,420,914,000, which is $223,328,000 below the budget request 
and $570,708,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2003, 
excluding supplemental amounts. Of the total amount provided, 
$8,285,935,000 is derived from general purpose discretionary 
funds and $134,979,000 is scored as mandatory spending. The 
recommended funding levels include significant program 
increases to improve security and diplomatic readiness. The 
recommendation includes the full amount requested, 
$1,508,101,000, to continue worldwide security activities, 
including the design and construction of replacement facilities 
for the most vulnerable overseas posts.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

    The Committee's fiscal year 2004 recommendation for the 
Department of State strongly supports ongoing efforts to 
achieve diplomatic readiness; strengthen diplomatic, embassy 
and border security; and institutionalize management reforms. 
The recommendation continues for a fourth consecutive year a 
historic expansion of the Department's overall operations and 
staffing. Since fiscal year 2001, the Committee has provided an 
average annual increase of over 11 percent for Department 
operations, exclusive of specific initiatives on worldwide 
security upgrades and technology. Over this same period, the 
Committee has funded over 2,500 new American positions. The 
fiscal year 2004 recommendation provides an 8.7 percent 
increase for basic operations, and funds 601 new American 
positions Department-wide. The Committee expects that this 
funding level will allow the Department to meet critical 
staffing requirements, provide additional opportunities for 
training, and continue vigorous management reform initiatives 
to right-size America's overseas presence.
    The Committee recommends a total of $7,857,414,000 for 
fiscal year 2004 for the Department of State. This amount is 
$223,328,000 below the budget request and $510,549,000 above 
the amount appropriated for fiscal year 2003, excluding 
supplemental appropriations. Of the total amount provided, 
$7,722,435,000 is derived from general purpose discretionary 
funds and $134,979,000 is scored as mandatory spending.
    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$6,051,420,000 for the discretionary appropriation accounts 
under Administration of Foreign Affairs; $1,560,663,000 for the 
accounts under International Organizations and Conferences; 
$57,101,000 for International Commissions; and $53,251,000 for 
Other activities. The Committee's recommended priorities for 
the Department of State are detailed in the following 
paragraphs.

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs


                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $4,099,961,000 for the Diplomatic 
and Consular Programs account, including $646,701,000 to 
continue funding for worldwide security upgrades and 
$301,563,000 for public diplomacy international information 
programs.
    This appropriation provides for the formulation and 
execution of United States foreign policy, including the 
conduct of diplomatic and consular relations with foreign 
countries, diplomatic relations with international 
organizations, and related activities. The account includes 
funding for the regional, program, and operations bureaus and 
offices of the Department of State and the Foreign Service.
    The recommendation represents a reduction of $63,583,000 
from the budget request and an increase of $302,548,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 appropriation, excluding supplemental 
amounts. Within this total, the recommendation of $646,701,000 
for worldwide security upgrades is $97,296,000 above the fiscal 
year 2003 level and the same amount as requested. Exclusive of 
security programs, the recommendation represents an increase of 
$205,252,000 above fiscal year 2003, which includes 
$125,130,000 for pay and inflationary adjustments to base and 
$80,122,000 for program increases described below. Security 
funding increases are described under the ``Worldwide Security 
Upgrades'' section below:
    Staffing increases.--The Committee recommendation includes 
a program increase of $72,572,000 for non-security staffing to 
improve diplomatic readiness and strengthen visa adjudication. 
This increase will allow the Department to establish and fill 
approximately 378 new positions, including 68 new foreign 
service positions dedicated to visa adjudication. The Committee 
expects the Department to meet emerging worldwide staffing 
requirements, including new requirements related to operations 
in Afghanistan and Iraq, within these funding levels. The 
recommendation also supports the establishment of 223 
additional positions associated with specific program increases 
for diplomatic security, border security, trafficking in 
persons, and international religious freedom, which are 
described more fully under those sections. With regard to 
funding provided for staffing increases in fiscal years 2003 
and 2004, if such funding is used to establish a new office or 
organizational entity, the Committee directs the Department to 
submit a notification as required under section 605 of this 
Act.
    In addition to these new staffing resources, the Committee 
expects the Department to thoroughly review current resource 
allocations to ensure that staffing plans match program 
priorities and add value. The Committee notes that the 
Department currently has 216 domestic positions under the 
Undersecretary for Economic, Business and Agricultural Affairs, 
including 34 positions in the offices of the Undersecretary and 
Assistant Secretary. In business, agriculture and trade 
affairs, other U.S. Government agencies frequently take the 
lead role. The Committee also notes that the Department now has 
81 Deputy Assistant Secretary positions Department-wide, an 
increase of 15 such positions since the statutory cap was 
lifted in 1998. The Committee expects the Department to enhance 
the diplomatic readiness initiative in a climate of resource 
scarcity by re-evaluating and reallocating resources to meet 
emerging requirements.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned about the serious problem of international 
trafficking in persons. The recommendation includes $4,581,000 
for the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons 
(TIP Office), which is $800,000 above the requested amount. The 
increase shall provide nine additional positions for the TIP 
Office, including six country analyst positions to further 
strengthen the annual reporting process and three positions to 
support the Department-led Senior Policy Operating Group to 
coordinate interagency activities to implement the Trafficking 
Victims Prevention Act of 2000. In the event that hiring lapses 
result in the inability of the TIP Office to fully obligate the 
American Salaries portion of the recommended funding level, the 
same amount shall be available for alternate temporary or part-
time staffing arrangements during fiscal year 2004 to ensure 
that reporting and coordination activities are accomplished.
    The Committee congratulates the Department on the recently 
released 2003 annual report on trafficking, in which 30 new 
countries were added as a result of increased diplomatic 
dialogue and public attention. According to the 2003 report, 
many countries are improving anti-trafficking efforts. This 
report gives the Congress a comprehensive and objective 
assessment of compliance with minimum standards for the 
elimination of trafficking in persons as defined in section 108 
of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act. The 
content of this report should present information and 
assessments solely on the basis of facts and the requirements 
established in the law. The Committee expects the Department to 
report fully, and consistent with the intent of the Act, on 
this critical problem. Faithful reporting of the facts is vital 
to shared efforts to eliminate trafficking, punish traffickers, 
and protect their victims.
    International Summits.--The recommendation includes a 
program increase of $3,000,000 to support one-time costs 
associated with the United States hosting the 2004 Summit of 
the Industrialized Nations.
    United Nations Education, Science and Culture Organization 
(UNESCO).--The recommendation includes a program increase of 
$3,250,000 to re-establish and operate a United States Mission 
to UNESCO in Paris, France, and to re-establish a UNESCO 
National Commission in Washington, DC. Assessed costs 
associated with rejoining UNESCO are provided under the 
``Contributions to International Organizations'' account.
    International Religious Freedom.--The recommendation 
includes $1,946,000 for the Office of International Religious 
Freedom in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, an 
increase of $500,000 above the requested amount. The increase 
will provide at least six additional staff positions to support 
the integration of religious freedom into United States foreign 
policy. Additional resources will allow the Office to develop 
and implement comprehensive strategies to promote religious 
liberty, and to assist in the preparation of the Human Rights 
Reports and the annual Report on International Religious 
Freedom. The Committee also expects the Office, in consultation 
with the Commission on International Religious Freedom, to work 
to further incorporate religious freedom themes in the 
Department's public diplomacy programs. In addition, the 
Committee expects the Department to integrate the 
internationally recognized right to freedom of religion into 
foreign service officer training at all levels.
    Public Diplomacy Programs.--The recommendation includes 
language specifying that $301,563,000 is available only for 
Public Diplomacy programs. The Committee believes that 
separately identifying these resources will facilitate the 
Committee's ability to monitor funding levels and trends for 
these activities. The amount identified for public diplomacy 
programs includes the costs of personnel and programs 
throughout the Department. The Committee expects the Department 
to identify any impediments to optimal performance of public 
diplomacy programs and propose any necessary changes through 
the reprogramming process. The recommendation for public 
diplomacy will support the continuation of programs in the Arab 
and Muslim world, which were expanded in fiscal years 2002 and 
2003.
    The Committee directs the Department to support and 
facilitate the work of the Advisory Panel on Public Diplomacy, 
which was created under the fiscal year 2003 Supplemental 
Appropriations Act. The Committee further directs the 
Department to submit a performance and spending plan, no later 
than thirty days after the submission of the Panel's final 
report, that describes the strategic allocation of public 
diplomacy resources and the actions to be taken pursuant to the 
Panel's recommendations.
    Changes from the Budget Request.--The Committee 
recommendation does not include other requested increases for 
program enhancements in this account. As in previous years, the 
Committee expects that there will be additional savings 
available to the Department, including exchange rate gains and 
vacancies in funded positions. The Department will have the 
ability, through the normal reprogramming process, to propose 
that savings be used for needs not funded by the 
recommendation.
    Worldwide Security Upgrades.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $646,701,000, the full amount requested under 
Diplomatic and Consular Programs, for the costs of worldwide 
security upgrades. This funding includes $547,998,000 to 
provide full year costs of maintaining base security activities 
at current levels. These activities include guard services, 
physical security equipment, armored vehicles, personnel, 
training, and wireless communications. Program increases of 
$98,703,000 are described below.
    The recommendation includes $68,400,000 to continue the 
perimeter/compound security initiative. This amount, an 
increase of $25,300,000, will support the completion in fiscal 
year 2004 of the initial multi-year plan to enhance perimeter 
security at 243 posts, and technical upgrades at annexes and 
other buildings not included in the original program. This 
increase also includes $5,000,000 to allow the Department to 
provide technical assistance to protect soft targets overseas.
    The recommendation includes increases of: $7,952,000 to 
support the addition of 85 security professional staff 
positions, including 70 special agents and 15 professional and 
administrative support positions; $12,400,000 to maintain a 
five-year replacement cycle for armored vehicles; $3,000,000 to 
reduce the risk that information systems will be compromised; 
$36,680,000 to provide necessary protections for U.S. 
facilities and personnel in Kabul, Afghanistan and Dushanbe, 
Tajikistan; $7,923,000 to improve electronic access to, and 
exchange of, security and law enforcement information; 
$2,763,000 to meet security requirements associated with the 
2004 Summer Olympics; and $2,685,000 to increase the security 
of key domestic facilities.s
    Right-Sizing the U.S. Government Presence Overseas.--The 
Committee continues to define right-sizing as the 
reconfiguration of overseas U.S. Government staff to the number 
necessary to achieve U.S. foreign policy goals. The Committee 
is convinced, and agrees with the recommendation of the 
Overseas Presence Advisory Panel, that rationalizing staffing 
and operations abroad has the potential for significant 
budgetary savings. It costs two to three times as much to 
maintain an employee outside of the United States as it does 
within the United States. The notion of right-sizing as a 
desirable means to improve security and gain efficiencies 
implies that the current number of overseas staff in some 
locations is greater than the minimum number necessary, and 
that the presence of a number greater than the minimum number 
presents an unnecessary and unacceptable financial and security 
burden. The Committee is not aware of any right-sizing analysis 
in the past three years that has resulted in a proposed 
reduction to a country-wide staffing presence.
    The recommendation identifies $3,000,000 from within base 
resources to establish and operate an Office on Right-Sizing 
the United States Government Overseas Presence. The Committee 
expects this new Office, reporting directly to the 
Undersecretary for Management, to lead the effort to develop 
internal and interagency mechanisms to better coordinate, 
rationalize and manage the overall deployment of U.S. 
Government personnel overseas. The Committee believes that the 
creation of this Office will facilitate the Department's 
ability to establish and enforce a uniform right-sizing 
methodology to link overseas staffing levels to physical 
security considerations, mission priorities, and costs. The 
Committee also expects that this Office will hold the 
responsibility and accountability for ensuring that right-
sizing standards are applied systematically to final planning 
estimates for staffing of new mission facilities.
    The Committee understands that the Department has changed 
its annual Mission Performance Plan and Bureau Performance Plan 
process to require that staffing be related to performance 
goals and that the chief of mission must confirm that each 
mission is right-sized. The Department shall report to the 
Committee by November 1, 2003, as to what actual impact those 
new requirements have had on the operations, size and 
performance of the missions and bureaus. In addition, the 
Department is directed to undertake a review of the size of the 
20 largest overseas missions including all staff, contractors, 
foreign service nationals, temporary duty officers, and other 
temporary staff, using the mission plan and the right-sizing 
criteria developed by the General Accounting Office, and report 
to the Committee by February 1, 2004, as to whether those 
missions are right-sized.
    The Committee strongly supports the Department's effort to 
initiate a consolidation, streamlining and regionalization of 
country and multi-regional staffing in Frankfurt, Germany. The 
success of this initiative will be measured largely by the 
streamlining reductions made possible at less secure locations 
throughout Germany, Europe, Eurasia, Africa and the Near East.
    Further guidance regarding right-sizing is included under 
the ``Highlights of the Bill'' section at the front of this 
report, and under the ``Embassy Security, Construction and 
Maintenance'' account below.
    Border Security Program.--The recommendation includes 
$736,013,000 for the Department's Border Security program, to 
be entirely funded through collection of Machine Readable Visa 
(MRV) fees. This amount is an increase of $119,192,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 program level. This funding level includes 
a program increase of 125 new consular positions, reflecting 
projected workload increases and requirements to implement 
collection of biometric identifiers in visas at 40 posts. The 
Committee remains concerned about the availability of fee 
collections to support border security funding requirements. 
The Committee directs the Department to continue its bimonthly 
reporting on MRV fee revenue as specified in the conference 
report accompanying the fiscal year 2003 Supplemental 
Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-11).
    The Committee urges the Department to continue to work on 
an interagency basis to strengthen the visa process to make it 
an effective anti-terrorism tool, while avoiding the creation 
of unnecessary barriers or delays to legitimate travel to the 
United States. In addition, the Committee continues to support 
Bureau of Consular Affairs efforts to implement the diversity 
visa program.
    Africa Policy Advisory Panel.--The recommendation includes 
base funding to continue support to the Africa Policy Advisory 
Panel, which will issue a final report during fiscal year 2004, 
making recommendations to the Secretary for specific action.
    NATO Interparliamentary Assembly.--The recommendation 
continues base funding, as necessary, for costs associated with 
fulfilling United States responsibilities with regard to 
hosting the NATO Interparliamentary Assembly.
    Interagency Task Force.--The recommendation continues base 
funding for costs associated with the operation of a U.S. 
Government interagency task force to monitor the United Nations 
headquarters renovation project.
    Minority Recruitment and Hiring.--The Department is 
directed to continue base funding for the educational 
partnership with Hostos Community College and Columbia 
University. This program supports the Department's ongoing 
efforts to increase minority hiring and diversity by 
facilitating the preparation of non-traditional and minority 
students for careers in the Foreign Service and the State 
Department. The Committee also expects the Department to 
continue base funding for an ongoing partnership with Howard 
University in support of the Department's efforts to enhance 
the diversity of the U.S. diplomatic corps by increasing the 
number of underrepresented minorities in foreign relations and 
international affairs careers. These resources are to continue 
and expand the successful collaborative partnership between the 
Department and Howard University to recruit and prepare 
students from various institutions with large minority 
populations for positions in the U.S. Foreign Service.
    Overseas Schools.--The Committee commends the Consolidated 
Overseas Schools Assistance Program for its continuing 
effectiveness in improving the quality of education for 
American children residing abroad. This program fulfills the 
two-fold purpose of providing a high quality, American-style 
education for children of Americans assigned overseas and 
demonstrating American educational philosophy and practice to 
children of other countries and local educators. The Committee 
also commends the continuing contribution of the Overseas 
Schools Advisory Council and its Program of Educational 
Assistance that helps provide educational excellence to 
American overseas schools. In addition, the Council 
successfully promotes financial and in-kind support to these 
schools from American businesses and foundations, as well as 
volunteer participation in activities of the schools by 
American firms' employees and their spouses stationed overseas.
    Extradition.--The Committee expects the Department to work 
with the Department of Justice to bolster efforts to negotiate 
effective extradition treaties.
    Security of Classified Material.--Consistent with the 
report submitted to the Committee in 2002 and language included 
in fiscal year 2003, the recommendation includes necessary sums 
to continue efforts to replace locks used to secure classified 
information.
    Sea Turtles.--Section 609 of Public Law 100-162 requires 
the Secretary to certify that shrimp harvesting nations are in 
compliance with certain conditions with respect to possible 
adverse effects on certain species of sea turtles in order to 
be exempted from a ban on the importation of shrimp or shrimp 
products. The Committee is aware of concerns that this law is 
being inadequately enforced. Therefore, the Department shall 
submit an enforcement plan to the Committee by October 1, 2003, 
including a report describing all tracking, training and 
inspection efforts of the U.S. Government, and a list of all 
shrimp harvesting nations that are not in compliance with the 
law.
    Tibet.--A number of provisions in the Tibetan Policy Act 
fall under the jurisdiction of the Department of State 
including provisions concerning establishment of a U.S. 
presence in Lhasa; Tibetan language training and requirements 
for Foreign Service officers; promotion of advocacy on 
religious freedom in Tibet; necessary support for the Office of 
the Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues; and the need to 
raise inter-departmental awareness of the provisions of this 
legislation. The Committee urges the relevant bureaus and 
offices within the Department to ensure the full implementation 
of the Tibetan Policy Act.
    Legislative Affairs.--The recommendation includes language, 
similar to language carried for the other Departments funded 
under this Act, establishing a budget and position ceiling for 
the Bureau of Legislative Affairs.
    Middle East Partnership Initiative/Islamic Outreach.--The 
Committee notes that supplemental funding was provided in 
fiscal year 2003 for Middle East Partnership Initiative/Islamic 
Outreach programs. The Committee notes that the Department has 
not created an office or other organizational entity to carry 
out these programs, nor has the Department identified any 
operational or administrative funding requirements associated 
with these programs. In that regard, no funds are provided 
under this heading for such costs. Should the Department decide 
to create an office to carry out these programs, the Committee 
directs the Department to immediately submit the notification 
that is required under section 605 of this Act.
    Bureau of International Organization Affairs.--The 
recommendation includes language designating a ceiling on the 
funding allocation for the Bureau of International Organization 
Affairs. The costs described above for re-establishing a U.S. 
mission to UNESCO shall be included within this ceiling. The 
Committee is disappointed with the Department's efforts to 
pursue a forceful human rights agenda in the UN. Within the 
recommended funding level, the Committee expects the Bureau to 
place top priority on international human rights protection and 
advocacy, and submit a report to the Committee by November 1, 
2003, presenting an international organizations human rights 
agenda and work plan for fiscal year 2004.
    Presence in China.--The United States currently maintains 
six diplomatic facilities in the People's Republic of China. 
Given the size of China's population and its rapid economic 
growth, the Committee believes that our relations with China 
are growing in importance and likely to represent an increasing 
part of the Department's workload. In light of these factors, 
the Committee directs the Department to prepare a report by 
February 15, 2004, on the ideal size and geographical 
deployment of the U.S. diplomatic presence in China by 2010, 
for long-term planning purposes. The Committee emphasizes the 
key human rights, religious freedom, economic and military 
issues the Department will have to monitor in the coming years. 
The Committee expects that the future U.S. presence in China 
will ensure that the Executive Branch and Congress are not 
surprised by any major developments in China that could affect 
the foreign policy of the United States.
    The Committee has included language in the bill, similar to 
language in prior years, which: (1) permits not to exceed 
$4,000,000 to be transferred to the Emergencies in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service account for emergency 
evacuations and terrorism rewards; (2) provides $1,343,000 in 
fees collected from other Executive Branch agencies and 
$490,000 from reserves for lease or use of facilities at the 
International Center Complex, as authorized by law; (3) 
provides not to exceed $15,000 from reimbursements, surcharges, 
and fees for use of Blair House facilities in accordance with 
the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956; (4) 
requires notification of Congress before processing licenses 
for the export of satellites to China; and (5) makes not to 
exceed $6,000,000 in fee collections available until expended 
for various activities.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

