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                                                       Calendar No. 274
108th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                    108-144

======================================================================



 
DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 2004

                                _______
                                

               September 5, 2003.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Gregg, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1585]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1585) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the judiciary, and related agencies for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 2004, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Amount in new budget (obligational) authority

Total bill as reported to Senate........................ $37,637,536,000
Amount of appropriations, 2003..........................  37,999,565,000
Amount of budget estimates, 2004, as amended............  38,345,235,000
The bill as reported to the Senate:
    Below the appropriations for 2003...................     362,029,000
    Below the estimates for 2004........................     707,699,000


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Background:
    Purpose of the bill..........................................     3
    Hearings.....................................................     3
    Summary of the bill..........................................     3
Budgetary impact of the bill.....................................     6
Title I--Department of Justice and related agency................     8
Title II--Department of Commerce and related agencies............    69
Title III--The judiciary.........................................   115
Title IV--Department of State and related agency.................   124
Title V--Related agencies:
    Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad.   168
    Commission on Civil Rights...................................   168
    Commission on International Religious Freedom................   169
    Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe.............   169
    Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic 
      of China...................................................   169
    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission......................   169
    Federal Communications Commission............................   170
    Federal Trade Commission.....................................   171
    Legal Services Corporation...................................   173
    Marine Mammal Commission.....................................   173
    National Veterans' Business Development Corporation..........   174
    Securities and Exchange Commission...........................   174
    Small Business Administration................................   175
    State Justice Institute......................................   178
    United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission..   178
Title VI--General provisions.....................................   179
Title VII--Rescissions...........................................   181
Title VIII--Other Matters........................................   183
Title IX--Alaskan Fisheries......................................   184
Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   185
Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   185
Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   186

                               BACKGROUND

                          Purpose of the Bill

    This bill makes appropriations for the Departments of 
Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies 
for the period October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2004. 
Functional areas include the pay, allowances, and support of 
personnel, operation and maintenance, procurement of equipment 
and systems, construction, and research.
    The bill provides funds for responding to the threat of 
terrorism, fighting crime, enhancing drug enforcement, 
continuing the judicial process, conducting commerce within the 
United States, improving State Department operations, and 
fullfilling the needs of various independent agencies.

                                Hearings

    The Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary 
and Related Agencies Appropriations began hearings on the 
fiscal year 2004 budget request on March 6, 2003, and concluded 
them on April 10, 2003, after holding 5 separate sessions. The 
subcommittee heard testimony from representatives of the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

                          Summary of the Bill

    The budget estimates for the departments and agencies 
included in the accompanying bill are contained in the budget 
of the United States for fiscal year 2004 submitted on February 
3, 2003.
    The total amount of new budget authority recommended by the 
Committee for fiscal year 2004 is $37,637,536,000. This amount 
is a decrease of $362,029,000 below appropriations enacted for 
fiscal year 2003 for these departments and agencies. The 
Committee recommendation is $707,699,000 below the budget 
estimates. The following paragraphs highlight major themes 
contained in this bill:

                               TERRORISM

    The simplified explanation for September 11 was that we 
failed to ``connect the dots''. Post-September 11 reforms were 
intended to consolidate and unify intelligence gathering, 
analysis, and enforcement. Instead, we now have more agencies 
and organizations in the counterterrorism game than ever 
before.
    An April 2003 General Accounting Office [GAO] report on 
terrorist watch lists highlights the result. Nine agencies 
maintain twelve watch lists that are often inconsistent and 
incompatible. GAO's conclusion: vital information is still 
``not available to the right people at the right time.''
    The new Terrorist Threat Integration Center, which stood up 
May 1, 2003, demonstrates clearly that sensitivities over 
``turf'' still drive decisions. Though counterterrorism assets 
will be co-located, distinct bureaucratic identities, 
management structures, and allegiances will be maintained. 
Claims that mere proximity will promote unity can be debunked 
by taking a short stroll through the Capitol.
    As long as we lack a ``commander'' leading a unified 
counterterrorism apparatus, we will remain vulnerable to 
terrorist attacks. That decision, who will answer directly to 
the President as the unified commander of the war on terrorism, 
is the most important domestic security issue before the 
Nation. Until that decision is made, all else in the war is in 
doubt.
    In the interim, the Committee recommendation does what it 
can to eliminate duplicative functions, consolidate related 
activities, or otherwise streamline counterterrorism agencies 
funded by this Act.

