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108th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     108-815
_______________________________________________________________________


                                                 Union Calendar No. 500

                               ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                  HOUSE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM

                      ONE HUNDRED EIGHTH CONGRESS

                       FIRST AND SECOND SESSIONS

                               2003-2004

                  (Pursuant to House Rule XI, 1(d)(4))

                                     


                                     

  Available via the World Wide Web: http://www.gpo.gov/congress/house
                      http://www.house.gov/reform

January 3, 2005.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed


For Sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office
Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov  Phone: toll free (866) 512-1800; (202) 512�091800  
Fax: (202) 512�092250 Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402�090001

                     COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM

                     TOM DAVIS, Virginia, Chairman
DAN BURTON, Indiana                  HENRY A. WAXMAN, California
CHRISTOPHER SHAYS, Connecticut       TOM LANTOS, California
ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida         MAJOR R. OWENS, New York
JOHN M. McHUGH, New York             EDOLPHUS TOWNS, New York
JOHN L. MICA, Florida                PAUL E. KANJORSKI, Pennsylvania
MARK E. SOUDER, Indiana              CAROLYN B. MALONEY, New York
STEVEN C. LaTOURETTE, Ohio           ELIJAH E. CUMMINGS, Maryland
DOUG OSE, California                 DENNIS J. KUCINICH, Ohio
RON LEWIS, Kentucky                  DANNY K. DAVIS, Illinois
TODD RUSSELL PLATTS, Pennsylvania    JOHN F. TIERNEY, Massachusetts
CHRIS CANNON, Utah                   WM. LACY CLAY, Missouri
ADAM H. PUTNAM, Florida              DIANE E. WATSON, California
EDWARD L. SCHROCK, Virginia          STEPHEN F. LYNCH, Massachusetts
JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee       CHRIS VAN HOLLEN, Maryland
NATHAN DEAL, Georgia                 LINDA T. SANCHEZ, California
CANDICE S. MILLER, Michigan          C.A. ``DUTCH'' RUPPERSBERGER, 
TIM MURPHY, Pennsylvania                 Maryland
MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio              ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON, District of 
JOHN R. CARTER, Texas                    Columbia
MARSHA BLACKBURN, Tennessee          JIM COOPER, Tennessee
PATRICK J. TIBERI, Ohio              BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota
KATHERINE HARRIS, Florida                        ------
MICHAEL C. BURGESS, Texas            BERNARD SANDERS, Vermont 
                                         (Independent)

                    Melissa Wojciak, Staff Director
       David Marin, Deputy Staff Director/Communications Director
                     Keith Ausbrook, Chief Counsel
               Rob Borden, Senior Counsel/Parliamentarian
                       Teresa Austin, Chief Clerk
          Phil Barnett, Minority Chief of Staff/Chief Counsel
?

                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                                  House of Representatives,
                                   Washington, DC, January 3, 2005.
Hon. J. Dennis Hastert,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Speaker: Pursuant to House Rule XI, clause 
1(d)(4), I submit the enclosed the activities report of the 
Committee on Government Reform for the 108th Congress.
                                                 Tom Davis,
                                                          Chairman.

                                 (iii)

                                     
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Part One. Committee Organization.................................     1
  I. Jurisdiction and History of the Committee........................1
 II. Rules and Organization of the Committee..........................4
Part Two. Committee Accomplishments..............................    13
  I. Legislative Accomplishments.....................................13
        A. Legislation enacted into Law..........................    14
        B. Legislation considered by the House...................    21
        C. Legislation considered by the Committee...............    23
        D. Postal facility designations considered by the 
            Committee or the House...............................    25
        E. Resolutions considered by the Committee or the House..    47
 II. Oversight and Investigative Accomplishments.....................65
Part Three. Full Committee Meetings..............................    69
  I. Full Committee Hearings.........................................69
 II. Full Committee Business Meetings...............................105
Part Four. Subcommittee Accomplishments..........................   107
  Subcommittee on Civil Service and Agency Organization..........   107
  Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human 
    Resources....................................................   128
  Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural Resources and Regulatory 
    Affairs......................................................   171
  Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and Financial Management.   191
  Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness......................   211
  Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats and 
    Intergovernmental Relations..................................   221
  Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
    Intergovernmental Relations and the Census...................   248

                                APPENDIX

Committee Prints.................................................   271
Investigative Reports............................................   271
Legislative Reports..............................................   271

                                 VIEWS

Views of Ranking Minority Member Henry A. Waxman.................   274


  
                                                 Union Calendar No. 500
108th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     108-815

======================================================================

 
         ACTIVITIES OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM

                                _______
                                

January 3, 2005.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Davis of Virginia, from the Committee on Government Reform, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

ACTIVITIES OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM, 108TH CONGRESS, 
                   1ST AND 2D SESSIONS, 2003 AND 2004

                    PART ONE. COMMITTEE ORGANIZATION


              I. History and Jurisdiction of the Committee

    The Committee on Government Reform serves both as the House 
of Representative's government operations committee and also as 
its chief investigative and oversight body, reviewing 
allegations of waste, fraud and mismanagement across the 
Federal Government. Alone among the House committees, the 
Committee on Government Reform has legislative jurisdiction 
over the operations of all Federal agencies including, human 
resources, information technology, procurement, and financial 
and general management policy. Unlike other House committees, 
the committee has the authority to conduct oversight and 
investigations outside of its legislative jurisdiction. The 
committee's unique legislative jurisdiction and oversight 
authority make it one of the most influential committees in the 
House of Representatives.
    Congressman Tom Davis (R-VA) served as the chairman of the 
committee in the 108th Congress. The ranking minority member 
was Congressman Henry Waxman (D-CA).
    The Committee on Government Reform first appeared in 1927 
as the Committee on Expenditures in the Executive Departments. 
It was created by consolidating the 11 Committees on 
Expenditures previously responsible for overseeing how taxpayer 
moneys were spent at each executive branch department.
    Under the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, the 
committee was renamed the Committee on Government Operations. 
The name change was intended to communicate the primary 
function of the committee to study ``the operations of 
Government activities at all levels with a view to determining 
their economy and efficiency.'' The Government Operations 
Committee's oversight jurisdiction over all Federal agencies 
and departments was unprecedented in the legislative branch.
    On January 4, 1995, Republicans assumed control of the 
House of Representatives for the first time in over 40 years. 
Republicans immediately implemented several internal reforms, 
including an initiative to reduce the number of standing 
committees in the House and cut committee staffs by one-third. 
The Committee on Government Reform exemplified the changes that 
took place in the House. Both the Committee on Post Office and 
Civil Service and the Committee on the District of Columbia 
were consolidated into the newly named Government Reform and 
Oversight Committee. The name change highlighted the Republican 
view that the Federal Government needed reform to ensure 
accountability. This consolidation of three committees into one 
resulted in millions of dollars in savings and a nearly 50 
percent reduction in staff. At the start of the 107th Congress, 
the committee's name was shortened to the Committee on 
Government Reform.
    House Rule X, clause 1(h) sets forth the committee's 
jurisdiction, functions, and responsibilities as follows:

          1. The Federal Civil Service, including 
        intergovernmental personnel; and the status of officers 
        and employees of the United States, including their 
        compensation, classification, and retirement.
          2. Municipal affairs of the District of Columbia in 
        general (other than appropriations).
          3. Federal paperwork reduction.
          4. Government management and accounting measures 
        generally.
          5. Holidays and celebrations.
          6. Overall economy, efficiency, and management of 
        government operations and activities, including Federal 
        procurement.
          7. National Archives.
          8. Population and demography generally, including the 
        Census.
          9. Postal Service generally, including transportation 
        of the mails.
          10. Public information and records.
          11. Relationship of the Federal Government to the 
        States and municipalities generally.
          12. Reorganizations in the executive branch of the 
        Government.

    Every standing committee, including the Committee on 
Government Reform, has general oversight responsibilities 
pursuant to House Rule X, clause 2. These responsibilities 
include the analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of Federal laws 
including the necessity or desirability of enacting new or 
additional legislation. The committees are also charged with 
determining whether laws and programs are being implemented and 
carried out in accordance with the intent of Congress and 
whether they should be continued, curtailed, or eliminated. 
Each standing committee is required to review and study on a 
continuing basis the application, administration, execution, 
and effectiveness of laws and programs addressing subjects 
within its jurisdiction as well as the organization and 
operation of agencies within its jurisdiction.
    In addition to its general oversight responsibilities, the 
Committee on Government Reform has the following special and 
additional functions:

Special oversight functions, Rule X, clause 3(e)

          The Committee on Government Reform shall review and 
        study on a continuing basis the operation of Government 
        activities at all levels with a view to determining 
        their economy and efficiency.

Additional functions of committees, Rule X clause 4(c)

          (1) The Committee on Government Reform shall--
          (A) receive and examine reports of the Comptroller 
        General of the United States and submit to the House 
        such recommendations as it considers necessary or 
        desirable in connection with the subject matter of the 
        reports;
          (B) evaluate the effects of laws enacted to 
        reorganize the legislative and executive branches of 
        the Government; and
          (C) study intergovernmental relationships between the 
        United States and the States and municipalities and 
        between the United States and international 
        organizations of which the United States is a member.
          (2) In addition to its duties under subparagraph (1), 
        the Committee on Government Reform may at any time 
        conduct investigations of any matter without regard to 
        clause 1, 2, 3, or this clause conferring jurisdiction 
        over the matter to another standing committee. The 
        findings and recommendations of the committee in such 
        an investigation shall be made available to any other 
        standing committee having jurisdiction over the matter 
        involved.

    In the 108th Congress, 44 members served on the committee, 
including 24 Republicans, 19 Democrats and 1 Independent. The 
committee had seven subcommittees. The jurisdiction of the 
subcommittees was established by committee resolution on 
February 13, 2003 along with the rules of the committee. The 
committee rules and the subcommittee resolution are reproduced 
below, followed by the subcommittee rosters for the 108th 
Congress.

              II. Rules and Organization of the Committee

                     U.S. House of Representatives

                             108th Congress

                              ----------                              

    Rule XI, clause 1(a)(1)(A) of the House of Representatives 
provides:

          Except as provided in subdivision (B), the Rules of 
        the House are the rules of its committees and 
        subcommittees so far as applicable.
          (B) A motion to recess from day to day, and a motion 
        to dispense with the first reading (in full) of a bill 
        or resolution, if printed copies are available, each 
        shall be privileged in committees and subcommittees and 
        shall be decided without debate.

    Rule XI, clause 2(a)(1) of the House of Representatives 
provides, in part:

          Each standing committee shall adopt written rules 
        governing its procedure.

    In accordance with this, the Committee on Government 
Reform, on February 13, 2003, adopted the rules of the 
committee:

                     Rule 1.--Application of Rules

    Except where the terms ``full committee'' and 
``subcommittee'' are specifically referred to, the following 
rules shall apply to the Committee on Government Reform and its 
subcommittees as well as to the respective chairmen.

                           Rule 2.--Meetings

    The regular meetings of the full committee shall be held on 
the second Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m., when the House is 
in session. The chairman is authorized to dispense with a 
regular meeting or to change the date thereof, and to call and 
convene additional meetings, when circumstances warrant. A 
special meeting of the committee may be requested by members of 
the committee following the provisions of House Rule XI, clause 
2(c)(2). Subcommittees shall meet at the call of the 
subcommittee chairmen. Every member of the committee or the 
appropriate subcommittee, unless prevented by unusual 
circumstances, shall be provided with a memorandum at least 
three calendar days before each meeting or hearing explaining 
(1) the purpose of the meeting or hearing; and (2) the names, 
titles, background and reasons for appearance of any witnesses. 
The ranking minority member shall be responsible for providing 
the same information on witnesses whom the minority may 
request.

                            Rule 3.--Quorums

    A majority of the members of the committee shall form a 
quorum, except that two members shall constitute a quorum for 
taking testimony and receiving evidence, and one-third of the 
members shall form a quorum for taking any action other than 
the reporting of a measure or recommendation. If the chairman 
is not present at any meeting of the committee or subcommittee, 
the ranking member of the majority party on the committee or 
subcommittee who is present shall preside at that meeting.

                       Rule 4.--Committee Reports

    Bills and resolutions approved by the committee shall be 
reported by the chairman following House Rule XIII, clauses 2-
4.
    A proposed report shall not be considered in subcommittee 
or full committee unless the proposed report has been available 
to the members of such subcommittee or full committee for at 
least three calendar days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and 
legal holidays, unless the House is in session on such days) 
before consideration of such proposed report in subcommittee or 
full committee. Any report will be considered as read if 
available to the members at least 24 hours before 
consideration, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays 
unless the House is in session on such days. If hearings have 
been held on the matter reported upon, every reasonable effort 
shall be made to have such hearings available to the members of 
the subcommittee or full committee before the consideration of 
the proposed report in such subcommittee or full committee. 
Every investigative report shall be approved by a majority vote 
of the committee at a meeting at which a quorum is present.
    Supplemental, minority, or additional views may be filed 
following House Rule XI, clause 2(l) and Rule XIII, clause 
3(a)(1). The time allowed for filing such views shall be three 
calendar days, beginning on the day of notice, but excluding 
Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays (unless the House is in 
session on such a day), unless the committee agrees to a 
different time, but agreement on a shorter time shall require 
the concurrence of each member seeking to file such views.
    An investigative or oversight report may be filed after 
sine die adjournment of the last regular session of Congress, 
provided that if a member gives timely notice of intention to 
file supplemental, minority or additional views, that member 
shall be entitled to not less than seven calendar days in which 
to submit such views for inclusion with the report.
    Only those reports approved by a majority vote of the 
committee may be ordered printed, unless otherwise required by 
the Rules of the House of Representatives.

                          Rule 5.--Proxy Votes

    In accordance with the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, members may not vote by proxy on any measure 
or matter before the committee or any subcommittee.

                         Rule 6.--Record Votes

    A record vote of the members may be had upon the request of 
any member upon approval of a one-fifth vote of the members 
present.

                  Rule 7.--Record of Committee Actions

    The committee staff shall maintain in the committee offices 
a complete record of committee actions from the current 
Congress including a record of the rollcall votes taken at 
committee business meetings. The original records, or true 
copies thereof, as appropriate, shall be available for public 
inspection whenever the committee offices are open for public 
business. The staff shall assure that such original records are 
preserved with no unauthorized alteration, additions, or 
defacement.

                   Rule 8.--Subcommittees; Referrals

    There shall be seven subcommittees with appropriate party 
ratios that shall have fixed jurisdictions. Bills, resolutions, 
and other matters shall be referred by the chairman to 
subcommittees within two weeks for consideration or 
investigation in accordance with their fixed jurisdictions. 
Where the subject matter of the referral involves the 
jurisdiction of more than one subcommittee or does not fall 
within any previously assigned jurisdiction, the chairman shall 
refer the matter as he may deem advisable. Bills, resolutions, 
and other matters referred to subcommittees may be reassigned 
by the chairman when, in his judgement, the subcommittee is not 
able to complete its work or cannot reach agreement therein. In 
a subcommittee having an even number of members, if there is a 
tie vote with all members voting on any measure, the measure 
shall be placed on the agenda for full committee consideration 
as if it had been ordered reported by the subcommittee without 
recommendation. This provision shall not preclude further 
action on the measure by the subcommittee.

                      Rule 9.--Ex Officio Members

    The chairman and the ranking minority member of the 
committee shall be ex officio members of all subcommittees. 
They are authorized to vote on subcommittee matters; but, 
unless they are regular members of the subcommittee, they shall 
not be counted in determining a subcommittee quorum other than 
a quorum for taking testimony.

                            Rule 10.--Staff

    Except as otherwise provided by House Rule X, clauses 6, 7 
and 9, the chairman of the full committee shall have the 
authority to hire and discharge employees of the professional 
and clerical staff of the full committee and of subcommittees.

                       Rule 11.--Staff Direction

    Except as otherwise provided by House Rule X, clauses 6, 7 
and 9, the staff of the committee shall be subject to the 
direction of the chairman of the full committee and shall 
perform such duties as he may assign.

                 Rule 12.--Hearing Dates and Witnesses

    The chairman of the full committee will announce the date, 
place, and subject matter of all hearings at least one week 
before the commencement of any hearings, unless he determines, 
with the concurrence of the ranking minority member, or the 
committee determines by a vote, that there is good cause to 
begin such hearings sooner. So that the chairman of the full 
committee may coordinate the committee facilities and hearings 
plans, each subcommittee chairman shall notify him of any 
hearing plans at least two weeks before the date of 
commencement of hearings, including the date, place, subject 
matter, and the names of witnesses, willing and unwilling, who 
would be called to testify, including, to the extent he is 
advised thereof, witnesses whom the minority members may 
request. The minority members shall supply the names of 
witnesses they intend to call to the chairman of the full 
committee or subcommittee at the earliest possible date. 
Witnesses appearing before the committee shall so far as 
practicable, submit written statements at least 24 hours before 
their appearance and, when appearing in a non-governmental 
capacity, provide a curriculum vitae and a listing of any 
Federal Government grants and contracts received in the 
previous fiscal year.

                        Rule 13.--Open Meetings

    Meetings for the transaction of business and hearings of 
the committee shall be open to the public or closed in 
accordance with Rule XI of the House of Representatives.

                       Rule 14.--Five-Minute Rule

    (1) A committee member may question a witness only when 
recognized by the chairman for that purpose. In accordance with 
House Rule XI, clause 2(j)(2), each committee member may 
request up to five minutes to question a witness until each 
member who so desires has had such opportunity. Until all such 
requests have been satisfied, the chairman shall, so far as 
practicable, recognize alternately based on seniority of those 
majority and minority members present at the time the hearing 
was called to order and others based on their arrival at the 
hearing. After that, additional time may be extended at the 
direction of the chairman.
    (2) The chairman, with the concurrence of the ranking 
minority member, or the committee by motion, may permit an 
equal number of majority and minority members to question a 
witness for a specified, total period that is equal for each 
side and not longer than thirty minutes for each side.
    (3) The chairman, with the concurrence of the ranking 
minority member, or the committee by motion, may permit 
committee staff of the majority and minority to question a 
witness for a specified, total period that is equal for each 
side and not longer than thirty minutes for each side.
    (4) Nothing in paragraph (2) or (3) affects the rights of a 
Member (other than a Member designated under paragraph (2)) to 
question a witness for 5 minutes in accordance with paragraph 
(1) after the questioning permitted under paragraph (2) or (3). 
In any extended questioning permitted under paragraph (2) or 
(3), the chairman shall determine how to allocate the time 
permitted for extended questioning by majority members or 
majority committee staff and the ranking minority member shall 
determine how to allocate the time permitted for extended 
questioning by minority members or minority committee staff. 
The chairman or the ranking minority member, as applicable, may 
allocate the time for any extended questioning permitted to 
staff under paragraph (3) to members.

               Rule 15.--Investigative Hearing Procedures

    Investigative hearings shall be conducted according to the 
procedures in House Rule XI, clause 2(k). All questions put to 
witnesses before the committee shall be relevant to the subject 
matter before the committee for consideration, and the chairman 
shall rule on the relevance of any questions put to the 
witnesses.

                     Rule 16.--Stenographic Record

    A stenographic record of all testimony shall be kept of 
public hearings and shall be made available on such conditions 
as the chairman may prescribe.

      Rule 17.--Audio and Visual Coverage of Committee Proceedings

    (1) An open meeting or hearing of the committee or a 
subcommittee may be covered, in whole or in part, by television 
broadcast, radio broadcast, Internet broadcast, and still 
photography, unless closed subject to the provisions of House 
Rule XI, clause 2(g). Any such coverage shall conform with the 
provisions of House Rule XI, clause 4.
    (2) Use of the Committee Broadcast System shall be fair and 
nonpartisan, and in accordance with House Rule XI, clause 4(b), 
and all other applicable rules of the House of Representatives 
and the Committee on Government Reform. Members of the 
committee shall have prompt access to a copy of coverage by the 
Committee Broadcast System, to the extent that such coverage is 
maintained.
    (3) Personnel providing coverage of an open meeting or 
hearing of the committee or a subcommittee by Internet 
broadcast, other than through the Committee Broadcast System, 
shall be currently accredited to the Radio and Television 
Correspondents' Galleries.

                Rule 18.--Additional Duties of Chairman

    The chairman of the full committee shall:
          (a) Make available to other committees the findings 
        and recommendations resulting from the investigations 
        of the committee or its subcommittees as required by 
        House Rule X, clause 4(c)(2);
          (b) Direct such review and studies on the impact or 
        probable impact of tax policies affecting subjects 
        within the committee's jurisdiction as required by 
        House Rule X, clause 2(c);
          (c) Submit to the Committee on the Budget views and 
        estimates required by House Rule X, clause 4(f), and to 
        file reports with the House as required by the 
        Congressional Budget Act;
          (d) Authorize and issue subpoenas as provided in 
        House Rule XI, clause 2(m), in the conduct of any 
        investigation or activity or series of investigations 
        or activities within the jurisdiction of the committee;
          (e) Prepare, after consultation with subcommittee 
        chairmen and the minority, a budget for the committee 
        which shall include an adequate budget for the 
        subcommittees to discharge their responsibilities;
          (f) Make any necessary technical and conforming 
        changes to legislation reported by the committee upon 
        unanimous consent; and
          (g) Designate a vice chairman from the majority 
        party.

                     Rule 19.--Commemorative Stamps

    The committee has adopted the policy that the determination 
of the subject matter of commemorative stamps properly is for 
consideration by the Postmaster General and that the committee 
will not give consideration to legislative proposals for the 
issuance of commemorative stamps. It is suggested that 
recommendations for the issuance of commemorative stamps be 
submitted to the Postmaster General.

                    Rule 20.--Panels and Task Forces

    (a) The chairman of the committee is authorized to appoint 
panels or task forces to carry out the duties and functions of 
the committee.
    (b) The chairman and ranking minority member of the 
committee may serve as ex-officio members of each panel or task 
force.
    (c) The chairman of any panel or task force shall be 
appointed by the chairman of the committee. The ranking 
minority member shall select a ranking minority member for each 
panel or task force.
    (d) The House and committee rules applicable to 
subcommittee meetings, hearings, recommendations and reports 
shall apply to the meetings, hearings, recommendations and 
reports of panels and task forces.
    (e) No panel or task force so appointed shall continue in 
existence for more than six months. A panel or task force so 
appointed may, upon the expiration of six months, be 
reappointed by the chairman.

                     Establishment of Subcommittees

    In order to perform its functions and to carry out its 
duties as fully and as effectively as possible, the committee, 
under the leadership of Chairman Tom Davis at the beginning of 
the 108th Congress, established seven standing subcommittees, 
which cover the entire field of executive expenditures and 
operations.
    Committee on Government Reform adopted the following 
resolution on February 13, 2003.

Resolved,

Section One. Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging 
Threats and International Relations.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging 
Threats and International Relations.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to national security, emerging threats, 
veterans affairs, and international relations, including anti-
terrorism efforts, both foreign and domestic, and international 
trade.
    (c) There shall be twenty Members appointed to serve on the 
Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats and 
International Relations, eleven of whom shall be from the 
majority party, and nine of whom shall be from the minority 
party.

Section Two. Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to health care, public health policy and human 
rights. All matters relating to the health and well being of 
families and children.
    (c) There shall be seven Members appointed to serve on the 
Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness, four of whom shall 
be from the majority party, and three of whom shall be from the 
minority party.

Section Three. Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy 
and Human Resources.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy 
and Human Resources.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to the criminal justice system, the nation's 
anti-narcotics programs, both foreign and domestic; and all 
matters relating to housing, education and welfare.
    (c) There shall be sixteen Members appointed to serve on 
the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human 
Resources, nine of whom shall be from the majority party, and 
seven of whom shall be from the minority party.

Section Four. Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural Resources 
and Regulatory Affairs.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural 
Resources and Regulatory Affairs.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to regulatory reform and paperwork reduction 
measures; all matters relating to natural resources; and all 
matters relating to energy policy.
    (c) There shall be fourteen Members appointed to serve on 
the Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural Resources and 
Regulatory Affairs, eight of whom shall be from the majority 
party, and six of whom shall be from the minority party.

Section Five. Subcommittee on the Civil Service and Agency 
Organization.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on the Civil Service and Agency 
Organization.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to the Federal civil service, including 
personnel, compensation and employee benefits; all matters 
relating to Federal holidays and celebrations; and all matters 
relating to reorganizations of the executive branch.
    (c) There shall be twelve Members appointed to serve on the 
Subcommittee on the Civil Service and Agency Organization, 
seven of whom shall be from the majority party, and five of 
whom shall be from the minority party.

Section Six. Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and 
Financial Management.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and 
Financial Management.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to financial management of executive 
departments and agencies; all matters relating to governmental 
accounting measures; all matters relating to the overall 
efficiency and management of government operations; and all 
matters relating to financial services and the nation's 
economic growth.
    (c) There shall be ten Members appointed to serve on the 
Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and Financial Management, 
six of whom shall be from the majority party, and four of whom 
shall be from the minority party.

Section Seven. Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
Intergovernmental Relations and the Census.

    (a) Upon the adoption of this resolution, there is hereby 
established the Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
Intergovernmental Relations and the Census.
    (b) The jurisdiction of the subcommittee shall include all 
matters relating to information technology; all matters 
relating to government information policy including information 
security and the handling of government information, 
presidential records and the Freedom of Information Act; all 
matters relating to intergovernmental relations; and all 
matters relating to population and demography generally, 
including the Census.
    (c) There shall be eight Members appointed to serve on the 
Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
Intergovernmental Relations and the Census, five of whom shall 
be from the majority party, and three of whom shall be from the 
minority party.

                    Membership of the Subcommittees

    The committee appointed the chairmen and members of the 
subcommittes as follows:
          Subcommittee on Civil Service and Agency 
        Organization, Jo Ann Davis, chairwoman; members: Tim 
        Murphy, John L. Mica, Mark E. Souder, Adam H. Putnam, 
        Nathan Deal, Marsha Blackburn, Danny K. Davis, Major R. 
        Owens, Chris Van Hollen, Eleanor Holmes Norton and Jim 
        Cooper.
          Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and 
        Human Resources, Mark E. Souder, chairman; members: 
        Nathan Deal, John M. McHugh, John L. Mica, Doug Ose, Jo 
        Ann Davis, John R. Carter, Marsha Blackburn, Patrick J. 
        Tiberi, Elijah E. Cummings, Danny K. Davis, Wm. Lacy 
        Clay, Linda T. Sanchez, C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, 
        Eleanor Holmes Norton and Betty McCollum.
          Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural Resources and 
        Regulatory Affairs, Doug Ose, chairman; members: Edward 
        L. Schrock, Christopher Shays, John M. McHugh, Chris 
        Cannon, Nathan Deal, Candice S. Miller, Patrick J. 
        Tiberi, John F. Tierney, Tom Lantos, Paul E. Kanjorski, 
        Dennis J. Kucinich, Chris Van Hollen and Jim Cooper.
          Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and Financial 
        Management, Todd Russell Platts, chairman; members: 
        Marsha Blackburn, Steven C. LaTourette, Candice S. 
        Miller, Michael R. Turner, Katherine Harris, Edolphus 
        Towns, Paul E. Kanjorski, Major R. Owens and Carolyn B. 
        Maloney.
          Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness, Dan 
        Burton, chairman; members: Chris Cannon, Christopher 
        Shays, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Diane E. Watson, Bernard 
        Sanders and Elijah E. Cummings.
          Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging Threats 
        and International Relations, Christopher Shays, 
        chairman; members: Michael R. Turner, Dan Burton, 
        Steven C. LaTourette, Ron Lewis, Todd Russell Platts, 
        Adam H. Putnam, Edward L. Schrock, John J. Duncan, Tim 
        Murphy, Katherine Harris, Dennis J. Kucinich, Tom 
        Lantos, Bernard Sanders, Stephen F. Lynch, Carolyn B. 
        Maloney, Linda T. Sanchez, C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, 
        John F. Tierney and Diane E. Watson.
          Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
        Intergovernmental Relations and the Census, Adam 
        Putnam, chairman; members: Candice S. Miller, Doug Ose, 
        Tim Murphy, Michael R. Turner, Wm. Lacy Clay, Stephen 
        F. Lynch and Betty McCollum.
                  PART TWO. COMMITTEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

                     I. Legislative Accomplishments

    The Committee on Government Reform was very successful in 
the 108th Congress in improving the operations and 
effectiveness of the Federal Government. Significant reforms 
were made to modernize the Defense Department's 700,000 
employee Civil Service system and reform the Federal 
acquisition system, enabling the government to fully utilize 
private sector technology and innovation to make Federal 
agencies more service and technology-oriented. The committee 
championed landmark legislation providing families and children 
in the Nation's Capital with enhanced educational choices, 
expanding opportunities for students in under-performing D.C. 
elementary and secondary schools.
Improving Accountability in Federal Employment
    Government Reform, in coordination with the Armed Services 
Committee, succeeded in bringing the Department of Defense 
civilian workforce into the 21st century by allowing the 
Department to shed the shackles of a 50-year old Civil Service 
system and replace it with a new system that will enable the 
Department to meet today's diverse national security threats. 
The committee also succeeded in other agency specific personnel 
reforms for NASA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the 
Securities and Exchange Commission, the GAO. In terms of 
government-wide Civil Service reforms, the committee 
transformed the Senior Executive Service into a pay-for-
performance organization, and authorized government-wide Civil 
Service reforms for all agencies.
Making Better use of Technology in Government
    Holding true to our agenda, the committee championed 
reforms to the Federal acquisition system as part of the 
Services Acquisition Reform Act of 2003, building on the 
critical procurement reform initiatives of the 1990s by 
recognizing that the economy and the needs of our government 
have become increasingly service and technology oriented. In 
improving the way Federal agencies acquire goods, the 
legislation made the Federal Government leaner, more 
responsible and more accountable to taxpayers. Further 
improvements were made to streamline the acquisition system as 
part of the Acquisition System Improvements Act, which was 
enacted into law in 2004.
Providing Choices in Education for DC Parents
    The committee also succeeded in providing Federal 
scholarship funds for children to attend private elementary and 
high schools, providing parents and kids with an alternative to 
being condemned to the under-performing public schools in the 
Nation's Capital. The committee also worked on other 
legislative initiatives to improve the operations of the 
District government and the quality of life in the District. 
For example, the committee advocated for the first annual DC 
authorization bill, providing a vehicle for Congress to 
consider changes to Federal law that would impact the District, 
without requiring the city to lobby appropriators to consider 
authorizing issues.
Improving the Organization and Efficiency of the Government
    The committee also made improvements to the financial 
management practices of the Department of Homeland Security by 
strengthening the agency's CFO. Finally, the House passed one 
of the chairman's top priorities--reauthorization of the 
Executive Reorganization Authority--as part of the September 11 
intelligence reform legislation. Reauthorizing this authority 
will continue to be a top priority for the committee in the 
109th Congress. After all, the deliberations over the creation 
of a Department of Homeland Security and a National 
Intelligence Director have clearly demonstrated Congress' 
inability to overcome its internal turf battles in order to 
improve the organizational structure and operations of the 
Federal Government.
    The following sections of this report list legislation 
within the committee's jurisdiction that was considered either 
in committee or in the House during the 108th Congress. Section 
A lists the bills that were in some form enacted into public 
law. Section B lists bills that were considered by the House 
but were not enacted into law in any form. Section C lists 
bills that were considered by the committee but did not reach 
the House floor. Bills designating postal facilities and 
resolutions are listed separately in sections D and E.

                    A. LEGISLATION ENACTED INTO LAW

1. H.R. 10: To provide for reform of the intelligence community, 
        terrorism prevention and prosecution, border security, and 
        international cooperation and coordination, and for other 
        purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hastert, J. Dennis [R-IL-14] 
(introduced September 24, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Intelligence (Permanent Select), and in addition to the 
Committees on Armed Services, Education and the Workforce, 
Energy and Commerce, Financial Services, Government Reform, 
International Relations, the Judiciary, Rules, Science, 
Transportation and Infrastructure, Ways and Means, and Homeland 
Security (Select) on September 24, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
by the Select Homeland Security Committee on September 28, 
2004. Ordered to be reported by the Committees on Intelligence, 
Armed Services, Financial Services, Government Reform, and the 
Judiciary on September 29, 2004.
    Reported by: the Committee on Intelligence (Permanent) on 
October 4, 2004. H. Rept. 108-724, Part I; the Committee on 
Armed Services on October 4, 2004. H. Rept. 108-724, Part II; 
the Committee on Financial Services on October 4, 2004. H. 
Rept. 108-724, Part III; the Committee on Government Reform on 
October 5, 2004. H. Rept. 108-724, Part IV; and by the 
Committee on Judiciary, on October 5, 2004. H. Rept. 108-724, 
Part V. Agreed to in the House on October 8, 2004.
    * The Senate agreed to a similar bill, S. 2845, on October 
6, 2004. The House agreed to the conference report on S. 2854 
(H. Rept. 108-796) on December 7, 2004, and the Senate agreed 
to the conference report on December 8, 2004. Public Law 108-
458.
2. H.R. 658: To provide for the protection of investors, increase 
        confidence in the capital markets system, and fully implement 
        the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 by streamlining the hiring 
        process for certain employment positions in the Securities and 
        Exchange Commission
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Baker, Richard H. [R-LA-6] 
(introduced February 11, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to committee on February 
11, 2003. Ordered to be reported by the Committee on Financial 
Services on March 26, 2003. Reported to the House by the 
Committee on Financial Services on April 8, 2003, H. Rept. 108-
63. Agreed to by the House on June 17, 2003. Agreed to by the 
Senate on June 19, 2003. Public Law 108-44.
3. H.R. 735: To amend chapter 83 of title 5, United States Code, to 
        reform the funding of benefits under the Civil Service 
        Retirement System for employees of the U.S. Postal Service, and 
        for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McHugh, John M. [R-NY-23] 
(introduced February 12, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 12, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
by the Committee on Government Reform on March 6, 2003. 
Reported by the Committee on Government Reform. H. Rept. 108-
49.
    * The Senate passed a similar bill, S. 380, on April 2, 
2003. The House agreed to S. 380 by voice vote on April 8, 
2003. Public Law 108-18.
4. H.R. 978: To amend chapter 84 of title 5, United States Code, to 
        provide that certain Federal annuity computations are adjusted 
        by 1 percentage point relating to periods of receiving 
        disability payments, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Jo Ann [R-VA-1] 
(introduced February 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Agreed to by the House 
under suspension of the rules on September 10, 2003. Passed in 
the Senate by unanimous consent on September 11, 2003. Public 
Law 108-92.
5. H.R. 1836: To make changes to certain areas of the Federal Civil 
        Service in order to improve the flexibility and competitiveness 
        of Federal human resources management
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced April 29, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committees on Armed Services and 
Science on April 29, 2003. Ordered reported as amended by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 7, 2003. Reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 19, 2003. H. Rept. 108-
116 Part I. Referred to the Committee on Ways and Means on June 
3, 2003.
    * Enacted into law as Title XI, Subtitle A, Department of 
Defense National Security Personnel System of H.R. 1588. Public 
Law 108-136.
6. H.R. 1837: To improve the Federal acquisition workforce and the 
        process for the acquisition of services by the Federal 
        Government, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced April 29, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committee on Armed Services on April 
29, 2003. Ordered reported as amended by the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 7, 2003. Reported by the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 19, 2003. H. Rept. 108-117 Part I. 
Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary on May 19, 2003. 
Reported as amended by the Committee on the Judiciary on 
September 3, 2003.
    * Enacted into law as Title XIV, Services Acquisition 
Reform of H.R. 1588. Public Law 108-136.
7. H.R. 2556: To provide low-income parents residing in the District of 
        Columbia, particularly parents of students who attend 
        elementary or secondary schools identified for improvement, 
        corrective action, or restructuring under title I of the 
        Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, with expanded 
        opportunities for enrolling their children in higher-performing 
        schools in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced June 23, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 23, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on July 10, 2003.
    * Adopted in the House as an amendment to H.R. 2765, the 
District of Columbia of Appropriation Act, on September 9, 
2003. The provisions was finally enacted into law as H.R. 2673, 
the Fiscal Year 2004 Consolidated Appropriations Act, Division 
C, Title III, the DC School Choice Incentive Act of 2003. 
Public Law 108-199.
8. H.R. 2751: To provide new human capital flexibilities with respect 
        to the GAO, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Jo Ann [R-VA-1] 
(introduced July 16, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on July 16, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on November 6, 2003. Reported by 
the Committee on Government Reform on November 19, 2003. H. 
Rept. 108-380. Agreed to by the House on February 25, 2004. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on June 24, 2004. 
Public Law 108-271.
9. H.R. 3054: To amend the Policemen and Firemen's Retirement and 
        Disability Act to permit military service previously performed 
        by members and former members of the Metropolitan Police 
        Department of the District of Columbia, the Fire Department of 
        the District of Columbia, the U.S. Park Police, and the U.S. 
        Secret Service to count as creditable service for purposes of 
        calculating retirement annuities payable to such members upon 
        payment of a contribution by such members, and for other 
        purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced September 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 10, 2003. Ordered reported by 
the Committee on Government Reform on September 25, 2003. 
Agreed to by the House under suspension of the rules on October 
8, 2003. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on 
November 11, 2003. Public Law 108-133.
10. H.R. 3478: To amend title 44, United States Code, to improve the 
        efficiency of operations by the National Archives and Records 
        Administration and to reauthorize the National Historical 
        Publications and Records Commission
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Putnam, Adam H. [R-FL-12] 
(introduced November 7, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on November 7, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on November 20, 2003. Reported 
by the Committee on Government Reform on December 8, 2003. H. 
Rept. 108-403. Agreed to by the House under suspension of the 
rules on September 13, 2003. Agreed to in the Senate by 
unanimous consent on October 11, 2003. Public Law 108-383.
11. H.R. 3751: To require that the Office of Personnel Management study 
        current practices under which dental, vision, and hearing 
        benefits are made available to Federal employees, annuitants, 
        and other classes of individuals, and to require that the 
        Office also present options and recommendations relating to how 
        additional dental, vision, and hearing benefits could be made 
        so available
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Jo Ann [R-VA-1] 
(introduced January 30, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on January 30, 2004. Ordered reported as 
amended by the Committee on Government Reform on April 1, 2004. 
Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on June 17, 
2004. H. Rept. 108-552. Agreed to by the House under suspension 
of the rules on June 21, 2004.
    * The Senate passed a similar bill, S. 2657, on November 
20, 2004 by unanimous consent. The House agreed to S. 2657 
under suspension of the rules on December 6, 2004. Public Law 
108-496.
12. H.R. 3797: To authorize improvements in the operations of the 
        government of the District of Columbia, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced February 11, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform, Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
and the Committee on Financial Services on February 11, 2004. 
Ordered reported by the Committee on Government Reform on 
February 26, 2004. Reported by the Committee on Government 
Reform on June 17, 2004. H. Rept. 108-551 Part I. Agreed to by 
the House under suspension of the rules on June 21, 2004. 
Ordered reported by the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
July 21, 2003. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on 
October 11, 2003. Public Law 108-386.
13. H.R. 4012: A bill to amend the District of Columbia College Access 
        Act of 1999 to reauthorize for 2 additional years the public 
        school and private school tuition assistance programs 
        established under the act
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced March 23, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 23, 2004. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on April 1, 2004. Reported by 
the Committee on Government Reform on June 8, 2004. H. Rept. 
108-527. Agreed to by the House under suspension of the rules 
on July 19, 2004. Ordered Reported by the Committee on 
Governmental Affairs on July 22, 2004. Agreed to in the Senate 
by unanimous consent on November 24, 2004 with an amendment. 
Senate amendment agreed to in the House under suspension of the 
rules on December 6, 2004. Public Law 108-457.
14. H.R. 4259: To amend title 31, United States Code, to improve the 
        financial accountability requirements applicable to the 
        Department of Homeland Security, to establish requirements for 
        the Future Years Homeland Security Program of the Department, 
        and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Platts, Todd Russell [R-PA-19] 
(introduced May 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committee on Homeland Security on May 
4, 2004. Ordered reported by the Committee on Government Reform 
on May 6, 2004. Reported by the Committee on Government Reform 
on June 9, 2004. H. Rept. 108-533 Part I. Agreed to by the 
House under suspension of the rules on July 20, 2004. Referred 
to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on September 7, 2004. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on September 29, 
2004. Public Law 108-330.
15. H.R. 4302: To amend title 21, District of Columbia Official Code, 
        to enact the provisions of the Mental Health Civil Commitment 
        Act of 2002 which affect the Commission on Mental Health and 
        require action by Congress in order to take effect
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced May 6, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 6, 2004. Ordered to be reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 12, 2004. Reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on October 5, 2004. H. Rept. 
108-729. Agreed to in the House under suspension of the rules 
on October 6, 2004. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous 
consent on November 20, 2004. Public Law 108-450.
16. H.R. 4324: To amend title 5, United States Code, to eliminate the 
        provisions limiting certain election opportunities available to 
        individuals participating in the Thrift Savings Plan, and for 
        other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced May 11, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 11, 2004. Ordered reported as amended 
by the Committee on Government Reform on July 21, 2004. Agreed 
to by the House under suspension of the rules on November 19, 
2004. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on December 
7, 2004. Public Law 108-469.
17. H.R. 4564: To amend title 5, United States Code, to provide for 
        reform relating to employment at the Federal Bureau of 
        Investigation
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Wolf, Frank R. [R-VA-10] 
(introduced June 14, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 14, 2004.
    * Enacted into law as Sections 112-115 of Division B of 
H.R. 4818. Public Law 108-447.
18. H.R. 4657: To amend the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 to improve the 
        administration of Federal pension benefit payments for District 
        of Columbia teachers, police officers, and fire fighters, and 
        for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced June 23, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 23, 2004. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on July 21, 2004. Agreed to by 
the House under suspension of the rules on September 28, 2004. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on December 8, 
2004. Public Law 108-489.
19. S. 129: A bill to provide for reform relating to Federal 
        employment, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Voinovich, George V. [R-OH] 
(introduced January 9, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Governmental Affairs on January 9, 2003. Ordered reported by 
the Committee on Governmental Affairs with an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute on October 22, 2003. Agreed to in the 
Senate by unanimous consent on April 8, 2004. Referred to the 
Committee on Government Reform on April 20, 2004. Ordered 
reported as amended by the Committee on Government Reform on 
June 24, 2004. Reported by the Committee on Government Reform 
on October 5, 2004. H. Rept. 108-733. Agreed to by the House 
under suspension of the rules on October 7, 2004. Agreed to by 
the Senate as amended by unanimous consent on October 11, 2004. 
Public Law 108-411.
20. S. 858: A bill to extend the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial 
        Commission, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Durbin, Richard J. [D-IL] (introduced 
April 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on the 
Judiciary on April 10, 2003. Ordered reported by the Committee 
on Judiciary on May 22, 2003. Agreed to in the Senate by 
unanimous consent on May 23, 2003. Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 2, 2003. Ordered reported as amended 
by the Committee on Government Reform on June 5, 2003. Agreed 
to by the House under suspension of the rules on June 25, 2003. 
Public Law 108-59.
21. S. 926: A bill to amend section 5379 of title 5, United States 
        Code, to increase the annual and aggregate limits on student 
        loan repayments by Federal agencies
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Voinovich, George V. [R-OH] 
(introduced April 28, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Governmental Affairs on April 28, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Governmental Affairs on June 17, 2003. Agreed to 
in the Senate by unanimous consent on July 30, 2003. Referred 
to the Committee on Government Reform on September 3, 2003. 
Agreed to by the House under suspension of the rules on October 
28, 2003. Public Law 108-123.
22. S. 1683: A bill to provide for a report on the parity of pay and 
        benefits among Federal law enforcement officers and to 
        establish an exchange program between Federal law enforcement 
        employees and State and local law enforcement employees
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Voinovich, George V. [R-OH] 
(introduced September 30, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Governmental Affairs on September 30, 2003. Ordered reported by 
the Committee on Governmental Affairs on October 22, 2003. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on November 25, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Government Reform on 
December 8, 2003. Agreed to by the House on December 8, 2004. 
Public law 108-196.

                 B. LEGISLATION CONSIDERED BY THE HOUSE

1. H.R. 1385: To extend the provision of title 39, United States Code, 
        under which the U.S. Postal Service is authorized to issue a 
        special postage stamp to benefit breast cancer research
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Baca, Joe [D-CA-43] (introduced 
March 20, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform, the Armed Services Committee, and the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce on March 20, 2003. Agreed to 
by the House under suspension of the rules on January 27, 2004.
2. H.R. 2086: To reauthorize the Office of National Drug Control Policy
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Souder, Mark E. [R-IN-3] 
(introduced May 14, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform in addition to the Committees on the 
Judiciary, Energy and Commerce, and Intelligence on May 14, 
2003. Ordered reported as amended by the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 5, 2003. Reported by the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 19, 2003. H. Rept. 108-167, Part I. 
Ordered reported as amended by the Committee on the Judiciary 
on July 9, 2003. Agreed to by the House under suspension of the 
rules on September 30, 2003.
3. H.R. 2119: To provide for the conveyance of Federal lands, 
        improvements, equipment, and resource materials at the Oxford 
        Research Station in Granville County, NC, to the State of North 
        Carolina
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ballance, Frank W., Jr. [D-NC-
1] (introduced May 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committee on Agriculture on May 15, 
2003. Ordered reported as amended by the Committee on 
Agriculture on September 23, 2004. Agreed to by the House under 
suspension of the rules on October 5, 2004. Agreed to in the 
Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
4. H.R. 2122: To enhance research, development, procurement, and use of 
        biomedical countermeasures to respond to public health threats 
        affecting national security, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Tauzin, W.J. (Billy) [R-LA-3] 
(introduced May 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform in addition to the Committees on Energy, 
Commerce, and Homeland Security on May 15, 2003. Ordered 
reported as amended by the Committee on Government Reform on 
May 22, 2003. Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on 
June 12, 2003. H. Rept. 108-147 Part II. Reported by the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce on June 10, 2003. Referred to 
the Committee on Armed Services on June 10, 2003. Ordered 
reported as amended by the Committee on Homeland Security on 
June 26, 2003. Agreed to by the House on July 16, 2003.
5. H.R. 2249: To amend chapter 10 of title 39, United States Code, to 
        include postmasters and postmasters' organizations in the 
        process for the development and planning of certain personnel 
        policies, schedules, and programs of the U.S. Postal Service, 
        and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McHugh, John M. [R-NY-23] 
(introduced May 22, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 22, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on June 19, 2003. Agreed to by 
the House under suspension of the rules on July 21, 2003.
6. H.R. 2432: To amend the Paperwork Reduction Act and titles 5 and 31, 
        United States Code, to reform Federal paperwork and regulatory 
        processes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ose, Doug [R-CA-3] (introduced 
June 11, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform, and in addition to the Committee on the 
Budget on June 11, 2003. Ordered to be reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 12, 2004. Reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 14, 2004. H. Rept. 108-
490 Part I. Agreed to in the House on May 18, 2004 and 
incorporated into H.R. 2728.
7. H.R. 2449: To establish a commission to commemorate the 
        sesquicentennial of the American Civil War
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Baker, Richard H. [R-LA-6] 
(introduced June 12, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 12, 2003. Ordered reported as amended 
by the Committee on Government Reform on July 21, 2004. Agreed 
to by the House under suspension of the rules on September 22, 
2004.
8. H.R. 2528: To establish the Hudson-Fulton-Champlain 400th 
        Commemoration Commission, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hinchey, Maurice D. [D-NY-22] 
(introduced June 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 19, 2003.
    Ordered reported as amended by the Committee on Government 
Reform on July 21, 2004. Agreed to by the House under 
suspension of the rules on September 22, 2004.
9. H.R. 2631: To provide that the actuarial value of the prescription 
        drug benefits offered to Medicare eligible enrollees by a plan 
        under the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program shall be at 
        least equal to the actuarial value of the prescription drug 
        benefits offered by such plan to its enrollees generally
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced June 26, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 26, 2003. Agreed to by the House 
under suspension of the rules on July 8, 2003.
10. H.R. 3159: To require Federal agencies to develop and implement 
        plans to protect the security and privacy of government 
        computer systems from the risks posed by peer-to-peer file 
        sharing
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Waxman, Henry A. [D-CA-30] 
(introduced September 24, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 24, 2003. Ordered reported by 
the Committee on Government Reform on September 25, 2004. 
Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on October 7, 
2003. H. Rept. 108-305. Agreed to by the House under suspension 
of the rules on October 8, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Governmental Affairs on November 10, 2003.
11. H.R. 3193: To restore second amendment rights in the District of 
        Columbia
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Souder, Mark E. [R-IN-3] 
(introduced September 25, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 25, 2003. Agreed to by the House 
on September 29, 2004.
12. H.R. 4060: To amend the Peace Corps Act to establish an Ombudsman 
        and an Office of Safety and Security of the Peace Corps, and 
        for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hyde, Henry J. [R-IL-6] 
(introduced March 30, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committee on International Relations 
on March 30, 2004. Ordered reported by the Committee on 
International Relations on March 31, 2004. Agreed to by the 
House under suspension of the rules on June 1, 2004.
13. H.R. 5295: To amend part III of title 5, United States Code, to 
        provide for the establishment of programs under which 
        supplemental dental and vision benefits are made available to 
        Federal employees, retirees, and their dependents, to expand 
        the contracting authority of the Office of Personnel 
        Management, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Murphy, Tim [R-PA-18] 
(introduced October 8, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 8, 2004. Agreed to by the House 
without objection on October 8, 2004.

               C. LEGISLATION CONSIDERED BY THE COMMITTEE

1. H.R. 1085: To make certain workforce authorities available to the 
        National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and for other 
        purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Boehlert, Sherwood L. [R-NY-24] 
(introduced March 5, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committee on Science on March 5, 
2003. Ordered reported as amended by the Committee on Science 
on July 22, 2004.
2. H.R. 1151: To provide that transit pass transportation fringe 
        benefits be made available to all qualified Federal employees 
        in the National Capital Region; to allow passenger carriers 
        which are owned or leased by the Government to be used to 
        transport Government employees between their place of 
        employment and mass transit facilities, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Moran, James P. [D-VA-8] 
(introduced March 6, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on March 6, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on September 25, 2003. Reported 
by the Committee on Government Reform on September 9, 2004. H. 
Rept. 108-673.
3. H.R. 1231: To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to allow 
        Federal civilian and military retirees to pay health insurance 
        premiums on a pretax basis and to allow a deduction for TRICARE 
        supplemental premiums
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced March 12, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on Ways 
and Means, and in addition to the Committees on Government 
Reform, and Armed Services on March 12, 2003. Ordered to be 
reported by the Committee on Government Reform on September 25, 
2003. Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on July 7, 
2004. H. Rept. 108-585 Part I.
4. H.R. 1346: To amend the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act to 
        provide an additional function of the Administrator for Federal 
        Procurement Policy relating to encouraging Federal procurement 
        policies that enhance energy efficiency
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Turner, Michael R. [R-OH-3] 
(introduced March 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on March 19, 2003. Ordered reported as 
amended by the Committee on Government Reform on March 20, 
2003. Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on April 
29, 2003. H. Rept. 108-78, Part I. Referred to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure on April 29, 2003.
5. H.R. 1644: To enhance energy conservation and research and 
        development, to provide for security and diversity in the 
        energy supply for the American people, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Barton, Joe [R-TX-6] 
(introduced April 7, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committees on 
Science, Resources, Education and the Workforce, and 
Transportation and Infrastructure on April 7, 2003. Reported as 
amended by the Committee on Energy and Commerce on April 8, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on the Judiciary on April 8, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Government Reform on April 
9, 2003.
6. H.R. 2802: To reauthorize the Small Business Act and the Small 
        Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Manzullo, Donald A. [R-IL-16] 
(introduced July 21, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on Small 
Business on July 21, 2003. Ordered reported by the Committee on 
Small Business on July 24, 2003. Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 21, 2003.
7. H.R. 3737: To increase the minimum and maximum rates of basic pay 
        payable to administrative law judges, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Jo Ann [R-VA-1] 
(introduced January 28, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on January 28, 2004. Ordered reported as 
amended by the Committee on Government Reform on April 1, 2004. 
Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on July 7, 2004. 
H. Rept. 108-586.
8. H.R. 3826: To require the review of Government programs at least 
        once every 5 years for purposes of evaluating their performance
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Platts, Todd Russell [R-PA-19] 
(introduced February 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on February 25, 2004. Ordered reported as 
amended by the Committee on Government Reform on June 3, 2004. 
Reported by the Committee on Government Reform on October 8, 
2004. H. Rept. 108-768.
9. H.R. 4341: To reform the postal laws of the United States
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McHugh, John M. [R-NY-23] 
(introduced May 12, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 12, 2004. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 12, 2004. Referred to the 
Committee on the Judiciary on September 8, 2004. Ordered 
reported as amended by the Committee on the Judiciary on 
September 15, 2004. Reported by the Committee on Government 
Reform on September 8, 2004. H. Rept. 108-672 Part I.

  D. POSTAL FACILITY DESIGNATIONS CONSIDERED BY THE COMMITTEE OR THE 
                                 HOUSE

1. H.R. 480: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 747 Broadway in Albany, NY, as the ``U.S. Postal 
        Service Henry Johnson Annex''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McNulty, Michael R. [D-NY-21] 
(introduced January 29, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on January 29, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House on September 15, 2004. Agreed to by the House on 
September 22, 2004.
2. H.R. 825: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 7401 West 100th Place in Bridgeview, IL, as the 
        ``Michael J. Healy Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Lipinski, William O. [D-IL-3] 
(introduced February 13, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 13, 2003. Agreed to by vote under 
suspension of the rules on March 26, 2003. Referred to the 
Committee on Governmental Affairs on March 27, 2003. Ordered to 
be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. Passed the Senate 
by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public Law 108-46.
3. H.R. 917: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1830 South Lake Drive in Lexington, SC, as the 
        ``Floyd Spence Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Wilson, Joe [R-SC-2] 
(introduced February 25, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 25, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
by voice vote under suspension of the rules on March 26, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on March 27, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-47.
4. H.R. 925: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1859 South Ashland Avenue in Chicago, IL, as the 
        ``Cesar Chavez Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Gutierrez, Luis V. [D-IL-4] 
(introduced February 26, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 26, 2003. greed to in the House 
by voice vote under suspension of the rules on June 10, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on June 11, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-48.
5. H.R. 981: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 141 Erie Street in Linesville, PA, as the ``James R. 
        Merry Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative English, Phil [R-PA-3] 
(introduced February 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
by voice vote under suspension of the rules on March 26, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on March 27, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-49.
6. H.R. 985: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 111 West Washington Street in Bowling Green, OH, as 
        the ``Delbert L. Latta Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Gillmor, Paul E. [R-OH-5] 
(introduced February 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
by voice vote under suspension of the rules on May 13, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on May 14, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-50.
7. H.R. 1055: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1901 West Evans Street in Florence, SC, as the ``Dr. 
        Roswell N. Beck Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Clyburn, James E. [D-SC-6] 
(introduced March 4, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 4, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on April 7, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on April 8, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-51.
8. H.R. 1368: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 7554 Pacific Avenue in Stockton, CA, as the ``Norman 
        D. Shumway Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Pombo, Richard W. [R-CA-11] 
(introduced March 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 19, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on April 7, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on April 8, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-52.
9. H.R. 1465: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 4832 East Highway 27 in Iron Station, NC, as the 
        ``General Charles Gabriel Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ballenger, Cass [R-NC-10] 
(introduced March 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 27, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by voice vote on May 22, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on June 2, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on June 3, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-53.
10. H.R. 1505: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2127 Beatties Ford Road in Charlotte, NC, as the 
        ``Jim Richardson Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Watt, Melvin L. [D-NC-12] 
(introduced March 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 27, 2003. Agreed to by voice vote 
under suspension of the rules on March 31, 2003. Referred to 
the Committee on Governmental Affairs on April 1, 2003. Passed 
the Senate by unanimous consent on April 10, 2003. Public Law 
108-17.
11. H.R. 1596: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2318 Woodson Road in St. Louis, MO, as the ``Timothy 
        Michael Gaffney Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Clay, Wm. Lacy [D-MO-1] 
(introduced April 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 3, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on May 6, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on May 7, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-54.
12. H.R. 1609: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 201 West Boston Street in Brookfield, MO, as the 
        ``Admiral Donald Davis Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Graves, Sam [R-MO-6] 
(introduced April 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 3, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on May 7, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on May 8, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-55.
13. H.R. 1610: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 120 East Ritchie Avenue in Marceline, MO, as the 
        ``Walt Disney Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Graves, Sam [R-MO-6] 
(introduced April 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 3, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by voice vote on May 22, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on June 9, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on June 10, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on October 27, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 29, 2003. 
Public Law 108-110.
14. H.R. 1625: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1114 Main Avenue in Clifton, NJ, as the ``Robert P. 
        Hammer Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Pascrell, Bill, Jr. [D-NJ-8] 
(introduced April 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 3, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on May 6, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on May 7, 
2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 10, 2003. 
Public Law 108-33.
15. H.R. 1740: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1502 East Kiest Boulevard in Dallas, TX, as the 
        ``Dr. Caesar A.W. Clark, Sr. Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Johnson, Eddie Bernice [D-TX-
30] (introduced April 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 10, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on May 6, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on May 7, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-56.
16. H.R. 1761: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 9350 East Corporate Hill Drive in Wichita, KS, as 
        the ``Garner E. Shriver Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Tiahrt, Todd [R-KS-4] 
(introduced April 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 10, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by voice vote on June 19, 2003. Agreed to in the 
House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on July 8, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on July 
9, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on July 31, 
2003. Public Law 108-71.
17. H.R. 1822: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 3751 West 6th Street in Los Angeles, CA, as the 
        ``Dosan Ahn Chang Ho Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Watson, Diane E. [D-CA-33] 
(introduced April 11, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 11, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on April 1, 2003. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on April 
20, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
April 21, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 
2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2003. 
Public Law 108-239.
18. H.R. 1882: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 440 South Orange Blossom Trail in Orlando, FL, as 
        the ``Arthur `Pappy' Kennedy Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Brown, Corrine [D-FL-3] 
(introduced April 30, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 30, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
September 30, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 1, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-111.
19. H.R. 1883: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1601-1 Main Street in Jacksonville, FL, as the 
        ``Eddie Mae Steward Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Brown, Corrine [D-FL-3] 
(introduced April 30, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 30, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
October 15, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 16, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-124.
20. H.R. 2030: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 120 Baldwin Avenue in Paia, Maui, HI, as the ``Patsy 
        Takemoto Mink Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Case, Ed [D-HI-2] (introduced 
May 8, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 8, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
House by voice vote on May 22, 2003. Agreed to in the House by 
voice vote under suspension of the rules on June 10, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on June 11, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 20, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Public 
Law 108-57.
21. H.R. 2075: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1905 West Blue Heron Boulevard in West Palm Beach, 
        FL, as the ``Judge Edward Rodgers Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hastings, Alcee L. [D-FL-23] 
(introduced May 13, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 13, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
September 30, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 1, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-112.
22. H.R. 2130: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 650 Kinderkamack Road in River Edge, NJ, as the 
        ``New Bridge Landing Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Garrett, Scott [R-NJ-5] 
(introduced May 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 15, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on November 6, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
November 18, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on November 19, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on June 7, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent 
on June 9, 2004. Public Law 108-240.
23. H.R. 2254: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1101 Colorado Street in Boulder City, NV, as the 
        ``Bruce Woodbury Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Porter, Jon C. [R-NV-3] 
(introduced May 22, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 22, 2003. Agreed to in the House under 
suspension of the rules by roll call vote on June 16, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on June 17, 
2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on October 27, 2003. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 29, 2003. 
Public Law 108-113.
24. H.R. 2309: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2300 Redondo Avenue in Signal Hill, CA, as the ``J. 
        Stephen Horn Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Millender-McDonald, Juanita [D-
CA-37] (introduced June 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 3, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by voice vote on July 24, 2003. Agreed to in the 
House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 
3, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
September 4, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on 
October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on 
October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-114.
25. H.R. 2328: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2001 East Willard Street in Philadelphia, PA, as the 
        ``Robert A. Borski Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hoeffel, Joseph M. [D-PA-13] 
(introduced June 4, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 4, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by voice vote on June 19, 2003. Agreed to in the 
House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on July 21, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on July 
22, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on October 27, 
2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 29, 
2003. Public Law 108-115.
26. H.R. 2396: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1210 Highland Avenue in Duarte, CA, as the 
        ``Francisco A. Martinez Flores Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Solis, Hilda L. [D-CA-32] 
(introduced June 9, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 9, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by voice vote on June 19, 2003. Agreed to in the 
House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on July 8, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on July 
9, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on October 27, 
2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 29, 
2003. Public Law 108-116.
27. H.R. 2438: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 115 West Pine Street in Hattiesburg, MS, as the 
        ``Major Henry A. Commiskey, Sr. Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Taylor, Gene [D-MS-4] 
(introduced June 11, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 11, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on July 10, 2003. Agreed to in 
the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
November 4, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on November 5, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent 
on June 9, 2004. Public Law 108-241.
28. H.R. 2452: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 339 Hicksville Road in Bethpage, NY, as the ``Brian 
        C. Hickey Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative King, Peter T. [R-NY-3] 
(introduced June 12, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 13, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
October 8, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 14, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-117.
29. H.R. 2533: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 10701 Abercorn Street in Savannah, GA, as the ``J.C. 
        Lewis, Jr. Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Kingston, Jack [R-GA-1] 
(introduced June 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 19, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
September 23, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on September 24, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-118.
30. H.R. 2744: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 514 17th Street in Moline, IL, as the ``David Bybee 
        Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Evans, Lane [D-IL-17] 
(introduced July 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 15, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on October 8, 2003. Agreed to in 
the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
October 28, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 29, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 18, 2003. Public Law 108-149.
31. H.R. 2746: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 141 Weston Street in Hartford, CT, as the ``Barbara 
        B. Kennelly Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Larson, John B. [D-CT-1] 
(introduced July 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 15, 2003. Agreed to by voice vote on 
July 17, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on July 28, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on 
October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-119.
32. H.R. 2826: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1000 Avenida Sanchez Osorio in Carolina, Puerto 
        Rico, as the ``Roberto Clemente Walker Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Acevedo-Vila, Anibal [D-PR] 
(introduced July 23, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 23, 2003. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
September 23, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on September 24, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 1, 2003. Public Law 108-97.
33. H.R. 3011: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 135 East Olive Avenue in Burbank, CA, as the ``Bob 
        Hope Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Schiff, Adam B. [D-CA-29] 
(introduced September 4, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 4, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
September 30, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 1, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on October 27, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 29, 2003. Public Law 108-120.
34. H.R. 3029: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 255 North Main Street in Jonesboro, GA, as the ``S. 
        Truett Cathy Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Scott, David [D-GA-13] 
(introduced September 5, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 5, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
by voice vote under suspension of the rules on November 4, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
November 5, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 
7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 
2004. Public Law 108-242.
35. H.R. 3059: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 304 West Michigan Street in Stuttgart, AR, as the 
        ``Lloyd L. Burke Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Berry, Marion [D-AR-1] 
(introduced September 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 10, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House on March 4, 2004. Agreed to in the House under 
suspension of the rules by voice vote on March 24, 2004. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on March 25, 
2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. Public 
Law 108-243.
36. H.R. 3068: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2055 Siesta Drive in Sarasota, FL, as the 
        ``Brigadier General (AUS-Ret.) John H. McLain Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Harris, Katherine [R-FL-13] 
(introduced September 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 10, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
October 20, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 21, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent 
on June 9, 2004. Public Law 108-244.
37. H.R. 3166: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 57 Old Tappan Road in Tappan, NY, as the ``John G. 
        Dow Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Engel, Eliot L. [D-NY-17] 
(introduced September 24, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 24, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on October 8, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
November 4, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on 
November 20, 2003. Public Law 108-165.
38. H.R. 3175: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2650 Cleveland Avenue, NW in Canton, OH, as the 
        ``Richard D. Watkins Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Regula, Ralph [R-OH-16] 
(introduced September 24, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 24, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on October 8, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
October 28, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on October 28, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on November 18, 2003. Public Law 108-150.
39. H.R. 3185: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 38 Spring Street in Nashua, NH, as the ``Hugh Gregg 
        Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Bass, Charles F. [R-NH-2] 
(introduced September 25, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 25, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on October 8, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
November 17, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on 
November 18, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on 
November 20, 2003. Public Law 108-166.
40. H.R. 3234: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 14 Chestnut Street in Liberty, NY, as the ``Ben R. 
        Gerow Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hinchey, Maurice D. [D-NY-22] 
(introduced October 2, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on October 2, 2003. Agreed to in the House by 
voice vote under suspension of the rules on October 28, 2003. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on October 
29, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. Public 
Law 108-245.
41. H.R. 3300: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 15500 Pearl Road in Strongsville, OH, as the 
        ``Walter F. Ehrnfelt, Jr. Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative LaTourette, Steve C. [R-OH-14] 
(introduced October 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on October 15, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on November 6, 2003. Agreed 
to by roll call vote under suspension of the rules on November 
18, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
November 19, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 
7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 
2004. Public Law 108-246.
42. H.R. 3340: To redesignate the facilities of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 7715 and 7748 S. Cottage Grove Avenue in Chicago, 
        IL, as the ``James E. Worsham Post Office'' and the ``James E. 
        Worsham Carrier Annex Building'' respectively, and for other 
        purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Rush, Bobby L. [D-IL-1] 
(introduced October 20, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on October 20, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on June 24, 2004. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
July 6, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs 
on July 7, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on July 
22, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on July 22, 
2004. Public Law 108-294.
43. H.R. 3353: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 525 Main Street in Tarboro, NC, as the ``George 
        Henry White Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ballance, Frank W., Jr. [D-NC-
1] (introduced October 21, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on October 21, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on November 6, 2003. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
November 17, 2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on November 18, 2003. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent 
on June 9, 2004. Public Law 108-247.
44. H.R. 3379: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 3210 East 10th Street in Bloomington, IN, as the 
        ``Francis X. McCloskey Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hill, Baron P. [D-IN-9] 
(introduced October 28, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on October 28, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
by voice vote under suspension of the rules on November 5, 
2003. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
November 6, 2003. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on 
November 18, 2003. Public Law 108-151.
45. H.R. 3536: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 210 Main Street in Malden, IL, as the ``Army Staff 
        Sgt. Lincoln Hollinsaid Malden Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Weller, Jerry [R-IL-11] 
(introduced November 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on November 19, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
March 9, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on March 10, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-248.
46. H.R. 3537: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 185 State Street in Manhattan, IL, as the ``Army 
        Pvt. Shawn Pahnke Manhattan Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Weller, Jerry [R-IL-11] 
(introduced November 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on November 19, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
March 9, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on March 10, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-249.
47. H.R. 3538: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 201 South Chicago Avenue in Saint Anne, IL, as the 
        ``Marine Capt. Ryan Beaupre Saint Anne Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Weller, Jerry [R-IL-11] 
(introduced November 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on November 19, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
March 9, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on March 10, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-250.
48. H.R. 3690: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2 West Main Street in Batavia, NY, as the ``Barber 
        Conable Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Reynolds, Thomas M. [R-NY-26] 
(introduced December 8, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on December 8, 2003. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed 
to in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
February 25, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on February 26, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the 
Senate on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent 
on June 9, 2004. Public Law 108-251.
49. H.R. 3723: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 8135 Forest Lane in Dallas, TX, as the ``Vaughn 
        Gross Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Sessions, Pete [R-TX-32] 
(introduced January 21, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on January 21, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on March 4, 2004. Agreed to 
in the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote on 
March 29, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on March 30, 2004.
50. H.R. 3733: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 410 Huston Street in Altamont, KS, as the ``Myron V. 
        George Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ryun, Jim [R-KS-2] (introduced 
January 27, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on January 27, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on February 26, 2004. Agreed 
to in the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote 
on March 16, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on March 22, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-252.
51. H.R. 3740: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 223 South Main Street in Roxboro, NC, as the ``Oscar 
        Scott Woody Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Miller, Brad [D-NC-13] 
(introduced January 28, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on January 28, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on May 6, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote on 
May 18, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs 
on May 19, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 
7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 
2004. Public Law 108-253.
52. H.R. 3769: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 137 East Young High Pike in Knoxville, TN, as the 
        ``Ben Atchley Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Duncan, John J., Jr. [R-TN-2] 
(introduced February 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 4, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed 
to in the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote 
on March 2, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on March 3, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-254.
53. H.R. 3855: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 607 Pershing Drive in Laclede, MO, as the ``General 
        John J. Pershing Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Graves, Sam [R-MO-6] 
(introduced February 26, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on February 26, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
to the House by unanimous consent on March 4, 2004. Agreed to 
in the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote on 
April 20, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on April 21, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-255.
54. H.R. 3917: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 695 Marconi Boulevard in Copiague, NY, as the 
        ``Maxine S. Postal U.S. Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Israel, Steve [D-NY-2] 
(introduced March 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 9, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on March 18, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on March 
29, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
March 30, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 
2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. 
Public Law 108-256.
55. H.R. 3939: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 14-24 Abbott Road in Fair Lawn, NJ, as the ``Mary 
        Ann Collura Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Rothman, Steve R. [D-NJ-9] 
(introduced March 11, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 11, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on April 1, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on May 
11, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
May 12, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 
2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. 
Public Law 108-257.
56. H.R. 3942: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 7 Commercial Boulevard in Middletown, RI, as the 
        ``Rhode Island Veterans Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Kennedy, Patrick J. [D-RI-1] 
(introduced March 11, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 11, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on April 1, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote on 
April 27, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on April 28, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-258.
57. H.R. 4037: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 475 Kell Farm Drive in Cape Girardeau, MO, as the 
        ``Richard G. Wilson Processing and Distribution Facility''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Emerson, Jo Ann [R-MO-8] 
(introduced March 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 25, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on April 1, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote on 
April 20, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on April 21, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate 
on June 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 
9, 2004. Public Law 108-259.
58. H.R. 4046: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 555 West 180th Street in New York, NY, as the 
        ``Sergeant Riayan A. Tejeda Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15] 
(introduced March 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on March 25, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to 
in the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on 
September 28, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on 
October 10, 2004. Public Law 108-388.
59. H.R. 4176: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 122 West Elwood Avenue in Raeford, NC, as the 
        ``Bobby Marshall Gentry Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hayes, Robin [R-NC-8] 
(introduced April 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 20, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on May 6, 2004. Agreed to in the 
House under suspension of the rules by roll call vote on May 
18, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
May 19, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 
2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. 
Public Law 108-260.
60. H.R. 4222: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 550 Nebraska Avenue in Kansas City, KS, as the 
        ``Newell George Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Moore, Dennis [D-KS-3] 
(introduced April 27, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 27, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on June 3, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on June 
21, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
June 22, 2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on July 22, 
2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 22, 2004. 
Public Law 108-296.
61. H.R. 4232: To redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 4025 Feather Lakes Way in Kingwood, TX, as the 
        ``Congressman Jack Fields Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Brady, Kevin [R-TX-8] 
(introduced April 28, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on April 28, 2004. Agreed to in the House by 
voice vote under suspension of the rules on October 6, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
62. H.R. 4299: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 410 South Jackson Road in Edinburg, TX, as the ``Dr. 
        Miguel A. Nevarez Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hinojosa, Ruben [D-TX-15] 
(introduced May 6, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 6, 2004. Agreed to in the House under 
suspension of the rules by roll call vote on May 11, 2004. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on May 12, 
2004. Ordered to be reported to the Senate on June 7, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. Public 
Law 108-261.
63. H.R. 4327: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 7450 Natural Bridge Road in St. Louis, MO, as the 
        ``Vitilas `Veto' Reid Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Clay, Wm. Lacy [D-MO-1] 
(introduced May 11, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 11, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House on June 24, 2004. Agreed to in the House by voice 
vote under suspension of the rules on July 6, 2004. Referred to 
the Committee on Governmental Affairs on July 7, 2004. Ordered 
to be reported to the Senate on July 22, 2004. Passed the 
Senate by unanimous consent on July 22, 2004. Public Law 108-
298.
64. H.R. 4380: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 4737 Mile Stretch Drive in Holiday, FL, as the 
        ``Sergeant First Class Paul Ray Smith Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Bilirakis, Michael [R-FL-9] 
(introduced May 18, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 18, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House by unanimous consent on July 8, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House by voice vote under suspension of the rules on July 
12, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
July 13, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on July 
19, 2004. Public Law 108-292.
65. H.R. 4381: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 2811 Springdale Avenue in Springdale, AR, as the 
        ``Harvey and Bernice Jones Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Boozman, John [R-AR-3] 
(introduced May 18, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 18, 2004. Ordered to be reported to 
the House on July 8, 2004. Agreed to the House under suspension 
of the rules by roll call vote on September 7, 2004. Referred 
to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on September 8, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 10, 2004. 
Public Law 108-392.
66. H.R. 4427: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 73 South Euclid Avenue in Montauk, NY, as the 
        ``Perry B. Duryea, Jr. Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Bishop, Timothy H. [D-NY-1] 
(introduced May 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 20, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on June 24, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on July 6, 2004. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on July 7, 
2004. Reported and without written report on July 22, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on July 22, 2004. Public 
Law 108-300.
67. H.R. 4442: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1050 North Hills Boulevard in Reno, NV, as the 
        ``Guardians of Freedom Memorial Post Office Building'' and to 
        authorize the installation of a plaque at such site, and for 
        other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Gibbons, Jim [R-NV-2] 
(introduced May 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 20, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on July 8, 2004. Agreed to in the House under 
suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 7, 2004. 
Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on September 
8, 2004.
68. H.R. 4556: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1115 South Clinton Avenue in Dunn, NC, as the 
        ``General William Carey Lee Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Etheridge, Bob [D-NC-2] 
(introduced June 14, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 14, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on July 21, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by the roll call vote on 
September 7, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs on September 8, 2004. Committee discharged by unanimous 
consent on October 10, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 10, 2004. Public Law 108-395.
69. H.R. 4618: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 10 West Prospect Street in Nanuet, NY, as the 
        ``Anthony I. Lombardi Memorial Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Engel, Eliot L. [D-NY-17] 
(introduced June 18, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 18, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on July 21, 2004. On motion to suspend the 
rules and pass the bill agreed by voice vote on September 7, 
2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
September 8, 2004. The Committee discharged by unanimous 
consent on October 10, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 10, 2004. Public Law. 108-397.
70. H.R. 4632: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 19504 Linden Boulevard in St. Albans, NY, as the 
        ``Archie Spigner Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Meeks, Gregory W. [D-NY-6] 
(introduced June 21, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on June 21, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on July 21, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 13, 
2004. Referred to the Committee on Governmental Affairs on 
September 14, 2004. The Committee discharged by unanimous 
consent and on October 10, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on October 10, 2004. Public Law 108-398.
71. H.R. 4807: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 140 Sacramento Street in Rio Vista, CA, as the 
        ``Adam G. Kinser Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ose, Doug [R-CA-3] (introduced 
July 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 9, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent September 15, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 6, 2004. 
Received in the Senate on October 7, 2004. Passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
72. H.R. 4829: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 103 East Kleberg in Kingsville, TX, as the ``Irma 
        Rangel Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hinojosa, Ruben [D-TX-15] 
(introduced July 14, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 14, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 6, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
73. H.R. 4847: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 560 Bay Isles Road in Longboat Key, FL, as the 
        ``Lieutenant General James V. Edmundson Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Harris, Katherine [R-FL-13] 
(introduced July 15, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 15, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 6, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
74. H.R. 4968: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 25 McHenry Street in Rosine, KY, as the ``Bill 
        Monroe Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Lewis, Ron [R-KY-2] (introduced 
July 22, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on July 22, 2004. Ordered to be reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 6, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
75. H.R. 5027: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 411 Midway Avenue in Mascotte, FL, as the 
        ``Specialist Eric Ramirez Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Brown-Waite, Ginny [R-FL-5] 
(introduced September 8, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 8, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
by unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to in the 
House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 
28, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 10, 
2004. Public Law 108-402.
76. H.R. 5039: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at U.S. Route 1 in Ridgeway, NC, as the ``Eva Holtzman 
        Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Butterfield, G.K. [D-NC-1] 
(introduced September 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 9, 2004. Ordered to be reported 
by unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to in the 
House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 
22, 2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 10, 
2004. Public Law 108-403.
77. H.R. 5051: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1001 Williams Street in Ignacio, CO, as the 
        ``Leonard C. Burch Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McInnis, Scott [R-CO-3] 
(introduced September 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 9, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 6, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 10, 2004. 
Public Law 108-404.
78. H.R. 5053: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 1475 Western Avenue, Suite 45, in Albany, NY, as the 
        ``Lieutenant John F. Finn Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McNulty, Michael R. [D-NY-21] 
(introduced September 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 9, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 6, 2004.
79. H.R. 5133: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 11110 Sunset Hills Road in Reston, VA, as the 
        ``Martha Pennino Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Moran, James P. [D-VA-8] 
(introduced September 23, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 23, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 28, 
2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 10, 
2004. Public Law 108-407.
80. H.R. 5147: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 23055 Sherman Way in West Hills, CA, as the ``Evan 
        Asa Ashcraft Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Waxman, Henry A. [D-CA-30] 
(introduced September 24, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on September 24, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on September 28, 
2004. Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 10, 
2004. Public Law 108-408
81. H.R. 5364: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 5505 Stevens Way in San Diego, CA, as the ``Earl B. 
        Gilliam/Imperial Avenue Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Filner, Bob [D-CA-51] 
(introduced November 16, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform on November 16, 2004. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of rules by voice vote on November 17, 2004. 
Passed the Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
82. H.R. 5370: To designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 4985 Moorhead Avenue in Boulder, CO, as the ``Donald 
        G. Brotzman Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Udall, Mark [D-CO-2] 
(introduced November 16, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the House Committee on 
Government Reform November 16, 2004. Agreed to in the House by 
unanimous consent on November 19, 2004. Passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on December 7, 2004.
83. S. 867: A bill to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
        located at 710 Wick Lane in Billings, MT, as the ``Ronald 
        Reagan Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Burns, Conrad R. [R-MT] (introduced 
April 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on April 10, 2003. Passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on June 25, 2003. Referred to the Committee 
on Government Reform on June 26, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on November 18, 
2003. Public Law 108-143.
84. S. 1399: A bill to redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service located at 101 South Vine Street in Glenwood, IA, as 
        the ``William J. Scherle Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Harkin, Tom [D-IA] (introduced July 
14, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on July 14, 2003. Passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on July 17, 2003. Referred to the Committee 
on Government Reform on July 18, 2003. Agreed to in the House 
under suspension of the rules by voice vote on July 21, 2004. 
Public Law 108-65.
85. S. 1590: A bill to redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service, located at 315 Empire Boulevard in Crown Heights, 
        Brooklyn, NY, as the ``James E. Davis Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY] (introduced 
September 8, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on September 8, 2003. Passed the Senate 
by unanimous consent on October 29, 2003. Referred to the 
Committee on Government Reform on October 30, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on 
November 17, 2003. Public Law 108-141.
86. S. 1591: A bill to redesignate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service located at 48 South Broadway, Nyack, NY, as the 
        ``Edward O'Grady, Waverly Brown, Peter Paige Post Office 
        Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY] (introduced 
September 8, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Governmental Affairs on September 8, 2003. Passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on September 25, 2003. Referred to the 
Committee on Government Reform on September 30, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on 
October 20, 2003. Public Law 108-103.
87. S. 1718: A bill to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service located at 3710 West 73rd Terrace in Prairie Village, 
        KS, as the ``Senator James B. Pearson Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Roberts, Pat [R-KS] (introduced 
October 14, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on October 14, 2003. Passed the Senate 
by unanimous consent on October 29, 2003. Referred to the 
Committee on Government Reform on October 30, 2003. Ordered to 
be reported by unanimous consent on November 6, 2003. Agreed to 
in the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on 
November 18, 2003. Public Law 108-144.
88. S. 2214: A bill to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service located at 3150 Great Northern Avenue in Missoula, MT, 
        as the ``Mike Mansfield Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Burns, Conrad R. [R-MT] (introduced 
March 12, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on March 12, 2004. Passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. Referred to the House 
Committee on Government Reform on June 14, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on 
November 16, 2004. Public Law 108-440.
89. S. 2415: A bill to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service located at 4141 Postmark Drive, Anchorage, AK, as the 
        ``Robert J. Opinsky Post Office Building''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Stevens, Ted [R-AK] (introduced May 
13, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on May 13, 2004. Passed through the 
Senate by unanimous consent on June 9, 2004. Referred to the 
Committee on Government Reform on June, 14, 2004. Ordered to be 
reported by unanimous consent on July 21, 2004. Agreed to in 
the House under suspension of the rules by voice vote on 
October 6, 2004. Public Law 108-353.
90. S. 2693: A bill to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal 
        Service located at 1475 Western Avenue, Suite 45, in Albany, 
        NY, as the ``Lieutenant John F. Finn Post Office''
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY] (introduced 
July, 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Senate Committee 
on Governmental Affairs on July 20, 2004. Passed through the 
Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs by unanimous consent 
on October 10, 2004. Referred to the Committee on Government 
Reform on November 16, 2004. Agreed to in the House under 
suspension of the rules by voice vote on November, 16, 2004. 
Public Law 108-443.