    The Committee recommends $142,000,000 for the Capital 
Investment Fund, which is $40,119,000 below the fiscal year 
2003 level and $15,000,000 below the request. In addition, the 
budget request estimates that $114,000,000 in expedited 
passport fees will be used to support the information 
technology modernization effort, for a total fiscal year 2004 
spending availability of $256,000,000.
    The entire amount available under this heading, including 
fees, will support investments in new information technologies 
and infrastructure to improve the efficiency of Department 
operations. The total amount available, $256,000,000, is for 
new technology investments. Costs associated with information 
technology operations and maintenance are included under the 
Diplomatic and Consular Programs account, as in fiscal year 
2003. Costs requested under this account for fiscal year 2004 
for the OpenNet Plus and Classified Connectivity projects, both 
of which were completed with fiscal year 2003 appropriations, 
appear to be for ongoing maintenance, repair and replacement. 
The recommendation therefore includes language that delays 
obligation of $84,000,000 under this account until September 
15, 2004. The Committee directs the Department to provide a 
spending plan for this amount, subject to the reprogramming 
requirements under section 605 of this Act, by November 1, 
2003.
    The Committee recommendation provides the full requested 
amount of $15,000,000 for the State Messaging and Archive 
Retrieval Toolset (SMART) initiative. This project will 
integrate all Department systems through which people exchange 
information, including the outmoded telegram system. This 
single web-based system will also advance the goals of the 
Foreign Affairs Systems Integration project which received 
funding in previous years, namely, enhancing the ability of 
employees to communicate across agency and geographic 
boundaries. In addition, the recommendation includes $7,345,000 
for public key infrastructure requirements, as requested, to 
help establish secure interagency communications.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $29,777,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $703,000 above the fiscal 
year 2003 level and $1,926,000 below the request. The Inspector 
General conducts oversight at the State Department and the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors. The Committee recommendation 
includes funding for OIG oversight of the Department's efforts 
to implement worldwide security upgrades.
    The Committee recommendation includes language, as in 
previous years, waiving the statutory requirement that every 
post be inspected every five years, in order to provide greater 
flexibility to the Inspector General to use resources in the 
most critical areas.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

    The bill includes a total of $345,346,000 for the 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs of the Department of 
State. This amount is $101,634,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
level, and the same as the budget request. The recommendation 
consolidates funding for educational and cultural exchange 
programs under this heading. Some such programs for nations of 
East and Central Europe and the former Soviet Union were 
previously funded under the Foreign Operations, Export 
Financing and Related Programs Appropriations Act and 
transferred to this account.
    Funding provided under this heading supports international 
educational and cultural exchange programs, including the 
Fulbright student and scholar exchanges and the International 
Visitors Program, as well as related staff and administrative 
costs. To the maximum extent possible, the Committee urges that 
the following exchange programs be supported: the Congress-
Bundestag youth exchange program; the disability exchange 
clearinghouse; foreign study grants for U.S. undergraduates; 
educational advising and counseling; citizen exchange programs; 
interparliamentary exchanges; youth science leadership 
exchanges; American overseas research centers; Mitchell 
Scholarships; and exchanges with Tibet, the South Pacific, and 
Timor Leste. Regarding the Congress-Bundestag Program, the 
Committee intends that the amount provided will support 380 
exchanges in fiscal year 2004, the same level as in fiscal year 
2003.
    Regarding Fulbright exchanges with Tibet, the Committee 
expects that sufficient resources will be allocated to maintain 
the full complement of Tibetan scholars. Regarding the 
International Visitors Program, the Committee expects the 
Department to allocate additional funding as necessary to 
include primary and secondary educators in the Program under 
the Leaders in Education initiative. Regarding Citizen 
Exchanges, the Committee expects that increased resources will 
be allocated to the Traditional Public-Private Partnership 
grants in a sufficient amount to allow for the expansion of 
operations, programs, and alumni outreach. The Committee 
continues to support artistic and cultural exchange of persons 
programs as an important component of foreign policy. Within 
the levels provided, sufficient funds should be made available 
to continue such exchanges. Further, the Bureau of Educational 
and Cultural Affairs is expected to work with the Bureau of 
Consular Affairs to minimize unnecessary barriers or delays to 
legitimate travel to the United States for the purpose of such 
exchanges. In addition, the Committee supports the continuation 
of funding, to the maximum extent possible, for the following 
programs previously funded by transfers: Muskie Graduate and 
Ph.D. Fellowships; Youth Exchange and Excellence Award 
programs; and the Junior Faculty Development program.
    The Committee recommendation continues enhanced support for 
programs to engage Arab and Muslim audiences through 
educational and cultural exchanges as the highest programmatic 
priority under this account. The Committee expects the 
Department to allocate adequate funding to continue and expand 
Fulbright Exchanges (including American Studies), English 
Language Programs (including English Language Fellows), 
International Visitor programs, and Values/Religious Tolerance 
programs (including cultural exchanges) for these audiences. 
The Committee expects the Department to allocate fiscal year 
2004 appropriations to the Near East and South Asia regions in 
percentages consistent with those used in fiscal year 2003.
    With respect to exchanges with Southeast and Central Europe 
and the countries of the former Soviet Union, the Committee 
understands that the total amount requested and recommended for 
this account will not support a continuation of these programs 
at the levels reflected in the fiscal year 2003 transfers into 
this account. The Committee expects the Department to allocate 
all resources provided under this heading in accordance with 
worldwide public diplomacy and policy priorities.
    The Committee notes that the budget request for this 
account did not propose any programmatic or administrative 
allocation of the $100,040,000 requested to consolidate 
exchanges with Southeast and Central Europe and the countries 
of the former Soviet Union under this heading. Consistent with 
past practice, the Committee assumes that not more than 
$7,500,000 of this amount shall be for staff and administrative 
support in addition to the amount requested for Program 
Support. With regard to the programmatic distribution of these 
funds, the Committee expects the Department to integrate these 
resources with worldwide base programs such as the Fulbright 
Program, the International Visitors Program and the Citizen 
Exchanges Program. In addition, the Committee supports the 
continuation of specific regional exchange programs mentioned 
above that focus on Southeast and Central Europe and the 
countries of the former Soviet Union. No funding shall be 
expended under this account for programs that do not involve 
the exchange of persons, or that have foreign assistance or 
international development as the primary goal.
    The Committee expects that a proposal for the programmatic 
and geographic distribution of available resources (including 
unobligated balances and recoveries) will be submitted through 
the normal reprogramming process within 60 days from the date 
of enactment of this Act. The Committee expects that the 
overall funding distribution will conform to the programmatic 
and geographical guidance above.
    The Committee recommendation includes a limitation of not 
to exceed $2,000,000 on the use of fees or other payments 
received from or in connection with English teaching, 
educational advising and counseling, and exchange visitor 
programs as authorized by law.

                       REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES

    The Committee recommends $9,000,000 for representation 
allowances authorized by section 905 of the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980. This amount is $2,557,000 above the amount available 
in fiscal year 2003 and the same as the budget request. These 
funds are used to reimburse Foreign Service Officers for 
expenditures incurred in their official capacities abroad in 
establishing and maintaining relations with officials of 
foreign governments and appropriate members of local 
communities. The Department shall submit a quarterly report to 
the Committee containing detailed information on the allotment 
and expenditure of this appropriation.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