                     PROTECTING AMERICA'S CHILDREN

    The Commerce, Justice, State, and the Judiciary 
appropriations bill is the natural home of programs that keep 
our children safe. Programs such as the Safe Schools Initiative 
and Cops In Schools have for years enhanced the physical 
security of schools while creating a rapport between law 
enforcement officials and youths. Coupled with anti-drug, youth 
violence, and after-school programs, these initiatives have 
improved the condition of America's at-risk youth. The 
Committee's newest initiative, training School Resource 
Officers to prevent and deter acts of terrorism, receives 
funding again this year. September 11 demonstrated that 
terrorists are in constant search of new ways to harm the 
United States. We cannot ignore the disturbing reality that our 
schools could be targeted. The bill therefore includes funding 
to help schools take steps to prepare for this contingency. The 
threat to American children does not end at U.S. borders, 
however, and the Committee has also continued an initiative 
under the State Department to enhance the security of schools 
attended by American children overseas. Finally, the bill does 
much in the area of protecting children from violence in the 
media as well as protecting their privacy on the Internet. The 
bill continues support for the Federal Trade Commission's 
[FTC's] efforts to work with the entertainment industry to 
prevent the marketing of violent games, movies, and music to 
children, as well as FTC's efforts to protect children from 
fraud, abuse, or abduction stemming from the Internet.

                  INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ENHANCEMENTS

    In times of budget shortfalls, agencies have often looked 
first to their information technology [IT] budgets for savings. 
The result, seen again and again by the Committee, has been 
that new investments quickly degraded, leading to a costly and 
inefficient ``collapse-crisis-rebuild'' cycle for computer and 
communications networks. The Committee has found such practices 
unacceptable and years ago began directing hundreds of 
millions, if not billions, of dollars to the development, 
testing, deployment, operation and maintenance, and refreshment 
of IT programs. This year is no different.
    Within the Department of Justice [DOJ], the Committee 
recommendation includes substantial investments in critical IT 
programs, including enhancements for the Office of the Chief 
Information Officer to enhance the Office's role as manager and 
coordinator of IT programs at DOJ; Legal Activities Office 
Automation, the computer modernization program for many of 
DOJ's management, litigating, and law enforcement components; 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation's computer network Trilogy 
and its Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information Local 
Area Network; and the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task 
Force's data fusion center. The Committee directs DOJ to 
include funding for the operation, maintenance and refreshment 
of these programs in its fiscal year 2005 budget submission. 
Within the Department of State, the Committee recommendation 
includes substantial investments in the Capital Investment 
Fund, which funds the Department's IT programs. The State 
Department in the past has demonstrated that, with additional 
funding, it can complete IT projects on-time and under budget. 
The Committee expects the same for the Department's next major 
global IT project, State Messaging and Archive Retrieval 
Toolset [SMART], for which a substantial increase is provided.

            REPROGRAMMINGS, REORGANIZATIONS, AND RELOCATIONS

    As in previous years, section 605 is included under title 
VI of the general provisions of the bill. Reprogramming 
procedures are the gentleman's agreement that provides agencies 
with flexibility while ensuring proper oversight of those 
agencies by Congress. The current Administration has missed no 
opportunity to undermine this agreement. They will fail.
    The Committee directs that both the House and Senate 
chairmen of the Subcommittees on the Departments of Commerce, 
Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and related agencies will be 
notified by letter at least 15 days prior to:
  --Reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or temporary, in 
        excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, 
        between programs or activities. In addition, the 
        Committee desires to be notified of reprogramming 
        actions which are less than these amounts where so 
        directed or if such actions would have the effect of 
        committing the agency to significant funding 
        requirements in future years;
  --Increasing funds or personnel by any means for any project 
        or activity for which funds have been denied or 
        restricted;
  --Creating new programs, offices, agencies, or commissions, 
        or substantially augmenting existing programs, offices, 
        agencies, or commissions;
  --Relocating offices or employees;
  --Reorganizing offices, programs, or activities, including 
        consolidations, expansions, and changes in names or 
        designations;
  --Contracting out or privatizing any functions or activities 
        presently performed by Federal employees funded by this 
        subcommittee;
  --Initiating construction projects in excess of $500,000 not 
        specifically approved by the Committee; and
  --Adding, expanding, converting, or altering space in any 
        newly-constructed facility for a period of one year 
        after contract close-out of the new facility.
    For the purpose of the paragraph above, a construction 
project includes all cost activities necessary to produce a 
complete and usable facility. Projects include construction, 
addition, expansion, conversion, or acquisition of an existing 
building, land, or structure. This limitation applies to the 
total cost of the project regardless of the fiscal year that 
funds designated or used for the project were appropriated. 
This includes renovation projects which substantially expand or 
result in a change in the type of space or facility (garage to 
office, storage to garage, storage to office, etc.). This 
includes construction involving more than one building or 
structure or utility system or site improvements at a location 
which support the provision of a complete and usable facility.
    The Committee directs each department, commission, or 
agency to provide their current number of political appointees 
and the number as of January 30, 2004. These amounts should be 
broken out by pay level. This report should be provided to the 
Committees on Appropriations no later than April 10, 2004. 
Also, the Committee shall be notified when the number of 
political appointees rises above 10 percent from either of the 
previous 2 years or when five or more political appointees are 
added in a given year. The Committee should be notified 30 days 
before either of these situations occurs. Similar notification 
should be provided when the same number of personnel positions 
is converted from political appointments to civil service 
positions.
    In addition, the Committee directs departments or agencies 
funded in the accompanying bill that are planning to conduct a 
reduction in force to notify the Committees by letter 30 days 
in advance of the date of the proposed personnel action. Also, 
the Committee directs that any items which are subject to 
interpretation will be reported.