        E. RESOLUTIONS CONSIDERED BY THE COMMITTEE OR THE HOUSE

1. H. Con. Res. 6: Supporting the goals and ideals of Chronic 
        Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Awareness Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Stearns, Cliff [R-FL-6] 
(introduced January 7, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform January 7, 2003. Ordered to be reported by 
the Committee on Government Reform on June 19, 2003. Agreed to 
by the House on July 16, 2003.
2. H. Con. Res. 36: Encouraging the people of the United States to 
        honor and celebrate the 140th anniversary of the Emancipation 
        Proclamation and commending Abraham Lincoln's efforts to end 
        slavery
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Danny K. [D-IL-7] 
(introduced February 12, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 12, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 26, 2003.
3. H. Con. Res. 44: To express support for the celebration in 2004 of 
        the 150th anniversary of the Grand Excursion of 1854
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Leach, James A. [R-IA-2] 
(introduced February 13, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform February 13, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on March 26, 2003.
4. H. Con. Res. 54: Expressing the sense of the Congress that there 
        should be established an annual National Visiting Nurse 
        Association Week
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Markey, Edward J. [D-MA-7] 
(introduced February 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 25, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 4, 2003.
5. H. Con. Res. 58: Honoring the city of Fayetteville, NC, and its many 
        partners for the Festival of Flight, a celebration of the 
        centennial of Wilbur and Orville Wright's first flight, the 
        first controlled, powered flight in history
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Etheridge, Bob [D-NC-2] 
(introduced February 27, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 31, 2003. Agreed 
to by unanimous consent by the Senate on May 16, 2003.
6. H. Con. Res. 69: Expressing the sense of Congress that Althea Gibson 
        should be recognized for her ground breaking achievements in 
        athletics and her commitment to ending racial discrimination 
        and prejudice within the world of sports
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15] 
(introduced February 27, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on November 6, 2003. Agreed to 
under suspension of the rules by the House on November 18, 
2003. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on November 
22, 2003.
7. H. Con. Res. 71: Recognizing the importance of Ralph Bunche as one 
        of the great leaders of the United States, the first African-
        American Nobel Peace Prize winner, an accomplished scholar, a 
        distinguished diplomat, and a tireless campaigner of civil 
        rights for people throughout the world
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15] 
(introduced February 27, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Ordered Reported by 
unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 8, 2003. Agreed 
to in the Senate by unanimous consent on November 22, 2003.
8. H. Con. Res. 85: Expressing the sense of the Congress with regard to 
        the need for improved fire safety in nonresidential buildings 
        in the aftermath of the tragic fire on February 20, 2003, at a 
        nightclub in West Warwick, RI
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Langevin, James R. [D-RI-2] 
(introduced March 10, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on March 10, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on March 12, 2003
9. H. Con. Res. 106: Recognizing and honoring America's Jewish 
        community on the occasion of its 350th anniversary, supporting 
        the designation of an ``American Jewish History Month,'' and 
        for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Chabot, Steve [R-OH-1] 
(introduced March 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on March 20, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on September 18, 2003. Agreed to 
under suspension of the rules by the House on October 15, 2003. 
Agreed to by Senate on November 21, 2003.
10. H. Con. Res. 149: Expressing support for the celebration of 
        Patriots' Day and honoring the Nation's first patriots
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Markey, Edward J. [D-MA-7] 
(introduced April 10, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on April 10, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on April 29, 2003.
11. H. Con. Res. 162: Honoring the city of Dayton, OH, and its many 
        partners, for hosting ``Inventing Flight: The Centennial 
        Celebration,'' a celebration of the centennial of Wilbur and 
        Orville Wright's first flight
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Turner, Michael R. [R-OH-3] 
(introduced May 6, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to House Committee on 
Government Reform on May 6, 2003. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on May 22, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on June 9, 2003.
12. H. Con. Res. 172: Supporting the 20th Annual National Tourism Week
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Foley, Mark [R-FL-16] 
(introduced May 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on May 9, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of 
the rules by the House on June 2, 2003.
13. H. Con. Res. 176: Supporting the goals and ideals of Financial 
        Planning Week, recognizing the significant impact of sound 
        financial planning on achieving life's goals, and honoring 
        American families and the financial planning profession for 
        their adherence and dedication to the financial planning 
        process
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Platts, Todd Russell [R-PA-19] 
(introduced May 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on May 9, 2003. Ordered reported by unanimous 
consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of 
the rules by the House on November 4, 2003.
14. H. Con. Res. 208: Supporting National Men's Health Week
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Cummings, Elijah E. [D-MD-7] 
(introduced June 5, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 5, 2003. Ordered reported on June 19, 
2003. Agreed to under suspension of the rules by the House on 
July 16, 2003.
15. H. Con. Res. 220: Commending Medgar Wiley Evers and his widow, 
        Myrlie Evers-Williams, for their lives and accomplishments
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Thompson, Bennie G. [D-MS-2] 
(introduced June 12, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 12, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 16, 2003.
16. H. Con. Res. 230: Honoring the 10 communities selected to receive 
        the 2003 All-America City Award
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hayes, Robin [R-NC-8] 
(introduced June 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 25, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 10, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 21, 2003.
17. H. Con. Res. 235: Celebrating the life and achievements of Lawrence 
        Eugene ``Larry'' Doby
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Pascrell, Bill, Jr. [D-NJ-8] 
(introduced June 26, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 26, 2003. Ordered reported on July 
24, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of the rules by the House 
on September 16, 2003. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous 
consent on September 17, 2003.
18. H. Con. Res. 257: Expressing the sense of Congress that the 
        President should posthumously award the Presidential Medal of 
        Freedom to Harry W. Colmery
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Ryun, Jim [R-KS-2] (introduced 
July 24, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on July 24, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on June 3, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 6, 2004.
19. H. Con. Res. 262: Expressing the sense of the Congress in support 
        of the National Anthem ``SingAmerica'' project
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced July 25, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on July 25, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 4, 2003.
20. H. Con. Res. 264: Authorizing and requesting the President to issue 
        a proclamation to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the 
        birth of Constantino Brumidi
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Mica, John L. [R-FL-7] 
(introduced July 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on July 25, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on October 2, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 10, 2004. 
Agreed to by the Senate on February 24, 2004.
21. H. Con. Res. 270: Supporting the goals and ideals of College 
        Savings Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Rogers, Mike [R-MI-8] 
(introduced September 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on September 3, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 15, 2003.
22. H. Con. Res. 273: Recognizing and congratulating the East Boynton 
        Beach, FL, Little League team as the 2003 U.S. Little League 
        Champions
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Shaw, E. Clay, Jr. [R-FL-22] 
(introduced September 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 4, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 25, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 15, 2003. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on January 21, 
2004.
23. H. Con. Res. 287: Recognizing and honoring the life of the late 
        Raul Julia, his dedication to ending world hunger, and his 
        great contributions to the Latino community and the performing 
        arts
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Gutierrez, Luis V. [D-IL-4] 
(introduced September 23, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on September 23, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 25, 2004. 
Referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary on February 
26, 2004.
24. H. Con. Res. 295: Congratulating and saluting Focus: HOPE on the 
        occasion of its 35th anniversary and for its remarkable 
        commitment and contributions to Detroit, the State of Michigan, 
        and the United States
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Conyers, John, Jr. [D-MI-14] 
(introduced October 7, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on October 7, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on May 6, 2004. Agreed to under suspension of 
the rules by the House on June 1, 2004.
25. H. Con. Res. 299: Honoring Mr. Sargent Shriver for his dedication 
        and service to the United States of America, for his service in 
        the U.S. Navy, and for his lifetime of work as an ambassador 
        for the poor and powerless citizens of the United States of 
        America, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative McKeon, Howard P. (Buck) [R-CA-
25] (introduced October 8, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on October 8, 2003. Ordered Reported by 
unanimous consent on November 6, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 17, 2003.
26. H. Con. Res. 313: To urge the President, on behalf of the United 
        States, to present the Presidential Medal of Freedom to His 
        Holiness, Pope John Paul II, in recognition of his significant, 
        enduring, and historic contributions to the causes of freedom, 
        human dignity, and peace and to commemorate the Silver Jubilee 
        of His Holiness' inauguration of his ministry as Bishop of Rome 
        and Supreme Pastor of the Catholic Church
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Sensenbrenner, F. James, Jr. 
[R-WI-5] (introduced October 28, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on October 28, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on November 6, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 18, 2003. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on November 19, 
2003.
27. H. Con. Res. 320: Expressing the sense of the Congress regarding 
        the importance of motorsports
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Feeney, Tom [R-FL-24] 
(introduced November 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on November 4, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 19, 2003. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on November 20, 
2004.
28. H. Con. Res. 328: Recognizing and honoring the U.S. Armed Forces 
        and supporting the goals and objectives of a National Military 
        Appreciation Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced November 18, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on November 18, 2003. Ordered reported as 
amended by unanimous consent on February 26, 2004. Agreed to 
under suspension of the rules by the House on March 24, 2004. 
Referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary on March 25, 
2004. Ordered reported by the Committee on the Judiciary on 
April 22, 2004. Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on 
April 26, 2004.
29. H. Con. Res. 450: Recognizing the 40th anniversary of the day civil 
        rights organizers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael 
        Schwerner gave their lives in the struggle to guarantee the 
        right to vote for every citizen of the United States and 
        encouraging all Americans to observe the anniversary of the 
        deaths of the three men by committing themselves to ensuring 
        equal rights, equal opportunities, and equal justice for all 
        people
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Owens, Major R. [D-NY-11] 
(introduced June 15, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 15, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 21, 2004.
30. H. Con. Res. 461: Expressing the sense of Congress regarding the 
        importance of life insurance, and recognizing and supporting 
        National Life Insurance Awareness Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Biggert, Judy [R-IL-13] 
(introduced June 22, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 22, 2004. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on September 15, 2004. Agreed to 
under suspension of the rules by the House on September 28, 
2004.
31. H. Con. Res. 464: Honoring the 10 communities selected to receive 
        the 2004 All-America City Award
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hayes, Robin [R-NC-8] 
(introduced June 23, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on June 23, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 6, 2004. Agreed 
to in the Senate by unanimous consent on November 18, 2004.
32. H. Con. Res. 473: Expressing the sense of Congress that the 
        President should designate September 11 as a National Day of 
        voluntary service, charity and compassion
    a. Sponsor.--Representative King, Peter T. [R-NY-3] 
(introduced July 14, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on July 14, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules amended by the House on September 22, 2004. 
Referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pensions on September 23, 2004. Agreed to in the Senate by 
unanimous consent on October 10, 2004.
33. H. Con. Res. 489: Supporting the goals and ideals of National 
        Preparedness Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Cox, Christopher [R-CA-48] 
(introduced September 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on September 9, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 22, 2004. 
Referred to Committee on Governmental Affairs on September 23, 
2004.
34. H. Res. 31: Congratulating the Tampa Bay Buccaneers for winning 
        Super Bowl XXXVII
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Jim [D-FL-11] 
(introduced January 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on January 27, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on January 29, 2003.
35. H. Res. 46: Honoring the life of Al Hirschfeld and his legacy
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Nadler, Jerrold [D-NY-8] 
(introduced January 29, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on January 29, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 25, 2003.
36. H. Res. 57: Recognizing and supporting the goals and ideals of 
        ``National Runaway Prevention Month''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Israel, Steve [D-NY-2] 
(introduced February 5, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 5, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 26, 2003.
37. H. Res. 111: Honoring the legacy of Fred Rogers and his dedication 
        to creating a more compassionate, kind, and loving world for 
        children and adults
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Doyle, Michael F. [D-PA-14] 
(introduced February 27, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on February 27, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 4, 2003.
38. H. Res. 122: Recognizing the bicentennial of the admission of Ohio 
        into the Union and the contributions of Ohio residents to the 
        economic, social, and cultural development of the United States
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Regula, Ralph [R-OH-16] 
(introduced March 4, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on March 4, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on March 12, 2003.
39. H. Res. 127: Recognizing and supporting the goals and ideals of 
        ``Financial Literacy for Youth Month''
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Dreier, David [R-CA-26] 
(introduced March 5, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on March 5, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on April 7, 2003.
40. H. Res. 153: Recognizing the public need for fasting and prayer in 
        order to secure the blessings and protection of Providence for 
        the people of the United States and our Armed Forces during the 
        conflict in Iraq and under the threat of terrorism at home
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Akin, W. Todd [R-MO-2] 
(introduced March 20, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on March 20, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on March 27, 2003.
41. H. Res. 159: Expressing profound sorrow on the occasion of the 
        death of Irma Rangel
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hinojosa, Ruben [D-TX-15] 
(introduced March 25, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on March 25, 2003. Ordered reported by voice 
vote on May 22, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of the rules 
by the House on June 2, 2003.
42. H. Res. 178: Honoring the life and work of former Speaker of the 
        Pennsylvania House of Representatives Matthew J. Ryan and 
        offering the deepest condolences of the U.S. House of 
        Representatives to his wife and family on his death
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Weldon, Curt [R-PA-7] 
(introduced April 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on April 3, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on May 13, 2003.
43. H. Res. 195: Congratulating Sammy Sosa of the Chicago Cubs for 
        hitting 500 major league home runs
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Gutierrez, Luis V. [D-IL-4] 
(introduced April 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on April 10, 2003. Ordered reported by voice 
vote on May 22, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of the rules 
by the House on June 2, 2003.
44. H. Res. 213: Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives 
        that public service employees should be commended for their 
        dedication and service to the Nation during Public Service 
        Recognition Week
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Danny K. [D-IL-7] 
(introduced May 1, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on May 1, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of 
the rules by the House on May 8, 2003.
45. H. Res. 231: Supporting the goals and ideals of Peace Officers 
        Memorial Day
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hefley, Joel [R-CO-5] 
(introduced May 13, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to Committee on 
Government Reform on May 13, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 3, 2003.
46. H. Res. 240: Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives 
        that there should be established a National Community Health 
        Center Week to raise awareness of health services provided by 
        community, migrant, public housing, and homeless health 
        centers, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Danny K. [D-IL-7] 
(introduced May 19, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 19, 2003. Ordered reported by voice 
vote on June 19, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of the rules 
by the House on July 21, 2003.
47. H. Res. 262: Supporting the goals and ideals of Pancreatic Cancer 
        Awareness Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Platts, Todd Russell [R-PA-19] 
(introduced June 9, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 9, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 8, 2003.
48. H. Res. 274: Honoring John Stockton for an outstanding career, 
        congratulating him on his retirement, and thanking him for his 
        contributions to basketball, to the State of Utah, and to the 
        Nation
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Matheson, Jim [D-UT-2] 
(introduced June 12, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 12, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on November 6, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 3, 2004.
49. H. Res. 279: Congratulating the San Antonio Spurs for winning the 
        2003 NBA Championship
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Smith, Lamar [R-TX-21] 
(introduced June 16, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 16, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 19, 2003.
50. H. Res. 303: Honoring Maynard Holbrook Jackson, Jr., former mayor 
        of the city of Atlanta, and extending the condolences of the 
        House of Representatives on his death
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Lewis, John [D-GA-5] 
(introduced June 26, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 26, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 10, 2003. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 16, 2003.
51. H. Res. 306: Congratulating the New York Yankees on the occasion of 
        their 100th anniversary
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Serrano, Jose E. [D-NY-16] 
(introduced June 26, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 26, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 30, 2003.
52. H. Res. 315: Congratulating Rafael Palmeiro of the Texas Rangers 
        for hitting 500 major league home runs and thanking him for 
        being a role model for the Cuban American community, as well as 
        for all Americans
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Sessions, Pete [R-TX-32] 
(introduced July 9, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on July 9, 2003. Ordered reported by voice 
vote on July 24, 2003. Agreed to under suspension of the rules 
by the House on September 10, 2003.
53. H. Res. 350: Congratulating Lance Armstrong for winning the 2003 
        Tour de France
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced September 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 3, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 3, 2003.
54. H. Res. 352: Remembering and honoring the March on Washington of 
        August 28, 1963
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Bishop, Sanford D., Jr. [D-GA-
2] (introduced September 3, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 3, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 12, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 16, 2003.
55. H. Res. 357: Honoring the life and legacy of Bob Hope
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Miller, Jeff [R-FL-1] 
(introduced September 5, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 5, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 18, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 30, 2003.
56. H. Res. 369: Expressing the profound sorrow of the House of 
        Representatives for the death of Indiana Governor Frank 
        O'Bannon and extending thoughts, prayers, and condolences to 
        his family, friends, and loved ones
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Burton, Dan [R-IN-5] 
(introduced September 16, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 16, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 16, 2003.
57. H. Res. 392: Congratulating the Detroit Shock for winning the 2003 
        Women's National Basketball Association championship
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Conyers, John, Jr. [D-MI-14] 
(introduced October 8, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 8, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 9, 2004.
58. H. Res. 399: Honoring the life and legacy of Melvin Jones and 
        recognizing the contributions of Lions Clubs International
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Kennedy, Mark R. [R-MN-6] 
(introduced October 15, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 15, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on April 1, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on April 27, 2004.
59. H. Res. 415: Congratulating the Florida Marlins for winning the 
        2003 World Series
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Meek, Kendrick B. [D-FL-17] 
(introduced October 28, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 28, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 29, 2003.
60. H. Res. 425: Recognizing and honoring the firefighters and other 
        public servants who responded to the October 2003, historically 
        devastating, outbreak of wildfires in southern California
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Susan A. [D-CA-53] 
(introduced October 30, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 30, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 5, 2003.
61. H. Res. 433: Honoring the life and legacy of Luis A. Ferre
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Serrano, Jose E. [D-NY-16] 
(introduced November 5, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on November 5, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 26, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 16, 2004.
62. H. Res. 439: Honoring the life and career of Willie Shoemaker and 
        expressing the condolences of the House of Representatives to 
        his family and friends on his death
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Reyes, Silvestre [D-TX-16] 
(introduced November 10, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on November 10, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 2, 2004.
63. H. Res. 475: Congratulating the San Jose Earthquakes for winning 
        the 2003 Major League Soccer Cup
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Honda, Michael M. [D-CA-15] 
(introduced December 8, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on December 8, 2003. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 26, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 9, 2004.
64. H. Res. 512: Congratulating the New England Patriots for winning 
        Super Bowl XXXVIII
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Frank, Barney [D-MA-4] 
(introduced February 3, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on February 3, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 4, 2004.
65. H. Res. 519: Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives 
        with respect to the earthquake that occurred in San Luis Obispo 
        County, CA, on December 22, 2003
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Thomas, William M. [R-CA-22] 
(introduced February 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on February 4, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 12, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 9, 2004.
66. H. Res. 578: Supporting the goals and ideals of Financial Literacy 
        Month, and for other purposes
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Biggert, Judy [R-IL-13] 
(introduced March 25, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on March 25, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on April 1, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on April 27, 2004.
67. H. Res. 581: Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives 
        regarding rates of compensation for civilian employees and 
        members of the uniformed services of the United States
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced March 29, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on March 29, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on March 31, 2004.
68. H. Res. 612: Recognizing and honoring the firefighters, police, 
        public servants, civilians, and private businesses who 
        responded to the devastating fire in Richmond, VA, on March 26, 
        2004
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Cantor, Eric [R-VA-7] 
(introduced April 29, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on April 29, 2004. Ordered reported as 
amended by unanimous consent on May 12, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on June 1, 2004.
69. H. Res. 613: Recognizing and honoring the 10th anniversary of 
        Vietnam Human Rights Day
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced April 30, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on April 30, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on May 6, 2004. Agreed to under suspension of 
the rules by the House on May 11, 2004.
70. H. Res. 622: Supporting the goals and ideals of Peace Officers 
        Memorial Day
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hefley, Joel [R-CO-5] 
(introduced May 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 4, 2004. Ordered reported by unanimous 
consent on May 6, 2004. Agreed to under suspension of the rules 
by the House on May 11, 2004.
71. H. Res. 641: Supporting the goals and ideals of Pancreatic Cancer 
        Awareness Month
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Platts, Todd Russell [R-PA-19] 
(introduced May 12, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 12, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 16, 2004.
72. H. Res. 646: Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives 
        that there should be established a National Community Health 
        Center Week to raise awareness of health services provided by 
        community, migrant, public housing, and homeless health centers
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Danny K. [D-IL-7] 
(introduced May 18, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 18, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 8, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 12, 2004.
73. H. Res. 653: Honoring former President George Herbert Walker Bush 
        on the occasion of his 80th birthday
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Hall, Ralph M. [R-TX-4] 
(introduced May 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on May 20, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on June 3, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 14, 2004.
74. H. Res. 660: Congratulating Randy Johnson of the Arizona 
        Diamondbacks on pitching a perfect game on May 18, 2004
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Shadegg, John B. [R-AZ-3] 
(introduced June 2, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 2, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 21, 2004.
75. H. Res. 664: Mourning the passing of President Ronald Reagan and 
        celebrating his service to the people of the United States and 
        his leadership in promoting the cause of freedom for all the 
        people of the world
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Lewis, Jerry [R-CA-41] 
(introduced June 8, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 8, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 9, 2004.
76. H. Res. 668: Congratulating the Tampa Bay Lightning for winning the 
        2004 National Hockey League Stanley Cup championship and for 
        their outstanding performance during the entire 2003-2004 
        season
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Jim [D-FL-11] 
(introduced June 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 9, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 14, 2004.
77. H. Res. 679: Congratulating the Detroit Pistons on winning the 2004 
        National Basketball Association Championship
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Conyers, John, Jr. [D-MI-14] 
(introduced June 16, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 16, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on June 21, 2004.
78. H. Res. 684: Honoring David Scott Tidmarsh, the 2004 Scripps 
        National Spelling Bee Champion
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Chocola, Chris [R-IN-2] 
(introduced June 21, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 21, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 8, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 12, 2004.
79. H. Res. 695: Expressing the condolences of the House of 
        Representatives to the family and friends of Mattie Stepanek on 
        his passing, and honoring the life of Mattie Stepanek for his 
        braveness, generosity of spirit, and efforts to raise awareness 
        of muscular dystrophy
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Cardin, Benjamin L. [D-MD-3] 
(introduced June 24, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on June 24, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 21, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 22, 2004.
80. H. Res. 702: Honoring former President Gerald R. Ford on the 
        occasion of his 91st birthday and extending the best wishes of 
        the House of Representatives to former President Ford and his 
        family
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Dingell, John D. [D-MI-15] 
(introduced July 6, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on July 6, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 8, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on July 12, 2004.
81. H. Res. 717: Honoring former President William Jefferson Clinton on 
        the occasion of his 58th birthday
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Maloney, Carolyn B. [D-NY-14] 
(introduced July 14, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on July 14, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on July 21, 2004. Agreed to under suspension 
of the rules by the House on September 13, 2004.
82. H. Res. 761: Congratulating Lance Armstrong on his record-setting 
        victory in the 2004 Tour de France
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Doggett, Lloyd [D-TX-10] 
(introduced September 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 9, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 22, 2004.
83. H. Res. 772: Supporting the goals and ideals of National Long-Term 
        Care Residents' Rights Week and recognizing the importance the 
        Nation of residents of long-term care facilities, including 
        senior citizens and individuals living with disabilities
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Waxman, Henry A. [D-CA-30] 
(introduced September 14, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 14, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on September 15, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 22, 2004.
84. H. Res. 784: Commending the resiliency of the people of the State 
        of Florida and the work of those individuals who have assisted 
        with the recovery efforts after the devastation caused by 
        Hurricanes Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Foley, Mark [R-FL-16] 
(introduced September 22, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 22, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on September 28, 2004.
85. H. Res. 798: Honoring former President James Earl (Jimmy) Carter on 
        the occasion of his 80th birthday
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Lewis, John [D-GA-5] 
(introduced September 23, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 23, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 6, 2004.
86. H. Res. 815: Congratulating Andrew Wojtanik for winning the 16th 
        Annual National Geographic Bee, conducted by the National 
        Geographic Society
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Moore, Dennis [D-KS-3] 
(introduced October 4, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on October 4, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on October 6, 2004.
87. H. Res. 854: Congratulating the Boston Red Sox on winning the 2004 
        World Series
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Capuano, Michael E. [D-MA-8] 
(introduced November 16, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on November 16, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on November 18, 2004.
88. H.J. Res. 19: Recognizing the 92d birthday of Ronald Reagan
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Cox, Christopher [R-CA-48] 
(introduced February 4, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on February 4, 2003. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 11, 2003. 
Agreed to in the Senate by unanimous consent on February 13, 
2003. Public Law 108-9.
89. H.J. Res. 70: Commending the Inspectors General for their efforts 
        to prevent and detect waste, fraud, abuse, and mismanagement, 
        and to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the 
        Federal Government during the past 25 years
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Davis, Tom [R-VA-11] 
(introduced September 29, 2003).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on September 29, 2003. Ordered reported by 
the Committee on Government Reform on October 2, 2003. Agreed 
to by the House under suspension of the rules on October 15, 
2003.
    * The Senate passed a similar bill, S.J. Res. 18, on 
October 14, 2003. The House agreed to S.J. Res. 18 under 
suspension of the rules on November 17, 2003. Public Law 108-
139.
90. H.J. Res. 84: Recognizing the 93d birthday of Ronald Reagan
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Gibbons, Jim [R-NV-2] 
(introduced January 20, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on January 20, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on February 3, 2004. 
Referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary on March 25, 
2004.
91. H.J. Res. 87: Honoring the life and legacy of President Franklin 
        Delano Roosevelt and recognizing his contributions on the 
        anniversary of the date of his birth
    a. Sponsor.--Representative Slaughter, Louise McIntosh [D-
NY-28] (introduced January 28, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on 
Government Reform on January 28, 2004. Ordered reported by 
unanimous consent on February 26, 2004. Agreed to under 
suspension of the rules by the House on March 17, 2004. 
Referred to the Senate Committee on the Judiciary on March 22, 
2004.
92. S. Con. Res. 97: A concurrent resolution recognizing the 91st 
        annual meeting of the Garden Club of America
    a. Sponsor.--Senator Sarbanes, Paul S. [D-MD] (introduced 
March 9, 2004).
    b. Legislative History.--Referred to the Committee on the 
Judiciary on March 9, 2004. Agreed to in the Senate by 
unanimous consent on March 22, 2004. Referred to the Committee 
on Government Reform on March 23, 2004. Ordered reported by the 
Committee on Government Reform on April 1, 2004. Agreed to 
under suspension of the rules by the House on April 20, 2004.

            II. Oversight and Investigative Accomplishments

    The committee has conducted oversight on and investigated 
matters related to the effective administration of government 
programs of great public interest. These programs included 
government contracting in support of the war in Iraq, the 
Agriculture Department's handling of the discovery of Mad Cow 
Disease in the United States, the flu vaccine shortage, the 
role of the National Guard in national security and homeland 
defense, and management of the Department of Homeland Security. 
The committee's exposure of these matters to public scrutiny 
has enhanced public confidence in government, ensured 
accountability of public officials, and contributed to efforts 
to address serious problems facing America today.
Iraq Contracting
    The committee held a series of four hearings that looked 
into the contracting of goods and services and the Iraqi 
conflict. In preparing for these hearings, Chairman Tom Davis 
led two bipartisan delegations to Iraq and Kuwait. Both of 
these trips were designed to obtain insight into the 
complexities surrounding the coalition's situation and the role 
of contractors in the larger scheme of the Iraq situation.
    The hearings focused on, in order, the overall situation in 
Iraq, the U.S. Government contracting apparatus in the war 
theater, large sustainment contracts, and finally, specific 
allegations of wrongdoing by so called whistleblowers. These 
high profile hearings acted as a window on how the intricacies 
of government contracting work in a wartime environment. 
Government contracting is not black and white. There are many 
actors; each with different roles to ensure that goods and 
services are delivered in accordance with law and that in the 
end the taxpayer is protected.
    These hearings accomplished much. The hearings brought to 
light a better understanding of the impact of the security 
situation in Iraq on contracting. The security in Iraq is 
tenuous at best and it inhibits rebuilding and resupply efforts 
and impacts the day-to-day living conditions of our military 
and civilians in the country. Furthermore, the hearings 
revealed how difficult it is to deliver goods and services 
necessary to sustain a military and civilian presence in a war 
theater and how the government tries to maintain, at best, some 
resemblance of an audit chain, while at the same time ensuring 
that the mission is accomplished.
    The hearings established that the ``fog of war'' not only 
affects the military mission but it also affects the contractor 
and contract management structure on the battlefield. The 
committee understands that in both peace and war there are 
contractors that will try to take advantage of the situation. 
Unfortunately, the security situation causes a lag in the 
contract management system, which in turn caused many to think 
that contractors in Iraq were enriching themselves by abusing 
the system.
    The hearings provided a strong record that the system is/
was working. Auditing agencies have done their jobs. Where 
criminal investigations are necessary, they are being 
conducted. The laws put in place by Congress carefully balance 
affordability, accountability, and accessibility and have been 
able to ensure that goods and services can be delivered, when 
needed, even in emergencies, while protecting the taxpayer. And 
we established that there was no evidence that the contracts 
were awarded improperly.
    Government contracting is difficult. Government contracting 
in a war zone is nearly impossible. What the committee learned 
is that despite the security situation and the difficulties of 
the Iraq war, goods and services are being delivered and that 
in the end, the oversight process will ensure that the costs of 
those goods and services are reasonable and appropriate and the 
taxpayer will be protected. There will be times of trouble but 
all in all, if our mission in Iraq is to succeed, it will do so 
in large part because the acquisition system is functioning as 
it should.
Mad Cow
    After the December 23, 2003, USDA announcement of the 
discovery of the first U.S. case of Bovine Spongiform 
Encephalopathy [BSE], commonly known as ``mad cow disease,'' 
the committee initiated a 7-month investigation into concerns 
about the process for identification of BSE-infected cows and 
USDA's actions upon discovery of the cow. Committee 
investigators traveled to Washington State to interview the 
owner of the slaughterhouse where the BSE-infected cow was 
identified; requested documents from USDA; and held several 
meetings with USDA representatives and representatives of the 
cattle industry.
    As a result of the committee's investigation, USDA 
established written protocols to be followed in case of 
discovery of another BSE-infected cow. USDA also implemented an 
expanded BSE surveillance plan to better determine whether BSE 
is actually present in the U.S. cattle population, and if so, 
at what level. The committee held a joint hearing with the 
Committee on Agriculture to examine USDA's expanded 
surveillance plan, including concerns regarding the written 
protocols and management of the plan. The committee will 
continue to conduct oversight over USDA's surveillance plan 
during the 109th Congress.
Flu Vaccine Shortage
    The committee began its investigation into the flu vaccine 
shortage in February 2004, where the committee raised concerns 
over the possibility that the United States could lose half its 
supply of the flu vaccine if the United Kingdom, in a flu 
pandemic, nationalized the vaccine supply of Chiron Corp., the 
largest supplier of flu vaccine to the U.S. market. Then on 
October 5, 2004, the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products 
Regulatory Agency [MHRA] suspended Chiron's influenza vaccine-
manufacturing license effective immediately for 3 months 
because of manufacturing problems.
    As a result of the suspension, the United States did not 
receive Chiron's 46-48 million flu shots for this year's flu 
season. The committee subsequently held an emergency hearing on 
October 8, 2004, where the discussion centered on contributing 
factors to the flu vaccine shortage, the government's and 
vaccine manufacturers' responses to and management of the 
crisis, and the steps to be taken to prepare for next year's 
flu season. In addition, the committee requested official 
documents from FDA to ascertain whether FDA had knowledge prior 
to October 5, 2004, of Chiron's impending suspension. In 
November, Chairman Davis and staff traveled to London to hold 
meetings with officials from MHRA and Chiron.
    The committee also conducted an extensive meeting with FDA 
officials in Washington to discuss FDA documents and the 
results of the committee's meetings in London. On November 17, 
2004, the committee held its third flu vaccine shortage 
hearing. The testimony from previous hearings, FDA documents, 
and meetings with Chairman Davis appear to establish that FDA 
followed standard protocol in dealing with Chiron. The 
committee will continue to monitor the subsequent inspections 
of the Chiron facility to ensure that they are able to produce 
vaccine for next year's flu season, as well as determine 
whether any appropriate legislative action is necessary to 
prevent a similar situation in the future.
FDA's Safety And Efficacy of Drugs
    The committee has begun an investigation into FDA's 
approval and post-marketing surveillance of drugs, especially 
in light of questions surrounding the safety and efficacy of 
anti-depressant drugs prescribed for use by adolescents, and 
the voluntary withdrawal by Merck of Vioxx, an arthritis and 
acute pain medication taken by more than 2 million people 
worldwide. The committee's review is intended to ensure that 
FDA adequately monitors drug safety.
National Guard
    The committee focused on the role and resourcing of the 
National Guard in our country's growing and evolving national 
and homeland defense missions. We have held hearings on Army 
Guard and Reserve pay systems that have resulted in changes in 
Army policies effecting administration and customer services 
for the Army reserve component. The committee is also examining 
the relationship between the States and the Federal Government 
in use of the National Guard for homeland defense missions. The 
committee's April 2004 hearing resulted in changes in Title 32 
allowing for homeland defense operations under Governor 
control. The committee will continue to work on 
intergovernmental coordination between State and Federal 
Government and the Department of Defense in helping define the 
homeland role of the National Guard.
    The committee will also continue to examine the resourcing 
of the Army and Air National Guard for overseas and homeland 
missions, particularly in the areas of equipment and training. 
The committee is also looking at the Air Force Future Total 
Force transformation as it is affecting the equipping and 
positioning of the Air National Guard.
    The committee also has done extensive work on Army medical 
processing of injured Guard and Reserve, focusing on the lack 
of integrated systems and processes of oversight that create 
problems for injured reservists and their families.
Department of Homeland Security
    During the 108th Congress, the committee conducted 
extensive oversight into the newly created Department of 
Homeland Security. In addition to thorough oversight over 
aviation security, mass transportation security, and 
information management challenges facing a new department that 
combined 22 agencies and 170,000 employees, the committee has 
also spent considerable time examining visa policy and US 
VISIT.
    The committee maintained a strong focus on conducting 
oversight over the protection of the homeland through our 
embassies and consulates overseas. The newly created Department 
of Homeland Security [DHS] has primary responsibility for the 
visa issuing function and has infused an increased security 
interest into the process. Along with these additional 
precautions, however, come delays and frustrations that have 
seriously affected American businesses, educational 
institutions, the scientific community, and the tourism 
industry. The committee has encouraged DHS and the State 
Department to facilitate travel while maintaining homeland 
security through the efficient use of information technology, 
interagency cooperation, and human capital and resource 
management.
    The committee also documented the development of the US 
VISIT program examining, in particular, the inter-agency 
aspects of the new initiative. US VISIT will never meet its 
potential until agencies with applicable information freely and 
proactively share data so that government officials can make 
effective decisions no matter which Department they represent. 
Where necessary, the committee urged agencies to set aside 
parochial concerns to achieve the congressional vision of a 
seamless border entry system that actually facilitates U.S. 
border travel while protecting the Nation.
                  PART THREE. FULL COMMITTEE MEETINGS

                       I. Full Committee Hearings

1. ``From Reorganization to Recruitment: Bringing the Federal 
        Government into the 21st Century,'' March 6, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-2
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to begin a 
dialog on the 14 recommendations made by the Commission, and to 
give members of the committee the opportunity to evaluate those 
recommendations and discuss which ones are feasible in the near 
future and which are longer term goals. The Commission's 
report--much of which mirrors elements of the administration's 
management agenda--provides an excellent overview of some of 
the challenges we face in improving the operations of the 
Federal Government, and the hearing set the stage for much of 
the work this committee will do during the 108th Congress to 
reform and improve the Federal Government.
    b. Witnesses.--Paul A. Volcker, chairman of the National 
Commission on the Public Service; Frank C. Carlucci, member of 
the National Commission on the Public Service; and Donna 
Shalala, member of the National Commission on the Public 
Service.
2. ``Energy Efficiency Improvements in Federal Buildings and 
        Vehicles,'' March 12, 2003; Serial No. 108-1
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to gain a 
better understanding of the government's progress in reducing 
energy consumption and adopting more energy efficient 
facilities as the committee begins to consider provisions in 
upcoming energy policy legislation within its jurisdiction.
    b. Witnesses.--David Garman, Assistant Secretary for Energy 
Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy; 
Paul Lynch, Assistant Commissioner of Business Operations for 
the Public Buildings Service, General Services Administration; 
and William Rivers, Director of the Federal Vehicle Policy 
Division in the Office of Government-wide Policy, General 
Services Administration, accompanied by Barney Brasseaux of the 
Federal Supply Service.
3. ``Stumbling onto Smut: The Alarming Ease of Access to Pornography on 
        Peer-to-Peer Networks,'' March 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-8
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
growing problem of the availability of pornography, including 
child pornography, through file sharing programs, on peer-to-
peer computer networks. The committee also examined the risk of 
inadvertent exposure to children to pornographic materials on 
these networks. Seemingly harmless search terms likely to be 
used by children involving cartoon characters or popular 
singers produce a high proportion of pornographic images.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda Koontz, Director of Information 
Management Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; John M. 
Netherland, Acting Director of the CyberSmuggling Center, 
Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of 
Homeland Security; Randy Saaf, president of MediaDefender, 
Inc.; Daniel Rung, chief executive officer of Grokster Limited; 
Patricia Greenfield, Department of Psychology, University of 
California at Los Angeles; Mistress Shelley, 9th grade; and 
Master Rob, 10th grade.
4. ``Breathing Fumes: A Decade of Failure in Energy Department 
        Acquisitions,'' March 20, 2003; Serial No. 108-4
    a. Summary.--The committee held this oversight hearing to 
examine the Department of Energy's [DOE] troubled acquisition 
management function. DOE depends on contractors to operate its 
sites and carry out its varied missions, such as ensuring that 
America's nuclear weapons stockpile is safe and reliable, 
cleaning up radioactive and hazardous wastes, fostering a 
secure and reliable energy system, and performing world-class 
scientific research.
    For over a decade, GAO and the DOE IG have criticized the 
Department's acquisition practices, particularly the 
Department's inadequate contract management and oversight and 
its failure to hold its contractors accountable for results. 
Poor performance of DOE contractors has led to schedule delays 
and cost increases on many of the Department's projects. Some 
of these difficulties have been rooted in the Department's 
failure to seek competition for its large ``management and 
operating'' contracts for running its government-owned plants 
and laboratories and its failure to structure these contracts 
so as to encourage results rather than the method of 
performance.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General of 
the U.S. Department of Energy; Robin M. Nazzaro, Director of 
Natural Resources and Environment, U.S. Department of Energy; 
and James A. Rispoli, Director of the Office of Engineering and 
Construction Management, U.S. Department of Energy.
5. ``Point, Click, Self-Medicate: A Review of Consumer Safeguards on 
        Internet Pharmacy Sites,'' March 27, 2003; Serial No. 108-5
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine 
regulatory gaps pertaining to domestic Internet sites that sell 
medications without a valid prescription. The committee heard 
testimony regarding public health and consumer safety issues 
that stem from the sale of prescription drugs without a valid 
prescription or adequate physician supervision. The Food and 
Drug Administration, Federal Trade Commission, Federation of 
State Medical Boards, National Association of Boards of 
Pharmacy, and National Association of Attorneys General 
appeared before the committee to convey their concerns and 
suggest possible solutions to the problem of unlawful Internet 
prescribing.
    b. Witnesses.--Howard J. Beales, Director of the Bureau of 
Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission; William Hubbard, 
Senior Associate Commissioner for Policy Planning and 
Legislation, Food and Drug Administration; Dr. James Thompson, 
M.D., executive vice president and chief executive officer of 
the Federation of State Medical Boards; Carmen Catizone, 
executive director of the National Association of Boards of 
Pharmacy; and Richard Blumenthal, attorney general of the State 
of Connecticut, on behalf of the National Association of 
Attorneys General.
6. ``Toward a Logical Governing Structure: Restoring Executive 
        Reorganization Authority,'' April 3, 2003; Serial No. 108-33
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to discuss the 
reauthorization of the Executive Reorganization Authority, 
which expired in 1984. The hearing discussed the merits of 
restoring reorganization authority to the President and 
concerns regarding the proposal to restore them.
    Examining this authority is a critical component of the 
President's management agenda and the Government Reform 
Committee's goal of moving the Federal Government into the 
future. Reauthorization of executive reorganization authority 
is also a top priority in the Volcker Report on the public 
service. New technology, work-force training and retention, and 
organizational streamlining, mentioned in the proposal, will 
not only provide savings to the American taxpayer, but also 
make our government more efficient for all citizens.
    b. Witnesses.--Tom DeLay, Majority Leader of the U.S. House 
of Representatives; David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the 
General Accounting Office; Nancy Dorn, Deputy Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget; Dwight Ink, president emeritus 
of the Institute of Public Administration; Dr. Paul C. Light, 
Director of the Center for Public Service at the Brookings 
Institution; Colleen M. Kelley, president of the National 
Treasury Employees Union; and Mark D. Roth, general counsel for 
the American Federation of Government Employees.
7. ``Project BioShield: Contracting for the Health and Security of the 
        American Public,'' April 4, 2003; Serial No. 108-10
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
merits of the ``Project Bioshield Act,'' a legislative proposal 
designed to protect Americans from the threat of a bio-
terrorist attack. The proposal, first announced by President 
Bush in his 2003 State of the Union address, would enable the 
Federal Government to develop, procure, and make available 
countermeasures to biological, chemical, nuclear, and 
radiological agents that could cause public health emergencies 
affecting national security.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, Director of the 
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National 
Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; 
Dr. Mark McClellan, Commissioner of the Food and Drug 
Administration, Department of Health and Human Services; 
Michael Brown, Under Secretary for Emergency Preparedness and 
Response, Department of Homeland Security; Dr. Dale Klein, 
Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical and 
Biological Defense Programs, Department of Defense; Frank 
Rapoport, attorney at law for McKenna Long & Aldridge, on 
behalf of Aventis Pasteur; Michael Friedman, chief medical 
officer for biomedical preparedness, Pharmaceutical Research 
and Manufacturers of America; Una Ryan, president of Avant 
Immunotherapeutics; Katherine Bowdish, Ph.D., president of 
Alexion Antibody Technologies; and John Edwards, chief of 
infectious diseases at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, on 
behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
8. ``The SARS Threat: Is the Nation's Public Health Network Prepared 
        for a Possible Epidemic?'' April 9, 2003; Serial No. 108-9
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing assessed our public 
health system's response capabilities to manage an emerging 
infectious disease at the Federal, State, and local level. The 
global outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS], 
offered a valid test of the Nation's preparedness to handle any 
public health threat, whether it is caused by a naturally 
occurring infectious outbreak or a bioterrorist attack. In 
2002, The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness 
and Response Act provided substantial new funding for States, 
localities, and hospitals to boost preparedness to respond to a 
highly contagious disease. The SARS threat was the first 
challenge to our Nation's health network's capabilities since 
the enactment of the bill and provided the committee with a 
chance to evaluate existing procedures and safeguards.
    b. Witnesses.--Janet Heinrich, Director of Public Health 
Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; Dr. Margaret Hamburg, 
vice president of Biological Programs, the Nuclear Threat 
Initiative; Dr. David Goodfriend, director of the Loudoun 
County Health Department; and Tommy G. Thompson, Secretary of 
the Department of Health and Human Services, accompanied by 
General Phil Russell (retired), Commander, U.S.M., and Steve 
Ostroff, Centers for Disease Control.
9. ``Are We Ready for Prime Time? Assessing the State of Emergency 
        Readiness in the Nation's Capital,'' April 10, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-18
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
ability of the District of Columbia to cope with a major 
emergency. The National Capital Region faces some unique 
challenges in its emergency preparation and response planning. 
It is an area governed by two States, the District of Columbia, 
and the Federal Government; each with its own police forces and 
emergency plans, but closely connected by roads, bridges, and 
mass transit systems. The District of Columbia also is the seat 
of the Federal Government and employs close to 370,000 Federal 
employees, many who live in Maryland and Virginia. The District 
requires a multitude of local, State, and Federal Governments 
and agencies to coordinate their efforts to respond effectively 
to emergencies. The Federal, local, and State governments have 
taken a number of actions to improve coordination of emergency 
preparedness efforts.
    However, several incidents in the capital region have shown 
that there is much to be done in the way of planning, 
coordination, communication, and informing the public. For 
example, a disgruntled tobacco farmer drove a tractor onto the 
Mall, threatened to detonate explosives, and effectively held 
the area hostage for 47 hours. The incident seriously disrupted 
life and work in the region when traffic in the capital's vital 
thoroughfares came to a standstill. Law enforcement agencies 
attempted to negotiate with the disgruntled farmer, but there 
was no escalation of control strategies. This lack of control 
was occurring even after the homeland security risk condition 
had been upgraded to code orange because the Nation was on the 
eve of war. For all the planning to prepare for emergencies, 
the perception was that the numerous agencies and jurisdictions 
could not resolve the situation in a timely manner.
    Government leaders, law enforcement agencies, and the 
private and public sectors were asked to address the 
sufficiency of resources to handle security threats, 
coordination of emergency responses, and other issues regarding 
emergency preparedness and response.
    As a follow-up to the hearing, a GAO report has been 
requested to examine the emergency budget and spending plan for 
the National Capital Region. The report will help Congress 
identify whether the region is sufficiently funded and using 
the funds to its fullest capacity.
    b. Witnesses.--Van Harp, Director of the Washington Field 
Office, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Teresa Chambers, Chief 
of the U.S. Park Police; Charles Ramsey, chief of the 
Metropolitan Police Department; Richard White, general manager 
of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority; David 
Robertson, interim executive director of the Metropolitan 
Washington Council of Governments, Mary K. Hill, Chair of the 
Board of Directors, Metropolitan Washington Council of 
Governments; Bob Peck, president of the Washington Board of 
Trade; Anthony A. Williams, Mayor of the District of Columbia; 
Mark Warner, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia; Bruce 
Tuxill, adjutant general of the Maryland State Police; Edward 
T. Norris, secretary of State Police, State of Maryland; and 
Michael Byrne, Director of the Office of National Capitol 
Region Coordination, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.
10. ``Better Training, Efficiency and Accountability: Services 
        Acquisition Reform for the 21st Century,'' April 30, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-29
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted a legislative hearing 
on H.R. 1837, the Services Acquisition Reform Act [SARA] of 
2003. The hearing followed up on other hearings conducted 
during the 107th Congress on H.R. 3832, the Services 
Acquisition Reform Act of 2002, to address the barriers 
government agencies face in acquiring the goods and services 
necessary to meet mission objectives.
    The goal of the hearing was to discuss ways to provide the 
Federal Government greater access to the commercial 
marketplace. The current system, although much improved by the 
reforms of the 1990s, is simply inadequate to leverage the best 
and most innovative services and products our vigorous private-
sector economy has to offer. Today's acquisition processes do 
not keep up with the dynamics of an economy that has over the 
last few years become increasingly service and technology 
oriented.
    SARA addresses the multiple deficiencies plaguing 
government acquisition today; (1) the lack of up-to-date 
comprehensive training for our acquisition professionals, (2) 
the inability of the current government structure to reflect 
business-like practices by facilitating cross-agency 
acquisitions and information sharing, and (3) the lack of good 
tools and incentives to encourage the participation of the best 
commercial firms in the government market.
    SARA was passed into law as part of the fiscal year 2004 
Department of Defense Appropriations bill.
    b. Witnesses.--William Woods, Director of Contracting 
Issues, GAO; Stephen Perry, Administrator of GSA; Angela 
Styles, Administrator of Office of Federal Procurement Policy, 
OMB; Charles Tiefer, University of Baltimore Law School; Bruce 
Leinster, chairman of the Information Technology Association of 
America; Mark F. Wagner, chairman of the Public Policy Council 
for the CSA; and Edward Legasey, vice chairman of the 
Professional Service Council.
11. ``Instilling Agility, Flexibility and a Culture of Achievement in 
        Critical Federal Agencies: Review of H.R. 1836, the Civil 
        Service and National Security Personnel Improvement Act of 
        2003,'' May 6, 2003; Serial No. 108-25
    a. Summary.--The committee hosted a legislative hearing on 
H.R. 1836, which seeks to address the human capital management 
challenges facing three key Federal agencies: the Department of 
Defense, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
    b. Witnesses.--Paul Wolfowitz, Deputy Secretary of the 
Department of Defense, accompanied by General Peter Pace, vice 
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Department of Defense; 
Kay Cole James, Director of the Office of Personnel Management; 
Sean O'Keefe, Administrator of the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration; William Donaldson, chairman of the 
Securities and Exchange Commission; Dr. Paul Light, director of 
the Center for Public Service at the Brookings Institution; 
Bobby Harnage, Sr., national president of the American 
Federation of Government Employees; Colleen Kelly, president of 
the National Treasury Employees Union; and Mille Turner, member 
of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Conference of the Federal 
Managers Association.
12. ``Out of Many, One: Assessing Barriers to Information Sharing in 
        the Department of Homeland Security,'' May 8, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-31
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
current status of the Department of Homeland Security's efforts 
to integrate information sharing functions both among the 22 
agencies comprising the new Department, as well as between the 
Department and other Federal, State, and local entities and 
private sector stakeholders.
    b. Witnesses.--Greg Baroni, president of Global Public 
Sector, Unisys Corp.; Steven Perkins, senior vice president of 
Public Sector and Homeland Security, Oracle Corp.; Mark Bisnow, 
senior vice president of WebMethods, Inc.; Steven Cooper, Chief 
Information Officer of the Department of Homeland Security; 
Mark Forman, Associate Director for Information Technology, and 
e-Government, Office of Management and Budget; Robert Dacey, 
Director of Information Security Issues and Information 
Technology Team, General Accounting Office; Randolph C. Hite, 
Director of Architecture and Systems Issues and Information 
Technology Team, General Accounting Office; and Charles 
Rossotti, Senior Advisor of the Carlyle Group, former 
Commissioner, Internal Revenue Service.
13. ``In Search of Educational Excellence in the Nation's Capital: A 
        Review of Academic Options for Students and Parents in the 
        District of Columbia,'' May 9, 2003; Serial No. 108-30
    a. Summary.--The intent of the hearing was to begin an open 
dialog regarding school scholarships in the District of 
Columbia and whether there was a need for Federal legislation 
to address education performance and school choice in the 
District of Columbia. The committee will continue to examine 
school choice initiatives for the disadvantaged.
    b. Witnesses.--Jeff Flake, (R-AZ); Elijah Cummings, (D-MD); 
Eugene Hickok, Ph.D., Under Secretary, U.S. Department of 
Education; Anthony Williams, Mayor of the District of Columbia; 
Linda Cropp, chairman of the D.C. Council; Kevin Chavous, 
member of the D.C. Council; Peggy Cooper Cafritz, president of 
the D.C. Board of Education; Josephine Baker, executive 
director of the D.C. Public Charter School Board; Casey 
Lartigue, Jr., education policy analyst at the Cato Institute; 
Dr. Helen Ladd, researcher at Duke University, Jackie Pinckney-
Hackett, public school parent at Jefferson Junior High School; 
and Iris Tover, transformation school parent at Stanton 
Elementary School.
14. ``Overexposed: The Threats to Privacy and Security on Filesharing 
        Networks,'' May 15, 2003; Serial No. 108-26
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was for the 
committee to assess the security and privacy risks posed by the 
use of peer-to-peer file sharing programs. Witnesses at the 
hearing included computer security experts and representatives 
from academia. Witnesses expressed significant concern about 
security vulnerabilities associated with peer-to-peer file-
sharing programs. At the hearing the committee released a staff 
report entitled ``File-Sharing Programs and Peer-to-Peer 
Networks: Privacy and Security Risks.'' This report summarized 
the results of the committee's staff investigation into the 
potential privacy and security risks associated with the use of 
peer-to-peer file-sharing programs. Committee staff found that 
users of file-sharing programs have inadvertently made highly 
personal information available to other users and that file-
sharing software can spread viruses, worms, and other malicious 
computer files.
    b. Witnesses.--Nathaniel S. Good, University of California, 
Berkeley; Dr. John Hale, assistant professor of Computer 
Science at the University of Tulsa; Jeffrey I. Schiller, 
network manager at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Derek S. Broes, executive vice president of Worldwide 
Operations, Brilliant Digital Entertainment; Alan B. Davidson, 
associate director of the Center for Democracy and Technology; 
and Mari J. Frank, esq., Mari J. Frank, Esq. & Associates.
15. ``Protecting Our Most Valuable Residents: A Review of Reform 
        Efforts at the District of Columbia Child and Family Services 
        Agency,'' May 16, 2003; Serial No. 108-24
    a. Summary.--The committee held an oversight hearing to 
examine the status of the District of Columbia's Child and 
Family Services Agency [CFSA]. A series of highly publicized 
incidents last year, including the abuse of underage children 
placed in group homes, prompted the committee to request a GAO 
followup report to examine CFSA's performance measures and 
compliance with the Adoption and Safe Families Act [ASFA], the 
implementation of key foster care policies, and the 
relationship between the agency and the family court. The 
committee learned that CFSA is developing written plans to help 
it comply with some of the ASFA requirements and performance 
measures. The agency has developed numerous foster care 
policies and, in the case of face-to-face intake interviews, 
their standards even exceed accepted best practices. 
Furthermore, CFSA has lowered the number of underage children 
who are placed in group homes. The vital relationship between 
CFSA and the family court is improving and includes regular 
meetings between the heads of both organizations. However, the 
hearing also highlighted challenges that CFSA still faces such 
as (1) compliance with AFSA requirements regarding the 
termination of parental rights, permanency hearings, and 
notification to participants about hearings and reviews, (2) 
delay in establishing policies related to a child's permanency 
goals, (3) the licensing of foster homes, (4) ensuring social 
worker visitation, (5) ensuring parental visitation in 
reunification cases, (6) maintaining up-to-date information in 
the FACES automated case management system, and (7) the 
recruitment and retention of case workers, foster families, and 
adoptive families. The committee will follow-up on CFSA's 
progress in improving its performance in these areas.
    b. Witnesses.--Cornelia M. Ashby, Director of Education, 
Workforce and Income Security Issues, GAO; Dr. Olivia A. 
Golden, director of the D.C. Child and Family Services Agency; 
Judith W. Meltzer, deputy director of the Center for the Study 
of Social Policy; Anne Schneiders, esq., LISW, chairman of the 
Washington Chapter of the National Association of Counsel for 
Children; Jennifer Massengale, acting executive director of 
Safe Shores at the D.C. Children's Advocacy Center; Marilyn 
Egerton, deputy director of the Foster & Adoptive Parent 
Advocacy Center; and Judith Sandalow, executive director of the 
Children's Law Center of Washington, DC.
16. ``H.R. 2086, the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
        Reauthorization Act of 2003,'' May 22, 2003; Serial No. 108-27
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this legislative hearing was to 
provide committee members with an opportunity to discuss our 
national drug control policy and the administration's general 
views and priorities for reauthorization with the Director of 
the Office of National Drug Control Policy [ONDCP], John P. 
Walters. Specifically, the committee discussed H.R. 2086 the 
``Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization of 
2003,'' the purpose of which is to reauthorize ONDCP. It also 
renews congressional authorization for national programs 
administered by ONDCP, including the National Youth Anti-Drug 
Media Campaign and the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas 
[HIDTA] program. The committee also requested the Partnership 
for Drug Free America and the Office of Management and Budget 
to submit statements for the record regarding the National 
Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign and the High Intensity Drug 
Trafficking Areas program.
    b. Witnesses.--John P. Walters, Director, Office of 
National Drug Control Policy.
17. ``Potential Reduced Exposure/Reduced Risk Tobacco Products: An 
        Examination of the Possible Public Health Impact and Regulatory 
        Challenges,'' June 3, 2003; Serial No. 108-38
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to provide an 
overview of the effects of the use of reduced exposure/reduced-
risk tobacco products on the public health. The hearing also 
examined what type of regulatory structure would best ensure 
the development of products designed to provide tobacco users 
with less dangerous sources of nicotine than conventional 
cigarettes.
    Many questions remain regarding the value of these types of 
products to the public health, and much research still needs to 
be done. However, several witnesses did express the opinion 
that modified tobacco products have the potential, if used 
appropriately and regulated stringently, to significantly 
affect individual and public health by reducing the level of 
toxins in these products. As a result of this hearing, the 
committee continues to actively follow tobacco related issues.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Scott Leischow, Chief of the Tobacco 
Control Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH; Dr. 
Robert Wallace, vice-chairman of the Committee to Assess the 
Science Base for Tobacco Harm Reduction, Institute of Medicine, 
NAS; Lee Peeler, Deputy Director of the Bureau of Consumer 
Protection, FTC; Michael E. Szymanczyck, chairman and CEO of 
Phillip Morris USA, Inc.; Dorothy K. Hatsukami, professor at 
the University of Minnesota Medical School; Jack Henningfield, 
professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; 
Dr. Lynn T. Kozlowski, professor at the Pennsylvania State 
University; David T. Sweanor, senior legal counsel for the Non-
Smokers' Rights Association; Dr. David M. Burns, professor at 
the San Diego School of Medicine, University of California; and 
Richard H. Verheji, executive vice president of the U.S. 
Smokeless Tobacco Co.
18. ``Wasted Space, Wasted Dollars: Reforming Federal Real Property to 
        Meet 21st Century Needs,'' June 5, 2003; Serial No. 108-35
    a. Summary.--The committee held a hearing on the current 
condition of the Federal Government's real property holdings 
and the reforms that could be implemented to revitalize these 
extensive assets. The Federal Government spends literally 
millions of dollars each year just to maintain these extensive 
properties. Many Federal properties are in disrepair, lack up-
to-date technological infrastructure, are ill equipped for 
adequate security protection, and pose health and safety 
threats to workers and visitors alike. Other properties are no 
longer suitable to meet the Federal Government's changing 
mission. This situation has led the GAO to include vacant, 
underutilized, and deteriorating Federal real property on its 
High Risk Series. In March 2000, GAO reported that GSA has 
struggled over the years to meet the repair and alteration 
requirements identified at its buildings and that billions of 
dollars will be required to satisfy the repair and alteration 
needs at Federal buildings.
    The Federal Government is faced with a critical situation 
in Federal real property management. The degraded condition of 
so many Federal buildings has a tremendous negative impact on 
the government's ability to perform its critical mission. It 
has negative budget ramifications and results in negative 
workforce productivity. It adversely affects the health and 
well being of government workers and citizens. Action must be 
taken to stem this tide of deterioration of Federal buildings. 
Throwing more money at the problem is not the answer. Fiscal 
responsibility requires that the Federal Government look to 
alternatives, that Federal agencies be given property 
management tools, incentives to dispose of unneeded properties, 
and authority to enter into partnerships with the private 
sector.
    GSA and other agencies need broader management authority in 
order to efficiently and cost-effectively manage their 
properties. The provision found in H.R. 2548, ``The Federal 
Property Asset Management Reform Act of 2003,'' offers agencies 
the tools needed to stem this growing problem. The first step 
is to require an accurate and updated inventory of all Federal 
real property and to establish a Real Property Officer in each 
agency. Next, agencies must be given expanded authority to 
exchange or transfer property with other Federal agencies. GSA, 
acting on behalf of landholding, must be able to sublease 
unexpired portions of leased property, and outlease 
underutilized property. In addition, agencies should be 
permitted to retain the proceeds from disposition of excess 
real property, subject to appropriations, to meet the agency's 
capital asset needs.
    b. Witnesses.--Stephen A. Perry, Administrator of GSA; 
Linda M. Springer, Controller of the Office of Federal 
Financial Management, OMB; Bernard L. Ungar, Director of 
Physical Infrastructure Issues, GAO; D. Mark Catlett, Principal 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Management, Department of 
Veterans'' Affairs; Major General (Retired) Charles E. 
Williams, Director and COO of Overseas Buildings Operations, 
U.S. Department of State; and Brent W. Bitz, representing the 
Building Owners and Managers Association International.
19. ``Budget Autonomy for the District of Columbia: Restoring Trust in 
        our Nation's Capital,'' June 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-36
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to discuss 
options for providing budget autonomy for the District of 
Columbia. After issuing six consecutive balanced budgets, 
receiving clean, unqualified financial audits and building up a 
general surplus and cash reserves of over $1 billion, it is 
appropriate for Congress to consider relaxing some of its 
oversight controls over the Nation's Capital. During the 
hearing discussion centered on how to develop legislation that 
would allow the District of Columbia to submit its local budget 
to Congress for congressional review and consideration under an 
expedited review process that would ensure that the District 
can begin utilizing the next fiscal year's funds when the 
fiscal year begins. The committee sought from the witnesses 
their expectations of how they thought the expedited 
congressional consideration of the local budget would work.
    b. Witnesses.--Anthony Williams, Mayor of the District of 
Columbia Government; Linda Cropp, chairman of the District of 
Columbia Council; and Dr. Natwar Gandhi, chief financial 
officer of the District of Columbia Government.
20. ``The Next Step in the Investigation of the Use of Informants by 
        the Department of Justice: The Testimony of William Bulger,'' 
        June 19, 2003; Serial No. 108-41
    a. Summary.--During the 107th Congress, the committee 
conducted an investigation of the use of informants by the 
Department of Justice. The committee held a number of hearings 
and conducted hundreds of interviews.
    The next step of the committee's investigation was to 
receive testimony from William Bulger. The committee wanted 
information pertaining to Mr. Bulger's interaction with Federal 
law enforcement officials, the effect of the FBI's misuse of 
informants on public confidence in State government, and his 
knowledge of law enforcement's efforts to apprehend his 
fugitive brother, James ``Whitey'' Bulger.
    To obtain William Bulger's full cooperation, the committee 
conferred immunity on him in April 2003. When William Bulger 
appeared before the committee on December 6, 2002, he asserted 
his rights under the fifth amendment of the U.S. Constitution.
    b. Witnesses.--William Bulger, president of the University 
of Massachusetts.
21. ``H.R. 2556, School Choice in the District of Columbia: Opening 
        Doors for Parents and Students,'' June 24, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-37
    a. Summary.--The committee held this hearing to further 
explore options to provide greater school choice and 
scholarships for District of Columbia school children. 
Witnesses were asked to discuss how increasing school choice 
would benefit both children who participate in the program as 
well as parents who choose to keep their children in public 
schools in the District. Witnesses were also asked how a school 
choice program would improve overall education in the Nation's 
Capital.
    After hearing testimony from witnesses and further 
legislative research, Chairman Tom Davis, along with Education 
and the Workforce Committee Chairman John Boehner introduced 
H.R. 2556, legislation that would expand educational 
opportunities to D.C. students in under-performing elementary 
and secondary schools.
    b. Witnesses.--John A. Boehner, chairman of the Committee 
on Education and the Workforce; Rod Paige, Secretary of 
Education; and Anthony A. Williams, Mayor of the District of 
Columbia.
22. ``New Century, New Process: A Preview of Competitive Sourcing for 
        the 21st Century,'' June 26, 2003; Serial No. 108-42
    a. Summary.--The committee hosted this hearing to examine 
the revised Office of Management Budget [OMB] Circular A-76 
(the Circular). The Circular sets forth the policies and 
procedures Federal agencies must follow when conducting public-
private competitions to determine whether Federal or contractor 
employees should perform the government's commercial jobs. The 
revised Circular, which became effective on May 29, 2003, 
extensively reforms the existing competitive sourcing process. 
Specifically, the new rules establish tight deadlines for 
competitions, require competitions to be based on the 
government's Federal Acquisition Regulation [FAR], permit 
certain competitions to be evaluated using a ``best value'' 
standard, and mandate close monitoring of the winner's 
performance. At the hearing, the committee heard from the 
administration as well as representatives from contractor 
groups and Federal employee unions.
    b. Witnesses.--David M. Walker, Comptroller General of GAO; 
Angela Styles, Director of the Office of Federal Procurement 
Policy, OMB; Philip W. Grone, Principal Assistant Deputy Under 
Secretary of Defense (Installations and Environment); Scott J. 
Cameron, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Performance and 
Management, DOI; Bobby L. Harnage, Sr., national president of 
AFGE; Colleen M. Kelley, president of NTEU; Donald D. Dilks, 
president of the DDD Co.; and Stan Z. Soloway, president of 
PSC.
23. ``Smooth Sailing or an Impending Wreck? The Impact of New Visa and 
        Passport Requirements on Foreign Travel to the United States,'' 
        July 10, 2003; Serial No. 108-51
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to gain 
insight on the important security measures the State 
Department, the Department of Homeland Security, and the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation are implementing to protect the 
homeland from foreign visitors who would do us harm. The 
committee also learned about ways in which potential damage to 
American business and tourism from these measures can be 
avoided or mitigated.
    b. Witnesses.--Janice L. Jacobs, Deputy Assistant Secretary 
for Visa Services, U.S. State Department; Michael Cronin, 
Associate Commissioner for Immigration Policy and Programs at 
the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection, Department of 
Homeland Security; Robert J. Garrity, Jr., Acting Assistant 
Director of the Records Management Division, Federal Bureau of 
Investigation; John A. Marks, national chair of the Travel 
Industry Association of America; Randel K. Johnson, vice 
president of labor, Immigration and Employee Benefits, U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce; and Richard J. Pettler, partner at 
Fragomen, Del Rey, Bernsen & Loewy, P.C.
24. ``Cutting Out Waste, Fraud, Mismanagement, Overlap, and 
        Duplication: Exploring Ideas for Improving Federal 
        Reorganization, Management and Spending,'' July 16, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-69
    a. Summary.--The Conference Report accompanying the fiscal 
year 2004 budget resolution (House Report 108-71) requires 
House and Senate authorizing committees to identify means of 
eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse in mandatory spending 
programs (programs not subject to annual appropriations) in 
their jurisdictions. Committees are required to submit to their 
respective Budget Committee, findings as to the changes in law 
needed to eliminate specified amounts of waste, fraud, and 
abuse.
    The specified amount is based on 1 percent of the total 
level of mandatory spending under each committee's 
jurisdiction. The committee on Government Reform has been 
directed to find savings of $827 million in fiscal year 2004, 
$4.5 billion over the 2004-08 period, and $9.9 billion over the 
2004-13 period.
    The Office of Personnel Management [OPM] administers the 
majority of mandatory spending under the Committee on 
Government Reform's jurisdiction ($57 billion out of a total 
$78 billion in fiscal year 2004, according to the March 2003 
Congressional Budget Office baseline). Therefore, the purpose 
of this hearing is to receive testimony on the subject of 
waste, fraud, and abuse in mandatory spending programs 
administered by OPM.
    b. Witnesses.--Patrick E. McFarland, Inspector General of 
the Office of Personnel Management, accompanied by Dennis K. 
Black, Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Audits, Office of 
Personnel Management, and Norbert Vint, Assistant Inspector 
General for Investigations, Office of Personnel Management; and 
Paul L. Posner, Managing Director for Federal Budget and 
Intergovernmental Issues, Strategic Issues, General Accounting 
Office, accompanied by Ralph Block, Tax Group, General 
Accounting Office.
25. ``H.R. 2432, Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 2003,'' 
        July 22, 2003; Serial No. 108-68
    a. Summary.--The Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act 
of 2003 makes improvements in processes governing both 
paperwork and regulations. The goal of this legislation is to 
ensure additional paperwork reduction and regulatory relief to 
benefit average Americans. This bill also seeks to make 
information available to Congress that will allow Members to 
make intelligent decisions to decrease the heavy burden of 
Federal paperwork and regulations on America's small businesses 
and families.
    The Office of Management and Budget [OMB] estimates the 
Federal paperwork burden on the public at over 8 billion man-
hours. The Internal Revenue Service [IRS] accounts for over 80 
percent of the total. In its June 2003 task force report to 
implement the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act, OMB 
estimated that the cost imposed on the public for all 
government-required paperwork is $320 billion a year. This 
amount does not include the cost of the underlying regulations 
for which the paperwork is required.
    The bipartisan Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 
2003 was introduced by Representative Doug Ose (R-CA), chairman 
of the Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural Resources and 
Regulatory Affairs.
    b. Witnesses.--John D. Graham, Administrator of the Office 
of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and 
Budget; Thomas M. Sullivan, Chief Counsel for Advocacy, Small 
Business Administration; Fred L. Smith, Jr., president and 
founder of Competitive Enterprise Institute; Wendy Lee Gramm, 
director of the Regulatory Studies Program, Mercatus Center, 
George Mason University, and former Administrator of the Office 
of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB; John Sample, vice 
president of sales and marketing at Peake Printers, Inc. on 
behalf of the National Association of Manufacturers; Raymond 
Arth, president and CEO of Phoenix Products, Inc. and first 
vice chairman, National Small Business Association; and Lisa 
Heinzerling, professor of law at the Georgetown University Law 
Center.
26. ``The Thrift Savings Plan: Putting Customers First?,'' July 24, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-71
    a. Summary.--During the summer, the customer service 
provided to Federal employees by the Federal Retirement Thrift 
Investment Board [FRTIB] came into question as a consequence of 
the June 16, 2003 launch of the new Thrift Savings Plan [TSP] 
recordkeeping system, which is accessible to Federal employees 
and retirees through its internet site. The TSP is a retirement 
savings and investment plan available to all Federal employees 
and civilian members of the uniformed services. It was designed 
to be similar to 401(k) plans provided by many private sector 
employers. The TSP is a particularly important part of the 
Federal Employees Retirement System [FERS] because of the 
inadequacy to provide sufficient retirement income from the 
combination of Social Security, the FERS basic annuity and the 
government's automatic contribution of 1 percent of pay to the 
TSP. Each agency contributes a specific dollar amount or 
percentage of pay into employees' accounts, which is invested 
in five different funds.
    The committee received many complaints during the summer 
that the TSP Web site remained difficult to access months after 
its launch. Many participants found it impossible to make loan 
requests and contribution allocations. Numerous people 
discovered that their contribution allocations were delivered 
to the wrong funds or even a different person's account, and 
several even missed home purchases because loans were not 
processed. To make matters worse, many participants have 
complained that too often the TSP phone lines have been busy 
and attempts to send applications via U.S. mail to the TSP 
Service Office have also yielded no response. This oversight 
hearing aimed to determine how FRTIB can improve its service to 
TSP participants, and how participants should proceed when they 
have exhausted all communication options with the FRTIB.
    b. Witnesses.--Andrew Saul, chairman of FRTIB; Ted 
McPherson, CFO of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture; Alan Lebowitz, 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Program Operations, EBSA, U.S. 
Dept. of Labor; Michelle Corridon, co-chair, FMA-USDA 
Conference; and Keith Rauschenbach, VP, Eastern Division, TIAA-
CREF.
27. ``Black Men and Boys in the District of Columbia and Their Impact 
        on the Future of the Black Family,'' September 12, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-74
    a. Summary.--In an effort to address problems facing young 
African American men in the District of Columbia and other 
metropolitan areas, the committee examined social, economic, 
and health-related problems of African American men and boys. 
The purpose of the hearing was to examine issues the District 
of Columbia Commission on Black Men and Boys has been exploring 
and to help the Commission develop a final action plan to be 
carried out by the District's government, businesses, and 
community. Black men and boys in the District of Columbia and 
across the country face an unprecedented combination of serious 
social, economic, and health challenges.
    Witnesses concluded that there are countless African 
American men with the potential to become leaders of the 
District of Columbia and cities and States around the country--
but too few of them get to the point where they can exercise 
that potential. It is important for the community and the 
government to foster an environment in which they can succeed 
and positively influence the course of events pertinent to 
African Americans, and to us all.
    The Commission will produce an action plan that aims to be 
useful not only to Federal agencies, but also to local 
jurisdictions that may want to establish similar commissions. 
The goal of the Commission is to identify problems affecting 
African-Americans and build awareness about these issues.
    b. Witnesses.--George Starke, chairman of the D.C. Black 
Men and Boys Commission; Charles Mann, Good Samaritan 
Foundation; William Julius Wilson, Ph.D., Harvard University; 
Paul A. Quander, director of the D.C. Court Services and 
Offender Supervision Agency; Jay R. Cummings, Ph.D., Texas 
Southern University; and Robin Gwalthney, Rutgers University.
28. ``Holocaust Era Insurance Restitution After AIA v. Garamendi: Where 
        Do We Go From Here?'' September 16, 2003; Serial No. 108-79
    a. Summary.--This was the third hearing held by the 
committee to examine the ability of the Holocaust victims and 
their heirs to receive restitution on insurance policies 
obtained during the Holocaust era. At the previous hearings, 
witnesses complained about a low claims approval rate and poor 
management and oversight of the process by the International 
Commission on Holocaust-Era Insurance Claims [ICHEIC]. ICHEIC 
is a nonprofit organization comprised of representatives of 
Holocaust survivors, United States and European insurance 
regulators, the Israeli Government, and five insurance 
companies. At the hearing, the committee examined the impact of 
the recent Supreme Court decision in AIA v. Garamendi, which 
overturned a California State law proposing sanctions against 
insurance companies that fail to publish information about 
Holocaust-era policies. The committee also focused on whether 
ICHEIC is fulfilling its mission to address the insurance 
claims of Holocaust victims and their heirs and beneficiaries. 
Other issues that were discussed during the hearing included 
the cooperation of insurance companies to provide documentation 
of holocaust-era insurance policies, the role of the Congress 
in light of the recent Supreme Court decision, and needed 
improvements to ensure that ICHEIC is accountable to its 
stakeholders. The committee heard from the State Department, 
ICHEIC, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, 
and Holocaust survivors.
    b. Witnesses.--Ambassador Randolph M. Bell, Special Envoy 
for Holocaust Issues, U.S. Department of State; Lawrence S. 
Eagleburger, chairman of ICHEIC; Gregory V. Serio, NAIC; Gideon 
Taylor, executive VP of the Conference of Jewish Material 
Claims Against Germany; Israel Arbeiter, president of the 
American Association of Jewish Holocaust Survivors of Greater 
Boston; and Daniel Kaden, Ph.D., Holocaust Survivor Advocate.
29. ``What Happened to GPRA? A Retrospective Look at Government 
        Performance and Results,'' September 18, 2003; Serial No. 108-
        75
    a. Summary.--This hearing assessed the overall 
effectiveness of the Government Performance and Results Act of 
1993 in shifting the focus of government from process to 
results. In addition, the hearing provided Members an 
opportunity to discuss legislative options for improving the 
Results Act and integrating performance information more 
closely into the budget process.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Armey, former Majority Leader of the 
House of Representatives; Clay Johnson III, Deputy Director for 
Management at OMB; David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the 
GAO; and Patricia McGinnis of the Council for Excellence in 
Government.
30. ``Entrepreneurial Government Run Amok? A Review of FSS/FTS 
        Organizational and Management Challenges,'' October 2, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-80
    a. Summary.--The Committee on Government Reform conducted 
an oversight hearing on General Services Administration [GSA] 
efforts to restructure the organization of the Federal Supply 
Service [FSS] and Federal Technology Service [FTS], the impact 
of recent GSA Inspector General [IG] investigations of FTS 
contract mismanagement, and GSA's plans for a new government-
wide telecommunications program.
    The hearing built on the information on structural and 
management challenges faced by the two services developed in a 
hearing held last Congress by the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Procurement Policy and supplemented by General Accounting 
Office [GAO] work.
    The committee intends to conduct more hearings on FSS and 
FTS current structural challenges. The committee will continue 
its oversight of FTS's contract mismanagement in the second 
session.
    b. Witnesses.--Stephen Perry, Administrator of GSA; William 
T. Woods, Director of Acquisition and Sourcing Management, GAO; 
Larry Allen, executive vice president of the Coalition for 
Government Procurement; and Donald Scott, senior vice president 
of EDS, Inc., on behalf of the International Technology 
Association of America.
31. ``What if Isabel Met Tractor Man? A Post-Hurricane Reassessment of 
        Emergency Readiness in the Capital Region,'' October 3, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-89
    a. Summary.--This was a followup hearing to examine the 
state of emergency preparedness in the Nation's Capital. A 
multitude of local, State, and Federal agencies must coordinate 
their efforts to respond effectively to emergencies because the 
capital region faces unique challenges in its incidence 
preparation and response planning. The region's response to the 
Hurricane Isabel gave the parties involved in oversight and 
planning an opportunity to reassess the region's readiness for 
potential disasters of all types. The aftermath of Isabel 
created problems that contributed to public safety concerns. 
Hurricane Isabel tested many systems in the region--
particularly transportation, electrical power, and water 
systems. Witnesses were asked to share their experiences and 
lessons they learned in terms of overall emergency readiness in 
the capitol region. The committee is dedicated to make sure 
emergency plans are effective, coordinated, and communicated. 
The committee will continue to monitor emergency preparedness 
in the National Capital Region.
    b. Witnesses.--Eric Tolbert, Director of the Response 
Division at FEMA, DHS; John Marshall, Secretary of Public 
Safety, Commonwealth of Virginia; Dennis R. Schrader, director 
of the Governor's Office of Homeland Security, State of 
Maryland; Peter G. LaPorte, director of the Emergency 
Management Agency, District of Columbia; Richard White, CEO of 
WMATA; William J. Sim, president of Pepco; Admiral Jay Johnson, 
president and CEO of Dominion Delivery, Dominion Virginia 
Power; Jerry N. Johnson, general manager of the D.C. Water and 
Sewer Authority; Charlie C. Crowder, Jr., general manager of 
the Fairfax County Water Authority; and Leslie A. Violetter, 
treasurer of the Belle View Condominium Unit Owners Association 
Community.
32. ``Winning the Peace: Coalition Efforts to Restore Iraq,'' October 
        8, 2003; Serial No. 108-90
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to gain insight 
from the on-the-ground experience of the people performing 
reconstruction projects in Iraq as well as the viewpoints of 
Iraqi-Americans, scholars, and others who have recently 
observed the reconstruction process.
    b. Witnesses.--Les Brownlee, Acting Secretary of the Army; 
Philo Dibble, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, 
Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs; Tom Korologos, Senior Advisor 
to Ambassador L. Paul Bremer III, administrator of the 
Coalition Provisional Authority; Major General Carl Strock, 
U.S. Army, Director of Operations and Infrastructure, Coalition 
Provisional Authority; Bernie Kerik, former Director of the 
Interior, Coalition Provisional Authority; Alaa H. Haidari, 
Iraqi-American; Beate Sirota Gordon, Constitutional scholar; 
and Lamya Alarif, Iraqi-American.
33. ``Emerging from Isabel: A Review of FEMA's Preparation for and 
        Response to Affected Areas in the Hampton Roads Region,'' 
        October 10, 2003; Serial No. 108-92
    a. Summary.--The committee hosted two field hearings in 
Norfolk and Chesapeake, VA to investigate the ability of 
Federal agencies to coordinate with State governments to 
respond to the occurrence of a natural disaster or emergency. 
The Government Reform Committee has a vital interest in the 
government's response to the damage caused by Hurricane Isabel 
to the Hampton Roads region. It is critical that the Federal, 
State and local governments plan and act in a coordinated, 
efficient manner, not only in response to future natural 
disasters, but also to potential terrorist acts. The Federal 
Government, Commonwealth of Virginia, and local jurisdictions 
have taken a number of actions to improve coordination of 
emergency preparedness efforts. Since the private sector owns 
most of the critical infrastructure in the Hampton Roads region 
and across the country, it is important for the private and 
public sector to work closely to protect regional and national 
infrastructure.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory Cade, fire chief/emergency 
management coordinator for the city of Virginia Beach; Ron 
Keys, director of Emergency Services for the city of Norfolk; 
Curt Shaffer, director of the Plans, Analysis and Emergency 
Operations Branch, Police Division, city of Hampton; David 
Jolly, director of public safety for Dinwiddie County; Richard 
Childress, director of emergency management for Isle of Wight 
County; Steve Herbert, city manager/director of emergency 
services for the city of Suffolk; Steve Best, fire chief/
director of emergency operations for the city of Chesapeake; 
John Marshall, secretary of public safety, Commonwealth of 
Virginia; and Eric Tolbert, Director of the Response Division, 
Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security.
34. ``You've Got Mail--But is it Secure? An Examination of Internet 
        Vulnerabilities Affecting Businesses, Governments and Homes,'' 
        October 16, 2003; Serial No. 108-95
    a. Summary.--The committee examined the Internet's vulner-
abilities and the threat they pose to our national security, 
public health and safety, and economy. The committee saw a 
demonstration of the Slammer virus' effect in elapsed time and 
its estimated impact on individual computers and networks. A 
second presentation demonstrated the ease with which the 
average computer user can obtain names, Social Security numbers 
and other sensitive information through popular search engines 
like Google. Citizens, businesses, and State, local, and 
Federal governments rely on the Internet for a variety of 
activities: business transactions, acquisition of goods and 
services, and the collection and dissemination of information.
    Through the hearing the committee learned the Federal 
Government has taken important steps to respond to this growing 
cyber-threat. The Federal Computer Incident Response Center 
[FedCIRC] coordinates responses to cyber attacks (non-law 
enforcement), promoting incident reporting, and cross-agency 
sharing of data about common vulnerabilities. The National 
Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST] provides timely 
guidance to Federal agencies on securing networks, systems, and 
applications; recommends that agencies implement a patch 
management program, harden all hosts appropriately, deploy 
anti-virus software to detect and block malicious code, and 
configure the network perimeter to deny all traffic that is not 
necessary. Another critical mechanism used to enforce 
protection of Federal systems is the Federal Information 
Security Management Act [FISMA].
    However, due to its vast inventory and the vulnerabilities 
inherent in commercial software, the Federal Government will 
continue to be impacted by threats from the Internet. The 
Federal Government remains vulnerable to Internet-based 
attacks, because government networks often use the same 
hardware and software as the rest of the Nation. The Internet's 
vulnerabilities stem from its origin and evolution; it is a 
cobbled together collection of networks that was not originally 
designed to be the communications and commerce medium it is 
today. There are no protocols in place necessary to protect the 
security of Internet commerce and the structure itself is not 
capable of withstanding a major attack. For example, there are 
many ways for a thief to steal card numbers, personal 
passwords, and many other sensitive data that are commonly 
transmitted over the Internet. Cyber predators can even 
redirect Internet traffic to pose as one's bank Web site and 
gain access to accounts. To ensure that the Internet remains up 
and running, while decreasing the risk to national security and 
the economy, the actual infrastructure of the Internet must be 
repaired and updated. Furthermore, the public needs to be 
educated about virus activity, maintaining up-to-date software 
patches and firewalls to protect the first line of defense; 
their home computers.
    b. Witnesses.--Karen Evans, Administrator of the Office of 
Electronic Government, OMB; and Dr. F. Thomson Leighton, chief 
scientist of Akami Technologies, Inc.
35. ``Implementing the SAFETY Act: Advancing New Technologies for 
        Homeland Security,'' October 17, 2003; Serial No. 108-96
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to learn about 
the interim final rule promulgated by DHS and whether the rule 
mirrors the Congressional intent of the act. The committee 
hopes that this open discussion will result in effective 
implementation of the act.
    b. Witnesses.--Parney Albright, Assistant Secretary for 
Plans, Programs and Budgets, Department of Homeland Security; 
Harris N. Miller, president of the Information Technology 
Association of America; Stan Z. Soloway, president of the 
Professional Services Council; and John M. Clerici, esquire, on 
behalf of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
36. ``Open for Business: Ensuring Employee and Customer Safety at the 
        Former Brentwood Postal Facility,'' October 23, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-107
    a. Summary.--This was a follow-up to a hearing held on July 
26, 2002 examining the clean-up efforts of the USPS's Brentwood 
Processing and Distribution Center. The purpose of the hearing 
was to examine the status of efforts to reopen the U.S. Postal 
Service's center on Brentwood Road in Washington, DC, which 
closed on October 21, 2001 because of anthrax contamination. At 
the hearing, views regarding safety issues involved in the 
reopening of the building were obtained to ensure that the 
facility is clean and to make sure new security measures are 
taken to prevent contamination or another bio-terrorist attack. 
The decontamination of the Postal and Distribution Center is 
the largest biohazard clean up of a building with chloride 
dioxide, a corrosive gas.
    Congress appropriated $500 million to the U.S. Postal 
service to enable it to protect postal employees and customers 
from exposure to bio-hazardous material, to sanitize and screen 
mail, and to replace and repair facilities destroyed or damaged 
as a result of terrorist attacks. The goal of the U.S. Postal 
Service is to install equipment capable of detecting a bio-
threat at the point it enters the sorting process and then 
immediately sealing off any area where the threat is 
identified.
    Federal partners have been effectively working to open the 
postal facility. The facility has been deemed to be safe and 
the U.S. Postal Service will resume operations at the facility. 
The committee will continue to monitor the status of the postal 
facility.
    b. Witnesses.--Bernard L. Ungar, Director of Physical 
Infrastructure, GAO; R. Davis Layne, Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health; Thomas G. Day, 
vice president for Engineering, USPS; Jerry Lane, manager of 
Capital Metro Operations, USPS; Theodore J. Gordon, senior 
deputy director for environmental health science and 
regulation, District of Columbia; Richard Collins, assistant to 
the national president, National Postal Mail Handlers Union; 
and Myke Reid, legislative assistant director of the American 
Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO.
37. ``Serving the Underserved in the 21st Century: The Need for a 
        Stronger, More Responsive Public Health Service Commissioned 
        Corps,'' October 30, 2003; Serial No. 108-108
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
Department of Health and Human Services [HHS] proposed 
transformation of the U.S. Public Health Service's Commissioned 
Corps (PHS Commissioned Corps). By exploring the primary 
components of the transformation proposal, the hearing allowed 
the transformation process to be a more transparent one.
    Some of the witnesses expressed concerns about specific 
elements of the transformation plan. Although the hearing 
allowed for a constructive dialog of those concerns, all 
witnesses shared the same goal at the end of the day--a 
Commissioned Corps dedicated to, and prepared for, emerging 
21st century challenges and needs.
    Following the hearing, the committee has worked in a 
bipartisan and collaborative manner with HHS to help clarify 
certain points of the proposal and modify the draft plan to 
address the legitimate concerns raised at the hearing.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S., 
Surgeon General, U.S. Public Health Service, HHS; C. Everett 
Koop, M.D., Sc.D., Surgeon General, 1981-1989; Julius B. 
Richmond, M.D., Surgeon General, 1977-1981; and Captain Gerard 
M. Farrell, USN (Retired), Executive Director, Commissioned 
Officers Association of the U.S. Public Health Service.
38. ``Knives, Box Cutters, and Bleach: A Review of Passenger Screener 
        Training, Testing and Supervision,'' November 20, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-117
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to gain insight 
on the lessons TSA has learned as a result of the Nat Heatwole 
incident and the GAO and IG reviews. In addition, given the 
upcoming high-volume travel season, the committee hopes to 
discuss how TSA is preparing to process holiday travelers while 
ensuring aircraft security and passenger safety.
    b. Witnesses.--Mr. Stephen McHale, Deputy Administrator of 
the Transportation Security Administration; Ms. Cathleen A. 
Berrick, Acting Director for Homeland Security and Justice 
Issues, General Accounting Office; Mr. John DeMell, president 
of FirstLine Transportation Security; and Mr. James McNeil, 
Chief Executive Officer of McNeil Technologies Inc., 
accompanied by Mr. Mike Broida, site manager, Greater Rochester 
International Airport.
39. ``Avoiding `Financial Friendly Fire': A Review of Efforts to 
        Overcome Army National Guard Pay Problems,'' January 28, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-131
    a. Summary.--This hearing assessed the state of the 
Department of Defense's and the Department of the Army's 
efforts to correct the current inadequacies in payroll 
processes that are negatively affecting Army National Guard 
members mobilized on active duty.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory D. Kutz, Director, Financial 
Management and Assurance, General Accounting Office; Geoff 
Frank, Assistant Director, Financial Management and Assurance, 
General Accounting Office; John Ryan, Assistant Director, 
Office of Special Investigations, General Accounting Office; 
Ernest J. Gregory, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army, 
Financial Management and Comptroller; Patrick R. Shine, 
Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service; Colonel James 
L. Leonard, Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, 
Indianapolis; Lieutenant General Roger C. Shultz, Director, 
Army National Guard; Major Kenneth Chavez, Unit Commander, B 
Co., 5th Battalion, 19th Special Forces, Colorado Army National 
Guard.
40. ``Answering the Administration's Call for Postal Reform--Parts I, 
        II, and III'' January 28, February 5, and Febaruary 11, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-135
    a. Summary.--Recognizing the importance of modernizing the 
Nation's outdated postal laws, Chairman Davis appointed a 
Special Panel on Postal Reform and Oversight, on January 21, 
2004. Chaired by Mr. McHugh, with Mr. Danny Davis as its 
ranking minority member, the Panel was comprised of 11 
committee members and reported directly to Chairman Davis, 
making postal reform a full committee priority.
    In response to the President's call for postal reform in 
December 2003, the Special Panel immediately responded with 
three hearings in a 2 week period. On January 28, 2004, the 
Panel heard from the Treasury Department, the Postal Service, 
the Postal Rate Commission, and the General Accounting Office. 
On February 5, 2004, the Panel traveled to Chicago, IL, for a 
hearing in which the presidents of all postal unions and 
employee groups testified. The Panel held a final hearing on 
February 11, 2004 in which nine chief executives of 
competitors, commercial and nonprofit mailers, and postal 
reliant businesses testified.
    All witnesses stated support for the administration's broad 
principles on postal reform, and the hearings underscored that 
universal postal service is at risk and reform in urgently 
needed to minimize the danger of significant taxpayer bailout 
or dramatic postal rate increases. As the General Accounting 
Office emphasized, the Postal Service's current business model, 
formulated as it was in 1970, is no longer sustainable in the 
21st century.
    b. Witnesses.--January 28, 2004: Brian C. Roseboro, Acting 
Undersecretary for Domestic Finance, U.S. Department of the 
Treasury; David Fineman, chairman, U.S. Postal Service Board of 
Governors; John E. Potter, Postmaster General, U.S. Postal 
Service; George A. Omas, chairman, Postal Rate Commission; and 
David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the United States.
    February 5, 2004: William Burrus, president, American 
Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO; William H. Young, president, 
National Association of Letter Carriers; Dale A. Holton, 
president, National Rural Letter Carriers'' Association; John 
F. Hegarty, national president, National Postal Mail Handlers 
Union; Walter M. Olihovik, national president, National 
Association of Postmasters of the United States; Steve D. 
Lenoir, president, National League of Postmasters; and Vincent 
Palladino, president, National Association of Postal 
Supervisors.
    February 11, 2004: Fredrick W. Smith, chairman, president 
and CEO, FedEx Corp.; Ann S. Moore, chairman and CEO, Time, 
Inc.; Michael J. Critelli, chairman and CEO, Pitney Bowes, 
Inc.; William L. Davis, chairman, president and CEO, R.R. 
Donnelley; Nigel Morris, co-founder and vice-chairman, Capital 
One; Lester C. Hess, Jr., past national president and chairman 
of the Grand Lodge Advisory Committee, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks of the United States of America; 
Hamilton Davison, president and chief executive officer, 
Paramount Cards Inc.; Rebecca Jewett, vice chairman, Norm 
Thompson Outfitters, Inc.; and Gary M. Mulloy, chairman and 
CEO, ADVO, Inc.
41. ``A Review of This Year's Flu Season: Does Our Public Health System 
        Need a Shot in the Arm?'' February 12, 2004; Serial No. 108-143
    a. Summary.--The 2003-2004 influenza season raised the 
urgent question of whether the country is prepared to deal with 
a pandemic, be it a naturally occurring pandemic or one that 
results from a bioterrorist attack. The purpose of this hearing 
was to assess our public health system's response capabilities 
at the Federal, State, and local level. The hearing used the 
2003-2004 influenza season as a vehicle to review the adequacy 
of our public health infrastructure preparedness for an 
epidemic of a contagious disease. The committee examined what 
actions and planning procedures have been taken at Federal, 
State, and local levels to handle the annual influenza season 
and other communicable disease outbreaks.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Julie Gerberding, Director, Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director, 
National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases; Dr. 
Robert Stroube, Virginia Health Commissioner, Association of 
State and Territorial Health Officials; Ms. Karen N. Miller, 
president, National Association of Counties; Ms. Janet 
Heinrich, Director, Public Health Issues, U.S. General 
Accounting Office; Dr. Shelley A. Hearne, executive director, 
Trust for America's Health; Mr. Howard Pien, president and 
chief executive officer, Chiron Corp.; Dr. James Young, 
president, Research and Development, Medimmune, Inc.
42. ``Will `Networx' Work? A Review of Whether a Centralized Government 
        Telecom Plan Jibes With an Ever-Evolving Market,'' February 26, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-149
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted an oversight hearing 
on the General Services Administration's [GSA] proposed 
government-wide voice and data telecommunications program, 
Networx. This hearing gave Members an opportunity to gather 
information from industry and other stakeholders, including 
GSA, and determine whether GSA's proposed acquisition strategy, 
contained in its Request for Information, would be effective in 
an ever-evolving telecommunications environment.
    b. Witnesses.--Stephen Perry, Administrator, U.S. General 
Services Administration; Sandra Bates, Commissioner, Federal 
Technology Service, U.S. General Services Administration; Linda 
Koontz, Director, Information Management Issues, U.S. General 
Accounting Office; Mr. Drew Ladner, Chief Information Officer, 
U.S. Department of the Treasury; Mel Bryson, Director of 
Information Technology, Administrative Office of the U.S. 
Courts; Mr. Anthony D'Agata, vice president and general 
manager, Government Systems Division, Sprint; Mr. Quinten 
Johnson, regional vice president, SBC Federal Solutions; Mr. 
Kevin O'Hara, president and chief operating officer, Level 3 
Communications LLC; Mr. Jerry Hogge, senior vice president, 
Winstar Government Systems, LLC; Mr. David Page, vice 
president, Federal systems, BellSouth Business Systems; Mr. 
Louis M. Addeo, president, AT&T; Government Solutions; Ms. 
Shelley Murphy, president, Federal markets, Verizon; Mr. Jerry 
A. Edgerton, senior vice president, Government Markets, MCI.
43. ``America's New Welcome Mat: A Look at the Goals and Challenges of 
        the US-VISIT Program,'' March 4, 2004; Serial No. 108-154
    a. Summary.--This hearing continued this committee's 
ongoing investigation into the newly implemented entry-exit 
tracking program and in the changes made to policies for 
issuing visas as a result of the terrorist attacks of September 
11, 2001.
    b. Witnesses.--Asa Hutchinson, Under Secretary for Border 
and Transportation Security, Department of Homeland Security; 
Maura Harty, Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs, 
Department of State.
44. ``Public Confidence, Down the Drain: The Federal Role in Ensuring 
        Safe Drinking Water in the District of Columbia,'' March 5, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-161
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing reviewed the condition 
of lead contamination in the District of Columbia water supply 
and examined District and Federal agencies' responsibilities 
for drinking water safety in the District of Columbia, as well 
as the coordination among responsible agencies. The hearing 
also reviewed the effectiveness of applicable regulations in 
ensuring the safety of drinking water in the District of 
Columbia.
    b. Witnesses.--Benjamin H. Grumbles, Acting Assistant 
Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water; 
Donald S. Welch, Regional Administrator, Environmental 
Protection Agency Region III; Thomas P. Jacobus, P.E., general 
manager, Washington Aqueduct, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; 
Glenn S. Gerstell, chairman, District of Columbia Water and 
Sewer Authority; Erik Olson, senior attorney, Natural Resources 
Defense Council; Professor Ellen Silbergeld, Johns Hopkins 
Bloomberg School of Public Health; and Professor Marc Edwards, 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University.
45. ``The Complex Task of Coordinating Contracts Amid Chaos: The 
        Challenges of Rebuilding a Broken Iraq,'' March 11, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-213
    a. Summary.--This hearing was the second of four held to 
look at U.S. contracting activities in Iraq. Emergency 
supplemental appropriations bills for both fiscal year 2003 and 
fiscal year 2004 have provided more than $20 billion to rebuild 
postwar Iraq. Many Federal departments and agencies have 
already awarded or will soon award contracts for the 
sustainment and reconstruction efforts. The hearing provided 
Members with an understanding of how our acquisition system and 
the professionals that run it have responded to the challenges 
of contracting in a war zone.
    b. Witnesses.--Major General Carl A. Strock, Director of 
Civil Works, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Department of 
Defense, General Paul J. Kern, Commanding General, U.S. Army 
Material Command, U.S. Department of Defense, Major General 
Wade H. McManus, Jr. Commanding General, U.S. Army Field 
Support Command, U.S. Department of Defense, Mr. Lewis Lucke, 
Deputy Assistant Administrator, U.S. Agency for International 
Development, Dov S. Zakheim, Under Secretary of Defense--
Comptroller and Chief Financial Officer, U.S. Department of 
Defense, William H. Reed, Director, Defense Contract Audit 
Agency, U.S. Department of Defense and Rear Admiral David Nash 
(Retired) Director, Program Management Office, Coalition 
Provisional Authority.
46. ``A Prescription for Safety: The Need for H.R. 3880, the Internet 
        Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act,'' March 18, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-169
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on how to curb the 
growing sale of prescription drugs over the Internet without a 
valid prescription through new legislative means. Prescription 
drugs are well regulated in our country, by a system that 
includes pre-market approval by the FDA, State licensure of 
healthcare practitioners who are allowed to prescribe, and 
State oversight of pharmacists and pharmacies. However, as 
noted in previous committee hearings and recent media reports, 
the Internet creates an easy environment for illegitimate 
pharmacy Web sites to bypass traditional regulations and 
established safeguards for the sale of prescription drugs. 
First, the bill establishes disclosure standards for Internet 
pharmacies. These Web sites are required to display certain 
identifying information, including the name of the business, 
pharmacist, and physician associated with the Web site. Second, 
the bill prohibits Internet sites from selling or dispensing 
prescription drugs solely on the basis of an online 
questionnaire. Online medical evaluations do not meet 
reasonable standards of care and create risks for consumers. 
And third, the bill provides additional authority for States to 
take action against illegal Internet pharmacies. The bill 
allows State attorneys general to file an injunction in Federal 
court to shut down a rogue site across the country.
    b. Witnesses.--William Hubbard, Associate Commissioner for 
Policy, Planning, and Legislation, Food and Drug 
Administration; Dr. James Thompson, M.D., president and chief 
executive officer of the Federation of State Medical Boards; 
Dr. Carmen Catizone, executive director of the National 
Association of Boards of Pharmacy; Jerry Kilgore, attorney 
general of the State of Virginia, National Association of 
Attorneys General; Dr. Rebecca J. Patchin, trustee, American 
Medical Association; and John M. Rector, senior vice president 
of Governmental Affairs and general counsel, National Community 
Pharmacists Association.
47. ``The Postal Service in Crisis: A Joint Senate-House Hearing on 
        Principles for Meaningful Reform,'' March 23, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-171
    a. Summary.--The committee held a joint hearing with the 
Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs on the current state 
of the U.S. Postal Service, the need for reform, the 
recommendations of the President's Commission on the U.S. 
Postal Service, and the administration's December 2003 call for 
postal reform.
    b. Witnesses.--John W. Snow, U.S. Secretary of the 
Treasury, accompanied by Brian C. Roseboro, Acting 
Undersecretary for Domestic Finance, U.S. Department of the 
Treasury; David Fineman, chairman, U.S. Postal Service Board of 
Governors; John E. Potter, Postmaster General, U.S. Postal 
Service.
48. ``Maintaining a Level Playing Field for D.C. Graduates: Legislation 
        to Reauthorize the D.C. College Access Act,'' March 25, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-172
    a. Summary.--The committee held a hearing to discuss H.R. 
4012, the reauthorization of the District of Columbia College 
Access Reauthorization Act.
    b. Witnesses.--Anthony Williams, D.C. Mayor; Kelly 
Valentine, acting director, D.C. Tuition Assistance Program; 
Argelia Rodriguez, executive director, D.C. College Access 
Program; Brian Ford, former DCTAG recipient; Anthony Talley, 
director of guidance and counseling, Washington Math and 
Science Technology Public Charter High School.
49. ``Can Federal Agencies Function in the Wake of a Disaster? A Status 
        Report on Federal Agencies' Continuity of Operations Plans,'' 
        April 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-184
    a. Summary.--The hearing assessed the development and 
execution of continuity of operations [COOP] plans by Federal 
agencies and reviewed the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 
actions to improve oversight of agency COOP plans, particularly 
in view of the lack of uniformity of identification of critical 
functions by individual Federal agencies. The hearing also 
considered recommendations for improving COOP planning and 
implementation.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda D. Koontz, Director, Information 
Management Issues, General Accounting Office; Michael Brown, 
Under Secretary for Emergency Preparedness and Response 
Directorate, Department of Homeland Security; and John Kern, 
Director of Network Continuity, AT&T.;
50. ``Justice for All: A Review of the Operations of the District of 
        Columbia Superior Court,'' April 23, 2004; Serial No. 108-185
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted an oversight hearing 
to review the operations and case management of the D.C. 
Superior Court, with particular focus on the Family Court and 
the Probate Division. The committee's hearing included a review 
of (1) how the D.C. Superior Court sets its performance goals 
and measures the performance outcomes and (2) the court's 
fiscal management and general court operations, including the 
clearance of cases, monitoring the judges' caseloads, and the 
use of the IJIS system to facilitate access to databases in use 
at the court. Additionally, we reviewed the status of the D.C. 
Court site plan for Judiciary Square.
    b. Witnesses.--Rufus G. King III, chief judge, District of 
Columbia Superior Court; Lee F. Satterfield, presiding judge, 
Family Court, District of Columbia Superior Court; Jose M. 
Lopez, presiding judge, Probate Division, District of Columbia 
Superior Court; Cornelia M. Ashby, Director, Education, 
Workforce, and Income Security Issues, U.S. General Accounting 
Office; Elliott S. Hall, chairman, Council for Court 
Excellence; Rhonda Dahlman, esquire, Legal Counsel for the 
Elderly, American Association of Retired Persons; Nicholas 
Ward, esquire, former chairman, District of Columbia Bar 
Association Guardian and Conservator Committee; Michael F. 
Curtin, esquire, former Deputy Register of Wills, and member of 
the District of Columbia Bar.
51. ``Transforming the National Guard: Resourcing for Readiness,'' 
        April 29, 2004; Serial No. 108-188
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
emerging operational roles of the National Guard abroad and at 
home, and to measure the level of readiness the Guard possesses 
to meet those roles. Highlights included discussions of Federal 
statutory changes to Title 32 to reflect Guard operational 
missions in homeland defense and homeland security, resulting 
in language passed in DOD Authorization Conference on October 
8, 2004.
    b. Witnesses.--George E. Pataki, Governor of New York; Paul 
McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense; 
Thomas F. Hall, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve 
Affairs; Lieutenant General H. Stephen Blum, Chief, National 
Guard Bureau; Major General John A. Love, Special Assistant to 
Combatant Commander for National Guard Affairs, U.S. Northern 
Command; Janet A. St. Laurent, Director, Defense Capabilities 
and Management, General Accounting Office; Lieutenant General 
Wayne D. Marty, State Adjutant General of Texas; Major General 
Timothy J. Lowenberg, State Adjutant General of Washington; 
Major General Bruce Tuxill, State Adjutant General of Maryland.
52. ``Betting on Transparency: Toward Fairness and Integrity in the 
        Interior Department's Tribal Recognition Process,'' May 5, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-198
    a. Summary.--The hearing assessed the legal sufficiency and 
procedural fairness of the American Indian tribal recognition 
process administered by the--Interior Department's Bureau of 
Indian Affairs [BIA].--The hearing also examined the integrity, 
transparency and accountability of BIA tribal recognition 
decisions, particularly focusing on recent recognition actions 
on acknowledgement petitions filed by the Historical Eastern 
Pequot and Schaghticoke tribes in Connecticut. Members also 
considered recommendations to improve the BIA recognition 
process.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Blumenthal, attorney general, State 
of Connecticut; Theresa Rosier, Counselor to the Assistant 
Secretary for Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior; Earl 
E. Devaney, Inspector General, Department of the Interior; Mark 
D. Boughton, mayor, city of Danbury, CT; Rudy Marconi, first 
selectman, town of Ridgefield, CT; Nicholas Mullane, first 
selectman, town of North Stonington, CT; Marcia Flowers, 
chairwoman, tribal council, Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation; 
Jeffrey Benedict, Connecticut Alliance Against Casino 
Expansion; and Wayne R. Smith, former Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior.
53. ``What's the Hold Up? A Review of Security Clearance Backlog and 
        Reciprocity Issues Plaguing Today's Government and Private 
        Sector Workforce,'' May 6, 2004; Serial No. 108-199
    a. Summary.--This hearing continues the committee's review 
of personnel security clearance processing and reciprocity. The 
government mechanisms that investigate and adjudicate personnel 
security clearances have not kept pace with the necessity to 
process security clearance requests for industry personnel 
quickly and efficiently. Industry personnel face additional 
challenges once they have a security clearance from one agency 
but then need to work on a project on behalf of a different 
agency. Often agencies do not recognize clearances granted by 
their sister agencies, requiring industry personnel to go 
through the process yet again.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory C. Wilshusen, Acting Director, 
Defense Capabilities and Management, U.S. General Accounting 
Office; Stephen C. Benowitz, Associate Director, Division for 
Human Resources Products and Services, U.S. Office of Personnel 
Management; Heather Anderson, Acting Director of Security, 
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence; J. 
William Leonard, Director, Information Security Oversight 
Office; Sudhakar V. Shenoy, chairman, Northern Virginia 
Technology Council; Douglas Wagoner, chairman, Intelligence and 
Security Task Group, Information Technology Association of 
America; and L. Kenneth Johnson, president, Board of Directors, 
Northern Virginia Technology Council.
54. ``Harnessing Science: Advancing Care by Accelerating the Rate of 
        Cancer Clinical Trial Participation,'' May 13, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-189
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
status of efforts to bring innovative cancer treatments to 
public and to discuss how to change the face of cancer into a 
more chronic and treatable disease. The hearing considered the 
various factors contributing to low accrual of adult patients 
in cancer clinical trials and what efforts are being taken to 
obtain reasonable participation levels to better provide more 
treatment options to cancer patients.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Michaele Christian, Associate Director, 
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Cancer Therapy 
Evaluation Program, National Cancer Institute; Dr. Richard 
Pazdur, Director, Division of Oncology Drug Products, Center 
for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration; 
Dr. Andrew Pecora, chairman and director, the Cancer Center, 
Hackensack University Medical Center; Dr. Robert Comis, 
president and Chair, Coalition of National Cancer Cooperative 
Group; and Ms. Ellen Stovall, president and chief executive 
officer, National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship.
55. ``Redundancy and Duplication in Child Welfare Programs: A Case 
        Study on the Need for Executive Reorganization Authority,'' May 
        20, 2004; Serial No. 108-200
    a. Summary.--The committee held a hearing to identify and 
assess the varied Federal programs and agencies involved in 
promoting child welfare.
    b. Witnesses.--Tom DeLay, Majority Leader; Wade Horn, 
Assistant Secretary for Children and Families, HHS; Robert 
Flores, Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention, DOJ; Colien Hefferan, Administrator, 
Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service, 
Department of Agriculture.
56. ``Thirsty for Results: Lessons Learned from the District of 
        Columbia's Lead Contamination Experience,'' May 21, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-204
    a. Summary.--This hearing was a follow-up to the March 5, 
2004 hearing on the excessive levels of lead found in the 
District of Columbia water supply. This second hearing 
addressed the status of the lead problem in the District--its 
causes and the governmental responses. The hearing also focused 
on whether the existing Safe Drinking Water program is adequate 
to assure safe drinking water for the consuming public, both in 
the District of Columbia and across the nation, or whether 
additional measures, either legislative or regulatory, are 
necessary to accomplish that objective. Specifically, the 
hearing considered whether the situation in the District of 
Columbia is indicative of water systems throughout the country 
and whether the experience in the District of Columbia 
justifies changes to the Safe Drinking Water Act.
    b. Witnesses.--Benjamin H. Grumbles, Acting Assistant 
Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency Office of Water; 
Donald S. Welch, Regional Administrator, Environmental 
Protection Agency Region III; Thomas P. Jacobus, P.E., general 
manager, Washington Aqueduct, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; 
Jerry Johnson, general manager, District of Columbia Water and 
Sewer Authority; Paul Schwartz, Clean Water Action; Howard 
Neukrug, director, Office of Watersheds, Philadelphia Water 
Department, on behalf of the American Water Works Association; 
Angela Logomasini, director, Risk and Environmental Policy, 
Competitive Enterprise Institute; Scott Rubin, attorney-
consultant; and Katherine Funk, District of Columbia resident.
57. ``The Supersizing of Amercia: The Federal Government's Role in 
        Combating Obesity and Promoting Healthy Living,'' June 3, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-201
    a. Summary.--America's obesity rates have increased 
dramatically over the past two decades. Obesity will soon 
surpass smoking as the leading avoidable cause of death among 
Americans. In response, the Federal Government has been 
recently reexamining many of its health and nutrition policies. 
The committee scrutinized several government initiatives and 
assessed their impact. Members also heard testimony from 
leading private sector diet and nutrition experts to determine 
what the government can learn from their approaches.
    b. Witnesses.--Lester M. Crawford, Acting Commissioner, 
Food and Drug Administration; Lynn Swann, Chair, President's 
Council on Physical Fitness and Sports; Eric Hentges, Director, 
Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, Department of 
Agriculture; Arthur Agatston, cardiologist and author, the 
South Beach Diet; Stuart Trager, chairman, Atkins Physicians 
Council; G. Harvey Anderson, professor, Department of 
Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto; Susan Finn, Chair, 
American Council for Fitness and Nutrition; Bruce Silverglade, 
Director of Legal Affairs, Center for Science in the Public 
Interest.
58. ``Unprecedented Challenges: The Complex Task of Coordinating 
        Contracts Amid the Chaos and the Rebuilding of Iraq,'' June 15, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-213
    a. Summary.--This hearing was the third of four held to 
look at U.S. contracting activities in Iraq. The rebuilding of 
Iraq is an enormous task and the challenges the military and 
contractors faced in completing their respective missions were 
explored through testimony from contracting experts in DOD and 
the GAO. The Members heard testimony on additional challenges 
and the efforts made to manage, oversee and coordinate 
acquisition activities to ensure that taxpayer money is spent 
as effectively and efficiently as possible in a difficult 
wartime atmosphere.
    b. Witnesses.--David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States; William T. Woods, Director, Acquisition, and 
Sourcing Management, U.S. General Accounting Office; Neal P. 
Curtain, Director, Defense Capabilities and Management, U.S. 
General Accounting Office; Lawrence Lanziotta, Acting Under 
Secretary of Defense, Comptroller, U.S. Department of Defense; 
Deidre Lee, Director, Defense Procurement and Acquisition 
Policy, U.S. Department of Defense; Tina Ballard Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of the Army, (Policy and Procurement) U.S. 
Department of Defense; General Paul J. Kern, Commanding 
General, U.S. Army Material Command, U.S. Department of 
Defense; Brigadier General Robert Crear, Commanding Commander, 
Southwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. 
Department of Defense; William H. Reed, Director, Defense 
Contract Audit Agency, U.S. Department of Defense.
59. ``The War Against Drugs and Thugs: A Status Report on Plan Colombia 
        Successes and Remaining Challenges,'' June 17, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-214
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted an oversight hearing 
on Plan Colombia, an important component of U.S. foreign and 
counternarcotics policy. The hearing examined the U.S. 
Government's support and contributions to the progress being 
made in Colombia in fighting drug trafficking and international 
crime, and in improving economic and social conditions. 
Witnesses at the hearing provided an update on the current 
status of U.S.-Colombian programs, progress that has been made 
in recent years, and an assessment of remaining challenges in 
the war against narcoterrorism.
    b. Witnesses.--John P. Walters, Director, Office of 
National Drug Control Policy; Ambassador Luis Alberto Moreno, 
Ambassador to the U.S., Republic of Colombia; Roger F. Noriega, 
Assistant Secretary for Western Hemisphere Affairs, Department 
of State; Robert B. Charles, Assistant Secretary for 
International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Department 
of State; Thomas W. O'Connell, Assistant Secretary for Special 
Operations and Low-intensity Conflict, Department of Defense; 
Genera James T. Hill, Commander, U.S. Southern Command; Karen 
P. Tandy, Administrator, Drug Enforcement Administration; and 
Mr. Carlos Ploter, former Political Commandante, Revolutionary 
Armed Forces of Colombia [FARC].
60. ``Common Sense Justice for the Nation's Capital: An Examination of 
        Proposals to Give D.C. Residents Direct Representation,'' June 
        23, 2004; Serial No. 108-218
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the four legislative 
remedies addressing the District's lack of congressional 
representation offered during the 108th Congress; 
Representative Norton's H.R. 1285, Representative Rohrabacher's 
H.R. 3709, Representative Regula's H.R. 381, and Chairman 
Davis' H.R. 4640.
    b. Witnesses.--Representative Ralph Regula; Representative 
Dana Rohrabacher; Anthony A. Williams, Mayor of the District of 
Columbia; Linda W. Cropp, chairman, Council of the District of 
Columbia; Wade Henderson, executive director, Leadership 
Conference on Civil Rights; Kenneth Starr, former solicitor 
general of the United States and former judge, U.S. Court of 
Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit; Ilir Zherka, 
executive director, DC Vote; Walter Smith, executive director, 
the DC Appleseed Center for Law and Justice; Betsy W. Werronen, 
chairman, District of Columbia Republican Committee; and Ted 
Trabue, Greater Washington Board of Trade.
61. ``Target Washington: Coordinating Federal Homeland Security Efforts 
        with Local Jurisdictions in the National Capital Region,'' June 
        24, 2004; Serial No. 108-190
    a. Summary.--This hearing was the committee's third in our 
series examining the state of emergency preparedness in the 
National Capital Region. The hearing investigated the findings 
of a GAO report, conducted at the committee's request, which 
examined the budgets and spending plans of the Office of 
National Capital Region Coordination [ONCRC] and local 
jurisdictions to assess if the region is sufficiently funded 
and whether the funds are being used effectively and 
efficiently. In addition, the hearing provided Members an 
opportunity to discuss the need for better coordination and 
planning in the allocation of Federal homeland security 
funding.
    b. Witnesses.--Thomas Lockwood, Director, Office of 
National Capital Region Coordination, U.S. Department of 
Homeland Security; William O. Jenkins, Jr., Director, Homeland 
Security, U.S. General Accounting Office; George Foresman, 
assistant to the Governor for Commonwealth Preparedness, 
Commonwealth of Virginia; Dennis Schrader, director, Office of 
Homeland Security, State of Maryland; Barbara Childs-Pair, 
director, D.C. Emergency Management Agency, District of 
Columbia; Anthony H. Griffin, county executive, Fairfax County, 
VA; Mary Beth Michos, fire chief, Prince William County, VA; 
James H. Schwartz, director of emergency management, Arlington 
County, VA; Jacqueline F. Brown, chief administrative officer, 
Prince George's County, MD.
62. ``Beneficial or Critical: The Heightened Need for Telework 
        Opportunities in the Post-9/11 World,'' July 8, 2004; Serial 
        No. 108-210
    a. Summary.--This hearing assessed the status of 
telecommuting within the Federal workforce almost 4 years after 
the enactment of Section 359 of Public Law 106-346 (Public Law 
106-346), which requires 100 percent of eligible Federal 
teleworkers to be teleworking by April 2005. The hearing 
provided Members an opportunity to voice concerns about 
cultural hindrances, which appear to be the greatest barrier to 
implementation of telework in the Federal Government. Telework 
has gained greater attention over the last decade in both the 
public and private sectors as a human capital flexibility that 
offers many potential benefits to employers, employees, and 
society. In addition, the omnipresent threat of terrorist 
attacks on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001 makes the need 
urgent to implement effective telework programs in all areas of 
the Federal Government. The committee intended to ascertain 
what OPM, GSA, and the Congress must do to compel agencies to 
allow more employees to telework on a more frequent basis.
    b. Witnesses.--Kay Coles James, Director of Office of 
Personnel Management; Stephen Perry, Administrator of General 
Services Administration; Pamela Gardiner, Acting Inspector 
General for Tax Administration of the Department of Treasury; 
Kathleen Wheeler, Deputy Chief Human Capital Officer of the 
Office of Policy, Management and Budget at the Department of 
Interior; J. Christopher Mihm, Director for Strategic Issues at 
the Government Accountability Office; James Kane, president and 
chief executive officer of Software Productivity Consortium; 
Steve DuMont, vice president of Internet Business Solutions 
Group for Cisco Systems; Eric Richert, vice president for iWork 
Solutions Group, Sun Microsystems; and Carol Goldberg, former 
telework program manager of Fairfax County (VA) Government.
63. ``A Review of USDA's Expanded BSE Cattle Surveillance Program,'' 
        July 14, 2004; Serial No. 108-219
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held jointly with the 
Committee on Agriculture. It examined the then recently 
implemented USDA expanded BSE surveillance plan and USDA's 
efforts to detect the prevalence of BSE in the U.S. cattle 
population. The hearing was the culmination of an almost 7 
month investigation conducted by the committee on the discovery 
of a single cow with BSE in Washington State and the actions 
taken by USDA upon the discovery of the BSE-infected cow.
    b. Witnesses.--Ann Veneman, Secretary, Department of 
Agriculture, accompanied by Dr. Ron DeHaven, Administrator, 
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Department of 
Agriculture and Dr. Keith Collins, Chief Economist, Department 
of Agriculture; Phyllis K. Fong, Inspector General, Department 
of Agriculture, accompanied by Marlane Evans, Deputy Assistant 
Inspector General for Audit, Department of Agriculture and Mark 
Woods, Assistant Inspector General for Investigations, 
Department of Agriculture; Dr. Gary M. Weber, executive 
director, Regulatory Affairs, National Cattlemen's Beef 
Association; Jim Hodges, president, American Meat Institute 
Foundation; Dr. George M. Gray, executive director, Harvard 
Center for Risk Analysis; and Dr. Peter G. Lurie, deputy 
director, Public Citizen's Health Research Group.
64. ``Unprecedented Challenges: The Complex Task of Coordinating 
        Contracts Amid the Chaos and the Rebuilding of Iraq,'' July 22, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-213
    a. Summary.--This hearing was the final in a series held to 
look at U.S. contracting activities in Iraq. Because of the 
national attention of the rebuilding efforts in Iraq, the 
committee decided to hold a hearing on so called whistleblower 
accusations as it pertained to waste and abuse. The committees 
main interest was to determine if there was systematic cheating 
of U.S. taxpayers or if accusations were well intended but off 
the mark because of the complexity of the situation and the 
difficulties understanding the whole picture surrounding the 
contracting activities. The committee also heard from 
representatives of the primary contractor in Iraq, Kellogg, 
Brown and Root as well as an acquisition expert.
    b. Witnesses.--James Warren, former truck driver, Kellogg 
Brown and Root Corp.; David Wilson, former truck driver, 
Kellogg Brown and Root Corp.; Marie deYoung, former logistics 
specialist Kellogg Brown and Root Corp.; Alfred Neffgen, chief 
operation officer, Kellogg Brown and Root Corp. Government 
Operations, Americas Region; William Walter, director of 
government compliance, Kellogg Brown and Root Corp., Government 
Operations; Charles ``Stoney'' Cox, vice president and past 
restore Iraqi Oil [RIO] project director, Kellogg Brown and 
Root Corp., Government; Keith Richard, regional project 
manager, Theater Transportation Mission, LOGCAP III, Kellogg 
Brown and Root Corp., Government Operations; and Dr. Steven 
Kelman, Weatherhead professor of public management, Harvard 
Kennedy School of Government and former Director of the Office 
of Federal Procurement Policy, under the Clinton 
administration.
65. ``Moving from `Need to Know' to `Need to Share': A Review of the 9/
        11 Commission's Recommendations,'' August 3, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-217
    a. Summary.--The committee held a hearing to discuss and 
evaluate the findings of the 9/11 Commission Report.
    b. Witnesses.--Bob Kerrey, 9/11 Commission; John Lehman, 9/
11 Commission; Beverly Eckert, 9/11 victim family member; Sally 
Regenhard, 9/11 victim family member; Robin Weiner, 9/11 victim 
family member; David Walker, GAO Comptroller; Paul Light, 
director, Center for Public Service, the Brookings Institution; 
Dan Duff, VP of government affairs, APTA; Bob Collett, VP for 
engineering, AT&T; John McCarthy, executive director, Critical 
Infrastructure Protection Project; Jim Dempsey, executive 
director, Center for Democracy and Technology.
66. ``A Model for Success? Monitoring, Measuring and Managing the 
        Health of the Chesapeake Bay,'' August 20, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-221
    a. Summary.--This field hearing sought to determine the 
overall progress made in addressing the problem facing the 
Chesapeake Bay. It also responded to specific concerns raised 
by contemporary news reports that the Chesapeake Bay Program, 
the agency charged with cleaning up the bay, was exaggerating 
its progress.
    b. Witnesses.--Rebecca W. Hanmer, director, Chesapeake Bay 
Program; W. Tayloe Murphy, Jr., secretary of natural resources, 
Commonwealth of Virginia; Lowell H. Bahner, director, 
Chesapeake Bay Office, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration; Scott W. Phillips, Chesapeake Bay coordinator, 
U.S. Geological Survey; Ann Pesiri Swanson, executive director, 
Chesapeake Bay Commission; Theresa Pierno, vice president for 
environmental protection and restoration, Chesapeake Bay 
Foundation; Dr. Donald F. Boesch, president, University of 
Maryland Center for Environmental Science; Dr. Linda C. 
Schaffner, associate professor, Virginia Institute of Marine 
Science; Dr. Eileen E. Hofmann, professor, Department of Ocean, 
Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Old Dominion University; 
Frances W. Porter, executive director, Virginia Seafood 
Council; Mark Wallace, member, Easter Shore Waterman's 
Association.
67. ``Creating Secure Borders and Open Doors: A Review of DHS-State 
        Collaboration on U.S. Visa Policy,'' September 9, 2004; Serial 
        No. 108-240
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing reviewed the 
collaboration between the Department of Homeland Security and 
the Department of State with regard to formulating and 
implementing visa policy. The hearing covered improvements in 
Security Advisory Opinion processes and information sharing as 
well as challenges facing the Visa Security Officer program and 
the efficient utilization of biometric databases in making visa 
adjudications. In addition, the hearing provided Members the 
opportunity to voice their concerns about delays in granting 
visas for business and tourist visitors as well as students and 
scientists.
    b. Witnesses.--C. Stewart Verdery, Jr., Assistant Secretary 
for Border and Transportation Security Policy and Planning, 
Department of Homeland Security; Janice Jacobs, Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for Visa Services, Department of State; 
Clark Kent Ervin, Inspector General, Department of Homeland 
Security; and Jacquelyn L. Williams-Bridgers, Managing 
Director, International Affairs & Trade Team, Government 
Accountability Office.
68. ``Making Networx Work: An Examination of GSA's Continuing Efforts 
        to Create a Modern, Flexible and Affordable Government-wide 
        Telecommunications Program,'' September 15, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-223
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted a second oversight 
hearing on the General Services Administration's [GSA] proposed 
government-wide voice and data telecommunications program, 
Networx. Following the first hearing, GSA revised its strategy 
in response to comments from industry, agency customers, and 
this committee. Members had the opportunity to ask questions on 
these changes in strategy and determine whether the changes 
would prove effective in a dynamic telecommunications 
environment.
    b. Witnesses.--Sandra Bates, Commissioner, Federal 
Technology Service, U.S. General Services Administration; Linda 
Koontz, Director, Information Management Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Don Scott, senior vice-
president, EDS U.S. Government Solutions; Jerry Hogge, senior 
vice president, Level 3 Communications LLC; Robert Collet, vice 
president, Engineering, AT&T; Government Solutions; Shelly 
Murphy, president, Federal Markets, Verizon; Jerry A. Edgerton, 
senior vice president, Government Markets, MCI.
69. ``Intellectual Property Piracy: Are We Doing Enough to Protect U.S. 
        Innovation Abroad?'' September 23, 2004; Serial No. 108-225
    a. Summary.--The hearing explored intellectual property 
rights and the effectiveness of government and private sector 
efforts to protect U.S. interests from piracy abroad. The 
hearing focused on the rampant counterfeiting and piracy in 
foreign countries of software, movies, music, and designs for 
consumer and industrial products that are protected by U.S. 
intellectual property laws.
    b. Witnesses.--Congressman Rob Simmons, Connecticut; Loren 
Yager, Director, International Affairs and Trade, Government 
Accountability Office; Joe Papovich, senior vice president, 
International Recording Industry Association of America; John 
Malcolm, senior vice president for Worldwide Anti-piracy, 
Motion Picture Association of America; and Robert Cresanti, 
vice president for public policy, Business Software Alliance.
70. ``The Nation's Flu Shot Shortage: How it Happened and Where We Go 
        From Here?'' October 8, 2004; Serial No. 108-231
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted an oversight hearing 
regarding developments concerning the U.S. influenza vaccine 
supply. The hearing examined the contributing factors that led 
to the influenza vaccine shortage, the public health 
implications of the vaccine shortage, and the U.S. Government 
and vaccine manufacturer's plan to address this problem. 
Preparing for the annual flu season highlights the importance 
of strong cooperation between different health agencies and 
private sector companies at all levels. However, this year's 
vaccine shortage starkly underscores the need to ensure that 
adequate production capabilities exist. Witnesses discussed 
factors contributing to the 2004 flu vaccine shortage, how the 
government and vaccine manufacturers will respond to and manage 
this crisis, and the steps that must be taken to be prepared 
for next year's flu season.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, Director, Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, 
Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious 
Diseases; Dr. Lester M. Crawford, Acting Commissioner, Food and 
Drug Administration; Christine Grant, vice president for Public 
Policy and Government Affairs, Aventis Pasteur, Inc.; Dr. James 
Young, president, Research and Development, Medimmune, Inc.; 
and Dr. Robert Stroube, State health commissioner, Virginia 
Department of Health.
71. ``The Nation's Flu Shot Shortage: Where Are We Today and How 
        Prepared Are We for Tomorrow?'' November 17, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-246
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted a second oversight 
hearing regarding the U.S. influenza vaccine supply. This 
hearing was held in conjunction with the committee's ongoing 
investigation into the influenza vaccine shortage. The hearing 
examined the Federal Government's response to the vaccine 
shortage, how U.S. public health officials are coordinating 
with vaccine manufacturers to locate and adequately distribute 
available influenza vaccine to high risk populations, what 
steps are being taken in preparation for next year's influenza 
season, and what incentives can be provided to manufacturers to 
ensure a stable annual influenza vaccine supply.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Julie L. Gerberding, Director, Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, 
Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious 
Diseases; Dr. Lester M. Crawford, Acting Commissioner, Food and 
Drug Administration; Howard Pien, president, CEO, and chairman 
of the Board, Chiron Corp.; Kathleen Coelingh, senior director, 
regulatory and scientific affairs, Medimmune, Inc.; Dr. Robert 
Stroube, Virginia State health commissioner, Association of 
State and Territorial Health Officials; and Dr. Jerome Klein, 
professor of pediatrics, Boston University School of Medicine.
72. ``Stalking a Furtive Killer: A Review of the Federal Government's 
        Efforts to Combat Hepatitis C,'' December 14, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-275
    a. Summary.--The committee conducted an oversight hearing 
on the significant public health threat posed by hepatitis C. 
In 1998, the committee held a hearing on the need to improve 
the Nation's response to hepatitis C. At that hearing, several 
specific points of action were recommended. The December 14, 
2004 hearing examined what progress has been made in responding 
to the hepatitis C epidemic and identified areas for 
improvement.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Rima Khabbaz, M.D., Associate Director 
of Epidemiologic Science, National Center for Infectious 
Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. Jay 
Hoofnagle, M.D., Liver Disease Research Branch, Division of 
Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of 
Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of 
Health; Dr. Lawrence Deyton, MSPH, M.D., Chief Consultant, 
Public Health Strategic Healthcare Group, Department of 
Veterans Affairs; Dr. Michael Rudman, founder, Frederick County 
Hepatitis Clinic, Inc.; Ann Jesse, founding executive director, 
Hep C Connection; Captain John Niemiec, first vice president, 
Fairfax County Professional Fire Fighters and Paramedics; and 
Erika Stein, Robinson Secondary School DECA student.