    The Committee recommends a total of $10,000,000 for the 
Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials account. This is 
$929,000 below the amount available in fiscal year 2003 and the 
same as the budget request.
    This account reimburses local governments and communities 
for the extraordinary costs incurred in providing protection 
for international organizations, foreign missions and 
officials, and foreign dignitaries under certain circumstances. 
The Committee believes that local jurisdictions incurring such 
costs must submit a certified billing for such costs in 
accordance with program regulations. The Committee also 
believes that in those instances where a local jurisdiction 
will realize a financial benefit from a visit by a foreign 
dignitary through increased tax revenues, such circumstances 
should be taken into account by the Department in assessing the 
need for reimbursement under this program. The Committee 
expects the Department to treat such submissions diligently and 
provide reimbursement to local jurisdictions on a timely basis 
if claims are fully justified.
    The Committee is aware of concerns regarding the level of 
reimbursement for protection expenses in light of heightened 
security measures since September 11, 2001. The Committee 
directs the Department to report to the Committee within 30 
days from the enactment of this Act on the amount of valid 
outstanding reimbursement claims; the availability of 
appropriated funds to pay for such claims, including balances 
of prior year supplemental appropriations; and how the 
Department intends to budget for such needs in future years.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$1,394,335,000 for Embassy Security, Construction, and 
Maintenance. This amount is $139,047,000 above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2003 (excluding supplemental 
appropriations) and $120,065,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation designates $861,400,000 as available only for 
priority worldwide security upgrades, acquisition, and 
construction, the full amount requested for such activities. 
The recommendation includes $532,935,000 for non-security 
related costs, which is $27,740,000 above fiscal year 2003 and 
$120,065,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes requested wage and price increases for 
the Department's Office of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO), 
which will support 787 positions in fiscal year 2004.
    This account provides funds to manage U.S. Government real 
property overseas and maintain Government-owned and long-term 
leased properties at approximately 260 posts, leasing office 
and functional facilities, and residential units, not only for 
the Department of State, but for all U.S. employees overseas.
    Worldwide Security Upgrades.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $861,400,000 for security projects, the full amount 
requested, including $761,400,000 to continue the capital 
security program of constructing new secure replacement 
facilities for the Department's most vulnerable embassies and 
consulates. The Committee expects that projects undertaken 
under this program will address the highest priority facilities 
from a security standpoint. In previous fiscal years the 
Department has proposed to reprogram funds under this activity 
for projects that do not address top priority security 
vulnerabilities and for projects that will not result, when 
complete, in a facility that meets existing security standards. 
The Committee expects that worldwide security funds will be 
used only for projects that meet these specifications. To the 
extent that a top priority security replacement project also 
involves a plan for a separate building on the compound for 
another agency, the Committee expects that these, also, will be 
included in the spending plan described below, including a 
justification regarding the necessity for such a separate 
building.
    The Committee recommendation for the capital security 
program includes $120,000,000 for the first year cost of the 
Capital Security Cost Sharing Program. The Committee expects 
that the continuing growth in the Department's contribution to 
this program will be further enhanced by contributions from 
other U.S. Government agencies starting in fiscal year 2005. 
The Committee believes that such a program, in addition to 
creating an enhanced funding stream to accelerate the 
replacement of vulnerable facilities, will also create new 
incentives for all agencies with a presence overseas to 
rationalize and right-size their overseas operations.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $100,000,000, 
the amount requested, to continue the compound security upgrade 
program. The Committee understands that this program includes 
the installation of forced entry/ballistic resistant roof 
hatches, vault doors and power-assisted vehicle barriers, and 
other similar measures. The Committee expects that this funding 
will also provide physical security improvements to residential 
compounds.
    The Committee expects that a proposed spending plan for the 
entire amount of available resources for worldwide security 
upgrades will be submitted through the normal reprogramming 
process within 60 days from the date of enactment of this Act. 
The Committee expects the Department to notify it immediately 
if there are any facilities that the Department believes face 
serious security risks.
    Right-Sizing the U.S. Government Overseas Presence.--The 
Committee continues to be disappointed at the lack of 
discernable progress in the pursuit of an interagency process 
of determining the right size and makeup of overseas posts, 
including exorbitant staffing projections at posts scheduled 
for new embassy or consulate compounds. The Committee directs 
the Office of Overseas Buildings Operation (OBO) to work 
closely with the new Office on Right-Sizing the U.S. Government 
Overseas Presence to ensure that projected staffing levels for 
new embassy compounds are prepared in a disciplined and 
realistic manner, and that these estimates become a basis for 
determining the size, configuration and budget of new embassy 
compound construction projects. The justification for all 
facilities projects funded under this account must include a 
full explanation of regional efficiency and security planning, 
and related staffing assumptions. Such projects will not be 
approved for funding absent evidence of the application of a 
uniform right-sizing methodology.
    Capital Program.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$22,313,000 for the non-security capital program. The Committee 
expects the Department to propose an allocation of this funding 
through the normal reprogramming process. The recommendation 
does not include funding requested specifically for non-
security construction costs related to the construction of a 
new U.S. Embassy in Berlin, Germany. The Committee understands 
that, in addition to funding provided in this Act, the 
Department also has significant additional amounts available 
from the asset management account to support ongoing costs of 
the Berlin project.
    Operations and Maintenance.--The recommendation provides a 
total of $346,000,000 for OBO operations and maintenance 
activities, including the full amount requested for facility 
rehabilitation, and for maintenance and repair of buildings. 
The recommendation also provides $155,000,000 for the leasehold 
program, including a base increase of $5,975,000 to adjust for 
overseas inflationary impacts.
    Project Execution.--The recommendation includes $91,241,000 
for project execution activities, including $31,650,000, the 
full amount requested, for security management. This amount 
will support additional site security measures and cleared 
American guards to supervise an increasing number of capital 
projects.
    Other.--The Committee recommendation also includes 
$6,735,000 for headquarters operations, $28,449,000 for 
information management and support, $8,847,000 for planning and 
development, $6,150,000 for real estate and property 
management, and $23,000,000 for renovations to the Harry S 
Truman Building.
    Assets Management.--The budget request designates 
$50,000,000 in assets management funds planned for expenditure 
in fiscal year 2004. The Committee expects that these funds 
will be used for opportunity purchases to replace uneconomical 
leases and for other priority capital acquisition purposes. In 
addition, as in previous years, the Committee expects that 
assets management funds will continue to be allocated in part 
to security construction needs. Any use of these or additional 
assets management funds in fiscal year 2004 is subject to 
reprogramming. In addition, with respect to the requirement 
that a reprogramming for any major new start be submitted, the 
Committee understands that requirement to mean that any 
rehabilitation or construction projects involving an 
ambassador's residence will be subject to the requirement. In 
addition to regular reporting provided to the Committee on 
acquisition and disposal of overseas property, the Department 
shall submit a report to the Committee by November 1, 2003, 
listing all properties disposed of, or in process for disposal, 
along with associated actual or anticipated proceeds of sale, 
at posts which have had funding approved for the construction 
of a new secure compound in, or after, fiscal year 1999.
    Changes from the Budget Request.--The Committee 
recommendation is $14,078,000 below the request for non-capital 
construction items in this account. The Committee notes, 
however, that the request was based upon the fiscal year 2003 
request and not the enacted fiscal year 2003 Act. As in 
previous years, the Committee expects that there will be 
additional savings available to the Department. The Department 
will have the ability to propose that savings be used for needs 
not funded by the recommendation through the normal 
reprogramming process. The Committee would also entertain a 
reprogramming of funds from the non-security capital program 
budget, should requirements in that category fall short of the 
recommended amount.
    The recommendation continues language carried in the bill 
in previous years that prohibits funds from being used for 
acquisition of furniture and furnishings and generators for 
other departments and agencies.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to enable the Secretary 
of State to meet unforeseen emergencies arising in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service. This amount is $5,458,000 
below the non-supplemental amount provided in fiscal year 2003 
and the same as the budget request. A fiscal year 2003 
supplemental appropriation of $50,000,000 was provided under 
this account in Public Law 108-11 to cover anticipated 
evacuation costs related to the war in Iraq. The Committee 
funding recommendation anticipates that carryover balances from 
fiscal year 2003 will be available for obligation in fiscal 
year 2004. Funding provided in this account is available until 
expended.
    The Committee has included a provision in the bill that 
permits up to $1,000,000 to be transferred from this account to 
the Repatriation Loans Program account, as requested in the 
budget. This provision will ensure an adequate level of 
resources for loans to American citizens through the 
Repatriation Loans Program account should that account require 
additional funds in fiscal year 2004 due to an unanticipated 
increase in the number of loans.
    This appropriation provides resources for the Department of 
State to meet emergency requirements in the conduct of foreign 
affairs. The Committee recommendation provides funds for: (1) 
travel and subsistence expenses for relocation of American 
employees of the United States Government and their families 
from troubled areas to the United States and/or safe-haven 
posts; (2) allowances granted to State Department employees and 
their dependents evacuated to the United States for the 
convenience of the Government; and (3) payment of rewards for 
information concerning terrorist activities.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommendation includes $612,000 for the 
subsidy cost of repatriation loans and $607,000 for 
administrative costs of the program as authorized by 22 U.S.C. 
2671, which is $8,000 above the amount available in fiscal year 
2003 and the same as the budget request.
    This account provides emergency loans to assist destitute 
Americans abroad who have no other source of funds to return to 
the United States.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

    The Committee recommends $18,782,000 for the appropriation 
entitled ``Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan''. This 
amount is $452,000 above the fiscal year 2003 amount and 
$991,000 below the request. The recommendation provides for the 
Institute's pay and inflationary base adjustments. In addition, 
the Institute is authorized to collect Machine Readable Visa 
fees, as well as reimbursements from agencies and user fees 
from trade show exhibitors.
    The Committee expects that the American Institute in Taiwan 
(AIT) will cover anticipated operating expenses in fiscal year 
2004 through a combination of appropriations and visa fee 
revenues. The Committee expects the Department to submit by 
November 1, 2003, an AIT spending plan for fiscal year 2004, 
indicating the total amount of estimated fee collections, the 
amount of such fee collections allocated for operating 
expenses, and the total amount planned for operating expenses 
from all funding sources.
    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the American Institute in Taiwan and 
authorizes funds to be appropriated to the Secretary of State 
to carry out the provisions of the Act. The Institute 
administers programs in the areas of economic and commercial 
services, cultural affairs, travel services, and logistics. The 
Department of State contracts with the American Institute in 
Taiwan to carry out these activities.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

    The Committee recommends $134,979,000 for the appropriation 
entitled ``Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
Disability Fund''. This amount is the full budget request and 
$3,221,000 below the amount appropriated for fiscal year 2003. 
The amount provided in the Committee recommendation is required 
to amortize the unfunded liability in the system, as documented 
by the annual evaluation of Fund balances.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
budget scorekeeping purposes, is authorized by the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980, which provides for an appropriation to the 
Fund in 30 equal annual installments of the amount required for 
the unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed. The Retirement Fund is maintained through 
contributions by participants, matching government 
contributions, special government contributions (including this 
account), interest on investments, and voluntary contributions.

                      International Organizations


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    The bill includes a total of $1,010,463,000 for payment of 
obligations of United States membership in international 
organizations as authorized by conventions, treaties, or 
specific Acts of Congress for fiscal year 2004. This amount is 
$150,092,000 above the amount available in fiscal year 2003 and 
the same as the request.
    The amount provided in the bill is intended to cover 
anticipated assessments for membership in international 
organizations, including the United Nations (UN). In addition, 
the amount provides full funding for anticipated assessments 
for membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and 
the related North Atlantic Assembly, International War Crimes 
Tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia, the 
Organization of American States, and the Pan American Health 
Organization, among others.
    Estimates of the amount required to cover fiscal year 2004 
assessments have varied based on the most recent foreign 
currency exchange rates for the dollar, which has fallen in 
value since the budget request was formulated. The Committee 
expects that these exchange rate losses may be offset by 
amounts pre-paid in fiscal year 2003, transfers from other 
accounts, and some activities included in the request that will 
not require funding within fiscal year 2004. No funding is 
requested or recommended for implementation of the UN Capital 
Master Plan. The Committee continues to support close 
coordination and oversight of this plan by the U.S. Government 
interagency task force funded under the Diplomatic and Consular 
Programs account.
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization (UNESCO).--The recommendation includes 
$71,429,000, as requested, for the estimated costs associated 
with the United States accession to membership in UNESCO. The 
Committee expects, as the U.S. prepares to re-enter, that the 
Department will work aggressively to ensure that UNESCO, 
particularly at senior levels, employs more Americans. Should 
the Department make an exception to the ``zero nominal growth'' 
budget policy with regard to international organizations and 
support an increase in the UNESCO budget for the 2004-2005 
biennium, the Department shall submit a reprogramming of funds 
from lower priority items under this account to cover an 
increase in the U.S. assessment for UNESCO. The Committee 
further expects that any increase in the 2004-2005 UNESCO 
budget will focus on those management and administrative 
reforms identified by the General Accounting Office, and that 
any U.S. contribution for the last quarter of this calendar 
year will be directed toward those UNESCO activities and 
programs that will directly benefit U.S. national interests and 
priorities. In addition, to address security and efficiency 
concerns, the Committee encourages the Department to consider 
appointing one representative with the rank of ambassador to 
represent the U.S. at UNESCO and at the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development in Paris, France.
    Reassessment of U.S. Membership in International 
Organizations.--The Committee notes, with approval, the 
Department's actions to formally withdraw from certain 
international organizations where continued U.S. participation 
was determined to be a low priority in the context of overall 
U.S. national interests. The Committee continues to support the 
comprehensive reassessment of U.S. membership in each of the 50 
international organizations for which funding is requested 
under this account, and to insist that the Department take the 
necessary measures to live within the amount of funds provided 
under this account.
    Reform and Budget Discipline.--The Committee continues to 
insist on reform and budget discipline as a priority for all of 
the international organizations, including the development of 
processes to evaluate, prioritize and terminate programs. The 
Committee believes that the onus is on each international 
organization and the State Department representatives to those 
organizations to reduce overall budgets and eliminate 
duplicative activities, excessive administrative costs, and 
inefficient operations.
    United Nations Regular Budget.--The recommendation assumes 
full payment of the U.S. assessment to the UN regular budget. 
This assessment is estimated at $340,700,000 for calendar year 
2003, an increase of $61,373,000, or 22 percent, over the 
calendar year 2002 assessment. In order to ensure the ability 
of the Congress to monitor fiscal discipline at the UN and 
adherence to the continuing United States policy of zero 
nominal growth budgets for international organizations, the 
recommendation includes language requiring the Secretary to 
notify the Committee in advance of any United Nations action to 
increase funding for any United Nations program without 
identifying an offsetting decrease elsewhere in the United 
Nations budget. Toward this end the Committee expects the 
Department to insist on the evaluation and prioritization of 
ongoing UN programs and activities, so that in the event of 
unanticipated requirements, budget offsets may be taken from 
activities and programs that have already been determined to be 
lower-priority by the organization. Any proposal to exceed the 
adopted biennial budget level of $2,891,000,000 should be 
communicated to the Committee in advance of the formal 
notification, consideration and adoption of such a proposal.
    Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).--The Committee 
continues to support the work done by the Pan American Health 
Organization (PAHO). PAHO has taken the lead in health issues, 
including border health concerns, emerging diseases and bio-
terrorism, that have an impact on citizens of the United States 
and all citizens of the Americas. The outbreak of the SARS 
virus and the treatment of similar diseases highlight the 
importance of PAHO to the United States. The Committee 
recommendation includes full funding as requested for the U.S. 
assessment for PAHO in fiscal year 2004.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $550,200,000 for 
United States payments for Contributions for International 
Peacekeeping Activities for fiscal year 2004, the amount 
requested in the budget and $119,131,000 below the fiscal year 
2003 level. The Committee recommendation provides for the full 
payment of anticipated fiscal year 2004 assessments for United 
Nations (UN) peacekeeping missions.
    The Committee is concerned about the continuing lack of 
progress in resolving the dispute over the Western Sahara, 
despite an enormous investment of funds in the MINURSO 
peacekeeping mission. The Committee urges the Department to 
work to encourage a negotiated settlement to the dispute, and 
bring to an end the costly UN peacekeeping presence associated 
with a referendum settlement program that has failed to 
materialize over the past decade and that the Secretary General 
and his Personal Envoy abandoned as unworkable last year.
    The establishment of several large, complex missions over 
the past few years has tested the capacity of the UN to plan 
and manage such operations successfully. The Brahimi report 
addressed many deficiencies in UN peacekeeping efforts, 
including problems in doctrine, strategy, decision-making, 
planning, deployment, support and information technology. The 
Committee continues to support efforts to improve the 
performance and efficiency of UN peacekeeping missions through 
structural and procedural reforms. The Committee also supports 
efforts to better limit and focus the goals of such missions, 
and to set specific benchmarks for performance and mission 
termination.
    With regard to benchmarks, the Committee is convinced that 
clear, realistic benchmarks must be established and enforced 
for the performance of MONUC, the UN peacekeeping mission in 
the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Committee 
recommendation includes requested funding to cover anticipated 
fiscal year 2004 assessments for MONUC totaling $210,012,000. 
The Committee expects the Department to consult with the 
Committee, and to submit the required notifications, prior to 
any progression of this mission.
    The Committee continues to support the efforts of the UN's 
Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) to identify waste, 
fraud and abuse in peacekeeping operations, and to recommend 
specific reforms to ensure that such practices are brought to 
an end. The Committee directs the Department to provide the 
necessary support to ensure that OIOS oversight is 
systematically brought to bear on every UN peacekeeping 
mission, including through the presence of resident auditors.
    The bill retains language carried in previous years 
requiring 15-day advance notice of any new or expanded mission, 
together with a statement of cost, duration, exit strategy, 
vital national interest, and source of funds to pay the cost. 
The bill also retains language requiring certification that 
American manufacturers and suppliers are provided equal 
procurement opportunities, and language prohibiting the use of 
funds under this account for the costs of court monitoring. The 
bill does not include requested language to make a portion of 
appropriations under this account available for two fiscal 
years.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

    The bill includes a total of $31,168,000 for the 
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and 
Mexico (IBWC). This amount is $437,000 above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2003 and $9,295,000 below the total 
budget request for fiscal year 2004. The total amount provided 
includes $25,668,000 for Salaries and Expenses and $5,500,000 
for construction. The recommendation includes language 
authorizing not to exceed $6,000 for representation expenses.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation for the Salaries and Expenses 
account is $25,668,000, which is $352,000 above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2003 and $5,894,000 below the budget 
request. The amount recommended by the Committee provides 
additional resources for requested wage and price increases. 
The recommendation does not include requested program 
increases. The Committee notes that fluctuations in the 
Commission's operations and maintenance budgets can result in 
unanticipated cost savings. Should the Commission experience 
such savings, the Commission will have the ability to propose, 
through the section 605 reprogramming process, the use of 
surplus funds for items not included in the Committee 
recommendation.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommendation for IBWC construction provides 
$5,500,000, which is $85,000 above the amount available in 
fiscal year 2003 and $3,401,000 below the budget request.
    The recommendation provides funding for ongoing projects as 
follows: Boundary-wide construction--$2,101,000; and Rio Grande 
construction--$3,399,000. The Committee is aware that the Rio 
Grande American Canal Extension project has been completed, and 
that remaining unobligated balances for this project total 
approximately $3,400,000. The Committee expects that this 
funding will be applied to facilities renovation and Rio Grande 
construction needs in fiscal year 2004. Any reallocation of 
funding among projects must be proposed to the Committee under 
the reprogramming procedures set forth in section 605 of this 
Act.
    The Committee notes the Commission's continuing failure to 
conclude negotiations with Mexico to ensure the secondary 
treatment of Tijuana sewage. As a result of this lack of 
progress, the Committee recommendation does not include funding 
requested under this heading for Western Boundary activities. 
The Committee expects the Commission to conclude negotiations 
with Mexico before the submission of the Commission's fiscal 
year 2005 budget request. The Commission shall submit a monthly 
report to the Committee on Appropriations regarding the 
progress of such negotiations.

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,944,000 to fund the 
U.S. share of expenses of the International Boundary 
Commission, the International Joint Commission, United States 
and Canada, and the Border Environment Cooperation Commission 
for fiscal year 2004. This amount is $466,000 below the amount 
available in fiscal year 2003 and $2,260,000 below the budget 
request, and includes $1,261,000 for the International Boundary 
Commission, $5,550,000 for the International Joint Commission 
and $2,133,000 for the Border Environment Cooperation 
Commission. The recommended funding level for the International 
Joint Commission includes $1,311,000 for fourth year costs of a 
five-year study of the water regulation plan governing Lake 
Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $16,989,000 to fund the 
U.S. share of the expenses of international fisheries 
commissions or related organizations, as well as the travel 
expenses of the United States commissioners. This amount is the 
same as the amount available in fiscal year 2003 and $3,054,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes $2,100,000 for the 
Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission and $12,248,000 for the 
Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC), as requested. In 
addition, the Committee expects that any amounts reprogrammed 
from the Great Lakes Fishery Commission's lampricide program 
for other purposes in fiscal year 2003 will be restored to the 
GLFC in the allocation of funding under this heading. The 
Committee further expects the GLFC to coordinate its efforts 
with other agencies with regard to the threat posed by the 
introduction of Asian Carp into the Great Lakes. Remaining 
amounts under this heading may be allocated on a priority basis 
to other international commissions, subject to the 
reprogramming guidelines contained in section 605 of this Act.
    The Committee expects the Department to take immediate 
action to evaluate and prioritize United States participation 
in, and funding for, international fisheries commissions. In a 
climate of limited resources the Committee continues to insist 
that the Department live within appropriated amounts, 
prioritize as necessary among commissions according to policy 
goals, take steps as necessary to withdraw from lower priority 
commissions, and refrain from entering into new commitments.
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a proposed 
spending plan for the total amount provided under this heading 
no later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act.

                                 Other


                     PAYMENT TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,376,000 
for payment to the Asia Foundation for fiscal year 2004, which 
is the same as the amount available in fiscal year 2003 and 
$1,126,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation continues the increased funding provided in 
fiscal year 2003 for enhanced Foundation programs on human 
rights, higher education, democratic governance, ethnic 
harmony, religious tolerance and legal/judicial reform in 
Afghanistan, Pakistan and Indonesia.
    The Asia Foundation is a private, nonprofit institution, 
established to stimulate Asian democratic development and 
assist the peoples of Asian countries to shape their own 
destinies.

                 EISENHOWER EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2004 of interest and earnings from the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund, expected to total $500,000. The 
Committee recognizes the important and unique role of 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships in the U.S. Government's 
worldwide public diplomacy effort. The Committee has urged the 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, Incorporated, (EEF) to fashion 
its exchange programs to reflect the priority within all public 
diplomacy programs of building mutual understanding with Arab 
and Muslim populations worldwide. In this regard, the Committee 
continues to expect that the selection of foreign and United 
States fellows will reflect this priority. In addition, the 
Committee supports a nation-wide, merit-based recruitment and 
selection process for United States Fellows. The Committee 
expects EEF and the Department to submit a report to the 
Committee by November 30, 2003, describing its achievements in 
these areas.
    The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990 authorized a 
permanent endowment for the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program to increase educational opportunities for young leaders 
in preparation for and enhancement of their professional 
careers and to advance peace through international 
understanding. The Act established the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund in the United States Treasury for 
these purposes. A total of $7,500,000 has been provided to 
establish a permanent endowment for the program, from which the 
appropriation of interest and earnings is provided to 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, Incorporated.

                    ISRAELI ARAB SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends language in the accompanying bill 
that will appropriate for fiscal year 2004 interest and 
earnings of the Israeli Arab Scholarship Endowment Fund, 
expected to total $375,000. A permanent endowment of $4,978,500 
for the Fund was established in fiscal year 1992 with funds 
made available to the United States Information Agency under 
section 556(b) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990, as amended. The 
income from the endowment is to be used for a program of 
scholarships for Israeli Arabs to attend institutions of higher 
education in the United States.

                            EAST-WEST CENTER

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the 
costs of maintaining and operating the East-West Center. The 
budget request included $14,280,000 for this purpose.
    The Committee recommendation eliminates a direct sole-
source grant from the Federal government. The Committee notes 
that the Center can solicit contributions and can compete for 
other Federal grants to support its research and training 
activities. The Center started receiving a direct grant from 
the Federal government in fiscal year 1961.

                    NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY

    The Committee recommends $42,000,000 for the National 
Endowment for Democracy (NED) for fiscal year 2004, $273,000 
above the amount available in fiscal year 2003 and $6,000,000 
above the budget request. The recommendation continues the 
increased funding provided in fiscal year 2003 for enhanced 
Endowment grant programs to build and strengthen democratic 
institutions in the Muslim world. The Committee recommendation 
also continues funding for grants to foster Africa's dynamic 
democracy movements, including groups in Sudan and the 
Democratic Republic of Congo.
    The NED is a private, non-profit corporation established to 
encourage and strengthen the development of democratic 
institutions and processes internationally through private-
sector initiatives, training, and other activities, including 
those which promote pluralism, democratic governance, civic 
education, human rights, and respect for the rule of law. The 
NED provides funding for projects which are determined to be in 
the national interest of the United States and which are 
administered by private organizations and groups.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $552,105,000 to carry 
out United States International Broadcasting Operations for 
fiscal year 2004, which is an increase of $61,421,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2003 level, excluding supplemental 
amounts, and the same as the comparable request. This account 
funds the operating and engineering costs of Voice of America 
(VOA), Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), Radio Free 
Asia (RFA), and the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). The 
recommendation includes funding for Broadcasting to Cuba under 
this account. In the current year, and in the request, this 
funding is provided in a separate account. The Committee 
recommendation provides the full request for all entities 
funded under this account, including funding to continue the 
Middle East Televison Network initiative. The Committee 
recommendation includes the requested reduction of $8,838,000 
from broadcasting programs, and $3,964,000 from management and 
administrative efficiencies. As directed in previous years, all 
communications with the Committee on the part of the various 
broadcasting entities shall be coordinated through the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors.
    Arabic Television.--The United States continues to face an 
enormous challenge to provide the people of Arab and Muslim 
countries with accurate information about U.S. policies and 
values. The Committee recommendation continues to support the 
Board's efforts to expand its ability to reach audiences in the 
Middle East. To date, the Committee has provided $60,400,000, 
including $30,000,000 in the accompanying bill for television 
broadcasting in Arabic. The Committee directs the BBG to 
provide quarterly status reports detailing the progress of this 
effort, with the first report expected by December 1, 2003. 
Developing quality news and entertainment programs in the 
Arabic language should to the maximum extent possible involve 
the creative talents of the private and not-for-profit sectors. 
The Committee continues its direction to the Board to integrate 
new approaches in developing programming, to more effectively 
engage key audiences.
    Language Service Review and Research.--The Committee 
continues to support the Board's efforts to objectively and 
systematically review and evaluate the performance, results, 
and priority of every U.S. Government-sponsored international 
broadcasting language service and to propose corresponding 
reallocations of funds. The Committee endorses this process as 
a means to improve broadcast quality and meet emerging program 
priorities within limited resources. The Committee expects that 
the Board will establish comprehensive performance measures and 
improve coordination of programming streams across component 
organizations, including the grantee organizations. The 
Committee continues to direct the Board to ensure that foreign 
policy implications are given full consideration before 
adopting language service review recommendations. The Committee 
expects the Board to submit a comprehensive report on Language 
Service Review results and corresponding reallocations of 
funds, as appropriate. The Committee anticipates that the 
continuing language service review effort will result in the 
dedication of additional resources to emerging priority 
programs, through the normal reprogramming process.
    Africa Broadcasting.--The Committee understands that 40 
million Africans listen to VOA on a regular basis. The 
Committee supports the use of radio broadcasts as a component 
of sustained HIV/AIDs prevention efforts undertaken by many 
African governments, African countries, humanitarian 
organizations, and U.S. assistance programs. VOA's Africa 
Division has incorporated more than 3,000 broadcasts about HIV/
AIDs into its regular programming for broadcasting to Africa 
within the past 18 months.
    Anti-jamming efforts.--The Committee continues to support 
initiatives by the BBG to defeat jamming and reach a wider 
audience for Radio Free Asia and Voice of America broadcasts to 
China, Tibet, Vietnam, and North Korea. The Committee is aware 
that new technologies may allow the VOA and RFA to more 
effectively defeat jamming efforts. The Committee encourages 
the Board to evaluate the usefulness of these technologies. The 
Committee directs the BBG to make available an additional 
$500,000 for anti-jamming technologies in fiscal year 2004.
    The Committee notes that the recommendation assumes 
reductions in certain language services in countries that have 
made significant advances in democratic reforms, including 
press freedoms. The Committee expects the BBG to continue to 
monitor the situations in these countries and advise the 
Committee regarding any change in language service 
prioritization.
    The Committee is increasingly concerned about a potential 
blurring of the distinction between the international 
broadcasting conducted by the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
and that conducted by the Defense Department. While the 
Committee continues to strongly support all necessary efforts 
to provide for national security, close collaboration with the 
Defense Department may foster misunderstanding among foreign 
audiences as to the principles and goals of BBG broadcasting. 
Within sixty days of enactment of this bill, the BBG shall 
report fully to the Committee on the nature and duration of any 
cooperative efforts with the Defense Department over the last 
year. In addition, the BBG shall notify Congress in writing of 
any projects or programs to be undertaken with the Defense 
Department within 7 days of the beginning of such activities. 
Both reports should include a description of services provided 
and any financial arrangements between the entities.
    The Committee recommends funding for the principal 
broadcasting entities as follows:
    Voice of America.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$162,192,000 for VOA, including requested program reductions of 
$1,860,000 from lower priority programs.
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.--The Committee 
recommendation provides the full requested amount of 
$73,988,000 for RFE/RL, including the requested amounts for 
broadcasting to Iran and Iraq. The Committee continues to 
support programming efforts in Persian, Tajik, Uzbek, Turkmen, 
Arabic, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, and Azeri.
    The Committee commends RFE/RL for developing programming in 
Avar, Chechen, and Circassian, and for expanding broadcasting 
to the Northern Caucasus. The Committee recognizes the 
continuing importance of broadcasting objective, uncensored 
information to the isolated minorities of the Northern Caucasus 
in their native languages.
    RFE/RL headquarters.--The Committee understands the 
Administration has engaged the government of the Czech Republic 
regarding the relocation of RFE/RL headquarters in Prague, the 
Czech Republic. The Committee further understands that, to 
date, the BBG and RFE/RL have not reached agreement with the 
Czech Republic on a suitable site for relocation within the 
Republic. The Committee directs the Board to submit a report to 
the Committee by no later than September 5, 2003, on all 
aspects of the relocation and an analysis of relocating outside 
the Czech Republic, including economic and security 
considerations. No funding is included in this Act to expand 
RFE/RL regional staffing.
    Broadcasting to Cuba.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $26,901,000 for radio and television broadcasting to 
Cuba, which is the same as the request and $2,067,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level.
    Radio Free Asia.--The Committee recommendation includes the 
full requested amount of $28,571,000 for RFA. This amount will 
allow RFA to continue its expanded schedule of broadcasting to 
China, Tibet, Burma, Vietnam, North Korea, Laos, and Cambodia.
    The recommendation includes funding for RFA to continue 
daily Uyghur broadcasts.
    The Committee is supportive of efforts to increase the 
number of broadcast hours of both the VOA and the RFA Korea 
services. The Committee expects the BBG to reprogram funds, if 
necessary, to achieve these increases.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,395,000 in new 
budget authority for broadcasting capital improvements, 
$1,262,000 below the current year level and the same amount as 
the request. Of the amount provided, $1,250,000 is for the 
relocation costs of the Philippines transmitting station. The 
recommendation will provide for the continuation of base costs 
for maintenance, improvements, replacements and repairs, 
digital production capability development, and security 
upgrades at transmitting stations overseas.
    The Board shall continue to keep the Committees informed on 
the status of its efforts to acquire additional transmission 
capabilities in the Middle East. The Board shall also continue 
to keep the Committees informed regarding costs and results of 
the ongoing digital conversion project.

       General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agency

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the Department of State, similar to provisions that were 
included in the fiscal year 2003 Appropriations Act:
    Section 401 of the bill permits funds appropriated in this 
Act for the Department of State to be available for allowances 
and differentials as authorized by subchapter 59 of Title 5 of 
the United States Code; for services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109; and for hire of passenger transportation pursuant to 5 
U.S.C. 1343(b).
    Section 402 of the bill permits up to five percent of any 
State Department appropriation to be transferred to another 
State Department appropriation, but no program can be increased 
by more than ten percent, and also provides the same authority 
to Broadcasting Board of Governors programs. In addition, the 
language provides that any transfer pursuant to this subsection 
shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 605 
of the accompanying bill and shall not be available for 
obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the 
procedures set forth in that section.
    Section 403 of the bill prohibits the use of funds by the 
Department of State or the Broadcasting Board of Governors to 
provide assistance to the Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation.

                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES


                   Antitrust Modernization Commission

    The recommendation provides $1,499,000 as initial funding 
to establish the Antitrust Modernization Commission. The 
request did not include funding for the Commission. The 
Commission, authorized by Public Law 107-273, will examine 
whether antitrust laws need to be modernized and identify and 
study related antitrust issues.

      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $499,000 for the Commission for 
the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, which is $3,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 level and equal to the request. The 
recommendation will allow the Commission to fund its 
administrative expenses through appropriated funds while 
relying on other sources of funding for actual purchase and 
restoration of property.
    The Committee commends the Commission's recent progress in 
protecting and preserving endangered cultural sites in Eastern 
and Central Europe important to the heritage of U.S. citizens, 
including cemeteries, monuments, and historic buildings. One of 
its primary tasks is to obtain protection and preservation 
assurances from the governments of the region. Although it 
began operations during FY 1990, more than two-thirds of the 13 
government-to-government agreements it has negotiated have been 
entered into since 2001. On May 19, 2003, the Commission signed 
a Joint Declaration of Agreement with the German Government to 
preserve and protect sites associated with victims of genocide 
during World War II. The Commission has also accelerated 
efforts to identify and support a growing number of site 
preservation projects.

                       Commission on Civil Rights


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,096,000 for 
the salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights for 
fiscal year 2004. The amount recommended is $59,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and equal to the request.
    The Commission was established by the Civil Rights Act of 
1957 and is directed by eight part-time commissioners. The 
Commission was created to protect the civil rights of people 
within the U.S. and was intended to be an independent, 
bipartisan, fact-finding agency. The Commission investigates 
charges of citizens being deprived of voting and other civil 
rights and collects, studies, and disseminates information on 
the impact of Federal laws and policies on civil rights.
    The Committee recommends language as included in previous 
years, which provides: (1) $50,000 to employ consultants; (2) a 
limitation of four full-time positions under schedule C of the 
Excepted Service, exclusive of one special assistant for each 
Commissioner, and (3) a prohibition against reimbursing 
Commissioners for more than 75 billable days, with the 
exception of the chairperson, who is permitted 125 billable 
days.