                  II. Full Committee Business Meetings

    February 13, 2003--Organizational Meeting: Approved 
committee rules, established subcommittees, oversight plans, 
and the committee's budget views and estimates, all by voice 
vote.
    March 6, 2003--Approved H.R. 735 as amended by voice vote.
    March 20, 2003--Approved H.R. 1346 as amended by voice 
vote.
    March 27, 2003--Approved Recommendations to the House 
regarding Oversight Plans for all House Committees by voice 
vote.
    April 9, 2003--Approved Immunity Vote for William Bulger 
and Francis Salemme by roll call votes.
    May 7, 2003--Approved H.R. 1836 as amended by roll call 
vote and H.R. 1837 as amended by roll call vote.
    May 22, 2003--Approved H.R. 2122 as amended, H.R. 2087 as 
amended, H. Con. Res. 162, H.R. 1465, H.R. 1610, H.R. 2030, H. 
Res. 159, and H. Res. 195 all by voice vote.
    June 5, 2003--Approved H.R. 2086 as amended by voice vote 
and S. 858 by voice vote.
    June 19, 2003--Approved ``A Citizen's Guide on Using the 
Freedom of Information Act and the Privacy Act of 1974 to 
Request Government Records,'' H.R. 1761, H.R. 2249, H.R. 2328, 
H.R. 2396, H. Con. Res. 6, H. Con. Res 208 and H. Res. 240 all 
by voice vote.
    July 10, 2003--Approved H. Res. 303, S. 867, H.R. 2438, and 
H. Con. Res. 230 all by unanimous consent. Also, H.R. 2556, as 
amended by roll call vote.
    July 17, 2003--Approved H.R. 2548 as amended by voice vote 
and H.R. 2746 by voice vote.
    July 24, 2003--Approved H.R. 2309, H. Con. Res. 235 and H. 
Res. 315 all by voice vote.
    September 12, 2003--Approved H.R. 1882, H.R. 1883, H.R. 
2452, H.R. 2826, H. Con. Res. 71, H. Con. Res. 262, H. Res. 
262, H. Res. 306 and H. Res. 352 all by unanimous consent.
    September 18, 2003--Approved H.R. 2075, H.R. 2533, H.R. 
3011 H.R. 3068, H. Con. Res. 106, H. Con. Res. 176, H. Con. 
Res. 270 and H. Res. 357 all by unanimous consent.
    September 25, 2003--Approved H. Con. Res. 273 by unanimous 
consent and H.R. 1151, H.R. 1231, H.R. 3054, and H.R. 3159 all 
by voice vote.
    October 2, 2003--Approved H.J. Res. 70 and H. Con. Res. 264 
both by unanimous consent.
    October 8, 2003--Approved H.R. 2744, H.R. 3166, H.R. 3175, 
H.R. 3185 and S. 1591 all by unanimous consent.
    November 6, 2003--Approved H.R. 2130, H.R. 3300, H.R. 3353, 
H. Con. Res. 69, H. Con. Res. 299, H. Con. Res. 313, H. Res. 
274, H. Res. 373 as amended, S. 1590 and S. 1718 all by 
unanimous consent. Also, the committee approved H.R. 2751 as 
amended and H.R. 2886 as amended by voice vote.
    November 20, 2003--Approved H.R. 3478 by voice vote and two 
reports: ``Everything Secret Degenerates: The FBI's Use of 
Murderers as Informants,'' and ``Efforts to Rightsize the U.S. 
Presence Abroad Lack Urgency and,''Momentum both by voice vote.
    February 12, 2004--Approved H.R. 3536, H.R. 3537, H.R. 
3538, H.R. 3690, H.R. 3769, H. Con. Res. 287, H. Res. 392, H. 
Res. 439 and H. Res. 519 all by unanimous consent. Also, 
Salemme transcript released to public by unanimous consent.
    February 26, 2004--Approved H.R. 3733, H. Con. Res. 328, as 
amended, H. Res. 433, H. Res. 475 and H.J. Res. 87 all by 
unanimous consent. Also, committee budget views and estimates 
by voice vote and H.R. 3797 by voice vote.
    March 4, 2004--Approved H.R. 3059, H.R. 3723 and H.R. 3855 
all by unanimous consent.
    March 18, 2004--Approved the Resolution on subcommittee 
assignments by unanimous consent and H.R. 3917 by unanimous 
consent.
    April 1, 2004--Approved H.R. 4012, H.R. 3751 as amended, 
H.R. 3737 as amended all by voice vote. Also, the committee 
approved H.R. 1822, H.R. 3939, H.R. 3942, H.R. 4037, H. Res. 
399, H. Res. 578, and S. Con. Res. 97, all by unanimous 
consent.
    May 6, 2004--Approved H.R. 3740, H.R. 4176, H. Con. Res. 
295, H. Res. 613 and H. Res. 622 all by unanimous consent. 
Also, the committee approved H.R. 4259 by voice vote.
    May 12, 2004--Approved H. Res. 612 as amended by unanimous 
consent. Also, H.R. 4302 and H.R. 2432 as amended both by voice 
vote. H.R. 4341 was approved by a roll call vote.
    June 3, 2004--Approved H.R. 3826 as amended by voice vote 
and H.R. 4222, H. Con. Res. 257 and H. Res. 653 all by 
unanimous consent.
    June 23, 2004--Approved consulting contract by voice vote.
    June 24, 2004--Approved S. 129 as amended by voice vote and 
H.R. 3340, H.R. 4327 and H.R. 4427 all by unanimous consent.
    July 8, 2004--Approved H.R. 4380, H.R. 4381, H.R. 4442 H. 
Res. 646, H. Res. 684 and H. Res. 702 all by unanimous consent.
    July 21, 2004--Approved minority subcommittee assignments 
for Ms. McCollum, H.R. 4556, H.R. 4618, H.R. 4632, H. Res. 695, 
H. Res. 717 and S. 2415 all by unanimous consent. H.R. 4324 and 
H.R. 4657 by voice vote. Also, H.R. 2449 as amended and H.R. 
2528 as amended by voice vote.
    September 15, 2004--Approved H.R. 480, H.R. 4046, H.R. 
4807, H.R. 4847, H.R. 4968, H.R. 5027, H.R. 5039, H. Con. Res. 
461, H. Con. Res. 464, H. Con. Res. 489, H. Res. 641, H. 
Res.761 and H. Res. 772 all by unanimous consent. Also, the 
committee approved the minority-consulting contract by voice 
vote.
    September 29, 2004--Approved H.R. 3281 as amended by voice 
vote and H.R. 10 as amended by voice vote.
                PART FOUR. SUBCOMMITTEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

         SUBCOMMITTEE ON CIVIL SERVICE AND AGENCY ORGANIZATION

                              Legislation

1. H.R. 978, To amend chapter 84 of title 5, United States Code, to 
        provide that certain Federal annuity computations are adjusted 
        by 1 percentage point relating to periods of receiving 
        disability payments, and for other purposes
    Inspired by the saga of Louise Kurtz, a Stafford County, 
VA, woman who was severely injured in the terrorist attack 
against the Pentagon, this law applies to Federal Employees 
Retirement System employees who are disabled for more than 2 
months and later return to Federal service. While disabled, 
employees are unable to contribute to their Thrift Savings Plan 
accounts or to Social Security--which represent a substantial 
portion of a FERS employee's pension upon retirement. This law 
makes up for that shortfall by doubling an employee's defined 
benefit under FERS--which is usually calculated at 1 percent 
per year of service--for the duration of the disability, 
thereby increasing the employee's Government-funded slice of 
his or her pension to the same degree that the employee-funded 
portions were affected. Passed the Congress on September 11, 
2003, and became Public Law 108-92 on October 3, 2003.
2. H.R. 1151, To provide that transit pass transportation fringe 
        benefits be made available to all qualified Federal employees 
        in the National Capital Region; to allow passenger carriers 
        which are owned or leased by the Government to be used to 
        transport Government employees between their place of 
        employment and mass transit facilities, and for other purposes
    This legislation, sponsored by Representative Jim Moran (D-
VA) requires that mass transit fringe benefits be made 
available to all eligible employees in the National Capital 
Region. A Clinton-era Executive order authorized agencies in 
and around the Capital to offer transit benefits to their 
employees, but not all Federal agencies in the Washington, DC, 
area have implemented transit benefit programs yet. The second 
part of this legislation would permit Federal agencies to use 
Government vehicles to transport employees to and from subway, 
bus and other mass-transit facilities--something they are not 
allowed to do under current law. The subcommittee marked up 
this legislation on July 16th, and the full committee ordered 
it reported on September 25th.
3. H.R. 1231, To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to allow 
        Federal civilian and military retirees to pay health insurance 
        premiums on a pretax basis and to allow a deduction for TRICARE 
        supplemental premiums
    Government Reform Committee Chairman Tom Davis introduced 
this bill, which would extend premium conversion (the ability 
to pay health care premiums with pre-tax money) to Federal and 
military retirees and to allow active duty military personnel 
to take a below-the-line income tax deduction to pay for 
TRICARE supplemental premiums. The subcommittee held a hearing 
on this long-standing proposal--the first congressional hearing 
on the issue since it was first proposed four years earlier--
and marked up the legislation on July 16th, and the full 
committee ordered it reported out on September 25th. However, 
H.R. 1231 was also referred to the House Ways and Means and 
House Armed Services committees, where no action was taken.
4. H.R. 1588 (H.R. 1836), National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
        Year 2004
    Included in the Department of Defense authorization 
proposal in 2003 was a new authority to create the National 
Security Personnel System. Generally modeled after the 
management flexibilities granted to the Department of Homeland 
Security upon its creation in 2002, the NSPS authorization 
allows the Department to create a pay-for-performance system 
for all 700,000 civilian employees, establish a new employees 
appeals process, streamline the collective bargaining process, 
employ retirees with no reduction in either their salary or 
their Civil Service pension, and hire outside experts without 
review from the Office of Personnel Management. The legislation 
also includes a provision raising the pay cap for Senior 
Executive Service employees, who are the Government's senior 
managers and leaders. Passed the Congress on November 12, 2003, 
and became Public Law 108-136 on November 24, 2003.
5. H.R. 1602, Senior Executive Service Reform Act of 2003
    The key objective of this bill was to raise the cap of 
Senior Executive Service pay from executive level III to 
executive level II. This proposal was incorporated into H.R. 
1588. (See discussion of H.R. 3737, below.)
6. H.R. 1603, Presidential Appointments Improvement Act of 2003
    This proposal would amend the Ethics in Government Act of 
1978 (5 U.S.C. App.) to streamline the financial disclosure 
process for executive branch employees. The financial 
disclosure reporting requirements would be streamlined by 
reducing the amount of detail a high-level executive branch 
nominee or employee must report. The proposal provides a newly 
elected President the ability to submit all nominations to the 
Senate for all Presidential appointments as expeditiously as 
possible after taking office. The bill also requires agencies 
to examine, with an eye to reducing, the number of Presidential 
appointed positions given that part of the reason for lengthy 
delays is the dramatic increase in the number of political 
appointees in the executive branch--a reported rise from 451 in 
1960 to 3,361 in 2000.
7. H.R. 2743, the Government Accountability and Streamlining Act of 
        2003
    This proposal sought to prevent the creation of redundant 
Government programs. The proposal would have required the 
Comptroller General of the United States to determine whether 
any proposed legislation in the House or Senate creates any new 
``Federal entities, programs or functions'' that are 
duplicative of any existing Federal program. Under the 
proposal, the Comptroller General would prepare statements for 
bills approved by any committee or subcommittee of the House or 
Senate--similar to how the Congressional Budget Office 
``scores'' a bill to determine its budgetary impact prior to 
consideration on the House or Senate floor.
8. H.R. 2751, GAO Human Capital Reform Act of 2004
    This legislation gives the GAO additional management 
flexibilities, such as: giving the Comptroller General and GAO 
managers more authority to reward employees for good work, 
while also removing the guarantee of annual pay raises for 
employees who do not reach minimum performance standards; 
making permanent the GAO's early retirement and buyout 
authority; allowing the Comptroller General to increase annual 
leave benefits for employees with less than 3 years experience; 
expanding GAO's ability to reimburse employees for some 
relocation expenses; and authorizing an employee exchange 
program with the private sector. The legislation also changes 
the name of the organization from the General Accounting Office 
to the Government Accountability Office, which better reflects 
the agency's modern-day mission. Passed the Congress on June 
24, 2004, and became Public Law 108-271 on July 7, 2004.
9. H.R. 3205, Federal Law Enforcement Pay and Benefits Parity Act of 
        2003
    Several pieces of legislation (H.R. 466; H.R. 1676; H.R. 
2260; H.R. 2442 among them) were introduced in the House to 
deal with the issue of law enforcement compensation. Many 
Federal law enforcement officers believe they are grossly 
underpaid, in comparison to their State and local colleagues, 
and believe that this disparity is not only hurting recruitment 
efforts but also forcing current officers to consider leaving 
Federal service. In addition, many other Federal employees who 
work in or with law enforcement agencies but who are not 
classified as ``law enforcement officers'' (LEOs, as they are 
commonly known, receive enhanced retirement benefits) believe 
they are wrongly excluded from that designation.
    Chairwoman Jo Ann Davis, together with the Subcommittee on 
Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources, held a July 
23, 2003, hearing to examine this issue, and subcommittee staff 
traveled to California to meet with dozens of law enforcement 
agents (both with and without the ``LEO'' designation) who work 
in high-cost areas, such as Los Angeles, San Diego and San 
Francisco. These meetings included FBI, Immigration and 
Customs, and Border Patrol employees, among others. Following 
the hearing, Chairwoman Davis concluded that this issue needed 
further study. As a result, she and Senator Voinovich 
introduced companion pieces of legislation requiring the Office 
of Personnel Management to study the issue of law enforcement 
compensation. Senator Voinovich's bill, S. 1683, passed the 
Congress on December 8, 2003 and became Public Law 108-196 on 
December 19, 2003.
    In response, OPM issued a report on July 15, 2004, 
entitled, ``Federal Law Enforcement Pay and Benefits,'' 
detailing three critical areas in need of reform: (1) 
retirement benefits, (2) classification and basic pay, and (3) 
premium pay. OPM took the position that Congress should enact 
legislation authorizing the Office of Personnel Management to 
issue regulations that would eliminate unwarranted disparities 
in these areas while providing appropriate pay and benefits for 
employees in law enforcement occupations. While stakeholder 
groups testifying at the hearing objected to this approach, the 
subcommittee staff is committed to working with OPM and 
stakeholder groups to find a solution that can be introduced as 
legislation in the 109th Congress.
10. H.R. 3737, Pay Compression Relief Act of 2004
    This legislation addressed the problem of pay compression 
affecting groups of employees whose pay is capped at executive 
level III, and who were not addressed when Congress enacted 
Senior Executive Service pay reform legislation in H.R. 1588. 
H.R. 3737 would raise the current cap on pay that results in 
pay compression of pay rates of higher-level administrative law 
judges, members of contract appeals boards, and certain senior 
level employees outside the Senior Executive Service. The rates 
of basic pay for these employees would be set administratively, 
subject to a new, higher limit set in law, thus allowing the 
establishment of salaries that reflect differences in position 
responsibility. The subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 3737 on 
February 10, 2004, and marked up the bill on March 17; the 
Government Reform Committee marked up the bill and ordered it 
reported as amended to the House of Representatives on April 1.
11. H.R. 3751, to require that the Office of Personnel Management study 
        current practices under which dental, vision, and hearing 
        benefits are made available to Federal employees, annuitants, 
        and other classes of individuals, and to require that the 
        Office also present options and recommendations relating to how 
        additional dental, vision, and hearing benefits could be made 
        so available
    This legislation focused on the pressing need of the 
Government to determine the best way to make available dental 
and vision insurance to Federal employees and retirees, 
including qualified relatives and other appropriate classes of 
individuals. The bill would have begun a collaborative process 
by which Congress and the Office of Personnel Management can 
develop a solution to the meager dental and vision benefits 
currently available through the Federal Employees Health 
Benefits Program. H.R. 3751 required OPM to study and evaluate 
options under which dental and vision benefits could be made 
available to Federal employees--either as part of the existing 
FEHBP plans, as a stand-alone option, or as a hybrid of the 
two. The legislation allowed OPM to assess whether the benefits 
should be contracted for on a regional or national basis and 
whether any regular Government contributions or allocation for 
start-up costs might be necessary or appropriate. The 
legislation establishes a June 30, 2004 deadline for the Office 
of Personnel Management to report its analysis to Congress.
    The subcommittee held a hearing on the bill on February 24, 
2004, and marked up the bill on March 17; the Government Reform 
Committee approved the bill and ordered it reported as amended 
on April 1 to the House of Representatives, where it was passed 
on June 21. The Senate took no action on H.R. 3751. However, S. 
2657, the ``Federal Employee Dental and Vision Benefits 
Enhancement Act of 2004,'' and a companion bill in the House 
(H.R. 4844), introduced on July 14 and 15, 2004, respectively, 
would authorize OPM to establish dental and vision insurance 
coverage programs for Federal employees. S. 2657, introduced by 
Senator Susan Collins, was approved by the Senate Governmental 
Affairs Committee on October 8. A related bill, H.R. 5295, 
which would similarly authorize OPM and also require a study 
concerning the provision of hearing insurance coverage, was 
introduced by Representative Tim Murphy of the subcommittee, 
and this legislation passed the House of Representatives on 
October 8. S. 2657 passed the Congress on December 6, 2004, and 
is likely to be signed into law by the President.
12. H.R. 4324, to amend title 5, United States Code, to eliminate the 
        provisions limiting certain election opportunities available to 
        individuals participating in the Thrift Savings Plan, and for 
        other purposes
    This legislation would amend the law governing the Thrift 
Savings Plan to allow plan participants to elect or modify 
their contributions in any pay period rather than being 
restricted to open season periods. The bill was introduced on 
May 11, 2004, and on July 21 it was marked up and reported out 
of the Government Reform Committee to the House of 
Representatives. H.r. 4324 passed the Congress as amended on 
December 7, 2004, and is likely to be signed into law by the 
President.
13. H.R. 5295 (H.R. 4844): Federal Employees Dental and Vision Benefits 
        Enhancement Act of 2004--See discussion of H.R. 3751, above.
14. S. 129 (H.R. 1601), Federal Workforce Flexibility Act of 2004
    On April 3, 2003, H.R. 1601 was introduced as a companion 
bill to S. 129, which had been introduced on January 9, 2003. 
The subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 1601 (S. 129) on 
February 11, 2004 and approved a manager's amendment of S. 129 
on May 18. This action was followed by approval of the 
Government Reform Committee on June 24 and passage, with 
amendments, of S. 129 by the House of Representatives on 
October 6. The Senate then approved the House-passed version of 
S. 129 on October 11. The President signed the bill on October 
30, at which time it became Public Law 108-411.
    The Federal Workforce Flexibility Act of 2004 will 
modernize and update personnel flexibilities and authorities 
available to agencies of the Federal Government. The 
legislation covers several topics, as follows:
  Recruitment, Retention and Relocation Bonuses: 
Federal agencies will have enhanced flexibility, within their 
budgets, to pay bonuses of up to 100 percent of pay (over a 4-
year period) to help agencies recruit, retain and relocate 
employees in the Civil Service on a targeted basis.
  Streamlined Critical Pay Authority: The Office of 
Personnel Management will be empowered to revitalize an 
underused authority to pay employees in certain critical and 
difficult-to-fill Government positions up to the salary of a 
Cabinet member.
  Agency Training: Federal agencies will be required to 
link agency training programs with their performance plans and 
strategic goals, establish a comprehensive management 
succession program, and provide special training to help 
managers deal with employees whose performance is unacceptable.
  Annual Leave: To help recruit qualified executives, 
members of the Senior Executive Service hired from the private 
sector will receive the same vacation benefits as those hired 
internally, and other newly-hired Federal employees with 
qualifying non-Federal experience will receive credit for that 
experience in determining the amount of their vacation time.
  Compensatory Time for Travel: In situations where 
Federal employees who must travel outside normal working hours 
currently receive no compensation, the law will provide 
compensatory time off for their travel time.
  Pay Administration: Several corrections to streamline 
and rationalize the laws on pay-setting in unusual situations--
where employees change from one location to another or from one 
pay schedule to another--will be made. No employee's pay will 
be reduced as a result of these corrections.
15. S. 926 (H.R. 3080), Federal Employee Student Loan Assistance Act
    S. 926 permits agencies to pay up to $10,000 a year for 
loan relief, up from $6,000 previously, and up to a lifetime 
maximum of $60,000 per employee, up from $40,000. Employees 
that accept the loan repayment assistance are required to work 
for the agency for a specified period of time or to repay the 
amount given to them. Passed the Congress on October 28, 2003, 
and became Public Law 108-123 on November 11, 2003.

                               Oversight

                          TOPICS OF OVERSIGHT

1. Agency Organization
    The subcommittee spent considerable time investigating the 
organizational structure of many Federal agencies and found 
widespread inefficiency and disorder. One area of concentration 
for the subcommittee's oversight was the Federal food safety 
inspection system. This system is comprised of 10 Federal 
agencies that enforce more than 35 food safety laws, some of 
which were passed 100 years ago and before significant 
scientific advances in food safety techniques. The 
subcommittee's objective in this area has been to focus public 
attention on the need for organizational improvement in these 
and other agencies as a foundation for improving Government 
services, as well as highlight the need to re-institute 
Presidential fast-track authority. Fast-track authority, which 
has been available to various Presidents since 1932, has 
allowed them to propose reorganizations of the executive branch 
to Congress. Congress has then had the opportunity to vote the 
plan up or down, but has not been allowed to offer amendments. 
In various subcommittee hearings, a bipartisan group of 
witnesses provided testimony supporting the benefits of such 
authority for promoting a more efficient and effective 
Government.
2. Chief Human Capital Officers
    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 created in law the 
position of Chief Human Capital Officer [CHCO], as well as the 
CHCO Council, for the purpose of assisting agency heads in 
developing human capital strategies. Each of the 15 departments 
and other major agencies are required to appoint a CHCO as a 
senior level policy officer. The CHCO Council, headed by the 
Director of the Office of Personnel Management, provides a 
setting to facilitate best practices among the entire Federal 
Government.
    The subcommittee's efforts have been focused on overseeing 
the activities of the CHCO Council. Particularly, the Council 
is tasked with making recommendations for legislative and 
managerial improvements to human capital strategies of Federal 
agencies. The goal of the subcommittee's oversight is to prompt 
the Council to make recommendations on such areas as hiring 
reform and how to deal with poor performers. Once the 
recommendations have been made, the subcommittee will oversee 
their implementation and review any legislative proposals.
3. Dental and Vision Benefits for Federal Employees
    Currently, the dental, vision and hearing offerings 
available to those covered by the Federal Employees Health 
Benefits Program [FEHBP] are inadequate for most Federal 
employees. They are often without proper dental care as part of 
their health insurance coverage. In fact, most plans in the 
FEHBP either do not offer dental and vision care, or cover only 
very minimal, basic procedures. While some plans do offer a 
supplemental dental package, they come at the cost of a very 
high premium.
    In the 1987 FEHBP Call Letter, sent annually to potential 
insurance carriers asking for proposals to provide health 
insurance for the Federal Government, OPM requested that 
carriers not increase the amount of dental benefits offered to 
the plan. This was an effort aimed at maintaining the quality 
of other higher priority services without the burden of a 
premium increase. Dental and vision benefits have remained the 
two most sought after benefits by Federal employees, and 
finding a solution will help the Federal Government compete for 
talent. The subcommittee has explored solutions to this problem 
through potential legislative or regulatory changes.
4. Department of Homeland Security Personnel System
    The Homeland Security Act of 2002 provided for the creation 
of a new personnel system in which DHS and OPM could rewrite 
many of the provisions of Title 5 of the U.S. Code. In doing 
so, the Department was given authority to move away from the 
General Schedule system in place in most Federal agencies, and 
design a system based upon performance rather than seniority. 
Following an extensive process of system design, including 
outreach to stakeholders and collaboration with employee 
unions, the Department and OPM issued proposed regulations for 
the new system in the following areas: performance appraisal, 
job classification, compensation, labor-management relations, 
disciplinary personnel actions, and employee appeals.
    The subcommittee has overseen the design and collaboration 
process to ensure that the Department will have a fair, merit-
based system. Additionally, the subcommittee has worked to 
ensure that the final design is consistent with the intent of 
the law, which was created to give an agency with national 
security priorities the maximum flexibility when dealing with 
personnel. Final regulations are expected to be issued in late 
2004, at which time the subcommittee will oversee their 
implementation.
5. Department of Defense Personnel System--National Security Personnel 
        System [NSPS]
    The Department of Defense authorization bill for fiscal 
year 2004 authorized the Secretary of Defense to rewrite the 
rules of U.S.C. 5 and to create a new National Security 
Personnel System [NSPS] for its 700,000 civilian employees. 
This personnel overhaul required significant oversight as it 
affected nearly half of all civilian employees of the Federal 
Government, most of which remained under the General Schedule 
system. The law gave the Department flexibility to create a 
pay-for-performance system, similar to the flexibility given to 
the administration when creating the Department of Homeland 
Security. Department of Defense officials are drafting 
regulations to establish a new employee appeals process, 
streamline the collective bargaining process, and hire outside 
experts without review from the Office of Personnel Management.
    Chairwoman Jo Ann Davis held the first hearing on this 
legislation in April 2003 and advocated several changes that 
were included in the final version, including specific 
safeguards the Department must follow as it moves toward pay-
for-performance, protection for the overtime pay of Defense 
Department firefighters, and a requirement that the Department 
work with OPM in writing its Civil Service regulations. During 
2004 the Department and the Office of Personnel Management 
embarked upon the process of creating the NSPS, but as of 
November 2004, the agencies have not published any proposed 
elements of a new system. The subcommittee, however, is 
monitoring the progress of the efforts to create a DOD-tailored 
personnel system, and has announced its intention to exercise 
its oversight authority in this regard.
6. Diploma Mills
    OPM has been quite active in assisting agency managers to 
detect bogus education credentials and the subcommittee has 
monitored its progress and agencies' response to the issue. 
This issue has come to light because a few Federal employees, 
including political appointees, have been claiming degrees from 
schools on their resume that are not properly accredited. Such 
degrees are from schools, often referred to as ``diploma 
mills,'' that are not accredited by an appropriate authority 
subject to oversight by the U.S. Department of Education and 
that generally involve payment of a fee in exchange for a 
degree without any significant academic requirements.
7. Employee Surveys
    The Defense Authorization Bill for fiscal year 2004 signed 
into law now requires that ``each agency shall conduct an 
annual survey of its employees.'' OPM ``shall issue regulations 
prescribing survey questions that should appear on all agency 
surveys.'' The subcommittee is monitoring the use of this new 
law and seeking to determine when OPM will issue regulations 
and whether agencies are complying. Depending on findings, a 
possible hearing will be considered in the 109th Congress.
8. Firefighters
    H.R. 2963, the Federal Wildland Firefighter Emergency 
Response Compensation Act, was introduced on July 25, 2003, by 
Congressman Richard Pombo (R-CA) and was subsequently referred 
to the subcommittee. The subcommittee hoped to conduct a field 
hearing in Tempe, AZ to examine the way the Federal Government 
pays for wildland fire suppression but was unable to do so this 
session. The subcommittee examined the need for H.R. 2963, 
which was aimed at rectifying inequities in the pay system for 
Federal wildland firefighters. H.R. 2963 had two main 
objectives: (1) to provide for portal-to-portal compensation 
when firefighters are assigned to emergency situations; and (2) 
entitlement of hazardous duty pay when calculating retirement 
benefits.
9. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation [FDIC] Personnel System
    The FDIC, a Government-established corporation, operates 
independently of the personnel rules of U.S.C. 5, which governs 
most Federal agencies and employees. FDIC, and other 
Government-run independent financial agencies, operates under 
the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act 
[FIREA]. It has been operating a pay-for-performance style 
system, but has recently requested increased flexibilities in 
this area for the purpose of creating an increasingly 
performance-oriented culture and to gain needed flexibility in 
expanding and contracting the workforce. The subcommittee has 
met with staff from FDIC and will work with certain FIREA 
agencies in possibly developing appropriate legislation as well 
as overseeing implementation of any new personnel system.
10. Patent and Trademark Office [PTO] Personnel System
    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office [PTO] planned on 
unveiling a new performance appraisal plan for its trademark 
examining attorneys to help with the processing of trademark 
applications and to align attorneys' performance appraisal 
plans with the mission and goals of the agency on April 1, 
2004. The subcommittee staff spoke with several employees and 
employee unions who expressed their concern of the dramatic 
increase in workload and the resulting negative impact on 
employee morale. Based on these concerns and upon the request 
of the subcommittee, representatives from PTO came to brief the 
staff on the new plan and to discuss measures they are taking 
to establish strategies to open up lines of communication with 
employees and to respond to their concerns regarding the new 
plan. The subcommittee continues to monitor the planned 
implementation of the new performance appraisal plan as well as 
PTO's line of communication with employees. There has been no 
date set for implementation of the new appraisal plan.
11. Federal Employee Rights and Protections and Appeals
    The subcommittee has monitored the flexibilities given to 
the Department of Homeland Security, as well as to the 
Department of Defense for developing new appeals processes. The 
current appeals process for Federal employees involves several 
agencies: the Merit Systems Protection Board, the Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office of Personnel 
Management [OPM], the Office of Special Counsel, and the 
Federal Courts. In addition, agencies may have internal 
grievance systems for employee complaints, governed by 
collective bargaining agreements, and disputes between agencies 
and labor unions are adjudicated by the Federal Labor Relations 
Authority.
12. Federal Employees Health Benefits Program [FEHBP]
    The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program [FEHBP] 
provides health insurance benefits to over 8 million Federal 
workers, annuitants and their families. The program provided 
about $24 billion in health care benefits last year. It is the 
largest program of its kind and is widely considered to be a 
model employer-provided health insurance program.
    Federal employees, retirees and their survivors enjoy the 
widest selection of health plans in the country. Enrollees can 
choose from among fee-for-service plans and preferred provider 
organizations, or plans offering a point of service product, or 
health maintenance organizations if they live within the area 
serviced by the plan. OPM renews contracts annually with 
participating plans, after negotiating the benefits package and 
price. The cost of an enrollment is shared: the Government pays 
75 percent of the premium or 72 percent of the average weighted 
premium for all plans whichever is less. The FEHBP law does not 
mandate a standard plan benefit package, although OPM has the 
authority to impose certain coverage requirements, such as 
child immunizations.
    The subcommittee has focused oversight efforts on the 
development and introduction of health savings accounts to the 
FEHBP to ensure fairness to active and retired employees. 
Additionally, FEHBP, as the largest employer health insurance 
program, has been looked to as a potential source for 
strengthening health care around the Nation. Last, subcommittee 
oversight activities have led to examinations of the general 
management of the FEHBP by OPM to ensure the highest quality 
care for employees and a competitive advantage in benefits for 
the Federal Government's recruitment efforts.
13. Federal Law Enforcement Officer Pay and Benefits Reform (See 
        explanation of H.R. 3205)
    During the 108th Congress, numerous Federal law enforcement 
officer [LEO] associations approached the subcommittee claiming 
that disparities existed in pay and benefits for LEOs from one 
agency to another. Furthermore, the subcommittee also learned 
of examples of State and local law enforcement officers earning 
salaries that varied widely from those offered to officers in 
the Federal Government. Additionally, many other Federal 
employees who work in or with law enforcement agencies but who 
are not classified as ``law enforcement officers'' believe they 
are wrongly excluded from that designation. This led 
subcommittee members to investigate how these disparities are 
affecting the ability of the Federal Government to recruit and 
retain employees to law enforcement positions, as well as how 
to eliminate unnecessary inequalities.
    Chairwoman Jo Ann Davis, together with the subcommittee on 
Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources, held a July 
23, 2003, hearing to examine this issue, and subcommittee staff 
traveled to California to meet with dozens of law enforcement 
agents (both with and without the ``LEO'' designation) who work 
in high-cost areas, such as Los Angeles, San Diego and San 
Francisco. Following the hearing, Chairwoman Davis concluded 
that this issue needed further study. As a result, she and 
Senator Voinovich introduced companion pieces of legislation 
requiring the Office of Personnel Management to study the issue 
of law enforcement compensation. The subcommittee will continue 
its oversight of this issue into the 109th Congress with the 
goal of developing comprehensive legislation to reform pay and 
benefits for all LEO's and possibly to create a new statutory 
definition of ``law enforcement officer.''
14. Federal Hiring Process
    Problems with the Federal hiring process range from long 
length of time to hire to poor recruitment efforts and 
underused hiring flexibilities. Certain problems with the 
Federal Government's ability to assess job candidate date back 
to a 1981 court decision resulting in the Leuvano Consent 
Decree. Leuvano declared that the Professional and 
Administrative Careers Exam, used by agencies to rate entry-
level candidates, was unfair to minority applicants. As a 
result, agencies now largely use the highly ineffective 
Administrative Careers With America exam, greatly reducing 
agencies' ability to properly rate candidates.
    The subcommittee has focused on developing legislative 
solutions and overseeing management of the process by various 
agencies. Multiple hearings were held examining the reasons for 
low use of new hiring flexibilities: category ranking and 
direct-hire authority.
15. Annual Federal Employee Pay Raise
    Each year, civilian Federal employees under the General 
Schedule are eligible for a pay increase without regard to 
their performance in the previous year. Additionally, as a 
Federal employee moves through his career, he is given a pay 
raise when he receives a within-grade step increase or a 
promotion to a higher grade. All together, employees are 
eligible to receive salary increases from three sources: (1) 
annual General Schedule increase; (2) annual locality pay 
increase; and (3) increases resulting from a within-grade-
increase, a promotion, a quality-step-increase, or a 
performance award.
    Traditionally, the Congress has given Federal employees an 
annual raise equal in percentage to the raise received by the 
military. The subcommittee has overseen the enactment of the 
annual pay raise for Federal employees, and urged the Congress 
to ensure a raise in the exact proportion to military 
employees.
16. Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program [FLTCIP]
    The FLTCIP was created by the Long-Term Care Security Act 
(Public Law 106-265) in 2000. The Office of Personnel 
Management contracts with John Hancock Life Insurance Co. and 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. to administer the FLTCIP under 
a jointly owned company called Long Term Care Partners. No 
other carrier provides long term care for Federal employees, 
and the Federal Government makes no contribution to employee 
premiums as it does in the FEHBP.
    FLTCIP provides an insurance benefit to people who can no 
longer perform various everyday functions for themselves, such 
as washing, feeding or dressing themselves, or to patients 
suffering from a severe cognitive impairment. This care can be 
provided in a number of settings, including the patient's home, 
an assisted living facility, a nursing home or a number of 
others. Long term insurance is not a part of standard health 
insurance plans, and is not the same as standard medical care 
provided for in hospitals or doctors' offices.
    Among the issues investigated by the subcommittee was 
whether or not to open up the FLTCIP to competition rather than 
continue with the current system of one carrier. This issue was 
raised by Members and witnesses at the subcommittee's February 
24, 2004, hearing on dental and vision benefits. Additionally, 
the subcommittee conducted oversight of the level and quality 
of service that employees and retirees are receiving with this 
benefit. Last, the subcommittee will be examining how much 
money employees are saving under the FLTCIP versus offerings 
they can access in the private sector.
17. Pay for Performance
    During the 108th Congress, compensation reform, including 
pay for performance, has been at the top of the subcommittee's 
agenda. In fact, the subcommittee's first hearing examined the 
need for Government-wide compensation reform for the Federal 
Government. Congress granted both the Department of Homeland 
Security and the Department of Defense the authority to create 
new flexible performance-based personnel management systems, in 
2002 and 2003 respectively, and has established a new 
performance-based pay system in 2003 for members of the Senior 
Executive Service that is designed to provide clear linkage 
between pay and performance. The subcommittee's oversight in 
this area has been aggressive in light of the fact that DHS and 
DOD alone comprise of more than 50-percent of the non-postal 
Federal workforce and that their proposed systems, as well as 
the SES performance-based pay system, have precedent-setting 
implications.
18. Poor Performers
    The Government's general inability to deal effectively with 
poor performers in the workplace is well known. Employee 
surveys have shown that the Federal workforce is dismayed over 
the continued presence of poor performers in Government 
positions. In a recent survey, only 22 percent of Federal 
employees said they believe their supervisor deals effectively 
with poor performers and that about 14 percent of their 
coworkers are either poor performers or actually deserve to be 
fired. Congress has recently granted to both the Department of 
Homeland Security and DOD the authority to re-write the 
statutory rules on performance management, labor relations and 
appeals, and has also provided these Departments with the 
ability to create pay systems that make meaningful distinctions 
based on employee performance. The subcommittee began to 
examine the best manner in which to approach this area with the 
goal of building a case for specific legislative actions. The 
Government Accountability Office has agreed to conduct a report 
on the subject, which is due in the 109th Congress.
19. Presidential Management Fellows [PMF] Program
    The PMF Program, formerly referred to as the Presidential 
Management Intern Program, was a program in place to bring 
highly talented graduate-level students into the Federal 
workforce. This past year, the program was officially renamed 
the Presidential Management Fellows Program because of its 
inclusion of mid-career fellows as well as graduate-level 
students. The program is widely respected for its 2-year 
training opportunities afforded to participants, and seen as a 
crucial piece to Federal recruitment efforts. One persistent 
problem has been that the program has not helped many 
participants reach beyond the 2-year length of time. The 
subcommittee has conducted oversight to ensure that the program 
is properly used to train the best and the brightest, but also 
to ensure that they stay with the Federal Government for many 
years to come.
20. Specific Agency Oversight Jurisdiction
    The subcommittee continues to monitor and exercise its 
oversight jurisdiction over agencies of the executive branch: 
Office of Personnel Management; Federal Labor Relations 
Authority; Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board; Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission; Merit Systems Protection 
Board; Office of Special Counsel; and Office of Government 
Ethics.
21. Student Loan Repayment Program
    As a recruitment or retention incentive for highly 
qualified candidates or current employees, agencies are 
authorized to establish a program under which they may repay 
certain types of federally made, insured, or guaranteed student 
loans. Agencies may agree to repay as much as $10,000 for an 
employee in a calendar year, up to an aggregate maximum of 
$60,000 for any one employee. The subcommittee continues to 
monitor Federal agencies' use of the student loan repayment 
program and the success of whether the program is assisting 
them in competing for top-notch talent.
22. Telecommuting
    The subcommittee researched and assessed the major issues 
surrounding telecommuting and examined its usefulness in 
improving the quality of life for Federal employees and 
ensuring the continuity of government in light of a National 
emergency. The subcommittee learned of many benefits resulting 
from telecommuting, which include: improvements in employee 
morale and effectiveness; retention of skilled employees and 
reduction in turnover due in part to increased job 
satisfaction; potential for increased productivity; and cost 
savings to the Government in regard to office space, sick leave 
absences and energy conservation.
23. Thrift Savings Plan [TSP]
    The Thrift Savings Plan [TSP] is a retirement savings and 
investment plan available to all Federal employees, similar to 
401(k) plans provided in the private sector. The subcommittee 
has maintained vigorous oversight of the Federal Retirement 
Thrift Investment Board throughout the 108th Congress 
regarding, in particular, the new TSP recordkeeping system's 
daily valuation and recurring problems with employee access to 
the TSP Web site. The new recordkeeping system has resulted in 
slowness of the Web site, unavailable access, untimely 
processing of loan requests and difficulties making 
contribution allocations. The subcommittee staff also continued 
to pursue ideas for adding investment options to the TSP. There 
has been much discussion about adding investment funds to the 
TSP, such as a Real Estate Investment Trust. The TSP initially 
(1986) was limited to three funds. In 2001, the menu was 
expanded to include the S Fund and the I Fund. A typical 
private sector entity offers about 12 investment funds in its 
401K plan. Allowing for diversification can reduce investment 
risk and increase the rate of a participant's return. Staff has 
also been exploring the possibility of adding a lifetime fund 
to the Plan.
24. Whistleblower Protections
    Subcommittee staff has monitored and reviewed specific 
cases of alleged mistreatment by Federal agencies of employees 
who ostensibly blew the whistle on matters relating to national 
security failures.

                           Business Meetings

    1. July 16, 2003, approved H.R. 1231, by voice vote, and 
H.R. 1151, by voice vote.
    2. July 23, 2003, approved H.R. 2751, by voice vote.
    3. March 17, 2004, approved H. R. 3737, as amended by voice 
vote, and H.R. 3751, as amended by voice vote.
    4. May 18, 2004, approved S. 129, as amended by voice vote.