             Commission on International Religious Freedom


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $3,000,000 for the Commission 
on International Religious Freedom, which is $135,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and the same as the request.
    The Committee commends the Commission for its efforts to 
promote international religious freedom in consultation with 
the U.S. Department of State, independent human rights groups, 
and other non-governmental organizations, religious leaders, 
academics, policy experts, the intelligence community, and 
government agencies. The Committee urges the Commission and the 
State Department to explore the idea of devising an Index on 
Religious Freedom that may be used to assess progress on 
relevant issues within regions and specific countries. The 
State Department's Report on Trafficking in Persons may provide 
a useful model for assessing and tracking efforts to promote 
religious freedom worldwide.
    The Commission, established pursuant to the International 
Religious Freedom Act of 1998, conducts independent reviews, 
reports on facts and circumstances of violations of religious 
freedom abroad, and recommends options for United States 
policies with respect to foreign countries engaging in or 
tolerating violations of religious freedom.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $1,615,000 for the Commission 
on Security and Cooperation in Europe, which is $43,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 level and the same as the request. The 
Commission was established in 1976 to monitor compliance with 
the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in 
Europe, with particular regard to provisions dealing with 
humanitarian affairs.
    The Committee commends the Commission for addressing 
threats to the peace, security, and stability of Europe and for 
promoting U.S. national interests in this vital region of the 
world. The Committee recognizes the leadership of the 
Commission in promoting human rights, democracy, and the rule 
of law in the 55 participating States of the Organization for 
Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $1,800,000 for the 
Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of 
China, which is $429,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level and 
the same as the request.
    The Committee commends the Commission for its ongoing 
efforts to monitor China's compliance with international human 
rights agreements and standards. The Committee urges the 
Commission to expedite completion of its Political Prisoner 
Registry project in accordance with Section 302(b) of Public 
Law 106-286 and to provide a monthly status report to the 
Committee on related plans and activities. The timely 
completion of the registry will significantly heighten 
international awareness regarding the plight of political 
prisoners in China. The Committee urges the Commission to 
consult with key stakeholders and the public on the design and 
development of the Registry project.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill includes $328,400,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) 
for fiscal year 2004. This amount is $21,585,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level, excluding supplemental amounts, and 
$6,354,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes inflationary 
increases for personnel, benefits, and space rental costs. The 
Committee understands that one of the goals of the pending EEOC 
restructuring is to maintain investigation and litigation 
services in the locations where these functions currently 
exist. The Committee supports EEOC's efforts to restructure its 
organization to better serve the American people and requests 
that the EEOC inform the Committee prior to taking any 
restructuring actions, in accordance with the reprogramming 
provisions of section 605 of the Act. The Committee expects the 
Commission to maintain cost-saving mechanisms put in place over 
the last year, if necessary, to implement elements of the 
restructuring plan. In addition, the EEOC should continue to 
submit quarterly reports on projected and actual spending and 
staffing levels during fiscal year 2004.
    The bill includes language similar to that included in 
previous Appropriations Acts allowing not to exceed $33,000,000 
for payments to State and local Fair Employment Practices 
Agencies (FEPAs). The Committee again encourages the EEOC to 
use the experience the FEPAs have in mediation as the 
Commission continues to expand its Alternative Dispute 
Resolution programs. The bill also includes language similar to 
that included in previous Appropriations Acts allowing non-
monetary awards to private citizens and up to $2,500 for 
official reception and representation expenses.

                   Federal Communications Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill includes total budget authority of $278,958,000 
for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) for fiscal year 2004, of which $269,000,000 is 
to be derived from offsetting collections, resulting in a 
direct appropriation of $9,958,000. The operating level for 
fiscal year 2004 is $7,971,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level 
and $1,840,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language, 
similar to that included in previous Appropriations Acts, which 
allows: (1) up to $600,000 for land and structure; (2) up to 
$500,000 for care and improvement of grounds and buildings; (3) 
up to $4,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses; (4) purchase of uniforms and acquisition of vehicles; 
(5) special counsel fees; (6) collection of $269,000,000 in 
section 9 fees; (7) the sum appropriated to be reduced as 
section 9 fees are collected; and (8) fees in excess of 
$269,000,000 to be available in fiscal year 2005.
    The mission of the Federal Communications Commission is to 
implement the Communications Act of 1934 in a manner that 
promotes competition, innovation, and deregulation in the 
communications industry and the availability of high quality 
communications services for all Americans.
    The Committee is disturbed by the declining standards of 
broadcast television and is concerned about reports of a 
proposed program that would appear to denigrate some rural 
Americans. In the fiscal year 2003 Statement of Managers, the 
conferees directed the Commission to continue to report to 
Congress on the issues associated with resurrecting a broadcast 
industry code of conduct for programming, that, if adhered to 
by the broadcast industry, would protect against the further 
erosion of broadcasting standards. The Committee has not 
received any updates during fiscal year 2003, and the Committee 
requests that the FCC provide a status report by December 31, 
2003.
    The Committee is concerned about a recent report on FCC 
travel sponsored by non-Federal sources. The recommendation 
includes language that prohibits FCC Commissioners and staff 
from accepting payment from certain non-Federal sources to 
attend conventions, conferences, and meetings. The Committee 
recommends a funding level that is sufficient to accommodate 
mission-critical travel.

                        Federal Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$183,041,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Trade 
Commission for fiscal year 2004, which is $6,488,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level and $8,091,000 below the request. 
Collections from premerger filing fees under the Hart-Scott-
Rodino Act and Do-Not-Call list fees partially offset the 
appropriation requirement for this account.
    The mission of the Commission is to enforce a variety of 
Federal antitrust and consumer protection laws. Under these 
laws, the Commission seeks to ensure that the nation's markets 
are competitive, function vigorously and efficiently, and are 
free from undue governmental and private restrictions. The 
Commission also seeks to improve the operation of the 
marketplace by eliminating deceptive and unfair practices. 
Appropriations for both the Antitrust Division of the 
Department of Justice and the Commission are partially financed 
with Hart-Scott-Rodino Act pre-merger filing fees. The 
Committee understands that due to changes in the Hart-Scott-
Rodino fee structure and a reduction in merger activity the 
number of pre-merger filings requiring review declined by 76 
percent between fiscal year 2000 and fiscal year 2002.
    The Committee commends the Commission for its efforts to 
establish a national Do-Not-Call registry to protect consumers 
from unwanted and intrusive telemarketing calls. The Do-Not-
Call program goal is to reduce telemarketing calls by 80 
percent for consumers who wish to participate in the program. 
The Committee directs the General Accounting Office (GAO) to 
study the implementation of the Do-Not-Call program and 
determine whether the Commission is achieving its goal of 
reducing by 80 percent the number of telemarketing calls 
registered consumers receive. If GAO determines that the 
program does not reduce 80 percent of telemarketing calls to 
enrolled telephone numbers, then the GAO shall provide 
recommendations to the Committee and the FTC on how to 
strengthen the program.
    To improve responsiveness to an individual's decision to 
enroll in the program, the Committee directs that not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Commission shall amend the Telemarketing Sales Rule to require 
telemarketers subject to such rule to update, by obtaining from 
the Commission the list of telephone numbers on the ``do-not-
call'' registry on the first day of each month.
    Since 2000, the Commission has issued a series of reports 
entitled, ``Marketing Violent Entertainment to Children: A 
Review of the Self-Regulation and Industry Practices in the 
Motion Picture, Music Recording & Electronic Game Industries.'' 
The latest report, from June 2002, found that advertisements 
for mature video games are still being placed in television and 
print media with substantial youth audiences. The Commission's 
December 2001 study also found that 78 percent of unaccompanied 
minors aged 13 to 16 years old were able to purchase video 
games rated ``mature''. The Committee is concerned with the 
level of violence in video games and the impact these games 
have on children. The Committee directs the Commission to 
educate parents on the content included in video games rated 
``teen'' and ``mature''. The Committee further directs the 
Commission to work with the industry to discontinue the 
marketing of ``teen'' and ``mature'' video games to children. 
The Committee also directs the Commission to work with 
retailers to ensure that such video games are not sold to 
unaccompanied children.
    The recommendation continues bill language, as requested, 
prohibiting the use of funds to implement section 151 of the 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvements Act of 1991. 
However, the Committee notes that GAO is currently studying the 
enforcement of this section and will be reporting its findings 
to the Committee in August 2003.
    The recommendation includes bill language that prohibits 
Commissioners and staff from accepting payment from certain 
non-Federal sources to attend conventions, conferences, and 
meetings. The Committee recommends a funding level that is 
sufficient to accommodate mission-critical travel.
    The recommendation also includes bill language which: (1) 
allows for purchase of uniforms and hire of motor vehicles; (2) 
allows up to $2,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses; (3) allows for the collection of fees; (4) allows for 
the sum appropriated to be reduced as fees are collected; and 
(5) allows funding to be available until expended.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    The recommendation includes $338,848,000 for the payment to 
the Legal Services Corporation. This amount is $2,203,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 level and $9,548,000 above the request. 
This amount includes: (1) $319,548,000 for grants to basic 
field programs and required independent audits; (2) $2,600,000 
for the Office of the Inspector General; (3) $13,300,000 for 
Corporation management and administration; and (4) $3,400,000 
for client self-help and information technology.
    The Legal Services Corporation is a private, nonprofit 
corporation that provides low-income individuals with access to 
legal assistance and information concerning civil legal 
problems. Created in 1974, the Legal Services Corporation is 
charged by Congress to provide assistance to those who would 
otherwise be unable to afford adequate legal counsel.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    The Committee recommendation includes bill language to 
continue statutory requirements and restrictions contained in 
previous Appropriations Acts.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,856,000 for the 
necessary expenses of the Marine Mammal Commission, which is 
$1,174,000 below the current year level, and the same amount as 
requested.

           National Veterans Business Development Corporation

    The recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the Corporation, 
which is $13,000 above the fiscal year 2003 level and equal to 
the request. The Corporation was established by Public Law 106-
50 to foster entrepreneurship and business opportunities for 
veterans, including access to training, capital and markets. 
The Committee understands that fiscal year 2004 is the last 
year the Corporation is authorized to receive appropriated 
funding and that the Corporation's operations and programs will 
be self-sustaining by the start of fiscal year 2005.

                   Securities and Exchange Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $841,500,000 for the 
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including 
$738,500,000 from current year fee collections and $103,000,000 
from prior year unobligated balances. This total funding level 
is $7,000 below the request and $95,711,000 above the level of 
funds available in fiscal year 2003.
    The primary mission of the SEC is to protect investors and 
maintain the integrity of the securities markets. This includes 
ensuring full disclosure of financial information, regulating 
the nation's securities markets, and preventing and policing 
fraud and malpractice in the securities and financial markets.
    In fiscal year 2003, the Commission received an 
appropriation increase of $226,845,000 to significantly 
increase its ability to protect investors and to implement the 
Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The fiscal year 2004 recommendation 
annualizes the increases provided in fiscal year 2003, 
including fully funding the Commission's pay parity and merit 
pay programs, annualizing the 842 new positions partially 
funded in fiscal year 2003, and providing $106,070,000 for 
information technology programs.
    While the Committee has provided large increases to ensure 
the Commission has all the resources it needs to combat 
corporate fraud, the Committee wants to ensure that such 
significant increases in funding can be effectively utilized. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the General Accounting Office 
(GAO) to review the Commission's allocation of the additional 
funding provided in fiscal years 2003 and 2004, including 
actual spending in fiscal year 2003 and planned spending for 
fiscal year 2004. The Committee expects GAO to review the 
Commission's processes for distributing additional positions 
among the Commission's various program offices, and the 
allocation of resources to information technology. GAO shall 
report its finding to the Committee no later than 180 days 
after the enactment of this Act.
    The Committee is concerned that American investors may be 
unwittingly investing in companies with ties to countries that 
sponsor terrorism and countries linked to human rights 
violations. For example, the Committee is aware of certain 
companies listed on U.S. exchanges that are linked to human 
rights abuses in Sudan. The Committee believes that a company's 
association with sponsors of terrorism and human rights abuses, 
no matter how large or small, can have a material adverse 
effect on a public company's operations, financial condition, 
earnings, and stock prices, all of which can negatively affect 
the value of an investment. In order to protect American 
investors' savings and to disclose these business relationships 
to investors, the Committee directs the Commission to establish 
an Office of Global Security Risk within the Division of 
Corporation Finance. The duties of this office shall include, 
but not be limited to: (1) establishing a process by which the 
SEC identifies all companies on U.S. exchanges operating in 
State Department-designated terrorist-sponsoring states; (2) 
ensuring that all companies sold on U.S. exchanges operating in 
State Department-designated terrorist-sponsoring states are 
disclosing such activities to investors; (3) implementing 
enhanced disclosure requirements based on the asymmetric nature 
of the risk to corporate share value and reputation stemming 
from business interests in these higher risk countries; (4) 
coordinating with other government agencies to ensure the 
sharing of relevant information across the Federal government; 
and (5) initiating a global dialogue to ensure that foreign 
corporations whose shares are traded in the United States are 
properly disclosing their activities in State Department-
designated terrorist-sponsoring states to American investors. 
The Commission is directed to provide the Committee with 
quarterly reports on the activities of Office of Global 
Security Risk.
    The recommendation includes bill language that prohibits 
Commissioners and staff from accepting payment from certain 
non-Federal sources to attend conventions, conferences, and 
meetings. The Committee recommends a funding level that is 
sufficient to accommodate mission-critical travel.
    In addition, the Committee recommends language, similar to 
that included in previous Appropriations Acts, which: (1) 
allows for the rental of space; (2) makes up to $3,000 
available for official reception and representation expenses; 
(3) makes up to $10,000 available for a permanent secretariat 
for the International Organization of Securities Commissions; 
and (4) makes up to $100,000 available for expenses of meetings 
and consultations with foreign governmental and regulatory 
officials.

                     Small Business Administration

    The accompanying bill provides a total of $745,557,000 for 
the four appropriations accounts of the Small Business 
Administration (SBA). This amount is $55,331,000 below the 
budget request, and $13,885,000 above the amount appropriated 
in fiscal year 2003. Detailed guidance for the four SBA 
appropriations accounts are contained in the following 
paragraphs.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $326,592,000 for the salaries and 
expenses account of the Small Business Administration. This 
amount is $14,179,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2003 and $33,563,000 below the request.
    Of the amount provided under this heading, $191,592,000 is 
for operating expenses of the SBA. In addition, a total of 
$138,085,000 from other SBA accounts may be transferred to and 
merged with the salaries and expenses account for indirect 
operating costs. This amount consists of $129,000,000 from the 
Business Loans Program account and $9,085,000 from the Disaster 
Loans Program account from the administrative expenses related 
to those accounts. The Committee also anticipates that SBA will 
have an additional $3,280,000 in fee receipts available for 
operating expenses and $1,500,000 in transfers from other 
agencies. This will result in a total availability of 
$334,457,000 for the operating expenses of the SBA, an increase 
of $15,721,000.
    In addition, the recommendation includes language under the 
Disaster Loans Program account providing that $117,585,000 of 
the amount provided for administrative expenses may be 
transferred to and merged with the salaries and expenses 
account for the direct and indirect administrative costs of 
disaster loan making and servicing.
    Within the amounts provided under this heading, the 
Committee expects the SBA to continue to help small businesses 
adapt to a paperless procurement environment. The Committee 
recommendation also includes the full amount requested for Low 
Documentation Processing Centers.
    The Committee supports efforts by the SBA to examine and 
implement organizational changes, both in Washington, D.C., and 
in the field, that result in greater operational efficiencies, 
cost savings, and improved delivery of SBA services to small 
businesses nationwide. The Committee recommendation includes an 
increase of $1,700,000 for space restructuring. The Committee 
expects that this one-time investment will result in future GSA 
rent savings. The recommendation also includes an increase of 
$500,000 to assist in compliance with Government regulations, 
$200,000 for the 8(a) business development program internet 
application program, and $600,000 for the creation of an 
electronic grant system. The Committee is aware of the HUBZone 
Empowerment Contracting Program and the Procurement Marketing 
and Access Network (PRO-Net) and expects SBA to fund continuing 
expenses of these programs as appropriate, from the SBA 
operating account.
    The Committee directs SBA to submit a long-range plan for 
implementation of the loan monitoring system (LMS) and the 
joint accounting and administrative system project (JAAMS). The 
Committee expects this plan to include a description of how the 
remaining balances obligated to FEDSIM in prior fiscal years 
will be utilized.
    The Committee recommendation for salaries and expenses 
includes a total of $135,000,000 for non-credit initiatives as 
follows:

National Ombudsman......................................        $500,000
Advocacy Research.......................................       1,100,000
Veterans Programs.......................................         750,000
7(j) Technical Assistance Programs......................       1,500,000
Small Business Development Centers......................      89,000,000
SCORE...................................................       5,000,000
Women's Business Centers................................      12,500,000
Women's Business Council................................         750,000
Business Information Centers............................         400,000
Native American Outreach................................       2,500,000
Microloan Technical Assistance..........................      15,000,000
PRIME Technical Assistance..............................       5,000,000
Drug Free Work Place....................................       1,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Total, non-credit initiatives.......................     135,000,000

    The Committee expects future SBA budgets to fund staff 
salaries and expenses out of funding provided for operations 
and not under funds budgeted for non-credit initiatives.
    The Committee recommendation includes $2,500,000 for a 
Native American Outreach initiative, which is $2,500,000 above 
the amount requested and $513,000 above the current level. The 
Committee expects that this initiative will assist small 
businesses and economic development in tribal areas on the 
basis of need. The Committee realizes that not all Native 
American tribes, particularly those in remote areas 
experiencing severe economic hardship, may be aware of this and 
other SBA programs. The Committee expects the SBA to include a 
strong outreach component in this initiative to ensure that 
underserved Native American tribes have the opportunity to 
participate in the program. The Committee understands that 
funding for this initiative is in addition to other SBA credit 
and non-credit programs that serve Native Americans.
    The Committee provides $89,000,000 for Small Business 
Development Centers (SBDC), $579,000 above the current level 
and $1,000,000 above the request. The Committee expects SBDCs, 
among other areas of assistance, to assist small businesses in 
the development of drug-free workplaces, identifying export 
opportunities, and providing Native Americans with business 
opportunities. The SBA is directed to submit a report to the 
Committee within 90 days of enactment of this Act describing 
the various programs offered by SBDCs to support American small 
businesses.
    Of the amounts provided for the SBDC program, $2,000,000 is 
to continue the SBDC defense transition program.
    The Committee recommendation includes requested language 
authorizing $3,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses as well as language authorizing the SBA to charge fees 
to cover the cost of publications and certain loan servicing 
activities. The language also permits revenues received from 
all such activities to be credited to the salaries and expenses 
account to be available for carrying out these purposes without 
further appropriations. The recommendation does not include the 
requested authority for a specified amount of program funds to 
remain available for two years. The recommendation also does 
not include requested language allowing the SBA to retain not 
to exceed $3,000,000 of increased collections of delinquent 
debt for qualified expenses.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General of the Small Business Administration, which 
is $1,500,000 below the request and $659,000 above the amount 
appropriated in fiscal year 2003. The recommendation assumes 
that an additional $500,000 may be transferred to this account 
from the administrative expenses of the Disaster Loans Program 
account for oversight costs related to that program. The 
Committee recommendation includes resources for continued 
oversight of SBA's business loan portfolio and SBA's 
administration of the 7(a) and disaster loan programs and non-
credit programs. The Committee directs that the additional 
resources provided above current services be directed to 
increasing costs for the SBA's financial statement and 
additional fraud investigations in the 7(a) and disaster loans 
programs.

                     BUSINESS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends a total of $215,715,000 under this 
account, consisting of: $84,805,000 for the Business Loans 
Program account for subsidies for guaranteed business loans, 
which is equal to the fiscal year 2003 level; $1,910,000 for 
subsidies for direct business loans; and $129,000,000 for 
administrative expenses related to business loan programs. The 
amount provided for administrative expenses may be transferred 
to and merged with the appropriation for SBA salaries and 
expenses to cover the common overhead expenses associated with 
business loans. The recommendation includes a provision in the 
bill, also carried in previous years, which allows up to 
$45,000,000 to remain available for two fiscal years.
    The SBA Business Loan Program serves as an important source 
of capital for America's small businesses. The Committee's 
recommendation provides $84,805,000 for the 7(a) program and 
understands that an additional $10,000,000 is expected to carry 
over into fiscal year 2004. This level of funding will provide 
for a $9,300,000,000 business loan program level, the requested 
program level. The Committee understands that SBA is estimating 
a fiscal year 2003 7(a) program level of $8,500,000,000. 
Therefore, the Committee's fiscal year 2004 recommendation 
provides for an increase of $800,000,000 in the 7(a) program 
level. The recommendation also includes language, as carried in 
previous fiscal years, requiring the SBA to submit a 
reprogramming under section 605 of the Act before exceeding a 
7(a) program level of $10,000,000,000.
    The Committee further understands that in fiscal year 2003 
the Supplemental Terrorist Activity Relief program funded a 
loan program level of $1,663,000,000. The Committee understands 
that this is a non-recurring program to address the small 
business needs in the aftermath of 9/11.
    In addition, the recommendation includes bill language 
providing a $4,500,000,000 program level for the 504 Certified 
Development Company Loans program for long-term, fixed-rate 
financing for the purchase of land, buildings and long-life 
capital equipment, and a $4,500,000,000 program level for the 
Small Business Investment Companies program to provide equity 
capital and long-term debt financing for new or expanding 
entrepreneurial companies. The recommendation includes 
requested bill language regarding the Master Reserve Fund.
    As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, 
Congress is required to appropriate an amount sufficient to 
cover the subsidy costs associated with all direct loan 
obligations and loan guarantee commitments made in fiscal year 
2004, as well as the administrative expenses of the loan 
programs. The subsidy amounts are measured on a net present 
value basis, and the administrative expenses are estimated on a 
cash basis.

                     DISASTER LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends a total of $190,250,000 for the 
Disaster Loans Program Account for loan subsidies and 
associated administrative expenses, which is $10,213,000 below 
the request, and equal to the fiscal year 2003 level. The 
Committee recommendation includes $72,665,000 for the subsidy 
costs of disaster loans, which when combined with estimated 
recoveries and other balances will provide for a loan level of 
at least $760,316,000,000, which represents the requested 
average annual disaster loan program level.
    The Committee recommendation includes $117,585,000 for 
administrative expenses of carrying out the program, which may 
be transferred to and merged with appropriations for salaries 
and expenses. The recommendation includes language specifying 
that, of the amount provided for administrative expenses, 
$108,000,000 is for the direct administrative expenses of loan 
making and loan servicing, and $9,085,000 is for indirect 
administrative expenses. The recommendation also includes 
language requiring that any amount in excess of $9,085,000 
transferred to the salaries and expenses account for indirect 
administrative expenses shall be subject to reprogramming 
requirements, as detailed under section 605 of this Act. In 
addition, the recommendation retains language transferring 
$500,000 of the amount provided for administrative expenses to 
the Office of Inspector General for audits and reviews of the 
disaster loan portfolio.
    As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, the 
Congress is required to appropriate an amount sufficient to 
cover the subsidy costs associated with all direct loan 
obligations and loan guarantee commitments made in fiscal year 
2004, as well as the administrative expenses of the loan 
programs. The subsidy amounts are measured on a net present 
value basis, and the administrative expenses are estimated on a 
cash basis.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the State Justice 
Institute (SJI) for fiscal year 2004, which is $19,000 above 
the fiscal year 2003 appropriation and $3,000,000 above the 
President's request.
    The SJI is a private, non-governmental organization that 
awards grants to improve the administration of justice in State 
courts. For the second consecutive year, the Administration's 
budget request has proposed eliminating Federal funding for 
SJI. However, the Administration's request provides a variety 
of grant programs to assist State courts under the Office of 
Justice Programs (OJP). Under Title I of this Act, the 
Committee provides funding for programs such as the Byrne 
Formula program, the Drug Courts program, the Southwest Border 
Prosecutor initiative, the Gun Violence Reduction Program, the 
Juvenile Accountability Incentive Block Grant Program, the 
Criminal Records Upgrade program, Child Abuse Training for 
Judicial Personnel and Practitioners, the Closed-Circuit 
Televising of Testimony for Children program, and the Violence 
Against Women--STOP Grants program. All of these programs are 
available to assist State courts. The Committee encourages SJI 
to work with the OJP on issues involving State courts and 
encourages SJI to apply for funding from OJP grant programs 
that support State court programs.
    The Committee understands that SJI has been unable to raise 
non-Federal funding. The Committee understands that SJI has 
contacted bar associations and State court organizations and 
while these organizations support SJI, and enjoy receiving 
grant funding and services from SJI, they are not inclined to 
contribute to operations of the SJI beyond matching grant 
funding for individual projects.

                      TITLE VI--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments and agencies funded in the accompanying 
bill. Except where modifications are indicated, these general 
provisions were included in the fiscal year 2003 Appropriations 
Act.
    Section 601 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
Act from being used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by the Congress.
    Section 602 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
Act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless explicitly provided.
    Section 603 provides that the expenditure of any 
appropriation contained in the Act for any consulting service 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection, except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive Order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 604 provides that if any provision of the Act or 
the application of such provision to any person or circumstance 
shall be held invalid, the remainder of the Act and the 
application of such provisions to persons or circumstances 
other than those to which it is held invalid shall not be 
affected.
    Section 605, modified from fiscal year 2003, provides for 
the Committee's policy concerning the reprogramming of funds. 
Section 605(a) prohibits the reprogramming of funds which: (1) 
creates new programs; (2) eliminates a program, project, or 
activity; (3) increases funds or personnel by any means for any 
project or activity for which funds have been denied or 
restricted; (4) relocates offices or employees; (5) reorganizes 
offices, programs, or activities; or (6) contracts out or 
privatizes any function or activity presently performed by 
Federal employees unless the Appropriations Committees of both 
Houses of Congress are notified 15 days in advance. Section 
605(b) prohibits a reprogramming of funds in excess of $500,000 
or 10 percent, whichever is less, that: (1) augments existing 
programs, projects or activities; (2) reduces by 10 percent 
funding for any existing program, project, or activity, or 
numbers of personnel by 10 percent as approved by Congress; or 
(3) results from any general savings due to a reduction in 
personnel which would result in a change in existing programs, 
activities, or projects as approved by Congress unless the 
Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress are 
notified 15 days in advance. The Committee has again included 
carryover funds under the requirements of section 605 to 
clarify that agencies must follow reprogramming procedures with 
respect to carryover funds.
    Section 606 prohibits funds in the Act from being used for 
construction, repair (other than emergency repair), overhaul, 
conversion, or modernization of vessels for the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in shipyards located 
outside the United States.
    Section 607 states the sense of the Congress that all 
equipment and products purchased with funds made available in 
the bill should be American-made, directs the head of each 
Federal agency to provide a notice describing Congressional 
intent to any entity it provides financial assistance to or 
enters into a contract with, and makes any person determined to 
have misused ``Made in America'' labeling ineligible to receive 
grants or contracts made with funds provided under this Act.
    Section 608 prohibits funds from being used to implement, 
administer, or enforce any guidelines of the Equal Employment 
Opportunity Commission covering harassment based on religion 
similar to proposed guidelines published by the EEOC in 
October, 1993.
    Section 609 prohibits the use of funds for any United 
Nations peacekeeping mission when it is made known that United 
States Armed Forces are under the command or operational 
control of a foreign national and the President has not 
submitted to the Congress a recommendation that such 
involvement is in the national security interest of the United 
States.
    Section 610 prohibits the use of funds to pay for expansion 
of diplomatic or consular operations in Vietnam beyond the 
level of operations on July 11, 1995, unless the President 
certifies within 60 days that Vietnam is cooperating in full 
faith with the U.S. on POW/MIA issues.
    Section 611 provides that any closing or downsizing costs 
incurred by a department or agency funded under this Act 
resulting from funding reductions in the Act shall be absorbed 
within the budgetary resources available to the Department or 
agency, and provides transfer authority between appropriation 
accounts to carry out the provision, subject to reprogramming 
procedures.
    Section 612 limits funding under the Local Law Enforcement 
Block Grant to 90 percent to an entity that does not provide 
public safety officers injured in the line of duty and, as a 
result, separated or retired from their jobs, with health 
insurance benefits equal to those they received while on duty.
    Section 613 prohibits funds made available in this Act from 
being used to promote the sale or export of tobacco or tobacco 
products, or to seek the reduction or removal of foreign 
restrictions on the marketing of tobacco products, provided 
that such restrictions are applied equally to all tobacco 
products or tobacco products of the same type. This provision 
is not intended to impact routine international trade services 
provided to all U.S. citizens, including the processing of 
applications to establish foreign trade zones.
    Section 614 prohibits funds for the issuance of visas to 
persons involved in political and extrajudicial killings in 
Haiti.
    Section 615 prohibits funds made available in this Act from 
being used to implement a Federal user fee for background 
checks conducted pursuant to the Brady Handgun Control Act of 
1993, or to implement a background check system that does not 
require and result in the immediate destruction of certain 
information.
    Section 616, modified from fiscal year 2003, delays the 
obligations of any receipts deposited into the Crime Victims 
Fund in excess of $625,000,000 until October 1, 2004. Due to 
unprecedented criminal fines in recent years, receipts 
deposited have greatly exceeded historical levels. The 
Committee has continued to take this action to ensure that a 
stable source of funds will remain available for the program.
    Section 617 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against or denigrate the 
religious beliefs of students participating in such programs.
    Section 618, modified from fiscal year 2003, prohibits the 
use of funds to process visas for citizens of countries that 
deny or delay the repatriation of deported citizens.
    Section 619 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds to transport high security prisoners to facilities not 
certified by the Bureau of Prisons as appropriate to receive 
such prisoners.
    Section 620 prohibits the use of funds for certain 
audiovisual equipment and material by Federal Prisons.
    Section 621 prohibits the transfer of funds in the Act to 
any department or agency of the U.S. Government, except 
pursuant to authority provided in this, or any other 
appropriation Act.
    Section 622, modified from fiscal year 2003, requires the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and the 
Small Business Administration to each establish a policy under 
which eligible employees may participate in telecommuting to 
the maximum extent possible. This section also designates 
funding for the departments, the Judiciary, and the Small 
Business Administration to be available only to implement 
telecommuting programs and requires the entities to report on 
expenditure of the funds provided.
    Section 623 amends fiscal year 2002 supplemental 
appropriations language to allow certain remaining balances to 
be used for similar loan programs in fiscal year 2004.
    Section 624 prohibits the use of funds in this Act to 
grant, transfer or assign a license for a commercial television 
broadcast station if such action would result in an entity 
exceeding a 35 percent aggregate national audience reach.
    Section 625 requires the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
Firearms and Explosives to include specific language in any 
release of tracing study data that makes clear that trace data 
cannot be used to draw broad conclusions about firearms-related 
crime.