                                Hearings

1. ``Compensation Reform: How Should the Federal Government Pay Its 
        Employees?'' April 1, 2003; Serial No. 108-46
    a. Summary.--This hearing followed up on the full 
Government Reform Committee's March 6, 2003, hearing, ``From 
Reorganization to Recruitment: Bringing the Federal Government 
Into the 21st Century,'' and examined the need for Government-
wide compensation reform for the Federal Government. Most 
Federal employees are currently paid according to the General 
Schedule, which many see as a seniority-based system. Witnesses 
at the hearing discussed the possibility of moving toward a 
performance-based system through pay banding, performance pay, 
the $500 million Human Capital Performance Fund and relieving 
pay compression for the Senior Executive Service.
    b. Witnesses.--Hon. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, U.S. House of 
Representatives; Dan Blair, Deputy Director of OPM; Hannah 
Sistare, executive director of National Commission on the 
Public Service; and J. Christopher Mihm, Director of Strategic 
Issues at GAO.
2. ``The Human Capital Challenge: Offering Solutions and Delivering 
        Results,'' April 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-28
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee joined with the Senate 
Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management, the Federal 
Workforce and the District of Columbia, chaired by Senator 
George V. Voinovich (R-OH), to examine legislative solutions to 
strategic human capital management problems. Witnesses 
discussed similar issues at the subcommittee's April 1, 2003, 
hearing and considered the possibility of the Federal 
Government's moving away from the General Schedule and toward a 
pay-for-performance compensation system.
    b. Witnesses.--David Walker, Comptroller General of GAO; ay 
Coles James, Director of OPM; Bobby Harnage, national president 
of American Federation of Government Employees; Colleen Kelly, 
national president of National Treasury Employees Union; Carol 
Bonosaro, president of Senior Executives Association; Michael 
Styles, president of Federal Managers Association; Hannah 
Sistare, executive director of National Commission on the 
Public Service; Dr. Steven Kelman, professor of public 
management at John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard 
University; Max Stier, president and chief executive officer at 
Partnership for Public Service; Jeff Taylor, president and 
chief executive officer at Monster Government Solutions; and 
Maj. Gen. Robert McIntosh, executive director of Reserve 
Officers Association of the United States.
3. ``Transforming the Defense Department: Exploring the Merits of the 
        Proposed National Security Personnel System,'' April 29, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-40
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee examined the Defense 
Department's [DOD] ``Defense Transformation for the 21st 
Century Act,'' which proposed significant changes to the 
personnel system for civilian employees at the department, and 
carried far-reaching implications for the Government-wide 
personnel provisions of Title 5. Provisions contained in the 
proposed ``National Security Personnel System'' included giving 
the Secretary of Defense the authority to rewrite DOD personnel 
rules for the purpose of creating a performance management 
system.
    b. Witnesses.--David Chu, Under Secretary for Personnel and 
Readiness at DOD; Dan Blair, Deputy Director of OPM; David 
Walker, Comptroller General of GAO; Bobby Harnage, national 
president of American Federation of Government Employees; and 
G. Jerry Shaw, general counsel for Senior Executives 
Association.
4. ``H.R. 1231, Making Health Care More Affordable: Extending Premium 
        Conversion to Federal Retirees,'' July 9, 2003; Serial No. 108-
        66
    a. Summary.--At this hearing, the subcommittee considered 
H.R. 1231, a bill introduced by Chairman Tom Davis (R-VA), and 
S. 623 by Senator John Warner (R-VA), to allow retired civilian 
and military employees to pay health insurance premiums with 
pre-tax dollars, a process known as ``premium conversion.'' 
Active civilian employees participating in the Federal 
Employees Health Benefits Program received the premium 
conversion benefit in October 2000. The subcommittee passed 
H.R. 1231 by voice vote at a July 16, 2003, business meeting.
    b. Witnesses.--Hon. Tom Davis, chairman, Committee on 
Government Reform, U.S. House of Representatives; Charles 
Fallis, president of National Association of Retired Federal 
Employees; Sue Schwartz, deputy director of government 
relations at the Military Officers Association of America; and 
William Young, president of the National Association of Letter 
Carriers.
5. ``GAO Human Capital Reform: Leading the Way,'' July 16, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-77
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee examined H.R. 2751, the ``GAO 
Human Capital Reform Act of 2003,'' which would extend human 
capital flexibilities granted to the General Accounting Office 
[GAO] by Congress in 2000. The bill would allow the GAO to 
develop a more performance-based compensation system, as well 
as increase the agency's restructuring flexibilities. H.R. 2751 
passed the subcommittee by voice vote at a July 23, 2003, 
business meeting.
    b. Witnesses.--David Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States; Christopher Keisling, GAO Employees Advisory 
Council; Pete Smith, president of Private Service Council; and 
Paul Light, senior fellow, governance studies at the Brookings 
Institution.
6. ``Federal Law Enforcement Personnel in the Post September 11 Era: 
        How Can We Fix An Imbalanced Compensation System?'' July 23, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-83
    a. Summary.--This hearing, held jointly with the 
Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human 
Resources, chaired by Representative Mark Souder (R-IN), 
explored personnel issues affecting law enforcement officers of 
the Federal Government. The subcommittee examined pay, 
benefits, retirement, recruitment and retention in certain 
sectors of the Federal law enforcement community. Additionally, 
quality of life issues were looked at, such as: work 
conditions, responsibilities, hazards, and regional costs of 
living. H.R. 466, H.R. 1676, H.R. 2276, and H.R. 2442, were 
considered as legislative remedies to problems associated with 
these issues.
    b. Witnesses.--Hon. Charles Schummer, U.S. Senator; Hon. 
Peter King, U.S. House of Representatives; Hon. Robert Filner, 
U.S. House of Representatives; Hon. Michael Rogers, U.S. House 
of Representatives; Hon. Chris Van Hollen, U.S. House of 
Representatives; Joanne Simms, Deputy Assistant Attorney 
General for Human Resources and Administration at the DOJ; 
Norman Rabkin, Managing Director on Homeland Security and 
Justice at GAO; Donald Winstead, Deputy Associate Director of 
Center for Pay and Performance Policy at OPM; Kay Frances 
Dolan, Director of Human Relations Policy at DHS; Colleen 
Kelley, national president of National Treasury Employees 
Union; Ignatius Gentile, president of DHS Council 117 of the 
American Federation of Government Employees; Nancy Savage, 
president of Federal Bureau of Investigation Agents 
Association; Richard Gallo, former president of Federal Law 
Enforcement Officers Association; T.J. Bonner, president of 
National Border Patrol Council; and Louis Cannon, chairman of 
the Federal Officer's Committee in the Fraternal Order of 
Police.
7. ``Human Capital Planning: Exploring the National Commission on the 
        Public Service's Recommendations for Reorganizing the Federal 
        Government,'' September 17, 2003; Serial No. 108-109
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
need to reorganize the Federal Government into a limited number 
of mission-related executive departments, and how best to 
conduct such a reorganization. The National Commission on the 
Public Service made this recommendation in its report, ``Urgent 
Business for America: Revitalizing the Federal Government for 
the 21st Century.'' Subcommittee members considered various 
proposals including one to allow the President ``fast-track'' 
reorganization authority. Under this proposal, the President 
would propose a plan for reorganization that would not be 
subject to amendment by Congress and would either be approved 
or rejected in its entirety.
    b. Witnesses.--David Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States; Clay Johnson, Deputy Director for Management at 
OMB; and Paul Volker, chairman of National Commission on the 
Public Service.
8. ``Human Capital Succession Planning: How the Federal Government Can 
        Get a Workforce to Achieve Results,'' October 1, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-116
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee received testimony from 
public and private sector sources explaining the need for 
effective succession planning in the Federal Government. With 
high percentages of GS-15s and executives in the Senior 
Executive Service being eligible to retire now or becoming 
eligible in the short term, many observers have predicted a 
human capital ``crisis.'' Systematic succession planning 
through the development of various programs in Federal agencies 
was offered as a solution to the impending problems.
    b. Witnesses.--J. Christopher Mihm, Director of Strategic 
Issues at GAO; Dan Blair, Deputy Director of OPM; Howard 
Messner, president of National Academy of Public 
Administration; Robert Gandossy, Global Practice Leader, Talent 
and Organizations Consulting at Hewitt Associates; David 
O'Connor, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Administration and 
Resources Management at EPA; Vicki Novak, Assistant 
Administrator for Human Resources at NASA; and William 
Campbell, Acting Assistant Secretary for Human Resources and 
Administration at Department of Veterans Affairs.
9. ``Achieving Diversity in the Senior Executive Service,'' October 15, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-130
    a. Summary.--In this hearing, the subcommittee examined the 
issue of diversity in the ranks of the Senior Executive Service 
[SES]. The General Accounting Office report (GAO-03-34) titled, 
``Senior Executive Service: Enhanced Agency Efforts Needed to 
Improve Diversity as the Senior Corps Turns Over,'' projected 
that in the coming years the only significant changes in 
diversity will be an increase in the number of White women. 
Witnesses discussed various solutions for increased diversity, 
including the Office of Personnel Management's newly announced 
SES Candidate Development Program.
    b. Witnesses.--George Stalcup, Director of Strategic Issues 
at GAO; Ronald Sanders, Associate Director for Strategic Human 
Resources Policy at OPM; Carlton Hadden, Director, Office of 
Federal Operations at EEOC; Gail Lovelace, Chief Human Capital 
Officer at GSA; Jo-Anne Barnett, Chief Financial Officer at 
PTO; Reginald Wells, Deputy Commissioner for Human Resources at 
SSA; William Brown, president, African-American Federal 
Government Executives Association; Jasemine Chambers, Chair of 
Asian-American Government Executives Association; Manuel 
Oliverez, president and CEO of National Association of Hispanic 
Federal Executives; Shirley Harrington-Watson, National 
Legislative Review Committee Chair of Blacks in Government; 
Patricia Wolfe, president of Federally Employed Women; and 
Linda Brooks Rix, co-chief executive officer of AVUE 
Technologies Corp.
10. ``Decision Time: A New Human Resources Management System at the 
        Department of Homeland Security,'' October 29, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-162
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
status of the new human resources management system being 
developed at the Department of Homeland Security [DHS]. Under 
Public Law 107-296, Congress granted the Secretary of DHS and 
the Director of the Office of Personnel Management the 
authority to develop a unique personnel system for DHS. Pay, 
performance management, job classification, disciplinary 
measures and labor-management relations were all topics of 
discussion at the hearing.
    b. Witnesses.--Ronald James, Chief Human Capital Officer of 
DHS; Steven Cohen, Senior Advisor of Homeland Security at OPM; 
John Gage, national president of American Federation of 
Government Employees; Colleen Kelley, national president of 
National Treasury Employees Union; Hannah Sistare, executive 
director of National Commission on the Public Service; and 
George Nesterczuk, president of Nesterczuk & Associates.
11. ``Esprit de Corps: Recruiting and Retaining America's Best for the 
        Federal Civil Service, H.r. 1601, S. 129, and H.R. 3737'' 
        February 11, 2004; Serial No. 108-163
    a. Summary.--This hearing discussed Federal workforce 
flexibilities in two parts. First, the subcommittee examined 
H.R. 1601, and S. 129, the ``Federal Workforce Flexibility Act 
of 2003.'' These bills granted flexibilities to managers 
regarding the areas of pay and annual leave. Second, the 
subcommittee examined the pay and benefits of Administrative 
Law Judges [ALJ] in the Federal Government. Pay compression in 
the Federal Government has continued to harm the ability of the 
Federal Government to recruit and retain the best and 
brightest.
    b. Witnesses.--Ronald Sanders, Associate Director for 
Strategic Human Resources Policy at OPM; Kevin Dugan, vice 
president of Association of Administrative Law Judges; John 
Gage, national president of American Federation of Government 
Employees; Colleen Kelley, national president of National 
Treasury Employees Union; and Carl DeMaio, president of the 
Performance Institute.
12. ``We'd Like to See You Smile: The Need for Dental and Vision 
        Benefits for Federal Employees,'' February 24, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-173
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the possibility of 
making available to Federal employees insurance covering dental 
and vision care. There are limited dental and vision offerings 
within the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program [FEHBP]. 
Federal employees often cite dental coverage as the health 
benefit they would most like to see added to the FEHBP. H.R. 
3751, introduced by Chairwoman Jo Ann Davis on January 30, 
2004, requires the Office of Personnel Management to study this 
issue and present to Congress options to offer dental and 
vision plans to Federal employees and qualified relatives. The 
legislation does not specify whether these benefits should be 
added as part of the FEHBP, as stand-alone options, or as a 
hybrid of the two. This hearing examined H.R. 3751 in depth, as 
well as look at the entire issue of dental/vision benefits for 
Federal employees.
    b. Witnesses.--Abby Block, Deputy Associate Director at 
OPM; Ed Wristen, president and chief executive officer at First 
Health; Dr. Stan Shapiro, vice chairman of CompBenefits; Jon 
Seltenheim, chairman of National Association of Dental Plans; 
and Howard Braverman, O.D., past president of American 
Optometric Association.
13. ``The Key to Homeland Security: The New Human Resource System,'' 
        February 25, 2004; Serial No. 108-183
    a. Summary.--The Department of Homeland Security [DHS] 
intended to move most of its 180,000 employees to a system in 
which annual raises would be determined primarily by 
performance, appeal rights would be streamlined, and management 
would have greater ability to take mission-related actions 
without submitting to collective bargaining. The regulations 
governing the new personnel system were published the week 
prior to the hearing in the Federal Register, beginning the 
public comment phase of the process. This hearing enabled 
Members of Congress to comment and ask questions about these 
regulations at the outset.
    b. Witnesses.--Kay Coles James, Director of OPM; James Loy, 
Deputy Secretary at DHS; David Walker, Comptroller General of 
the United States; John Gage, national president of American 
Federation of Government Employees; Colleen Kelley, national 
president of National Treasury Employees Union; and Mike 
Randall, president of National Association of Agricultural 
Employees.
14. ``Oversight of the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and 
        the Federal Long-Term Care Insurance Program,'' March 24, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-170
    a. Summary.--At this hearing the subcommittee conducted 
broad oversight over a number of developing issues regarding 
the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and the Federal 
Long-Term Care Insurance Program. Among the issues discussed at 
the hearing were: Health Savings Accounts; Flexible Savings 
Accounts; Cost Accounting Standards; Cost-containment in the 
FEHBP; the statutory cap of 75 percent the Federal Government 
may contribute to premiums; and the prospect of opening the 
FEHBP to small businesses.
    b. Witnesses.--Dan Blair, Deputy Director of OPM; Dr. 
Harvey Fineberg, president of the Institute of Medicine; 
Charles Fallis, president of National Association of Retired 
Federal Employees; Stephen Gammarino, senior vice president of 
National Programs at Blue Cross/Blue Shield; Dr. Scott Smith, 
vice president and chief medical officer at First Health; and 
Paul Forte, chief executive officer of Long Term Care Partners 
LLC.
15. ``A System Rued: Inspecting Food,'' March 30, 2004; Serial No. 108-
        182
    a. Summary.--At this hearing the subcommittee conducted 
broad oversight over how the Federal Government has organized 
food safety inspection agencies. There are over 12 agencies 
that enforce more than 35 food safety laws. Such organization 
may lead to lack of accountability, inconsistencies, and 
ineffective Government oversight. Witnesses discussed the 
possibility of consolidating the agencies in the food safety 
program as a means of improving effectiveness.
    b. Witnesses.--Lawrence Dyckman, Director of Natural 
Resources and Environment at GAO; Dr. Robert Brackett, Director 
of Center for Food Safety and applied Nutrition at FDA; Dr. 
Merle Pierson, Deputy Undersecretary for Food Safety at USDA; 
Dan Glickman, former Secretary of USDA; and Caroline Smith 
DeWaal, Director of Food Safety at the Center for Science in 
the Public Interest.
16. ``First Year on the Job: Chief Human Capital Officers,'' May 18, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-236
    a. Summary.--This hearing reviewed Federal agencies' 
implementation of the Chief Human Capital Officers [CHCO] Act. 
The Chief Human Capital Officers Act of 2002 required certain 
agencies to appoint a CHCO to assist agency heads in producing 
a productive workforce as well as to assist in implementing 
Civil Service laws.
    b. Witnesses.--Kay Coles James, Director of the Office of 
Personnel Management; J. Christopher Mihm, Director of 
Strategic Issues at GAO; Dr. Reginald Wells, Deputy 
Commissioner of Human Resources at the SSA; and Kevin Simpson, 
executive vice president and general counsel for the 
Partnership for Public Service.
17. ``The Federal Hiring Process: The Long and Winding Road,'' field 
        hearing in Chicago, IL, June 7, 2004
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the need for hiring 
reforms and possible legislative solutions. GAO is preparing an 
update to their earlier hiring engagement at the request of the 
chairwoman and released their findings at the hearing.
    b. Witnesses.--Dan Blair, Deputy Director at OPM; J. 
Christopher Mihm, Director of Strategic Issues at GAO; Stanley 
Moore, Regional Director at the U.S. Census Bureau; Marcia 
Marsh, vice president for agency partnerships at the 
Partnership for Public Service; Brent Pearson, sr. vice 
president and general manager at Monster Government Solutions; 
Ed Flynn, managing consultant of Federal Sector Programs at 
Hewitt Associates; Andres Garza, director of career placement 
services at the University of Illinois; and Krystal Kemp, 
student, Washington University; and Camille Sladek, Federal 
applicant.
18. ``The Federal Hiring Process II: Shortening the Long and Winding 
        Road,'' July 13, 2004
    a. Summary.--This hearing served as a follow up to the 
subcommittee's June 7th hearing in Chicago entitled ``The 
Federal Hiring Process: The Long and Winding Road,'' and 
attempted to put an end to the blame game between agencies and 
OPM on the use of newly granted hiring flexibilities. The 
hearing again discussed the GAO report, released June 7, 2004, 
which stated that agencies are not using the new hiring 
flexibilities primarily due to lack of guidance from OPM and 
the lack of flexibility in rules and regulations administered 
by OPM.
    b. Witnesses.--Dan Blair, Deputy Director at OPM; David 
Chu, Undersecretary for Personnel and Readiness at DOD; Ed 
Sontag, Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management 
at HHS; Claudia Cross, Director of the Office of Human 
Resources Management at DOE; and J. Christopher Mihm, Director 
of Strategic Issues at GAO.
19. ``Time to Bite the Bullet: Fixing Federal Law Enforcement Pay and 
        Benefits,'' July 20, 2004
    a. Summary.--This hearing addressed pay and benefits 
disparities within the Federal law enforcement community as 
part of the subcommittee's ongoing efforts to reform Federal 
law enforcement pay and benefits, aiming toward one Government-
wide solution. The need for compensation reform is particularly 
vital to develop and retain a highly effective and qualified 
Federal law enforcement community and vital to our national 
security. Last year, Chairwoman Jo Ann Davis introduced the 
``Federal Law Enforcement Pay and Benefits Parity Act of 
2003,'' directing the Office of Personnel Management [OPM] to 
conduct a report and submit recommendations to Congress on the 
parity of pay and benefits among Federal law enforcement 
officers. That report, which OPM released on July 15, 2004, 
entitled, ``Federal Law Enforcement Pay and Benefits,'' 
detailed three critical areas in need of reform: (1) retirement 
benefits, (2) classification and basic pay, and (3) premium pay 
and was a major focus of the hearing. The complete report is 
available at http://www.opm.gov/.
    b. Witnesses.--Ronald Sanders, Associate Director for 
Strategic Human Resources Policy at OPM; Colleen Kelley, 
national president for National Treasury Employees Union; 
Frederick Bragg, president of the FBI Agents Association; Louis 
Cannon, chairman of the National Fraternal Order of Police 
Federal Officers Committee; and T.J. Bonner, president of the 
National Border Patrol Council
20. ``You Can't Always Get What You Want: What if the Federal 
        Government Could Drive Improvements in Healthcare?'' September 
        13, 2004
    a. Summary.--At the hearing the subcommittee looked at how 
the Federal Employee Health Benefits Program [FEHBP] can 
enhance its service to Federal employees and serve as a model 
for improving the performance of the U.S. health system as a 
whole. The hearing examined: (1) ways to encourage plans to 
focus on high value services including preventive services and 
comprehensive care for common chronic conditions; (2) the 
impact of good health practices on premiums; (3) a 
reimbursement component that allows plans to receive a premium 
for meeting certain high standards of quality; (4) ways to 
promote the use of information technology to create cost 
savings; (5) ways that the FEHBP can measure comparative 
efficacy and value of alternative preventives and treatments in 
a systematic way; and (6) possible avenues on how the FEHBP can 
better stress health literacy.
    b. Witnesses.--Dan Blair, Deputy Director at OPM; Dr. Karen 
Wolk Feinstein, Chair of the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare 
Initiative; Dr. Neil Resnick, director of at the University of 
Pittsburgh Institute of Aging; and Dr. Alan Axelson, medical 
director at the American Academy of Child and Adolescent 
Psychiatry.

                            GAO Work Product

    The Government Accountability Office conducted an extensive 
amount of work for the subcommittee throughout the 108th 
Congress. A detailed summary of that work is attached as 
appendix A.

   SUBCOMMITTEE ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE, DRUG POLICY AND HUMAN RESOURCES

                              Legislation

H.R 2086, Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization
    The subcommittee's work on problems of narcotics law 
enforcement and treatment informed the process of drafting 
legislation to reauthorize the Office of National Drug Control 
Policy, reform drug sentencing laws, expand treatment options, 
and assist drug-endangered youths.
    On May 15, 2003, H.R. 2086, the ``Office of National Drug 
Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2003,'' was considered by 
the Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy and Human 
Resources, and forwarded to full committee by voice vote. On 
June 5, 2003, the bill was ordered to be reported as amended by 
voice vote from the full committee. On September 30, 2003, H.R. 
2086 was passed by the House of Representatives by voice vote 
under suspension of the rules.
    The purpose of H.R. 2086 is to reauthorize the Office of 
National Drug Control Policy [ONDCP] within the Executive 
Office of the President for 5 years, through the end of fiscal 
year 2008. It also renews congressional authorization for 
national programs administered by ONDCP, including the National 
Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign and the High Intensity Drug 
Trafficking Areas [HIDTA] program. The office was originally 
created in 1988 and is the President's principal adviser with 
respect to drug control policy development and program 
oversight. ONDCP's current statutory mission is to guide the 
Nation's efforts to both reduce the use, manufacturing, and 
trafficking of illicit drugs, and to reduce the associated 
crime, violence, and health consequences of illegal drug use.
    H.R. 2086 makes some significant revisions to current law 
that will enhance the effectiveness and accountability of the 
National Drug Control Strategy and its programs, streamline and 
simplify the process for its development, and provide increased 
flexibility to the ONDCP director to respond to changing 
circumstances. For example, the subcommittee has replaced an 
inflexible legal requirement for a 5-year strategy guided by 
pages of outdated statutory mandates with a flexible and 
responsive annual strategy that still follows the same basic 
principles to ensure a comprehensive and responsive drug 
strategy.
    The subcommittee has also worked in many areas to improve 
performance measurement for the annual strategy, Federal drug 
control programs, ONDCP programs, and even some private sector 
efforts to ensure that these programs will be effective and 
accountable. For example, H.R. 2086 requires the Director to 
conduct a specific evaluation of the performance of each 
Federal agency in carrying out its responsibilities under the 
strategy each year, and mandates for the first time ever that a 
uniform system be developed to evaluate the effectiveness of 
drug treatment programs in the United States. The bill also 
provides for direct evaluation of the effectiveness of the 
Media Campaign and its individual ads.
    Another key theme of H.R. 2086 is to ensure that ONDCP 
programs, most notably the HIDTA program and the Media 
Campaign, remain directed to their original intent and purpose 
in areas where oversight activities have clearly demonstrated 
some lack of focus. Finally, the bill is intended to ensure 
that the Federal Government maintains appropriate attention and 
resources directed to drug control, which recently has been 
subjugated to other purposes and policies.
    On the treatment side, the subcommittee's bill enables the 
Director to continue his strong leadership on behalf of the 
President's ``Access to Recovery'' initiative to ensure that 
all Americans who need drug treatment can get it. H.R. 2086 
gives him enhanced authority to coordinate scientific research 
on what makes treatment effective, and required annual 
reporting of whether and how Federal treatment programs have 
worked.
    Concerning drug prevention, H.R. 2086 reauthorizes the 
Media Campaign for 5 years. It is the main national program to 
reach vulnerable youth with important anti-drug messages, but 
it must remain focused in order to ensure its effectiveness. 
The bill also attempts to require a tighter prevention focus in 
budgeting for the Safe and Drug Free Schools program by 
ensuring that each of its activities includes a clear anti-drug 
message. The subcommittee has also sent a strong bipartisan 
signal in the bill that marijuana use is clearly harmful to our 
children and to non-users and must continue to be firmly 
resisted.
    With respect to law enforcement, the subcommittee has 
attempted to ensure that adequate budget resources be directed 
to drug enforcement, which has been drained in recent months by 
other national priorities. This is a critical issue which must 
continue to be carefully addressed by the executive branch. 
Drug cartels must know that Federal law enforcement agencies 
will devote their full efforts to dismantling their 
organizations.
    Finally, regarding the drug supply, H.R. 2086 attempts to 
facilitate resources and coordination for interdiction 
programs, provides for a new assessment by the Director of 
whether foreign nations are fully cooperating with our efforts, 
and requires the issuance of a new strategy to deal with the 
accelerating problem of Colombian heroin.
H.R. 3634, The Drug Addiction Treatment Expansion Act
    Drug addiction treatment is an important battleground in 
American's war on drugs, and is also an area in which the 
subcommittee has been active. On November 21, 2003, Chairman 
Souder, Chairman Davis, and Ranking Member Cummings introduced 
H.R. 3634, the Drug Addiction Treatment Expansion Act.
    In 2000, Congress passed (as part of Public Law 106-310) 
the Drug Addiction Treatment Act [DATA], to expand treatment 
options for patients addicted to opiates. Under this law, 
patients are no longer required to seek treatment only through 
public methadone clinics. Effective treatment is now available 
in the offices or clinics of qualified individual physicians, 
specially trained to provide addiction treatment.
    To address concerns about potential abuse or diversion of 
the treatment medications, DATA includes a limit of 30 patients 
per treating physician. Regrettably, the law applies that same 
limit to group practices, which is having the effect of 
limiting access for patients who receive their care in group 
practices such as managed care groups or academic medical 
centers.
    Today, estimates show that there are almost 1 million 
heroin addicts and over 3 million prescription opiate abusers 
who are in need of treatment: only about 150,000 treatment 
placements are available for methadone maintenance. Although 
DATA was designed to alleviate this treatment capacity gap, the 
group practice 30-patient limit means that large group 
practices can only treat 30 out of thousands of potential 
opiate-dependent individuals who may seek treatment.
    H.R. 3634 will resolve this problem by eliminating the 
requirement that group practices be limited to 30 patients, 
while leaving in place the 30-patient limit for individual 
practitioners. In that way, potential for diversion continues 
to be minimized, but the necessary expanded access to treatment 
envisioned by DATA will be a reality for all patients, 
regardless of where they receive their medical care.

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

    Among the Government Reform Committee amendments proposed 
to H.R. 10, the 9/11 Recommendations Implementation Act, five 
of them were derived from oversight conducted by the 
subcommittee, and were designed to strengthen the Department of 
Homeland Security's ability to stop the ability of terrorist 
organizations to finance their activities through drug 
trafficking. The proposals sought to promote two key objectives 
to deprive terrorists of their means of financing their 
operations: first, strengthening the effectiveness of the 
Department's narcotics interdiction efforts; and second, 
improving coordination and cooperation among the Department's 
subdivisions and between the Department and other agencies with 
counterterrorism missions. As the 9/11 Commission reported, 
``We recommend significant changes in the organization of the 
government. . . . Good people can overcome bad structures. They 
should not have to.'' (See 9/11 Commission Report, 399).
1. Counternarcotics Office at DHS
    The first provision--which was included as Section 5025 of 
H.R. 10--would add a new Section 878 to the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002, which created the new Department. At present, the 
Counternarcotics Officer is not actually an employee of DHS; 
instead, he is a detailee employed by the Office of National 
Drug Control Policy [ONDCP]. Furthermore, he has no authority 
to hire staff to assist him. The current law also fails to 
clearly define how the Counternarcotics Officer is to carry out 
his responsibilities.
    The new Section 878 would rectify this problem by (1) 
replacing the CNO with a Director of Counternarcotics 
Enforcement, subject to Senate confirmation and reporting 
directly to the Secretary; (2) assigning specific 
responsibilities to the new Director, including oversight of 
DHS counterdrug activities and the submission of reports to 
Congress; and (3) authorizing permanent staff assigned to an 
Office of Counternarcotics Enforcement, as well as detailees 
from relevant agencies, to assist the Director.
2. Use of Counternarcotics Performance for Certain DHS Personnel 
        Evaluations
    The second provision--included as Section 5026 of H.R. 10--
would add a new Section 843 to the 2002 Act, ensuring that 
employees involved in counternarcotics activities will be 
evaluated in part on the basis of such activities. It is vital 
that DHS encourage its law enforcement personnel to continue 
their efforts to stop illegal drug trafficking. Regrettably, it 
is unclear whether drug enforcement is being given sufficient 
consideration by the Department in developing its employee 
performance management system. A word search of the 
Department's proposed new personnel rules (including those for 
``performance management''), 69 Federal Register 8030-01 
(February 20, 2004), shows that the words ``narcotic(s)'' and 
``drug(s)'' do not appear at all.
    New Section 843 would require DHS to include, as one of its 
criteria in a performance appraisal system for relevant 
employees, performance of counternarcotics duties. In order to 
encourage such personnel to cooperate and coordinate efforts 
with other agencies, the new Section also requires that this be 
a factor for consideration in performance appraisals as well.
3. Reform of Law Enforcement Intelligence at the Department of Homeland 
        Security
    This third provision--added to H.R. 10 by the full House as 
Amendment No. 29--sought to reform law enforcement intelligence 
at the Department of Homeland Security. The shortfalls in 
intelligence and information sharing described by the 9/11 
Commission were not confined just to the FBI and the CIA. The 
agencies that make up the new Department of Homeland Security 
have also suffered from a lack of coordination and cooperation. 
This problem has in the past hampered our ability to screen 
persons and goods crossing U.S. borders. The ``stovepipe'' 
mentality at many agencies has resulted in duplicative systems 
that don't communicate with each other--meaning that 
potentially vital information about a threat at one agency is 
never shared with the agency that could potentially stop that 
threat.
    A partial listing of the information gathering and 
intelligence units, task forces and fusion centers that support 
Homeland Security includes the following organizations.
    1. Within the Executive Office of the President is the 
Office of National Drug Control Policy [ONDCP]. Within ONDCP, 
are the following:
        --  Counterdrug Intelligence Coordination Group [CDICG]
        --  Counterdrug Intelligence Executive Secretariat 
        [CDX]
        --  LHigh Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas [HIDTA] 
        program with associated Regional Intelligence Centers 
        [RIC]
    2. Within the Department of Homeland Security [DHS] are the 
following:
        a. Intelligence Analysis and Infrastructure Protection 
        [IAIP] directorate
        b. DHS Operations Center [HSOC]
        c. the proposed Border Interdiction Support Center 
        [BISC]
        d. Transportation Security Administration [TSA]
        --  Transportation Security Operations Center [TSOC]
        e. U.S. Coast Guard
        --  Intelligence Coordination Center [ICC]
        --  Maritime Intelligence Fusion Centers [MIFC]
        --  Field Intelligence Support Teams [FIST]
        --  National Vessel Movement Center [NVMC]
        --  Maritime Intelligence Center [MIC]
        f. Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE]
        --  Law Enforcement Support Center [LESC]
        --  Money Laundering Coordination Center [MLCC]
        --  Tactical Intelligence Center [TIC]
        --  ICE Operations Center [IOC]
        --  Field Intelligence Units [FIU]
        g. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection [CBP]
        --  Border Patrol Field Intelligence Center [BORFIC]
        --  Air and Maritime Operations Center [AMOC]
        --  National Targeting Center [NTC]
    3. Department of Justice [DOJ]
        a. National Drug Intelligence Center [NDIC]
        b. Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI]
        --  National Crime Information Center [NCIC]
        --  Terrorist Screening Center [TSC]
        --  Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force [FTTTF]
        --  Joint Terrorist Task Forces [JTTFs]
        c. Drug Enforcement Administration
        --  El Paso Intelligence Center [EPIC]
        --  Special Operations Division [SOD]
        --  proposed Financial Attack Center [FAC]
        d. Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force [OCDETF] 
        program
        --  proposed OCDETF Drug/Finance Fusion Center
    4. Department of Treasury [DOT]
        a. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network [FinCEN]
        b. High-Risk Money-Laundering and Related Financial 
        Crimes Area [HIFCAs]
    5. Director of Central Intelligence [DCI]
        a. Crime and Narcotics Center [CNC]
        b. Terrorist Threat Integration Center [TTIC]
    6. Department of Defense [DOD]
        a. Joint Inter-Agency Task Forces South/West [JIATFs]
        b. Joint Task Force North [JTF-N]
        c. National Maritime Intelligence Center [NMIC]
    A partial listing of the databases and information 
collecting, analysis and sharing systems used by the above 
organizations includes the following:
        1. Homeland Security Information Network [HSIN]
        2. Department of Justice's Regional Information Sharing 
        System [RISS]
        3. Department of Defense's Joint Regional Information 
        Exchange System [JRIES]
        4. FBI's Law Enforcement Online system [LEO]
        5. Intelligence Community's Open Source Information 
        System [OSIS]
        6. The National Law Enforcement Telecommunication 
        System [NLETS]
        7. Anti-Drug Network-Unclassified [ADNET-U]
        8. Department of State's OpenNet Plus
        9. The Automated Regional Justice Information System 
        [ARJIS]
        10. The Southwest Border States Anti-Drug Information 
        System [SWBSADIS]
        11. The Southwest Border's Criminal Information Sharing 
        Alliance Network [CISAnet]
        12. The Law Enforcement Agency Data System [LEADS]
    This provision would direct the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to ensure that appropriate personnel with security 
clearances who are engaged in border and transportation 
security have access to relevant law enforcement and 
intelligence information maintained by DHS; direct the 
Secretary to take appropriate steps to consolidate databases or 
systems used by different agencies in the Department; improve 
information sharing between the Border and Transportation 
Security Directorate and the Information Analysis and 
Infrastructure Protection Directorate within DHS; require a 
report to Congress containing an overview of all of the 
agencies, databases, and other capabilities within DHS involved 
in intelligence relating to terrorism, drug trafficking, 
illegal immigration, screening, investigations, and inspection 
of goods or individuals entering the United States; direct the 
Secretary to ensure that information and intelligence sharing 
is subject to appropriate limitations and legal safeguards; and 
direct the Secretary to submit a plan to Congress to improve 
information and intelligence sharing within the Department.
    Please see adjoining diagram, ``Homeland Security 
Information and Intelligence Sharing.''
    [The information referred to follows:]
    
    
4. Transfer of Legacy Customs Office of Air and Marine Operations to 
        Bureau of Customs and Border Protection
    The fourth provision--proposed by subcommittee Chairman 
Souder but not included in the final version of H.R. 10--would 
have transferred the legacy Customs Office of Air and Marine 
Operations [AMO] to the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection 
[CBP]. The Office of Air and Marine Operations [AMO] was first 
created in 1969 as a branch of the legacy U.S. Customs Service. 
AMO has provided our Nation's primary defense against the 
smuggling of narcotics and other contraband through the air or 
in the territorial waters of the United States. Since the 
terrorist attacks of September 11, the Office has taken on 
additional homeland security functions.
    When DHS was created, AMO was administratively assigned to 
the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE]. This 
assignment (made when Customs and INS were merged in March 
2003) has had the unfortunate effect of dividing AMO from its 
partners within the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection 
[CBP]. (After Mr. Souder first proposed this amendment, DHS 
administratively transferred AMO to CBP in October 2004.)
    This amendment would have statutorily placed AMO directly 
under CBP. AMO would have been headed by an Assistant 
Commissioner of CBP, who would have reported directly to the 
Commissioner (ensuring that AMO would not be submerged under 
another subdivision of CBP, potentially diluting its 
interdiction mission). The provision would also have required a 
separate line item for AMO in the President's annual budget 
submissions, and included a ``sense of Congress'' resolution 
emphasizing the importance of maintaining AMO's primary focus 
of counterdrug enforcement.
5. Transfer of ``Shadow Wolves'' Native American Customs Patrol 
        Officers to Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement
    The final proposal by subcommittee Chairman Souder--which 
ultimately was not included in H.R. 10--dealt with an anti-drug 
trafficking unit known as the ``Shadow Wolves.'' The Shadow 
Wolves comprise a specialized unit of Customs Patrol Officers 
[CPO], created by Congress in 1972, patrols the international 
land border within the Tohono O'odham sovereign Indian nation 
in the State of Arizona.
    This unit has proven to be one of the Nation's most 
valuable assets against narcotics smuggling. The Shadow Wolves 
officers are Native Americans who combine modern technology and 
ancient tracking techniques to identify, follow and arrest 
illegal drug smugglers along the 76 miles of border and 2.8 
million acres within the Tohono O'odham Nation. Each year, the 
21 agents in the Shadow Wolves unit have combined to seize over 
100,000 pounds of illegal narcotics. Chairman Souder and the 
subcommittee staff met with the Shadow Wolves in Sells, AZ in 
2003, and observed their tactics and expertise in action.
    After the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, 
the Shadow Wolves unit was transferred to the bureau of Customs 
and Border Protection, and placed under the administrative 
control of the Tucson Sector of the U.S. Border Patrol. This 
reorganization has produced uncertainty and a lack of clear 
direction for the Shadow Wolves unit--because they don't fit in 
with the Border Patrol's mission and ethos. Unlike Border 
Patrol agents, the Shadow Wolves don't just watch the line; 
they identify and track drug smugglers and attempt to locate 
their routes and distribution centers. The resulting 
uncertainty is having a severe impact on the Shadow Wolves, 
whose numbers are shrinking.
    Chairman Souder's amendment (which was subsequently 
introduced as an independent piece of legislation, H.R. 5346, 
the ``Shadow Wolves Border Defense Act'') would have 
transferred the unit to the Bureau of Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement [ICE]. The Shadow Wolves' work most closely 
resembles that of ICE Special Agents who investigate and 
attempt to bring down large drug smuggling operations. ICE is 
therefore the most natural home for the Shadow Wolves unit. The 
amendment would also have set the pay scale of the Shadow 
Wolves on the same rate as Special Agents at ICE, who have 
similar work responsibilities and expertise.
    This amendment would also have authorized new units, 
similar to the Shadow Wolves, to operate on other similarly 
situated Indian reservations--including the Akwesasne (Mohawk) 
Reservation in upstate New York, which has a similar drug 
smuggling problem.

                               Oversight

    The subcommittee's oversight hearings, briefings, site 
visits, and congressional correspondence concerning the 
problems of drug abuse facing the United States informed the 
subcommittee's findings which resulted in the language of H.R. 
2086, the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
Reauthorization Act of 2003, and H.R. 3634, the Drug Addiction 
Treatment Expansion Act, discussed above.
    The subcommittee conducted authorization and oversight 
activity on the following matters during the second session of 
the 108th Congress:

                              DRUG POLICY

ONDCP Reauthorization
    The subcommittee will continue to oversee matters relating 
to H.R. 2086, the House-passed bill to reauthorize the Office 
of National Drug Control Policy and its programs. In addition 
to the office itself, many of its subsidiary programs are 
reauthorized in this legislation, most notably the High 
Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program and the National Youth 
Anti-Drug Media Campaign.
Methamphetamine Oversight
    In the course of the subcommittee's numerous hearings on 
the subject of methamphetamine trafficking and abuse, it became 
clear that this drug--perhaps more than any drug since the 
crack cocaine epidemic of the early 1980's--presents the 
greatest problem for State and local law enforcement. This is 
so not because it is the most widely used drug--meth abuse 
probably accounts for less than 10 percent of the total drug 
abuse in the United States--but rather because meth trafficking 
creates such a massive drain on law enforcement resources. Meth 
addicts commit a large number of crimes, and in some parts of 
the country a large percentage of arrestees test positive for 
the drug. Moreover, although proliferating small meth labs do 
not produce large amounts of meth, they create health hazards 
for citizens and police, and require major clean-up costs.
    The subcommittee's findings suggest that Congress and the 
Federal Government must seek new ways to assist State and local 
law enforcement in dealing with this problem. Chairman Souder 
accordingly has introduced two pieces of legislation, H.R. 5347 
(the ``Methamphetamine Abuse Prevention Act''), which would 
regulate sales of products containing meth precursor chemicals 
(such as pseudoephedrine), and H.R. 5345, which would authorize 
grants to States to set up ``Meth Watch'' programs (modeled on 
those in Kansas and Washington State) that bring together law 
enforcement and retailers to limit the diversion of precursor 
chemicals to meth traffickers. By cutting down on the supply of 
precursor chemicals, the government can reduce the number of 
meth labs and the corresponding drain on law enforcement 
resources.
State Drug Legalization Initiatives
    Despite past successes and the intense efforts of the drug 
legalization movement in several States, ballot initiatives to 
legalize or decriminalize certain drug uses under State laws 
were defeated nationwide in November 2002 and 2004. The 
subcommittee will continue to work to find the best and most 
suitable approach to continue strong opposition at the Federal 
level to drug legalization and decriminalization in 2004.
    On Thursday, April 1, 2004, the subcommittee held a public 
hearing to explore the numerous scientific and medical claims 
being made about marijuana, and the real health impact the drug 
has on individuals. The hearing examined the potential impact 
that bypassing Federal regulations of medical drugs--as various 
State laws that purport to legalize marijuana as medicine do--
may have on consumer health and safety. This hearing provided 
an opportunity for representatives of Federal and State 
agencies, with the responsibility for regulating drugs and the 
practice of medicine, as well as representatives of the medical 
and scientific communities, to discuss these issues and suggest 
solutions.
International and Interdiction Issues
    Air Bridge Denial Program.--The United States assists 
foreign governments under the Air Bridge Denial program to 
intercept suspected drug trafficking aircraft in the Andean 
region of South America. The program was suspended after the 
Peruvian government shoot down of an innocent missionary plane 
and resulting loss of life. The subcommittee continues to 
examine the practical and residual obstacles the administration 
must overcome before the resumption of this program can 
continue.
    Enhanced Focus on Drugs/Terrorism.--The subcommittee's 
previous oversight activities have made us aware of numerous 
pending drug cases with significant and very specific links to 
international terrorism. The subcommittee continues to examine 
how we best heighten public awareness of these cases and the 
demonstrable links between the drug trade and terrorism.
    Department of Homeland Security/Subordinate Budgets.--The 
subcommittee remains vigilant to ensure that the Department of 
Homeland Security does not reallocate resources away from 
counterdrug activities.
    Status of Colombia Programs and the Andean Counterdrug 
Initiative.--President Uribe has significantly increased his 
support for U.S. eradication programs in Colombia, which has 
led to a fairly significant increase in activity and 
effectiveness. In addition, the Plan Colombia equipment 
provided for by Congress in earlier years is starting to arrive 
in significant amounts. The subcommittee's oversight activities 
in the area of international and interdiction issues include a 
careful examination of U.S. support for Colombia's efforts in 
drug eradication.
Drug Prevention and Treatment
    Treatment Initiatives.--The President's ``Access to 
Recovery'' initiative to increase the availability and 
effectiveness of drug treatment is first year of operation. The 
subcommittee will continue to examine how the program will be 
implemented and what is likely to be the immediate impact for 
Americans seeking treatment.
    Status of Federal Prevention Programs.--The Federal 
Government continues to have a largely uncoordinated and 
frequently unfocused group of drug prevention programs. The 
subcommittee will continue to examine how they can be better 
coordinated and made more effective.
    Drug Testing.--A study of Oregon students showed that 
students who were regularly drug tested in schools are much 
less likely to use illegal narcotics, and enhanced awareness of 
testing has been a significant initiative of ONDCP Director 
Walters. The subcommittee will continue to work to ensure that 
the public is made aware of the importance of testing, and 
identify which Federal programs can be accessed to facilitate 
testing and accountability among youth.

                            LAW ENFORCEMENT

Needle Exchange Enforcement
    Federal and State court opinions issued late last year in 
New York City and Massachusetts held that participants in 
needle exchange programs could not be arrested for drug use. 
The subcommittee will continue to work with the Justice 
Department and the Department of Health and Human Services to 
ensure that public safety and public health will be upheld.
Effect of Homeland Security on Federal Law Enforcement
    During the last Congress, the subcommittee conducted a 
number of hearings on the impact which the creation of a 
Department of Homeland Security might have on other Federal law 
enforcement agencies--primarily examining whether the intense 
focus on that single goal would adversely affect the resources, 
focus, or personnel available to more traditional law 
enforcement missions which did not disappear after September 
11. Now that the Department has been established, these issues 
will require ongoing attention to ensure the continued 
effectiveness of the overall system.
Border
    During the last Congress, the subcommittee carried out an 
exhaustive review of U.S. border agencies and policies, as well 
as the multitude of diverse and distinct issues represented at 
individual crossings, both north and south. These activities 
and field hearings were summarized in a lengthy interim 
committee report. Field hearings were conducted in Sells, AZ, 
Niagara Falls, NY, Detroit, MI and Las Cruces, NM.

                             NATIONAL PARKS

    On February 17, 2004, the subcommittee sent a letter to the 
National Park Service [NPS] regarding the potential censorship 
of a book in Grand Canyon National Park bookstores, urging the 
NPS to ensure that viewpoint discrimination was not taking 
place and requesting information on NPS' policies and standards 
for approving books for sale in its bookstores. NPS responded 
on March 5, 2004, supplying pertinent management policies and 
stating that it was facilitating a review of the book's 
``appropriateness'' for sale. NPS indicated that it planned to 
make a decision by March 2004; however, the review is still 
underway. The subcommittee will continue to monitor this 
situation in the next Congress.
    On May 20, 2004, the subcommittee held a hearing entitled, 
``Historic Preservation of the Peopling of America.'' This 
hearing examined how the history of the immigration, migration, 
and settlement of the population of the United States--the 
peopling of America--is being preserved. The hearing 
particularly considered how this story is preserved through 
National Park Service [NPS] and community programs. It 
investigated what stories on this theme are currently 
represented and interpreted through NPS sites and National 
Historic Landmarks, and how NPS connects these places to tell 
the story of the peopling of America. The hearing also explored 
how preservation of sites significant to this story and 
education about these places can be improved. Despite over 
77,000 listings on the National Register of Historic Places, 
sites associated with the exploration and settlement of the 
United States by a broad range of cultures are not well 
represented.
    The hearing discussed the challenges in identifying the 
gaps in representation, made difficult by NPS' lack of a clear 
system for identifying them. Representatives of community 
programs also spoke to the pressing need to identify and 
preserve these places before they are lost. The subcommittee 
will continue to investigate means by which identification and 
preservation of significant sites can be accomplished. 
Witnesses included Dr. Janet Snyder Matthews, Associate 
Director for Cultural Resources, National Park Service; 
Katherine Toy, executive director, Angel Island Immigration 
Station Foundation, San Francisco, CA; Ellen von Karajan, 
executive director, Society for the Preservation of Federal 
Hill and Fell's Point, and member, Board of Directors and 
Fiscal Agent, Baltimore Immigration Project, Baltimore, MD; Dr. 
Kathryn Wilson, director of education and interpretation, 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

                     HUMAN RESOURCES/SOCIAL POLICY

Health and Social Policy Oversight
    The subcommittee continued its agenda of oversight on 
agencies responsible for health and social policies, focused 
most prominently on bioethics (including human cloning and stem 
cell research), human life issues, reproductive health, HIV 
policy, health issues impacting illegal drug use. These 
oversight activities are a continuation of those pursued by the 
subcommittee in the 107th Congress.
Stem Cell Research
    The subcommittee continued its oversight of stem cell 
research. The subcommittee has learned that medical 
breakthroughs continue to be discovered utilizing adult and 
cord blood stem cells while embryonic stem cell research has 
failed to produce any human treatments. To date, over 70 human 
diseases are currently being treated with adult or cord blood 
stem cells and numerous others are undergoing clinical trials.
    Aggressive oversight by the subcommittee was necessary to 
obtain this information from the National Institutes of Health 
[NIH]. On October 8, 2002, the subcommittee first requested 
that NIH provide ``a detailed report'' providing comprehensive 
information about the medical applications of adult and 
embryonic stem cells as well as stem cells from cloned embryos 
and aborted fetuses. Over the next 2 years repeated follow-ups 
with NIH to provide the subcommittee with this information went 
unanswered. Subcommittee Chairman Souder and Government Reform 
Committee Chairman Tom Davis sent a letter June 17, 2004 
raising the possibility of pursuing ``other avenues to provide 
the Department with additional incentives for full 
cooperation.''
    The following day, the subcommittee received a response 
signed by Dr. James Battey, Director of the National Institutes 
on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders [NIDCD] and 
Director of the Stem Cell Task Force. The letter we received, 
however, did not fully answer the questions we had posed. At a 
meeting on July 2, 2004 between subcommittee staff and NIH 
staff, Dr. Battey agreed that he and his colleagues would 
assemble a comprehensive report as originally requested. The 
subcommittee sent a letter to Secretary of Health and Human 
Services Tommy Thompson re-iterating this commitment on July 9, 
2004. Another letter was sent to NIH Director Elias A. 
Zerhouni, M.D., on August 31, 2004.
    A response from Dr. Battey was received on September 8, 
2004. This letter provided the most comprehensive overview of 
the successful outcomes of stem cell research. The findings 
reflected that great medical advances continue to be made with 
adult and cord blood stem cells but that embryonic stem cells 
and human cloning research have failed to live up to the 
enthusiasms of the popular press and are unlikely soon to yield 
cures or treatments.
    The subcommittee is deeply concerned that because this 
information was not made public sooner countless patients 
suffering from a variety of ailments have been manipulated with 
false hopes over the potential of embryonic stem cell research 
and cloning. The subcommittee supports continued efforts to 
exhaust all ethical research avenues, including adult stem cell 
research, to improve health.
HPV/Cervical Cancer Prevention
    The subcommittee continued its oversight of Federal efforts 
to prevent human papilloma virus [HPV] infection and cervical 
cancer.
    HPV infection is the primary cause of cervical cancer. The 
virus is the cause of at least 99.7 percent of all cervical 
cancers, which kills more women in America then AIDs. HPV is 
also associated with more than 1 million pre-cancerous lesions, 
oral cancer, cancer of the vagina, penis, anus, head and neck, 
as well as genital warts. In addition, HPV has been detected in 
some prostate tumors. In 2001, cervical cancer was estimated to 
be the 12th most commonly new diagnosed cancer among women in 
the United States. About 24 million Americans are currently 
infected with HPV according to the National Cancer Institute 
and an estimated 5.5 million Americans become infected with HPV 
every year.
    Scientific studies and public opinion polls continue to 
show that few Americans are aware of HPV or its health risks. 
The subcommittee is concerned that Federal agencies such as the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] and the Food 
and Drug Administration [FDA] have been lax in implementing 
Federal law that requires these agencies to take actions to 
educate the public and health care providers about HPV.
    Public Law 106-554, signed by President Clinton on December 
21, 2000, requires the CDC to educate the public and health 
care professionals about HPV prevention and directs the FDA to 
``reexamine existing condom labels . . . to determine whether 
the labels are medically accurate regarding the overall 
effectiveness or lack of effectiveness of condoms in preventing 
sexually transmitted diseases, including HPV.''
    CDC failed to meet a statutory deadline of December 20, 
2003 to issue a report outlining the ``best strategies to 
prevent future infections, based on available science.''
    As a result of aggressive oversight by the subcommittee, 
the CDC did issue a report to Congress entitled, ``Prevention 
of Genital Human Papillomavirus'' on January 30, 2004. The 
report found:

          Because genital HPV infection is most common in men 
        and women who have had multiple sex partners, 
        abstaining from sexual activity (i.e. refraining from 
        any genital contact with another individual) is the 
        surest way to prevent infection. For those who choose 
        to be sexually active, a monogamous relationship with 
        an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to 
        prevent future genital HPV infections. For those who 
        choose to be sexually active but who are not in a 
        monogamous relationship, reducing the number of sexual 
        partners and choosing a partner less likely to be 
        infected may reduce the risk of genital HPV infection. 
        . . . The available scientific evidence is not 
        sufficient to recommend condoms as a primary prevention 
        strategy for the prevention of genital HPV infection.

    The CDC's findings echo the scientific consensus, including 
that of a 2001 report entitled ``Scientific Evidence on Condom 
Effectiveness for Sexually Transmitted Disease [STD] 
Prevention'' prepared by the National Institute of Allergy and 
Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health in 
consultation with the FDA, the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention and the U.S. Agency for International Development 
which evaluated the published data on latex condoms and STD 
prevention and ``concluded that there was no evidence that 
condom use reduced the risk of HPV infection.''
    Four years since the President Clinton signed the HPV 
education law, the FDA has yet to include information of HPV on 
condom labels and has failed to comply with the legal 
requirements to re-label condoms to ensure that such labels are 
``medically accurate.''
    The subcommittee held a hearing on this issue on March 11, 
2004 that featured the CDC and FDA and subcommittee staff has 
held numerous meetings with FDA throughout the year to monitor 
compliance with this law. The subcommittee is concerned that 
FDA has failed to comply with the directives of this law and as 
a result has compromised the agency's scientific integrity.
    The subcommittee plans to continue to work with FDA and CDC 
to ensure that the HPV education provisions of Public Law 106-
554 are fully implemented and that the public is given 
scientifically accurate information to protect against HPV 
infection and cervical cancer.
    The subcommittee has consulted with officials of NIH and 
other scientific experts to assist with the development of HPV 
vaccines that could protect against infection and the 
development of cervical cancer. Despite significant progress, 
it appears unlikely that any vaccine that could protect against 
all high risk strains of HPV is likely to be available in the 
near future. Prevention, screening and treatment therefore 
remain the best protections against the health risks associated 
with HPV infection.
Nonoxynol-9
    The subcommittee continued its oversight of Federal 
regulation and labeling of products containing the microbicide 
nonoxynol-9 (N-9), a spermicide lubricant that that has been 
found to increase HIV infection risk. Studies have suggested 
for 15 years that use of N-9 increases risk for HIV infection. 
Nearly half--42 percent--of condoms sold in the United States 
and many sexual lubricants are estimated to be lubricated with 
N-9.
    On June 21, the FDA provided answers to questions regarding 
products containing N-9 previously posed by the subcommittee. 
FDA acknowledges studies show N-9 does not protect against HIV 
and other STDs but remains skeptical about data indicating N-9 
may increase HIV risk. FDA will allow vaginal contraceptive 
devices containing N-9 to remain on the market, but will 
require new labeling informing users that N-9 does not protect 
against HIV and other STDs ``and that frequent use by women at 
risk for HIV may increase their risk of getting HIV.'' The new 
N-9 warning label will not apply to condoms, but FDA is 
reviewing labeling of condoms with N-9 ``to make sure that 
information regarding appropriate use of this product is 
properly presented to the consumer in light of new information 
about the potential risks of N-9.'' FDA claims ``the data do 
not support removal of [condoms with N-9] from the market.'' 
FDA does not address what actions, if any, the agency may take 
to address sexual lubricants that contain N-9, primarily used 
by men who have sex with men. This omission and continued 
questioning of the scientific data regarding the health risks 
of N-9 indicates additional oversight of the FDA is warranted.
    At the request of the subcommittee, the General Accounting 
Office [GAO] is conducting an investigation to determine the 
role of Federal health agencies and condom companies in the 
promotion and use of N-9 in the United States and the impact N-
9 use has had on HIV rates. GAO expects to complete its work 
and issue a report in 2005.
HIV/AIDS
    The subcommittee continued its oversight of domestic and 
global HIV/AIDS efforts. The subcommittee applauds of the 
leadership of President George W. Bush in addressing this 
pandemic, particularly the administration's focus on science 
based prevention, early diagnosis, access to treatment and 
including the faith community in prevention and care efforts.
    With hundreds of Americans on waiting lists for access to 
the AIDS Drug Assistance Program [ADAP] and tens of millions 
around the world with no access to any AIDS care, the 
subcommittee remains concerned that many Federal resources that 
could be better prioritized on direct lifesaving medical care 
are being misspent on less pressing needs. During the past 
year, the subcommittee identified more than $133 million in 
misspent Federal AIDS dollars.
    AIDS ``conferencing'' continues to siphon away significant 
resources from health care programs to subsidize multiple 
gatherings of advocates. The U.S. Federal Government paid to 
send more than 200 individuals, including 130 Federal 
employees, to the 15th International AIDS Conference held in 
Bangkok, Thailand, in July 2004. The total cost of this 
conference to the U.S. Federal Government totaled over 
$500,000. The Health Resources and Service Administration 
[HRSA] spent approximately $2 million on a single conference 
held in August 2004 in Washington, DC. The Department of 
Housing and Urban Development [HUD] spent more than $15,000 for 
another AIDS conference held in Philadelphia, PA, in October. 
CDC, NIH, HRSA and other Federal agencies funded a number of 
other conferences related to HIV/AIDS throughout the year.
    The subcommittee supports efforts to develop HIV vaccines 
and believes this goal should be among the highest of our 
national health care priorities. The subcommittee is concerned, 
however, that significant amounts of resources intended for HIV 
vaccine research are being misspent. NIH is spending $119 
million on an HIV vaccine study in Thailand that analyzes two 
components that have both failed to protect against HIV 
infection in previous studies. One of the components of the 
vaccine called gp120, which has completed phase III trials, 
``failed completely in providing any degree of protection to 
HIV infection,'' according to Dr. Robert W. Doms, chairman of 
the department of microbiology at the University of 
Pennsylvania. The other component, called ALVAC, has had 
unimpressive results in trials, he adds. ``Combining something 
that's failed with something that has not been terribly 
impressive doesn't seem to provide a good rationale for 
proceeding with such a large and costly trial,'' according to 
Doms. Twenty-two leading HIV researchers including Dr. Robert 
Gallo, the co-discoverer of the AIDS virus, wrote a letter 
published in the January 16, 2004 issue of Science critical of 
the continued funding for this project. In June, officials 
announced that this study would be delayed due to a lack of 
volunteers (the project has attracted less than one-third of 
the planned number of participants). This costly study has 
neither support from the scientific community or the public 
that is necessary to go forward with the research.
    In addition, NIH spends more than $1 million every year 
promoting HIV vaccine ``awareness,'' when no such vaccine even 
exists of which to be aware. The President's 2005 budget 
request, in fact, extends the goal of developing an HIV vaccine 
from 2007 to 2010 ``to more realistically reflect the state of 
the science.'' The subcommittee feels strongly that HIV vaccine 
research dollars should be spent on research rather than costly 
and unnecessary public relations campaigns that do little or 
nothing to fulfill the goal of developing an effective HIV 
vaccine.
    Fraud and abuse of Federal AIDS funding has also undermined 
efforts to provide care to those affected by HIV/AIDS. In the 
past year, the subcommittee has learned of numerous cases of 
AIDS funding abuse that have cost in excess of $10.5 million.
    An October 7, 2004 GAO report found ``little assurance that 
the $936,285 reimbursed to South Shore (South Shore Hospital 
and Medical Center) was used as intended to serve HIV/AIDS 
clients'' provided under Title I of the HRSA administered Ryan 
White CARE Act in Miami-Dade County, FL.
    Another GAO review of CARE Act funds in San Francisco dated 
August 27, 2004, found $216,461 in Federal AIDS funds were 
spent by Baker Places on ``unallowable costs.'' GAO also called 
for an evaluation of ``the allowability of $80,776 claimed for 
housing services that may not have met the intent of CARE Act 
Title I, and make a refund as appropriate.''
    In October 2004, the Arkansas Department of Health revealed 
that it is investigating its AIDS division to determine whether 
some of the $8.2 million it receives in Federal AIDS funding 
has been misspent. The Arkansas Health Department terminated 
the contract of one organization that received funding, finding 
that $53,592.85 of its program expenses could not be adequately 
documented. Other groups received increasing amounts of funding 
without documenting their work, leaving the Health Department 
unsure of what services were provided. The agency cannot locate 
reports showing results for one $40,000 grant. Another group's 
1-year $25,000 grant increased to $100,000 before the Health 
Department learned that the grant provided classes for only 
seven people in 10 months. Another audit found that the agency 
inappropriately paid four department employees a total of 
$17,566.66, much of which was not supported by travel receipts. 
These questionable spending reports have surfaced at the same 
time that shortfalls for Arkansas' ADAP have forced people with 
HIV onto a waiting list for medication.
    In July 2004, Federal auditors directed University of 
Southern California [USC] to pay back more than $1 million in 
government funds because of the university's lapses in managing 
a program to train HIV/AIDS counselors for minority 
communities. USC's program was shut down by Federal officials 
in 2001 in response to concerns about conflict of interest, 
improper research procedures and misuse of Federal funds. The 
resulting audit uncovered further evidence of those problems 
and said the program failed in its goal of training HIV/AIDS 
counselors, or ``peer treatment educators.''
    In June 2004, the HUD Office of Inspector General [OIG] 
released an audit report that found a Washington, DC, AIDS 
charity spent thousands of dollars of Federal grant money on 
cigarettes, movie tickets and bingo games. The charity, Safe 
Haven Outreach Ministry Inc., also could not account for how it 
spent more than $1.1 million in Federal grant money since 1997. 
Under that Federal grant, Safe Haven officials charged more 
than $3,800 for movie tickets, cigarettes, Christmas 
decorations and weekly bingo games, HUD investigators found.
    In May 2004, an audit by the HUD OIG reported that the 
Peninsula AIDS Foundation of Newport News, VA, may have misused 
some of the Federal grant money it received. The Federal funds 
were intended for programs that help those with HIV/AIDS and 
their families to pay for housing, transportation and other 
services. In the report given to HUD on May 17, the auditors 
concluded that Peninsula AIDS Foundation officials had no 
records to show how the organization used nearly $340,000--or 
96 percent--of a $353,562 grant.
    In May 2004, CDC ceased Federal funding of the Stop AIDS 
Project of San Francisco. The Stop AIDS Project had received 
hundreds of thousands of dollars in Federal funds that it has 
used to host questionable programs, including ``flirting 
classes.'' Neither CDC nor the Stop AIDS Project could provide 
any scientific proof to demonstrate that these were effective 
in preventing HIV.
    In May 2004, two South Beach Miami, FL, AIDS clinics were 
charged for defrauding Medicare for $5.4 million on false 
claims for drugs that were either not provided, not given as 
claimed or not medically necessary.
    In March 2004, Norfolk, VA officials revealed the regional 
Ryan White CARE Act program failed to spend about $1 million of 
its $5 million grant, even though as many as 900 eligible HIV-
positive residents in Hampton Roads are not receiving care. The 
area's accumulated amount of unspent funds was $2.6 million, 
enough to cover all health-care expenses for Ryan White CARE 
patients for a year in the area. Norfolk's AIDS program has 
faced other problems. A contract dispute last year led to the 
suspension of payments for some prescription drugs not directly 
related to HIV, including pain relievers, anti-depressants and 
insulin. Another contract dispute forced other clinics to close 
for 3 months.
Education
    The subcommittee has examined how science education 
standards are being developed and implemented in States in 
accordance with the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (Public 
Law 107-110) and its conference report (H.R. 107-334).
    The enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 
[NCLB] (Public Law 107-110) represents the first time States 
will be required by Federal law to put in place statewide 
science education standards and assessments. During September 
and October 2004, the subcommittee sent letters to State 
education officials requesting information on States' science 
standards and assessments under NCLB. The letters requested 
information on the States' processes for developing and 
implementing these requirements, as well as the impact of 
language from the NCLB's conference report supporting academic 
freedom in science education. The subcommittee is now receiving 
responses to these requests and compiling the information as 
part of its oversight of the Department of Education.
Faith-Based Initiatives
    The subcommittee continued its oversight of the 
administration's Centers for Faith and Community Based 
Initiatives, and has worked regularly with administration 
officials on the development of executive branch policies to 
promote faith-based charities, the status of pilot programs, 
and on pending legislative proposals on the issue and outreach 
to the faith-based social provider community.
    A total of eight hearings were held by the subcommittee in 
order to understand and demonstrate the credibility and reach 
of the President's Office of Faith-Based and Community 
Initiative. Seven of these hearings were held in the field to 
hear directly from a total of 60 grassroots leaders. Each made 
extensive comments on the conditions surrounding their 
organization's efforts, if and/or how they interacted with the 
government and where they saw the best path forward.