                         TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS


                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE


                       Office of Justice Programs


               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

                              (RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $24,122,000 of 
unobligated balances in this account, which is $12,500,000 
above the level requested to be rescinded in the budget. This 
amount consists of $14,522,000 in balances available through 
the recovery of prior year deobligations and $9,600,000 from 
the Cooperative Agreement Program for projects associated with 
activities no longer performed by the Justice Department.

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

                              (RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $6,378,000 in 
balances made available through the recovery of prior year 
deobligations. This amount is equal to the request.

              House of Representatives Report Requirements

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

                        Constitutional Authority

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives states that:
    Each report of a committee on a bill or joint resolution of 
a public character shall include a statement citing the 
specific powers granted to the Congress in the Constitution to 
enact the law proposed by the bill or joint resolution.
    The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to 
report this legislation from Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States of America, which 
states:
    No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
consequence of Appropriations made by law. * * *
    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives in developing 
funding recommendations.

               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill, which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities which require annual authorization 
or additional legislation, which to date has not been enacted.
    The bill includes provisions which place limitations on the 
use of funds in the bill or change existing limitations and 
which might, under some circumstances, be construed as changing 
the application of existing law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years, which are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill also provides that a number of appropriations 
shall remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal 
year. While these provisions are not specifically authorized 
for all of the items, it is deemed desirable to include such 
language for certain programs in order to provide for orderly 
administration and the effective use of funds.
    Language is included under a number of accounts, in which 
appropriations are offset by collections, that specify the 
level of offsetting collections to be credited to the account 
and in certain cases makes collections in excess of the level 
available in the following fiscal year.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has designated 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
programs and has adjusted some designations.
    Language is deleted for items that were one-time 
requirements in fiscal year 2003.
    Language is included making changes to citations of 
authorizations.
    Language is included designating the number of employees 
and funding for legislative affairs functions of the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice and State.
    In various places in the bill, language is included 
restricting travel costs of regulatory agencies from being paid 
by certain non-Federal sources.
    Throughout the bill, several General Provisions carried in 
the fiscal year 2003 bill for one-time requirements are deleted 
and several other contain technical modifications.
    Those additional changes in the fiscal year 2004 bill, 
which might be interpreted as changing existing law, are as 
follows:
    Language is included establishing an account, 
Identification Systems Integration, for deployment of an 
automated booking system and for an integrated fingerprint 
identification system.
    Under Legal Activities Office Automation, language is 
included delaying a certain amount of obligations.
    Language is included regarding authorities of the Detention 
Trustee.
    Under Department of Justice, Office of Inspector General, 
language is deleted regarding authorities of the Attorney 
General with regard to emergencies and acquisition of motor 
vehicles.
    Under United States Marshals Service, language is deleted 
regarding purchase of motor vehicles and language is included 
funding construction of prisoner-holding space.
    Under Federal Bureau of Investigation, language is deleted 
regarding certain basic authorities and regarding facilities 
buildout.
    Language is included that transfers the Interagency Crime 
and Drug Enforcement account into the Drug Enforcement 
Administration.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement account is 
changed to Interagency Drug Enforcement. Language is included 
directing that the Drug Enforcement Administrator, rather than 
the Attorney General, be responsible for redistributing 
carryover balances.
    Under Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, 
language is included prohibiting the use of funds for certain 
purposes.
    Under Office of Justice Programs, Justice Assistance, 
language is included concerning the Prosecutorial Remedies and 
Other Tools to end the Exploitation of Children Today Act of 
2003. Language is deleted concerning Domestic Preparedness.
    Under State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance, language 
is included making funding available for grants, contracts, 
cooperative agreements and other assistance. Language is also 
included concerning prior year balances of the Violence Against 
Women Prevention and Prosecution Program, expanding the purpose 
areas for the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Program, citing 
the authorities for Boys and Girls Clubs, designating the USA 
Freedom Corps, describing the purposes of the Cooperative 
Agreement Program, concerning alcohol and crime prevention in 
Indian Country, and regarding a hate crimes training and 
technical assistance program for State and local law 
enforcement. Language is deleted concerning prior year 
unobligated balances and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
    Under Weed and Seed, language is deleted concerning 
salaries and related expenses.
    Under Community Oriented Policing Services, language is 
included making deobligations available in accordance with 
section 605 of the Act. Language is modified concerning 
training and technical assistance. Language is included 
concerning the Police Corps program, a DNA analysis and backlog 
reduction program, a gun violence reduction program, and the DC 
Superior Court and a fugitive apprehension program. Language is 
deleted transferring prior year balances derived from the 
Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.
    Under Juvenile Justice Programs, language is included for a 
tribal youth delinquency prevention program. Language is 
deleted designating funds for the School Safety Initiative. 
Language is modified concerning Project Sentry and the Juvenile 
Accountability Block Grant program. Language is included for 
Secure our Schools Act and Project Childsafe.
    Under Public Safety Officers Benefits, language is included 
making funds available for education benefits.
    Under International Trade Administration, Operations and 
Administration, language is included changing the name of a 
programmatic line office, designating funds for an Office of 
China Enforcement, and designating funds for the United States 
Foreign and Commercial Service.
    Under Periodic Censuses and Programs, language is included 
designating funds for certain purposes. Language is deleted 
designating amounts for the 2000 decennial census and regarding 
prior-year obligations. Language is modified regarding the 2010 
decennial census.
    Under National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration, Salaries and Expenses, language is deleted 
making funds available until expended, and prohibiting NTIA 
from authorizing spectrum to any Federal entity without 
reimbursement. Language is included designating funds for 
expenses related to Federal spectrum management.
    Under Public Telecommunications Facilities, Planning and 
Construction, language is included providing for the 
administration of grants. Language is deleted regarding 
availability of funds and limiting funding for program 
administration.
    Under Industrial Technology Services, language is deleted 
regarding the Advanced Technology Partnership Program and 
regarding non-profit organizations.
    Under National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
Operations, Research and Facilities, language is deleted 
regarding limitations on a grant program and funding 
requirements for a program. Language is included regarding 
Ocean and Coastal Observing System grants.
    Under National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
Procurement, Acquisition and Construction, language is deleted 
regarding transfers of funds and establishment of a program.
    Language is deleted regarding the conservation category.
    Under Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery, language is deleted 
regarding the 1999 Pacific Salmon Treaty Agreement between the 
United States and Canada.
    Language is deleted regarding funding for the Fishermen's 
Contingency Fund and the Foreign Fishing Observer Fund.
    Under Fisheries Finance Program Account, language is 
deleted providing funds for direct loans and designating funds 
for certain loan programs. Language is included regarding uses 
of the funding.
    Language is included authorizing the Supreme Court to repay 
student loans for law clerks.
    Language is deleted making an amount available only for 
trafficking grants. Language is deleted regarding establishment 
of an Africa Advisory Panel. Language is included making a 
maximum amount available for the Bureau of International 
Organization Affairs, designating an amount to establish and 
operate an Office on Right-Sizing the United States Government 
Overseas Presence, and designating an amount for worldwide 
security upgrades.
    Under Capital Investment Fund, language is included 
delaying obligation of a portion of the funds.
    Under Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance, 
language is included making funds available only for worldwide 
security upgrades, acquisition, and construction. Language is 
also included identifying an amount for domestic and overseas 
representation.
    Under International Organizations, Contributions to 
International Organizations, language is included requiring 
that the United Nations remain within its biennial budget. 
Language is included specifying the funds that may be used to 
pay the assessment to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
    Under Contributions to International Peacekeeping 
Activities, language is deleted making funding available for 
two fiscal years.
    Under Federal Communications Commission, language is 
deleted making a portion of the appropriation available for two 
fiscal years.
    Under Legal Services Corporation, Payment to the Legal 
Services Corporation, language is deleted that exempted a 
certain portion of the appropriation from the historical 
funding formula. Similar language is also deleted from 
Administrative Provision--Legal Services Corporation.
    Under Marine Mammal Commission, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is deleted extending the availability of funding.
    Under Securities and Exchange Commission, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included making prior year balances 
available in fiscal year 2004.
    Under Small Business Administration, language is deleted 
relating to funds available in 2003. A new provision is 
included regarding disaster loans. Language is included 
regarding the Master Reserve Fund. A new section 623 is 
included to allow remaining balances to be used for similar 
purposes in fiscal year 2004.
    In section 615, language is included regarding the 
immediate destructin of certain records.
    In section 622, language is included requiring the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and the 
Small Business Administration to each establish a telework 
policy. This section also designates funding for the 
departments, the Judiciary, and the Small Business 
Administration to be available only to implement telecommuting 
programs and requires a report on expenditure of the funds.
    In section 624, language is included prohibiting the use of 
funds for specific actions related to commercial television 
broadcast licenses.
    In section 625, language is included requiring the Bureau 
of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to include 
specific language in any release of tracing study data.
    Language is included rescinding funds under State and Local 
Law Enforcement Assistance and Community Oriented Policing 
Services.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Appropriations
                                                   Last year of    Authorization   in last year   Appropriations
                 Agency/program                    authorization       level            of         in this bill
                                                                                   authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Justice:\1\
    General Administration......................            2003         121,079          95,477         106,664
    Identification Systems Integration..........            2003          24,505              --          20,677
    Legal Activities Office Automation..........            2003          15,942          15,838          30,136
    Narrowband..................................            2003         149,292          71,327         103,171
    Counterterrorism Fund.......................            2003          35,000          20,993           1,000
    Administrative Review and Appeals...........            2003         198,869         190,290         193,530
    Detention Trustee...........................            2003       1,388,583         808,578         810,125
    Office of Inspector General.................            2003          66,288          54,099          56,245
    U.S. Parole Commission......................            2003          11,355          10,420          10,609
    General Legal Activities....................            2003         659,181         605,368         618,537
    Radiation Exposure Compensation.............            2003       Such sums           1,983           1,996
    Antitrust Division..........................            2003         141,855         133,133         128,133
    U.S. Attorneys..............................            2003       1,550,948       1,493,993       1,526,253
    Foreign Claims Settlement Commission........            2003           1,194           1,129           1,205
    U.S. Marshals Service-Salaries and Expenses.            2003         722,193         684,051         678,672
    Fees and Expenses of Witnesses..............            2003         156,146         175,645         156,145
    Community Relations Service.................            2003          10,732           9,412           9,526
    Assets Forfeiture Fund......................            2003          22,949          21,759          21,759
    Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement......            2003         362,131         369,712              --
    Federal Bureau of Investigation--Salaries               2003       4,322,662       4,581,923       4,576,730
     and Expenses...............................
    Federal Bureau of Investigation--                       2003           1,250           1,242           1,242
     Construction...............................
    Federal Bureau of Investigation--FTTTF......              --              --              --          61,597
    Drug Enforcement Administration.............            2003       1,582,044       1,550,773       1,601,327
    Interagency Drug Enforcement................              --              --              --         556,465
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and                 --              --              --         831,199
     Explosives.................................
    Federal Prison System.......................            2003       4,605,068       4,444,827       4,667,526
Office of Justice Programs:
    Justice Assistance:
        Management and Administration...........            2003         215,811         137,753          40,000
        National Institute of Justice...........            1995          33,000          27,000          59,000
        Bureau of Justice Statistics............            1995          33,000          21,379          33,731
        Regional Information Sharing System.....            2003         100,000          28,812          35,000
        White Collar Crime......................              --              --              --           4,500
State and Local Law Enforcement:
    Local law enforcement block grants..........              --              --              --         400,000
    Byrne Grants................................            1995       1,000,000         500,000         615,000
    USA Freedom Corps...........................              --              --              --           5,000
    Cooperative Agreement Program...............              --              --              --           2,500
    Indian Assistance Programs..................              --              --              --          13,000
    Victims of Trafficking......................            2002          10,000          10,000          10,000
    State Prison Drug Treatment Program.........            2000          72,000          63,000          70,000
    Prescription Drug Monitoring................              --              --              --          10,000
    Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution......              --              --              --          60,000
    Law Enforcement Family Support..............            2000           7,500           1,500           1,487
    Telemarketing...............................            2000           2,500           2,000           1,982
    Missing Alzheimer's Patients................            1998             900             900             892
    Hate Crimes Training........................              --              --              --           1,000
Weed and Seed...................................              --              --              --          51,811
Violence Against Women:
    Training Programs...........................            1997           1,000           1,000           4,957
    Safe Havens.................................            2002          15,000          15,000          14,903
Community Oriented Policing
    Training and Technical Assistance...........              --              --              --          20,662
    Tribal Law Enforcement......................              --              --              --          30,000
    Methamphetamine Hot Spots...................              --              --              --          60,000
    Law Enforcement Technologies................              --              --              --         100,000
    DNA Initiative..............................              --              --              --         174,353
    Southwest Border Prosecutors................              --              --              --          40,000
    Project Safe Neighborhoods..................              --              --              --          45,000
    Police Integrity............................              --              --              --          17,000
    Management and Administration...............              --              --              --          26,130
Juvenile Justice:
    Tribal Youth................................              --              --              --          12,500
    Alcohol Prevention..........................              --              --              --          25,000
    Project Sentry..............................              --              --              --          20,000
    Secure our Schools Act......................            2003          30,000           4,968          20,000
    Project Childsafe...........................              --              --              --          25,000
Department of Commerce:
    International Trade Administration..........            1996       Such sums         248,726         382,123
    Bureau of Industry and Security.............            2001       Such sums          64,711          68,203
    Economic Development Administration.........            2003         335,000         318,680         318,680
    National Telecommunications and Information               --              --              --              --
     Administration \2\.........................
    National Institute of Standards and                     1993         383,500         310,677         460,059
     Technology.................................
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric              ..............  ..............  ..............  ..............
     Administration \2\.........................
Department of State:
    Administration of Foreign Affairs...........            2003       5,133,390       5,098,804       5,190,020
    International Organizations.................            2003       1,617,359       1,529,702       1,560,663
    International Commissions...................            2003          66,385          57,130          57,101
    Other State.................................            2003          72,000          69,986          52,376
Broadcasting Board of Governors.................            2003         644,486         533,841         563,500
Commission on International Religious Freedom...            2003           2,865           2,865           3,000
Federal Communications Commission...............            1991       Such sums         115,794         278,958
Federal Trade Commission........................            1998         110,000         106,500         183,041
Legal Services Corporation......................            1980       Such sums         300,000         338,848
Securities and Exchange Commission..............            2002         776,000         716,350         738,500
State Justice Institute.........................            1996          25,000           6,850           3,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The fiscal year 2001 Commerce, Justice, State, and the Judiciary and Related Agencies Appropriation Act,
  Public Law 106-553, Section 102, hereafter continued the authorizations contained in Public Law 96-132, the
  Department of Justice Appropriations Authorizations Act, Fiscal Year 1980, until the effective date of a
  subsequent Department of Justice appropriation authorization act.
\2\ Programs under the Department of Commerce are funded pursuant to a number of expiring authorizing statutes.
  The statutes address a number of projects that do not directly correspond to the account structure in this
  Act. Following are the relevant authorizing statutes and estimates of the funding provided pursuant to each
  statute:



National Telecommunications and Information                 1993          17,000          18,123          14,604
 Administration Salaries and Expenses:
 Telecommunications Authorization Act of 1992,
 P.L. 102-538...................................
Public Telecommunications Facilities, Planning              1994          42,000          24,000          17,940
 and Construction/Information Infrastructure
 Grants: Public Telecommunications Authorization
 Act of 1992, P.L. 102-356......................
Technology Administration, Salaries and                     1993           8,500           6,070           7,822
 Expenses, P.L. 102-245.........................
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration   ..............  ..............  ..............       2,974,513
 Operations, Research and Facilities:
    Endangered Species Act Amendments of 1958,              1992           6,750           8,236  ..............
     P.L. 100-478...............................
    Marine Mammal Protection Act, P.L. 103-238..            1999          14,768          22,927  ..............
    International Dolphin Conservation Program              2001           4,000           3,293  ..............
     Act, P.L. 105-42...........................
    Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation Act,            1999         159,000         165,286  ..............
     P.L. 104-297...............................
    NOAA Marine Fisheries Program Authorization             2000         110,470         125,596  ..............
     Act, P.L. 104-297..........................
    Coastal Zone Management Act, P.L. 104-150...            1999          55,100          58,500  ..............
    Coastal Zone Management Act, P.L. 101-506               1995          12,000           5,000  ..............
     section 6217, Coastal Nonpoint Source
     Program....................................
Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery: Northern                   2003         100,000         129,155          90,000
 Boundary and Transboundary Rivers Restoration
 and Enhancement Fund and Southern Boundary
 Restoration and Enhancement fund, P.L. 106-553.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                 Comparison With the Budget Resolution

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, which requires that the report accompanying a bill 
providing new budget authority contain a statement detailing 
how that authority compares with the reports submitted under 
section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from 
the Committee's section 302(a) allocation.

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          Section 302(b)  Recommended in
                                            allocation       this bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget authority:
    Mandatory...........................             642             642
    Discretionary.......................          37,914          37,914
                                         -------------------------------
      Total budget authority............          38,556          38,556
                                         ===============================
Outlays:
    Mandatory...........................             654             654
    Discretionary.......................          41,009          40,989
                                         -------------------------------
      Total outlays.....................          41,663          41,643
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Five-Year Outlay Projections

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill:

Fiscal year 2004 outlays

                        [In millions of dollars]

Budget authority........................................          38,556
Outlays:
    2004................................................          27,382
    2005................................................           6,895
    2006................................................           3,033
    2007................................................           1,544
    2008 and future years...............................             516


               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the financial assistance to 
State and local governments is as follows:

                                                                Millions
FY 2004 new budget authority............................           1,828
FY 2004 outlays resulting therefrom.....................           3,074

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is 
printed in italics and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

              SECTION 530C OF TITLE 28, UNITED STATES CODE


Sec. 530C. Authority to use available funds

    (a) * * *
    (b) Permitted Uses.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Specific Permitted Uses.--
                  (A) Aircraft and boats.--Funds available to 
                the Attorney General for United States 
                Attorneys, for the Federal Bureau of 
                Investigation, for the United States Marshals 
                Service, for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
                Firearms and Explosives, for the Drug 
                Enforcement Administration, and for the 
                Immigration and Naturalization Service may be 
                used for the purchase, lease, maintenance, and 
                operation of aircraft and boats, for law 
                enforcement purposes.
                  (B) Purchase of ammunition and firearms; 
                firearms competitions.--Funds available to the 
                Attorney General for United States Attorneys, 
                for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, for 
                the United States Marshals Service, for the 
                Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and 
                Explosives, for the Drug Enforcement 
                Administration, for the Federal Prison System, 
                for the Office of the Inspector General, and 
                for the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
                may be used for--
                          (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                    EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL ACT, 2002


                   (Division B of Public Law 107-117)


                DIVISION B--TRANSFERS FROM THE EMERGENCY


RESPONSE FUND PURSUANT TO PUBLIC LAW 107-38

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



CHAPTER 2

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



RELATED AGENCIES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     DISASTER LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    For emergency expenses for the cost of loan subsidies and 
for loan modifications as authorized by section 202 of this 
Act, for disaster recovery activities and assistance related to 
the terrorist acts in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania on 
September 11, 2001 or section 7(b) of the Small Business Act, 
for ``Disaster Loans Program Account'', $75,000,000, to remain 
available until expended, to be obligated from amounts made 
available in Public Law 107-38.

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, language is not included regarding 
certain transfer authority.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

Department of Justice, State and Local Law Enforcement 
    Assistance Account..................................     $24,122,000
Department of Justice, Community Oriented Policing 
    Services Account....................................      $6,378,000
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(b) of rule XIII of 
the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, are 
printed below:

                             ROLLCALL NO. 1

    Date: July 16, 2003.
    Measure: Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the 
Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2004.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To prohibit the use of funds in this 
Act to grant, transfer or assign a license for a commercial 
television broadcast station if such action would result in an 
entity exceeding a 35 percent aggregate national audience 
reach.
    Results: Adopted 40 yeas to 25 nays.


Members Voting
      Yea                                     Members Voting Nay

Mr. Berry       Mr. Moran             Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Bishop      Mr. Murtha            Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Boyd        Mr. Nethercutt        Mr. Crenshaw
Mr. Clyburn     Mr. Obey              Mr. Culberson
Mr. Cramer      Mr. Olver             Mr. Cunningham
Ms. DeLauro     Mr. Pastor            Mr. Doolittle
Mr. Dicks       Mr. Peterson          Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Edwards     Mr. Price             Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Farr        Mr. Regula            Ms. Granger
Mr. Fattah      Mr. Rothman           Mr. Hobson
Mr. Goode       Ms. Roybal-Allard     Mr. Kingston
Mr. Hinchey     Mr. Sabo              Mr. Kirk
Mr. Hoyer       Mr. Serrano           Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Istook      Mr. Sherwood          Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Jackson     Mr. Taylor            Mr. LaHood
Ms. Kaptur      Mr. Visclosky         Mr. Latham
Mr. Kennedy     Mr. Vitter            Mr. Lewis
Ms. Kilpatrick  Mr. Walsh             Mrs. Northup
Mrs. Lowey      Mr. Wamp              Mr. Rogers
Mr. Mollohan    Mr. Wolf              Mr. Simpson
                                      Mr. Sweeney
                                      Mr. Tiahrt
                                      Dr. Weldon
                                      Mr. Wicker
                                      Mr. Young


                             ROLLCALL NO. 2

    Date: July 16, 2003.
    Measure: Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the 
Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2004.
    Motion by: Mr. Tiahrt.
    Description of motion: To exempt corporations from a 
separate provision in this Act that prohibits the use of funds 
to investigate or act upon applications for relief under 18 
U.S.C. 925(c) from persons who are prohibited from processing 
shipping, transporting or receiving firearms or ammunition; to 
prohibit the use of funds to transfer the functions of the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) to 
other agencies or Departments in fiscal year 2004; to prohibit 
the use of funds to disclose to the public any information 
required to be kept by Federal firearms licensees; to prohibit 
the use of funds to require Federal firearms licensees to 
submit certain records to the ATF regarding the acquisition or 
disposition of a firearm; to prohibit the use of funds to 
promulgate or implement any rule to require Federal firearms 
licensees to conduct a physical inventory of firearms; to 
prohibit the use of funds to deny applications for Federal 
firearms dealer licenses or renewal of such licenses due to a 
lack of business activity, provided that the applicant is 
otherwise eligible to receive such a license and is eligible to 
report business income or to claim an income tax deduction for 
business expenses under the Internal Revenue Code; to amend a 
provision to prohibit the use of funds for any national instant 
criminal background check system that does not require and 
result in the immediate destruction of any identifying 
information submitted by or on behalf of any person who has 
been determined not to be prohibited from owning a firearm; and 
to require the ATF to include specific language in any release 
of tracing study data that makes clear that trace data cannot 
be used to draw broad conclusions about firearms-related crime.
    Results: Adopted 31 yeas to 30 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Aderholt                        Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Berry                           Mr. Clyburn
Mr. Bishop                          Mr. Dicks
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Farr
Mr. Crenshaw                        Mr. Fattah
Mr. Culberson                       Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Cunningham                      Ms. Granger
Mr. Doolittle                       Mr. Hobson
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. Hoyer
Mrs. Emerson                        Mr. Jackson
Mr. Goode                           Ms. Kaptur
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Kennedy
Mr. Istook                          Ms. Kilpatrick
Mr. Kingston                        Mr. Kirk
Mr. Knollenberg                     Mr. Kolbe
Mr. LaHood                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Latham                          Mrs. Lowey
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Obey
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Olver
Mr. Nethercutt                      Mr. Pastor
Mr. Peterson                        Mr. Price
Mr. Rogers                          Mr. Regula
Mr. Sherwood                        Mr. Rothman
Mr. Simpson                         Ms. Roybal-Allard
Mr. Sweeney                         Mr. Sabo
Mr. Taylor                          Mr. Serrano
Mr. Tiahrt                          Mr. Visclosky
Mr. Vitter                          Mr. Walsh
Mr. Wamp                            Mr. Wolf
Dr. Weldon                          Mr. Young
Mr. Wicker

      Comparative Statement of New Budget (Obligational) Authority

    The following table provides a detailed summary, for each 
Department and agency, comparing the amounts recommended in the 
bill with fiscal year 2003 enacted amounts and budget estimates 
presented for fiscal year 2004:
<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

  ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE DAVID R. OBEY AND JOSE E. SERRANO

    In crafting the FY 2004 Commerce, Justice, and State 
appropriations bill, the Chairman was forced to work with an 
inadequate and irresponsible request from the President that 
cut roughly $1.2 billion of funding to State and local first 
responders. An insufficient allocation based on the House's 
irresponsible budget resolution and the shortfall in the 
President's request forced the Chairman to make exceptionally 
hard decisions. We commend the Chairman for working with us to 
address our priorities in a fair and open manner. The bill 
fully funds many critical agencies and activities, including 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the UN Educational, 
Scientific, and Cultural Organization; the Legal Services 
Corporation; and international peacekeeping and diplomatic 
security initiatives. Important increases over the President's 
request are provided for drug enforcement programs and state 
and local law enforcement.
    We also commend Appropriations Committee members on both 
sides of the aisle for adopting an amendment that overturns the 
FCC decision to expand the national audience reach that 
television networks may acquire. The FCC decision would have 
further concentrated power in the hands of a few media giants 
and undermined community standards.
    Five media conglomerates--Viacom, Disney, AOL Time Warner, 
NewsCorp, and General Electric--now control a 70 percent share 
of homes watching during prime time. And new technologies 
expand the reach of these media giants. The networks are 
guaranteed carriage to cable subscribers. In fact, they own 
most of cable. There are 91 major cable networks, 80 percent of 
which are owned by the same media conglomerates. The cable news 
networks are all owned by AOL Time Warner (CNN), NewsCorp (Fox 
News), and General Electric (MSNBC and CNBC). The top twenty 
Internet news sites are also largely owned by the same media 
giants.
    This media concentration is a threat to democracy. The 
public owns the airwaves, but the Supreme Court has held that 
it is in the public interest to grant exclusive private 
licenses because ``the widest possible dissemination of 
information from diverse and antagonistic sources is essential 
to the welfare of the public.'' In other words, democracy will 
flourish only when its citizens have access to a diversity of 
sources of news and information. Having the capacity to read 
the New York Times in print or online is useful but it does not 
increase the diversity of sources of news. As William Safire 
has argued, ``Why do we have more channels and fewer real 
choices today? Because the ownership of our means of 
communication is shrinking. Moguls glory in amalgamation, but 
more individuals than they realize resent the loss of local 
control and community identity.''
    In addition to threatening democratic practices, media 
concentration leads to programming inconsistent with local 
community standards. At network-owned stations, program 
decisions are made by network executives in cloistered 
corporate headquarters. Local managers run affiliates. They 
live in the communities they serve and are held accountable for 
program decisions by their neighbors and acquaintances. As a 
result, affiliates occasionally preempt national programming to 
meet the needs of their communities. For example, when some 
affiliates refused to air certain liquor ads, NBC abandoned the 
idea. No network-owned stations even threatened not to air the 
ads. In another well-publicized instance, the network-owned 
stations all showed the Victoria's Secret Fashions Show in the 
same early evening time slot. In contrast, several locally-
owned stations aired it at a later time slot, after young 
children could be expected to be asleep. In another example, 
one network would not let its stations air a political debate 
because it would have preempted a season premiere. The fact is, 
no network-owned and operated station has ever refused to run a 
network program.
    Locally-owned stations are an endangered species. The 
percentage of stations that are network-owned and operated is 
growing and the FCC's decision would have allowed the networks 
to reach an even wider audience. A single entity could own 
stations that reach 45 percent of TV households under the FCC's 
new regulations. If networks own a larger portion of the 
stations, they can ignore the local concerns of their few 
remaining affiliates with impunity. The networks might even 
punish stations that refused to run network shows, or changed 
their time slot or content. As the national cap has weakened. 
affiliates preempt networks less. From 1991 to 1995, when the 
cap on national audience reach was at 25 percent, affiliates on 
average preempted 48 hours of network programming per year. 
With the cap at 35 percent, affiliates preempted only 36 hours.
    By adopting this amendment, the Committee took an important 
stand to protect our democratic institutions and local 
communities. We look forward to working with the Chairman to 
get this provision enacted into law. In addition, we would like 
to work with the Chairman to address several other important 
issues as this bill moves forward. These issues are described 
in more detail below.
    First Responders: As was noted previously, the President's 
request cut $1.2 billion in State and local law enforcement 
grants. This included theelimination of Byrne grants, the Local 
Law Enforcement Block Grant, and the COPS Hiring program, all of which 
provide essential funding for first responders. The Chairman has done 
an admirable job restoring funds for most of these programs to the FY 
2003 levels, with the notable exception of the COPS Hiring program. 
However, flat funding for homeland defense is not acceptable.
    A report issued by the Council on Foreign Relations and 
chaired by Warren Rudman stated, ``America will fall 
approximately $98 billion short of meeting critical emergency 
responder needs over the next five years if current funding 
levels are maintained.'' Over the past two years, House 
Democrats have consistently proposed additional funding to 
address first responder needs. We must continue to help State 
and local law enforcement prepare for potential terrorist 
attacks. This will be costly. We must accept this conclusion 
and make the investments necessary to provide for our homeland 
defense.
    Corporate Oversight: For the past two years, we have been 
confronted with stories of corporations collapsing in value, 
devouring investors' savings, and destroying the retirement 
hopes of thousands and thousands of workers. Despite recent 
investments that have been made in the Securities and Exchange 
Commission, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the US 
Attorneys to better regulate business and protect American 
investors, it is important that we do not become complacent. 
One of the government's chief responsibilities is making sure 
that businesses are honest and play by the rules, and that is 
an everyday job. Two of the most important agencies in 
performing this function are the Federal Trade Commission and 
the Justice Department's Antitrust Division. We are concerned 
about the possible impact of cuts in the House bill to these 
agencies and will continue to seek sufficient resources to 
ensure appropriate corporate oversight.
    Economic Growth and Development: The United States economy 
has underperformed and been mired in recession for several 
years. Unemployment is currently at an unacceptable 6.4 
percent. The key to reversing these trends will be small 
businesses. The House bill proposes deep cuts to current 
operating levels for important programs such as the 
Manufacturing Extension Program, the Advanced Technology 
Program, the Economic Development Administration, and the Small 
Business Administration. To help provide businesses with the 
resources and assistance to turn the economy around, we will 
continue to advocate for sufficient funding in these and other 
business and development programs.
    Other areas of concern include maintaining an adequate 
diplomatic presence abroad; fully funding legitimate Federal 
debts owed to State and local governments for diplomatic and 
homeland security activities; protecting the environment; and 
transitioning public television to digital broadcasting. 
However, we would once again commend the Chairman for the 
openness and fairness with which he has dealt with concerns we 
have raised. As this bill moves through the House and into 
Conference negotiations, we look forward to continuing our 
close working relationship, securing additional funds for key 
priorities, and enacting media ownership rules that protect 
fundamental principles of democracy and community decency.

                                   Dave Obey.
                                   Jose E. Serrano.