                                Hearings

1. ``Recovery Now Initiative,'' February 27, 2003; Serial No. 108-7
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on the ``Recovery Now'' 
drug treatment initiative proposed by President George W. Bush 
in his State of the Union Address on January 28, 2003. The 
President proposed a $600 million initiative (over 3 years) to 
significantly enhance the availability and accountability of 
drug treatment in the United States. The initiative created a 
voucher program to supplement existing treatment programs 
intended to address the currently assessed shortfall in the 
availability of drug treatment in the United States. The 
program is intended to provide sufficient funding to make drug 
treatment available to the vast majority of Americans who need 
assistance, but cannot enroll in a course of treatment. By 
using vouchers, ``Recovery Now'' is intended to make treatment 
more accessible and available by allowing drug users to get 
Federal assistance through a broader network of treatment 
providers. Funding would be available to a wide range of 
providers, including health care providers, faith and community 
based programs, community organizations, workplaces, and 
schools.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from senior administration 
officials responsible for administering and evaluating existing 
drug treatment programs, which described the President's new 
proposal and discussed its implications with the Members. The 
subcommittee also heard testimony from treatment providers from 
local communities, who discussed their approaches to substance 
abuse treatment and the impact that the President's initiative 
could have. The subcommittee continues to closely monitor this 
new initiative as part of its ongoing study of drug treatment 
in the United States.
    b. Witnesses.--John Walters, Director, Office of National 
Drug Control Policy; Charles Curie, M.A., A.C.S.W., 
Administrator, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration; and Jude Boyer-Patrick, M.D., M.P.H., 
Hagerstown, MD.
2. ``ONDCP Reauthorization and the National Drug Control Strategy for 
        2003,'' March 5, 2003; Serial No. 108-15
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held an oversight hearing on 
March 5, 2003 to examine the annual National Drug Control 
Strategy for 2003, issued by the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy [ONDCP]. The strategy, issued in February of 
each year, outlined the administration's comprehensive approach 
to the issue of drug abuse--whether law enforcement, treatment, 
or prevention. This year, the hearing also addressed the 
pending reauthorization of ONDCP.
    ONDCP Director John Walters testified on behalf of the 
administration. In discussing the 2003 strategy, Director 
Walters outlined the basic approach to drug abuse taken by 
President Bush, which emphasizes compassionate care for those 
addicted to drugs, common-sense prevention targeted especially 
at young people, and effective law enforcement designed to 
disrupt the illegal market for drugs. The subcommittee also 
heard testimony concerning the administration's proposals for 
the reauthorization of ONDCP and its programs. The subcommittee 
has since drafted and reported a reauthorization statute (H.R. 
2086), and actively monitored the progress of this legislation, 
and the general implementation of the National Strategy.
    b. Witnesses.--John Walters, Director, Office of National 
Drug Control Policy.
3. ``The Impact of the Drug Trade on Border Security and National 
        Parks,'' field hearing in Sells, AZ, March 10, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-19
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Sells, AZ, the administrative seat of the Tohono O'odham 
Nation, a sovereign tribal region that straddles the Arizona-
Mexico international border. The purpose of the hearing was to 
examine the status of drug smuggling and other illegal activity 
along the Arizona-Mexico border, particularly within the Nation 
and other Federal lands, such as the Organ Pipe Cactus National 
Monument (administered by the National Park Service). Recent 
events, including the murder of Park Ranger Kris Eggle by drug 
smugglers in 2002, illustrated the significance of the problem 
in Arizona.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from Federal and tribal 
officials, and from concerned local citizens, about the 
problems of cross-border crime and discussed potential 
solutions. The subcommittee has closely monitored the situation 
in Arizona and similar areas, and explored legislative and 
other ways to bring assistance to local authorities in their 
struggle to protect the country from narcotics smugglers and 
other cross-border criminals.
    After the hearing, Chairman Souder, Representative Shadegg, 
and the subcommittee staff met with the unit of Customs Patrol 
Officers known as the ``Shadow Wolves.'' The Shadow Wolves 
comprise a specialized unit of Customs Patrol Officers [CPO], 
created by Congress in 1972, patrols the international land 
border within the Tohono O'odham sovereign Indian Nation in the 
State of Arizona. This unit has proven to be one of the 
Nation's most valuable assets against narcotics smuggling. The 
Shadow Wolves officers are Native Americans who combine modern 
technology and ancient tracking techniques to identify, follow 
and arrest illegal drug smugglers along the 76 miles of border 
and 2.8 million acres within the Tohono O'odham Nation. Each 
year, the 21 agents in the Shadow Wolves unit have combined to 
seize over 100,000 pounds of illegal narcotics.
    Subsequent to Mr. Souder's visit, the Department of 
Homeland Security transferred the Shadow Wolves unit to the 
bureau of Customs and Border Protection, and placed it under 
the administrative control of the Tucson Sector of the U.S. 
Border Patrol. This reorganization has produced uncertainty and 
a lack of clear direction for the Shadow Wolves unit--because 
they don't fit in with the Border Patrol's mission and ethos. 
Unlike Border Patrol agents, the Shadow Wolves don't just watch 
the line; they identify and track drug smugglers and attempt to 
locate their routes and distribution centers. The resulting 
uncertainty is having a severe impact on the Shadow Wolves, 
whose numbers are shrinking.
    Chairman Souder has since proposed legislation to remedy 
this problem, by transferred the Shadow Wolves back to the 
bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE].
    b. Witnesses.--Edward D. Manuel, chairman, Tohono O'odham 
Nation; Joseph Delgado, assistant chief of police, Tohono 
O'odham Police Department; David Aguilar, chief patrol agent, 
Tucson Sector, U.S. Border Patrol; Dom Ciccone, Regional Chief, 
National Wildlife Refuge System (Region 2), U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service; William Wellman, Park Supervisor, Organ Pipe 
Cactus National Monument, National Park Service; Hugh 
Winderweedle, Port Director, Lukeville Port of Entry, U.S. 
Customs Service; James Woolley, Assistant Special Agent in 
Charge, Tucson Division Office, Drug Enforcement 
Administration; Fern Salcido, Tohono O'odham Nation Legislative 
Council Member; Augustine Toro, chairman, Chukut Kuk Boundary 
Committee, Tohono O'odham Nation; Col. Ben Anderson, U.S. Army 
(retired); Jennifer Allen, Border Action Network; and Rev. 
Robin Hoover, president, Humane Borders, Inc.
4. ``ONDCP Reauthorization: The National Youth Anti-Drug Media 
        Campaign,'' March 27, 2003; Serial No. 108-17
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a legislative hearing 
concerning the reauthorization of the National Youth Anti-Drug 
Media Campaign, which is administered by ONDCP. The campaign 
provides Federal funding for television, radio, print and other 
media advertisements designed to discourage drug abuse by young 
people. It is the Federal Government's largest and most 
important prevention (or demand reduction) program.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from Members of Congress, 
Federal officials responsible for the campaign, and from 
private entities involved in the campaign. The subcommittee 
drafted and reported legislation reauthorizing the campaign 
(H.R. 2086), who's last authorization expired in 2002. The 
subcommittee will continue to provide oversight of the 
campaign, and to assist in final passage and enactment of the 
reauthorization.
    b. Witnesses.--Hon. Rob Portman, Member of Congress; 
Christopher Marston, Chief of Staff, Office of National Drug 
Control Policy; Steve Pasierb, president, Partnership for a 
Drug Free America; David McConnaughey, Ogilvy & Mather; and 
Peggy Conlon, president and chief executive officer, the Ad 
Council.
5. ``ONDCP Reauthorization: The High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas 
        Program and CTAC,'' April 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-52
    a. Summary.--This legislative hearing focused on two 
programs administered by ONDCP: the High Intensity Drug 
Trafficking Areas [HIDTA] program, and the Counterdrug 
Technology Assistance Center [CTAC]. Both of these programs 
must be reauthorized by Congress, together with ONDCP, after 
the current authorization expires in September 2003. HIDTA 
seeks to foster Federal, State and local law enforcement agency 
cooperation in areas designated as high intensity drug 
trafficking areas by ONDCP, meaning that they are centers of 
drug supply, importation or distribution that have a 
significant impact on the Nation as a whole. Through the HIDTA 
program, the Federal Government provides financial and other 
assistance to set up local or regional task forces and 
intelligence centers to fight drug trafficking organizations, 
and to provide technology. The CTAC program seeks to foster 
research and development of scientific methods of fighting drug 
trafficking and treating drug abuse, and through its Technology 
Transfer Program provides technology to local law enforcement 
agencies.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from administration 
officials responsible for administering or participating in the 
HIDTA and CTAC programs, and from State and local officials 
with experience in dealing with these programs. The witnesses 
and Members discussed how these programs can be improved 
without sacrificing their core missions of furthering the 
national struggle against drug trafficking and abuse. The 
subcommittee has since drafted and reported legislation 
reauthorizing both programs (H.R. 2086), and will continue to 
work to bring this important legislation to the President for 
his signature.
    b. Witnesses.--Scott Burns, Deputy Director, Office of 
State and Local Affairs, Office of National Drug Control 
Policy; Roger Guevara, Chief of Operations, Drug Enforcement 
Administration; Christy McCampbell, chief, Bureau of Narcotics 
Enforcement, California Department of Justice; Wayne Wiberg, 
commander, Narcotics and Gang Investigation Section, Chicago 
Police Department; Lt. Col. Steve Moyer, chief, Homeland 
Defense/Intelligence Bureau, Maryland State Police; Anthony 
Romano, chief, Organized Crime Division, Baltimore Police 
Department; Ron Burns, chief, Lakewood, CO Police Department; 
and Peter Modafferi, chief of detectives, Rockland County, NY 
District Attorney's Office.
6. ``The Impact of the Drug Trade on Border Security,'' field hearing 
        in El Paso, TX, April 15, 2003; Serial No. 108-70
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a field hearing in El 
Paso, TX to examine the status of drug smuggling and other 
illegal activity along the Texas-Mexico border. The El Paso 
region continues to be a major conduit for drug smuggling from 
Mexico into the United States, as well as for other forms of 
cross-border crime, such as illegal immigration and people 
smuggling. State and local officials have often been 
overwhelmed by the extent of the border crime problem, and have 
sought greater Federal assistance.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from Federal, State and 
local officials, and from the business community and other 
concerned local citizens, about the problems of cross-border 
crime and discussed potential solutions. The subcommittee has 
closely monitored the situation in Texas and similar areas, and 
has explored legislative and other ways to bring assistance to 
local authorities in their struggle to protect the country from 
narcotics smugglers and other cross-border criminals.
    b. Witnesses.--Paul Beeson, Assistant Chief Patrol Agent, 
El Paso Sector, U.S. Border Patrol, Bureau of Customs and 
Border Protection; Frank Deckert, Superintendent, Big Bend 
National Park, National Park Service; Sandalio Gonzalez, 
Special Agent in Charge, El Paso Division Office, Drug 
Enforcement Administration; David Longoria, Interim Port 
Director, El Paso Port of Entry, Bureau of Customs and Border 
Protection; Carlos Leon, chief, El Paso Police Department; Leo 
Samaniego, sheriff, El Paso County Sheriff's Department; Bob 
Cook, president, Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce; Ruben 
Garcia, truancy prevention specialist, Ysleta Independent 
School District; and Jose Luis Soria, clinical deputy director, 
Aliviane Drug Treatment Center.
7. ``Improving Security and Facilitating Commerce at the Northern 
        Border,'' field hearing in Niagara Falls, NY, May 19, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-73
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a joint hearing with the 
Select Committee on Homeland Security's Subcommittee on 
Infrastructure and the Border (chaired by Representative Dave 
Camp) at Niagara Falls, NY, to explore ways to improve security 
and law enforcement, facilitate commerce, and ease travel 
between the United States and Canada. The subcommittee has a 
particular interest in addressing the growing problem of cross-
border crime at the Northern border.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from Federal officials, 
Members of the Canadian Parliament, State and local officials, 
the business community, and concerned citizens about the issues 
of border management in the region. The subcommittee has 
closely monitored this situation, and will continue to work 
with the Select Committee on Homeland Security in exploring 
legislative and other solutions to these problems.
    b. Witnesses.--Michael P. D'Ambrosio, Interim Director, 
Field Operations, Buffalo Field Office, Bureau of Customs and 
Border Protection; CDR Paul M. Gugg, Commanding Officer, Marine 
Safety Office, Buffalo, NY, U.S. Coast Guard; Peter R. Moran, 
Chief Patrol Agent, Buffalo Sector, U.S. Border Patrol, Bureau 
of Customs and Border Protection; William J. Walker, Associate 
Special Agent in Charge, New York Field Division, Drug 
Enforcement Administration; Derek Lee, Member of Parliament, 
House of Commons (Canada); John Maloney, Member of Parliament, 
House of Commons (Canada); Thomas A. Beilein, sheriff, Niagara 
County Sheriff's Department; Russell J. Deveso, chairman, New 
York State Motor Trucking Association; Kevin Feely, president, 
Chapter 154, National Treasury Employees Union; Dawn Hamilton, 
director of strategic planning, WNED; Stephen F. Mayer, general 
manager-operations, Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge 
Authority; and Dr. Andrew Rudnick, president, Buffalo Niagara 
Partnership.
8. ``Faith-based Perspectives on the Provision of Community Services,'' 
        field hearing in Franklin, TN, June 16, 2003; Serial No. 108-60
    a. Summary.--This hearing, held in San Antonio, TX, served 
as research in the area of the effectiveness of faith-based 
organizations. The question was asked, ``What factors make the 
faith-based organization uniquely qualified to provide social 
services?'' This hearing was intended to begin consideration of 
what, in the eyes of the providers, makes faith-based 
organizations especially equipped to provide social services to 
the community.
    At this hearing the subcommittee heard from organizations 
that provide community development and reconciliation, and 
services to children, families, and prisoners. Witnesses 
testified to the impact faith-based organizations can have in 
bringing about a stronger community by helping to build 
relationships between people of different race and class.
    b. Witnesses.--Paige Pitts, founder, New Hope Academy, 
Franklin, TN; Rev. Scott Roley and Rev. Denny Denson, Empty 
Hands Fellowship, Franklin, TN; Onnie Kirk, the Family 
Foundation Fund, Nashville, TN; John Lanza and Dennis Bradby, 
Corrections Corp. of America, Nashville, TN; and Robert Flores, 
Lighthouse Outreach Ministries, Inc., Lawrenceburg, TN.
9. ``The Role of Faith-Based Organizations in Providing Effective 
        Social Services,'' July 2, 2003; Serial No. 108-87
    a. Summary.--This hearing was the first in a series of 
oversight hearings designed to examine the role of faith-based 
and community organizations in providing social services to the 
needy in communities across the United States. Research in the 
area of the effectiveness of faith-based organizations is 
limited, and often largely anecdotal. The question remains as 
to what factors make the faith-based organization uniquely 
qualified to provide social services. This hearing was intended 
to begin consideration of what, in the eyes of the providers, 
makes faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide 
social services to the community.
    This hearing featured the juxtaposition of faith-based 
substance abuse treatment providers. One organization was 
deeply rooted in the belief that faith alone can assist an 
addict in overcoming substance abuse, while the other which is 
rooted in a faith tradition, believes that faith alone is not 
the proper path to recovery, but recovery requires medical 
care. Both organizations are committed to their approach, both 
look to care for the whole person, and both have success in 
bringing addicts to recovery, but they differ significantly in 
the role that faith plays in the recovery process.
    b. Witnesses.--Pastor Freddie Garcia, Victory Fellowship, 
San Antonio, TX; Ninfa Garcia, Victory Fellowship, San Antonio, 
TX; Jubal Garcia, Victory Fellowship, San Antonio, TX; Joe 
Willome, Victory Fellowship, San Antonio, TX; Philip Dautrich, 
program manager, InnerChange Freedom Initiative, Carol S. Vance 
Unit, Richmond, TX; Greg Kepferle, executive director, Catholic 
Charities of Central New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Mitch 
Sudolsky, Jewish Family Service, Austin, TX; Leslie Grubbs, 
program director, Urban Connection, San Antonio, TX; Milt 
McFarland, Christian Assistance Ministry, San Antonio, TX; and 
Mike Tellez, Character Kids, Las Cruces, NM.
10. ``Disrupting the Market: Strategy, Implementation, and Results in 
        Narcotics Source Countries,'' July 9, 2003; Serial No. 108-118
    a. Summary.--A large number of significant issues relating 
to drug supply reduction required careful consideration. This 
hearing intended to make senior Federal officials, with 
operational responsibility for narcotics supply issues, 
available to the subcommittee.
         Plan Colombia: U.S. assistance to the 
        Government of Colombia has led to the first meaningful 
        signs of success due to the strong support from 
        President Uribe.
         Resource Allocation: A significant strain on 
        supply reduction resources caused by defense and 
        homeland security requirements has challenged drug 
        supply reduction efforts.
         Emerging Threats: Emerging threats such as the 
        growth of Colombian heroin use on the East Coast of the 
        United States, the resumption of large-scale opium 
        production in Afghanistan and the expansion of emerging 
        and club drugs such as ecstasy, ``Yaba'' and others 
        have challenged traditional assumptions relating to 
        supply reduction and could require adjustments in 
        strategy.
         Organizational Issues: What impact has the 
        creation of the Department of Homeland Security had on 
        supply reduction efforts, and what has been the 
        progress of implementation of legislation designed to 
        ensure adequate focus within the Department on drug 
        supply reduction?
         Airbridge Denial Program: The Airbridge Denial 
        Program to provide intelligence to South American 
        governments relating to aerial narcotics smuggling has 
        been suspended for more than 2 years as a result of the 
        tragic shoot down incident in Peru. What effects has 
        the program suspension had on drug supply, and what has 
        been the cause of the lengthy delay in its restoration?
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Barry Crane, Deputy Director for Supply 
Reduction, Office of National Drug Control Policy.
11. ``Facing the Methamphetamine Problem in America,'' July 18, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-93
    a. Summary.--This hearing, a follow-up to a hearing held in 
July 2001, continued the subcommittee's ongoing study of 
methamphetamine abuse, one of our Nation's most significant and 
growing drug problems. The subcommittee discussed potential 
legislative solutions to assist those agencies in the fight 
against methamphetamine, including H.R. 834, the Clean, Learn, 
Educate, Abolish, Neutralize, and Undermine Production [CLEAN-
UP] of Methamphetamines Act offered by Representative Doug Ose.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from Federal and State law 
enforcement officials concerning the rise in methamphetamine 
trafficking and abuse, and discussed ways to address this 
problem. The subcommittee has continued to monitor this issue, 
and has recommended legislative or other changes in order to 
bring assistance to law enforcement agencies.
    b. Witnesses.--Hon. John Boozman; Hon. Ed Case; Roger E. 
Guevara, Chief of Operations, Drug Enforcement Administration; 
John C. Horton, Associate Deputy Director for State and Local 
Affairs, Office of National Drug Control Policy; Captain 
William Kelly, Commander, Narcotics Division, Sacramento County 
Sheriff's Department; Brian J. Martinek, chief, Vancouver, WA 
Police Department; and Sheriff Garry E. Lucas, Clark County, WA 
Sheriff's Office.
12. ``How Can the Federal Government Assist State and Local Programs to 
        Protect Citizens and Communities Against Drug-Related 
        Violence,'' field hearing in Baltimore, MD, July 21, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-106
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a field hearing in 
Baltimore, MD to explore potential ways the Federal Government 
can assist State and local law enforcement agencies in 
protecting citizens who assist the police in the fight against 
illegal drugs. The murders of the Dawson family in Baltimore in 
October 2002, in retaliation for the Dawsons' active attempts 
to rid their neighborhood of drug dealers, have spurred calls 
for greater protection of law-abiding citizens.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from Federal, State and 
local officials, as well as concerned local citizens, about 
these pressing issues. One potential legislative solution, the 
Dawson Family Community Protection Act (H.R. 1599), was 
introduced by subcommittee Ranking Member Elijah Cummings. This 
bill's provisions were included in the legislation 
reauthorizing ONDCP, drafted and reported by the subcommittee 
(H.R. 2086).
    b. Witnesses.--Martin O'Malley, mayor, city of Baltimore; 
Preston L. Grubbs, Assistant Special Agent in Charge, Baltimore 
District Office, Drug Enforcement Administration; Thomas Carr, 
Director, Baltimore/Washington High Intensity Drug Trafficking 
Area; Alan C. Woods III, director, Governor's Office of Crime 
Control and Prevention; Kevin P. Clark, commissioner, Baltimore 
City Police Department; Lt. Col. David W. Czorapinski, chief, 
Maryland State Police, Operations Bureau; Anthony Romano, 
chief, Organized Crime Bureau, Baltimore City Police 
Department; Gen. Arthur T. Dean (retired), chairman and CEO, 
Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America; Rev. Dr. Robert 
Burley, Sr., president, Oliver Community Association and 
Pastor, New Life Ministry Baptist Church; Dr. Linda S. 
Thompson, coordinator, Baltimore Community Anti-Drug Coalition, 
and Acting Chair and Associate Dean, University of Maryland 
School of Nursing; and Rev. Iris Tucker, pastor, Knox 
Presbyterian Church.
13. ``Federal Law Enforcement Personnel in the Post September 11 Era: 
        How Can We Fix An Imbalanced Compensation System?'' July 23, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-83
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a joint hearing with the 
Government Reform Committee's Subcommittee on Civil Service and 
Agency Organization (chaired by Representative Jo Ann Davis) 
concerning the challenges facing Federal law enforcement 
agencies as they seek to restructure their personnel management 
systems. Since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the 
Federal Government has sought new ways to restructure itself in 
response to new threats. The creation of the Department of 
Homeland Security in 2002, merging many disparate agencies, has 
necessitated a comprehensive review and reform of the law 
enforcement personnel system.
    The subcommittees heard testimony from Federal officials, 
representatives of Federal employee unions, and other concerned 
individuals about the issues facing our Nation's law 
enforcement agencies. The subcommittee will continue to work 
with the Civil Service Subcommittee and other relevant 
committees to conduct oversight and pursue potential 
legislative solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--T.J. Bonner, national president, National 
Border Patrol Council of the American Federation of Government 
Employees, AFL-CIO; Inspector Louis P. Cannon, president, 
District of Columbia State Lodge, chairman, Federal Officer's 
Committee, Fraternal Order of Police; Kay Frances Dolan, 
Department of Homeland Security; Richard Gallo, immediate past 
president, Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association; 
Ignatius Gentile, president, Department of Homeland Security 
Council 117, American Federation of Government Employees; 
Colleen M. Kelley, national president, National Treasury 
Employees Union; Hon. Peter King (R-NY); Norman J. Rabkin, 
Managing Director, Homeland Security and Justice Issues, U.S. 
General Accounting Office; Mike Rogers; Nancy Savage, Federal 
Bureau of Investigation Agents Association; and Joanne W. 
Simms, Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Justice Management 
Division.
14. ``Faith-based Perspectives on the Provision of Community 
        Services,'' field hearing in Chicago, IL, August 25, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-101
    a. Summary.--Research in the area of the effectiveness of 
faith-based organizations is limited, and often largely 
anecdotal. The question remains as to what factors make the 
faith-based organization uniquely qualified to provide social 
services. This hearing was intended to consider what factors 
makes faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide 
social services to the community.
    Witnesses from organizations that reach out to male 
prostitutes, children, addicts, and work to develop communities 
discussed with the subcommittee the importance of partnerships 
between government agencies at all levels, and the critical 
importance that those relationships to not materially alter the 
mission of the faith-based organizations.
    b. Witnesses.--Pastor Jesse Beasly, Team 3, Inc., Fort 
Wayne, IN; Richard Hart, Salvation Army, Chicago, IL; Beth 
Truett, executive director, Partners In Education, Fourth 
Presbyterian Church, Chicago, IL; Tim Sauder, executive 
director, Gateway Woods Children's Home, Leo, IN; Mark Terrell, 
CEO, Lifeline Youth and Family Services, Fort Wayne, IN; John 
Green, executive director, Emmaus Ministries, Chicago, IL; Mary 
Nelson, president and CEO, Bethel New Life, Inc., Chicago, IL; 
Richard Townsell, executive director, Lawndale Christian 
Development Corp., Chicago, IL; and Emmet Moore, 11th District 
Police Steering Committee, Chicago, IL.
15. ``Implementation of National Supply Reduction Strategy,'' September 
        17, 2003; Serial No. 108-115
    a. Summary.--Complementing its focus on the reauthorization 
of the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the 
President's initiative on drug treatment, the subcommittee held 
hearings during the 108th Congress on narcotics supply issues. 
This hearing made available to the subcommittee a senior 
Federal official with policy responsibility for narcotics 
supply issues from the Office of National Drug Control Policy, 
as a follow-up to a hearing entitled ``Disrupting the Market: 
Strategy, Implementation, and Results in Narcotics Source 
Countries.''
    Dr. Barry Crane, Deputy Director, Office of National Drug 
Control Policy spoke about issues such as Plan Colombia, Air 
Bridge Denial, resource allocation and emerging threats as well 
as organizational issues and agency organization.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Barry Crane, Deputy Director for Supply 
Reduction, Office of National Drug Control Policy.
16. ``Strengthening the Long Arm of the Law: How Are Fugitives Avoiding 
        Extradition, and How Can We Bring Them to Justice?'' October 1, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-128
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held this hearing to assess 
the status of the extradition process, whereby our law 
enforcement agencies and courts attempt to bring fugitives in 
foreign countries to justice for crimes committed in the United 
States. Recent developments have put strains on the extradition 
process, hindering or sometimes completely impeding the ability 
of law enforcement to bring criminal fugitives to justice. In 
particular, the decision of the Mexican Supreme Court to bar 
extradition for anyone facing life imprisonment--even 
murderers--has shielded many violent criminals from justice.
    The subcommittee heard testimony from representatives of 
Federal, State and local agencies with experience in the 
extradition process, as well as the widow of a murder victim 
whose killer fled to Mexico and remains at large. The 
subcommittee will continue to monitor this issue, and to pursue 
any legislative or other solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--Bruce Swartz, Deputy Assistant Attorney 
General, Criminal Division, U.S. Department of Justice; Samuel 
Witten, Deputy Legal Advisor, Legal Bureau, U.S. Department of 
State; James Fox, District Attorney, San Mateo County, CA, 
Representing the National District Attorneys Association; 
Daniel J. Porter, District Attorney, Gwinnett Judicial Circuit, 
Georgia; and Teri March, widow of Los Angeles County, CA Deputy 
Sheriff David March.
17. ``Drug Production on Public Lands--A Growing Problem,'' October 10, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-138
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a joint field hearing at 
Sequoia National Park, CA, with the Government Reform 
Committee's Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Natural Resources 
and Regulatory Affairs on the impact of drug production on 
national parks, forests and other public lands. Recent years 
have seen a dramatic rise in drug production, including 
marijuana cultivation and methamphetamine labs, in these areas. 
This presents serious challenges for drug enforcement and for 
visitor and resource protection on public lands. The growing 
techniques and dangerous chemicals associated with these 
operations pose a significant environmental threat to protected 
areas. Violent incidents involving armed guards at these 
production sites also raise concern about safety for the 
employees who work on these lands and the visitors who enjoy 
them. Public lands in California, including national parks and 
national forests, have particularly experienced an increase in 
drug production. In 2002 marijuana plant seizures in 
California's national forests accounted for over 70 percent of 
the marijuana plants seized in national forests across the 
country. In Sequoia National Park, marijuana cultivation has 
exploded in recent years, with only about 700 marijuana plants 
eradicated in the park in 2000 but around 34,000 plants 
eradicated in 2002.
    The subcommittees heard testimony from land management 
agency representatives, law enforcement officials, and 
concerned citizens, who discussed the effects of drug 
production on public lands and efforts to combat it. Witnesses 
included representatives of the National Park Service, the U.S. 
Department of Agriculture Forest Service, the Drug Enforcement 
Administration, California Department of Parks and Recreation, 
California Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement, the Tulare County 
Sheriff's Department, and the citizen group Wilderness Watch. 
Witnesses described the extensive environmental degradation to 
public lands used for drug production and the difficulty of 
restoring these areas. Many witnesses testified that the 
sophisticated, large-scale marijuana growing operations on 
public lands in recent years are the work of drug trafficking 
organizations. They expressed concern about the increased 
violence armed growers exhibited toward one another and toward 
law enforcement during the 2003 marijuana growing season. While 
many of the marijuana plantation sites are located in remote 
areas, concern remains that this violence will also confront 
the visiting public. Witnesses and Members discussed strategies 
to find and eradicate drugs produced on public lands. Many 
witnesses emphasized past and current cooperative efforts of 
land management agencies and Federal, State, and local law 
enforcement to investigate drug production on public lands and 
eradicate the drugs produced there, and they stressed the 
importance of continued interagency cooperation to effectively 
combat this problem.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Martin, Superintendent, Sequoia and 
Kings Canyon National Parks, Department of the Interior, 
National Park Service; Arthur Gaffey, Forest Supervisor, 
Sequoia National Forest, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest 
Service; Stephen C. Delgado, Special Agent in Charge, San 
Francisco Field Division, Drug Enforcement Administration; Lisa 
Mulz, superintendent of law enforcement and public safety, 
California Department of Parks and Recreation; Val Jiminez, 
special agent supervisor and commander, Campaign Against 
Marijuana Planting, California Department of Justice, Bureau of 
Narcotic Enforcement; Captain David Williams, Tulare County 
Sheriff's Department; and Joe Fontaine, member, Board of 
Directors, Wilderness Watch.
18. ``Organized Retail Theft: Conduit of Money Laundering,'' field 
        hearing in Cypress, TX, November 10, 2003; Serial No. 108-147
    a. Summary.--As a result of its focus on criminal justice 
and money laundering, the subcommittee conducted a field 
hearing intended to expose the problem of organized rings of 
criminals who steal high-price-point retail items and then 
resell them. The proceeds from the resale, in some cases, are 
being surreptitiously funneled out of the United States. The 
consumer and American retail businesses are unwittingly 
contributing to an international money laundering operation.
    Baby formula and other high priced retail items are being 
stolen at high rates and resold to small ``Mom & Pop'' 
retailers. The product is not stored in prescribed conditions 
between the time it is stolen and returns on the selves of 
smaller retailers. Witnesses testified that this practice puts 
consumer safety in jeopardy.
    b. Witnesses.--Randy Merritt, detective, Pasadena Police 
Department, Pasadena, TX; Johnnie Jezierski, sergeant, Texas 
Department of Public Safety; Alonzo Pena, Associate Special 
Agent In Charge, Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Frank Borden, assistant 
director, Manufactured Food Division, Texas Department of 
Health; Don Clemmer, assistant attorney general, Texas Attorney 
General's Office; James Jacks, First Assistant U.S. Attorney, 
Northern District of Texas, U.S. Department of Justice; Joe 
Williams, Gulf Coast Retailer's Association; Darrell Taylor, 
HEB Grocery Store Chain; and Deborah Brookshire, Texas 
Department of Health.
19. ``Faith-based Perspectives on the Provision of Community 
        Services,'' field hearing in Charlotte, NC, December 10, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-148
    a. Summary.--Research in the area of the effectiveness of 
faith-based organizations is limited, and often largely 
anecdotal. The question remains as to what factors make the 
faith-based organization uniquely qualified to provide social 
services. This hearing was intended to consider what factors 
make faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide 
social services to the community.
    Witnesses discussed with the subcommittee the need for 
technical assistance and networking among organizations, 
government agencies, and private foundations, and the need for 
development of private donations.
    b. Witnesses.--Rev. Tony Marciano, executive director, 
Charlotte Rescue Mission, Charlotte, NC; Cindy Marshall, 
executive director, the Potter's House, Gastonia, NC; Shirley 
Stowe, director of nursing and home management, House of Mercy, 
Belmont, NC; Rev. Mable Hemphill, World Outreach Medical 
Center, Gastonia, NC; Alice Harrison, executive director, Hope 
Haven, Charlotte, NC; Thompson Children's Home, Charlotte, NC; 
and Pat Marcum, LOVE, Inc. of Mecklenburg County.
20. ``Faith Based Perspectives on the Provision of Community 
        Services,'' field hearing in Los Angeles, CA, January 12, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-152
    a. Summary.--The Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug 
Policy, and Human Resources held the fifth in a series of 
oversight hearings designed to examine the role of faith-based 
organizations in providing social services to the needy in 
communities across the United States. Faith-based providers 
discussed what methods of the provision of social services that 
they have found to be effective in their communities.
    Research in the area of the effectiveness of faith-based 
organizations is limited, and often largely anecdotal. The 
question remains as to what factors make the faith-based 
organization uniquely qualified to provide social services. 
This hearing was intended to continue consideration of what 
makes faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide 
social services to the community.
    Faith-based organizations discussed with the subcommittee 
the need for technical assistance and networking among 
organizations, government agencies, and private foundations, 
and the need for development of private donations.
    b. Witnesses.--Rudy Carrasco, executive director, Harambee, 
Pasadena, CA; Rev. Lee de Leon, Templo Calvario, Santa Ana, CA; 
Maria Hamilton, executive director, Simi Valley Community 
Center; Rev. Jeff Carr, executive director, the Bresee 
Foundation, Los Angeles, CA; Dr. Keith Phillips, president, 
World Impact, Los Angeles, CA; Doug Gold, executive director, 
Jewish Big Brothers & Big Sisters, Los Angeles, CA; Pastor John 
Baker, Celebrate Recovery, Lake Forest, CA; Lt. Col. Alfred Van 
Cleef, Salvation Army of Southern California; and Tim Hooten, 
executive director, Office of Ministry and Service, Azusa 
Pacific University, Azusa, CA.
21. ``Faith-based Perspectives on the Provision of Community 
        Services,'' field hearing in Colorado Springs, CO, January 23, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-158
    a. Summary.--The Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug 
Policy, and Human Resources held the sixth in a series of 
oversight hearings designed to examine the role of faith-based 
organizations in providing social services to the needy in 
communities across the United States. Faith-based providers 
will discuss what methods of the provision of social services 
that they have found to be effective in their communities.
    Research in the area of the effectiveness of faith-based 
organizations is limited, and often largely anecdotal. The 
question remains as to what factors make the faith-based 
organization uniquely qualified to provide social services. 
This hearing was intended to continue consideration of what 
makes faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide 
social services to the community.
    Faith-based organizations discussed with the subcommittee 
the need for technical assistance and networking among 
organizations, government agencies, and private foundations, 
and the need for development of private donations.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Walter Larimore, vice president of 
medical outreach, Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO; 
Wilford Wooten, Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO; 
Frank Keller, Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO; Mike 
Haley, public policy/youth & gender specialist, Focus on the 
Family, Colorado Springs, CO; Tom Minnery, vice president of 
public policy, Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO; Larry 
Jones, president, Feed the Children, Oklahoma City, OK; Jackie 
Jaramillo, executive director, Faith Partners, Colorado 
Springs, CO; Rev. Dean Cowles, president, YouthPartnersNET, 
Denver, CO; Bob Cote, executive director, Step 13, Denver, CO; 
and Ed Anderson, Compassion International, Colorado Springs, 
CO.
22. ``Fighting Methamphetamine in the Heartland: How Can the Federal 
        Government Assist State and Local Efforts,'' field hearing in 
        Elkhart, IN, February 6, 2004; Serial No. 108-179
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to assess the recent 
growth in methamphetamine trafficking and abuse in the Midwest 
region of the United States as well as the response of Federal, 
State and local law enforcement agencies. The hearing provided 
an opportunity for representatives of Federal and local 
agencies with experience in fighting methamphetamine 
trafficking, as well as organizations that specialize in the 
treatment and prevention of meth addiction and abuse, to 
discuss these issues and suggest solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--Scott Burns, Deputy Director for State and 
Local Affairs, Office of National Drug Control Policy; Armand 
McClintock, Assistant Special Agent in Charge, Indianapolis, IN 
District Office, Drug Enforcement Administration; Melvin 
Carraway, superintendent, Indiana State Police; Curtis T. Hill, 
Jr., prosecuting attorney, Elkhart County Prosecuting 
Attorney's Office; Bill Wargo, chief investigator, Elkhart 
County Prosecuting Attorney's Office; Detective Daniel 
Anderson, Starke County Sheriff's Department; Corporal Tony 
Ciriello, Kosciusko County Sheriff's Department; Kevin Enyeart, 
Cass County prosecutor; Doug Harp, chief deputy, Noble County 
Sheriff's Office; Sergeant Jeff Schnepp, Logansport-Cass County 
Drug Task Force; Brian Connor, acting executive director, the 
Center for the Homeless, South Bend; Barry Humble, executive 
director, Drug & Alcohol Consortium of Allen County; and 
Benjamin Martin, Serenity House, Inc.
23. ``To Do No Harm: Strategies for Preventing Prescription Drug 
        Abuse,'' field hearing in Winter Park, FL, February 9, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-187
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a public hearing to 
examine how the Federal Government, in cooperation with State 
and local authorities, can improve the process of testing, 
approval, and dispensing to reduce the risk of prescription 
drug abuse. The hearing provided an opportunity for 
representatives of Federal and State agencies with the 
responsibility for controlling prescription drug abuse, as well 
as representatives of the medical and scientific communities, 
pharmaceutical companies, and concerned citizens to discuss 
these issues and suggest solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--William T. Fernandez, Director, Central 
Florida HIDTA; Dr. Robert J. Meyer, M.D., Director, Office of 
Drug Evaluation II, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, 
U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Tom Raffanello, Special 
Agent in Charge, Miami Division, DEA; James R. McDonough, 
director, Florida Office of Drug Control; Dr. Stacy Berckes, 
M.D., board member, Lake Sumter Medical Society; Jack E. 
Henningfield, Ph.D., Pinney Associates, on behalf of Purdue 
Pharma; Theresa Tolle, R.Ph., president, Florida Pharmacy 
Association; Frederick W. Pauzar; Dr. Douglas Davies, M.D., 
Medical Director, Stewart-Marchman Center; Professor Paul L. 
Doering, M.S., distinguished service professor of pharmacy 
practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida; and Dr. 
Chad D. Kollas, M.D., medical director, palliative medicine, 
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando.
24. ``Afghanistan: Law Enforcement Interdiction Efforts in 
        Transshipment Countries to Stem the Flow of Heroin,'' February 
        26, 2004; Serial No. 108-215
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held this hearing to examine 
the efforts of the Drug Enforcement Administration and the 
Department of State, International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs Bureau in impeding and interdicting the 
various forms of heroin as it leaves Afghanistan. Several 
smuggling routes were identified as the most commonly used. 
Each witness discussed their strategies, funding, and resources 
in addressing this rapidly increasing problem. The interagency 
and international relationships between the key stakeholders 
were explored and encouraged.
    b. Witnesses.--Robert Charles, Assistant Secretary, 
Department of State, International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs; and Karen Tandy, Administrator, Drug 
Enforcement Administration.
25. ``Andean Counterdrug Initiative,'' March 2, 2004; Serial No. 108-
        186
    a. Summary.--Oversight hearing to examine the fiscal year 
2005 President's budget request as it applies to the 
counternarcotics efforts throughout the Andean Region. The 
Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Department of 
Defense, and the Department of State discussed the disruption 
of the narcotics business and alternative economic development 
initiatives that were included in the President's budget.
    This hearing sought to provide an opportunity for Director 
Walters to discuss the administration's general views and 
priorities in the President's budget and for Members to discuss 
issues related to the national drug control budget, strategies, 
and policies. Members heard from Mr. O'Connell, Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict and Mr. Charles, Assistant Secretary of State for 
International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs about the 
implementation of the National Drug Control Strategy in the 
Andean Region. Some of the major initiatives, listed as 
follows, were discussed: Alternative Economic Development, 
Aerial Eradication, Air Bridge Denial Program, Plan Colombia, 
and Resource Allocation.
    b. Witnesses.--John Walters, Director, Office of National 
Drug Control Policy; Tom O'Connell, Assistant Secretary, 
Department of Defense, Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict; and Robert Charles, Assistant Secretary, Department 
of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs.
26. ``Cervical Cancer and Human Papillomavirus,'' March 11, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-206
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on cervical cancer and 
human papillomavirus [HPV], the virus that causes nearly all 
cervical cancer. Federal agencies discussed efforts to address 
cervical cancer, including prevention, screening, treatment and 
research.
    During the last several decades, the incidence of cervical 
cancer and deaths from the disease have declined steadily in 
the United States due to treatment and an increase in the use 
diagnostic tools such as of PAP smears, which detect abnormal 
cervical changes that may indicate precancerous cells or 
cancer. In 2001, cervical cancer was estimated to be the 12th 
most commonly newly diagnosed cancer among women in the United 
States. In contrast, it is the second leading cancer of women 
worldwide. The rate of cervical cancer cases in African-
American women (11.4 per 1,000) is 60 percent higher than the 
rate in white women (7.1 per 1,000), and African-American women 
are about 33 percent more likely to die from it.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Dave Weldon, Member of Congress; Ed 
Thompson, M.D., Deputy Director for Public Health Services, 
Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention; Edward L. Trimble, 
M.D., M.P.H., Gynecologic Oncologist, National Cancer 
Institute, National Institutes of Health; Daniel G. Schultz, 
M.D., Director, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices 
and Radiologic Health, Food and Drug Administration; Tom A. 
Coburn, M.D., Muskogee, OK; Freda Bush, M.D., FACOG, Jackson, 
MS; John Thomas Cox, M.D., Santa Barbara, CA; Margaret Meeker, 
M.D., Traverse City, MI; and Jonathan M. Zenilman, M.D., 
Baltimore, MD.
27. ``Centers for Faith-based and Community Initiatives: Promise and 
        Progress,'' March 23, 2004; Serial No. 108-194
    a. Summary.--Oversight hearing on ``Legal and Practical 
Issues Related to the Faith-Based Initiative.'' The hearing 
provided an opportunity to discuss the varied legal and 
practical issues that surround government partnerships with 
faith-based organizations.
    Research in the area of the effectiveness of faith-based 
organizations is limited, and often largely anecdotal. The 
question remains as to what factors make the faith-based 
organization uniquely qualified to provide social services. 
This hearing was intended to continue consideration of what 
makes faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide 
social services to the community.
    Faith-based organizations discussed with the subcommittee 
the need for technical assistance and networking among 
organizations, government agencies, and private foundations, 
and the need for development of private donations.
    b. Witnesses.--Rev. Barry Lynn, executive director, 
Americans United for the Separation of Church and State; Holly 
Hollman, general counsel, Baptist Joint Committee; Nathan 
Diament, director of public policy, Union of Orthodox Jewish 
Congregations of America; Dr. Amy Sherman, director, Hudson 
Institute Faith-In-Communities Program; Rev. Wilson Goode, 
senior advisor on Faith-Based Initiatives for Public/Private 
Ventures; and Steve Fitzhugh, director, the House.
28. ``Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug Addiction Treatment,'' March 
        30, 2004; Serial No. 108-222
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing examined how the 
effectiveness of drug addiction treatment is measured. The 
Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration [SAMHSA] and the Director of the National 
Institute of Drug Abuse [NIDA] of the National Institutes of 
Health [NIH], together with private citizen witnesses 
representing drug addiction treatment policy organizations, 
discussed measurement of the effectiveness of drug addiction 
treatment.
    Defining and measuring the success of drug addiction 
treatment is fundamental to measuring the relative 
effectiveness of drug treatment programs and therapies 
supported by the Federal Government. Effective measurement 
methods can provide for reliable emphasis on results, which can 
lead to improvement in treatment. The witnesses addressed how 
to measure drug addiction treatment effectiveness: what the 
best methods are; how organizations and individuals are working 
to identify and improve those methods; and what the future 
holds in measuring effectiveness and improving treatment.
    b. Witnesses.--Charles Currie, Administrator, Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Nora D. 
Volkow, Director, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National 
Institutes of Health; A. Thomas McLellan, Ph.D., director, 
Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA; Charles 
O'Keefe, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA; Karen 
Freeman-Wilson, executive director, National Drug Court 
Institute, Alexandria, VA; Jerome Jaffe, M.D., professor, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD; Catherine Martens, 
senior vice president, Second Genesis, Silver Spring, MD; and 
Hendree Jones, Ph.D., research director, Center for Addiction 
and Pregnancy, Baltimore, MD.
29. ``Afghanistan: Are British Counternarcotics Efforts Going Wobbly?'' 
        April 1, 2004; Serial No. 108-224
    a. Summary.--This investigative hearing examined the 
eradication efforts of the British military and other coalition 
forces in Afghanistan. The CNC estimated over 60,000 hectares 
under cultivation in 2004, the second largest to date. The 
harvest amounted to approximately 3,000 metric tons of heroin. 
The Department of State discussed the disruption of the 
narcotics business by manual eradication and alternative 
economic development initiatives to the Afghan farmers.
    This hearing provided an opportunity for Assistant 
Secretary of the Department of State Robert Charles to discuss 
the importance of eradication. DOS oversees all aerial 
eradication programs in Latin America and as a result, their 
experience serves as a model of effective supply reduction 
efforts. The witness had recently returned from Afghanistan and 
other countries within the region.
    b. Witnesses.--Robert Charles, Assistant Secretary, 
Department of State, International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs.
30. ``Marijuana and Medicine: The Need For a Science Based Approach,'' 
        April 1, 2004; Serial No. 108-226
    a. Summary.--This hearing explored the numerous scientific 
and medical claims being made about marijuana, and the real 
health impact the drug has on individuals. The hearing also 
examined the potential impact that bypassing Federal 
regulations of medical drugs--as various State laws that 
purport to legalize marijuana as medicine have done--may have 
on consumer health and safety. The hearing provided an 
opportunity for representatives of Federal and State agencies 
with the responsibility for regulating drugs and the practice 
of medicine, as well as representatives of the medical and 
scientific communities, to discuss these issues and suggest 
solutions.
    This hearing addressed one of the most contentious debates 
in modern drug policy: the use of marijuana for ``medicinal'' 
purposes. Marijuana is a plant which, when smoked or consumed, 
is a powerful psychoactive drug (due to the presence of its 
main chemical component, THC). It was once used as a folk 
``medicinal'' remedy in many primitive cultures, and even in 
the 19th century was frequently used as a treatment for various 
maladies by some Western doctors (much as alcohol, cocaine and 
heroin were once so used). By the 20th century, however, its 
use by legitimate medical practitioners had dwindled, while its 
illegitimate use as a ``recreational'' drug had risen. The drug 
was finally banned as a medicine in the 1930's. Beginning in 
the 1970's, however, individuals began reporting anecdotal 
evidence that marijuana might have some medically beneficial 
uses, most notably in suppressing the nausea associated with 
cancer chemotherapy. By the 1990's, the evidence was still 
anecdotal, but a large and well-funded pro-marijuana movement 
had succeeded in convincing many Americans that marijuana was a 
true ``medicine.'' Unable to change the Federal laws, pro-
marijuana activists turned to the States, and succeeded in 
passing a number of ``medical marijuana'' laws. This has 
created a direct conflict between Federal and State law, and 
has put into sharp focus the competing claims about the 
scientific value of marijuana (and its components) as 
``medicine.''
    b. Witnesses.--Nora D. Volkow, Director, National Institute 
on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health; Dr. Robert J. 
Meyer, M.D., Director, Office of Drug Evaluation II, Center for 
Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug 
Administration; Patricia Good, Chief, Liaison and Policy 
Section, Office of Diversion Control, Drug Enforcement 
Administration; Dr. James D. Scott, M.D., board member, Oregon 
Board of Medical Examiners; Joan Jerzak, chief of enforcement, 
Medical Board of California; Dr. Claudia Jensen, M.D., Ventura, 
CA; Robert Kampia, executive director, Marijuana Policy 
Project; Dr. Phillip E. Leveque, D.O., Ph.D., Portland, OR; and 
Dr. Robert DuPont, M.D., Institute for Behavior and Health, 
Inc., Rockville, MD.
31. ``Northern Ice: Stopping Methamphetamine Precursor Chemical 
        Smuggling Across the U.S.-Canada Border,'' field hearing in 
        Detroit, MI, April 20, 2004
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held a public hearing to 
investigate the smuggling of methamphetamine precursor 
chemicals from Canada into the United States, as well as the 
response of Federal, State and local law enforcement agencies. 
The hearing provided an opportunity for representatives of law 
enforcement agencies with experience in fighting 
methamphetamine precursor trafficking to discuss this issue and 
suggest solutions.
    This hearing, the fourth in a series of hearings held by 
this subcommittee since 2001 on methamphetamine trafficking and 
abuse, continued subcommittee work on this significant and 
growing drug problem. Methamphetamine (``meth''), among the 
most powerful and dangerous stimulants available, is relatively 
easy to produce; so-called meth ``cooks'' can create the drug 
from common household or agricultural chemicals and cold 
medicines like ephedrine and pseudoephedrine (such chemicals 
being referred to as meth ``precursors''). The drug is highly 
addictive and has multiple side effects, including psychotic 
behavior, physical deterioration, and brain damage. Death by 
overdose is a significant risk.
    These chemicals are being smuggled, usually by truck, 
across such border crossings as Detroit's Ambassador Bridge and 
Port Huron, MI's Blue Water Bridge. DEA and other law 
enforcement agencies have identified several organizations, 
many of Middle Eastern origin, as being the primary smugglers. 
Identifying and stopping smugglers using these bridges presents 
a serious challenge for law enforcement. Detroit is the busiest 
truck crossing in the United States, while Port Huron is the 
fourth busiest, and both crossings are at or near the top in 
the volume of passenger traffic as well. It is unclear whether 
U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CBP], which conducts the 
inspections of all trucks and persons entering the United 
States, has sufficient resources and facilities to check enough 
vehicles for drugs and other contraband.
    b. Witnesses.--Abraham L. Azzam, Director, Southeast 
Michigan High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, Office of 
National Drug Control Policy; Michael Hodzen, Interim Special 
Agent in Charge, Detroit, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security; John Arvanitis, 
Acting Special Agent in Charge, Detroit Field Division, Drug 
Enforcement Administration; and Kevin Weeks, Director, Field 
Operations, Detroit Field Office, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, Department of Homeland Security.
32. ``DOD Counternarcotics: What Is Congress Getting For Its Money?'' 
        April 21, 2004; Serial No. 108-208
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing examined the efficiency 
and effectiveness of Department of Defense [DOD] 
counternarcotics efforts.
    The growth of poppy in Afghanistan has been a concern for 
decades, but only recently a new challenge for DOD's Central 
Command [CENTCOM]. Most estimates of poppy cultivation are 
categorized into periods of control of that country. For 
example, the Mujahedin is recognized for the decade of the 
1980s, while the Warlord period covered the first half of the 
1990s. The Taliban took over in 1995 and their control spanned 
through 2001. The U.S.-led War on Terrorism, the return of the 
King, and installation of the Karzai government comprise the 
period post 2001.
    The increase of opium poppy production in Afghanistan in 
2004 created anxiety in the international community that there 
is a significant risk that Afghanistan will fall into the 
status of a failed state once again, this time under the 
control of drug cartels and narco-terrorists instead of Islamic 
militants. The House Government Reform Committee shares this 
concern, and wants to see an increased level of effort and 
cooperation with United States and allied elements in the 
region.
    b. Witnesses.--Tom O'Connell, Assistant Secretary, 
Department of Defense, Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict; RADM David Kunkel, U.S. Pacific Command; and BG 
Benjamin Mixon, U.S. Southern Command.
33. ``Faith-Based Perspectives on the Provision of Community 
        Services,'' field hearing in Seattle, WA, April 26, 2004
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held the seventh and final in 
a series of oversight hearings designed to examine the role of 
faith-based organizations in providing social services to the 
needy in communities across the United States. Faith-based 
providers discussed methods of the provision of social services 
that they have found to be effective in their communities.
    Research in the area of the effectiveness of faith-based 
organizations is limited, and often largely anecdotal. This 
hearing was intended to continue consideration of what makes 
faith-based organizations especially equipped to provide social 
services to the community.
    Faith-based organizations discussed with the subcommittee 
the need for technical assistance and networking among 
organizations, government agencies, and private foundations, 
and the need for development of private donations.
    b. Witnesses.--Jill Esau, executive director, We Care 
Northwest, Seattle, WA; Dan Neary, senior vice president for 
college advancement, Northwest College, Kirkland, WA; Cal 
Uomoto, affiliate director, World Relief, Seattle, WA; Mary 
Diggs Hobson, executive director, African American Reach and 
Teach Ministry, Seattle, WA; Mike Meinser, director of 
development, Seattle Hebrew Academy, Seattle, WA; Pastor Aaron 
Haskins, executive director, Coalition for Community 
Development and Renewal, Seattle, WA; Pastor Doug Wheeler, Zion 
Preparatory Academy, Seattle, WA; Pastor Gregg Alex, director, 
the Matt Talbot Center, Seattle, WA; and Pastor Harvey Drake, 
executive director, Emerald City Outreach Ministry, Seattle, 
WA.
34. ``Terrorist Financing and Money Laundering Investigations: Who 
        Investigates and How Effective Are They?'' May 11, 2004; Serial 
        No. 108-243
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined whether the Federal law 
enforcement agencies charged with money-laundering 
investigations have become more efficient in their efforts due 
to recent organizational changes. The subcommittee also 
reviewed agency lines of responsibility and agency oversight 
designed to protect the American public from the terrorist and 
criminal enterprises funded by these illegal proceeds.
    b. Witnesses.--Marcy Forman, Deputy Assistant Director, 
Financial Investigations, U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security; Donald C. 
Semesky, Chief, Office of Financial Operations, Drug 
Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice; Michael 
Morehart, Section Chief, Terrorist Financing Operations 
Section, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of 
Justice; Dwight Sparlin, Director, Operations, Policy, and 
Support for the Criminal Investigations Branch, Internal 
Revenue Service, Department of Treasury; Bob Werner, Chief of 
Staff, FinCEN, Department of the Treasury; Daniel Glaser, 
Director, Executive Office for Terrorist Financing and 
Financial Crimes, Department of Treasury; John Roth, Chief of 
Criminal Division's Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering 
Section, Department of Justice; Bonni Tischler, vice president, 
Pinkerton Global Transportation and Supply Chain Security 
Department; and Richard Stana, Director of Homeland Security 
and Justice, General Accounting Office.
35. ``Ensuring Accuracy and Accountability in Laboratory Testing: Does 
        the Experience of Maryland General Hospital Expose Cracks in 
        the System?'' May 18, 2004; Serial No. 108-248
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined a situation at Maryland 
General Hospital where hundreds, perhaps thousands, of patients 
might have received incorrect HIV and hepatitis test results 
during a 14-month period ending in August 2004. The hospital 
failed to notify the patients of the problem. The hearing 
raised a number of issues related to the actual incident, 
including the impact of Federal regulations and policies on HIV 
testing and the ethics of HIV testing. The subcommittee has 
played an important role in these areas. Specifically, the 
subcommittee led the effort to secure FDA approval for an 
inexpensive, reliable rapid HIV test and to promote more 
routine HIV testing by the CDC.
    b. Witnesses.--Steven I. Gutman, M.D., Director, Office of 
In Vitro Diagnostics Device, Evaluation and Safety, Food and 
Drug Administration, Department of Health and Human Services; 
Sean Tunis, M.D., Chief Clinical Officer, Centers for Medicare 
and Medicaid, Services [CMS] and Deputy Director, Office of 
Clinical Standards and Quality, CMS, Department of Health and 
Human Services; Teresa Williams, former employee of Maryland 
General Hospital; Richard Eckloff, Adaltis US Inc., Allentown, 
PA; Nelson J. Sabatini, Secretary, Maryland Department of 
Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore, MD; Ronald B. Lepoff, 
M.D., F.C.A.P., Chair of the Commission on Laboratory 
Accreditation, College of American Pathologists, Northfield, 
IL; and Edmond Notebaert, president, University of Maryland 
Medical System, Baltimore, MD.
36. ``Historic Preservation of the Peopling of America'' May 20, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-230
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined how the history of the 
immigration, migration, and settlement of the population of the 
United States--the peopling of America--is being preserved. The 
hearing particularly considered how this story is preserved 
through National Park Service [NPS] and community programs. It 
investigated what stories on this theme are currently 
represented and interpreted through NPS sites and National 
Historic Landmarks, and how NPS connects these places to tell 
the story of the peopling of America. The hearing also explored 
how preservation of sites significant to this story and 
education about these places can be improved.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Janet Snyder Matthews, Associate 
Director for Cultural Resources, National Park Service; 
Katherine Toy, executive director, Angel Island Immigration 
Station Foundation, San Francisco, CA; Ellen von Karajan, 
executive director, Society for the Preservation of Federal 
Hill and Fell's Point, and member, Board of Directors and 
Fiscal Agent, Baltimore Immigration Project, Baltimore, MD; and 
Dr. Kathryn Wilson, director of education and interpretation, 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.
37. ``Ice in the Ozarks: The Methamphetamine Epidemic in Arkansas,'' 
        field hearing in Bentonville, AR, June 28, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-245
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held this field hearing to 
examine the state of methamphetamine trafficking, production 
and abuse in Arkansas and the Southern region of the United 
States, and how the Federal Government can assist State and 
local authorities in combating this growing problem through law 
enforcement, environmental clean-up, and drug treatment and 
prevention programs. The hearing provided an opportunity for 
representatives of Federal and local agencies with experience 
in fighting methamphetamine trafficking, as well as 
organizations that specialize in the environmental aspects of 
the problem, and the treatment and prevention of meth addiction 
and abuse, to discuss these issues and suggest solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--William J. Bryant, Assistant Special Agent 
in Charge, Little Rock, AR Office (New Orleans Field Division), 
Drug Enforcement Administration; William M. Cromwell, Acting 
U.S. Attorney, Western District of Arkansas; James MacDonald, 
Federal on Scene Coordinator, Region 7, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency; Keith Rutledge, State drug director, Office 
of the Governor of Arkansas; David Hudson, Sebastian County 
judge; J.R. Howard, executive director, Arkansas State Crime 
Lab; Shirley Louie, M.S., CIH, environmental epidemiology 
supervisor, Arkansas Department of Health; Sheriff Danny 
Hickman, Boone County Sheriff's Office; David Gibbons, 
prosecuting attorney, 5th Judicial District; Mary Ann Gunn, 
circuit judge, Fourth Judicial District, Fourth Division; Larry 
Counts, director, Decision Point Drug Treatment Facility; Bob 
Dufour, RPH, Director of Professional and Government Relations, 
Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.; Greg Hoggatt, director, Drug Free 
Rogers-Lowell; Dr. Merlin D. Leach, executive director, Center 
for Children & Public Policy; and Michael Pyle.
38. ``The Impact of the Drug Trade on Border Security,'' field hearing 
        in Las Cruces, NM, June 29, 2004; Serial No. 108-250
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held this field hearing to 
explore the impact of the drug trade, the status of law 
enforcement along the border between the Texas/New Mexico 
region and Mexico, and ways to improve security there. The 
hearing provided an opportunity for regional representatives of 
the principal agencies entrusted with the security of our 
borders, as well as representatives of State and local 
agencies, to discuss these issues and suggest solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--Luis E. Barker, Chief, El Paso Sector, U.S. 
Border Patrol, Department of Homeland Security; Kenneth Cates, 
Associate Special Agent in Charge, El Paso, U.S. Immigration 
and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland Security; Errol 
Chavez, Regional Director, New Mexico Regional Partnership, 
Southwest Border High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, Office 
of National Drug Control Policy; Luis Garcia, Director, Field 
Operations, El Paso Field Office, U.S. Customs and Border 
Protection, Department of Homeland Security; Sandalio Gonzalez, 
Special Agent in Charge, El Paso Field Division, Drug 
Enforcement Administration; Steve Swingle, Acting Aviation 
Group Supervisor, Albuquerque Air Branch, Office of Air and 
Marine Operations, Department of Homeland Security; Louise 
Peterson, Hidalgo County commissioner; Captain Richard 
Williams, commander, District 4 (Las Cruces), New Mexico State 
Police; Sheriff Robert E. Hall, Hidalgo County Sheriff's 
Department; and Sheriff Juan Hernandez, Dona Ana County 
Sheriff's Office.
39. ``Ensuring Accuracy and Accountability in Laboratory Testing: Does 
        the Experience of Maryland General Hospital Expose Cracks in 
        the System? Part II,'' July 7, 2004; Serial No. 108-252
    a. Summary.--In continuation of the subcommittee's May 18, 
2004 hearing on this topic, this hearing examined a situation 
at Maryland General Hospital where hundreds, perhaps thousands, 
of patients might have received incorrect HIV and hepatitis 
test results during a 14-month period ending in August 2004. 
The hospital failed to notify the patients of the problem. The 
hearing raised a number of issues related to the actual 
incident, including the impact of Federal regulations and 
policies on HIV testing and the ethics of HIV testing. The 
subcommittee led the effort to secure FDA approval for an 
inexpensive, reliable rapid HIV test and to promote more 
routine HIV testing by the CDC. AIDS activists have long 
demanded heavily regulated counseling policies that have 
discouraged individuals from being tested and doctors from 
offering testing.
    b. Witnesses.--Kristin Turner, former employee of Maryland 
General Hospital; Carol Benner, Director of the Office of 
Health Care Quality, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; 
Dr. Mary Kass, MD, FCAP, president, College of American 
Pathologists, Northfield, IL; and Edmond Notebaert, president, 
University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, MD.
40. ``Drugs and Security in a Post-September 11 World: Coordinating the 
        Counternarcotics Mission at the Department of Homeland 
        Security,'' July 22, 2004
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held this hearing to discuss 
how well the Department of Homeland Security is fulfilling its 
counternarcotics mission, what level of material and personnel 
support it is providing to counternarcotics operations, and 
what steps it is taking to improve coordination and cooperation 
between its own subdivisions. The hearing was held jointly with 
the Select Committee on Homeland Security's Subcommittee on 
Infrastructure and Border Security (chaired by Representative 
Dave Camp).
    b. Witnesses.--Robert Bonner, Commissioner, U.S. Customs 
and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security; Adm. 
Thomas Collins, Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Department of 
Homeland Security; Michael J. Garcia, Assistant Secretary, U.S. 
Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Department of Homeland 
Security; and Roger Mackin, Counternarcotics Officer, 
Department of Homeland Security.
41. ``The Poisoning of Paradise: Crystal Methamphetamine in Hawaii,'' 
        August 2, 2004
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held this field hearing to 
examine the state of methamphetamine trafficking, production 
and abuse in Hawaii, and how the Federal Government can assist 
State and local authorities in combating this growing problem 
through law enforcement, drug treatment, and prevention 
programs. The hearing provided an opportunity for 
representatives of Federal and local agencies with experience 
in fighting methamphetamine trafficking, and experts in the 
treatment and prevention of meth addiction and abuse, to 
discuss these issues and suggest solutions.
    b. Witnesses.--James R. Aiona, Jr., Lieutenant Governor, 
State of Hawaii; Larry D. Burnett, Director, Hawaii High 
Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, Office of National Drug 
Control Policy; Charles Goodwin, Special Agent in Charge, 
Honolulu Office, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Briane Grey, 
Assistant Special Agent in Charge, Honolulu Office (Los Angeles 
Field Division), Drug Enforcement Administration; Harry Kim, 
mayor, county of Hawaii; Keith Kamita, chief, Narcotics 
Enforcement Division, Hawaii Department of Public Safety; 
Lawrence K. Mahuna, Police chief, Hawaii County Police 
Department; Richard Botti, executive director, Hawaii Food 
Industry Association; Dr. Kevin Kunz, Kona Addiction Services; 
Wesley Margheim, Big Island Substance Abuse Council; Alan 
Salavea, Hawaii County Prosecutor's Office, Youth Builders; and 
Dr. Jamal Wasan, Lokahi Treatment Program.
42. ``Access to Recovery: Improving Participation and Access in Drug 
        Treatment,'' September 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-269
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee reviewed the Substance Abuse 
& Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA] Access to 
Recovery drug treatment program, which allows individuals to 
select from a range of community-based services to treat drug 
and alcohol addiction.
    President Bush announced in his 2003 State of the Union 
Address a new substance abuse treatment initiative, Access to 
Recovery. This new initiative provides people seeking drug and 
alcohol treatment with vouchers to pay for a range of 
appropriate community-based services. Congress appropriated 
$100 million in the 2004 budget for the Substance Abuse and 
Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA].
    This new program has established a State-run voucher 
program for substance abuse clinical treatment and recovery 
support services built on the following three principles: 
consumer choice, outcome orientation, and increased capacity.
    b. Witnesses.--Charles G. Curie, M.A., A.C.S.W., 
Administrator, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration, Department of Health and Human Services; Melody 
Heaps, president, Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities, 
Chicago, IL; and Dr. Michael Passi, Associate Director, 
Department of Family and Community Services, city of 
Albuquerque, NM.
43. ``Law Enforcement and the Fight Against Methamphetamine,'' November 
        18, 2004
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine how 
the Federal Government can best assist State and local law 
enforcement authorities to stop the production and trafficking 
of methamphetamine. In particular, the subcommittee and the 
witnesses discussed potential changes in the regulation of 
methamphetamine precursor chemical sales, specialized training 
in dealing with meth labs for State and local law enforcement 
officials, and programs to improve communication and 
cooperation between precursor chemical manufacturers and 
retailers, and law enforcement agencies.
    b. Witnesses.--Scott Burns, Deputy Director for State and 
Local Affairs, Office of National Drug Control Policy; Domingo 
S. Herraiz, Director, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of 
Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice; Lonnie Wright, 
Director, Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs; 
Sheriff Steve Bundy, Rice County (Kansas) Sheriff's Department; 
Lt. George E. Colby, division commander/project director, Allen 
County Drug Task Force, Allen County (Indiana) Sheriff's 
Department; Joseph Heerens, senior vice president, Government 
Affairs, Marsh Supermarkets, Inc., on behalf of the Food 
Marketing Institute; Dr. Linda Suydam, president, Consumer 
Healthcare Products Association; and Mary Ann Wagner, vice 
president, Pharmacy Regulatory Affairs, National Association of 
Chain Drug Stores.

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY POLICY, NATURAL RESOURCES AND REGULATORY AFFAIRS

                         Legislative Highlights

    During 2003, the subcommittee authored six bills. During 
the 108th Congress, three were considered in congressional 
hearings and one of them passed the House. Another was folded 
into the comprehensive energy bill, which passed the House. The 
last two were not considered in congressional hearings during 
the 108th Congress; however, another Government Reform 
Subcommittee held hearings on predecessor versions of both 
bills during the 107th Congress.
    The first three included: H.R. 2138, ``Elevation of the 
Environmental Protection Agency;'' H.R. 2193, ``Port Security 
Improvements Act of 2003;'' and H.R. 2432, ``Paperwork and 
Regulatory Improvements Act of 2003.'' The fourth was H.R. 964, 
the ``Electric Refund Fairness Act.'' The last two included: 
H.R. 1493, ``Revocation of Executive Order Limiting Access to 
Presidential Records,'' and H.R. 1623, ``Presidential Gifts 
Accountability Act.''

                              Legislation

    As discussed in detail below, the subcommittee held two 
hearings on Chairman Ose's Environmental Protection Agency 
[EPA] elevation bill (H.R. 2138), and the full committee held a 
hearing on Chairman Ose's bi-partisan Paperwork and Regulatory 
Improvements bill (H.R. 2432). The EPA bill was not marked up 
or reported out. However, H.R. 2432 was marked up and reported 
out by the full committee on May 14, 2004 (House Report 108-
490), and passed the House by a 373 to 54 vote on May 18th. On 
November 20, 2003 and June 9, 2004, two different 
Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittees considered 
Chairman Ose's bi-partisan port security bill (H.R. 2193).
EPA Elevation
    On May 15, 2003, subcommittee Chairman Ose introduced H.R. 
2138, ``Elevation of the Environmental Protection Agency.'' On 
June 6th and September 9th, the subcommittee held hearings to 
consider this bill and a second bill (H.R. 37), which would 
simply elevate EPA to department level status without making 
any reforms. During the 107th Congress, the subcommittee held 
three additional hearings on EPA elevation. During 2004, 
subcommittee staff negotiated certain changes with the House 
Science Committee staff and the Bush administration. In the 
end, time did not permit a subcommittee or full committee 
markup.
    EPA is charged with protecting the Nation's natural 
resources and human health. Although EPA has enjoyed past 
successes, resolution of the next generation of environmental 
challenges will require leadership and statistical and 
scientific information that looks beyond the traditional point 
source pollution model. Currently, the fragmented organization 
of EPA is based on environmental media and pollution source, 
and provides for 9 Assistant Administrators and 10 Regional 
Administrators, each reporting directly to the Administrator. 
This structure stymies coordination, lacks upper-level 
management leadership, and facilitates inconsistent regulatory 
approaches to environmental protection.
    H.R. 2183 redesignates EPA as the Department of 
Environmental Protection. The bill also reorganizes the 
Department based on function, and establishes an independently 
peer-reviewed Bureau of Environmental Statistics for the 
purpose of measuring environmental and human health risks that 
are used as bases for policy decisions. The reorganized 
structure and the new Bureau will prepare the Department to 
meet the goals of the next generation of environmental 
challenges.
Port Security
    On April 24, 2003, the subcommittee held a hearing to 
examine port security. On May 21st, subcommittee Chairman Ose 
introduced the bi-partisan H.R. 2193, ``Port Security 
Improvements Act of 2003.'' On November 20th, the 
Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment held a hearing entitled, ``Financing 
Port Security: Who Should Pay?'' Chairman Ose testified at the 
hearing on H.R. 2193 and the Members and other witnesses 
discussed it as well. On June 9, 2004, the Transportation and 
Infrastructure Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation 
Subcommittee held a legislative hearing on the bill. Chairman 
Ose submitted testimony and public witnesses, including the 
American Association of Port Authorities, expressed support for 
the Ose bill.
    To date, Congress has provided extensive Federal funding to 
fully ensure air security. In contrast, Congress has not 
provided sufficient Federal funding to fully ensure port 
security. The U.S. maritime system includes more than 300 ports 
with more than 3,700 cargo and passenger terminals. The vast 
maritime system is particularly susceptible to terrorist 
attempts to smuggle personnel, weapons of mass destruction, or 
other dangerous materials into the United States. A large-scale 
terrorist attack at a U.S. port would cause widespread damage 
and seriously affect our economy.
    Currently, the U.S. Customs Bureau collects $15.2 billion 
in duties on commodities entering the United States through 
marine transportation. H.R. 2193 dedicates a portion of these 
duties for 5 years toward port security enhancements. In 
addition, H.R. 2193 sets deadlines for issuance of regulations 
governing transportation security cards, and requires 
regulations that include a national minimum set of standard 
security requirements for ports, facilities, and vessels.
    Under the bill, ``entitlement'' funding to duty-collecting 
ports and their facilities and vessels will flow through the 
Department of Homeland Security, which by law must review and 
approve each Area Maritime Transportation Security Plan, 
Facility Security Plan, and Vessel Security Plan. The 
distribution within a port would be based on the approved Area 
Maritime Transportation Security Plan.
    At the end of the 108th Congress, there were 34 bi-partisan 
co-sponsors.
Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements
    On June 11, 2003, based on extensive hearings and oversight 
letters on paperwork and regulatory reform during the 107th and 
108th Congresses, subcommittee Chairman Ose introduced the bi-
partisan H.R. 2432, ``Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act 
of 2003.'' On July 22nd, the full committee held a hearing on 
the bill. The bill seeks to make incremental improvements in 
the existing processes governing paperwork and regulations to: 
(a) increase the probability of results in paperwork reduction, 
(b) assist Congress in its review of agency regulatory 
proposals, and (c) improve regulatory accounting. A key 
provision in the bill is a required multi-agency study of and 
report to Congress on regulatory budgeting.
    Paperwork has increased--instead of decreased--in each of 
the last 8 years. Since the Internal Revenue Service [IRS] 
accounts for over 80 percent of the government-wide paperwork 
burden on the public, H.R. 2432 requires additional Office of 
Management and Budget [OMB] review of and reporting to Congress 
on IRS paperwork reduction.
    H.R. 2432 makes permanent the authorization for the 
Government Accountability Office [GAO] to respond to requests 
from Congress for an independent evaluation of selective 
economically significant rules proposed or issued by Federal 
agencies. With this analytic help, Congress will be better 
equipped to review final agency rules under the Congressional 
Review Act. More importantly, Congress will be better equipped 
to submit timely and knowledgeable comments on proposed rules 
during the public comment period.
    Also, H.R. 2432 requires certain changes to improve the 
annual regulatory accounting reports. To date, OMB's six final 
and a seventh draft regulatory accounting reports have all 
failed to meet some of the statutorily-required content 
requirements. Part of the reason is that OMB has not requested 
agency estimates for each agency bureau and program, as it does 
annually for its paperwork budget and for the President's 
fiscal Budget. The bill requires agency input for OMB's annual 
regulatory accounting statements. The reported, but not House-
passed, version of the bill also required integration into the 
fiscal Budget so that Congress would be better able to 
simultaneously review both the on-budget and off-budget costs 
associated with each Federal agency imposing regulatory or 
paperwork burdens on the public.
    Last, the required multi-agency study of regulatory 
budgeting will determine if agencies can better manage 
regulatory burdens on the public. Agencies will identify 
regulatory alternatives and then prioritize them so that the 
worst societal problems can be addressed first.
Electricity
    On February 27, 2003, subcommittee Chairman Ose introduced 
H.R. 964, the ``Electric Refund Fairness Act of 2003.'' It was 
referred to the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and 
Air Quality. The bill amends the Federal Power Act to provide 
greater protection for consumers. It increases the scope of the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's [FERC's] civil penalty 
authority and increases criminal fines from a maximum of $5,000 
and 2 years in jail to $1,000,000 and 5 years in jail. 
Violations of regulations are increased from $500 per day to 
$25,000 per day. In addition, the bill would make parties that 
were overcharged for power eligible for a refund beginning on 
the date they file a complaint at FERC, rather than 60 days 
later.
    H.R. 964 was folded into H.R. 6, ``Energy Policy Act of 
2003,'' which passed the House on November 18th.
Presidential Records
    On March 27, 2003, subcommittee Chairman Ose introduced the 
bi-partisan H.R. 1493, ``Revocation of Executive Order Limiting 
Access to Presidential Records.'' This bill would simply revoke 
President Bush's 2001 Executive Order 13233, ``Further 
Implementation of the Presidential Records Act,'' and replace 
it with President Reagan's 1989 implementing Executive Order 
12267. It is a simpler version of the 107th bill (H.R. 4187), 
which was reported out by the Government Reform Committee.
    In the 1978 Presidential Records Act, Congress clearly 
intended to make Presidential records available for 
congressional investigations and then for the public after a 
12-year period. The act authorized the National Archives and 
Records Administration [NARA] to issue implementing 
regulations. President Reagan's order expanded on NARA's 
implementing regulations and clarified some areas not 
specifically addressed in the regulations. The Bush order made 
many changes, including broadening the grounds for Executive 
Privilege claims. This broadening could severely limit 
congressional access to key documents in its investigations of 
a former administration.
    In addition, the Bush order is inconsistent both with the 
Presidential Records Act itself and with NARA's codified 
implementing regulations. H.R. 1493 would restore the public's 
rights to be fully informed about how its government operated 
in the past.
Presidential Gifts
    On April 3, 2003, subcommittee Chairman Ose introduced H.R. 
1623, ``Presidential Gifts Accountability Act.'' This is a 
revised version of the bill (H.R. 1081) he introduced in the 
107th Congress. This bill establishes responsibility in one 
agency for the receipt, valuation, and disposition of 
Presidential gifts.
    In January 2001, there were press accounts of President 
Clinton's last financial disclosure report, which covered 
calendar year 2000 and January 1-20, 2001. This report revealed 
that the Clintons chose to retain $190,027 in gifts (each over 
$260) during this period. In February 2001, there were press 
accounts of numerous furniture gifts to the White House 
residence, which the Clintons returned to the U.S. Government. 
To prevent future abuses, the subcommittee conducted a 1-year 
investigation of how the current Presidential gifts system 
works and collected empirical data, and then identified what 
legislative changes, if any, were needed to prevent future 
abuses.
    The subcommittee found that several laws, involving six 
Federal offices and agencies, govern the current system. The 
subcommittee identified a host of problems with the 
Presidential gifts system, such as consistently undervalued 
gifts and questionable White House counsel rulings. The current 
system is subject to abuse and political interference. H.R. 
1623 establishes responsibility in one agency--staffed by 
career employees--for the receipt, valuation, and disposition 
of Presidential gifts.
    On October 28, 2002, the subcommittee's analysis was 
presented in House Report 107-768, ``Problems with the 
Presidential Gifts System.'' H.R. 1623 provides transparency 
for the public, establishes discipline in the multi-agency 
system, and ensures accountability.
    At the end of the 108th Congress, some of the Presidential 
records requested by subcommittee Chairman Ose on March 5, 2001 
were still not provided by the Bush administration.

                          Oversight Highlights

    During the 108th Congress, the subcommittee conducted 
oversight over a range of issues in each of the three principal 
areas within the subcommittee's jurisdiction: Energy Policy, 
Natural Resources, and Regulatory Affairs. As indicated below, 
the subcommittee sent 59 oversight letters--34 in Regulatory 
Affairs, 15 in Energy Policy, 8 in Natural Resources, and 2 in 
other areas.
    In Regulatory Affairs, during the 108th Congress, the 
subcommittee submitted four comment letters on the Office of 
Management and Budget's [OMB's] regulatory accounting reports 
(final 5th, draft 6th, final 6th, and draft 7th) and two on 
OMB's draft June 2003 and draft June 2004 task force reports 
that were required by the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act 
[SBPRA]. In addition, the subcommittee sent OMB an August 2003 
letter about its own investigation of agency SBPRA 
implementation and a May 2003 letter to the Department of 
Agriculture about its violations of the Paperwork Reduction 
Act. Last, the subcommittee sent 17 sets of post-hearing 
followup questions on regulatory accounting, paperwork 
reduction, and SBPRA, 10 of which went to OMB.
    In addition, the subcommittee conducted a June 2003 
investigation of commercial activities identified in each 
agency's Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act inventory, 
with especial attention to California. Also, the subcommittee 
submitted a May 2004 comment letter on the Small Business 
Administration's [SBA's] proposed rule to restructure small 
business size standards. In response to public comments, 
including this letter, SBA withdrew its proposed rule.
    In the transportation area, the subcommittee sent letters 
to all six April 24, 2003 hearing witnesses on port security 
regulations, and two pre-hearing letters (in March and August 
2003) to the Department of Transportation [DOT] on regulations 
to ensure private sector participation in mass transit and then 
four post-hearing letters (from May to October 2004) to DOT 
with questions on this need as well as other related private 
sector participation questions. In the labor area, the 
subcommittee sent a June 2003 letter to the Department of Labor 
[DOL] on its protective regulations to avoid another Union 
Labor Life Insurance Company-type scandal.
    In Energy Policy, during 2003, the subcommittee sent four 
oversight letters. The subcommittee continued oversight of the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's [FERC's] refund 
proceedings resulting from the California energy crisis, and, 
in June, requested the Government Accountability Office [GAO] 
to review the U.S. Department of Agriculture's [USDA's] Rural 
Utility Service's [RUS's] lending programs for electric power. 
It also sent March and August letters to the Energy 
Department's Energy Information Administration on California's 
and New York-Connecticut's transition from MTBE to ethanol in 
their gasoline and on gasoline prices.
    In Energy Policy, during 2004, in addition to six sets of 
post-hearing followup questions for certain Federal agency 
witnesses, the subcommittee sent five oversight letters. These 
included a February letter to Agriculture's RUS asking it to 
extend the comment period for its proposed RUS rule to allow 
GAO and USDA time to complete their pending investigations on 
RUS's lending programs for electric power. In February and 
April, it sent letters to the Environmental Protection Agency 
[EPA] regarding Federal requirements for gasoline content. The 
first letter urged EPA to approve California's request for a 
waiver from the Federal minimum oxygen requirement for 
reformulated gasoline. The second letter asked EPA to refrain 
from relaxing its sulfur content standards and to work on means 
to increase domestic gasoline supply, such as granting 
California's waiver request and finding ways to increase 
refinery capacity.
    Last, the subcommittee sent two letters to FERC. The first, 
in March, requested reconsideration of FERC's approval of 
Southern California Edison's power purchase agreement with its 
affiliate Mountainview Power Co. The second, in October, 
recommended, in response to FERC's Notice of Inquiry (69 FR 
58112), that it adopt regulations specific to the financial 
reporting and cost accounting, oversight and recovery practices 
of Regional Transmission Organizations [RTOs] and Independent 
System Operators [ISOs].
    In Natural Resources, in addition to two sets of post-
hearing followup questions for certain Federal agency 
witnesses, the subcommittee submitted four comment letters on 
proposed agency rules or guidance documents. In September 2003, 
the subcommittee commented to EPA on California's impending 
final rule on emission standards for small non-road engines. In 
January 2004, the subcommittee commented on USDA's proposed 
rule on mandatory country of origin labeling for certain food 
products. This letter questioned how the proposed rule related 
to congressional intent and presented options for USDA to 
consider in implementing an interim and final rule, i.e., to 
pursue legislative relief, reduce recordkeeping requirements to 
limit regulatory burden, and publish nonbinding guidance for 
implementing its rule. Also, in January 2004, subcommittee 
Chairman Ose sent a joint oversight letter with Chairmen Davis, 
Young and Duncan on EPA's proposed guidance on National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit requirements for 
``blending'' in municipal wastewater treatment plants during 
wet weather events. Last, in September 2004, the subcommittee 
sent a comment letter to the Army Corps of Engineers on its 
Sacramento District Office's attempt to impose Regional 
Conditions on several nationwide water permits.
    Last, in February 2003, the subcommittee asked GAO to 
conduct a study of Federal agency regulations of jurisdictional 
waters under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. And, in March 
2003, the subcommittee sent an oversight letter to Interior's 
Fish and Wildlife Service on conservation banks to insure the 
survival of endangered species.
    In addition, not directly related to any of the three 
subcommittee's principal areas, the subcommittee sent an April 
2003 oversight letter to the President as a follow up to its 
107th investigation of the Presidential gifts system, and March 
2004 post-hearing questions to the Department of Homeland 
Security regarding its implementation of the Ose Co-Location 
Amendment.

                       Summary of Accomplishments

    The subcommittee sent 25 oversight letters (including 6 
comment letters on draft and final OMB reports, 17 sets of 
post-hearing questions, and 2 additional oversight letters) 
concerning the administration's regulatory accounting and 
paperwork reduction reports and its implementation of SBPRA. 
This oversight resulted in increased current and promised 
future attention to all three areas by the Bush administration.

                                Hearings

    During the 108th Congress, the subcommittee held 24 
hearings, 11 during 2003 and 13 during 2004. In the Regulatory 
Affairs area, the subcommittee held 12 hearings, including: one 
on regulatory reform accomplishments and initiatives underway, 
two on implementation of required annual regulatory accounting, 
two on implementation of the Paperwork Reduction Act, three on 
implementation of the Small Business Paperwork Relief Act, one 
on port security regulations, two on private sector 
participation in transportation, and one on efficient and 
effective homeland security.
    In the Energy Policy, the subcommittee held five hearings, 
including: three on gasoline prices, one on California energy 
markets, and one on liquefied natural gas. In Natural 
Resources, the subcommittee held seven hearings, including: two 
on elevation of the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] to a 
Cabinet level department, one on EPA water enforcement, one on 
specialty crops, one on wildfires in the West, one on the West 
Nile Virus, and one on illegal drug production on public lands.
    In addition, the full committee held a hearing on the 
subcommittee's Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 
2003 (H.R. 2432). Each of these is summarized below.
1. ``How To Improve Regulatory Accounting: Costs, Benefits and Impacts 
        of Federal Regulations,'' March 11, 2003; Serial No. 108-3
    a. Summary.--On March 11, 2003, the subcommittee held its 
second annual hearing on the Office of Management and Budget's 
[OMB's] annual regulatory accounting report, which is required 
to be submitted with the President's fiscal budget. The law 
requires OMB to estimate the total annual costs and benefits 
for all Federal rules and paperwork in the aggregate, by 
agency, by agency program, and by major rule, and to include an 
associated report on the impacts of Federal rules and paperwork 
on certain groups, such as small business. The hearing examined 
OMB's draft sixth annual regulatory accounting report, which 
was published on the same day as release of the President's 
budget.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs [OIRA], OMB; James C. Miller 
III, former OMB Director and first OIRA Administrator and 
current chairman, CapAnalysis Group; Dr. Jim J. Tozzi, former 
OIRA Deputy Administrator and current Advisory Board Member, 
the Center for Regulatory Effectiveness; Dr. Robert W. Hahn, 
Director, AEI-Brookings Joint Center for Regulatory Studies; 
Lisa Heinzerling, professor of law, Georgetown University Law 
Center; and Rabbi Daniel J. Swartz, executive director, 
Children's Environmental Health Network.
2. ``California Energy Markets: Refunds and Reform,'' April 8, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-14
    a. Summary.--On April 8, 2003, the subcommittee held a 
hearing on California's energy markets. The hearing examined 
actions by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [FERC] on 
March 26th regarding the California energy crisis, and reviewed 
progress California has made in reforming its electricity 
market. Since it takes years to propose, site, and build a 
power plant, reform is necessary to encourage investments in 
energy generation and transmission.
    b. Witnesses.--Patrick Wood III, chairman, FERC; Terry 
Winter, president and chief executive officer, California 
Independent System Operator; Karen Tomcala, vice president, 
Regulatory Relations, Pacific Gas and Electric Co.; Gary 
Ackerman, executive director, Western Power Trading Forum; Jan 
Smutny-Jones, executive director, Independent Energy Producers; 
and George Fraser, general manager, Northern California Power 
Agency.
3. ``Mid-Term Report Card: Is the Bush Administration Doing Enough on 
        Paperwork Reduction?'' April 11, 2003; Serial No. 108-16
    a. Summary.--On April 11, 2003, the subcommittee held its 
fifth annual hearing on the administration's progress in 
paperwork reduction. The Office of Management and Budget [OMB] 
estimates the Federal paperwork burden on the public at over 8 
billion hours. The Internal Revenue Service [IRS] accounts for 
81 percent of the total. In 1980, Congress established an 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs [OIRA] in OMB. By 
law, OIRA's principal responsibility is paperwork reduction. 
Paperwork burden has increased, not decreased, in each of the 
last 7 years. In sum, OMB and the IRS are not doing a credible 
job in paperwork reduction.
    b. Witnesses.--OMB's OIRA Administrator John D. Graham; 
Acting IRS Commissioner Robert E. Wenzel; John L. Henshaw, 
Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and 
Health, Department of Labor; Victor S. Rezendes, Managing 
Director, Strategic Issues, General Accounting Office; Joanne 
E. Peterson, president and CEO, Abator in Pittsburgh, PA; 
Victor Schantz, president, Schantz Organ Co. in Orrville, OH; 
and Frank C. Fillmore, Jr., president, the Fillmore Group, Inc. 
in Ellicott City, MD.
4. ``What Regulations are Needed to Ensure Port Security?'' April 24, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-23
    a. Summary.--On April 24, 2003, the subcommittee held a 
field hearing in California's Port of Los Angeles on how best 
to achieve port security. On November 25, 2002, the President 
signed the Maritime Transportation Security Act into law. This 
law provided for interim final rules on anti-terrorism plans 
for port security, facility security, and vessel security, and 
other rules to follow, such as for transportation security 
cards. The hearing examined what Federal regulations are needed 
to ensure port security for various aspects, such as security 
of United States and foreign ports, facility security, vessel 
security, cargo identification and screening, and 
transportation security cards and background checks.
    b. Witnesses.--Larry Keller, executive director, Port of 
Los Angeles; Timothy Parker, executive secretary, Steamship 
Association of Southern California; John Ochs, security 
manager, Maersk Sealand, Ltd.; Rob Marshall-Johns, director of 
operations and quality control, the Oppenheimer Group; 
Stephanie Williams, vice president, California Trucking 
Association; and Dr. Domenick Miretti, senior liaison, Ports of 
Los Angeles and Long Beach, International Longshore and 
Warehouse Union.
5 & 6. ``Elevation of the Environmental Protection Agency to 
        Departmental Level Status: H.R. 37 and H.R. 2138,'' June 6, 
        2003, and ``Elevation of the EPA to Department Level Status: 
        Federal and State Views,'' September 9, 2003; Serial No. 108-50
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee held two legislative hearings 
on two bills to elevate the Environmental Protection Agency 
[EPA] to a Cabinet level department: H.R. 37 that simply 
elevates EPA to department-level status, and H.R. 2138 that 
reorganizes EPA and creates a Bureau of Environmental 
Statistics. Since its creation in 1970, EPA has grown from a 
small agency to one with about 18,000 employees and a budget of 
$7.7 billion. Over the last 30 years, 11 major environmental 
laws expanded EPA's jurisdiction and delegated most 
implementation activities to the States. EPA now faces new 
environmental challenges originating from non-point sources 
that are difficult to regulate. EPA's current structure lacks 
adequate oversight and coordination of its offices to ensure 
that science, policy and implementation are integrated 
throughout EPA. By reorganizing EPA and providing the 
statistical tools to understand our changing environment, a 
Cabinet level department could do a better job of protecting 
the environment than it currently does as an independent 
Federal agency.
    b. Witnesses.--June 6th hearing--Dr. Paul Portney, 
president, Resources for the Future; Janice Mazurek, director 
for innovation and the environment, Progressive Policy 
Institute; Dr. George Gray, deputy director, Center for Risk 
Analysis, Harvard School of Public Health; Dr. Steven Hayward, 
F.K. Weyerhaeuser fellow, American Enterprise Institute; Wesley 
Warren, senior fellow for environmental economics, Natural 
Resources Defense Council; and Rena U. Steinzor, professor, 
University of Maryland School of Law and Board Member, Center 
for Progressive Regulation.
    September 9th hearing--Marianne L. Horinko, Acting 
Administrator, EPA; James L. Connaughton, chairman, Council on 
Environmental Quality; State Representative Warren Chisum, 
Texas House of Representatives; Howard Roitman, director of 
environmental programs, Colorado Department of Public Health 
and Environment; Dr. Ron Hammerschmidt, director, Division of 
Environment, Kansas Department of Health and Environment; E. 
Donald Elliott, former EPA general counsel and partner at the 
law firm of Willkie, Farr & Gallagher; Dr. A. Alan Moghissi, 
president, Institute for Regulatory Science; and Gary S. Guzy, 
former EPA General Counsel and partner at the law firm of Foley 
Hoag LLP.
7. ``California Gasoline Markets: From MTBE to Ethanol,'' July 2, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-65
    a. Summary.--On July 2, 2003, the subcommittee held the 
first of three 108th hearings on gasoline prices. This field 
hearing in Diamond Bar, CA focused on California's gasoline 
markets. It reviewed the transition from using MTBE to ethanol 
in California's reformulated gasoline and the cause of the 
recent gasoline price spikes. The biggest difference between 
2003's price spike and previous price spikes was the use of 
ethanol in California's gasoline. Ethanol is an inferior 
product to MTBE in terms of its performance as a gasoline 
additive and its effect on air quality. The hearing provided an 
important look into the challenges of using ethanol-blended 
gasoline outside the Midwest since 15 other States, besides 
California, have banned MTBE. In addition, on March 27th, the 
subcommittee requested that the Energy Information 
Administration [EIA] report on the cause of these price spikes.
    b. Witnesses.--Guy Caruso, Administrator, EIA, Department 
of Energy; William J. Keese, chairman, California Energy 
Commission; Joe Sparano, president, Western States Petroleum 
Association; Bob Gregory, vice president and general manager of 
Valero's Wilmington, CA Refinery; and Lynne Kiesling, director 
of economic policy, Reason Public Policy Institute.
8. ``What is OMB's Record in Small Business Paperwork Relief?'' July 
        18, 2003; Serial No. 108-82
    a. Summary.--On July 18, 2003, the subcommittee held the 
first of three joint hearings with the Small Business 
Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform and Oversight to examine the 
administration's record in paperwork reduction and burden 
relief for small businesses. The Small Business Paperwork 
Relief Act of 2002 required the Office of Management and Budget 
[OMB] to take certain actions by June 28, 2003, including to: 
(a) publish the first annual list of all compliance assistance 
resources available to small businesses; (b) have each agency 
establish one point of contact to act as a liaison between 
small businesses and the agency regarding paperwork 
requirements; and, (c) report to Congress on the findings of an 
interagency task force, chaired by OMB. The hearing concluded 
that OMB's two June 27th published documents were incomplete 
and unsatisfactory, its task force report was unresponsive, and 
its track record in small business paperwork reduction was 
dismal.
    b. Witnesses.--Senator George V. Voinovich, chairman, 
Senate Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight of 
Government Management, the Federal Workforce and the District 
of Columbia; Representative Donald A. Manzullo, chairman, House 
Small Business Committee; Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB; Karen 
Kerrigan, chairman, Small Business Survival Committee; and 
Andrew Langer, manager, Regulatory Policy, National Federation 
of Independent Business.
9. ``H.R. 2432, Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 2003,'' 
        July 22, 2003; Serial No. 108-68
    a. Summary.--On July 22, 2003, the full committee held a 
legislative hearing on the subcommittee's Paperwork and 
Regulatory Improvements Act of 2003 (H.R. 2432). The bill seeks 
to make incremental improvements in the existing processes 
governing paperwork and regulations to: (a) increase the 
probability of results in paperwork reduction, (b) assist 
Congress in its review of agency regulatory proposals, and (c) 
improve regulatory accounting. Among several provisions, the 
bill makes permanent the authorization for the General 
Accounting Office to respond to requests from Congress for an 
independent evaluation of selective economically significant 
rules proposed or issued by Federal agencies, and establishes 
pilot projects for regulatory budgeting.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs [OIRA], Office of Management 
and Budget [OMB]; Thomas M. Sullivan, Chief Counsel for 
Advocacy, Small Business Administration; Fred L. Smith, Jr., 
president and founder, Competitive Enterprise Institute; Dr. 
Wendy Lee Gramm, Director, Regulatory Studies Program, Mercatus 
Center, George Mason University, and former Administrator, 
OIRA, OMB; John Sample, vice president of sales and marketing, 
Peake Printers, Inc. on behalf of the National Association of 
Manufacturers; and Raymond Arth, president and CEO, Phoenix 
Products, Inc. and first vice chairman, National Small Business 
Association.
10. ``Drug Production on Public Lands--A Growing Problem,'' October 10, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-138
    a. Summary.--On October 10, 2003, the subcommittee held a 
joint hearing in California's Sequoia National Park with the 
Government Reform Subcommittee on Criminal Justice, Drug Policy 
and Human Resources to examine drug production on public lands. 
The hearing explored the increase of illegal drug production in 
our national parks and forests and available tools to combat 
this problem. For years, relatively small illegal drug 
operations existed on our national lands. After September 11, 
2001, however, our border security tightened significantly, and 
drug smugglers reacted by moving drug production from Mexico to 
the United States. Growers have little concern for the 
environmental damage they cause. In addition, drug production 
also increases the risk of forest fires.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Martin, Superintendent, Sequoia and 
Kings Canyon National Parks, National Park Service, Department 
of the Interior; Arthur Gaffrey, Forest Supervisor, Sequoia 
National Forest, Forest Service, Department of Agriculture; 
Stephen C. Delgado, Special Agent in Charge, San Francisco 
Field Division, Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of 
Justice; Val Jiminez, special agent supervisor, and commander, 
Campaign Against Marijuana Planting, California Bureau of 
Narcotics Enforcement; Lisa Mulz, superintendent of law 
enforcement and public safety, California Department of Parks 
and Recreation; Captain David Williams, Tulare County sheriff; 
and Joe Fontaine, member, Board of Directors, Wilderness Watch.
11. ``EPA Water Enforcement: Are We On the Right Track?'' October 14, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-157
    a. Summary.--On October 14, 2003, the subcommittee held a 
field hearing in Ipswich, MA on water enforcement activities by 
the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA]. The hearing explored 
the mutually reinforcing relationship between EPA's strategy of 
compliance assistance and formal enforcement. Since the mid-
1990's, EPA has increasingly used compliance assistance 
programs, in conjunction with traditional enforcement tools, to 
help facilities comply with Federal environmental laws and 
regulations. Tabulating the number of enforcement actions--or 
outputs--does not measure actual results. Collaborative efforts 
can only be measured by more meaningful outcome performance 
data, such as the changes in the quality of the water.
    b. Witnesses.--J.P. Suarez, Assistant Administrator, Office 
of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, EPA; Robert Varney, 
Regional Administrator, Region I, EPA; Steve Thompson, 
executive director, Oklahoma Department of Environmental 
Quality; Shelley H. Metzenbaum, visiting professor, University 
of Maryland School of Public Affairs and Director, 
Environmental Compliance Consortium; Roberta Savage, executive 
director, Association of State and Interstate Water Pollution 
Control Administrators; Scott H. Segal, partner at Bracewell & 
Patterson LLP; J. Charles Fox, vice president of public 
affairs, Chesapeake Bay Foundation; Pam DiBona, vice president 
for policy, Environmental League of Massachusetts; and Eric 
Shaeffer, director, Environmental Integrity Project.
12. ``Problems Facing the Specialty Crop Industry,'' December 12, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-151
    a. Summary.--On December 12, 2003, the subcommittee held a 
field hearing in Salinas, CA on problems facing the U.S. 
specialty crop industry. The hearing examined the domestic and 
international issues faced by this industry, and identified 
needed legislative and regulatory changes to moderate adverse 
impacts so that U.S. specialty crops can effectively compete in 
the international marketplace.
    The U.S. agricultural sector is primarily divided into two 
types of crops: program crops and specialty crops. Program 
crops are farm commodities, such as wheat, corn, cotton, and 
rice. Specialty crops are comprised of 250 different crops, 
including fruits, nuts, vegetables, forage crops, flowers, wine 
grapes, and other agricultural commodities. In contrast to 
program crops, specialty crops do not receive any Federal price 
supports. Moreover, they are marketed to foreign countries, 
some of which have provided price supports for their own 
specialty crop industries.
    b. Witnesses.--A.G. Kawamura, secretary, California 
Department of Food and Agriculture; Joseph Zanger, president, 
California Farm Bureau Federation; Jim Bogart, president, 
Grower-Shipper Vegetable Association of Central California; 
John D'Arrigo, chairman, Western Growers Association; and 
Robert Nielsen, vice president, Tanimura & Antle.
13. ``What is the Administration's Record in Relieving Burden on Small 
        Business?'' January 28, 2004; Serial No. 108-142
    a. Summary.--On January 28, 2004, the subcommittee held the 
second of three joint hearings with the Small Business 
Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform and Oversight to examine the 
administration's record in paperwork reduction and burden 
relief for small businesses. The Small Business Paperwork 
Relief Act of 2002 required the Office of Management and Budget 
[OMB] to take certain actions by June 28, 2003 and others by 
December 31st.
    The hearing reviewed: (a) OMB's still incomplete listing of 
each agency's single point of contact to act as a liaison 
between small business and the agency, (b) OMB's still 
incomplete listing of agency compliance assistance resources 
available to small businesses, (c) the incomplete initial 
agency enforcement reports (due December 31st), and (d) 
additional significant (over 100,000 hours each) paperwork 
reduction accomplishments and plans to benefit small business. 
In addition, the three key regulatory agencies--the Departments 
of Labor [DOL] and Transportation [DOT] and the Environmental 
Protection Agency [EPA]--discussed their track record in 
relieving enforcement burdens on small business. The 
subcommittee sent extensive post-hearing questions to OMB and 
DOL.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB; Patrick Pizzella, 
Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management, DOL; 
Jeffrey Rosen, General Counsel, DOT; Kimberly Terese Nelson, 
Assistant Administrator for Environmental Information, EPA; 
Harold Igdaloff, president, Sungro Chemicals, Inc., California, 
on behalf of the National Small Business Association; and 
Andrew Langer, manager, regulatory policy, the National 
Federation of Independent Business.
14. ``How to Improve Regulatory Accounting: Costs, Benefits, and 
        Impacts of Federal Regulations--Part II,'' February 25, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-159
    a. Summary.--On February 25, 2004, the subcommittee held 
its third annual hearing on the Office of Management and 
Budget's [OMB's] annual regulatory accounting report, which is 
required to be submitted with the President's fiscal budget. 
The law requires OMB to estimate the total annual costs and 
benefits for all Federal rules and paperwork in the aggregate, 
by agency, by agency program, and by major rule, and to include 
an associated report on the impacts of Federal rules and 
paperwork on certain groups, such as small business. The 
hearing examined OMB's draft seventh annual regulatory 
accounting report, which was published 11 days after the 
statutory deadline for the final report. The subcommittee sent 
extensive post-hearing questions to OMB.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB; Thomas M. Sullivan, 
Chief Counsel for Advocacy, Small Business Administration; 
William Kovacs, Vice President, Environment, Technology and 
Regulatory Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Susan Dudley, 
director, regulatory studies program, Mercatus Center, George 
Mason University; Dr. Richard B. Belzer, president, Regulatory 
Checkbook; Joan Claybrook, president, Public Citizen; and 
Robert R.M. Verchick, Ruby M. Hulen professor of law, 
University of Missouri at Kansas City School of Law, 
representing the Center for Progressive Regulation.
15. ``The Homeland Security Department's Plan to Consolidate and Co-
        Locate Regional and Field Offices: Improving Communication and 
        Coordination,'' March 24, 2004; Serial No. 108-168
    a. Summary.--On March 24, 2004, the subcommittee held a 
joint oversight hearing with Government Reform Subcommittee on 
National Security, Emerging Threats and International Relations 
on the Department of Homeland Security's [DHS's] efforts to 
implement Section 706 of the Department of Homeland Security 
Act (Public Law 107-296). Section 706 required DHS to develop a 
plan to consolidate and co-locate the former Federal agencies' 
regional and field offices within the same municipality that 
were transferred to DHS and to submit a report to Congress by 
November 25, 2003. DHS filed its plan on February 4, 2004 
without addressing the specific issues mandated by Section 706. 
After the hearing, the subcommittee submitted followup 
questions to DHS Under Secretary Asa Hutchinson regarding 
implementation of a field and regional office plan, cost 
savings, cross training, technical assistance, best practices 
and cooperation with the Department of Defense. After 
responding to the questions, DHS agreed in writing to submit a 
final and responsive report on implementation of Section 706 to 
the subcommittee by 1 year after the statutory deadline, i.e., 
by November 25, 2004.
    b. Witnesses.--Asa Hutchinson, Under Secretary for Border 
and Transportation Security, DHS; James Lee Witt, president, 
James Lee Witt Associates, LLP and former Director of the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency; C. Morgan Kinghorn, 
president, National Academy of Public Administration; Edward A. 
Flynn, secretary, Executive Office of Public Safety, State of 
Massachusetts, on behalf of the National Governors Association; 
Karen Anderson, mayor, city of Minnetonka, MN, on behalf of the 
National League of Cities; and Dr. Martin Fenstersheib, health 
officer for the Santa Clara County Public Health Department, 
San Jose, CA, on behalf of the National Association of County 
and City Health Officers.
16. ``What is the Bush Administration's Economic Growth Plan Component 
        for Paperwork Reduction?'' April 20, 2004; Serial No. 108-197
    a. Summary.--On April 20, 2004, the subcommittee held its 
sixth annual hearing on the administration's progress in 
paperwork reduction. The Office of Management and Budget [OMB] 
estimates the Federal paperwork burden on the public at over 8 
billion hours. The Internal Revenue Service [IRS] accounts for 
over 80 percent of the total. In 1980, Congress established an 
Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs [OIRA] in OMB. By 
law, OIRA's principal responsibility is paperwork reduction. 
Paperwork burden has increased, not decreased, in each of the 
last 8 years. In sum, OMB and the IRS are not doing a credible 
job in paperwork reduction. The subcommittee sent extensive 
post-hearing questions to OMB and the IRS.
    b. Witnesses.--OMB's OIRA Administrator John D. Graham; IRS 
Commissioner and former OMB Deputy Director for Management Mark 
W. Everson; Patricia A. Dalton, Director, Strategic Issues, 
General Accounting Office; Daniel Clifton, Federal affairs 
manager, Americans for Tax Reform; Paul Hense, president, Paul 
A. Hense CPA, P.C., on behalf of the National Small Business 
Association; and Raymond J. Keating, chief economist, Small 
Business Survival Committee.
17. ``Wildfires in the West: Is the Bush Administration's Response 
        Adequate?'' May 5, 2004; Serial No. 108-178
    a. Summary.--On May 5, 2004, the subcommittee held a 
hearing on the administration's efforts to prevent catastrophic 
wildfires in the West. In 2000 and 2002, the United States 
experienced two of the worst wildfires in 50 years. In 
response, President Bush launched his Healthy Forests 
Initiative [HFI] and signed into law the Healthy Forests 
Restoration Act [HFRA]. The hearing assessed the sufficiency of 
HFI and HFRA in the long-term prevention of wildfires and also 
examined how Federal, State, and local entities can further 
increase cooperation and coordination to address future fires. 
After the hearing, the subcommittee sent post-hearing questions 
to the U.S. Department of Agriculture [USDA] relating to the 
conditions for its release of Federal funds to States and 
counties for wildfire prevention.
    b. Witnesses.--P. Lynn Scarlett, Assistant Secretary for 
Policy, Management, and Budget, Department of the Interior; 
Mark Rey, Under Secretary for Natural Resources and 
Environment, USDA; Montana Governor Judy Martz on behalf of 
Western Governors' Association (who submitted written 
testimony); William Campbell, chairman, California Governor's 
Blue Ribbon Fire Commission; Bruce Tuberville, chairman, the 
Fire Safe Council; William J. McCammon, president, California 
Fire Chiefs Association; and Amy Mall, senior forest policy 
analyst, Natural Resources Defense Council.
18. ``How Can We Maximize Private Sector Participation in 
        Transportation?--Part I,'' May 18, 2004; Serial No. 108-220
    a. Summary.--On May 18, 2004, the subcommittee held its 
first of two hearings on maximizing private sector 
participation in transportation. The hearing explored 
opportunities for further private sector participation in 
ground transportation and past experiences with public-private 
partnerships, service delivery by competitively-award private 
sector providers, and existing private sector transportation 
services. Also, the subcommittee examined the Department of 
Transportation's [DOT's] record in facilitating private sector 
participation in transportation and in faithfully implementing 
the various private sector participation statutory provisions 
through its codified rules, oversight, enforcement, and other 
initiatives. The subcommittee sent three sets of post-hearing 
questions to DOT--on May 28th, July 9th, and August 4th. Due to 
the answers received, the subcommittee held a followup hearing 
on September 30th.
    b. Witnesses.--Emil Frankel, Assistant Secretary for 
Transportation Policy, DOT; William R. Allen, president, Amador 
Stage Lines, Sacramento, CA; Katsumi Tanaka, chairman of the 
Board & CEO, E Noa Corp., Honolulu, HI; Terrence V. Thomas, 
president, Community Bus Services, Inc., Youngstown, OH; Dr. 
Adrian Moore, vice president, Reason Foundation and executive 
director, Reason Public Policy Institute; Dr. Ronald D. Utt, 
Herbert & Joyce Morgan senior research fellow, the Heritage 
Foundation; and Dr. Max B. Sawicky, economist, Economic Policy 
Institute.
19. ``Easing Pain at the Gasoline Pump: Finding Solutions for Western 
        Woes,'' May 28, 2004; Serial No. 108-203
    a. Summary.--On May 28, 2004, the subcommittee held the 
second of three 108th hearings on gasoline prices. This field 
hearing in Henderson, NV examined short and long-term 
regulatory solutions to the gasoline supply problem that had 
driven up prices in California and the Nation. The subcommittee 
considered various approaches, some of which focused on 
increasing supply, such as streamlining environmental laws and 
regulations, reducing the number of boutique fuels, increasing 
imports of finished gasoline and fuel blending components, and 
adding additional gasoline storage capacity. Potential demand-
side solutions that the subcommittee considered were improving 
vehicle fuel economy, encouraging the use of alternative energy 
or hybrid vehicles, and providing incentives for public 
transportation and carpooling.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Burdette, energy advisor to Governor 
Guinn, State of Nevada; William Keese, chairman, California 
Energy Commission; Lynette Evans, policy advisor regulatory 
affairs, Office of Governor Napolitano, State of Arizona; Joe 
Sparano, president, Western States Petroleum Association; Sean 
Comey, media relations representative, AAA of Northern 
California, Nevada and Utah; David Hackett, president, 
Stillwater Associates; and Tyson Slocum, research director, 
Public Citizen's Energy Program.
20. ``LNG Import Terminal and Deepwater Port Siting: Federal and State 
        Roles,'' June 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-238
    a. Summary.--On June 22, 2004, the subcommittee held a 
hearing addressing how Federal and State regulatory frameworks 
were furthering various policy goals, such as competitive 
pricing, regional supply, safety, and environmental integrity, 
and playing complementary or redundant roles. The agencies were 
asked how they planned to address barriers to liquefied natural 
gas [LNG] siting, such as local community fears and conflicting 
laws. The subcommittee also sent the three Federal agency 
witnesses (representing the Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission [FERC], the Department of Energy [DOE], and the U.S. 
Coast Guard) followup questions about steps contemplated or 
being taken to streamline the siting process, clarify agency 
roles, and modernize regulations, and about anticipated 
economic consequences if sufficient new facilities failed to be 
sited.
    b. Witnesses.--Patrick H. Wood III, chairman, FERC; David 
Garman, Acting Under Secretary, DOE; Rear Admiral Larry Hereth, 
Director, Office of Port Security, U.S. Coast Guard, Department 
of Homeland Security; Jay Blossman, commissioner, Louisiana 
Public Service Commission; Joe Desmond, deputy secretary, 
energy, California Resources Agency; Kenneth D. Schisler, 
chairman, Maryland Public Service Commission; Donald Santa, 
president, Interstate Natural Gas Association of America; and 
Philip Warburg, president, Conservation Law Foundation.
21. ``Driving Down the Cost of Filling Up,'' July 7, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-241
    a. Summary.--On July 7, 2004, the subcommittee held the 
third of three 108th hearings on gasoline prices. This hearing 
focused on the regulatory causes underlying high gasoline 
prices and potential solutions, and examined steps appropriate 
from a regulatory standpoint to expand and enhance the 
petroleum infrastructure to encourage upgrades and expansions. 
The subcommittee addressed the cumulative affect of 
governmental regulations, such as those mandating fuel content, 
gasoline supply and prices, and California's de facto ethanol 
mandate and its waiver request to the Environmental Protection 
Agency [EPA].
    The subcommittee sent followup questions to EPA, the 
Federal Trade Commission [FTC] on its investigations of 
petroleum company mergers, the Government Accountability Office 
[GAO], and the National Petrochemical and Refiners Association 
on costs associated with refining gasoline.
    b. Witnesses.--Guy F. Caruso, Administrator, Energy 
Information Administration, Department of Energy [DOE]; Mark R. 
Maddox, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, DOE; 
Jeffrey R. Holmstead, Assistant Administrator for Air and 
Radiation, EPA; William E. Kovacic, General Counsel, FTC; Jim 
Wells, Director, Natural Resources and Environment, GAO; Robert 
Slaughter, president, National Petrochemical and Refiners 
Association and on behalf of the American Petroleum Institute; 
Michael Ports, president, Ports Petroleum Co., Inc., and on 
behalf of the Society of Independent Gasoline Marketers and the 
National Association of Convenience Stores; Ben Lieberman, 
senior policy analyst, Competitive Enterprise Institute; and A. 
Blakeman Early, environmental consultant, American Lung 
Association.
22. ``What is the Administration's Record in Relieving Burden on Small 
        Business?--Part II,'' July 20, 2004; Serial No. 108-255
    a. Summary.--On July 20, 2004, the subcommittee held the 
third of three joint hearings with the Small Business 
Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform and Oversight to examine the 
administration's record in paperwork reduction and burden 
relief for small businesses. The Small Business Paperwork 
Relief Act of 2002 required the Office of Management and Budget 
[OMB] to take certain actions by June 28, 2003, others by 
December 31st, and others by June 28, 2004.
    The hearing reviewed: (a) OMB's still incomplete listing of 
each agency's single point of contact to act as a liaison 
between small business and the agency, (b) OMB's still 
incomplete listing of agency compliance assistance resources 
available to small businesses, (c) the still incomplete agency 
enforcement reports, (d) the second report of an OMB-chaired 
interagency task force (due June 28, 2004), and (e) additional 
significant (over 100,000 hours each) paperwork reduction 
accomplishments and plans to benefit small business. The 
hearing concluded that OMB's June 2003 and June 2004 task force 
reports were unresponsive to congressional specifications and 
intent, and its track record in small business paperwork 
reduction remained dismal. The subcommittee sent extensive 
post-hearing questions to OMB, Treasury, and the General 
Services Administration [GSA].
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB; Jesus Delgado-Jenkins, 
Acting Assistant Secretary for Management and Budget & Chief 
Financial Officer, Department of the Treasury; Felipe Mendoza, 
Associate Administrator, Office of Small Business Utilization, 
GSA; Joseph Acker, president, Synthetic Organic Chemical 
Manufacturers Association; Anita Drummond, director of legal 
and regulatory affairs, Associated Builders and Contractors, 
Inc.; and John DiFazio, assistant general counsel--legal/
regulatory affairs, Consumer Specialty Products Association.
23. ``How Can We Maximize Private Sector Participation in 
        Transportation?--Part II,'' September 30, 2004
    a. Summary.--On September 30, 2004, the subcommittee held 
its second of two hearings on maximizing private sector 
participation in transportation. The hearing focused on mass 
transit and highways, and further explored the Department of 
Transportation's [DOT's] record in implementing the various 
statutory and regulatory private sector participation 
requirements. The subcommittee found that, since Chairman Ose's 
August 2003 request, DOT neither initiated a rulemaking to 
implement the various statutory private sector participation 
provisions nor took an enforcement action against a clearly 
noncompliant grantee. In addition, the subcommittee found that, 
in other cases, DOT has not enforced its own regulations and, 
thus, allowed local transit authorities to compete unfairly 
with existing private mass transit service providers.
    The subcommittee sent extensive post-hearing questions to 
DOT, and more limited questions to the DC Department of 
Transportation and the former Chief Counsel for DOT's Federal 
Transit Administration [FTA].
    b. Witnesses.--Jennifer Dorn, Administrator, FTA, DOT; Dan 
Tangherlini, Director, DC Department of Transportation; Tom 
Mack, chairman, Tourmobile Sightseeing, Washington, DC; David 
Smith, director of marketing and sales, Oleta Coach Lines, 
Inc., Williamsburg, VA; Jerome Cooper, chairman, Transit 
Alliance & president, Jamaica Buses, Inc., Jamaica, NY; Steven 
Diaz, esq., former Chief Counsel, FTA, DOT; and Shirley Ybarra, 
president, Ybarra Group and council member, the National 
Council for Public-Private Partnerships, and former 
commissioner, Virginia Department of Transportation (who 
submitted written testimony).
24. ``Current Challenges in Combating the West Nile Virus,'' October 6, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-274
    a. Summary.--On October 6, 2004, the subcommittee held a 
hearing examining recent activities and challenges to Federal, 
State and local efforts to control or eliminate the West Nile 
Virus epidemic. In the summer of 2004, California and Arizona 
faced a West Nile Virus epidemic. The subcommittee examined the 
impact of Federal court decisions and Clean Water Act citizen 
lawsuits and the need for and effect of National Pollutant 
Discharge Elimination System [NPDES] permits on the ability of 
local vector control districts to fight the severe public 
health crisis caused by the West Nile Virus.
    The subcommittee submitted post-hearing questions to the 
Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] regarding efforts to curb 
citizen lawsuits, issue final nonbinding guidance, promulgate a 
regulation, and the availability of reduced risk pesticides. 
Additionally, the subcommittee sent post-hearing questions to 
the California Vector Control Association regarding mosquito 
abatement efforts, impact of the NPDES permit, and nonbinding 
guidance or a binding regulation.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, Director, National 
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National 
Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services 
[HHS]; Dr. Stephen M. Ostroff, Deputy Director, National Center 
for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, HHS; 
Benjamin J. Grumbles, Acting Assistant Administrator, Office of 
Water, EPA; John Pape, chief epidemiologist, Colorado 
Department of Public Health & Environment; Dr. Jonathan 
Weisbuch, director of public health Maricopa County, AZ; Joe 
Conlon, technical advisor, American Mosquito Control 
Association; David Brown, Chair, Integrated Pest Management, 
Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California; Wendy 
Station, founder, Encephalitis Global; and Dr. A. Marm 
Kilpatrick, senior research scientist, Consortium for 
Conservation Medicine at Wildlife Trust.
25. ``What is the Bush Administration's Record in Regulatory Reform?'' 
        November 17, 2004
    a. Summary.--On November 17, 2004, the subcommittee held a 
hearing to examine the Bush administration's 4-year record in 
regulatory reform, especially for public nominations made in 
response to the Office of Management and Budget's [OMB's] 
annual regulatory accounting reports. The hearing also 
specifically explored public nominations affecting small 
business and several existing rules issued by the Department of 
Labor [DOL] and the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], 
including DOL's rules for the Family and Medical Leave Act 
[FMLA], and EPA's rules for its Toxic Release Inventory [TRI], 
New Source Review [NSR], and mercury. The subcommittee 
submitted post-hearing questions to OMB for details about the 
administration's record and process.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John D. Graham, Administrator, Office of 
Information and Regulatory Affairs, OMB; Stephen L. Johnson, 
Deputy Administrator, EPA; Howard M. Radzely, Solicitor, DOL; 
Thomas M. Sullivan, Chief Counsel for Advocacy, Small Business 
Administration; William Kovacs, vice president, Environment, 
Technology and Regulatory Affairs, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; 
Todd O. McCracken, president, National Small Business 
Association; Nancy McKeague, senior vice president, Michigan 
Health & Hospital Association, representing the Society for 
Human Resource Management; James L. Gattuso, research fellow in 
regulatory policy, the Heritage Foundation; Catherine O'Neill, 
associate professor, Seattle University School of Law, 
representing the Center for Progressive Regulation; and John A. 
Paul, supervisor, Regional Air Pollution Control Agency, 
Dayton, OH, representing the State and Territorial Air 
Pollution Program Administrators.

     SUBCOMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT EFFICIENCY AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

                              Legislation

1. H.R. 4259, The Department of Homeland Security Financial 
        Accountability Act
    The Chief Financial Officers Act (CFO Act) of 1990, Public 
Law 101-576, is the cornerstone of Federal financial management 
reform. It came about after 5 years of debate and made sweeping 
changes to the way the Federal Government manages its finances, 
with the advent of financial audits and a new commitment to 
sound financial management. The CFO Act established a 
leadership structure within the 24 largest departments and the 
Office of Management and Budget [OMB] by establishing a Chief 
Financial Officer [CFO] in all major executive departments. 
Legislation that created the Department of Homeland Security 
did not include the new agency among those covered by the CFO 
Act.
    On July 24, 2003, Government Efficiency and Financial 
Management Subcommittee Chairman Todd Platts (R-PA) introduced 
H.R. 2886, the ``Department of Homeland Security Financial 
Accountability Act,'' to ensure that DHS would be subject to 
the same financial accountability requirements as all other 
cabinet-level departments by applying the provisions of the CFO 
Act.
    H.R. 2886 required the CFO at DHS to be appointed by the 
President with the advice and consent of the Senate, reporting 
directly to the Secretary. Furthermore, the bill ensured that 
DHS would be required to comply with the Federal Financial 
Management Improvement Act of 1996 (enacted as Title VIII of 
the Omnibus Consolidated Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1997, 
Public Law 104-208), which established important financial 
management systems requirements for CFO Act agencies. 
Additionally, H.R. 2886 required an opinion-level audit of 
internal accounting controls at DHS. The requirements spelled 
out in H.R. 2886 were designed to make sure that financial 
management was a high priority at DHS.
    The subcommittee passed the bill unanimously by voice vote 
and reported it favorably to the full Committee on Government 
Reform on September 24, 2003. The full committee then passed 
the bill unanimously by voice vote on November 6, 2003 and 
reported it favorably to the House of Representatives. The 
House Select Committee on Homeland Security also marked up H.R. 
2886 and reported a significantly different version to the 
House of Representatives. H.R. 2886 was not considered by the 
full House of Representatives.
    The legislation was reintroduced in May 2004 as H.R. 4259 
and represented a compromise between the House Government 
Reform Committee and Select Committee on Homeland Security. 
H.R. 4259, in addition to including the CFO Act and internal 
control audit requirements of H.R. 2886, also included 
important provisions insisted upon by the House Select 
Committee on Homeland Security to establish in statute the 
existing Office of Program Analysis and Evaluation, as well as 
an annual requirement for a Future Years Homeland Security 
Program and Homeland Security Strategy.
    H.R. 4259 passed the House Government Reform Committee in 
May 2004. The House Select Committee on Homeland Security 
discharged the legislation. The bill passed the House of 
Representatives on July 20, 2004, and cleared the Senate on 
September 30, 2004. On October 16, 2004, the legislation was 
signed into law by President Bush and became Public Law 108-
330.
2. H.R. 3826, The Program Assessment and Results Act
    In August 2001, President Bush announced an ambitious 
agenda to reform government management and improve the 
performance of Federal programs. The President's management 
agenda focuses on areas where the need and opportunity to 
improve are the greatest. The budget and performance 
integration initiative, a key facet of the President's 
management agenda, stresses the need to make budget decisions 
based on results. To implement this initiative, the 
administration developed the Program Assessment Rating Tool 
[PART], to evaluate a program's purpose, management, results 
and accountability to determine its overall effectiveness.
    The subcommittee believes that the process of evaluating 
the efficiency and effectiveness of the Federal Government 
program-by-program is necessary to ensure that tax dollars are 
being spent in the most appropriate manner. To that end, on 
February 25, 2004, subcommittee Chairman Todd R. Platts and 
full committee Chairman Tom Davis introduced H.R. 3826, the 
``Program Assessment and Results Act,'' to amend and improve 
the Government Performance and Results Act [GPRA] of 1993, 
Public Law 103-62.
    The Program Assessment and Results [PAR] Act is designed to 
improve the GPRA by implementing a program review and 
evaluation process that attempts to determine the strengths and 
weaknesses of Federal programs with a particular focus on 
results. Furthermore, the information gathered in the review 
and evaluation process established by the PAR Act will build on 
the groundwork laid by GPRA to help the executive branch make 
informed management decisions and evidence-based funding 
requests aimed at achieving positive results. Finally, the 
program reviews created by the PAR Act will provide 
congressional policymakers with the information needed to 
conduct more effective oversight, to make better-informed 
authorization decisions, and to make more evidence-based 
spending decisions.
    The PAR Act amends GPRA to require the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget [OMB] to review each Federal 
program, as defined by OMB, at least once every 5 fiscal years. 
The choice of a 5-year cycle divides the workload of evaluating 
all Federal programs into manageable segments. Attempting to 
evaluate the performance of all Federal programs in 1 year was 
a major impediment to the success of past attempts at 
performance measurement. The 5-year cycle also parallels the 
timeframe used by OMB in its Program Assessment Rating Tool 
[PART], which OMB has used to evaluate programs, representing 
20 percent of all Federal spending each year beginning with the 
fiscal year 2003 budget cycle. The PAR Act does not interfere 
with OMB's timeline for using PART to complete program 
assessments of each program in the Federal budget, nor does the 
PAR Act attempt to codify the specific methodology used by 
PART. Instead, the PAR Act directs OMB to conduct reviews of 
programs in consultation with the relevant agency that 
administers the program and to evaluate each program's purpose, 
design, strategic plan, management, results, and any other 
matters that OMB considers appropriate.
    On May 19, 2004, the Subcommittee on Government Efficiency 
and Financial Management held a business meeting to mark up 
H.R. 3826. H.R. 3826 was reported to the full Committee on 
Government Reform, as amended, by voice vote. On June 3, 2004 
the full Committee on Government Reform held a business meeting 
to mark up H.R. 3826 and reported the legislation, as amended, 
by voice vote to the full House of Representatives for 
consideration. H.R. 3826 has not yet been considered by the 
full House of Representatives.
3. H.R. 3457, The Improving Government Accountability Act of 2003
    Representative Jim Cooper (D-TN), H.R. 3457, introduced the 
``Improving Government Accountability Act of 2003,'' which 
seeks to amend the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. 
App.) to enhance the independence and operational effectiveness 
of Inspectors General. H.R. 3457 was referred to the 
subcommittee and was the subject of two subcommittee hearings. 
In addition to reviewing H.R. 3457, the subcommittee is also 
working closely with the President's Council on Integrity and 
Efficiency [PCIE] and the Executive Council on Integrity and 
Efficiency [ECIE] on legislative ideas similar to those 
embodied in H.R. 3457.
    The Improving Government Accountability Act of 2003 
addresses a number of key issues of interest to the IG 
community. H.R 3457 amends the Inspector General Act of 1978 to 
allow an Inspector General [IG] to be removed from office prior 
to the expiration of his term on the grounds of permanent 
disability, inefficiency, neglect of duty, malfeasance, or 
conviction of a felony or conduct involving moral turpitude. In 
addition, the bill establishes the term of office of each IG as 
7 years. The legislation also establishes the Council of 
Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency to develop 
policies, standards, and approaches to facilitate a well-
trained workforce in the offices of the IG. This council 
represents a consolidation of the existing PCIE and ECIE. The 
bill also directs the Office of Personnel Management to 
maintain a personnel management system applicable to the 
officers and employees of IG offices.
    Although the independence and effectiveness of Inspectors 
General is of significant importance to the subcommittee, no 
specific legislative action on H.R. 3457 was taken during the 
108th Congress. The subcommittee expects to consider a similar 
proposal, currently being drafted for introduction next year by 
Representative Cooper, in the 109th Congress.

                          Oversight Highlights

    The Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and Financial 
Management examines issues involving the overall economy, 
efficiency, and financial management of Federal operations and 
activities. More specifically, the subcommittee oversees the 
financial reporting and management requirements of laws such as 
the Chief Financial Officers Act [CFO], the Inspector General 
Act, the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act, and the 
Accountability of Tax Dollars Act. Furthermore, the 
subcommittee examines the quality of agencies' performance 
goals and reports in accordance with the Government Performance 
and Results Act.

                       Summary of Accomplishments

1. Governing with Accountability
    A major part of the Subcommittee on Government Efficiency 
and Financial Management's oversight responsibility involves 
the performance and accountability measures of the President's 
management agenda. To meet this responsibility, the 
subcommittee completed a series of hearings focused on 
governing with accountability, a significant part of the 
President's management agenda. This included an overview of 
management initiatives included in the President's budget for 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005, a substantive review of the 
effectiveness of the Government Performance and Results Act 
[GPRA], and an examination of GPRA's relationship to the Office 
of Management and Budget's initiative known as the Program 
Assessment Rating Tool [PART], including the possibility of 
making program assessments similar to the PART a statutory 
requirement. These hearings brought much needed attention to 
President Bush's efforts to incorporate performance information 
in his fiscal year 2004 budget submission. During both sessions 
of the 108th Congress, hearings were held during consideration 
of the President's budget by the House of Representatives in 
order to educate other Members on this increasingly important 
topic. In addition to these hearings, the subcommittee 
requested a GAO 10-year retrospective on the effectiveness of 
GPRA and an analysis of the use of the PART. The findings of 
these reports were presented at several hearings and served as 
a basis for legislative proposals.
    One of the most important aspects of governing with 
accountability is the generation of timely, accurate, and 
useful financial information. Without this information, it is 
impossible to complete cost/benefit analyses or to assess the 
financial impact of programs relative to their budgetary 
outlays. In this light, financial management must be a high 
priority for agency management. One of the goals when Congress 
enacted the CFO Act was to place the CFO in the upper echelon 
of agency management structure. With a focus on improving 
agency management, Congress has created several positions--the 
Chief Information Officer, Chief Human Capital Officer, and 
Chief Acquisition Officer--whose responsibilities complement 
and sometimes duplicate those of agency CFOs. Through its 
oversight efforts, the subcommittee examined the changing 
dynamics of Federal management and how best to balance the 
roles of these new statutory offices with the unique fiduciary 
responsibilities of the CFO.
2. Financial Management and Systems Modernization
    Since fiscal year 1996 all CFO Act agencies have been 
required to produce annual audited financial statements. In 
fiscal year 2002, 21 of the 24 CFO Act agencies received clean 
opinions from their auditors. Audits for fiscal year 2003 were 
similarly positive, with 20 of 23 agencies achieving clean 
opinions. Although the subcommittee applauds agencies for their 
commitment to getting clean opinions, many engaged in end-of-
year heroic efforts to get there. The majority of agencies are 
working around financial management systems problems by 
expending significant resources and making extensive manual 
adjustments after the end of the fiscal year. The result has 
been a clean but stale snapshot of an agency's financial 
position as of September 30th of any given fiscal year. This 
practice does not yield useful information for day-to-day 
decisionmaking, and it undermines the congressional mandate 
that agencies develop and implement financial management 
systems capable of providing useful and timely decisionmaking 
data. A clean audit opinion should occur as a natural 
consequence of top-notch year-round financial management not 
because of end of the year heroic efforts requiring thousands 
of hours to create financial statements that are reliable for 
only 1 day.
    During the 108th Congress, the subcommittee embarked on an 
extensive oversight schedule of hearings designed to improve 
government-wide financial management. The subcommittee began 
its financial management oversight each session with a hearing 
on the Financial Report of the U.S. Government--commonly known 
as the Consolidated Financials. Beginning with fiscal year 
1997, the CFO Act, as expanded by the Government Management 
Reform Act of 1994, required consolidated financial statements 
for the entire Federal Government to be audited by March 31st 
each year. The Secretary of the Treasury compiles the 
statements in coordination with the OMB Director, and the 
Comptroller General then audits the statements. These 
statements reflect the overall financial position of the 
executive branch, including assets, liabilities, and the 
results of the operations.
    On March 31, 2003, for the 6th straight year, the GAO was 
unable to render an opinion on the Federal Government's 
financial statements; in other words, the GAO found that the 
information in the financial statements was not reliable. In 
GAO's audit report, Comptroller General David Walker pointed to 
three major impediments to achieving a clean opinion on the 
consolidated financial statements: (1) serious financial 
management problems at the Department of Defense [DOD]; (2) the 
Federal Government's inability to account for billions of 
dollars of transactions between Federal Government entities; 
and(3) the Federal Government's inability to properly prepare 
financial statements.
    Unless there is a marked improvement in the financial 
systems used throughout the executive branch, the Federal 
Government will not be able to produce the kind of financial 
information that it needs to effectively manage its day-to-day 
operations. Furthermore, Congress and the administration need 
timely, accurate, and useful financial and performance 
information to make choices about today's needs versus the 
long-term fiscal future.
    The CFO Act calls for modernization of financial management 
systems so that the systematic measurement of performance, the 
development of cost information, and integration of program, 
budget, and financial information from management reporting can 
be achieved. The Federal Financial Management Improvement Act 
of 1996 [FFMIA] builds on the foundation laid by the CFO Act by 
emphasizing the need for agencies to have systems that can 
generate reliable useful and timely information with which to 
make fully informed decisions and to ensure accountability on 
an ongoing basis. FFMIA requires the CFO Act agencies to 
implement and maintain financial management systems that comply 
substantially with: Federal financial management systems 
requirements; Federal accounting standards; and the U.S. 
Government Standard General Ledger [SGL].
    GAO is required to report annually to the Congress on how 
the agencies are complying with the congressional mandates of 
FFMIA. According to GAO (GAO-03-1062), the nature and 
seriousness of the reported problems indicate that agency 
management does not yet have a full range of reliable 
information needed for accountability, performance reporting, 
and decisionmaking. This situation exists notwithstanding the 
fact that the majority of CFO Act agencies received clean audit 
opinions. The number of unqualified or clean opinions has been 
increasing over the past 6 years, from 11 in fiscal year 1997 
to 21 in fiscal year 2002 and 20 in fiscal year 2003, but the 
number of agencies reported to have substantially noncompliant 
systems has remained relatively stable: 20 in fiscal year 1997, 
21 in fiscal year 1998 and 1999, 19 in fiscal year 2000, 20 in 
fiscal year 2001, and 19 in fiscal year 2002. As previously 
noted, many agencies are working around systems problems to 
obtain clean opinions by expending significant resources and 
making extensive manual adjustments after the end of the fiscal 
year.

                           Business Meetings

    September 24, 2003, business meeting: Approved H.R. 2886 
``The Department of Homeland Security Financial Accountability 
Act,'' as amended by voice vote.
    May 19, 2004, business meeting: Approved H.R 3826 ``The 
Program Assessment and Results Act,'' as amended by voice vote.

                                Hearings

1. ``Management and the President's Budget,'' March 26, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-45
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on the President's 
management agenda and the impact the agenda has had on the 
improvement of the executive branch's operational efficiency 
and effectiveness. The subcommittee explored how the 
President's management agenda impacted the budget numbers 
included in the President's fiscal year 2004 budget and 
reviewed the President's latest scorecard of the agencies' 
progress in implementing the management agenda. The Federal 
Government has a responsibility to the taxpayers of this 
country to be productive and accountable. Unfortunately, the 
results of the scorecard show that many agencies are unable to 
demonstrate the value that they provide for the tax dollars 
that are spent on the programs they administer. Progress is 
being made on the management agenda's five broad initiatives, 
but the status quo of these initiatives is still sub par at 
most agencies.
    b. Witnesses.--The Honorable Pete Sessions (R-TX), U.S. 
House of Representatives, chairman, Results Caucus; Patricia A. 
Dalton, Director, Strategic Issues, U.S. General Accounting 
Office; Edward R. McPherson, Chief Financial Officer, 
Department of Agriculture; Angela B. Styles, Administrator for 
Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and Budget; 
and Mark A. Forman, Associate Director, Information Technology 
and E-Government, Office of Management and Budget.
2. ``Performance, Results, and Budget Decisions,'' April 1, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-32
    a. Summary.--Congressional spending decisions have 
traditionally been based on three things: the amount of funding 
that a program received in the previous year, the President's 
requests, and the policy preferences of Congress. A more 
appropriate approach, however, is for Congress to focus on 
whether Federal taxpayers are receiving a good return on the 
investment of their hard-earned dollars. In 1993, Congress 
passed the Government Performance and Results Act [GPRA] in an 
effort to begin doing just that. In furtherance of the budget 
and performance integration initiative in the President's 
management agenda, the Office of Management and Budget 
developed the Program Assessment Rating Tool [PART]. Unlike 
GPRA, which looks at agency-wide performance, the PART examines 
the performance of individual programs. The PART was used to 
rate 234 Federal programs, representing over 20 percent of all 
Federal funding in the fiscal year 2004 budget. An additional 
20 percent of all funding will be reviewed in the fiscal year 
2005 budget. While PART has the potential to be a very valuable 
tool, more than half of the programs examined thus far received 
grades of ``results not demonstrated.'' Chairman Platts is very 
interested in these grades, and the subcommittee will continue 
to monitor future PART scores.
    b. Witnesses.--Donna McLean, Chief Financial Officer, 
Department of Transportation; Paul Posner, Director, Strategic 
Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; and Maurice McTigue, 
QSO, director, Government Accountability Project, Mercatus 
Center at George Mason University.
3. ``The Consolidated Financial Statements of the Federal Government 
        for Fiscal Year 2002,'' April 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-34
    a. Summary.--Countless taxpayer dollars continue to be lost 
each year to fraud, waste and financial mismanagement in 
hundreds of Federal programs. In this hearing, the subcommittee 
examined the single most comprehensive statement of the status 
of the financial management of the Federal Government, the 2002 
Financial Report of the U.S. Government. The Financial Report 
and the accompanying audit of the report performed by the 
General Accounting Office [GAO] were released on time as usual, 
on March 31, 2003. For the 6th straight year, GAO was unable to 
render an opinion on the Federal Government's financial 
statements. GAO reported significant material deficiencies that 
affected both the financial statements and the management of 
government operations. It is clear from the report that until 
the Department of Defense solves their financial problems and 
receives a clean opinion, the entire Federal Government's 
financial statements will continue to be unreliable.
    b. Witnesses.--David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States, U.S. General Accounting Office; Linda M. 
Springer, Controller, Office of Federal Financial Management, 
Office of Management and Budget; and Donald V. Hammond, Fiscal 
Assistant Secretary, Department of the Treasury.
4. ``Why is SBA Losing Ground on Financial Management?'' April 29, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-49
    a. Summary.--As one of the 24 Chief Financial Officer Act 
(CFO Act) agencies, the Small Business Administration [SBA] has 
been required to produce agency-wide audited annual financial 
statements since fiscal year 1996, and has been required to 
produce audited financial statements with respect to its loan 
programs since fiscal year 1991. Since 1996, SBA has 
consistently received a clean opinion from their auditors on 
their agency-wide financial statements. However, recently SBA's 
auditors issued a disclaimer on SBA's fiscal year 2002 
financial statements and chose to withdraw their clean opinions 
on SBA's financial statements for fiscal years 2001 and 2000. 
This turnaround occurred in part as the result of the findings 
by the GAO that SBA incorrectly calculated the accounting 
losses on $4.4 billion of loan sales and lacked reliable 
financial data to determine the overall financial impact of the 
sales. This hearing raised serious questions about the quality 
of the financial management of SBA's loan asset sales. It also 
demonstrated a point that is consistently raised by the 
subcommittee that sound financial management requires more than 
clean audit opinions.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda Calbom, Director of Financial 
Management and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office; 
Thomas Dumaresq, Chief Financial Officer, Small Business 
Administration; Peter McClintock, Deputy Inspector General, 
Small Business Administration; Charles Hayward, partner, Cotton 
& Co.; and Bill Menth, consultant to Cotton & Co.'s SBA Audit 
Team for Fiscal Year 2002, post-audit consultant to SBA.
5. ``Show Me the Tax Dollars--How Much is Lost to Improper Payments 
        Each Year?'' May 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-39
    a. Summary.--An improper payment is any payment that should 
not have been made. It can be an incorrect payment, an over or 
under payment, and can include, among other things, a payment 
to an ineligible recipient, a payment for an ineligible 
service, a duplicate payment or a payment for a service not 
received. The President has made the reduction of improper 
payments a significant part of his management agenda. Improper 
payments by Federal agencies are a serious and growing problem 
which cost taxpayers at least $35 billion each year. The total 
extent of the problem is still unknown. The subcommittee does 
know that these erroneous payments are made because agencies do 
not have adequate internal financial controls and business 
process systems to protect against them. The subcommittee 
convened this hearing to monitor this problem and the 
implementation of the ``Improper Payments Information Act,'' 
which is designed to address these concerns by establishing 
government-wide procedures for identifying and reducing 
improper payments.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda M. Springer, Controller, Officer of 
Federal Financial Management, Office of Management & Budget; 
McCoy Williams, Director, Financial Management and Assurance, 
U.S. General Accounting Office; and Kerry N. Weems, Acting 
Assistant Secretary for Budget, Technology, and Finance, 
Department of Health and Human Services.
6. ``Fixing the Financials: Featuring USDA and Education,'' June 10, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-58
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee brought before it, the 
Department of Agriculture [USDA] and the Department of 
Education, to discuss their significant progress on improving 
their overall financial management in fiscal year 2002. Both 
departments received clean audit opinions. While a clean audit 
opinion is certainly a goal that each of the CFO Act agencies 
shares, all too often agencies achieve clean opinions only 
through last minute heroic efforts or recreating their books at 
the end of the year. This is not what Congress intended under 
the CFO Act. Obtaining a clean audit opinion should be a by-
product of good year round financial management and not just a 
test that agencies try to pass at the end of the fiscal year. 
USDA and Education have implemented real changes designed to 
improve the long-term management of their agencies and as a 
consequence were able to obtain clean audits. USDA achieved a 
clean opinion by focusing on improving internal controls and 
accountability. Education learned from suggestions that were 
made on their previous financial audits and implemented 
solutions that addressed those suggestions. Chairman Platts 
commended both departments for their diligent efforts.
    b. Witnesses.--Edward McPherson, Chief Financial Officer, 
Department of Agriculture; Jack Martin, Chief Financial 
Officer, Department of Education; McCoy Williams, Director, 
Financial Management and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting 
Office; and Linda Calbom, Director of Financial Management and 
Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office.
7. ``Federal Debt Management--Are Agencies Using Collection Tools 
        Effectively?'' June 17, 2003; Serial No. 108-61
    a. Summary.--An important part of solid financial 
management effort is the collection of debts owed to the 
government. This subcommittee, under the leadership of former 
Chairman Steve Horn (R-CA) and current member of the 
subcommittee, Representative Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), developed 
legislation that was enacted as the Debt Collection Improvement 
Act [DCIA] of 1996, a law that made sweeping reforms to the way 
the Federal Government manages debt. Since that time, the 
subcommittee has held numerous hearings focusing on the 
implementation of the act. In this hearing, the subcommittee 
examined debt collection successes and challenges at the 
Veterans Administration and the Department of Education's 
Office of Federal Student Aid. The subcommittee also heard from 
the Treasury Department's Financial Management Service for a 
look at government-wide progress in DCIA. In terms of all 
Federal agencies, implementation of the DCIA is improving, but 
more needs to be done before DCIA will realize its full 
potential.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Gregg, Commissioner of the Financial 
Management Service, Department of Treasury; William Campbell, 
Assistant Secretary for Management and Chief Financial Officer, 
Department of Veterans Affairs; Theresa Shaw, Chief Operating 
Officer of Federal Student Aid, Department of Education; and 
Deanne Loonin, staff attorney, National Consumer Law Center in 
Boston, MA.
8. ``Winning the War on Financial Management--Status of Department of 
        Defense Reform Efforts,'' June 25, 2003; Serial No. 108-64
    a. Summary.--The Department of Defense [DOD] readily 
acknowledges that it is years away from earning an unqualified 
or ``clean'' opinion on its financial statements. The financial 
management challenges of DOD are unlike those of any other 
agency--in fact, they are unlike any entity in the world. With 
an annual budget of $400 billion, DOD is almost twice as large 
as the biggest publicly held corporation. It is our country's 
largest employer. The consolidated statement for DOD 
encompasses at least 20 stand-alone financials, many of which 
are larger and more complex than the statements of other CFO 
Act agencies. In light of these challenges, DOD has begun a 
complete restructuring of its financial management and business 
processes. The subcommittee is very interested in these reforms 
because they could result in billions of dollars of savings. 
The transformation will take years to complete and will require 
strong support from the highest levels of leadership within DOD 
if this modernization effort is to be successful.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory D. Kutz, Director, Financial 
Management and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office; 
Lawrence J. Lanzillotta, Principle Deputy and the Deputy Under 
Secretary of Defense for Management Reform, Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense (Comptroller); and Paul Granetto, 
Director, Defense Financial Auditing Service, Office of the 
Inspector General of the Department of Defense.
9. ``Show Me the Tax Dollars Part II--Improper Payments and the 
        TennCare Program,'' field hearing, Memphis, TN, July 14, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-76
    a. Summary.--This hearing was a follow up to the 
subcommittee's hearing on May 13 on improper payments. Held in 
Memphis, TN, the subcommittee examined waste, fraud, and 
mismanagement in Tennessee's Medicaid program, known as 
TennCare. Tennessee has been very aggressive in investigating 
potential fraud cases and has in place a number of mechanisms 
aimed at reducing TennCare fraud. The most identifiable form of 
fraud in the TennCare program is provider fraud, where 
providers commit fraud by lying to obtain an improper payment 
for services rendered (or allegedly rendered) to TennCare 
recipients. TennCare has an annual budget of approximately $6 
billion, $4 billion of which is provided by the Federal 
Government with another $2 billion provided by the State. The 
subcommittee conducted this hearing because not only are 
billions of dollars at stake here, the quality of the health 
care provided to TennCare recipients is in jeopardy as well.
    b. Witnesses.--McCoy Williams, Director, Financial 
Management and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office; Kerry 
Weems, Acting Assistant Secretary for Budget, Technology and 
Finance, Department of Health and Human Services; Barry Thomas 
Mathis, Director of Program Integrity, TennCare; William A. 
Benson, special agent, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, 
Medicaid Fraud Control Unit; and Holly E. Williams, director, 
Medicare Patrol Project, Upper Cumberland Area Agency on Aging.
10. ``SEC Strategic Planning--Will Additional Resources Help the SEC 
        Fulfill Its Mission?'' July 23, 2003; Serial No. 108-81
    a. Summary.--The Securities and Exchange Commission [SEC] 
faces a number of challenges, including a workload that has 
grown exponentially over the past decade and newly imposed 
requirements resulting from enactment of Sarbanes-Oxley in the 
107th Congress. The SEC has not undertaken comprehensive 
strategic planning to assess the gaps that exist between the 
way the SEC currently operates and the way the SEC should 
operate to execute its mission properly. Under the Government 
Performance and Results Act, the SEC is required to create a 5-
year strategic plan, an annual performance plan, and a year-end 
performance report. The SEC's strategic plan includes four 
broad goals: ``protect investors; maintain fair, honest and 
efficient markets; facilitate capital formation; and sustain 
and improve organizational excellence.'' Unfortunately, the 
performance measures for achieving these goals have 
traditionally focused on outputs not outcomes. As a result, the 
SEC cannot gauge whether the actions taken result in greater 
protection for investors or the smooth functioning of markets. 
Congress has provided the SEC with additional budget authority 
as well as increased flexibility in hiring and compensating 
personnel. The subcommittee continues to monitor the SEC's 
utilization of the tools and resources Congress has provided.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Hillman, Director of Financial 
Markets and Community Investment, U.S. General Accounting 
Office; and Peter Derby, Managing Executive for Operations, 
Office of the Chairman, Securities and Exchange Commission, 
accompanied by Jim McConnell, Executive Director, Office of the 
Executive Director, Securities and Exchange Commission.
11. ``Developing Sound Business Practices at the Department of Homeland 
        Security,'' September 10, 2003; Serial No. 108-103
    a. Summary.--On September 11, America sustained the most 
devastating attack on the homeland in its history. That day 
dealt a crushing blow to the confidence the Nation's citizens 
have in the Federal Government. The ability to protect the 
country from terrorism has become a national priority, and, to 
that end, Congress and the President established the Department 
of Homeland Security [DHS]. The creation of DHS is the largest 
reorganization of the Federal Government since the Department 
of Defense was established more than 50 years ago. DHS inherits 
22 agencies in varying financial condition with 19 different 
financial management systems and 15 compensation systems. Given 
the magnitude and importance of the mission of DHS, sound 
business practices are critical to success and must be 
established at the outset. The subcommittee examined the status 
of the financial management integration efforts at DHS. The 
hearing was an essential step to ensuring that DHS establishes 
sound business practices from the outset. The subcommittee also 
received comments from the witnesses on H.R. 2886, the 
``Department of Homeland Security Financial Accountability 
Act,'' which would help guarantee sound financial management at 
DHS during future administrations.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda Springer, Controller, Office of 
Federal Financial Management, Office of Management and Budget; 
McCoy Williams, Director, Financial Management and Assurance 
Team, U.S. General Accounting Office; Dr. Bruce Carnes, Chief 
Financial Officer, Department of Homeland Security; and Richard 
Berman, Assistant Inspector General for Audit, Department of 
Homeland Security.
12. ``Improving Financial Management at USAID,'' September 24, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-104
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused not only on the financial 
challenges facing the U.S. Agency for International Development 
[USAID], but also on successful improvements in USAID's 
financial management practices. After receiving disclaimers for 
5 consecutive years, USAID improved enough in fiscal year 2002 
to earn a qualified opinion on its consolidated financial 
statements. In fact, four of the five statements that make up 
the consolidated financial statements actually received clean 
opinions. That being said, USAID still faces many financial 
management challenges including the material weaknesses cited 
in their audit report and the need to discontinue the practice 
of using costly and time-consuming manual accounting 
transactions to reconcile its books at year-end.
    b. Witnesses.--John Marshall, Assistant Administrator for 
Management and Chief Information Officer, USAID; Everett 
Mosley, Inspector General, USAID; and Gregory Kutz, Director, 
of Financial Management and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting 
Office.
13. ``25th Anniversary of the Inspector General Act--Where Do We Go 
        From Here?'' October 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-110
    a. Summary.--Twenty-five years ago, Congress created 
Inspectors General [IGs] throughout the Federal Government in 
response to serious and widespread internal control breakdowns 
that resulted in significant monetary losses and reduced 
effectiveness and efficiency in Federal activities. Since their 
creation, IGs have been largely successful in carrying out 
their mission, reporting billions of dollars in savings and 
cost recoveries, as well as thousands of successful criminal 
prosecutions. There are currently 57 Inspector General offices 
throughout the Federal Government with 11,000 employees and a 
total budget of nearly $1.5 billion. IGs are responsible for 
conducting and supervising audits and investigations, promoting 
economy, efficiency and effectiveness, and preventing and 
detecting fraud and abuse in their agencies' programs and 
operations. IGs serve an important function in our system of 
separation of powers. Their autonomy and independence provide a 
crucial balance between the executive branch and the Congress. 
During this hearing, the subcommittee evaluated the progress 
that has been made in the 25 years since the IGs were created 
and what, if any, legislative changes are needed to help the IG 
community maintain its independence and effectiveness.
    b. Witnesses.--David M. Walker, Comptroller General, U.S. 
General Accounting Office; Clay Johnson III, Deputy Director 
for Management, Office of Management and Budget; Gaston Gianni, 
Vice Chair, President's Council on Integrity and Efficiency and 
Inspector General, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; and 
Barry Snyder, Vice Chair, Executive Council on Integrity and 
Efficiency and Inspector General, Federal Reserve Board.
14. ``Federal Financial Management--Private Sector Views,'' October 29, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-119
    a. Summary.--For fiscal year 2002, 21 of the 24 agencies 
mandated by the CFO Act to audit their statements earned an 
unqualified or ``clean'' opinion. Clean audit opinions are 
important but unfortunately, do not always signify that Federal 
agencies are using sound business practices. The thrust of the 
Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996 [FFMIA] 
was to extend the reach of the CFO Act and ensure that agencies 
were developing financial management systems that would produce 
timely, reliable, and useful information. FFMIA addressed 
concerns ranging from computer systems to the use of standard 
accounting practices, aiming to create uniformity in financial 
reporting throughout the Federal Government. During fiscal year 
2002, 19 of the 24 CFO Act agencies were in substantial non-
compliance with FFMIA. During this hearing, the subcommittee 
focused on the reasons agencies are not FFMIA compliant from 
the viewpoint of the private sector vendors of the financial 
management software. The software is put through a rigorous 
testing process before it can be marketed to Federal agencies 
so there are no quality control problems. The financial systems 
problems instead seem to center on the inability of the 
agencies to commit the resources needed to fully implement the 
new systems.
    b. Witnesses.--Sally Thompson, Director, Financial 
Management and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office; Karen 
Clearly Alderman, executive director, Joint Financial 
Management Improvement Program; Donna Morea, executive vice 
president of public sector and co-chief operating officer, 
American Management Systems; Thomas B. Moogan, vice president 
and chief financial officer, Digital Systems Group, Inc.; 
Leslie Casson Stevens, director of Federal solutions support, 
SAP Public Services Inc.; and Wayne Bobby, senior manager, 
Oracle Corp.--Federal.
15. ``Identify, Disrupt and Dismantle: Coordinating the Government's 
        Attack on Terrorist Financing,'' joint field hearing with the 
        Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
        Intergovernmental Relations and the Census, Tampa, FL, December 
        15, 2003; Serial No. 108-140
    a. Summary.--The subcommittee in conjunction with the 
Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, 
Intergovernmental Affairs and the Census held a joint field 
hearing to examine the Federal Government's efforts to combat 
money laundering and terrorist financing. The intricacy of 
identifying and prosecuting financial crimes requires the 
involvement of many Federal law enforcement and regulatory 
agencies, State and local authorities, and private sector 
financial institutions. Effective coordination and the best use 
of information technology are critical. Prior to September 11, 
most law enforcement and regulatory efforts focused primarily 
on money laundering (the disguising of illicit funds to appear 
legitimate). The attacks of September 11 highlighted the urgent 
need to combat a different form of financial crime--terrorist 
financing. While money laundering involves schemes to 
legitimize proceeds from illegal activities, terrorist funding 
often originates from legitimate enterprises, further 
complicating the investigation and prosecution of this type of 
financial crime. The ultimate goal of terrorist financing 
investigations is to disrupt the flow of money--a result that 
is difficult to quantify. Still, tangible progress is being 
made. The United States has sought and received unprecedented 
support from other countries in overhauling the laws governing 
the international financial system and designating entities as 
supporters of terror, and has increased transparency and 
vigilance in the private sector.
    b. Witnesses.--Jeff Ross, Senior Advisor, Office of 
Terrorist Financing and Financial Crime, U.S. Department of the 
Treasury; George Glass, Director, Office of Terrorist Financing 
and Economic Sanctions Policy, Bureau of Economic and Business 
Affairs, U.S. Department of State; Carl Whitehead, Special 
Agent in Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Tampa Office; 
Marcy Forman, Deputy Assistant Director for Financial 
Investigations, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
Department of Homeland Security; and Bruce Townsend, Deputy 
Assistant Director, Office of Investigations, U.S. Secret 
Service.
16. ``Should We PART Ways With GPRA: A Look at Performance Budgeting 
        and Program Review,'' February 4, 2004; Serial No. 108-144
    a. Summary.--This hearing reviewed the findings of a 
January 30, 2004 GAO report entitled ``Performance Budgeting: 
Observations on the Use of OMB's Program Assessment Rating Tool 
for the Fiscal Year 2004 Budget.'' The report and the hearing 
examined: (1) how the Program Assessment Rating Tool [PART] 
changed the Office of Management and Budget's [OMB] budget 
decisionmaking process; (2) PART's relationship to the 
Government Performance and Results Act [GPRA]; and (3) PART's 
strengths and weaknesses as an evaluation tool.
    b. Witnesses.--Paul Posner, Director, Strategic Issues, 
U.S. General Accounting Office; Jonathan Breul, senior fellow, 
IBM Center for the Business of Government; and Maurice McTigue, 
QSO, director, Government Accountability Project, Mercatus 
Center, George Mason University.
17. ``The President's Management Agenda: Are Agencies Getting To 
        Green?'' February 11, 2004; Serial No. 108-155
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on the President's Fiscal 
Year 2005 Budget, which was transmitted to Congress on February 
2, 2004. The hearing was second in a series of hearings on 
performance budgeting and looked at the budget submission, the 
President's management agenda, and agencies' progress under the 
management agenda's five government-wide priority initiatives, 
with a particular focus on the budget and performance 
integration initiative and the administration's use of the 
Program Assessment Rating Tool [PART].
    b. Witnesses.--Clay Johnson, Deputy Director for 
Management, Office of Management and Budget; and Kyle 
McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary, Department of Energy.
18. ``Financial Report of the U.S. Government for Fiscal Year 2003,'' 
        March 3, 2004; Serial No. 108-145
    a. Summary.--This hearing set the stage for the 
subcommittee's financial management oversight throughout the 
Second Session of the 108th Congress as it focused on the 
General Accounting Office's [GAO] audit of the consolidated 
financial statements for the Federal Government for fiscal year 
2003. The hearing examined the consolidated financial 
statements, the reasons that GAO was unable to express an 
opinion on them, and the managerial changes that need to take 
place in order for the Federal Government to produce reliable 
financial data for the Congress and the American people.
    b. Witnesses.--David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States, U.S. General Accounting Office; Linda M. 
Springer, Controller, Office of Federal Financial Management, 
Office of Management & Budget; and Donald V. Hammond, Fiscal 
Assistant Secretary, Department of the Treasury.
19. ``Making Financial Management a Priority at the Department of 
        Homeland Security,'' March 10, 2004; Serial No. 108-174
    a. Summary.--This hearing, the subcommittee's second look 
at financial management challenges facing the newly-created 
Department of Homeland Security, continued the important 
discussion of the steps needed to ingrain sound financial 
management and business processes at the Department. The 
hearing also focused on the findings of the Department's fiscal 
year 2003 financial audit and provided an overview of the 
continuing financial management challenges facing DHS in the 
realignment of its 22 component agencies.
    b. Witnesses.--Clark Kent Ervin, Inspector General, 
Department of Homeland Security; and Andrew Maner, Chief 
Financial Officer, Department of Homeland Security.
20. ``10 Years of GPRA--Results, Demonstrated,'' March 31, 2004; Serial 
        No. 108-175
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on the findings of the 
GAO report entitled ``Results Oriented Government: GPRA has 
Established a Foundation for Achieving Greater Results,'' GAO-
04-38. The report and the hearing itself looked at the effect 
of Government Performance and Results Act over the last 10 
years in creating a government-wide focus on results and the 
government's ability to deliver results to the American public, 
the challenges agencies face in measuring performance and using 
performance information in management decisions, and on how the 
Federal Government can continue to shift toward becoming more 
results-oriented.
    b. Witnesses.--Patricia Dalton, Director, Strategic Issues, 
U.S. General Accounting Office; Jonathan Breul, senior fellow, 
IBM Center for the Business of Government; Carl DeMaio, 
president and founder, the Performance Institute; Richard 
Keevey, director, Performance Consortium, National Academy of 
Public Administration; Patricia McGinnis, president and CEO, 
the Council for Excellence in Government; John Mercer, GPRA & 
Performance Management Services; and Carl J. Metzger, director, 
Government Results Center.
21. ``$35 Billion and Counting--A Review of the Improper Payments Act 
        of 2002,'' field hearing, York, PA, April 15, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-176
    a. Summary.--This field hearing, held in Chairman Platts' 
Congressional District in York, PA, examined agency progress in 
implementing the Improper Payments Information Act, reviewed 
OMB's improper payment guidance, and discussed strategies that 
agencies should consider for preventing future erroneous 
payments. The ``Improper Payments Information Act of 2002'' 
(Public Law 107-300), for the first time, requires Federal 
agencies to estimate the amount of erroneous or improper 
payments that their agency makes annually. While the full 
extent of the improper payments problem is not known today, 
this law, and the guidance stated by the Office of Management 
and Budget will get us closer to fully understanding the extent 
of the problem in the near future.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda Springer, Controller, Office of 
Federal Financial Management, Office of Management and Budget; 
McCoy Williams, Director, Financial Management and Assurance, 
U.S. General Accounting Office; Paul Gessing, National 
Taxpayers Union; and Charlie Gerow, chairman, Citizens Against 
Government Waste, Pennsylvania Chapter.
22. ``Strategic Planning, Resource Allocation and Crisis Management--Is 
        the SEC Ready?'' field hearing, New York City, NY, April 20, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-177
    a. Summary.--In light of the recently uncovered abuses in 
the mutual fund industry, a workload that has grown 
exponentially over the past decade, newly imposed requirements 
under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and changes in technology 
that have deeply affected the financial services industry, the 
subcommittee held a field hearing in New York City to review 
strategic planning and resource allocation at the Securities 
and Exchange Commission [SEC]. This hearing followed up on the 
subcommittee's hearing last July by reviewing the status of the 
Commission's new strategic plan, and how will it impact the 
SEC's overall mission, as well as whether or not the SEC has 
the necessary resources and appropriate focus to protect 
investors by regulating financial markets effectively.
    b. Witnesses.--Eliot Spitzer, Attorney General, State of 
New York; Richard Hillman, Director, Financial Markets and 
Community Investment, U.S. General Accounting Office; James 
McConnell, Executive Director, Securities and Exchange 
Commission; John Bogle, Bogle Financial Markets Research 
Center, founder, Vanguard Mutual Funds; and Dr. Matthew R. 
Morey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Finance and Economics, 
Pace University.
23. ``Mission Impossible? Fixing NASA's Financial Management,'' May 19, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-193
    a. Summary.--In light of recent financial audits, which 
revealed serious weaknesses in financial management at NASA, 
the subcommittee called this hearing to review the lessons 
learned during the fiscal year 2003 audit process, including 
how the auditor's findings will help improve overall financial 
management at NASA. Although the agency received unqualified or 
``clean'' opinions on its fiscal year 1996-2000 statements from 
Arthur Andersen, a congressional staffer discovered a 
discrepancy in its fiscal year 1999 statements. A subsequent 
investigation by the General Accounting Office [GAO] called 
into question the reliability of all previous audits. NASA's 
new auditor, PricewaterhouseCoopers [PwC], expressed only a 
qualified opinion for fiscal year 2001. The following year, 
fiscal year 2002, NASA earned a clean opinion only after making 
$10 billion in adjustments to balance its books. Most recently, 
PwC was unable to express an opinion as to the reliability of 
financial information for fiscal year 2003, pointing to more 
than $500 billion in undocumented year-end adjustments, a $2 
billion discrepancy in its Fund Balance with Treasury, and 
major internal control weaknesses. The hearing also reviewed 
the status of NASA's new systems implementation, the Integrated 
Financial Management Program [IFMP].
    b. Witnesses.--Gwendolyn Brown, Chief Financial Officer, 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Robert Cobb, 
Inspector General, National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; and Greg Kutz, Director, Financial Management 
and Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office.
24. ``Private Sector Consultants and Federal Financial Management: More 
        than Balancing the Books,'' June 16, 2004; Serial No. 108-244
    a. Summary.--As part of its ongoing review of Federal 
financial management, the subcommittee conducted an oversight 
hearing to discuss the role of private sector consultants in 
implementing financial management systems. Achieving sound 
financial management involves more than just accounting, and 
Federal agencies are beginning to use financial data to change 
the way they do business. This shift impacts human capital 
management and the use of information technology. As agencies 
move from data entry to data analysis, many are hiring private-
sector experts for a broad range of financial advice. The 
hearing provided an overview of consulting and systems 
integration services available to the Federal Government and 
how those services help agencies achieve sound business 
practices, provided a forum for the discussion of best 
practices and how they can be applied government-wide, and 
looked at barriers to success unique to the Federal Government, 
when implementing systems that have worked in the private 
sector.
    b. Witnesses.--George Cruser, partner, Public Sector 
Financial Management, IBM Corp.; David Halstead, vice 
president, Bradson Corp.; Robin Lineberger, senior vice 
president, BearingPoint; and Greg Pellegrino, partner, public 
sector, Deloitte Consulting.
25. ``Business Process Modernization at the Department of Defense,'' 
        joint hearing with the Subcommittee on National Security, 
        Emerging Threats and International Relations, July 7, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-229
    a. Summary.--Recent audits and investigations by GAO and 
DOD auditors continue to confirm the existence of pervasive 
weaknesses in DOD's financial management and related business 
processes and systems. The problems have (1) resulted in a lack 
of reliable information needed to make sound decisions and 
report on the status of day-to-day activities, including 
accountability of assets, and financial and other reports to 
Congress and DOD decisionmakers, (2) hindered operational 
efficiency, (3) adversely affected mission performance, and (4) 
left the Department vulnerable to fraud and waste. Although the 
senior Department of Defense leadership has repeatedly 
committed itself to transforming and improving the department's 
financial management and business process systems, limited 
progress has been made since Secretary Rumsfeld announced the 
effort in 2001. This hearing provided an update on the status 
of the Business Enterprise Architecture [BEA] and the 
implementation of financial management and business process 
reforms (the Business Management Modernization Project) 
including reviewing suggestions for accelerating reforms and 
overcoming obstacles that hinder their implementation.
    b. Witnesses.--Lawrence Lanzilotta, Under Secretary of 
Defense, Comptroller (Acting), Department of Defense; and Greg 
Kutz, Director, Financial Management and Assurance, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office
26. ``Improving IG Functionality and Independence: A Review of 
        Legislative Ideas,'' July 14, 2004; Serial No. 108-205
    a. Summary.--In August 2002, the General Accounting Office 
[GAO] issued a report on office consolidation and related 
issues affecting Inspectors General. GAO surveyed the IG 
community to obtain their views on how independence, quality of 
work, and use of resources might be affected by consolidation. 
Specifically, this report discusses raising the USPS, NSF and 
the Federal Reserve Board IGs to Presidential appointment 
status and consolidating the smaller DFE IG offices by 
transferring them into larger Presidential IG offices with 
related missions. In addition, the report looked at creating a 
statutory alternative to the President's Council on Integrity 
and Efficiency [PCIE] and the Executive Council on Integrity 
and Efficiency [ECIE]. In addition to the suggested revisions 
to the IG Act reported by GAO, there are a number of other 
potential reforms that have been discussed in the IG community 
recently. It is these potential reforms that were the subject 
of the subcommittee's July 14th hearing. The hearing discussed 
the proposals made in H.R. 3457, the ``Improving Government 
Accountability Act of 2003.'' Among this bill's most important 
provisions are the establishment of a ``removal for cause'' 
clause governing IG's service to their respective agencies and 
the establishment of a statutory term of office.
    b. Witnesses.--Gaston L. Gianni, Jr., Inspector General, 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; Barry R. Snyder, 
Inspector General, Federal Reserve Board; and J. Russell 
George, Inspector General, Corporation for National and 
Community Service.
27. ``Are Financial Management Problems at the Department of Defense 
        Impacting Army Reserve Pay?'' July 20, 2004; Serial No. 108-235
    a. Summary.--The House Government Reform Committee held a 
hearing on January 28, 2004, to look at pay problems with 
several National Guard units, which were identified by GAO in a 
November 2003 report. In GAO's case study, they found that 94 
percent of mobilized Army National Guard soldiers had pay 
problems. These problems distracted soldiers from their 
missions, imposed financial hardships on their families, and 
had a negative impact on retention. GAO identified significant 
systemic problems and made a number of recommendations. DOD 
acted on several of those recommendations and devised solutions 
to other concerns as well, and they have kept the committee 
updated on their progress with several briefings since the 
report was issued. This hearing, in looking specifically at pay 
for Reserve soldiers, is part of the subcommittee's ongoing 
oversight of DOD financial management from a broad perspective 
and also a follow-up to the National Guard hearing. Members of 
the Government Reform Committee requested that GAO begin 
reviewing, in similar fashion, the pay experiences of Army 
Reserve soldiers mobilized to active duty. Since many problems 
for Reservists are identical to those experienced by Guardsmen, 
measures DOD put in place should mitigate many of the problems. 
The hearing allowed the Department the opportunity to present 
the extensive work they have done to address these problems 
proactively.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory D. Kutz, Director, Financial 
Management and Assurance, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; Lieutenant Colonel Donald J. Campbell, USAR, (Ret.), 
former Unit Commander, 3423rd Military Intelligence Unit, 
Connecticut; Major George W. Riggins, USA, (Ret.), FORSCOM 
Support Unit, Maryland; Sergeant Melinda Sue DeLain, USAR, 
948th Forward Surgical Team, Michigan; Lieutenant General James 
R. Helmly, Chief, Army Reserve, Department of the Army; Ernest 
J. Gregory, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army for 
Financial Management and Comptroller, Department of the Army; 
and Patrick T. Shine, Director, Military and Civilian Pay 
Services, Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Department of 
Defense.
28. ``The Evolving Role of the Federal CFO,'' September 15, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-267
    a. Summary.--After 5 years of debate, Congress passed the 
Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990. The CFO Act became the 
cornerstone for a host of management reforms. For the first 
time, Federal agencies were required to submit to audit. 
Congress imparted the importance and prominence of sound 
financial management by establishing a management structure 
that placed the Chief Financial Officer in a position of power, 
reporting directly to the agency head, appointed by the 
President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The 
underlying goal was clear: CFOs would become more than 
stewards--they would become strategists who were part of an 
agency's top leadership team. As time has moved forward, 
Congress has created other management positions--the Chief 
Information Officer, Chief Human Capital Officer, and Chief 
Acquisition Officer--whose responsibilities complement and 
sometimes duplicate those of agency CFOs. The CFO now operates 
in a crowded management environment. However, the 
subcommittee's oversight has shown agency CFOs are 
fundamentally different given their fiduciary responsibility to 
the American taxpayer. This hearing discussed the changing 
dynamics of Federal management and how these statutory offices 
can work together most effectively, while maintaining the 
unique fiduciary responsibilities of the CFO.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda Springer, Controller, Office of 
Management and Budget; Morgan Kinghorn, president, National 
Academy of Public Administration; Edward DeSeve, senior vice 
president and managing director, ACS State and Local Solutions, 
Inc.; and Dr. Virginia McMurtry, Ph.D., Congressional Research 
Service.
29. ``Financial Management at the Department of Health and Human 
        Services,'' September 30, 2004; Serial No. 108-273
    a. Summary.--Across government, Federal agencies are 
attempting to implement new financial management systems 
because most existing systems lack the full range of reliable, 
useful, and timely information needed for accountability, 
performance reporting and decisionmaking. The subcommittee has 
examined ongoing efforts in a number of these agencies 
including DOD, NASA, DHS, and USAID among others, and found 
that agencies consistently do not follow the necessary 
disciplined processes for efficient and effective 
implementation of financial management systems and as a result 
billions are wasted in failed project implementation efforts. 
As part of this ongoing review of the agencies efforts, the 
subcommittee requested the Government Accountability Office to 
review the efforts under way at the Department of Health and 
Human Services [HHS] which has undertaken a multiyear effort to 
implement a Unified Financial Management System [UFMS]. The GAO 
was asked to focus on whether the HHS has (1) effectively 
implemented disciplined processes; (2) implemented effective 
information technology [IT], investment management, enterprise 
architecture, and information security management; and (3) 
taken actions to ensure that the agency has the human capital 
needed to successfully design, implement, and operate UFMS. The 
GAO report released September 24, 2004 concluded that HHS had 
not followed the disciplined processes necessary to reduce 
risks associated with implementing UFMS to acceptable levels 
and thereby risks failure in its efforts. HHS disagrees with 
the GAO and continues to believe it will be successful in the 
implementation of the UFMS project. The finding of the GAO 
report, as well as HHS's response was the subject of this 
hearing.
    b. Witnesses.--Jeffrey C. Steinhoff, Managing Director, 
Financial Management and Assurance, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; accompanied by Keith A. Rhodes, Chief 
Technologist, Center for Technology and Engineering, Government 
Accountability Office; and Kerry N. Weems, Acting Assistant 
Secretary for Budget, Information, and Finance, Department of 
Health and Human Services.

               Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness

                               Oversight

1. Federal Autism Initiatives and Research
    The subcommittee is continuously examining the Federal 
Government's initiatives regarding Autism Spectrum Disorders. 
Incidences of autism are increasing exponentially in modern 
times which has created a need for further Federal Government 
research and programs to assist the afflicted population and 
their families.
    Congress has recognized the need for further Autism 
research, and has passed appropriations legislation and 
resolutions on these matters. The subcommittee has continuously 
provided oversight into the progress that the Department of 
Health and Human Services has utilized these tools to 
facilitate the most up to date research on the causation of 
these spectrum disorders, and potential treatments to alleviate 
some of the symptoms associated with these diseases.
    The subcommittee is dedicated to ensuring that the National 
Vaccine Injury Compensation Program [NVICP], a Federal 
initiative enacted in 1988 to offer a non-adversarial process 
to review claims of vaccine injury, is providing families of 
autistic individuals the opportunity to have their petitions 
reviewed to allow for potential monetary awards to assist the 
families of autistic individuals with the costs associated with 
the continuous healthcare and related treatments necessary to 
sustain the well-being of autistic individuals. In addition, 
the subcommittee is also examining possible legislative 
solutions to improve and update the program.
    The subcommittee has also provided oversight into the 
special education programs that are offered to students with 
Autism Spectrum Disorders by the U.S. Department of Education.
    Currently, the subcommittee is coordinating an effort with 
the Government Accountability Office [GAO] to initiate a study 
on the costs of providing care to autistic individuals, as well 
as the current level of governmental assistance on these 
matters.
2. Oversight of Federal Government Initiatives Regarding Trafficking in 
        Persons
    Trafficking in persons, in modern day society, has become 
the third most lucrative and widespread form of trafficking in 
the world, next to illicit gun and drug trading. It is 
estimated that approximately 27,000,000 individuals are forced 
in to some type of slavery today, constituting the greatest 
concentration in known history. While the problem domestically 
in the United States is of a relatively smaller scale than in 
other areas around the world, Congress has initiated 
legislation such as the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
2000, and its successor, the Victims Protection Reauthorization 
Act of 2003 to further combat instances of trafficking in the 
United States by imposing greater penalties for facilitators of 
trafficking, and providing victims of these crimes with 
services to improve their quality of life.
    The strategies for combating trafficking in persons has 
greatly evolved in the United States in the last several years 
after the enactment of Federal legislation to decrease the 
incidences of slavery in our Nation (encompassing an estimated 
17,500-21,500 persons a year) and abroad. The subcommittee has 
provided oversight of both international and domestic 
initiatives to combat trafficking in persons, working with the 
Department of State, U.S. Agency for International Development 
[USAID], Department of Justice, Department of Health and Human 
Services, Department of Labor, and the Department of Homeland 
Security to ensure that they are provided with the necessary 
tools to cease these illicit crimes.
3. Federal Progress Regarding Dietary Supplements
    Dietary Supplements have been shown through credible 
research and historical use to be of benefit to personal 
health. In 1994, Congress passed the Dietary Supplement Health 
Education Act [DSHEA] to promulgate guidelines for how the 
Federal Government was to ensure the safety and efficacy of 
dietary supplements sold in the United States.
    Prior to DSHEA, dietary supplements were treated and 
regulated as food products. Seeing a need for the Federal 
Government to address the American consumer's growing interest 
in dietary products and public safety, DSHEA was enacted to 
make certain that all dietary health products sold in the 
United States are held to the highest safety and quality 
standards.
    This legislation ensures the safety and efficacy of dietary 
supplements by requiring manufacturers to follow standards 
called good manufacturing practices [GMPs]. Essentially, all 
ingredients in supplements sold in the United States must be 
previously approved by the FDA and listed on the bottle label, 
and distributors must follow strict guidelines on any claims 
that are made in regard to a particular product--to provide 
consumers with the most accurate information on supplements. 
Additionally, if at any time the FDA decides that a particular 
product or dietary ingredient is detrimental to human health, 
it reserves the right to have those items removed from the 
marketplace, as the case with the FDA's ban on Ephedra products 
during the 108th Congress.
    The subcommittee has continued the oversight into the 
implementation of this legislation by ensuring that the 
Department of Health and Human Services (FDA and NIH more 
specifically), as well as the dietary supplement industry have 
preserved the integrity of this legislation, as it was intended 
when it was passed a decade ago. The subcommittee has also 
investigated Federal Government and other credible research 
studies to identify particular dietary supplements that have 
the ability to reduce the incidences of certain life-
debilitating disease, in addition to further educating the 
public regarding the safe usage of these products.
4. Access to and Affordability of Prescription Drugs
    A major focus of the subcommittee's health oversight 
activities during the 108th Congress centered on access to and 
affordability of prescription drugs for Americans, particularly 
our senior citizens.
    Millions of senior citizens on fixed incomes in the United 
States continue to reportedly have difficulty affording the 
high costs of medicines needed to sustain their health, 
compelling many to make the difficult choice of spending their 
limited financial resources either on food or to purchase life-
saving prescription drugs. These reports led the subcommittee 
to conduct a series of five investigative hearings during the 
first session of the 108th Congress examining various aspects 
of the topic, including the safety and economic implications of 
facilitating the reimportation of Canadian prescription drugs 
in America, and the effectiveness and true cost of a new 
Medicare prescription drug benefit. These hearings provided 
valuable information and policy proposals that contributed to 
the introduction of several viable legislative initiatives 
designed to assist the rapidly aging American population.
    The subcommittee's investigations into the feasibility of 
reimportation proved especially pivotal in the development of 
the Pharmaceutical Market Access Act (H.R. 2427). This 
legislation would have required the Secretary of Health and 
Human Services to promulgate guidelines that would allow 
Americans to purchase U.S. Food and Drug Administration [FDA]-
approved drugs from FDA-approved facilities in foreign Nations 
to be accessed in the United States. On July 25, 2003, this 
legislation was passed in the House of Representatives by a 
margin of 243-186 (Roll No. 445) and became the official House 
of Representative's position on reimportation as it pertained 
to the legislative Conference on the Medicare Prescription 
Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (H.R. 1). 
However, the provisions of H.R. 2427 were not adopted by the 
Conference Committee which opted instead for a formal study on 
the feasibility of reimportation.
    No additional hearings on the subject of pharmaceutical 
pricing and reimportation were held by the subcommittee during 
the Second Session of the 108th Congress. Nevertheless, the 
Subcommittee on Human Rights and Wellness' actively continued 
to investigate this matter and document State, county and 
municipal efforts to implement reimportation programs. In 
addition, the subcommittee continued to monitor and record the 
growing public debate over the potential benefits of 
reimportation--a debate that reached as high as the 
Presidential race and witnessed two major national pharmacy 
chains and a high ranking executive with Pfizer embracing the 
idea of reimportation--as well as efforts by the U.S. Food and 
Drug Administration, and the pharmaceutical industry in 
general, to curtail the growing reimportation movement.
    So long as pharmaceutical prices continue to skyrocket and 
Americans are compelled to choose between buying critically 
needed prescription drugs and paying their home mortgage or 
buying food, reimportation will be an attractive option. As a 
result, the subcommittee fully expects to continue its 
investigation into the economic pressures within the 
pharmaceutical industry driving the astronomical growth in 
prescription drug prices being experienced in the United 
States.

                                Hearings

1. ``International Prescription Drug Parity: Are Americans Being 
        Protected or Gouged?'' April 3, 2003; Serial No. 108-12
    a. Summary.--This hearing discussed the regulatory 
environment for Canadian pharmacies who provide lower-cost 
prescription drugs to Americans. In particular Members 
discussed recently introduced legislation that would invoke 
monetary penalties to pharmaceutical companies who threaten to 
stop selling their products to Canadian pharmacies who sell 
these products to Americans.
    b. Witnesses.--William K. Hubbard, Senior Associate 
Commissioner for Policy, Planning and Legislation at the Food 
and Drug Administration [FDA]; Dr. Elizabeth Wennar of the 
Coalition for Access to Affordable Prescription Drugs; Dr. Andy 
Troszok of the Canadian International Pharmacists Association; 
and Robert M. Hayes of the Medicare Rights Center.
2. ``Consumer Choice and Implementing Full Disclosure in Dentistry,'' 
        May 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-22
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused primarily upon new 
information relating to possible health implications of mercury 
in the human body. In addition, the subcommittee reviewed the 
need for disclosing adequate information to patients to enable 
them to make informed choices about the type of dental 
restorative material that is used in their treatment.
    b. Witnesses.--Congressman Mike Michaud (ME-02); Dr. Maths 
Berlin of the University of Lund, Sweden; Dr. Frederick C. 
Eichmiller, D.D.S. of the American Dental Association Health 
Foundation; Sandra Duffy, esq. of the Consumers for Dental 
Choice Northwest; Dr. Chester Yokoyama, D.D.S. of the Dental 
Board of California; and Emmitt Carlton of the NAACP.
3. ``Canadian Prescription Drug Importation: Is There a Safety Issue?'' 
        June 12, 2003; Serial No. 108-59
    a. Summary.--This hearing discussed safeguards that either 
already were in place, or could be put in place, to maintain 
safety of U.S. Food and Drug Administration [FDA] approved 
prescription drugs that are re-imported into the United States, 
as well as efforts by the U.S. pharmaceutical industry to 
restrict Canadian wholesalers and pharmacists from selling 
their products on the U.S. market or to Canadian pharmacists 
that sell to U.S. consumers.
    b. Witnesses.--William K. Hubbard, Senior Associate 
Commissioner for Policy, Planning, and Legislation at FDA; 
Chris Veihbacher of GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals; and David 
Brennan of Astrazeneca Pharmaceuticals.
4. ``The Economic Aspects of the Pharmaceutical Industry in the United 
        States,'' June 25, 2003; Serial No. 108-63
    a. Summary.--This hearing was a follow up to the April 3, 
2003 hearing, and focused primarily on retail prices of 
prescription drugs in the United States. It also explored the 
reasons Americans pay remarkably higher prices for their drugs 
than citizens of Canada and Europe. Testimony contained 
information on cost containment remedies other than price 
controls as well.
    b. Witnesses.--Congressman Gil Gutknecht (R-MN); James Love 
of the Consumer Project on Technology; Dr. Stephen 
Schondelmeyer of the University of Minnesota; William Vaughn of 
Families USA; and Stephen Moore of the CATO Institute.
5. ``International Child Abduction: The Absence of Rights of Abducted 
        American Citizens in Saudi Arabia,'' July 9, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-67
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss ways to 
better facilitate the safe return of abducted American citizens 
abroad. Members also were able to hear the first hand 
experience of Sarah Saga, an American citizen abducted to Saudi 
Arabia in 1985 who only recently returned, and Debbie Dornier, 
her mother.
    b. Witnesses.--Maura Harty, Assistant Secretary for 
Consular Affairs at the U.S. Department of State [DOS]; Sarah 
Saga, American citizen abducted to Saudi Arabia in 1985; and 
Debbie Dornier, mother of Sarah Saga.
6. ``A New Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit: Is It Good for 
        Seniors?'' July 17, 2003; Serial No. 108-78
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the merits of 
H.R. 2427, the Pharmaceutical Market Access Act, which sought 
to allow American consumers access to affordable FDA-approved 
prescription drugs from the FDA-approved facilities in Canada 
and other industrialized nations. The second panel discussed 
the impact of adding a prescription drug bill to Medicare, as 
proposed in H.R. 1.
    b. Witnesses.--Congressman Rahm Emanuel (D-IL); Congressman 
Gil Gutknecht (R-MN); Ed Haislmaier of the Heritage Foundation; 
Joseph Antos of the American Enterprise Institute; Donald 
Newcomb of the Alliance for Retired Americans; Helen Darling of 
the Washington Business Group on Health; and Gail Shearer of 
Health Policy Analysis for the Consumers Union.
7. ``The SV-40 Virus: Has Tainted Polio Vaccine Caused an Increase in 
        Cancer,'' September 10, 2003; Serial No. 108-85
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to further explore the 
handling of the situation involving contaminated vaccines 
containing the SV-40 virus. Witnesses were questioned as to 
whether the full scope of the problem was known particularly in 
regard to how many people were actually affected. Also the 
current guidelines for immunization safety were reviewed to 
ensure nothing like the SV-40 situation occurs again.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. James J. Goedert, Chief of the Viral 
Epidemiology Branch and Senior Investigator at the National 
Cancer Institute [NCI]; Barbara Loe Fisher of the National 
Vaccine Information Center; Stanley J. Kops, attorney at law; 
Dr. Adi Gazdar of the Universiy of Texas Southwestern Oncology; 
and Eileen Grabinski, mother of an injured child.
8. ``A Medicare Prescription Drug Safety Net: Creating a Targeted 
        Benefit for Low-Income Seniors,'' September 24, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-86
    a. Summary.--This hearing is a follow-up to the 
subcommittee's hearing of July 17, 2003 examining the short and 
long-term financial costs of adding a prescription drug 
component to the Medicare program.
    b. Witnesses.--Congressman Calvin Dooley (D-CA); Joseph 
Antos of the American Enterprise Institute; Thomas Miller of 
the CATO Institute; Jeff Lemeiux of the Progressive Policy 
Institute; and Ed Haislmaier of the Heritage Foundation.
9. ``Dying for Help: Are Patients Needlessly Suffering Due to the High 
        Cost of Medical Liability Insurance?'' October 1, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-105
    a. Summary.--This hearing discussed the desperate need for 
tort reform to curb sky rocketing medical liability rewards 
that are crippling many doctors across the nation due to the 
exorbitant costs of medical liability insurance. It reviewed 
some crisis states more closely, such as Pennsylvania.
    b. Witnesses.--Kathryn G. Allen, Director of Health Care, 
Medicaid and Private Health Insurance Issues of the General 
Accounting Office [GAO]; Richard G. Hillman, Director of the 
Financial Markets and Community Investment of the GAO; Dick 
Thornburgh, former Attorney General of the United States and 
former Governor of Pennsylvania; Dr. John C. Nelson of the 
American Medical Association; Jay Angoff, former Insurance 
Commissioner of the State of Missouri; Dr. Sherman Joyce of the 
American Tort Reform Association; and Dr. James Tayoun of the 
Politically Active Physicians Association.
10. ``The Environmental Impact of Mercury-Containing Dental Amalgams,'' 
        October 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-102
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held as a follow-up to the 
subcommittee's hearing on May 8, 2003, entitled, ``Consumer 
Choice and Implementing Full Disclosure in Dentistry,'' the 
subcommittee examined the issue of whether mercury-containing 
dental amalgam can pose a danger to the public health when 
mercury from discarded amalgam scraps and capsules leach into 
the environment.
    b. Witnesses.--Geoffrey Grubbs, Director of the Office of 
Science and Technology at the Environmental Protection Agency 
[EPA]; Capt. James Ragain, Jr., Dental Corps of the U.S. Navy; 
Dr. Fredrick Eichmiller of the American Dental Association; 
Norman LeBlanc of the Association of Metropolitan Sewage 
Agencies; Peter Berglund, PE of the Metropolitan Council of 
Environmental Services; and David Galvin of the King County 
Department of Natural Resources and Parks in the Water and Land 
Resources Division.
11. ``Castro's Cuba: What's the Proper U.S. Response to Ongoing Human 
        Rights Violations in Our Hemisphere?'' October 16, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-120
    a. Summary.--This hearing was convened to discuss the 
current human rights violations in the island nation of Cuba, 
as well as how the United States should properly respond to 
permanently end those violations and usher in a free and 
democratic Cuba.
    b. Witnesses.--Roger Noriega, Assistant Secretary for the 
Western Hemisphere at DOS; Adolfo Franco, Assistant 
Administrator for Latin America and the Caribbean for the U.S. 
Agency for International Development [USAID]; R. Richard 
Newcomb, Director of the Office of Foreign Assets Control for 
the Department of Treasury [DOT]; Frank Calzon of the Center 
for a Free Cuba; Eric Olson of Amnesty International; and Tom 
Malinowski of Human Rights Watch.
12. ``The Ongoing Tragedy of International Slavery and Human 
        Trafficking: An Overview,'' October 29, 2003; Serial No. 108-
        137
    a. Summary.--This hearing investigated and discussed human 
trafficking around the world, addressing the main forms of 
human trafficking, including illicit sex trade, child slavery, 
and indentured servitude. The Members had an opportunity to 
hear personal accounts of victims across the globe, and discuss 
innovative ways to combat the problem both in the United States 
and abroad.
    b. Witnesses.--John Miller, former U.S. Congressman (WA-
01), Director of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking 
in Persons at DOS; Dr. Kent Hill, Assistant Administrator for 
USAID; Kevin Bales of Free the Slaves; Dr. Mohamed Mattar of 
the Protection Project at Johns Hopkins University School of 
Advanced International Studies; Dr. Janice Raymond of the 
Coalition Against Trafficking in Women; Andrew Johnson of Save 
the Children Federation; and Mary Covington of the 
International Labour Organization of the United Nations.
13. ``Preventing Another SV40 Tragedy: Are Today's Vaccine Safety 
        Protocols Effective?'' November 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-127
    a. Summary.--This hearing is a follow up to the September 
10, 2003 hearing. The subcommittee invited representatives from 
the National Cancer Institute [NCI] to reappear before the 
subcommittee to better explain the inconsistencies in the 
research being supported by the NCI's Division of Cancer 
Epidemiology and Genetics regarding the relationship of SV-40 
to contaminated polio vaccines. Additionally, the subcommittee 
heard from the FDA to present evidence that supports compliance 
with safe manufacturing protocols, and that supports the 
assertion that all polio vaccines have been, are, and will 
continue to be SV-40 free.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. William Egan, Acting Director in the 
Office of Vaccines Research and Review for the FDA; and Dr. 
Robert Hoover, Director of the Edpidemiology and Biostatics 
Program in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at 
NCI.
14. ``The Future Challenges of Autism: A Survey of the Ongoing 
        Initiatives in the Federal Government to Address the 
        Epidemic,'' November 20, 2003; Serial No. 108-125
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the current 
U.S. Government research in regard to Autism Spectrum 
Disorders, Federal Government assistance given to Autistic 
individuals, and therapies that have been found useful in the 
treatment of persons with Autism.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Peter van Dyck, Associate Administrator 
in the Office of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau for the 
Health Resources and Service Administration [HRSA] at the 
Department of Health and Human Services [HHS]; Ilene Schwartz 
of the Center for Training Personnel to Provide Evidence-Based 
Educational Services to Students with Autism Spectrum 
Disorders; Rick Rollens of the MIND Institute at the University 
of California-Davis; Dr. Stephen Edelson of the Edelson Center 
for Environmental and Preventative Medicine; and Colleen 
Pettinati, mother of two autistic children.
15. ``California's Compliance with Dental Amalgam Disclosure 
        Policies,'' January 26, 2004; Serial No. 108-141
    a. Summary.--This field hearing was held to look into the 
California Dental Board's non-compliance with Proposition 65, 
specifically in regards to regulations stating information must 
be posted in every dental office disclosing the makeup and 
potential risks associated with dental amalgams.
    b. Witnesses.--State Representative Karen Johnson of the 
Arizona State Legislature; Dr. Chester Yokoyama of the Dental 
Materials Fact Sheet Commission; Parin Shah of Community 
Toolbox for Children's Environmental Health; Dr. Harold Slavkin 
of USC School of Dentistry, and Shawn Khorrami, esquire.
16. ``Investigation into Health Care Disparities in U.S. Pacific Island 
        Territories,'' February 25, 2004; Serial No. 108-160
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to investigate current 
health problems affecting the U.S. Pacific Island Territories. 
The primary focus was on Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands, 
and how access to quality health care and emergency medical 
services is limited, as well as increased incidences of 
diabetes and other diseases among the Pacific Island community.
    b. Witnesses.--David Cohen, Deputy Assistant Secretary in 
the Office of Insular Affairs at the Department of Interior 
[DOI]; Dr. Nathan Stinson, Jr., Deputy Assistant Secretary in 
the Office of Minority Health at HHS; Felix Camacho, Governor 
of the U.S. Territory of Guam; Juan Babauta, Governor of the 
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands; Togiola 
Tulaffono, Governor of American Samoa; and Dr. Jefferson 
Benjamin of the Pacific Island Health Officers Association.
17. ``10 Years After the Implementation of DSHEA: The Status of Dietary 
        Supplements in the United States,'' March 24, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-146
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss Federal 
Government research and implementation of Public Law 103-417, 
the Dietary Supplement Health Education Act [DSHEA]. In 
addition, the subcommittee received testimony from dietary 
supplement industry leaders, medical doctors, and policy 
researchers regarding the impact of DSHEA in the United States. 
The Members had an opportunity to further explore some of the 
complications Federal agencies have encountered implementing 
DSHEA, and to consider the merit of proposals to amend DSHEA.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Robert Brackett, Director of the Center 
for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at FDA; Dr. Marc Micozzi 
of the Policy Institute for Integrative Medicine at the Thomas 
Jefferson University Hospital; Alan Dumoff, JD of the American 
Association for Health Freedom; David Seckman of the National 
Natural Foods Association; Annette Dickinson of the Council for 
Responsible Nutrition; and Doug Rose, dietary supplement user.
18. ``Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Update of Federal Government 
        Initiatives and Revolutionary New Treatments of Neuro-
        developmental Diseases,'' May 6, 2004; Serial No. 108-192
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the Federal 
Government initiatives in regard to autism stemming from a 
Department of Health and Human Services & Department of 
Education summit held in November 2003. In addition, the 
subcommittee heard from medical professionals who have found 
useful innovative treatments for patients afflicted with an 
Autism Spectrum Disorder.
    b. Witnesses.--Troy Justesen, Assistant Secretary of the 
Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services at the 
Department of Education [DOEd]; Dr. Rashid Buttar; Dr. Paul 
Harch of the International Hyperbaric Medical Association; Dr. 
Ken Stoller; and Julie Gordon of Mothers United for Moral 
Support.
19. ``Decades of Terror: Exploring Human Rights Abuses in Kashmir and 
        the Disputed Territories,'' May 12, 2004; Serial No. 108-212
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to examine the ongoing 
Kashmir land dispute between India and Pakistan, specifically 
the resulting egregious human rights violations, including 
summary executions, rape, and routine beatings.
    b. Witnesses.--Michael Kozak, Principal Duputy Assistant 
Secretary of the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor at 
DOS; Don Camp of the Bureau of South Asian Affairs at DOS; T. 
Kumar of Amnesty International; Bob Giuda of the Americans for 
Resolution of Kashmir; Dr. Ghulam-Nabi Fai of the Kashmiri 
American Council; Dr. Gurmit Singh Aulakh of the Council of 
Khalistan; Attiya Inayatullah; and Selig Harrison of the Center 
for International Policy.
20. ``Living in Fear: The Continued Human Rights Abuses in Castro's 
        Cuba,'' June 16, 2004; Serial No. 108-202
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the continued 
human rights violations occurring in the island nation of Cuba 
following the 1-year anniversary of a crackdown of 75 
dissidents. The subcommittee also heard proposals designed to 
assist Cuba in transitioning into a democratic form of 
government.
    b. Witnesses.--Michael Kozak, Principal Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor at 
DOS; David Mutchler, Senior Advisor on Cuba for the USAID; 
Jamie Suchlicki of the Cuban Transition Project at the 
University of Miami; Omar Lopez Montenegro of the Cuban 
American National Foundation; Eric Olson of Amnesty 
International; and Miguel Reyes.
21. ``Living with Disabilities in the United States: A Snapshot,'' June 
        24, 2004; Serial No. 108-242
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to examine the quality 
of life experienced by the persons afflicted with a disability 
in the United States. In addition, the subcommitee discussed 
the ways in which the Federal Government and non-governmental 
organizations are working to expand the participation and 
contributions of this population.
    b. Witnesses.--Congressman James R. Langevin (D-RI); Troy 
Justesen, Assistant Secretary of the Office of Special 
Education and Rehabilitative Services at DOE; Don Young, Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of the Office of Health Policy at HHS; Alan 
A. Reich of the National Organization on Disability; Robert 
David Hall, actor, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation; Dr. Peter 
Blanck of the University of Iowa College of Law; and John 
Register of the U.S. Olympic Committee.
22. ``Trafficking in Persons: The Federal Government's Approach to 
        Eradicate this Worldwide Problem,'' July 8, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-247
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the recently 
released State Department report on Trafficking in Persons, as 
well as the first-ever report in domestic trafficking by the 
Department of Justice. In addition, the subcommittee examined 
how the Federal Government and non-governmental organizations 
are working together to combat trafficking and assist victims 
of trafficking in the United States.
    b. Witnesses.--John Miller, former U.S. Congressman (WA-
01), Director of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking 
in Persons at DOS; R. Alexander Acosta, Assistant Attorney 
General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of 
Justice [DOJ]; Christopher Gersten, Principal Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for the Administration for Children and Families at 
HHS; Charles Sung of the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and 
Trafficking; Michele Clark of the Johns Hopkins University 
School of Advanced International Studies; and Derek Ellerman of 
the Polaris Project.
23. ``Balancing Act: The Health Advantages of Naturally-Occurring 
        Hormones in Hormone Replacement Therapy,'' July 22, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-249
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the 
differences between synthetic and naturally occurring hormones, 
or bioidentical hormones, for use in hormone replacement 
therapy. In addition, the subcommittee discussed additional 
health benefits that are evident in the utilization of 
bioidentical hormones in men and women.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Barbara Alving, Acting Director of the 
Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of 
Health [NIH]; Dr. Steven F. Hotze of the Hotze Health and 
Wellness Center; Dr. David Brownstein of the Center for 
Holistic Medicine; Carol Peterson of the Women's International 
Pharmacy; Vicki Reynolds, Hormone Replacement Therapy Patient, 
and Dr. Adriane Fugh-Berman of the Georgetown Medical Center.
24. ``Truth Revealed: New Scientific Discoveries Regarding Mercury in 
        Medicine and Autism,'' September 8, 2004; Serial No. 108-262
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the new 
scientific discoveries regarding the damaging effects due to 
the use of mercury in medicine. Specifically, the subcommittee 
looked at new research regarding the influence of genetics in 
how mercury may affect individuals.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. William Egan, Acting Director of the 
Office of Vaccines and Research and Review for the Center for 
Biologics Evaluation and Research at FDA; Dr. Melinda Wharton, 
Acting Deputy Director of the National Immunization Program at 
the Centers for Disease Control [CDC]; Dr. Richard Deth of 
Northeastern University; Dr. Marcel Just of Carnegie Mellon 
University; Richard Fischer of the International Academy of 
Oral Medicine and Toxicology; and Lyn Redwood, R.N. of 
Safeminds.
25. ``Conquering Obesity: the U.S. Approach to Combating this National 
        Health Crisis,'' September 15, 2004; Serial No. 108-268
    a. Summary.--This hearing was held to discuss the ever-
increasing incidences of obesity in the United States and the 
health implications of these increases in body weight. In 
addition, the hearing provided an opportunity for Members to 
discuss various government initiatives with representatives 
from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Ed Thompson, Chief of Public Health 
Practice at CDC; Eric Bost, Undersecretary for Food, Nutrition, 
and Consumer Services at the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
[USDA]; Alison Krester of the Grocery Manufacturers of America; 
Hunt Shipman of the National Food Processors Association; 
Morgan Downey of the American Obesity Association; Dr. Daniel 
Spratt of the Endocrine Society of America; and Dr. Thomas 
Wadden of the North American Association for the Study of 
Obesity.
26. ``Dietary Supplements: Nature's Answer to Cost Effective 
        Preventative Medicine,'' September 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-270
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to discuss the 
use of dietary supplements as an integral means of preventative 
medicine in an individual's health care regime with a 
particular focus on folic acid, saw palmetto, omega-3 fatty 
acids, calcium, and glucosamine. In addition, the subcommittee 
examined the possible cost savings derived by using various 
supplements on a regular basis to ensure well-being.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Paul Coates, Director of the Office of 
Dietary Supplements at NIH; Dr. Allen Dobson of the Lewin 
Group; Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg of Tufts University; Dr. Barbara 
Levine of Cornell University; Elliot Balbert of the Dietary 
Supplement Alliance; and Marilu Henner, Actress, Author and 
Health Advocate.

 SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY, EMERGING THREATS AND INTERNATIONAL 
                               RELATIONS

                    Summary of Oversight Activities

                               HIGHLIGHTS

    At the close of the 108th Congress, the subcommittee had 
conducted 48 hearings, forwarded 4 oversight reports to the 
full committee and was pursuing more than 30 investigations and 
programmatic reviews. Oversight focused in six major issue 
areas:
1. Counterterrorism and Homeland Security
    During four hearings, the subcommittee continued oversight 
of administration counterterrorism and homeland security 
programs. Two hearings examined U.S. strategies to combat 
terrorism, and focused on the questions: ``Do national 
strategies to combat terrorism articulate clear visions, 
statements, goals, and objectives to protect the United States 
from terrorist acts?,'' and ``Are the recommendations of the 
National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States 
(9/11 Commission) incorporated into to the goals, objectives 
and initiatives of the 2002 National Strategy for Homeland 
Security and the 2003 National Strategy to Combat Terrorism?''
    Witnesses at the hearing identified a set of desirable 
characteristics for strategies: (1) purpose, scope, and 
methodology; (2) problem definition and risk assessment; (3) 
goals, subordinate objectives, activities, and performance 
measures; (4) resources, investments, and risk management; (5) 
organizational roles, responsibilities, and coordination; and 
(6) integration and implementation.
    The subcommittee found considerable variation in the extent 
to which strategies related to combating terrorism and homeland 
security address the characteristics. A majority of the 
strategies at least partially address the characteristics. 
However, none of the strategies addresses all of the elements 
of resources, investments, and risk management; or integration 
and implementation.
    Additionally, the subcommittee found the 9/11 Commission 
recommendations share many features of the administration's 
National Strategy for Combating Terrorism, and National 
Strategy for Homeland Security. Each document emphasized the 
importance of timely and actionable intelligence. Each document 
also emphasized a need for pre-emptive strategy, for attacking 
terrorists and their organizations, for international 
cooperation, for foreign economic assistance, for winning 
hearts and minds, for strengthening counter-proliferation 
efforts, for attacking terrorist financing, for denying 
sanctuaries, and for border security. Most of the 9/11 
Commission recommendations were included in the national 
strategies to combat terrorism.
    Two hearings were held related to homeland security--The 
Homeland Security Advisory System [HSAS] and chemical plant 
security. The hearing on HSAS examined the Department of 
Homeland Security [DHS] program, and the adequacy of 
information on threats and appropriate protective measures 
provided to the public.
    The subcommittee found the utility of the Homeland Security 
Advisory System [HSAS] was being questioned by State and local 
officials, first responders, and the public. Department of 
Homeland Security [DHS] Secretary Tom Ridge acknowledged the 
need to refine the five-color scheme that seemed to be losing 
both its credibility and its audience. Witnesses testified 
public warning systems should, to the extent possible, include 
questions to determine if the entities receiving the alerts 
have the necessary information to respond appropriately to 
heightened alerts. The HSAS does not meet this standard.
    The chemical plant security hearing examined voluntary 
actions the chemical industry has taken to address security 
preparedness and challenges the industry faces protecting 
facility assets and operations from terrorist attacks.
    Witnesses testified chemical facilities might be attractive 
targets for terrorists intent on causing economic harm and loss 
of life. Many facilities exist in populated areas where a 
chemical release could threaten thousands. The Environmental 
Protection Agency [EPA] reported 123 chemical plants located 
throughout the Nation could each potentially expose more than a 
million people if a chemical release occurred. To date, no one 
has comprehensively assessed the security of chemical 
facilities.
2. Post-Conflict Iraq
    The subcommittee continued efforts to examine post-conflict 
issues in Iraq. During the first and second congressional 
sessions, subcommittee representatives made six trips to Iraq, 
and held two hearings concerning issues related to post-
conflict Iraq.
    The trips generated several recommendations that were sent 
to administration representatives:
         LThe administration should consider 
        independent assessments of reconstruction efforts in 
        Iraq.
         LThe administration should redouble efforts to 
        internationalize the rebuilding of Iraq.
         LThe position of special advisor to the 
        President for Public Diplomacy should be created.
         LThe face and voice of the Coalition 
        Provisional Authority should be an Iraqi.
         LRepresentation from the Iraqi Governing 
        Council should participate in all Coalition Provisional 
        Authority briefings.
         LThe establishment of an Iraqi government 
        should not be put off until the security situation is 
        stabilized.
    The hearing, ``Iraq: Winning Hearts and Minds,'' examined 
assumptions and significant policy decisions that contributed 
to changes in Iraqi confidence and cooperation with the 
Coalition Provisional Authority.
    The subcommittee found three policy decisions contributed 
to changes in Iraqi confidence and cooperation with the 
Coalition Provisional Authority [CPA]. The CPA focused their 
attention on the Iraqi religious sheiks rather than on Iraqi 
tribal sheiks. The De-Ba'athification program was a 
miscalculation. Planners for Iraq underestimated the resilience 
of Saddam Hussein's regime and underestimated the need for the 
number of forces needed to maintain stability in post-conflict 
Iraq.
    The other hearing, ``Training and Equipping Reserve 
Component Forces,'' focused on post-conflict Iraq, examined how 
the U.S. military applies lessons learned from dynamic combat 
environments to the development of training and equipment 
requirements, especially for National Guard and Reserve units.
    The subcommittee found that despite improvements in 
training and equipping Reserve Component forces, some still 
reported equipment shortages and inadequate training for units 
deploying to combat environments. Witnesses testified 
shortfalls and lessons learned in-theater need to be integrated 
into pre-deployment decisionmaking.
3. Strengthening Disease Surveillance
    The subcommittee conducted an oversight investigation of 
disease surveillance systems. Concerns about bioterrorism and 
improvements in technology have led to an increased emphasis on 
the development of early warning systems to detect the presence 
of disease. The sooner public health authorities are made aware 
of contagious disease outbreaks, the sooner protective measures 
can be put in place to contain and control its spread. An 
effective public health response will depend on the timeliness 
and quality of communication among local, State and Federal 
levels.
    The oversight investigation found disease surveillance 
systems are fragmented and have been slow to adapt to new 
technologies, which could improve the timeliness of data 
collection. The subcommittee recommended the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention set a clear timeframe for the 
establishment of a nationwide disease surveillance system. 
Steps should be taken to modernize, improve, and link disease 
surveillance systems.
4. Post-Conflict Humanitarian Assistance
    Two hearings and substantial interaction with international 
aid organizations and U.S.-based non-governmental organizations 
[NGOs] gave the subcommittee an in-depth understanding of the 
scope, successes and challenges of assistance efforts in 
Bosnia, Afghanistan and Iraq. NGOs remain concerned about 
limited international participation in aid efforts and find 
themselves limited by a lack of traditional ``humanitarian 
space'' to operate outside polarizing political or military 
structures.
5. Department of Defense
    Efficient management of complex and costly Pentagon 
programs was the focus of seven subcommittee hearings. Efforts 
to modernize business processes, control weapons system 
acquisition costs and modernize force structures were the 
subject of General Accounting Office [GAO] reports and 
testimony produced at the subcommittee's request. Waste, and an 
increased risk of diversion to unlawful use, were found in DOD 
disposal of surplus chemical and biological lab equipment and 
protective ensemble items.
6. State Department
    Through STAFFDEL travel to examine embassy construction, 
USAID activities and consular operations, the subcommittee 
undertook a thorough examination of State Department 
initiatives to strengthen overseas operations. Hearings on 
rightsizing, a key element of the President's management 
agenda, visa revocation followup processes and USAID workforce 
planning highlighted important issues in improving U.S. 
diplomatic operations. An oversight report entitled, ``Efforts 
to Rightsize the U.S. Presence Abroad Lack Urgency and 
Momentum,'' (House Report 108-395), was approved by the 
committee on November 21, 2003.
7. Department of Energy
    The subcommittee conducted an oversight investigation of 
Department of Energy [DOE] efforts to improve nuclear facility 
security. The subcommittee examined DOE's National Nuclear 
Security Administration [NNSA] and the Office of Energy, 
Science and Environment [ESE] divisions to determine the 
reasons behind persistent reports of facility security lapses. 
The Department of Energy is the Nation's custodian for the 
protection nuclear weapons, components and special nuclear 
material. The oversight investigation found substantial 
institutional, technical and fiscal challenges faced by efforts 
to develop and implement a strengthened design basis threat 
[DBT] within a reasonable timeframe. A multi-discipline team 
has been created to review the DBT and reassess divergence 
between DBT threat levels and the intelligence community 
analysis. In addition, a Consolidation of Materials Task Force 
has been formed and has compiled a list of excess material in 
the effort to reduce the number of facilities housing special 
nuclear materials.
8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
    The subcommittee conducted an oversight investigation of 
the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] efforts to improve 
commercial nuclear power facility security. The United States 
has 103 commercial nuclear reactors at 65 nuclear plant sites 
in 31 States. The Nation's nuclear energy utilities have 
primary responsibility for safety, security and protection for 
these nuclear reactors and spent fuel storage sites. As a 
result of September 11, 2001, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission 
[NRC] has directed the nuclear energy industry to take 
additional steps improve security at these sites.
    The subcommittee found it would take several more years for 
the NRC to have assurances that the plants are protected 
against the terrorist threat. The plants' development and 
implementation of security plans to comprehensively address the 
new design basis threat [DBT] is a critical step in ensuring 
that individual plants can defend against terrorism. Although 
new security plans are to be approved and implemented by 
October 29, 2004, the NRC will not have the detailed knowledge 
about security at individual facilities to ensure that these 
plans provide this protection.
9. Veterans Health
    The subcommittee continued to monitor implementation of the 
DOD anthrax vaccine immunization program, the smallpox 
inoculation effort, and other force health protection programs, 
to determine if lessons learned in Operations Desert Storm and 
Desert Shield are being applied. Deliberations of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs Advisory Committee on Gulf War 
Veterans Illnesses were monitored closely to assess the scope 
and rigor the Federal research agenda, particularly with regard 
to studies into the potential impact of environmental exposures 
and other toxins referenced in the Persian Gulf War Veterans 
Health Act of 1998.
10. United Nations Oil-for-Food Program
    Following the production of exhaustive documentation, much 
of which was produced under subpoena, travel to Iraq, and two 
hearings, it has become apparent the Oil-for-Food Program 
[OFFP] suffered from several weaknesses. These weaknesses 
include: a lack of support by certain Security Council member 
states; insufficient guidance and support from U.N. personnel; 
too much control by Iraqi authorities; too little authority and 
resources in the hands of contracted overseers; and a lack of 
transparency.
11. Public Diplomacy
    The subcommittee continued its oversight of U.S. public 
diplomacy efforts, holding two hearings on U.S. efforts. Both 
hearings focused on efforts to strengthen relationships between 
the United States and Arab and Muslim publics. However, as both 
hearings demonstrated, U.S. efforts still lack effective 
coordination and imagination. Nevertheless, the subcommittee 
was told of several new initiatives that hold promise to 
rectify some of the concerns voiced about existing public 
diplomacy efforts.

                       Summary of Accomplishments

    Subcommittee inquiries, investigations, hearings and 
followup questions prompted administrative and regulatory 
actions to address issues raised and recommendations made with 
regard to policies and practices in the following areas:
1. Surplus DOD Chem/Bio Equipment
    Weaknesses in risk assessment and inventory controls over 
potentially sensitive chemical and biological lab equipment 
identified by the subcommittee and GAO investigators are being 
addressed by the DOD Defense Logistics Agency. Internet sales 
of certain items have been suspended pending completion of the 
recommended risk assessment.
2. Preparedness Standards
    The subcommittee participated in the planning and execution 
of a tabletop exercise of local response capabilities to a WMD 
incident sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security. 
Based in part on those hearing findings regarding first 
responder training and readiness, government and private sector 
organizations acknowledged the urgent need for preparedness 
standards to guide substantial Federal investments and measure 
progress. The bipartisan Federal Preparedness Standards Act was 
introduced and significant elements of the proposal were 
incorporated into legislation approved the Select Committee on 
Homeland Security Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness and 
Response.
3. Deployment Health
    Applying lessons learned from extensive oversight of the 
1991 Persian Gulf war with regard to the adequacy of medical 
recordkeeping in theater, environmental monitoring for toxic 
exposures and administration of vaccines and treatments to 
counter biological and chemical weapons, the subcommittee 
closely examined statutorily mandated processes to assess pre- 
and post-deployment health of U.S. military personnel. 
Subsequent to a hearing on these issues, the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs agreed to substantially 
augment the post-deployment health assessment instrument and to 
study the potentially detrimental impacts of multiple 
inoculations.
4. Chemical Weapons Demilitarization
    At the request of subcommittee Vice Chairman Mike Turner, 
the subcommittee examined the management and execution of an 
Army contract for the disposal of hyrosolate, the byproduct of 
the chemical neutralization and dilution of the nerve agent VX. 
After subcommittee review of substantial program documentation, 
and after a field hearing to assess the extent of ``public 
acceptance'' of program activities required by the contract, 
the Army terminated the subcontract.
5. Rightsizing the U.S. Presence Abroad
    At the subcommittee's request, the General Accounting 
Office, working with the Department of State and the Office of 
Management and Budget [OMB], formulated an analytical framework 
to guide the President's management agenda initiative to put 
the right people, with the right skills at the right places to 
achieve U.S. strategic and diplomatic missions abroad. Both 
State and OMB have adopted the framework to guide rightsizing 
efforts. Based on the subcommittee's work, rightsizing language 
was inserted into H.R. 1950, the Millennium Challenge Account, 
Peace Corps Expansion, and Foreign Relations Authorization Act 
of 2003. The language requires chiefs of mission to reassess 
each staff position under their authority every 5 years.
6. Army National Guard Pay
    The subcommittee requested GAO to undertake a series of 
case studies to determine if pay and benefit calculation errors 
noted 9 years ago had been rectified. GAO again found a largely 
manual, error prone system used to calculate complex base pay, 
special pay and allowances for deployed Army National Guard 
personnel. In some instances, Guard members were billed for 
substantial arrearages, up to $48,000 in some cases, when in 
fact any actual amount owed due to erroneous processing was far 
less. Pay errors cause significant financial and emotional 
hardships for deployed Guard members and their families. 
Agreeing with the GAO findings, and responding to the 
recommendations, DOD offices responsible for mobilization and 
pay processes took immediate steps to correct specific errors 
and formulated a detailed action plan for near-, mid- and long-
term corrections.
7. Visa Revocation
    After subcommittee inquiries and hearing testimony 
documented a lack of coordination in identifying the risks 
posed by the presence of aliens whose visas had been revoked, 
the Departments of State and Justice agreed to review the 
language of the visa revocation document to strengthen the 
ability to expel an alien in the United States on a revoked 
visa. If the foreign visitor manages to enter the United States 
on a revoked visa, current language states the revocation 
becomes effective only after the alien departs voluntarily. 
With the exception of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
agencies involved also said greater efforts would be made to 
standardize dissemination and review of revocation 
notifications and indicate if the ``prudential'' reason for the 
action was based on an increased risk of terrorist activity.
8. Nuclear Weapons Complex Security
    Subcommittee oversight helped persuade the Department of 
Energy that the defensive security standard--called the design 
basis threat [DBT]--needs to be updated more quickly and more 
frequently and be as reflective of current threat postulations 
as possible. As a result, the Deputy Secretary of Energy has 
directed a review of the May 2003 DBT to better reflect the 
threat of improvised devices at sites containing fissile 
material.

                                Hearings

1. ``Combating Terrorism: A Proliferation of Strategies,'' March 3, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-20
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to assess the 
extent to which U.S. strategies to combat terrorism articulate 
clear vision statements, goals, and objectives to protect the 
United States from terrorist acts. Discussion focused on the 
strategic framework developed since September 11, 2001 and the 
need to better integrate and coordinate efforts so the approach 
is truly national, not just Federal.
    b. Witnesses.--Mr. Raymond Decker, Director, Defense 
Capabilities and Management Team, U.S. General Accounting 
Office; James Gilmore III, chairman, Advisory Panel to Assess 
the Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving 
Weapons of Mass Destruction; Dr. Michael E. O'Hanlon, senior 
fellow foreign policy studies, the Sydney Stein, Jr. Chair, the 
Brookings Institution; Dr. Andrew F. Krepinevich, executive 
director, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments; and 
John Newhouse, senior fellow, Center for Defense Information.
2. ``Emerging Threats: Assessing Public Safety and Security Measures at 
        Nuclear Power Facilities,'' March 10, 2003; Serial No. 108-43
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine 
nuclear power facility security and emergency evacuation plans. 
Focus of discussion was the need to update security and 
evacuate security and evacuation plans at the plant, and to 
involve nearly communities in planning and public education 
efforts.
    b. Witnesses.--W. Craig Conklin, Director, Technological 
Services Division, Office of National Preparedness, Emergency 
Preparedness and Response Directorate, Department of Homeland 
Security; Hubert Miller, NRC Region I Administrator, Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission; John T. Wiltse, Director, Office of 
Emergency Management, State of Connecticut; Richard Bond, first 
selectman, town of New Canaan; Richard Blumenthal, attorney 
general, State of Connecticut; Jim Wells, Director, Natural 
Resources and the Environment, U.S. General Accounting Office; 
Michael J. Slobodien, director, emergency programs, Entergy 
Nuclear Operations, Inc.; William F. Renz, director, nuclear 
protection services and emergency preparedness, Dominion 
Resources Services, Inc.; Angelina S. Howard, executive vice 
president, Nuclear Energy Institute [NEI]; Alex Matthiessen, 
executive director, Riverkeeper; and David Lochbaum, nuclear 
safety engineer, Union of Concern Scientists.
3. ``Protecting the Health of Deployed Forces: Lessons Learned from the 
        Persian Gulf War,'' March 25, 2003; Serial No. 108-54
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine 
deployment health lessons learned from the 1991 Persian Gulf 
war. Discussion focused on subsequent efforts to focus on 
deployment health and the extent to which the Pentagon was 
implementing a statutory requirement to administer ``medical 
examinations'' to deploying forces through primary reliance on 
a brief questionnaire.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. William Winkenwerder, Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, U.S. Department of 
Defense; Dr. Robert H. Roswell, Under Secretary for Health, 
U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; Dr. John H. Moxley III, 
managing director, North American Health Care Division, Korn/
Ferry International; Dr. Manning Feinleib, professor of 
epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, John Hopkins 
University; and Steve Robinson, executive director, National 
Gulf War Resource Center, Inc.
4. ``Strengthening Oversight of DOD Business Systems Modernization,'' 
        joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Technology, Information 
        Policy, Intergovernmental Relations and the Census, March 31, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-44
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine and 
evaluate the effectiveness of DOD management and oversight of 
Defense Financial and Accounting Service [DFAS] information 
technology [IT] investments. Discussion focused on the 
management failures in four system development projects in 
which requirements to articulate an incremental business case 
for continued spending were not observed. Discussion also 
focused on how similar uncoordinated system development could 
be prevented as DOD attempts to implement an ``enterprise 
architecture'' to integrate all financial and management data.
    b. Witnesses.--Randolph Hite, Director, Information 
Technology Architecture and System Issues, GAO; JoAnn Boutelle, 
Director, Deputy Chief Financial Officer, U.S. Department of 
Defense; John R. Landon, Principal Director, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of Defense, Command, Control Communications and 
Intelligence Surveillance, Reconnaissance, Space & IT Programs; 
and Thomas Bloom, Director, Defense Finance and Accounting 
Service [DFAS], U.S. Department of Defense.
5. ``The President's Management Agenda: Rightsizing the U.S. Presence 
        Abroad,'' April 7, 2003; Serial No. 108-21
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
processes used to determine the appropriate size of the U.S. 
diplomatic and Federal agency presence abroad. Discussion 
focused on one element of the President's management agenda 
calling for greater coordination between Federal departments to 
increase security at U.S. posts abroad and assure the right 
U.S. staff, at the right place with the right skills and 
training.
    b. Witnesses.--Jess T. Ford, Director International Affairs 
and Trade Division, GAO; Ruth A. Davis, Director General, U.S. 
Department of State; Maj. Gen. Charles E. Williams, USA Ret. 
Director, Overseas Buildings Office, U.S. Department of State; 
Richard Nygard, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Management, 
U.S. Agency for International Development; Anne Sigmund, 
Ambassador, Acting Inspector General, U.S. Department of State; 
William H. Itoh, Ambassador, Acting Deputy Inspector General, 
U.S. Department of State; and Testimony Submitted for the 
Record by Mitchell E. Daniels, Director, Office of Management 
and Budget.
6. ``Controlling Costs in Tactical Aircraft Programs,'' April 11, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-47
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
causes and implications of schedule delays and cost growth in 
the F/A-22 Raptor program. Discussion focused on efforts to 
contain costs and sustain the F/A-22 program under statutory 
spending caps. Additionally, discussion centered on the 
validity of cost savings estimates and the risks of 
concurrently developing production plans while attempting to 
mature critical technologies.
    b. Witnesses.--David M. Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States, GAO; Dr. Glen Lamartin, Director, Strategic and 
Tactical Systems, Department of Defense; Dr. Marvin Sambur, 
Assistant Secretary of the Air Force (Acquisition), Department 
of the Air Force, Department of Defense; Eric Miller, senior 
defense investigator, Project on Government Oversight; 
Christopher Hellman, senior analyst, Center for Defense 
Information; and Steven Ellis, vice president of programs, 
Taxpayers for Common Sense.
7. ``Homeland Defense: Old Force Structures for New Missions?'' April 
        29, 2003; Serial No. 108-48
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
role of the Department of Defense [DOD] in homeland defense. 
The creation of a unified combatant command for North America, 
NORTHCOM and designation of an Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Homeland Defense were examined. Discussion focused on the 
challenges of integrating the homeland defense mission into a 
force structure and training cycle currently centered on 
``major'' global war fighting requirements. Stress on reserve 
component forces (National Guard, Reserves) was also discussed 
as those units are called upon to perform both missions.
    b. Witnesses.--Paul McHale, Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Homeland Defense; Thomas F. Hall; Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Reserve Affairs; Lieutenant General Edward G. 
Anderson III, Deputy Commander, U.S. Northern Command and 
Aerospace Defense Command; Raymond Decker, Director, Defense 
Capabilities Management Team GAO; General Dennis J. Reimer, 
director, Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the 
Prevention of Terrorism; Dr. James Jay Carafano, senior fellow, 
Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments; and Michael 
Wermuth, senior policy analyst, RAND Corp.
8. ``Homeland Security: Improving Public Health Surveillance,'' May 5, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-55
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
status of public health surveillance programs and the 
challenges to improving local, State, Federal and international 
health data collection and reporting. Discussion focused on 
both lab networks, and new ``syndromic surveillance'' systems 
to mine public data to detect signs of disease outbreaks.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. David W. Fleming, Deputy Director for 
Public Health Science, Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention; Dr. David Tornberg, Deputy Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Clinical and Program Policy, Department of Defense; 
Mary C. Selecky, secretary, Washington State Department of 
Health, president, the Association of State and Territorial 
Health Officials, Council of State and Territorial 
Epidemiologists; Dr. Seth L. Foldy, medical director, city of 
Milwaukee health commissioner, Chair of National Association of 
County and City Health Officials Information Technology 
Committee; Dr. Julie Hall, medical officer, World Health 
Organization; and Karen Ignagni, president and CEO, American 
Association of Health Plans.
9. ``Humanitarian Assistance Following Military Operations: Overcoming 
        Barriers,'' May 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-56
    a. Summary.--The hearing examined problems encountered by 
nongovernmental organizations providing humanitarian assistance 
in the wake of a military conflict and prospects for overcoming 
those difficulties. Discussions focused on techniques to assess 
need, overcome cultural barriers to aid and deploy resources 
efficiently. A taped statement was provided from Iraq by Gen. 
Jay Garner (USA, Retired).
    b. Witnesses.--Lieutenant General Jay Garner (Retired), 
Director, Office of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance, 
Department of Defense, (taped testimony); Richard Greene, 
Principal Deputy Assistant, Bureau of Population, Refugee and 
Migration, Department of State; William J. Garvelink, Senior 
Deputy Assistant Administrator, Bureau of Democracy, Conflict, 
and Humanitarian Assistance, U.S. Agency for International 
Development; Curtis R. Welling, president and CEO, AmeriCares; 
George C. Biddle, senior vice president, International Rescue 
Committee; Rudy Von Bernuth, vice president and managing 
director, Children in Emergencies and Crisis, Save the 
Children; and Kevin M. Henry, director, policy and advocacy, 
CARE.
10. ``Stamping Out Anthrax in USPS Facilities: Technologies and 
        Protocols for Bioagent Detection,'' May 19, 2003; Serial No. 
        108-57
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine 
available technologies for detecting anthrax and other bio-
agents, and appropriate protocols for selecting and using those 
technologies. The discussion at the hearing centered on the 
uncertainties of sampling techniques, the quantification of 
laboratory findings and the need to standardize sampling and 
testing protocols in the event of future terrorist attacks.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Keith Rhodes, Chief Technologist, GAO; 
Dr. Robert G. Hamilton, director, John Hopkins Dermatology 
Allergy and Clinical Immunology; Colonel Erik A. Henchal, 
Commander, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious 
Diseases; Thomas G. Day, vice president of engineering, U.S. 
Postal Service; William Burrus, president, American Postal 
Workers Union; Captain Kenneth Martinez, engineer, Center for 
Disease Control; Dr. James L. Hadler, State epidemiologist, 
State of Connecticut Department of Public Health; and R. Davis 
Layne, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration.
11. ``Following Toxic Clouds: Science and Assumptions in Plume 
        Modeling,'' June 2, 2003; Serial No. 108-91
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
strengths and weaknesses of current methodologies to model the 
spread of aerosolized biological, chemical or radiological 
agents. At the hearing, discussion focused on advances in 
atmospheric plume modeling since the first Gulf war and 
remaining technical and management challenges to improving the 
real-time accuracy and predictive power of dispersion models.
    b. Witnesses.--Keith Rhodes, Chief General Accounting 
Office Technologist, GAO; Dr. Anna Johnson-Wineger, Deputy 
Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Chemical/Biological 
Defense Programs, Department of Defense; Dr. Donald L. Ermak, 
program leader, National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center 
[NARAC], Lawrence Livermore Laboratory; Bruce Hicks, director, 
Air Resources Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration [NOAA]; Dr. Eric Barron, Chair, Board on 
Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, National Research Council; 
and Dr. Steven R. Hanna, adjunct associate professor, Harvard 
School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
12. ``Visa Revocations: Catching the Terrorist Among Us,'' June 18, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-84
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
process of revoking visas and locating those who may have 
entered the country prior to the revocation of their visa. 
Based on GAO findings that persons with revoked visas were 
being admitted to the United States and not pursued once here, 
discussion concluded that more could be done jointly to prevent 
entry or remove persons whose visas had been revoked. However, 
the FBI represented that only their TIPOFF system could be 
relied upon to identify persons posing a terrorism risk, a 
representation not contained in the agency's submitted 
testimony.
    b. Witnesses.--Jess T. Ford, Director, International 
Affairs and Trade Division, GAO; Catherine Barry, Managing 
Director, Office of Visa Services, Bureau of Consular Affairs, 
U.S. Department of State; Jayson P. Ahern, Assistant 
Commissioner, Office of Field Operations, Bureau of Customs and 
Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Charles H. DeMore, Interim Assistant Director for 
Investigations, Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Steven C. McCraw, 
Inspector-Deputy Assistant Director of Intelligence, Federal 
Bureau of Investigation.
13. ``Emerging Threats: Assessing Nuclear Weapons Complex Facility 
        Security,'' June 24, 2003; Serial No. 108-62
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
adequacy of security at nuclear weapon facilities within the 
Department of Energy [DOE]. Discussion centered on recent 
efforts to update the fundamental security doctrine at nuclear 
weapons facilities--the design basis threat. Participants in 
the forum differed on the rigor of the effort and on the 
soundness of inspections and force-on-force threat. 
Additionally, differences arose on the rigor of that effort and 
on the soundness of inspections and force-on-force exercises to 
assess facility safeguards. A closed session followed to 
discuss classified matters dealing with the DBT and facility 
security.
    b. Witnesses.--Robin M. Nazzaro, Director, Natural 
Resources and Environment, GAO; Glenn S. Podonsky, Director, 
Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance, 
Department of Energy; Linton F. Brooks, Administrator, National 
Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy; Joseph 
S. Mahaley, Director, Office of Security, Department of Energy; 
Danielle Brian, executive director, Project on Government 
Oversight; and Ronald E. Timm, president, RETA Security.
14. ``Humanitarian Assistance Following Military Operations: Overcoming 
        Barriers,'' July 18, 2003; Serial No. 108-88
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine 
problems encountered by nongovernmental organizations providing 
humanitarian assistance in the wake of a military conflict and 
prospects for overcoming operational and political barriers. 
Drawing on lessons learned in Haiti, Bosnia, Kosovo and other 
locations, the discussion focused on current operations in Iraq 
to determine the efficacy of current approaches there.
    b. Witnesses.--Lieutenant General (Retired) Jay M. Garner, 
president of SY Coleman, former Director of the Office of 
Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance; Dr. Susan Westin, 
Managing Director, International Affairs and Trade, GAO; Dr. 
Joseph Collins, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Stability Operations, Department of Defense; Richard Greene, 
Principal Deputy Assistant, Bureau of Population, Refugee and 
Migration, U.S. Agency for International Development; James 
Kunder, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Asia and Near East, 
U.S. Agency for International Development; Tammie Willcuts, 
humanitarian operations specialist, Save the Children; Serge 
Duss, director of public policy and advocacy, World Vision, 
Inc., USA; and Pat Carey, senior vice president for programs, 
CARE.
15. ``Is DOD Meeting Joint Strike Fighter [JSF] International 
        Cooperative Program Goals?'' July 21, 2003; Serial No. 108-94
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to determine if 
international cost sharing agreements will adversely affect the 
overall development and production of the Joint Strike Fighter 
[JSF] and examine whether the JSF program office can mitigate 
the risks associated with technology transfers to foreign 
suppliers. Discussion at the hearing focused on the scope and 
implications of technology transfers required to implement 
international cooperative agreements and whether current laws, 
regulations and management practices can accomplish the 
transfers without compromising U.S. security interests.
    b. Witnesses.--Katherine V. Schinasi, Director, Acquisition 
and Sourcing Management, GAO; Al Volkman, Director, 
Acquisition, Technology & Logistics (International 
Cooperation), Department of Defense; Suzanne Patrick, Deputy 
Under Secretary, Acquisition, Technology & Logistics 
(Industrial Policy), Department of Defense; and Major General 
John L. ``Jack'' Hudson, Program Manager, Joint Strike Fighter 
[JSF] Program, Department of Defense.
16. ``Combating Terrorism: Preparing and Funding First Responders,'' 
        September 9, 2003; Serial No. 108-111
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to review 
efforts to improve domestic preparedness, focusing particularly 
on the recent Council on Foreign Relations report, ``Emergency 
Responders: Drastically Underfunded, Dangerously Unprepared.'' 
Discussion at the hearing focused on support for the Council on 
Foreign Relations' findings that much more money is needed to 
enhance emergency responder preparedness and that standardizing 
emergency responder requirements is a necessity.
    b. Witnesses.--Senator Warren B. Rudman, chairman, 
Independent Task Force on Emergency Responders, Council of 
Foreign Relations; Dr. Amy Smithson, Center for Strategic and 
International Studies; Adrian H. Thompson, chief, DC Fire and 
EMS Department, Government of the District of Columbia; and Ed 
Plaugher, fire chief, county of Arlington, VA, International 
Association of Fire Chiefs.
17. ``Combating Terrorism: Assessing Federal Assistance to First 
        Responders,'' field hearing in Stamford, CT, September 15, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-112
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to assess the 
impact of Federal training and equipment programs on local 
preparedness to deal with the consequences of a terrorist 
incident, particularly one involving the use of a radiological, 
chemical or biological weapon. Discussion at the hearing 
focused on the role of first responders in the event of a 
terrorist attack involving a weapon of mass destruction [WMD]. 
In addition to the hearing, there was a tabletop exercise 
sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security designed to 
model local response to a WMD event. In the exercise, a 
chemical agent was released into the city and first responders 
were asked to respond to the event. After the conclusion of the 
exercise, discussion focused on the strengths and weakness of 
the exercise and what was needed to help combat future 
terrorist attacks.
    b. Witnesses.--Dannel P. Malloy, mayor, city of Stamford, 
CT; Ted Macklin, Assistant Director, Office for Domestic 
Preparedness, DHS; Daniel Craig, Regional Director, DHS; 
Vincent J. DeRosa, deputy commissioner, Department of Public 
Safety, State of CT; and Christopher P. Bruhl, president and 
CEO, Southwestern Area Commerce and Industry Association.
18. ``Strategic Workforce Planning at USAID,'' September 23, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-113
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine 
efforts of the U.S. Agency for International Development to 
reshape its workforce to better meet new missions and mandates. 
The hearing focused on USAID lack of a strategic workforce plan 
and what affect that has on key missions in Afghanistan and 
Iraq. Discussion focused on the lack of an effective plan and 
described ongoing efforts to put such a plan in place and 
confront other longstanding management challenges.
    b. Witnesses.--John Marshall, Assistant Administrator for 
Management, USAID; and Jess T. Ford, Director, International 
Affairs and Trade Division, GAO.
19. ``Counterterrorism Technology: Picking Winners and Losers,'' 
        September 29, 2003; Serial No. 108-114
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
extent to which Federal agencies are succeeding in 
prioritizing, promoting, assessing and funding cutting-edge 
sciences and technologies designed to counter terrorism.
    b. Witnesses.--Michael A. Jakub, Director of Technical 
Programs, Office of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism, U.S. 
Department of State; Edward McCallum, Director, Combating 
Terrorism Technology Support Office, U.S. Department of 
Defense; Dr. David Bolka, Director of the HSARPA, DHS; Dr. 
Gordhan Patel, president, JP Laboratories, Middlesex, NJ; Jack 
Sawicki, director of business development, GEOMET Technologies, 
LLC, Germantown, MD; Lee F. Sword, program manager, Military 
Systems Division, iRobot Corp., Burlington, MA; Richard 
Mastronardi, vice president of product management, American 
Science and Engineering, Inc., Billerica, MA; Bruce deGrazia, 
chairman, Homeland Security Industries Association [HSIA], 
Washington, DC; Kenneth P. Ducey, president, Markland 
Technologies, Inc., Ridgefield, CT; and Laurence D. Bory, vice 
president, Federal Government Relations, HDR, Inc., Orlando, 
FL.
20. ``Emerging Threats: Assessing DOD Control of Surplus Chemical and 
        Biological Equipment and Material,'' October 7, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-121
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to discuss 
weaknesses in Department of Defense [DOD] controls of surplus 
chemical and biological [CB] equipment and material. Discussion 
at the hearing focused on how serviceable, or good as new, 
chemical and biological [CB] lab and protective equipment was 
being sold to individuals with little or no scrutiny while 
defective equipment remained in the system and was given to 
first responders.
    b. Witnesses.--Gregory Kutz, Director, Financial Management 
and Assurance Team, GAO; Shelton Young, Director, Readiness and 
Support Directorate, Office of Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Defense; Alan F. Estevez, Assistant Deputy Under 
Secretary of Defense, Supply Chain Integration, Department of 
Defense; Frederick N. Baillie, Executive Director, Distribution 
and Reutilization Policy, Defense Logistics Agency; and Patrick 
E. O'Donnell, Commander, Defense Reutilization and Marketing 
Service.
21. ``Army Contract Management: Compliance with Outreach and Public 
        Acceptance Agreements,'' field hearing in Dayton, OH, October 
        22, 2003; Serial No. 108-136
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to review Army 
contract and subcontract management in the chemical weapons 
demilitarization program, specifically a subcontract with 
Perma-Fix of Dayton Inc. (through prime contractor Parsons 
Inc.) involving the treatment and disposal of VX hydrolysate, 
the waste product from neutralized VX nerve agent.
    b. Witnesses.--Idotha Bootsie Neal, commissioner, city of 
Dayton; Angela Jones, trustee, Jefferson Township; Mary 
Johnson, private citizen; Ellis Jacobs, attorney, Legal Aid 
Society of Dayton; Dennis Bristow, coordinator, Dayton Regional 
Hazardous Materials Team; James Brueggeman, director, 
Montgomery County Sanitary Engineering Department; Dr. Louis 
Centofanti, president and CEO, Perma-Fix, Incarceration; 
Micheal A. Parker, Acting Director, Chemical Materials Agency, 
U.S. Army; and John T. Stewart, Parsons Infrastructure & 
Technology Group, Incarceration.
22. ``Assessing September 11th Health Effects: What Should Be Done?'' 
        Field hearing in New York City, NY, October 28, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-124
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine what 
is known about the short and long term health effects of the 
September 11th attack on those who worked at Ground Zero and 
live there today. The hearing looked at the steps the Federal 
and local government have taken to investigate any health 
effects and to provide treatment for those injured from the 
terrorist attacks which occurred at the World Trade Center on 
September 11, 2001.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. Robin Herbert, co-director of the World 
Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Medical Screen Program, 
medical co-director of the Mount Sinai-Selikoff Center for 
Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Commissioner Thomas R. 
Frieden, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; 
Dr. Michael Weiden, medical officer, New York Fire Department, 
assistant professor of medicine, Pulmonary Division, New York 
University Medical School; Jimmy Willis, vice chair for 
Conductors, assistant to the president, Transport Workers 
Union; John Graham, health and safety instructor, Carpenters 
Union; David Rapp, former worker at the World Trade Center 
site; Dr. Paul Gilman, Assistant Administrator for Research and 
Development, EPA; Diane Porter, Deputy Director, NIOSH; and Pat 
Clark, area office director for NY, NY, OSHA.
23. ``First Responder Interoperability: Can You Hear Me Now?'' Joint 
        hearing with the Subcommittee on Technology, Information 
        Policy, Intergovernmental Relations and the Census, November 6, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-139
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
challenges of communications interoperability for first 
responders and look at Federal programs and policies in 
responding to those challenges. The hearing focused on the e-
government initiative SAFECOM, the Wireless Public Safety 
Interoperable Communications Program at the Department of 
Homeland Security, and the role of the Federal Communications 
Commission in regulating State and local first responder 
spectrum allocation and licensing.
    b. Witnesses.--William O. Jenkins, Jr., Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, GAO; Marilyn Ward, chairman, 
National Public Safety Telecommunications Council [NPSTC] 
manager, Public Safety Communications Division, Orange County, 
FL; Aldona Valicenti National Association of State Chief 
Information Officers, NASCIO Member to PSWN/SAFECOM Chief 
Information Officer, State of Kentucky; Marilyn Praisner, 
councilwoman, Montgomery County, MD, chair, Telecommunity, 
chair, Technology Committee, National Association of Counties 
PSWN Executive Board, CAPWIN Executive Board; George Ake, 
program director, Capital Wireless Integrated Network [CAPWIN]; 
and Vincent Stile, president, Association of Public-Safety 
Communications Officials, International [APCO].
24. ``First Responder Interoperability: Can You Hear Me Now? (Federal 
        Perspectives),'' joint hearing with the Subcommittee on 
        Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations and 
        the Census, November 6, 2003; Serial No. 108-139
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the hearing was to examine the 
challenges of communications interoperability for first 
responders. Federal officials responsible for spectrum 
allocation and other policies effecting interoperability 
discussed ongoing efforts to link tactical communications and 
share critical data in the event of a terrorist attack.
    b. Witnesses.--Karen S. Evans, E-Gov/IT Director, OMB; Dr. 
David Boyd, Program Manager SAFECOM, Wireless Public Safety 
Interoperable Communications Program, DHS; John Morgan 
Assistant Director for Science and Technology, National 
Institute of Justice, AGILE; John Muleta, Chief, Wireless 
Bureau, FCC; and Edmond Thomas, Chief, Office of Engineering 
and Technology, FCC.
25. ``Effective Strategies Against Terrorism,'' February 3, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-150
    a. Summary.--Oversight of the processes used to develop and 
implement multiple national strategy statements to combat 
terrorism. Witnesses were asked to describe the elements of an 
effective strategy, assess whether current U.S. strategic 
statement possess those characteristics and analyze the extent 
to which the various strategies articulate clear goals, guide 
resource allocations and link to form a coordinated approach. 
Testimony was received from GAO and a panel of private sector 
experts.
    b. Witnesses.--Randall Yim, Managing Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Team, GAO; Dr. Ilana Kass, professor of 
military Strategy and Operations, National War College; Dr. 
David H. McIntyre, former dean of faculty, National Defense 
University; Colonel Randall J. Larsen, USAF (Retired), CEO, 
Homeland Security Associates; and Frank Ciluffo, associate vice 
president for homeland security, the George Washington 
University.
26. ``Public Diplomacy in the Middle East,'' February 10, 2004; Serial 
        No. 108-153
    a. Summary.--Oversight of State Department and interagency 
efforts to communicate U.S. policies to broader audiences in 
the Middle East. Ambassador Margaret Tutwiler, Under Secretary 
of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, testified on 
the range of efforts undertaken to convey U.S. policies and 
interests to governments and the broader publics in the region. 
Witnesses from the Broadcasting Board of Governors, the 
Advisory Commission on Pubic Diplomacy, GAO, the Heritage 
Foundation and others described past missteps and current 
efforts to inject the U.S. voice into regional electronic media 
to compete with the perceived anti-American bias of regional 
outlets like Al Jaziera.
    b. Witnesses.--Ambassador Margaret Tutwiler, Under 
Secretary of State for Public, Diplomacy and Public Affairs, 
U.S. Department of State; Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, chairman, 
Broadcasting Board of Governors; Harold Pachios, chairman, 
Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy; Jess T. Ford, 
Director, International Affairs and Trade, GAO; Stephen 
Johnson, senior policy analyst, the Heritage Foundation; David 
E. Morey, president & CEO, DMG, Inc., (& member of the Council 
on Foreign Relations public diplomacy task force); and Dr. 
Stephen P. Cohen, president, Institute for Middle East Peace 
and Development (& member of the Advisory Group on Public 
Diplomacy for the Arab and Muslim World).
27. ``Combating Terrorism: Chemical Plant Security,'' field hearing, 
        Moon Township, PA, February 23, 2004; Serial No. 108-156
    a. Summary.--Oversight of DHS and intergovernmental efforts 
to assess vulnerabilities and mitigate the risks of terrorist 
attacks against chemical production, transmission and storage 
facilities. DHS Assistant Secretary for Infrastructure 
Protection Robert Liscouski testified on the Department's 
efforts to increase and standardize voluntary, cooperative 
efforts by industry and local regulators to strengthen safety 
and security measures at plants producing or holding toxic and 
flammable materials of interest to terrorists. State and local 
officials, and industry trade association representatives, 
testified on the progress made in securing chemical plants 
since September 11, 2001 and the need for clearer Federal 
standards to guide further progress.
    b. Witnesses.--Michael Lowder, Operations Branch, Chief, 
Response Division, DHS, FEMA; Chief Robert Full, chief, 
Allegheny County Department of Emergency Services; Thomas 
Headley, vice-chairman, Forward Township, Board of Supervisors; 
Dave Sanko, director, Pennsylvania Management Agency; John 
Stephenson, director of Natural Resources and Environment, GAO; 
Pamela Witmer, president, Pennsylvania Chemical Industry 
Council; Marty Durbin, team leader, security & operations, 
senior director, Federal relations, American Chemistry Council; 
and Jennifer C. Gibson, vice president, government & public 
affairs, National Association of Chemical Distributor.
28. ``Nonproliferation: Assessing Missile Technology Export Controls,'' 
        March 9, 2004; Serial No. 108-165
    a. Summary.--Oversight of management of multi-agency 
categorization and licensing regimes used to control the spread 
of enabling technologies used in construction of unmanned 
aerial vehicles and cruise missiles. Witnesses from CRS, GAO, a 
think tank, Commerce, State and DOD described efforts to 
coordinate and strengthen controls on sensitive technologies 
and the challenges of doing so in the context of a rapidly 
growing global supply and demand for UAV capabilities.
    b. Witnesses.--Andrew Feickert, Specialist in National 
Defense, CRS; Joseph A. Christoff, Director, International 
Affairs and Trade Team, GAO; Dennis M. Gormley, senior fellow 
Monterey Institute of International Studies; Matthew S. Borman, 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Export Administration, 
Department of Commerce; Robert W. Maggi, Managing Director of 
Defense Trade Controls, U.S. Department of State; Lt. Gen. Tome 
H. Walters, Jr., USAF, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, 
U.S. Department of Defense; and Lisa Bronson Deputy Under 
Secretary of Defense for Technology Security Policy and 
Counterproliferation, U.S. Department of Defense.
29. ``Homeland Security Advisory System: Threat Codes and Public 
        Responses,'' March 16, 2004; Serial No. 108-166
    a. Summary.--Oversight of the homeland security advisory 
system administered by DHS. Witnesses from DHS, GAO, CRS, the 
American Red Cross and other private organizations discussed 
the ``evolving'' color code system used by DHS. Testimony by 
non-government witnesses generally agreed the current system is 
inadequate in terms of informing the public about appropriate 
preparedness and countermeasures when the threat level is 
raised. According to one witness, the current system is only a 
``threat'' alert, not a true ``warning'' system that would use 
existing broadcast and emergency communication (i.e. FCC, NOAA) 
capabilities to convey specific information to the public about 
heightened threats and what to do about them.
    b. Witnesses.--General Patrick Hughes, Assistant Secretary 
for Information Analysis, DHS; Randall Yim, Managing Director, 
Homeland Security and Justice Team, GAO; Shawn Reese Analyst in 
American National Government, CRS; Charles D. Connor, senior 
vice president, Communications & Marketing, American Red Cross; 
Michael Wermuth, senior policy analyst, RAND Corp.; Dr. James 
Jay Carafano, senior research fellow, Defense and Homeland 
Security, Heritage Foundation; and Kenneth B. Allen, executive 
director, Partnership for Public Warning.
30. ``U.S. Preparation for the World Radio Conferences: Too Little, Too 
        Late?'' March 17, 2004; Serial No. 108-180
    a. Summary.--Oversight of the processes used to select 
delegates and formulate U.S. positions for World Radio 
Conferences, the intermittent international meetings at which 
critical decisions are made regarding radio spectrum 
allocations and other telecommunications policies. Testimony 
from the Departments of State, Transportation, Commerce, 
Defense, NASA, FCC and former WRC Ambassadors described an 
increasingly sophisticated system of internal and bi-lateral 
sessions to coordinate national and regional spectrum policies. 
However, concerns were expressed whether the current system 
will be adequate to meet the demand for inter-agency dispute 
resolution and timely formulation of positions. One key concern 
was the practice of not appointing a WRC Ambassador until 6 
months before the conference, while other nations are able to 
communicate at the head-of-delegation level long before that.
    b. Witnesses.--Jeffrey N. Shane, Under Secretary for 
Transportation Policy, U.S. Department of Transportation; 
William Readdy, Associate Administrator for Space Flight, NASA; 
Michael Gallagher Acting Assistant Secretary for Communications 
and Information, National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce; Commissioner 
Kathleen Abernathy Federal Communications Commission; 
Ambassador David Gross, U.S. Coordinator, International 
Communications and Information Policy, U.S. Department of 
State; Dr. Lin Wells, Acting Assistant Secretary for NII 
(Networks and Information Integration), U.S. Department of 
Defense; Dr. James Scheslinger, Center for Strategic and 
International Studies; John Bryant former Congressman and U.S. 
Ambassador to 1997 World Radio Conference; Gail Schoettler U.S. 
Ambassador to 2000 World Radio Conference; and Janice 
Obuchowski, U.S. Ambassador to 2003 World Radio Conference.
31. ``The Homeland Security Department's Plan to Consolidate and Co-
        locate Regional and Field Offices: Improving Communication and 
        Coordination,'' joint hearing with the Subcommittee on Energy 
        Policy, Natural Resources and Regulatory Affairs, March 24, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-168
    a. Summary.--Oversight of DHS implementation of Section 706 
of the Homeland Security Act, authored by Representative Ose, 
requiring a plan to coordinate overlapping regional and field 
structures inherited from ``legacy'' units and agencies when 
the new Department was created. Testimony from the DHS Deputy 
Secretary for Border and Transportation Security indicated 
plans and consultations were underway to reconfigure DHS units 
into a truly regional system. But efforts appear hampered by 
lease management issues and involvement of State and local 
stakeholders seems limited.
    b. Witnesses.--Asa Hutchinson, Under Secretary, Border and 
Transportation Security, DHS; James Lee Witt, former 
Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency, currently 
president, James Lee Witt Associates, LLC; C. Morgan Kinghorn, 
president, National Academy of Public Administration; Edward 
Flynn, Secretary, Executive Office of Public Safety, State of 
Massachusetts on behalf of the National Governors Association; 
Karen Anderson, mayor, city of Minnetonka, MN, on behalf of the 
National League of Cities; and Dr. Martin Fenstersheib, health 
officer, Santa Clara County Public Health Department on behalf 
of the National Association of County and City Health Officers.
32. ``Does the `Total Force' Add Up? The Impact of Health Protection 
        Programs on Guard and Reserve Units,'' March 30, 2004; Serial 
        No. 108-181
    a. Summary.--Oversight of DOD force health protection 
programs, instituted after the first Persian Gulf war, to 
assess pre- and post-deployment health, maintain accurate 
medical records and assess the impact of environmental 
exposures in the field. Testimony from National Guard and 
Reserve members, and their spouses, described unique 
difficulties faced by Reserve Component units in accessing 
post-deployment health care. The DOD Assistant Secretary for 
Health Affairs and the Army Surgeon General testified on the 
implementation of congressionally mandated pre- and post-
deployment medical examinations and efforts to improve in-
theater mental health and suicide prevention programs.
    b. Witnesses.--First Sergeant Gerry L. Mosley, 296th 
Transportation Co., Brookhaven, MS, U.S. Army Reserves; 
Specialist John A. Ramsey, 32nd Army Air Missile Defense 
Command, Florida National Guard; Laura Ramsey; Sergeant First 
Class Scott Emde, 20th Special Forces Group, B Co., 3rd 
Battalion, Virginia National Guard; Lisa Emde; Specialist 
Timothi McMichael, U.S. Army Reserves, Medical Hold Unit, Fort 
Knox, KY; Dr. William Winkenwerder, Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Health Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense; and 
Lieutenant General James B. Peake, the Surgeon General, U.S. 
Army, U.S. Department of Defense.
33. ``The Iraq Oil-For-Food Program: Starving for Accountability,'' 
        April 21, 2004; Serial No. 108-216
    a. Summary.--Oversight of U.S. participation in the United 
Nations Oil-for-Food Program and efforts to investigate 
allegations of sanctions violations and profiteering in the 
largest-ever humanitarian program. Witnesses from the State 
Department, Defense Contract Audit Agency, Department of 
Treasury and private analysts--including a British advisor to 
the Iraqi Governing Council--testified on allegations nations 
and companies conspired with the former Iraqi regime of Saddam 
Hussein to skim proceeds from U.N. sanctioned oil sales and 
humanitarian purchases. GAO previously concluded more than $10 
billion was siphoned from the flow of funds intended to benefit 
the Iraqi population.
    b. Witnesses.--Patrick F. Kennedy, U.S. Representative for 
United Nations Management and Reform, U.S. Mission to the 
United Nations, U.S. Department of State; Robin L. Raphel, 
Coordinator, Office of Iraq Reconstruction, U.S. Department of 
State; Michael J. Thibault, Deputy Director, Defense Contract 
Audit Agency, U.S. Department of Defense; Jeff Ross, Senior 
Advisor to the Deputy Assistant Secretary, Executive Office for 
Terrorist Financing & Financial Crimes, U.S. Department of the 
Treasury; Claude Hankes-Drielsma, advisor, Iraq Governing 
Council, chairman, Roland Berger, Strategy Consultants; Dr. 
Nimrod Raphaeli, senior analyst, the Middle East Media Research 
Institute; Dr. Nile Gardiner, fellow in Anglo-American security 
policy, the Heritage Foundation; Claudia Rosett, senior fellow, 
Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, adjunct fellow, 
Hudson Institute; and Dr. Edward C. Luck, Director, Center on 
International Organization, School of International and Public 
Affairs, Columbia University.
34. ``Nuclear Security: Can DOE Meet Physical Facility Security 
        Requirement,'' April 27, 2004; Serial No. 108-207
    a. Summary.--Oversight of the National Nuclear Security 
Administration and Department of Energy efforts to implement 
new, enhanced physical security standards--called the design 
basis threat [DBT] at the nuclear weapons facility. The weapons 
``complex'' consists of a number of aging, widely dispersed 
facilities that pose varying degrees of difficulty meeting 
heightened, post-September 11 requirements to deny access to 
special nuclear material. Witnesses from NNSA, DOE, GAO, and 
the Project on Government Oversight testified on the pace and 
projected cost to bring facilities up to the new DBT standards. 
Consolidation of nuclear material within facilities, and 
eventually into fewer facilities was strongly advocated.
    b. Witnesses.--Robin M. Nazzaro, Director, Natural 
Resources and Environment, GAO; Danielle Brian, Executive 
Director, Project on Government Oversight; Linton F. Brooks, 
Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration, 
Department of Energy; and Glenn S. Podonsky Director, Office of 
Security and Safety Performance Assurance, Department of 
Energy.
35. ``Combating Terrorism: Training and Equipping Reserve Component 
        Forces,'' May 11, 2004; Serial No. 108-211
    a. Summary.--Oversight of Department of Defense management 
of Reserve Component (National Guard and Reserve) units' 
deployment mobilization. Reservists and National Guard members, 
DOD witnesses and service advocacy organizations testified on 
challenges to old RC systems and procedures posed by frequent 
mobilizations and changing missions. Limited access to 
equipment and training facilities can make it more difficult 
for RC units to ``train as they fight'' than their active duty 
counterparts. Incorporation of lessons learned from forward 
areas was also an issue discussed.
    b. Witnesses.--First Sergeant Gerald Neill, 323 Military 
Intelligence Battalion, U.S. Army Reserve, Maryland; Staff 
Sergeant Juan SanchezLopez, 2nd Battalion 23rd Marines 
Reserves; Specialist Michael Tanguay, 143 Military Police Co., 
National Guard, Connecticut; Lieutenant Colonel Steve J. 
Novotny, 530th Military Police Battalion, U.S. Army Reserve, 
Nebraska; Dr. Andrew F. Krepinevich, Executive Director, Center 
for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments, Major General 
(Retired) Richard C. Alexander, president, National Guard 
Association of the United States; Brigadier General Louis 
Weber, Director of Training, U.S. Army; Lieutenant General 
James R. Helmly, Chief of Army Reserve; Lieutenant General 
Roger C. Schultz, Director of Army National Guard; and 
Lieutenant General Edward Hanlon, Commandant, Marine Corps 
Combat Development Command.
36. ``Examining the Status of Gulf War Research and Investigations on 
        Gulf War Illnesses,'' June 1, 2004; Serial No. 108-228
    a. Summary.--Oversight of VA and DOD efforts in managing 
the research portfolio of studies into toxic exposures and 
subsequent illnesses in Gulf war veterans. Witnesses from the 
GAO, VA, Research Advisory Committee, DOD, veterans advocacy 
groups and others testified that promising results from 
previous studies are not being followed due to a reduction in 
the overall research effort. A Member of the British House of 
Lords, Lord Morris of Manchester, was invited to sit with the 
subcommittee based on his sustained advocacy on behalf of UK 
veterans of the 191 war.
    b. Witnesses.--Jim Bunker, chairman, Veteran Information 
Network, Gulf War Veteran, Topeka, KS; Dr. Derek Hall, Gulf war 
veteran, United Kingdom; Dr. Janet Heinrich, Director, Health 
Care-Public Health Issues, GAO; Dr. Keith Rhodes, Chief General 
Accounting Office Technologist, GAO; Jim Binns, chairman, 
Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans Illnesses; 
Steve Robinson, Executive Director, National Gulf War Resource 
Center, Inc.; Dr. Jonathan B. Perlin, Acting Under Secretary 
for Health and Acting Chief Research and Development Officer, 
Department of Veterans Affairs; Major General Lester Martinez-
Lopez, Commanding General of U.S. Army Medical Research and 
Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, MD; Dr. Robert Haley Professor 
of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical 
Center; Dr. Rogene Henderson, Senior Scientist, Lovelace 
Respiratory Research Institute; and Dr. Paul Greengard, Vincent 
Astor professor and head of Laboratory of Molecular and 
Cellular Neuroscience, the Rockefeller University, Nobel 
Laureate in Medicine 2000.
37. ``Iraq: Winning Hearts and Minds,'' June 15, 2004; Serial No. 108-
        233
    a. Summary.--Oversight of U.S. policy and operations to 
secure popular support for Coalition actions in Iraq. The Iraqi 
diplomatic representative to the United States testified on 
effective tactics, and dashed expectations, that have liberated 
Iraqis but also resulted in a steady erosion of public trust in 
Coalition intentions. Witnesses from the Departments of State, 
DOD, the Joint Staff and USAID described efforts underway to 
rebuild civil society in Iraq.
    b. Witnesses.--Ambassador Rend Al-Rahim, Iraqi Interests 
Section; Ambassador Ronald L. Schlicher, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary, Bureau of Near Eastern Asia/Iraq, U.S. Department of 
State; Peter Rodman, Assistant Secretary of Defense, 
International Security Affairs, Office of Secretary of Defense; 
Lieutenant General Walter L. Sharp, Director for Strategic 
Plans and Policy, Joint Chiefs of Staff; Gordon West, Senior 
Deputy Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Asia and the Near 
East, USAID; Dr. Samer S. Shehata, Center for Contemporary Arab 
Studies, Georgetown University; Richard Galen, former director, 
strategic media, Coalition Provisional Authority; and Danielle 
Pletka, vice president, foreign and defense policy studies, 
American Enterprise Institute.
38. ``Nuclear Security: Can DOE Meet Facility Security Requirements?'' 
        June 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-237
    a. Summary.--Continuing the subcommittee's oversight of 
physical security upgrades at DOE nuclear complex sites, 
witnesses from GAO and DOE described efforts to assess security 
needs at so-called ``environmental management'' sites 
containing special nuclear materials. These sites are not part 
of the active weapons complex, and some are scheduled to be 
decommissioned altogether. As a result, weighing the costs and 
benefits of expensive security enhancements called for by the 
new design basis threat can be challenging.
    b. Witnesses.--Robin M. Nazzaro, Director, Natural 
Resources and Environment, GAO; Danielle Brian, executive 
director, Project on Government Oversight; David Garman, Under 
Secretary, Office of Energy, Science, and the Environment, U.S. 
Department of Energy; and Glenn S. Podonsky, Director, Office 
of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, U.S. Department 
of Energy.
39. ``Business Process Modernization at the Department of Defense,'' 
        joint hearing with Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and 
        Financial Management, July 7, 2004; Serial No. 108-229
    a. Summary.--Oversight of ongoing DOD efforts to identify, 
consolidate and eliminate legacy information technology systems 
and migrate key business management functions to an enterprise 
architecture environment. Witnesses from DOD and GAO described 
progress to date and identified barriers that require 
sustained, high-level attention and dedicated resources.
    b. Witnesses.--Lawrence Lanzilotta, Under Secretary of 
Defense, Comptroller (Acting); and Greg Kutz, Director of 
Financial Management and Assurance, GAO.
40. ``Visa Revocations II: Still Porous, Slow to Fix,'' July 13, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-253
    a. Summary.--Oversight of State Department and DHS efforts 
to fix problems noted previously by GAO and the subcommittee in 
coordinating visa revocations so that persons denied visas on 
terrorism grounds do not enter the United States. GAO testified 
that information sharing problems noted 6 months ago persist so 
that visa revocation information does not get where it is 
needed in time to stop entry of the alien. And, once an alien 
enters the United States on a revoked visa, it is still not 
clear who, if anyone, is responsible to find the alien and 
determine if he/she should be removed. Interagency discussions 
on a regulation change to make the visa revocation instrument 
effective upon issuance, not only after the alien leaves the 
United States, bogged down.
    b. Witnesses.--Jess T. Ford, Director, International 
Affairs and Trade Division, GAO; Janice Jacobs, Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for Visa Services, U.S. Department of 
State; Robert M. Jacksta, Executive Director, Border Security 
and Facilitation, Bureau of Customs and Border Protection DHS; 
Robert A. Schoch, Deputy Assistant Director, National Security 
Investigations Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
DHS; and Donna A. Bucella Director, Terrorist Screening Center, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice.
41. ``Public Safety Interoperability: Look Who's Talking Now,'' July 
        20, 2004; Serial No. 108-257
    a. Summary.--Oversight of Federal efforts to improve public 
safety communications interoperability, specifically wireless 
voice and data systems. Witnesses from GAO, DHS, FCC and State 
and local public safety agencies testified on slow FCC 
decisionmaking on spectrum allocation issues affecting local 
jurisdictions and limited success of the DHS SAFECOM program to 
focus short and long-term interoperability efforts across so 
many jurisdictions.
    b. Witnesses.--William Jenkins, Jr., Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, GAO; Dr. David Boyd, Program 
Manager, SAFECOM, DHS; John Muleta, chief, Wireless 
Telecommunications Bureau, FCC; Stephen T. Devine, Patrol 
Frequency Coordinator Communications Division, Missouri State 
Highway Patrol General Headquarters; Glen S. Nash 
Telecommunications Division, California Department of General 
Services; Hanford Tomas, director, New York Statewide Wireless 
Interoperability Network; William Gardner, radio shop 
supervisor, Suffolk County, New York Police Headquarters; and 
Dr. Glenn Corbett, Department of Public Management, John Jay 
College of Criminal Justice City University of New York.
42. ``Homeland Security: Surveillance and Monitoring of Explosive 
        Storage Facilities,'' field hearing, San Mateo, CA, August 2, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-259
    a. Summary.--Oversight of DHS Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco 
and Firearms management of safety and security standards 
applicable to ammunition magazines and other storage facilities 
used by Federal, State and local law enforcement. The theft of 
high explosives from a joint Federal/local ammunition bunker 
raised questions about the adequacy of security standards 
applied to government facilities. Private facilities must be 
inspected by AFT. Government compliance with security and 
inspection requirements if voluntary.
    b. Witnesses.--Walfred A. Nelson, Deputy Assistant 
Director, Enforcement Programs and Services Division, the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, U.S. Department of 
Justice; Michael Gulledge, Director, Office of Evaluation and 
Inspections Division, Office of the Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Justice; Don Horsley, county sheriff, San Mateo 
County Sheriff's Office, State of California; Heather Fong, 
chief of police, San Francisco Police Department, city of San 
Francisco, CA; Scott MacGregor, assistant chief, California 
Highway Patrol, California Department of Justice, Sacramento, 
CA; Mark Church, president, San Mateo County Board of 
Supervisors, State of California; and Michael Nevin, 
supervisor.
43. ``The 9/11 Commission Recommendations on Public Diplomacy: 
        Defending Ideals and Defining the Message,'' August 23, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-261
    a. Summary.--Oversight of 9/11 Commission recommendations 
to improve U.S. information and exchange programs to foreign 
publics, particularly increasingly hostile publics in the Arab 
and Muslim world. Commission Chairman Thomas Kean and 
Commission member Jamie Gorelick testified on the importance of 
augmenting both the quality and quantity of one-on-one advocacy 
of American policies and ideals, (such as exchange programs, 
speakers bureaus and conferences) but increasing the reach and 
effectiveness of mass media broadcasting as well. Some 
witnesses advocated one approach over the other.
    b. Witnesses.--Governor Thomas H. Kean, Chair, National 
Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, (the 9/
11 Commission); Jamie S. Gorelick, Commissioner, National 
Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (the 9/
11 Commission); Patricia de Stacy Harrison, Acting Under 
Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, 
U.S. Department of State; Kenneth Y. Tomlinson, chairman, 
Broadcasting Board of Governors; Charles ``Tre'' Evers III, 
commissioner, Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy; Jess T. 
Ford, Director, International Affairs and Trade, GAO; Keith 
Reinhard, president, Business for Diplomatic Action, chariman, 
DDB Worldwide; Charlotte Beers, former Under Secretary of State 
for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs, U.S. Department of 
State; Dr. Rhonda S. Zaharna, associate professor of public 
communication, American University; and Hafez Al-Mirazi, bureau 
chief, Al Jazeera, Washington Office.
44. ``Too Many Secrets: Overclassification as a Barrier to Critical 
        Information Sharing,'' August 24, 2004; Serial No. 108-263
    a. Summary.--Oversight of classification and 
declassification policies in view of the 9/11 Commission 
finding that too much classification, and too little 
declassification, impedes the more robust forms of information 
sharing needed to fight terrorism effectively. Testimony from 
the National Archives' Information Security Oversight Office, 
DOD and others pointed to institutional and cultural incentives 
that sustain a ``when in doubt, classify!'' system. Estimates 
of the extent of overclassification ranged from 10 to 90 
percent of the 14 million documents marked ``Confidential'' 
``Secret'' or ``Top Secret'' in 2003. Witnesses suggested 
standardized training on classification and declassification 
criteria and procedures, and leadership from Department heads, 
could largely correct the problem. It was also suggested that 
the Public Interest Declassification Board, created in the 2002 
Intelligence Authorization bill but never populated with 
executive or legislative appointments, should be extended and 
made operational.
    b. Witnesses.--William Leonard, Director, Information 
Security Oversight Office, National Archives and Records 
Administration; Carol Haave, U.S. Department of Defense, Office 
of the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence; Steven 
Aftergood, Federation of American Scientists; and William P. 
Crowell, the Markle Foundation Task Force on National Security 
in the Information.
45. ``Assessing September 11th Health Effects,'' September 8, 2004
    a. Summary.--Oversight of Federal efforts to assess, 
diagnose and treat symptoms and syndromes resulting from post-
September 11 environmental exposures and psychological trauma. 
This was a follow-up to the subcommittee's initial hearing on 
this topic held in New York City in May. Federal and State 
medical officials testified on efforts to monitor health of 
first responders and others present at Ground Zero in the 
aftermath of the September 11 attack. Witnesses representing 
local response workers questioned the design and operation of 
health registries and whether support for long-term health 
monitoring was sufficient.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. John Howard, Director, National 
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health [NIOSH]; Dr. Janet 
Heinrich, Director, Health Care-Public Health Issues, GAO; 
Robert E. Robertson, Director, Education, Workforce and Income 
Security, GAO; Dr. Stephen M. Levin, M.D., co-director of the 
World Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening 
Program, medical director of the Mount Sinai-Selikoff Center 
for Occupational and Environmental Medicine; Dr. Michael 
Lonski, director of training and program development, Life 
Matters; Dr. James Melius, administrator, NY State Laborers 
Health and Safety Fund; Stan Mark, esq., program director, 
Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund; and Micki 
Siegel de Hernandez, health and safety director, Communications 
Workers of America [CWA].
46. ``Homeland Security: Monitoring Nuclear Power Plant Security,'' 
        September 14, 2004; Serial No. 108-265
    a. Summary.--Oversight of post-September 11 efforts to 
enhance physical security standards at civilian nuclear power 
facilities. Like DOE nuclear facilities, Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission [NRC] regulated facilities must meet a more 
stringent security standard, called a ``design basis threat,'' 
that reflects the level risk posed by terrorism. Witnesses from 
the NRC and GAO described efforts to bring plant operators into 
compliance with more stringent security requirements. Other 
witnesses questioned whether NRC was moving aggressively 
enough.
    b. Witnesses.--Luis A. Reyes, Executive Director of 
Operations, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Jim Wells, Director, 
Natural Resources and Environment, GAO; Alex Matthiessen, 
director, Hudson riverkeeper, Garrison, NY; David Lochbaum, 
Union of Concerned Scientists, Washington, DC; and Marvin 
Fertel, vice president and chief nuclear officer, Nuclear 
Energy Institute, Washington, DC.
47. ``Combating Terrorism: The 9/11 Commission Recommendations and the 
        National Strategies,'' September 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-271
    a. Summary.--Oversight to assess the recommendations of the 
9/11 Commission as they relate to the goals, objectives and 
initiatives of the national strategies to combat terrorism and 
homeland security. Commissioners Slade Gordon and Richard Ben-
Veniste, GAO, CRS and an analyst from the Rand Corp. concluded 
U.S. strategic statements already reflect many Commission 
recommendations. However, based on 9/11 Commission findings, 
strategies should be refined regarding the nature of the 
threat--Islamist terrorists versus any notional ``war on 
terror''--and a much greater focus on public diplomacy and 
other ``soft power'' means to address the ideological drivers 
of global jihadists.
    b. Witnesses.--Slade Gorton, member, National Commission on 
Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States; Richard Ben-Veniste, 
member, National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the 
United States; Norman Rabkin, Managing Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Team, GAO; Raphael Perl, Senior Policy 
Analyst, Congressional Research Service; and John V. Parachini, 
senior policy analyst, RAND Corp.
48. ``The U.N. Oil for Food Program: Cash Cow Meets Paper Tiger,'' 
        October 5, 2004
    a. Summary.--The purpose of the subcommittee's second 
hearing on the U.N. Oil for Food Program was to continue 
examination of the U.S. role in the scandal-plagued 
humanitarian program. A failure of U.N. oversight, and an 
erroneous assumption that commercial safeguards would protect 
the program from manipulation, resulted in the Iraqi regime 
being able to divert billions from the program. U.N. 
contractors retained to finance and monitor oil sales and 
commodity purchases by Iraq testified on the limited 
authorities they had to police program transactions, despite 
persistent public reports of surcharges and kickbacks 
benefiting Saddam's regime.
    b. Witnesses.--Ambassador Patrick F. Kennedy, U.S. 
Representative to the United Nations for U.N. Management and 
Reform, U.S. Mission to the U.N., U.S. Department of State; 
David L. Smith, director, corporate banking operations, BNP 
Paribas; Peter W.G. Boks, managing director, Saybolt 
International B.V.; and Andre E. Pruniaux, senior vice 
president, Africa & Middle East Cotecna Inspection S.A.

   SUBCOMMITTEE ON TECHNOLOGY, INFORMATION POLICY, INTERGOVERNMENTAL 
                        RELATIONS AND THE CENSUS

                   Summary of Legislative Activities

H.R. 3478
    During 2003, Chairman Putnam introduced H.R. 3478, the 
National Archives and Records Administration Act of 2003. It 
passed the House and the Senate this session. The act improves 
the efficiency of operations by the National Archives and 
Records Administration [NARA] in the following manner:
         LProviding for the extension of Federal 
        records retention periods by regulation
         LAllow for the creation of a revolving fund to 
        be used for the purchase and care of uniforms for 
        certain records center employees
         LEstablishes the authority to charge fees for 
        the public use of space in archival facilities and 
        Presidential libraries owned, operated, or controlled 
        by NARA
         LCreates the authority to enter into 
        cooperative agreements with State and local 
        governments, as well as educational institutions or 
        private non-profit organizations to further NARA 
        programs and to support NARA's community outreach 
        mission.
Additionally, this legislation reauthorizes appropriations 
through fiscal year 2009 for the National Historical 
Publications to Records Commission (NHPRC). This has been the 
8th passage of this legislation since 1964. The NHPRC's mandate 
is to look outward, to provide assistance to non-Federal 
agencies, institutions and individuals committed to the 
preservation and use of American documentary resources. The 
NHPRC remains today the only grantmaking organization, public 
or private, in the Nation whose only focus is the preservation 
of and increased access to American historical documentation, 
in its myriad forms and formats--whether it be quill pen or 
computer.
H.R. 4570
    The subcommittee's Chairman Adam Putnam (R-FL) introduced 
this legislation with co-sponsorship from the chairman of the 
Committee on Government Reform, Tom Davis (R-VA). The Clinger-
Cohen Act of 1996 affirmatively acknowledged the importance of 
information technology investment management in the Federal 
Government. H.R. 4570 amends and updates the Clinger-Cohen Act, 
to explicitly identify information security as a required 
element of the information technology investment management 
oversight and decisionmaking process within every agency of the 
Federal Government. The language of H.R. 4570 passed the House 
of Representatives as section 5031 of H.R. 10, the 9/11 
Recommendations Implementation Act. The language of H.R. 4570 
also passed the Senate as amendment 3727 to S. 2845, the 
National Intelligence Reform Act of 2004. At the time of the 
writing of this report, H.R. 10 and S. 2845 were in conference 
to resolve the differences between the two pieces of 
legislation.

                    Summary of Oversight Activities

1. Biometrics/Smart Cards
    In accordance with the President's vision of a more 
responsive and cost-effective government, GAO reports that 
Federal agencies continue to move toward integrated agency-wide 
initiatives that use smart cards as identity credentials that 
agency employees can use to gain both physical access to 
facilities and logical access to computer systems and networks, 
thus enhancing overall security. GAO also indicated in the 
report that even stronger authentication can and will be 
achieved by using smart cards in conjunction with biometrics, 
passwords, and public key infrastructure.
    In the GAO report titled, ``Electronic Government; Federal 
Agencies continue to Invest in Smart Card Technology,'' the GAO 
identifies a total of 24 projects, of which 16 projects 
reported that they are in planning, pilot, or operational 
phases and are intended to support a variety of uses. In 
January 2003, it was reported that there were some 52 various 
project at some phase of concept, design, development or 
implementation. As a result of congressional oversight, a new 
examination produced opportunities for consolidation and 
integration of projects and resulted in 28 projects being 
discontinued and absorbed into other smart card projects or 
deemed no longer feasible.
    The Federal Government's adoption of smart card technology 
is advancing with a number of agencies purchasing smart cards 
under the GSA's Smart Card Access Common ID contracting vehicle 
that promises to help reduce the cost and ensure that vendors 
incorporate interoperability specifications. The subcommittee 
is dedicated to continuing its oversight of Smart Card projects 
to ensure the appropriate application of this technology to 
achieve greater security for Federal agencies and Federal 
employees.
2. Cyber Security
    The subcommittee aggressively pursued oversight of the 
issue of cyber security in the 108th Congress. The subcommittee 
tackled cyber security from a variety of angles including 
looking at: the security precautions undertaken by both the 
Federal Government and the private sector; the threats to 
computers and information systems that are connected to the 
Internet; the Federal and private efforts to educate computer 
users about online threats; and the attempts to improve the 
security and quality of software and hardware products. The 
subcommittee has made every effort to raise the profile of this 
important issue and to improve the cyber security profile of 
all computer users in this Nation. Specifically, the 
subcommittee held 11 oversight hearings related to cyber 
security and received testimony from over 85 witnesses from a 
wide variety of government agencies, companies, non-profits, 
and academic organizations. Throughout these hearings, the 
message was clear that: the threats to this Nation's computer 
systems from viruses, worms, hackers, and others who wish us 
harm is very real; the vulnerabilities in our systems are 
extensive; and that there can be no delay from the public or 
private sectors in taking immediate steps to improve cyber 
security.
    In addition to the subcommittee's hearings, Chairman Putnam 
issued a computer security report card grading the 24 largest 
department and agencies in the Federal Government. Furthermore, 
the subcommittee made several requests to the Government 
Accountability Office on the topic of information security, 
including requesting examinations of technologies to secure 
Federal systems, technologies to secure the Nation's critical 
infrastructure, and the effectiveness of risk management 
processes designed to protect Federal information systems. 
Finally, the subcommittee frequently engaged in dialog with the 
private sector about the potential solutions to the cyber 
security challenges facing this Nation.
3. E-Government
    The subcommittee continued its stringent oversight of the 
Federal Government in its efforts to implement the 25 E-
Government initiatives described in the President's management 
agenda, both to measure the progress of those efforts and to 
keep Federal Government agencies and decisionmakers 
aggressively focused on meeting the key goals of the E-
Government Act of 2002. Specifically, those goals are: greater 
accessibility to government by citizens and businesses; 
improving government efficiency and productivity; enhancing 
customer service; facilitating cross-agency coordination; and 
tangible cost savings to taxpayers through use of 21st century 
technology and proven ``best practices'' throughout the Federal 
Government.
    In addition to the subcommittee's five hearings focused on 
specific E-Government initiatives, the subcommittee made a 
number of requests to the Government Accountability Office for 
studies on specific E-Government initiatives, the Federal 
Enterprise Architecture effort, Information Technology budget 
submissions to the Office of Management and Budget, and 
Information Technology funding and spending.
    The subcommittee also carried out its oversight 
responsibilities by continually meeting with the Office of 
Management and Budget, the Government Accountability Office, 
and numerous Federal agencies about the progress of various E-
Government projects. Further, the subcommittee staff engaged in 
outreach to the private sector and, where applicable, to State 
and local government officials to remain apprised of changes in 
technology, emerging and evolving impediments to the 
implementation of particular E-Government goals, and to learn 
from success stories reagding such obstacles.
4. E-Records Management
    Federal agencies are producing millions of records each 
year and are struggling to manage them. National Archives and 
Records Administration [NARA], since 1997, has been working on 
the solution--the Electronic Records Archives [ERA] system. 
However barriers exist. E-records are not being used as 
business assets for the agencies therefore information is not 
being shared as much as it can be across government and within 
agencies. Also, agencies do not provide the tools and training 
that are needed. A successful ERA program will support 
preserving records over time and support sharing, utilizing and 
access to information across business domains and across space. 
NARA has been working on additional transfer guidance formats 
for permanent records to come to the archives. NARA has also 
issued guidance for digital photography, geospatial information 
systems, Web records and the second guidance in their 
enterprise-wide electronic-records management initiative.
5. Information Sharing
    An interagency effort taken into serious consideration by 
the subcommittee during second session was information sharing. 
The September attacks highlighted the increasing risk of 
terrorism on U.S. soil. Consequently, Federal, State and local 
governments recognized an urgent need to effectively unify 
their efforts to enhance homeland security by employing the 
unique contribution that each level of government can make on 
the basis of its capabilities and knowledge of its own 
environment.
    Efforts and progress achieved by agencies in developing 
secure, reliable, and interoperable information-sharing 
networks has aided in facilitating a comprehensive and real-
time information-sharing capability that is dependable and can 
respect privacy provisions. The Federal terrorists watch lists 
are important tools that are used by Federal agencies to help 
secure our Nation's borders. Nine Federal agencies, which 
before the establishment of DHS spanned five different cabinet-
level departments, currently maintain 12 terrorist and criminal 
watch lists. These lists are also used by at least 50 Federal, 
State, and local agencies.
    The technological constraints caused by different system 
architectures that impede the sharing of different agencies' 
watch lists illustrate the widespread lack of interoperability 
of many Federal Government information systems. Differences in 
agencies' cultures have been and remain one of the principal 
impediments to integrating and sharing information from watch 
lists and other information. With the threat environment that 
exists in the world today, it is increasingly important that 
cross-agency and intergovernmental collaboration is effective 
and efficient. Accordingly, the subcommittee continues to 
explore progress and obstacles to achieving the most successful 
implementation of a national strategy for information sharing 
related to law enforcement and homeland security.

                           Business Meetings

1. June 11, 2003, A Citizen's Guide on Using the Freedom of Information 
        Act and the Privacy Act of 1974 to Request Government Records
    This was a business meeting to mark-up the yearly update to 
the referenced Guide. The purpose of the business meeting was 
to provide subcommittee members the opportunity to review, 
comment and approve recommended updates to the Citizen's Guide 
to using FOIA and the Privacy Act and report the 2003 edition 
to the full committee.
2. November 19, 2003, National Archives and Records Administration 
        Efficiency Act of 2003
    This was a business meeting of the subcommittee to review 
and mark-up the National Archives and Records Administration 
Efficiency Act of 2003. The subcommittee approved H.R. 3478 on 
a voice vote and reported the bill to the full Government 
Reform Committee.

                                Hearings

1. ``Federal E-Government Initiatives: Are We Headed in the Right 
        Direction?'' March 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-6
    a. Summary.--This hearing provided an examination of the 
progress and impediments to timely implementation of the 
Federal E-Government Act of 2002, and the 24 initiatives 
specifically contained within the Act.
    b. Witnesses.--Mark A. Forman, Associate Director, 
Information Technology and Electronic Government, Office of 
Management and Budget; Joel C. Willemssen, Managing Director, 
Information Technology, U.S General Accounting Office; Patricia 
McGinnis, president and CEO, the Council for Excellence in 
Government; and Leonard M. Pomata, president, webMethods 
Government.
2. ``Data Mining: Current Applications and Future Possibilities,'' 
        March 25, 2003; Serial No. 108-11
    a. Summary.--This hearing established a baseline of 
information regarding the process of data mining and the 
associated technologies utilized to accomplish the analytical 
evaluation. Data mining facilitates the ability to sort through 
masses of information through database exploration, in an 
effort to identify patterns and trends of activity and 
behavior.
    b. Witnesses.--State Senator Paula Dockery, majority whip, 
Florida State Senate; Dr. Jen Que Louie, president, Nautilus 
System, Inc.; Mark A. Forman, Associate Director, Information 
Technology and Electronic Government, Office of Management and 
Budget; Gregory Kutz, Director, Financial Management & 
Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office; and Jeffrey Rosen, 
Director, Financial Management & Insurance, U.S. General 
Accounting Office.
3. ``Strengthening Oversight of DOD Business Systems Modernization,'' 
        joint hearing with the Subcommittee on National Security, 
        Emerging Threats and International Relations, March 31, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-44
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing examined and evaluated 
the effectiveness of DOD management and oversight of Defense 
Financial and Accounting Service [DFAS] information technology 
investments and business systems modernization.
    b. Witnesses.--Randolph Hite, Director, Information 
Technology Architecture and Systems Issues, General Accounting 
Office; Gregory Kutz, Director, Financial Management & 
Assurance, U.S. General Accounting Office; Darby Smith, 
Assistant Director, Financial Management and Assurance, General 
Accounting Office; Joanne Boutelle, Deputy Chief Financial 
Officer, Department of Defense; Thomas R. Bloom, Director, 
Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Department of Defense; 
and John R. Landon, Principle Director, C3ISR, Space and 
Information Technology Programs, Office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications and 
Intelligence.
4. ``Cyber Security: The Challenges Facing Our Nation in Critical 
        Infrastructure Protection,'' April 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-13
    a. Summary.--This hearing provided information and an 
examination of the current issues related to cyber security and 
critical infrastructure protection, both in the government and 
private sector. The subcommittee received testimony from GAO, 
OMB, university experts, department CIO's, and private sector 
coordinators.
    b. Witnesses.--Richard Clarke, former special advisor to 
the President for Cyber Security; Michael A. Vatis, director, 
Institute for Security Technology Studies at Dartmouth College, 
chairman, Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection; 
Mark A. Forman, Associate Director, Information Technology and 
Electronic Government, Office of Management and Budget; Robert 
F. Dacey, Director, Information Security Issues, U.S. General 
Accounting Office; Thomas Pike, Chief Information Officer, 
Department of Commerce; and Rhonda MacLean, senior vice 
president and director of corporate information security for 
Bank of America, sector coordinator for the Financial Services 
Industry Public/Private Partnership on Critical Infrastructure 
Protection and Homeland Security.
5. ``Federal Grants Management: A Progress Report on Streamlining and 
        Simplifying the Federal Grants Process,'' April 29, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-53
    a. Summary.--This hearing provided an examination of the 
process by which State and local governments, Universities, and 
non-profit organizations determine eligibility for Federal 
grants, how they apply, and how they receive grants once 
awarded. The hearing also focused on the E-Grants initiative of 
the Federal E-Government Act of 2002, and the key reforms 
intended to simplify and streamline the Federal grants process, 
including the progress and impediments to timely implementation 
of the Federal Financial Assistance Management Act of 1999.
    b. Witnesses.--Linda M. Springer, Controller, Office of 
Federal Financial Management, Office of Management and Budget; 
Dr. Ed Sontag, Assistant Secretary for Administration and 
Management, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Lead 
Agency for E-Grants Initiative and Public Law 106-107 
Compliance; Paul Posner, Managing Director, Federal Budget 
Government and Intergovernmental Relations, U.S. General 
Accounting Office; Karen M. Miller, president-elect, National 
Association of Counties, commissioner, Boone County, MO; Marvin 
G. Parnes, executive director of research administration, 
University of Michigan; and Kathy Crosby, director of workforce 
development, Goodwill Industries International, Inc.
6. ``Can the Use of Factual Data Analysis Strengthen National Security? 
        Part One,'' May 6, 2003; Serial No. 108-72
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the use of factual data 
analysis techniques, processes, and results in the context of 
several Federal programs being implemented by agencies 
responsible for law enforcement and homeland security.
    b. Witnesses.--Steve McCraw, Assistant Director, Office of 
Intelligence, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Admiral James L. 
Loy, Director, Transportation Security Administration; and Dr. 
Anthony Tether, Director, Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency.
7. ``The American Community Survey: The Challenges of Eliminating the 
        Long Form from the 2010 Census,'' May 13, 2003; Serial No. 108-
        97
    a. Summary.--This hearing further explored the 
implementation of the American Community Survey as a 
replacement, and the corresponding challenges to eliminating 
the Long Form from the 2010 Census program. A further goal of 
the hearing was to continue the information gathering process 
as Congress endeavors to make a final determination on full 
funding for the ACS in the fall.
    b. Witnesses.--Kathleen Cooper, Undersecretary for Economic 
Affairs, U.S Department of Commerce; C. Louis Kincannon, 
Director, U.S. Census Bureau; Thomas Reardon, executive 
director, Fulton County Partnership, McConnellsburg, PA; Dr. 
Joseph Salvo, director population division, NYC Department of 
City Planning; and Joan Naymark, Director Research and 
Planning, Target Corp., testifying on behalf of the U.S. 
Chamber of Commerce.
8. ``Can the Use of Factual Data Analysis Strengthen National Security? 
        Part Two,'' May 20, 2003; Serial No. 108-98
    a. Summary.--This hearing continued the discussion and 
examination of the techniques and processes of factual data 
analysis, specifically focusing on the issues related to 
Constitutional and privacy concerns. This is the third hearing 
on this subject matter, and witnesses at this hearing included 
representation from organizations who speak to the specific 
areas of focus.
    b. Witnesses.--Paul Rosenzweig, senior legal research 
fellow, Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, the Heritage 
Foundation; Barry Steinhardt, director, Technology and Liberty 
Program, American Civil Liberties Union; and John Cohen, co-
founder, president and CEO PSCom LLC, Inc.
9. ``Geospatial Information: A Progress Report on Improving Our 
        Nation's Map-Related Data Infrastructure,'' June 10, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-99
    a. Summary.--This hearing explored the progress being made 
by the Federal Government to consolidate and improve 
utilization of the masses of geospatial data being collected by 
departments and agencies across the Federal Government and by 
State and local governments. In most cases, information is 
collected in different formats and standards for one specific 
mission, with little attention to subsequent intergovernmental 
data sharing. This produces wasteful redundancies and will be 
examined in the context of the Geospatial One-Stop Initiative, 
one of the Federal Government E-Government projects.
    b. Witnesses.-- Mark A. Forman, Associate Director, 
Information Technology and Electronic Government, Office of 
Management and Budget; Scott J. Cameron, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary, Performance and Management, Department of Interior, 
chairman, Geospatial One-Stop Board of Directors; Linda D. 
Koontz, Director, Information Management, U.S. General 
Accounting Office; Susan W. Kalweit, Chairman, Interagency 
Geospatial Preparedness Team, FEMA [DHS], Former Deputy Chief, 
NIMA North America and Homeland Security Division; Gene Trobia, 
president, National States Geographic Information Council 
[NSGIC]; Jack Dangermond, president and founder, ESRI, Inc.; 
and G. Michael Ritchie, P.E., L.S., C.P., president, Management 
Association for Private Photogrammetric Surveyors [MAPPS].
10. ``Cyber Security: The Status of Information Security and the 
        Effects of the Federal Information Security Management Act 
        [FISMA] at Federal Agencies,'' June 24, 2003; Serial No. 108-
        100
    a. Summary.--This hearing explored the actions undertaken 
by Federal agencies to make their information networks secure 
and to comply with the requirements of the Federal Information 
Security Management Act [FISMA] that was part of the E-
Government Act of 2002. The results of the May 2003 Government 
Information Security Reform Act [GISRA] were discussed, as well 
as the measures taken to assure the Congress and the American 
people that appropriate steps are being taken under GISRA, and 
now FISMA. Witnesses include GAO, OMB and representatives of 
various agencies.
    b. Witnesses.--Mark A. Forman, Associate Director, 
Information Technology and Electronic Government, Office of 
Management and Budget; Robert F. Dacey, Director, Information 
Security Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; Johnnie E. 
Frazier, Inspector General Department of Commerce; Robert W. 
Cobb, Inspector General National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; Scott Charbo, Chief Information Officer, 
Department of Agriculture; Drew Ladner, Chief Information 
Officer, Department of Treasury; and Bruce Morrison, Acting 
Chief Information Officer, Department of State.
11. ``Federal Electronic Records Management: What is the Plan? What is 
        our Progress?'' July 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-132
    a. Summary.--This hearing reviewed the efforts and progress 
that Federal agencies have made in developing and executing 
strategies for electronic records management and archiving. The 
National Archives and Records Administration has the 
responsibility to provide guidance and oversight to Federal 
agencies regarding their records management strategies. This 
issue is examined in that context as well as the Federal 
Records Act and the Electronic Records Management initiative of 
the E-Government Act of 2002.
    b. Witnesses.--John W. Carlin, Archivist of the United 
States, National Archives and Records Administration; L. 
Reynolds Cahoon, Chief Information Officer, NARA; Harriet 
Riofrio, eRecords Management Policy and Program Lead, U.S. 
Department of Defense; Linda Koontz, Director, Information 
Management Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; Timothy 
Sprehe, president, Sprehe Information Management Associates; 
Robert F. Nawrocki, CRM, Director, Records Management and 
Imaging Services Division, Library of Virginia; Caryn Wojcik, 
State Government Records Management, Michigan; and Dr. Richard 
Lysakowski, director, Collaborative Electronic Notebook Systems 
Association [CENSA].
12. ``Federal Information Systems Integration and Consolidation: 
        Maximizing Technology Investment Across Agency Boundaries,'' 
        July 15, 2003; Serial No. 108-122
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the progress being made 
by the Federal Government to modernize agency information 
technology management around so-called common ``lines of 
business'' that cross agency boundaries. As a result of Federal 
agencies reporting more thoroughly their business cases for IT 
investment and an OMB requirement that any new IT spending 
definitively demonstrate conformity to the principles of the 
Federal Enterprise Architecture initiative, the Federal 
Government has a significant new opportunity to identify 
redundancies ripe for integration and consolidation.
    b. Witnesses.--Mark A. Forman, Administrator of E-
Government and Information Technology, Office of Management and 
Budget; Craig A. Conway, president and chief executive officer, 
PeopleSoft, Inc.; Kevin Fitzgerald; senior vice president, 
Oracle Corp.; S. Daniel Johnson, executive vice president, 
BearingPoint, Inc.; and Paul M. Cofoni, president, Federal 
Sector, Computer Sciences Corp.
13. ``Advancements in Smart Card and Biometric Technology,'' September 
        9, 2003; Serial No. 108-133
    a. Summary.--This hearing sought to assess the Federal 
Government's progress in the implementation of smart card 
technology and to further explore the current and future use of 
biometrics. Smart Card technology can apply to physical 
security, computer security, information storage and other 
uses. This hearing was divided into two panels. The first one 
discussed the progress made in the utilization of smart card 
technology for identity management and authentication. The 
second panel discussed the utilization of biometrics in tandem 
as an additional identification and authentication tool.
    b. Witnesses.--Joel Willemssen, Managing Director of IT 
Management, General Accounting Office; Sandy Bates, 
Commissioner of Federal Technology Services, General Services 
Administration; Ken C. Scheflen, Director, Defense Manpower 
Data Center, U.S. Department of Defense; Benjamin Wu, Deputy 
Undersecretary of Commerce for Technology, U.S. Department of 
Commerce; Keith Rhodes, Chief Technologist, General Accounting 
Office; Christer Bergman, CEO, Precise Biometrics; and Daniel 
Turissini, president, Operational Research Consultants, Inc.
14. ``Worm and Virus Defense: How Can We Protect the Nation's Computers 
        from These Serious Threats?'' September 10, 2003; Serial No. 
        108--123
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the issue of patch 
management of computer information systems along with 
associated security issues as a result of the recent increase 
in the propagation of computer worms and viruses, such as 
Blaster and SoBig. The increase in the sheer numbers of 
computers connected to the Internet has dramatically enhanced 
the impact produced by vulnerabilities in software programs and 
the potential threat to the stability of the Internet and U.S. 
commerce.
    b. Witnesses.--Robert Dacey, Director, IT Security, General 
Accounting Office; Richard Pethia, Director, CERT Coordination 
Center; Lawrence Hale, Director, FedCIRC, Department of 
Homeland Security; Norman Lorentz, Acting Administrator, 
Electronic Government and Information Technology, Office of 
Management and Budget; John Malcolm, Deputy Assistant Attorney 
General, Criminal Division, Department of Justice; Gerhard 
Eschelbeck, chief technology officer and vice president of 
engineering, Qualys, Inc.; Christopher Wysopal, co- founder, 
Organization for Internet Safety and director of research and 
development, @stake, Inc.; and Ken Silva, vice president, 
operations and infrastructure, VeriSign, Inc.
15. ``Exploring Common Criteria: Can it Assure that the Federal 
        Government Gets Needed Security in Software?'' September 17, 
        2003; Serial No. 108-126
    a. Summary.--This hearing considered the methods by which 
the Federal Government attempts to have assurance that security 
features in software acquired for use by agencies of the 
Federal Government will function as intended and that 
information systems can actually be secured. The hearing will 
focus attention on the certification process required for 
software products acquired by the Department of Defense known 
as Common Criteria, and whether that process is working or 
needs to be modified, as well as its potential applicability to 
other products.
    b. Witnesses.--Edward A. Roback, Chief, Computer Security 
Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 
Department of Commerce; Michael G. Fleming, Chief, Information 
Assurance Solutions Group, Information Assurance Directorate, 
National Security Agency; Robert G. Gorrie, Deputy Director, 
Defense-wide Information Assurance Program, Department of 
Defense; J. David Thompson, director, Security Evaluation 
Laboratory, Cygnacom Solutions; Mary Anne Davidson, chief 
security officer, Server Technology Platforms, Oracle; Chris 
Klaus, chief technology officer, Internet Security Systems, 
Inc.; and Eugene Spafford, professor and director, Center for 
Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security, 
Purdue University.
16. ``Achieving E-Government Efficiencies at the Office of Personnel 
        Management,'' September 23, 2003; Serial No. 108-134
    a. Summary.--This hearing focused on the progress being 
made by the Federal Government to implement those key 
initiatives intended to improve Federal employee recruitment, 
employee training, management of payroll, management of 
employee data, and employee security clearance processes. These 
employee-related improvements represent 5 of the 24 major E-
Government initiatives being implemented across the Federal 
Government consistent with the E-Government Act of 2002 and the 
President's management agenda.
    b. Witnesses.--Kay Coles James, Director, Office of 
Personnel Management; Linda D. Koontz, Director, Information 
Management, U.S. General Accounting Office; and Norman Enger, 
E-Government Project Director, Office of Personnel Management.
17. ``Security of Industrial Control Systems in Our Nation's Critical 
        Infrastructure,'' closed hearing, October 1, 2003, will not be 
        printed
    a. Summary.--This hearing explored computer security issues 
and challenges presented by industrial control systems 
(commonly referred to as SCADA systems) that are used as 
elements of the Nation's critical infrastructure, including the 
electric power grid, oil and gas pipelines, chemical plants, 
telecommunications networks, and water supply systems, to name 
a few. This hearing gathered information about the operation of 
these systems and the threats posed by the vulnerabilities 
related to the computer systems that support these critical 
functions.
    b. Witnesses.--Robert Dacey, Director, IT Security, General 
Accounting Office; Denise Swink, Acting Director, Energy 
Assurance Office, Department of Energy; Paul Skare, manager, 
SCADA Development, Energy Management and Information Systems 
Division, Seimens Power Transmission & Distribution, Inc.; Eric 
J. Byers, professor of engineering, British Columbia Institute 
of Technology; Al Rivero, chairman of the API Workgroup on 
SCADA Security, Association of Oil Pipelines and American 
Petroleum Institute; Terry Boss, senior vice president, safety, 
operations and environment, Interstate Natural Gas Association 
of America; Melton A. Huey, department head, gas supply 
operations, Washington Gas; Dejan J. Sobajic, director, grid 
reliability and power markets, Electric Power Research 
Institute; and Lynn P. Constantini, chief information officer, 
North American Electricity Reliability Council.
18. ``The IT Roadmap: An Overview of Homeland Security's Enterprise 
        Architecture,'' October 8, 2003; Serial No. 108-129
    a. Summary.--This hearing produced an in-depth review of 
the first-ever U.S. Department of Homeland Security [DHS] 
Enterprise Architecture, which was scheduled for public release 
in Version 1 concurrent with this oversight hearing. In 
addition to the overview of the DHS EA, the hearing further 
examined how the DHS ``roadmap'' is aligned with the broader 
Federal Enterprise Architecture and E-Government strategy.
    b. Witnesses.--Steven I. Cooper, Chief Information Officer, 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security; and Karen S. Evans, 
Administrator of E-Government and Information Technology, 
Office of Management and Budget.
19. ``First Responder Interoperability: Can You Hear Me Now?'' Joint 
        hearing with the Subcommittee on National Security, Emerging 
        Threats and International Relations, November 6, 2003; Serial 
        No. 108-139
    a. Summary.--This oversight hearing examined the challenges 
of communications interoperability for first responders along 
with the programs and policies of the Federal Government in 
responding to these critical challenges. The hearing focused on 
the E-Government initiative SAFECOM, the Wireless Public Safety 
Interoperable Communications Program at the Department of 
Homeland Security, and the role of the Federal Communications 
Commission in regulating State and local first responder 
spectrum allocation and licensing.
    b. Witnesses.--William O. Jenkins, Jr., Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; 
Marilyn Ward, chairman, National Public Safety 
Telecommunications Council [NPSTC], manager, Public Safety 
Communications Division, Orange County, FL; Aldona Valicenti, 
National Association of State Chief Information Officers, 
NASCIO Member to PSWN/SAFECOM, Chief Information Officer, State 
of Kentucky; Marilyn Praisner, councilwoman, Montgomery County, 
MD, Chair, Telecommunity, Chair, Technology Committee, National 
Association of Counties, PSWN Executive Board, CAPWIN Executive 
Board; and George Ake, program director, Capital Wireless 
Integrated Network [CAPWIN].
20. ``Identify, Disrupt and Dismantle: Coordinating the Government's 
        Attack on Terrorist Financing,'' joint field hearing with the 
        Subcommittee on Government Efficiency and Financial Management, 
        December 15, 2003; Serial No. 108-140
    a. Summary.--This joint hearing was conducted at the Tampa 
Port Authority in Tampa, FL and examined the Federal 
Government's effort to combat money laundering and terrorist 
financing activities. The hearing examined the coordinated 
effort between various Federal agencies of jurisdiction, 
including law enforcement, regulatory agencies, State and local 
authorities, and private sector financial institutions. The 
hearing further examined the use of information technology in 
the achievement of efforts to identify and dismantle financing 
schemes that support terrorist activities.
    Additionally, the subcommittee has requested and been a co-
requestor on a series of GAO reports directly related to the 
work program as established by Chairman Putnam.
    Last, in an effort to become more educated and converse 
with experts, Chairman Putnam and the subcommittee staff have 
embarked on a couple of field trips to gather information and 
share ideas with industry and academic experts, as well as 
government officials.
    The subcommittee visited Raymond James Financial in St. 
Petersburg, FL on May 28th. The subcommittee visited Silicon 
Valley and Redmond, WA from August 12-15, and visited with 12 
technology companies during that trip. On December 2-3, 
subcommittee staff attended and participated in the National 
Cyber Security Summit in Santa Clara, CA.
    b. Witnesses.--Carl Whitehead, Special Agent in Charge, 
Tampa Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Marcy M. 
Forman, Deputy Assistant Director, Financial Investigations 
Division, Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 
Department of Homeland Security; Bruce A. Townsend, Deputy 
Assistant Director, Office of Investigations, U.S. Secret 
Service, George Glass, Director of the Office of Terrorism 
Finance and Sanctions Policy, Department of State; and Lee 
Jeffrey Ross, Jr., Senior Advisor, Executive Office for 
Terrorist Financing & Financial Crimes, U.S Department of the 
Treasury.
21. ``Federal Information Technology Investment Management, Strategic 
        Planning, and Performance Management: $60 Billion Reasons 
        Why,'' March 3, 2004; Serial No. 108-164
    a. Summary.--This hearing was a continuation of the 
subcommittee's congressional oversight into the Federal 
Government's spending on information technology [IT]. The 
subcommittee focused on the President's proposed fiscal year 
2005 IT spending request of nearly $60 billion as well as on 
investment management, strategic planning, and performance 
measurement tools. Specifically, the subcommittee reviewed the 
IT management progress arising from the Clinger-Cohen Act of 
1996, the creation of a Federal Enterprise Architecture, OMB 
review of agency IT business cases, effects of E-Government 
initiatives, and consolidation of duplicative systems. The 
subcommittee also reviewed the results of a GAO audit on the 
use of certain IT strategic planning and performance 
measurement practices. Finally, the subcommittee examined steps 
taken by OMB in preparing its fiscal year 2005 budget 
submission to enhance the security of Federal information 
networks and protect the information they contain in accordance 
with the Federal Information Security Management Act [FISMA].
    b. Witnesses.--Clay Johnson III, Deputy Director for 
Management, Office of Management and Budget; Karen S. Evans, 
Administrator of E-Government and Information Technology, 
Office of Management and Budget; and David A. Powner, Director, 
Information Technology Management Issues, U.S. General 
Accounting Office.
22. ``Phosphogypsum: Should We Just Let It Go To Waste? Parts 1 & 2,'' 
        field hearing in Bartow, FL, March 15, 2004; Serial No. 108-191
    a. Summary.--These hearings provided an examination of the 
purported risks associated with the use of phosphogypsum, as 
well as its environmentally safe potential uses. The first 
hearing focused on the scientific research conducted and the 
results found by various entities supporting a position that 
phosphogypsum is not a ``waste'' as the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency has determined. Conclusive evidence 
challenging the claims that use of the product is harmful and 
suggestions for specific applications were reviewed. The 
witnesses spoke on what uses that phosphogypsum can serve to 
industry, and the potential benefits to public taxpayers. The 
second hearing examined the risks associated with phosphogypsum 
as ruled by the U.S. EPA and the possible danger that continues 
to grow as 30 million new tons of phosphogypsum accumulate in 
the stacks located in central Florida every year.
    b. Witnesses.--G. Michael Lloyd, Jr. Research Director, 
Chemical Processing, Florida Institute of Phosphate Research; 
Dr. Malcolm E. Sumner, agricultural and environmental 
consultant, Regents' professor emeritus, University of Georgia; 
Dr. Doug Chambers, executive vice president, Director of 
Radioactivity and Risk Studies, SENES Consultants Limited; Dr. 
Chih-Shin Shieh, Environmental Consultant, CS Environmental 
Solutions; Elizabeth Cotsworth, Director of Office of Radiation 
and Indoor Air, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency; Harlan Keaton, Environmental Administrator, 
Bureau of Radiation Control, Florida Department of Health; and 
Dick Eckenrod, Executive Director, Tampa Bay Estuary.
23. ``Information Security in the Federal Government: One Year Into the 
        Federal Information Security Management Act,'' March 16, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-167
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to explore the 
actions agencies are undertaking to make their information 
systems secure, and to comply with the Federal Information 
Security Management Act [FISMA]. The results of the Office of 
Management and Budget's March 2004 FISMA report were discussed, 
and the subcommittee examined the current state of information 
security in the Federal Government.
    b. Witnesses.--Robert F. Dacey, Director, Information 
Security Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; Karen Evans, 
Administrator, E-Government and Information Technology, Office 
of Management and Budget; Benjamin Wu, Deputy Under Secretary 
for Technology, Department of Commerce; Paul Corts, Assistant 
Attorney General for Administration, Department of Justice; 
Jeffrey Rush, Jr., Inspector General, Department of the 
Treasury; Ellis W. Merschoff, Chief Information Officer, 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission; and Kerry Weems, Acting 
Assistant Secretary for Budget, Technology and Finance, 
Department of Health and Human Services.
24. ``Electronic Government: A Progress Report on the Successes and 
        Challenges of Government-wide Information Technology 
        Solutions,'' March 24, 2004; Serial No. 108-195
    a. Summary.--This hearing was a continuation of the 
subcommittee's congressional oversight into the Federal 
Government's efforts to implement the 25 Quicksilver E-
Government initiatives of the President's management agenda. 
The subcommittee examined the progress, success factors and 
continuing hurdles facing six of the more challenging 
initiatives: E-Authentication, E-Travel, E-Grants, E-
Rulemaking, E-Payroll, and Recruitment One-Stop.
    b. Witnesses.--Karen S. Evans, Administrator of E-
Government and Information Technology, Office of Management and 
Budget; Linda Koontz, Director, Information Management, U.S. 
General Accounting Office; Martin Wagner, Associate 
Administrator, Office of Government-wide Policy, U.S. General 
Services Administration; M.J. Jameson, Associate Administrator, 
Office of Citizen Services and Communication, U.S. General 
Services Administration; Norman Enger, Director, E-Government, 
Office of Personnel Management; Kim Nelson, Chief Information 
Officer, Environmental Protection Agency; and George Strawn, 
Chief Information Officer, Division of Grants and Agreements, 
National Science Foundation.
25. ``Telecommunications and SCADA: Secure Links or Open Portals to the 
        Security of Our Nation's Critical Infrastructure?'' March 30, 
        2004; Serial No. 108-196
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to explore 
computer security issues presented by communications used by 
industrial controls systems (commonly referred to as SCADA 
systems) that are present in much of the Nation's critical 
infrastructure, including the electrical power grid, pipelines, 
chemical plants, and water systems. The hearing served as an 
overall introduction to SCADA systems and the nature of the 
threat facing them, and provided insight on the 
telecommunications that connect SCADA devices to their control 
and monitoring networks.
    b. Witnesses.--Robert F. Dacey, Director, Information 
Security Issues, U.S. General Accounting Office; James F. 
McDonnell, Director, Protective Security Division, Department 
of Homeland Security; Joseph Weiss, executive consultant, KEMA, 
Inc.; Dan Verton, senior writer, ComputerWorld Magazine; Gerald 
S. Freese, director of enterprise information security, 
American Electric Power; and Jeffrey H. Katz, enterprise IT 
consultant, PSEG Services Corp.
26. ``Protecting Our Nation's Cyber Space: Educational Awareness for 
        the Cyber Citizen,'' April 21, 2004; Serial No. 108-209
    a. Summary.--While businesses, educational institutions, 
and home users enjoy the benefits of using the Internet, they 
are not always adequately informed about the potential dangers 
that their computer systems face if left vulnerable and 
unprotected. Both the Federal Trade Commission and Department 
of Homeland Security have public awareness campaigns to educate 
home users, small businesses, and corporations on the potential 
threats in cyber space and solutions to secure systems against 
those threats. In addition, trade associations and non-profits 
are working to educate their members, the corporate community, 
and the public on this important issue. This hearing provided 
an opportunity to evaluate the status of these efforts, their 
effectiveness, and the challenges to ensuring that overall 
computer security is improved in a meaningful way for the 
future.
    b. Witnesses.--Orson Swindle, Commissioner, Federal Trade 
Commission; Amit Yoran, Director, National Cyber Security 
Division, Department of Homeland Security; Larry Clinton, chief 
operating officer, Internet Security Alliance; Andrew Howell, 
vice president, Homeland Security, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; 
Rodney Petersen, security task force coordinator, EDUCAUSE; and 
Douglas Sabo, member, Board of Directors, National Cyber 
Security Alliance.
27. ``Federal Enterprise Architecture: A Blueprint for Improved Federal 
        IT Investment Management and Cross-Agency Collabora-tion and 
        Information Sharing,'' May 19, 2004; Serial No. 108-227
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to investigate 
the progress of the Office of Management and Budget and the 
Federal agencies to develop and implement the Federal 
Enterprise Architecture. The subcommittee appraised the 
progress of Federal efforts, success factors, and continuing 
hurdles facing various agencies and departments in integrating 
their individual agency enterprise architecture with the 
Federal Enterprise Architecture initiative. The results of a 
2003 Government Accountability Office report on the Federal 
agencies' development and use of enterprise architectures were 
also explored.
    b. Witnesses.--Karen S. Evans, Administrator of E-
Government and Information Technology, Office of Management and 
Budget; Randolph C. Hite, Director, Information Technology 
Architecture and Systems, U.S. General Accounting Office; 
Daniel Matthews, Chief Information Officer, Department of 
Transportation; Kim Nelson, Chief Information Officer, 
Environmental Protection Agency; David McClure, vice president 
for E-Government, Council for Excellence in Government; 
Venkatapathi Puvvada, Unisys, Chair, Enterprise Architecture 
Shared Interest Group, Industry Advisory Council; Norman E. 
Lorentz, senior vice president, DigitalNet; and Raymond B. 
Wells, Ph.D., Chief Technology Officer, IBM Federal, vice 
president, Strategic Transformations for IBM Software Group, 
Application Integration & Middleware Division [AIM], IBM Corp.
28. ``Who Might be Lurking at Your Cyber Front Door? Is Your System 
        Really Secure? Strategies and Technologies to Prevent, Detect 
        and Respond to the Growing Threat of Network Vulnerabilities,'' 
        June 2, 2004; Serial No. 108-232
    a. Summary.--At this hearing, the subcommittee examined the 
challenges in managing information system vulnerabilities at 
the enterprise level, including prevention, detection and 
response. The subcommittee also looked at strategies to assess 
and reduce the risks created by these vulnerabilities, such as 
configuration and patch management; the pace of the Federal 
Government's and the private sector's employment of these 
strategies in securing their own systems; and how automated 
tools should be employed in applying these strategies.
    b. Witnesses.--Karen Evans, Administrator, E-Government and 
Information Technology, Office of Management and Budget, Robert 
Dacey, Director, Information Security Issues, U.S. General 
Accounting Office; Amit Yoran, Director, National Cyber 
Security Division, Department of Homeland Security; Dawn 
Meyerriecks, Chief Technology Officer, Defense Information 
Systems Agency, Department of Defense; Daniel Mehan, Assistant 
Administrator for Information Services and Chief Information 
Officer, Federal Aviation Administration; Dubhe Beinhorn, vice 
president, Juniper Federal Systems; Scott Culp, senior security 
strategist, Microsoft Corp.; Louis Rosenthal, executive vice 
president, ABN AMRO Services Co., Inc.; Marc Maiffret, chief 
hacking officer, eEye Digital Security; and Steve Solomon, 
chief executive officer, Citadel Security Software, Inc.
29. ``Locking Your Cyber Front Door--The Challenges Facing Home Users 
        and Small Businesses,'' June 16, 2004; Serial No. 108-234
    a. Summary.--At this hearing, the subcommittee examined the 
challenges that home users and small businesses face in 
protecting their computers that are connected to the Internet, 
including threats from phishing, spyware, worms, viruses, etc. 
Furthermore, the subcommittee explored the responsibilities of 
hardware and software vendors in ensuring that their products 
are more secure out of the box, with particular emphasis on the 
security of operating systems, and Internet service provider's 
role in helping to educate and protect their subscribers.
    b. Witnesses.--Amit Yoran, Director, National Cyber 
Security Division, Department of Homeland Security; J. Howard 
Beales III, Director, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal 
Trade Commission; Cheryl A. Mills, Associate Administrator, 
Entrepreneurial Development, Small Business Administration; Ed 
Roback, Chief, Computer Security Division, National Institute 
of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce; Phil 
Reitinger, senior security strategist, Microsoft Corp.; Dr. 
Avie Tevanian, Jr., Ph.D., chief software technology officer, 
Apple Computer; Don Frischmann, senior vice president, Symantec 
Corp., member, National Cyber Security Alliance; Thomas Dailey, 
Chair and president, U.S. Internet Service Provider 
Association, general counsel Verizon Online Services; and Paul 
Kurtz, executive director, Cyber Security Industry Alliance.
30. ``Geospatial Information: Are We Headed in the Right Direction or 
        Are We Lost?'' June 23, 2004; Serial No. 108-239
    a. Summary.--The hearing was a follow up to the 
subcommittee oversight hearing held on June 10, 2003. The 
purpose of the hearing was to examine the progress made by the 
Federal Government to consolidate and improve utilization of 
geospatial data collected across the Federal Government and by 
State and local governments. Specifically, the subcommittee 
explored the status of the Geospatial One-Stop initiative, one 
of the President's key E-Government projects intended to 
simplify the process of locating, accessing, sharing and 
integrating geospatial information in a timely and efficient 
manner. The results of a General Accounting Office study on 
efforts to coordinate Federal geospatial investments across 
agencies and with State and local governments were also 
discussed. Finally, the subcommittee explored government and 
industry efforts to develop standards for the collection and 
use of geospatial information to facilitate data sharing.
    b. Witnesses.--Karen S. Evans, Administrator of E-
Government and Information Technology, Office of Management and 
Budget; Linda D. Koontz, Director, Information Management, U.S. 
General Accounting Office; Scott J. Cameron, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for Performance and Management, U.S. Department of 
the Interior; William Allder, Jr., Director, Office of 
Strategic Transformation, National Geospatial-Intelligence 
Agency; Zsolt Nagy, president-elect, National States Geographic 
Information Council [NSGIC], geographic information 
coordinator, North Carolina Department of Environment and 
Natural Resources; Frederic W. Corle II, president, Spatial 
Technologies Industry Association; John M. Palatiello, 
executive director, Management Association for Private 
Photogrammetric Surveyors; David Schell, president & CEO of the 
Open GIS Consortium, executive director, Open GIS Project; and 
David J. Cowen, Ph.D., Chair, Mapping Science Committee, 
National Research Council, Chair, Department of Geography, 
University of South Carolina.
31. ``Defining Federal Information Technology Research and Development: 
        Who? Where? What? Why? and How Much?'' July 7, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-251
    a. Summary.--This hearing provided an examination of the 
current strategic plan and efforts related to Federal funding 
for and leveraging of information technology [IT] research and 
development [R&D;] across Federal agencies, academia and the 
private sector. The subcommittee knew it was important to 
recognize collaborative efforts across programs, agencies, and 
stress the importance of leveraging efforts with academia and 
the private sector (i.e. universities and private companies). 
Also the subcommittee wanted assurance that Federal agencies 
are not pursuing conflicting R&D; goals. Because investments in 
science and technology have resulted in unparalleled economic 
growth, as well as the standard of living and quality of life, 
this hearing emphasized the importance of supporting the 
efforts of IT R&D.; This Nation needs a strong strategic plan to 
ensure that IT R&D; is being used to maximize improvement in 
mission goals and performance because it is essential to meet 
vital Federal needs and sustain U.S. global leadership in 
science and in the engineering of information technology.
    b. Witnesses.--Dr. David Nelson, Director, National 
Coordination Office for Information Technology, Research and 
Development (Executive Office of the President); Dr. Peter 
Freeman, Co-Chair of Interagency Working Group and Assistant 
Director, Computer and Information Science and Engineering 
Directorate, National Science Foundation; Dr. Hratch Semerjian, 
Acting Director, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology; Dr. C. Edward Oliver, Associate Director, Office of 
Advanced Scientific Computing Research, U.S. Department of 
Energy; Dr. Donna Fossum, manager of RaDiUS Project, RAND 
Corp.; Dr. Edward Lazowska, co-chair of President's Information 
Technology Advisory Committee and (Bill & Melinda Gates) Chair 
in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 
University of Washington; Dr. William Scherlis, professor, 
School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon, (member of CMU's 
International Software Research Institute); and Dr. Stephen 
Squires, chief science officer, vice president, Hewlett-
Packard.
32. ``Facilitating an Enhanced Information Sharing Network That Links 
        Law Enforcement and Homeland Security for Federal, State, and 
        Local Governments,'' July 13, 2004; Serial No. 108-254
    a. Summary.--This hearing addressed the initiatives and 
strategies being implemented to enhance information sharing 
capabilities between Federal, State and local law enforcement 
agencies and homeland security activities that are central to 
producing comprehensive and practical approaches and solutions 
to combating threats. During this hearing, the subcommittee 
examined the efforts and progress achieved in developing 
secure, reliable, and interoperable information-sharing 
networks that facilitate a comprehensive and real-time 
information-sharing capability that is dependable and that 
respects privacy provisions undertaken by DHS, Terrorist Threat 
Integration Center, FBI, Regional Information Security Systems, 
Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and local DC government. 
The subcommittee sought a better understanding of how improved 
collaboration, cooperation, and communications will enhance 
improved two-way flow of information between appropriate 
Federal, State and local law enforcement entities.
    b. Witnesses.--Lieutenant General Patrick Hughes, Assistant 
Secretary for Information Analysis, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Russell Travers, Deputy Director & Associate Director 
for Defense Issues, Terrorist Threat Integration Center; Willie 
Hulon, Deputy Assistant Director, Counterterrorism Division, 
Federal Bureau of Investigation; Gerard Lynch, chairman, 
Regional Information Security Systems Policy Board; Mark Zadra, 
chief of investigations, Florida Department of Law Enforcement; 
and Suzanne Peck, chief technology officer, Government of the 
District of Columbia.
33. ``Health Informatics: What is the Prescription for Success in 
        Intergovernmental Information Sharing and Emergency Response?'' 
        July 14, 2004; Serial No. 108-256
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to examine the 
state of health information technology and intergovernmental 
information sharing related to public health issues and 
emergency response at the clinical care delivery, public 
health, and consumer health levels, as well as among 
governmental entities at the Federal, State, and local levels. 
The subcommittee also focused on efforts to develop standards 
for the collection and use of health information to facilitate 
information sharing, as well as the efforts of the Federal 
Government in the Consolidated Health Informatics e-government 
initiative and the Public Health Information Network 
administered by the Centers for Disease Control.
    b. Witnesses.--Newt Gingrich, Ph.D., former Speaker of the 
U.S. House of Representatives, the Gingrich Group; Karen S. 
Evans, Administrator of E-Government and Information 
Technology, Office of Management and Budget; David A. Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Claire V. Broome, M.D., 
Senior Advisor to the Director for Integrated Health 
Information Systems, Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Seth 
Foldy, M.D., former Chair, Information Technology Committee, 
National Association of County and City Health Officials 
[NACCHO], former Health Commissioner, city of Milwaukee, 
associate clinical professor, family and community medicine, 
Medical College of Wisconsin; Richard S. Weisman, Pharm.D., 
ABAT, coordinator, Weapons of Mass Destruction Response 
Program, Jackson Memorial Medical Center, director, Florida 
Poison Information Center/Miami, research associate professor, 
Pediatrics, UM/Jackson Memorial Hospital; and Gordon Aoyagi, 
fire administrator, Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service.
34. ``The Science of Voting Machine Technology: Accuracy, Reliability 
        and Security,'' July 20, 2004; Serial No. 108-258
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the subject of 
electronic voting systems access, utilization and the 
associated issues of reliability, ease of use, efficiency, 
accuracy and security. The overriding goal of voting systems is 
to produce election results that are broadly accepted as 
representing the will of the people. This subcommittee 
addressed the issues of the maturity of the technology 
available to the market today, as well as the functional 
capabilities of access for the disabled community, as well as 
the ability to conduct audits should that be necessary.
    b. Witnesses.--Randolph Hite, Director, Information 
Technology Architecture and Systems, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Dr. Hratch Semerjian, Acting Director, 
National Institute of Standards and Technology; Terry Jarrett, 
general counsel, Secretary of State, State of Missouri; Dr. 
Aviel Rubin, technical director, Information Security 
Institute, Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins 
University; Dr. Michael Shamos, professor, Carnegie Mellon 
Director, Universal Library, co-director, Institute for e-
Commerce; Jim Adler, founder and CEO, VoteHere, Inc.; and 
Sanford J. Morganstein, president and founder, Populex Corp.
35. ``Where's the CIO? The Role, Responsibility and Challenge for 
        Federal Chief Information Officers in IT Investment Oversight 
        and Information Management,'' July 21, 2004; Serial No. 108-260
    a. Summary.--In an increasingly networked world with 
millions of computing devices, information technology is at the 
core of the successful delivery of government services. The 
Clinger-Cohen Act established the position of Chief Information 
Officer [CIO] as the leader of the management of information 
technology in Federal agencies. Federal agencies cannot operate 
efficiently and effectively without solid leadership from a CIO 
that has the support of the very top levels of the agency. This 
hearing gave the subcommittee members an opportunity to hear 
from the administration's information technology leadership, 
former CIOs, and current CIOs about this complex issue.
    b. Witnesses.--Clay Johnson III, Deputy Director for 
Management, Office of Management and Budget; Karen Evans, 
Administrator, Office of E-Government and Information 
Technology, Office of Management and Budget; David Powner, 
Director, Information Technology Management Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Paul Brubaker, executive vice 
president and chief marketing officer, SI International; James 
Flyzik, partner, Guerra, Kiviat, Flyzik & Associates; Debra 
Stouffer, vice president of strategic consulting services, 
DigitalNet; Kimberly Nelson, Assistant Administrator for 
Environmental Information and Chief Information Officer, 
Environmental Protection Agency; Steven Cooper, Chief 
Information Officer, Department of Homeland Security; Vance 
Hitch, Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Information Resources 
Management and Chief Information Officer, U.S. Department of 
Justice; and Ira Hobbs, Deputy Assistant Secretary for 
Information Systems and Chief Information Officer, Department 
of the Treasury.
36. ``Project SAFECOM: More Time, More Money, More Communication? What 
        Progress Have We Made in Achieving Interoperable Communication 
        Between Local, State and Federal First Responders?'' September 
        8, 2004; Serial No. 108-264
    a. Summary.--The purpose of this hearing was to explore the 
status and progress of efforts to achieve interoperability 
among Federal, State, and local first responders as well as 
determining the current state of interoperability among first 
responders according to State and local emergency response 
personnel. Specifically, the subcommittee reviewed the progress 
of Project SAFECOM, one of the President's 25 Quicksilver e-
Government initiatives, in developing policies and regulations 
that encourage State and local agencies to work together to 
promote and establish first responder interoperability.
    b. Witnesses.--William O. Jenkins, Jr., Director, Homeland 
Security and Justice Issues, U.S. Governmental Accountability 
Office; David Boyd, Ph.D., SAFECOM Program Manager, Wireless 
Public Safety Interoperable Communications Program, Science and 
Technology Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Timothy L. Beres, Associate Director, State and Local Program 
Management Division, Office of State and Local Government 
Coordination and Preparedness, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; John Muleta, Chief, Wireless Bureau, Federal 
Communications Commission; Maureen T. Lischke, Chief 
Information Officer, National Guard Bureau; Vincent R. Stile, 
past president, Association of Public-Safety Communications 
Officials, International [APCO] Police Radio Communications 
Systems director, Suffolk, NY; Michael P. Neuhard, fire chief, 
Fairfax County Fire & Rescue Department; and Tom Worden, chief, 
Telecommunications Branch, California Office of Emergency 
Services.
37. ``Lessons Learned from the 2004 Overseas Census Test,'' September 
        14, 2004; Serial No. 108-266
    a. Summary.--This hearing examined the results of the test 
and reviewed the GAO's report titled, ``2010 Census: Counting 
Americans Overseas as Part of the Decennial Census Would Not Be 
Cost-Effective.'' The 2004 Test involved enumerating the 
unknown universe of U.S. citizens living in France, Kuwait, and 
Mexico from Feb-July 2, 2004. GAO testified that participation 
was poor; just over 5,000 questionnaires were returned from the 
three test sites. The subcommittee also reviewed the important 
lessons learned and the preliminary findings from the ongoing 
evaluation by the Census Bureau and heard from some census 
stakeholders with relevant perspectives on the test and its 
challenges. GAO and the Census Bureau both agreed that this was 
not worthy of further funding and development for the 2010 
Census.
    b. Witnesses.--Charles Louis Kincannon, Director, U.S. 
Census Bureau; Patricia Dalton, Director, Strategic Issues, 
U.S. Government Accountability Office; Leigh Gribble, vice 
chair, American Business Council of the Gulf Countries; Lucy 
Stensland Laederich, U.S. liaison, Federation of American 
Women's Club Overseas, Inc.; and Clark H. Bensen, consultant 
and publisher, Polidata Co.
38. ``Identity Theft: The Causes, Costs, Consequences, and Potential 
        Solutions,'' September 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-272
    a. Summary.--At this hearing, the subcommittee explored the 
rise of fraud and identity related crimes through the use of 
the Internet and by exploiting vulnerabilities in unsecured 
information networks. The subcommittee also examined potential 
solutions, such as vulnerability management, credentialing and 
authentication tools, which may help reduce the impact of 
viruses, worms, spyware, spam, phishing and in turn reduce 
identity related cyber thefts.
    b. Witnesses.--Orson Swindle, Commissioner, Federal Trade 
Commission; Steven Martinez, Deputy Assistant Director, Cyber 
Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Larry Johnson, 
Special Agent in Charge, Criminal Investigative Division, U.S. 
Secret Service; Patrick O'Carroll, Acting Inspector General, 
Social Security Administration; Howard Schmidt, former White 
House cyber security advisor, and vice president, chief 
information security officer, eBay Inc.; Dr. Bill Hancock, vice 
president, Security Practice & Strategy, chief security 
officer, SAVVIS Communications Corporation; Bill Conner, 
chairman and chief executive officer, Entrust Inc.; and Jody 
Westby, managing director, PricewaterhouseCoopers.
                            A P P E N D I X

                              ----------                              


                            Committee Prints

February 2003
    Rules of the Committee on Government Reform, House of 
Representatives, Together with Selected Rules of the House of 
Representatives (Including Clause 2 of House Rule XI) and 
Selected Statutes of Interest
October 2003
    Title 5, United States Code Government Organization and 
Employees 108th Congress, 1st Session
November 2004
    United States Government Policy and Supporting Positions 
108th Congress, 2nd Session

                         Investigative Reports

March 31, 2003, House Report 108-52
    Oversight Plans for All House Committees (required by House 
Rule X, Clause 2(d) 108th Congress, 1st Session.
FIRST REPORT, June 23, 2003, House Report 108-172
    A Citizen's Guide on Using the Freedom of Information Act 
and the Privacy Act of 1974 to Request Government Records 
(Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Affairs and 
the Census).
SECOND REPORT, November 21, 2003, House Report 108-395
    Efforts to Rightsize the U.S. Presence Abroad Lack Urgency 
and Momentum (National Security, Emerging Threats and 
International Relations Subcommittee).
THIRD REPORT, February 3, 2004, House Report 108-414
    Everything Secret Degenerates: The FBI's Use of Murderers 
as Informants (full committee).

                          Legislative Reports

March 27, 2003, House Report 108-49
    Postal Civil Service Retirement System Funding Reform Act 
of 2003, to accompany H.R. 735, 108th Congress--1st Session.
April 29, 2003, House Report 108-78, Part I
    Federal Government Energy Management Improvement Act, to 
accompany H.R. 1346, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
May 19, 2003, House Report 108-116, Part I
    Civil Service and National Security Personnel Improvement 
Act, to accompany H.R. 1836, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
May 19, 2003, House Report 108-117, Part I
    Services Acquisition Reform Act of 2003, to accompany H.R. 
1837, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
June 12, 2003, House Report 108-147, Part II
    Project Bioshield Act of 2003 to accompany H.R. 2122, 108th 
Congress, 1st Session.
June 19, 2003, House Report 108-167, Part I
    Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act 
of 2003 to accompany H.R. 2086, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
October 7, 2003, House Report 108-305
    Government Network Security Act of 2003 to accompany H.R. 
3159, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
November 19, 2003, House Report 108-380
    GAO Human Capital Reform Act of 2003 to accompany H.R. 
2751, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
December 8, 2003, House Report 108-403
    National Archives and Records Administration Efficiency Act 
of 2003 to accompany H.R. 3478, 108th Congress, 1st Session.
May 14, 2004, House Report 108-490, Part I
    Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 2004 to 
accompany H.R. 2432, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
May 17, 2004, House Report 108-490, Part II (Supplemental Report)
    Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 2004 to 
accompany H.R. 2432, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
June 8, 2004, House Report 108-527
    Permanent Authorization of District of Columbia Tuition 
Assistance Programs to accompany H.R. 4012, 108th Congress, 2nd 
Session.
June 9, 2004, House Report 108-533, Part I
    Department of Homeland Security Financial Accountability 
Act to accompany H.R. 4259, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
June 17, 2004, House Report 108-552
    Office of Personnel Management Report Relating to Dental, 
Vision, and Hearing Benefits for Federal Employees and Others 
to accompany H.R. 3751, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
June 17, 2004, House Report 108-551, Part I
    2004 District of Columbia Omnibus Authorization Act to 
accompany H.R. 3797, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
July 7, 2004, House Report 108-585, Part I
    Health Insurance Premium Conversion Option for Federal 
Civilian and Military Retirees to accompany H.R. 1231, 108th 
Congress, 2nd Session.
July 7, 2004, House Report 108-586
    Pay Compression Relief Act of 2004 to accompany H.R. 3737, 
108th Congress, 2nd Session.
September 8, 2004, House Report 108-672, Part I
    Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act to accompany H.R. 
4341, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
September 9, 2004, House Report 108-673
    Transit Pass Transportation Fringe Benefits for Federal 
Employees to accompany H.R. 1151, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
October 5, 2004, House Report 108-724, Part 4
    9/11 Recommendations Implementation Act to accompany H.R. 
10, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
October 5, 2004, House Report 108-729
    District of Columbia Civil Commitment Modernization Act of 
2004 to accompany H.R. 4302, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
October 5, 2004, House Report 108-733
    Federal Workforce Flexibility Act of 2004 to accompany S. 
129, 108th Congress, 2nd Session.
October 8, 2004, House Report 108-768
    Program Assessment and Results Act to accompany H.R. 3826, 
108th Congress, 2nd Session.

            VIEWS OF RANKING MINORITY MEMBER HENRY A. WAXMAN

    While I agree with significant parts of the chairman's 
report, there are several sections that warrant comment as 
discussed below.

                    PART ONE. COMMITTEE ORGANIZATION

              I. History and Jurisdiction of the Committee

    The majority's report on the history of the committee 
omitted discussion of recent changes regarding the committee's 
review of postal matters. The 108th Congress saw the 
abolishment of the Subcommittee on the Postal Service, an 
entity that had been in existence since 1995. Instead, the 
committee created the Special Panel on Postal Reform and 
Oversight.

                  PART TWO. COMMITTEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

                     I. Legislative Accomplishments

H.R. 10, the 9/11 Recommendations Implementation Act (S. 2845, the 
        National Intelligence Reform Act of 2004)
    Despite the Republican leadership's unwillingness to work 
with the minority in a bipartisan manner, reasonable 
comprehensive intelligence reform, S. 2845, the National 
Intelligence Reform Act of 2004, ultimately was enacted.
    As introduced by House Republicans, H.R. 10 was deeply 
flawed and failed to address many of the 9/11 Commission's 
recommendations. It also included controversial ``poison 
pills.'' Democratic members of the committee were able to 
effect positive change. For example, Democratic members worked 
to ensure that the bill included language, drafted by 
Representative Van Hollen, to establish a more efficient 
information sharing network to correct past failures to 
``connect the dots'' among Federal agencies.
    After Democratic members raised objections, language was 
stripped from the bill that authorized government-wide 
executive branch reorganization authority that could have 
undone important reforms passed by Congress. Also, Democratic 
members objected to language that would have undermined 
longstanding financial disclosure requirements for Federal 
workers, and this language was not included in the final 
version of the bill. Moreover, after Democratic members raised 
objections, a provision was removed that would have stripped 
collective bargaining rights from employees in the name of 
``homeland security.'' Furthermore, Democratic members 
successfully worked to help ensure that there were minimum 
standards for identity documents without the creation of a 
national database.
    The legislation provides that, for the most part, a single 
Federal agency will conduct security clearance investigations, 
that a civil liberties protection board will be established, 
and that in the office of the National Intelligence Director, 
the appointment of an Inspector General is permitted. Although 
on these issues, the final language in S. 2845 is not as strong 
as many Democratic members would have preferred, it is far 
superior to the original language of H.R. 10.
H.R. 1836, National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004
    With the passage of H.R. 1836, the committee reversed many 
of the important legislative reforms of the past century. The 
bill stripped away fundamental rights from almost 700,000 
civilian employees at the Department of Defense [DOD]--
approximately one-third of all Federal civilian employees. The 
bill also opened the door for the rest of the Federal workforce 
to have their rights taken away as well.
    DOD needs certain flexibilities to allow it operate more 
effectively and more efficiently. Democratic members want the 
strongest possible national defense and are willing to give DOD 
the tools it needs to modernize its workforce. However, H.R. 
1836 went well beyond those flexibilities by giving DOD a 
blanket exemption from large parts of the Civil Service laws.
    In two hearings before the committee, DOD witnesses 
provided virtually no details about how DOD would exercise 
these flexibilities and no rationale for why statutory 
protections of employee rights should be waived. Often, the 
only rationale DOD provided for such waivers was that the 
Department of Homeland Security [DHS] received the same waivers 
in 2002.
    The committee gave DOD a complete exemption from several 
chapters of Title 5 of U.S. Code that protect due process and 
appeal rights of Federal employees. These chapters set forth 
basic employee protections, such as the right to have advance 
notice of suspension or removal, the right to respond in 
writing, the right to be represented by an attorney, and the 
right to a written decision explaining the action. In addition, 
these chapters set forth a procedure for employees to challenge 
personnel actions before the Merit Systems Protection Board 
[MSPB] and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission [EEOC] 
and receive back pay for wrongful termination actions.
    DOD also sought and received a complete waiver from Chapter 
71 of Title 5 relating to employee collective bargaining 
rights. Chapter 71 protects the rights of employees to join 
unions, requires that agencies and unions bargain in good 
faith, and prohibits discrimination based on union membership.
    In only one area--the ability of DOD to bargain with unions 
at the national level, instead of the local level--was the 
Department able to identify a potential problem that needed to 
be addressed. However, no justification was given for DOD's 
desire to waive all collective bargaining obligations.
    H.R. 1836 provided no guarantees that DOD will engage in 
collective bargaining at all. The bill required only that the 
Department engage in ``collaboration'' with unions in the 
development of the new personnel system. Under the bill, if the 
Defense Secretary decides to implement any part of the proposal 
over the objections of labor organizations, the Secretary has 
the discretion to do so after notifying Congress.
    With respect to those instances in which DOD chooses to 
engage in collective bargaining, the bill specifically removed 
the current requirement that the Federal Services Impasse 
Panel, whose members are appointed by the President, mediate 
agency-union impasses. Without any impasse resolution 
procedure--and without any legal duty to bargain in good 
faith--the Defense Department could always bargain to impasse 
and then unilaterally impose its will on employees.
    Fortunately, the bill approved by the committee and passed 
by the House was improved somewhat in conference. The 
conference report only allowed DOD to waive the collective 
bargaining requirements for the 6-year period following 
enactment. With regard to appeal rights, the conference report 
gave MSPB a very limited role in reviewing the decisions of a 
newly created DOD appeals process. It is unclear whether this 
limited appellate role will be sufficient to protect the due 
process rights of DOD employees.
H.R. 1837, the Services Acquisition Reform Act [SARA]
    H.R. 1837, the Services Acquisition Reform Act [SARA], was 
reported by the Government Reform Committee on May 7, 2003, by 
a party-line vote of 22 to 18. The minority opposed the bill 
because in key areas its effect would have been to impede the 
government's ability to protect against waste, fraud, and abuse 
in Federal contracting.
    Fortunately, many of the provisions opposed by the minority 
were not included in the version of the bill that was enacted 
into law as title XIV of H.R. 1588, a bill to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2004 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense and for other purposes (Public Law 
108-136). Those provisions included:
         LContractor involvement in Federal acquisition 
        decisions. As reported by the committee, the bill would 
        have created a government-industry exchange program for 
        acquisition personnel that would have given private 
        contractors undue influence over the Federal 
        contracting process.
         L``Share in Savings'' contracts. As reported 
        by the committee, the bill would have permanently 
        authorized a complicated and largely untested contract 
        type called share-in-savings. These contracts are 
        difficult to administer and would make congressional 
        oversight very difficult.
         LInadequate protections against waste, fraud, 
        and abuse. As reported by the committee, the bill would 
        have weakened current law by allowing the government to 
        enter into sole-source contracts for up to $15 million 
        without verifying that the prices charged were fair and 
        reasonable.
H.R. 2086, Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act 
        of 2003
    Democratic members engaged the majority in negotiations 
that resulted in the removal of provisions from H.R. 2086 that 
would have placed strict limitations on the ONDCP Director's 
discretion concerning allocation of funding for elements of the 
National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign, allowed the ONDCP 
Director to use the media campaign funds for partisan political 
activities in opposition to legalization efforts, eliminated 
prevention programs supported by High Intensity Drug 
Trafficking Areas [HIDTA] funds, and reduced HIDTA funding 
available to State and local law agencies in States that adopt 
``medical marijuana'' laws. As a result of the bipartisan 
negotiations, H.R. 2086, as reported, included language that 
would maintain the current categorical prohibition against use 
of media campaign funds for any partisan political purpose and 
that also would prohibit media campaign funds from being used 
to influence any legislation, regulation, election, or ballot 
initiative and bar the appearance of highly visible Federal 
officials in media campaign advertising.
H.R. 2432, Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 2003
    The majority fails to accurately describe this legislation. 
H.R. 2432 was rushed through committee without a subcommittee 
markup. This bill would weaken the process of developing 
Federal regulations while failing to stem the sharp rise in 
paperwork burden that has occurred under the Bush 
administration. The minority's objections to the Paperwork and 
Regulatory Improvements Act (H.R. 2432) are described in detail 
in the minority views filed with the committee's May 14, 2004, 
report on this legislation (House Report 108-490).
    One particularly troubling provision in H.R. 2432 requires 
OMB to choose at least three agencies to participate in a study 
on regulatory budgeting. OMB would be required to select three 
of the following agencies to participate: the Department of 
Labor; the Department of Transportation; the Department of 
Health and Human Services; and the Environmental Protection 
Agency. The language of H.R. 2432 is ambiguous, but at hearings 
Subcommittee Chairman Ose and witnesses described regulatory 
budgeting as being a regulatory cap that limits the total costs 
that an agency's combined regulations can impose on the public. 
The concept of regulatory budgeting is deeply flawed. A 
regulatory budget imposes an arbitrary cap on regulatory costs 
and does not take benefits into account.
H.R. 2556, D.C. Parental Choice Incentive Act of 2003
    The enactment of H.R. 2556, the first federally imposed and 
federally funded school vouchers program in the country in the 
District of Columbia, set a troubling precedent. While a school 
vouchers program may help a few students, the overall public 
school system pays the price. The bill is, in effect, little 
more than a transfer of Federal funding from public schools in 
D.C. to private ones. Diverting Federal or other public 
resources from the public school system into the private school 
system is bad policy. The bill also affirmatively allows 
Federal funding of religious activities.
    With respect to the District of Columbia, while the Mayor 
and the Chair of the D.C. school board did support the school 
vouchers program, the majority of publicly elected officials 
for the District opposed this idea. The District did not pass 
its own local law creating a school vouchers program, which it 
has the authority to do. The best kind of ``school choice'' 
already exists in the District. There are over 40 public 
charter schools in the District. Further, the District is home 
to over a dozen transformation schools, an approach in which 
the lowest performing public schools are identified and 
transformed with new staff and ``wrap-around'' social services 
for the parents and the students. Transformation schools have 
had documented success in improving the academic performance of 
many students.
    There are numerous other problems with H.R. 2556 as 
enacted. The measure does not provide for adequate 
accountability regarding public funds. The private schools that 
participate in the program are not held to the same standards 
as the public schools, such as those set forth in the No Child 
Left Behind Act. H.R. 2556 also did not provide for a control 
group or other mechanisms for gathering data and for showing 
measurable results from the school voucher program.
H.R. 2751, GAO Human Capital Reform Act of 2004
    Although Civil Service reform is best pursued on a 
governmentwide basis, not an agency-by-agency basis, 
Comptroller General David M. Walker made a strong case for why 
GAO should be granted the personnel flexibilities provided in 
H.R. 2751.
    At Democrats' request, Mr. Walker assured the committee 
that he would provide annual reporting on the size of pay 
raises given to minorities, women, and veterans. In the past, 
these groups have received lower appraisal ratings than the 
employee population as a whole.
    The bill was modified to allow all GAO employees to receive 
additional annual leave based on previous relevant work 
experience. The original version of the bill had allowed 
previous work experience to be considered only for upper-level 
employees.
    The section of the bill relating to employee exchanges with 
private sector companies also was modified at the minority's 
request. The number of GAO employees who could participate in 
such exchanges was decreased from 30 to 15. The provision was 
clarified to ensure that private sector employees will be 
subject to Federal ethics laws and will not have access to 
trade secrets. Language was added to ensure that any exchanges 
must be an effective use of GAO's resources. Moreover, GAO's 
authority to engage in such programs sunsets after 5 years.
    Finally, the bill was modified to require GAO to submit 
annual reports to Congress, detailing its use of the 
flexibilities in the bill. This reporting requirement is 
necessary for Congress to fulfill its oversight 
responsibilities.
H.R. 3193, The District of Columbia Personal Protection Act
    H.R. 3193 would have severely undermined the District's gun 
laws. This committee had jurisdiction over the bill, but it was 
taken up and passed by the full House without committee 
consideration. Had this bill become law it would have repealed 
the District's current ban on semiautomatic weapons, the 
requirement that guns be locked, dissembled, or unloaded, and 
the ban on armor piercing (``cop-killing'') bullets. H.R. 3193 
even went so far as to prevent the District from enacting any 
new laws that would restrict in any way such possession.
    Despite opposition from the majority of publicly elected 
officials in the District, the House majority leadership 
brought this bill to the House floor. The fact that a vote was 
allowed on this measure on the House floor, especially when 
District leadership and residents roundly opposed it, is 
troubling and sets a bad precedent. Congress under Article I, 
Section 8, does have the authority to repeal the District's 
locally enacted laws against the will of the elected officials 
and the District's residents. However, historically Congress 
has rarely taken such a step. It is especially difficult to 
justify measures that would result in more guns on the streets 
of the District at a time when security is a top priority in 
the Nation's Capital, the District often is under a heightened 
threat alert, and the overall crime rate and homicide rate in 
the District have been noticeably declining.
H.R. 3281, Federal Whistleblower Protection
    On September 29, 2004, the committee passed H.R. 3281, as 
amended, which provides additional protection to Federal 
whistleblowers. The minority supported the measure because it 
closes some loopholes in current law. However, the bill passed 
by the committee does not go far enough to protect courageous 
whistleblowers who risk their careers to disclose waste, fraud, 
and abuse in the Federal Government. A far better whistleblower 
protection bill is S. 2628, which was introduced by Senator 
Akaka and was passed by the Senate Governmental Affairs 
Committee on July 21, 2004.
    Specifically, H.R. 3281, as amended, omitted several 
important provisions in the introduced bill that are also 
contained in S. 2628. These omitted provisions include:
         LClassified disclosures to Congress. This 
        provision would have clarified that classified 
        information may be disclosed to a Member of Congress or 
        congressional staff as long as that person is 
        authorized to receive such information.
         LSecurity clearances. This provision would 
        have authorized the Merit Systems Protection Board to 
        review cases charging retaliation when an employee's 
        security clearance is revoked.
         LAll-circuit review. This provision would have 
        allowed any Federal circuit court to hear whistleblower 
        cases for a 5-year period, thus ending the U.S. Court 
        of Appeals for the Federal Circuit's exclusive 
        jurisdiction over whistleblower appeals.
         LCritical infrastructure information. This 
        provision would have ensured whistleblower protection 
        for those who disclose independently obtained 
        information that also may qualify as voluntarily 
        submitted critical infrastructure information under the 
        Homeland Security Act.
    It is noteworthy that some of these omitted provisions--
including all-circuit review and protection of disclosures to 
Congress--were contained in a bill (H.R. 2588) in the 107th 
Congress that was cosponsored by Chairman Tom Davis.
H.R. 3737, Pay Compression Relief
    Although the minority supported this legislation, there are 
concerns about the pay disparities created by both this bill 
and legislation enacted in 2003 to raise salaries for other 
Federal employees. After enactment of this bill, administrative 
law judges [ALJs], administrative appeals judges [AAJs], and 
many other senior Federal employees could be paid at Executive 
Schedule Level II, which is currently $158,100. This is the 
same amount earned by deputy secretaries of cabinet departments 
and agency administrators. The minority believes it is 
important to maintain some pay differential between the deputy 
secretary of a department and the administrative judges who 
work in the department.
    Moreover, this bill allowed ALJs and AAJs to be paid as 
much as Federal district judges and more than Federal 
bankruptcy judges and magistrates, who currently earn $145,500. 
The salary increases authorized by this bill would create 
incongruities in the overall Federal pay structure that need to 
be addressed.
    As a result, the Civil Service and Agency Organization 
Subcommittee adopted a Democratic amendment to require the 
Office of Personnel Management [OPM] to conduct a broad-based 
study of all Federal salaries paid under the Executive 
Schedule. OPM would determine whether there are any 
incongruities among Executive Schedule salaries and would 
recommend any necessary adjustments.
H.R. 3751 and S. 2657, Dental, Vision, and Hearing Benefits for Federal 
        Employees
    H.R. 3751 would have required the Office of Personnel 
Management [OPM] to study the feasibility of providing dental 
and vision benefits to Federal employees, annuitants, and their 
family members. S. 2657 would have authorized OPM to establish 
dental and vision insurance coverage for Federal employees, 
annuitants, and their family members. Both bills as originally 
introduced did not cover hearing benefits.
    Currently, over 28 million Americans suffer hearing loss, 
half of whom are under the age of 50. Hearing loss is not just 
a problem affecting adults. Thirty-three children are born 
everyday with some form of hearing loss. With early detection 
and treatment, these children can be taught in regular classes, 
saving a school system as much as $500,000 during a 12-year 
education. Like vision and dental benefits, most insurance 
plans do not provide hearing benefits, such as coverage for 
hearing aids.
    With regard to H.R. 3751, a Democratic amendment was 
accepted that required OPM to study the feasibility of 
providing hearing benefits to Federal employees, retirees, and 
their families. This provision was removed from the final 
version of S. 2657 that passed both the House and Senate. 
However, the House and Senate obtained an agreement that OPM 
would conduct such a study by September 30, 2005.
H.R. 3826, Program Assessment and Results Act [PARA]
    While the minority believes that there is a need to 
undertake more comprehensive efforts to evaluate public 
programs, the process established under H.R. 3826, the Program 
Assessment and Results Act [PARA], lacks provisions to ensure 
adequate agency participation during the review process as well 
as mechanisms for ensuring the objective establishment of 
criteria for program reviews. In essence, the PARA is an 
attempt to codify the Program Assessment Rating Tool [PART] 
that the Office of Management and Budget has used for program 
evaluations during the past two budget cycles. The PART, 
however, has proved unreliable for evaluation purposes in 152 
of the 407 programs--37.1 percent of the programs--to which it 
has been applied. Reasons for inconclusive evaluations under 
PART include the use of restrictive formats and data 
requirements among crosscutting agency programs, the lack of 
available or reliable information in certain programs, and 
intergovernmental discrepancies for programs administered 
jointly with State and local governments.
    Furthermore, the bill as reported out of committee provides 
too much discretion to OMB for the establishment of subjective 
criteria during the review of programs without adequate input 
from the agency community or public stakeholders. Stakeholder 
participation helps provide checks and balances against OMB 
developing unreasonable or subjective program assessment 
criteria. Efforts to remedy these deficiencies through the 
addition of a mandatory notice and comment period for program 
review criteria were made by Congressman Towns during the 
subcommittee markup on May 19, 2004. However, this change was 
weakened substantially in the manager's amendment reported out 
by the full committee on June 3, 2004. OMB and agencies should 
develop meaningful evaluation criteria for all Federal 
programs, including those programs administered cooperatively 
among State and local stakeholders.
S. 129 (H.R. 1601), Federal Workforce Flexibility Act of 2004
    This bill to provide personnel flexibilities to Federal 
agencies was modified in several important respects. At the 
Civil Service and Agency Organization Subcommittee markup of 
H.R. 1601, Democratic members restored two provisions that were 
contained in the Senate version (S. 129). One provision 
prohibited recruitment, relocation, and retention bonuses from 
being paid to political appointees. Another provision required 
the Office of Personnel Management [OPM] to report on the 
number of bonuses paid under this bill. This would allow 
Congress to evaluate whether these bonuses are effective in 
improving the recruitment and retention of high-quality 
employees. Language was also added to H.R. 1601 indicating that 
OPM should monitor the use of bonuses by one Federal agency to 
hire an employee from another Federal agency.

            II. Oversight and Investigative Accomplishments

Iraq Contracting
    The majority's summary of the committee's oversight of Iraq 
contracting states, ``The hearings provided a strong record 
that the system is/was working.'' Unfortunately, the opposite 
is true.
    Testimony from the Defense Contract Audit Agency [DCAA] and 
Government Accountability Office was critical of the 
administration and its contractors in Iraq. In particular, at 
the committee's March 11, 2004, hearing, DCAA Director William 
Reed testified that Pentagon auditors found ``significant'' and 
``systemic'' deficiencies in the cost estimating practices of 
Halliburton, the largest Iraq contractor. For example, 
Halliburton submitted a $2.7 billion cost proposal that ``did 
not contain current, accurate, and complete data regarding 
subcontractor costs.'' There was a $700 million discrepancy 
between the initial proposal and a revised proposal, which was 
also rejected. DCAA also found that Halliburton overcharged by 
$61 million through September 30, 2003, for gasoline imported 
into Iraq from Kuwait.
    At the June 15, 2004, hearing, Mr. Reed testified that 
Halliburton's cost estimation deficiencies had not been fixed. 
He noted that Halliburton's dining hall billings were as much 
as 36 percent higher than could be justified by the number of 
meals actually served to troops. As a result, DCAA had 
suspended $186 million in dining hall payments to Halliburton. 
Mr. Reed also testified that two Halliburton employees had 
allegedly received up to $6.3 million in kickbacks from a 
Kuwaiti company. David Walker, the Comptroller General, 
testified about GAO's recent findings regarding Halliburton's 
LOGCAP contract. GAO found ineffective planning, inadequate 
cost control, and insufficient training of contract management 
officials under LOGCAP in Iraq. GAO reported that, when 
Halliburton acted as a middleman for the operation of dining 
halls, costs were over 40 percent higher.
    During the March hearing, Pentagon Comptroller Dov Zakheim 
noted that, in late February 2004, DCAA recommended that the 
Army begin to withhold partial payment to Halliburton under the 
LOGCAP troop support contract as required by the Federal 
Acquisition Regulation. The Army refused to withhold payments. 
Six months later, on August 16, 2004, DCAA was still 
encouraging the Army to begin withholding 15 percent of 
Halliburton's reimbursements, stating, ``It is clear to us KBR 
will not provide an adequate proposal until there is a 
consequence.'' Instead, the Army has given Halliburton multiple 
extensions to provide the adequate cost estimates and 
supporting data needed to finalize the terms of the contract.
    At the July 22, 2004, hearing, former Halliburton employees 
also provided compelling testimony of egregious overcharges by 
the company in Iraq and Kuwait.
    Marie deYoung, a Halliburton logistics specialist, 
testified about subcontracts under which Halliburton paid $45 
per case of soda and $100 per 15-pound bag of laundry. Ms. 
deYoung also disclosed that Halliburton did not comply with the 
Army's request to move Halliburton employees from a five-star 
hotel in Kuwait, where it cost taxpayers approximately $10,000 
per day to house the employees, into air-conditioned tent 
facilities, which would have cost taxpayers under $600 per day. 
She characterized these instances as symptoms of Halliburton's 
systemic subcontract management weaknesses.
    David Wilson, a convoy commander for Halliburton, and James 
Warren, a Halliburton truck driver, testified that brand new 
$85,000 Halliburton trucks were abandoned or ``torched'' if 
they got a flat tire or experienced minor mechanical problems. 
Mr. Warren brought these and other concerns to the personal 
attention of Randy Harl, the president and CEO of Halliburton 
subsidiary KBR. He was fired a few weeks later.
    The majority asserts that the committee ``established that 
there was no evidence that the contracts were awarded 
improperly.'' This assertion is simply inaccurate. At the June 
15, 2004, hearing, GAO officials testified that the 
administration's award to Halliburton of a LOGCAP task order to 
prepare a contingency plan for the reconstruction and operation 
of Iraq's oil infrastructure was ``not in accordance with the 
law.'' They noted that the Army Materiel Command's own counsel 
agreed with this conclusion. GAO explained ``that once they 
made the decision to go with a particular contractor for the 
contingency planning task order, that would pretty much decide 
who would eventually get the larger contract to actually 
execute the contingency plan.''
    In addition, at a June 8, 2004, briefing for committee 
staff, Michael Mobbs, special advisor to Under Secretary of 
Defense Douglas Feith, explained that his Energy Infrastructure 
Planning Group, not career civil servants or contracting 
officials, selected Halliburton for the contingency planning 
task order. The decision was based on informal conversations 
with officials in executive agencies and former industry 
executives. In October 2002, Mr. Mobbs personally briefed the 
Vice President's chief of staff, I. Lewis ``Scooter'' Libby, 
and other senior White House and administration officials on 
his proposal to award the task order to Halliburton without 
giving other companies an opportunity to compete. He explained 
that his central purpose in bringing the plan to the attention 
of Mr. Libby and others at the Deputies Committee was to make 
sure there was no objection to it. He said that if anyone had 
raised an objection to selecting Halliburton without any 
competition, he would have gone back and reconsidered his 
approach. When asked about such a selection process at the June 
15, 2004, hearing, Comptroller General David Walker said that 
``it would be unusual.''
    The assertion that the committee ``established that there 
was no evidence that the contracts were awarded improperly'' 
also ignores the fact that the majority blocked the minority's 
effort to subpoena communications between the Vice President's 
office and the Defense Department with respect to Halliburton's 
planning task order and no-bid oil infrastructure contract. 
Rather than examining the actual communications in order to 
determine whether the contracts were improperly awarded, the 
majority just concluded that they were not. Moreover, the 
committee has received no documents in response to a July 9, 
2004, joint request regarding the rationale for the selection 
of Halliburton and the membership and operations of the Energy 
Infrastructure Planning Group.
Flu Vaccine Shortage
    In relating the outcome of the flu vaccine investigation, 
the majority asserts: ``The testimony from previous hearings, 
FDA documents, and meetings with Chairman Davis appear to 
establish that FDA followed standard protocol in dealing with 
Chiron.''
    In fact, Acting FDA Commissioner Lester Crawford testified 
before the committee that the agency broke with standard 
protocol by being 6 months late in sending Chiron a copy of the 
agency's June 2003 inspection report.
    Documents and interviews also revealed that FDA missed a 
series of opportunities to assure the continued production of 
the flu vaccine. After the June 2003 inspection, FDA rejected 
the recommendation of inspectors to initiate official 
enforcement action. FDA then refused the company's request to 
meet to review its remediation plan. FDA did not conduct a full 
re-inspection of the plant until October 2004, after the plant 
was shut down by the British and the United States lost half of 
its vaccine supply.

                  PART THREE. FULL COMMITTEE MEETINGS

``The Supersizing of America: The Federal Government's Role in 
        Combating Obesity and Promoting Healthy Living,'' June 3, 2004; 
        Serial No. 108-201
    In summarizing the committee's June 3, 2004, hearing on 
obesity, the majority writes that ``obesity will soon surpass 
smoking as the leading avoidable cause of death among 
Americans.'' This statement is based upon a 2004 study by CDC 
that is still under review. CDC has asked the Institute of 
Medicine to advise on evaluating the appropriate methodology 
for estimating the number of deaths in the United States from 
obesity.

                PART FOUR. SUBCOMMITTEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

 I. SUBCOMMITTEE ON CRIMINAL JUSTICE, DRUG POLICY, AND HUMAN RESOURCES

Stem Cell Research
    In summarizing the subcommittee's work on stem cell 
research, the majority provides a misleading view of research 
on embryonic stem cells. Many leading medical experts have 
stated that the President's restrictive policy on stem cell 
research is impairing our Nation's ability to find treatments 
cures for devastating diseases. NIH has reported that embryonic 
stem cells have certain important qualities that adult stem 
cells have not been demonstrated to have.
Nonoxynol-9
    In summarizing the subcommittee's work on nonoxynol-9, the 
majority provides a misleading view of the evidence. Leading 
public health experts support the removal of Nonoxynol-9 from 
condoms because of potential increased risk of HIV transmission 
and a lack of evidence that Nonoxynol-9 gives significant 
contraceptive advantage over condoms alone. However, these 
experts do not believe that there is evidence justifying the 
removal of Nonoxynol-9 from all products. Furthermore, any 
warning on products containing Nonoxynol-9 should be carefully 
crafted so that consumers are not unduly steered away from 
condoms and other contraceptives. When used properly, condoms 
are a highly effective method of birth control and HIV 
prevention.
HPV/Cervical Cancer Prevention
    In summarizing the subcommittee's work on human 
papillomavirus infection, the majority provides a highly 
misleading view of the science. Cervical cancer is almost 
entirely preventable by the provision of routine Pap Smears. 
CDC and NIH have also found that the weight of the evidence 
indicates that condom use does prevent cervical cancer.
HIV/AIDS
    The majority presumes a zero sum tradeoff between funding 
for treatment and funding for other HIV/AIDS activities. In 
fact, there is no reason why Congress cannot adequately fund 
treatment, research, and other important missions.
    The majority criticizes HHS for spending money for HIV 
conferences. In fact, scientific exchange is essential for the 
Federal investment in HIV to be spent wisely. An HHS decision 
this year to limit attendance at the world AIDS conference led 
to the cancellation of more than 30 presentations by U.S. 
scientists and of important workshops to assist scientists from 
developing countries.
    The majority provides a one-sided view of the AIDS vaccines 
trials being funded by NIH. This is a scientific question that 
should be reviewed by experts in the field.
    The majority asserts that the government should not be 
spending any money trying to ascertain how an HIV vaccine would 
be perceived and adopted. This position is short-sighted. 
Research on how the public would perceive a vaccine is 
important to designing programs to promote vaccination once a 
vaccine is approved.
    The majority's summary of ``fraud abuse'' of tax dollars in 
HIV programs contains errors. For example, the majority asserts 
that CDC stopped funding the STOP AIDS project because Federal 
funding was going to ``flirting classes.'' In fact, CDC found 
that no Federal funding was going to ``flirting classes,'' and 
CDC did not penalize STOP AIDS for the project.
``H.R. 2086, Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act 
        of 2003,'' May 15, 2003
    The subcommittee adopted amendments offered by Ranking 
Minority Member Cummings to ensure adequate funding of core 
drug prevention and treatment programs within the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
``Ensuring Accuracy and Accountability in Laboratory Testing: Does the 
        Experience of Maryland General Hospital Expose Cracks in the 
        System?'' May 18, 2004; Serial No. 108-248
    The majority's views suggest that the scope of the hearings 
examining lab-testing problems at Maryland General Hospital in 
Baltimore, MD, was narrower than it was. The purpose of the 
hearings requested by Ranking Minority Member Elijah E. 
Cummings was not merely to uncover what happened in the 
Maryland General case but also to examine whether and to what 
extent the problems were enabled by potential shortcomings in 
the system for enforcing Federal standards for medical 
laboratories.
    Inadequate protections for whistleblowers in medical labs, 
advance notice of accreditation inspections, and insufficient 
requirements for sharing of information among enforcement 
entities were important factors that contributed to the 
Maryland General incident. These factors are not specific to 
Maryland General, and have the potential to prevent or delay 
the revelation of serious deficiencies at other medical 
laboratory facilities. Consistent with these findings and the 
purpose of the hearings, Ranking Minority Member Cummings was 
joined by Chairman Mark Souder in asking GAO to examine a 
number of issues relating to the effectiveness of enforcement 
of Federal standards for medical lab testing. GAO accepted this 
bipartisan request, has begun its investigation, and will issue 
a report documenting its findings during the first session of 
the 109th Congress.
    In addition, Ranking Minority Member Cummings introduced 
legislation, H.R. 5311, the Clinical Laboratories Compliance 
Improvement Act, to address the aforementioned problems 
identified during the subcommittee's investigative hearings. 
Similar legislation will be reintroduced in the 109th Congress 
and Democratic members will continue to work with the majority 
on lab testing oversight issues.

 II. SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY POLICY, NATURAL RESOURCES, AND REGULATORY 
                                AFFAIRS

``H.R. 2432, Paperwork and Regulatory Improvements Act of 2003,'' July 
        22, 2003; Serial No. 108-68
    In addition to the witnesses listed in the majority's 
activities report, Lisa Heinzerling, professor, Georgetown 
University Law Center, Center for Progressive Regulation, also 
testified.
``EPA Water Enforcement: Are We On the Right Track?'' October 14, 2003; 
        Serial No. 108-157
    The majority report does not provide a complete description 
of this hearing on EPA's enforcement of the Clean Water Act. 
Subcommittee Ranking Minority Member John Tierney requested 
this hearing, which was held in Ipswich, MA. The hearing raised 
important issues related to EPA's ability to fully protect our 
Nation's waters. Witnesses identified a decline in EPA's 
enforcement of the Clean Water Act and expressed concerns that 
EPA does not have adequate resources to fully implement the 
act's requirements.
``How to Improve Regulatory Accounting: Costs, Benefits, and Impacts of 
        Federal Regulations--Part II,'' February 25, 2004; Serial No. 
        108-159
    As stated in the majority's summary, this hearing examined 
OMB's ``Draft 2004 Report to Congress on the Costs and Benefits 
of Federal Regulations and Unfunded Mandates on State, Local, 
and Tribal Entities.'' OMB's 2004 draft report fails to provide 
an accurate or useful picture of Federal regulation. For 
example, OMB's report lists the costs and benefits of various 
agency rules, yet cost and benefit estimates are often 
misleading because the costs are typically overstated while 
benefits are typically understated. Many benefits are not, or 
cannot, be translated into dollar amounts. In its draft report, 
OMB provides incomplete cost and benefit estimates. There are 
also concerns about aspects of OMB's methodology and sources of 
support.
    In its 2004 draft report, OMB solicited comments on 
regulatory reforms that would ``improve manufacturing 
regulation.'' This raises concerns that OMB will utilize these 
comments to create a ``regulatory hit list'' that targets 
environmental, health, and safety regulations for limitation or 
elimination.
    In December 2004, OMB released its final 2004 ``Report to 
Congress on the Costs and Benefits of Federal Regulations and 
Unfunded Mandates on State, Local, and Tribal Entities.'' The 
concerns raised regarding the draft report also apply to OMB's 
final report.
``LNG Import Terminal and Deepwater Port Siting: Federal and State 
        Roles,'' June 22, 2004; Serial No. 108-238
    In addition to the witnesses listed in the majority's 
activities report, Dr. Jerry Havens, distinguished professor of 
chemical engineering, University of Arkansas, testified.
    It is worth noting that one witness called on the Federal 
agencies with jurisdiction to pursue a regional approach to 
siting LNG facilities in New England that considers the need 
for LNG, protecting public safety, and protecting the 
environment. In addition, concerns were raised by witnesses 
about the safety of LNG vessels and facilities, and the 
adequacy of current safety policies and regulations.
``What is the Bush Administration's Record in Regulatory Reform?'' 
        November 17, 2004
    This hearing, in part, addressed EPA's rulemaking on 
mercury emissions from power plants. Subcommittee Ranking 
Minority Member John Tierney requested a subcommittee hearing 
on EPA's mercury proposal and Chairman Ose agreed to address 
the issue during this last hearing of the 108th Congress.
    On January 30, 2004, the Bush administration published a 
proposal for regulating mercury emissions from power plants. 
The administration's proposal, and the process it has followed 
in developing its proposal, is fundamentally flawed.
    According to EPA scientists, approximately 630,000 infants 
are born in the United States each year with blood-mercury 
levels at unsafe levels. Despite the clear need for strong 
controls on mercury pollution, EPA's proposal is grossly 
inadequate and fails to comply with the Clean Air Act. The 
Clean Air Act requires a much larger reduction in mercury 
pollution, in much less time, than EPA's proposal. 
Additionally, EPA has failed to analyze and consider any option 
more stringent than its own proposals. At the hearing, minority 
members urged the administration to conduct the required 
analysis and issue a strong regulation that protects public 
health and complies with the Clean Air Act.

             III. SUBCOMMITTEE ON HUMAN RIGHTS AND WELLNESS

Federal Autism Initiatives and Research
    With respect to the subcommittee's work on autism, the 
majority provides a misleading view of the scientific evidence. 
There is no scientific consensus that ``incidences [sic] of 
autism are increasing exponentially in modern times.'' There is 
currently scientific disagreement over whether the rise in 
autism diagnosis is due to a rise in disease or a change in 
what clinicians call autism.
Federal Progress Regarding Dietary Supplements
    The majority states that the Dietary Supplements and Health 
Education Act ``ensures the safety and efficacy of dietary 
supplements.'' This position is inconsistent with the nearly 
universal view among leading medical organizations that the act 
does too little to protect consumers from dietary supplements. 
Most recently, outgoing Secretary of Health and Human Services 
Tommy Thompson stated his personal opinion that the law needs 
to be revised.

      IV. SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY, EMERGING THREATS AND 
                        INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

``The Iraq Oil-For-Food Program: Starving for Accountability,'' April 
        21, 2004; Serial No. 108-216, and ``The U.N. Oil for Food 
        Program: Cash Cow Meets Paper Tiger,'' October 5, 2004
    The subcommittee is appropriately examining the serious 
allegations of corruption, overpricing, kickbacks, and 
smuggling under the U.N. Oil-for-Food Program. As part of this 
investigation, the subcommittee also has a responsibility to 
examine problems with the successor to the Oil-for-Food 
Program, the Development Fund for Iraq, which was administered 
by the U.S. Government between May 2003 and June 28, 2004. The 
Coalition Provisional Authority obligated or spent nearly $20 
billion in Iraqi oil proceeds deposited into the DFI. Reports 
from auditors at KPMG, an independent certified public 
accounting firm, and the Coalition Provisional Authority 
Inspector General have found that the administration failed to 
properly account for Iraqi funds.