                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount of    Committee    Amount of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the Budget Resolution
 for 2004: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and State, the
 Judiciary, and Related Agencies:
    Discretionary...........................................       36,989       36,989       40,193   \1\ 40,193
    Mandatory...............................................          642          642          654      \1\ 654
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2004....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........   \2\ 26,586
    2005....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        6,951
    2006....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        3,049
    2007....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,599
    2008 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........          844
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA        1,260           NA          171
 2004.......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.

    Proper Budgeting.--The Committee is aware that it is 
routine practice at the Office of Management and Budget [OMB] 
to non-recur capital investments and to force agencies to seek 
operations and maintenance, repair, and modernization funds as 
program increases rather than adjustments to base. The result, 
seen again and again by the Committee, is that new investments 
quickly degrade, leading to a costly and inefficient 
``collapse-crisis-rebuild'' cycle for computer and 
communications networks, specialized equipment, vehicles, and 
facilities. The Committee, as the advocate of the taxpayer, has 
made substantial capital investments in the Departments of 
Justice, Commerce, and State in the last 7 years. The Committee 
intends to protect that investment and expects the agencies to 
do the same. Therefore, the Committee urges OMB to properly 
recur capital investments in the fiscal year 2005 budget 
request and thereafter.
    Liaison.--The Committee shares the desire of the House to 
channel most of its inquiries and requests for information and 
assistance through the budget offices or comptroller 
organizations, but reserves the right to call upon any 
individual or organization in any agency under its 
jurisdiction. The Committee continues to stress the natural 
affinity between these offices and the Appropriations 
Committee, which makes a close working relationship imperative.

           TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND RELATED AGENCY

                             RELATED AGENCY

                 FOREIGN TERRORIST TRACKING TASK FORCE

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $61,597,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................      61,597,000
Committee recommendation................................      72,607,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $72,607,000.
    This account funds the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task 
Force [FTTTF]. The recommendation is $72,607,000 above the 
budget request.
    The FTTTF is an independent, inter-agency data fusion 
operation working in cooperation with the FBI, but is not and 
shall not be a part of the FBI. The FTTTF stood up on an ad hoc 
basis after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 and is 
charged with denying terrorists entry into the United States 
and locating, detaining, prosecuting, and deporting terrorists 
that have already entered the country. The FTTTF's advanced 
information technology capabilities are intended to compensate 
for profound shortcomings in Justice Department, particularly 
FBI, data warehousing, mining, and analysis capabilities. These 
advanced networking capabilities are also intended to eliminate 
the barriers that had led to past communications and 
information-sharing failures. Besides heavy Justice Department 
participation, Treasury, State, DOD, CIA, NSA, HHS, SSA, and 
OPM all have staff onboard.
    The Committee is aware that the Organized Crime and Drug 
Enforcement Task Force [OCDETF] needs a system that can 
automate and exploit huge volumes of information collected from 
multiple Federal agencies similar, if not identical, to that 
used by the FTTTF. The Committee recommendation therefore 
includes $22,017,000 for OCDETF to leverage the FTTTF 
architecture to create an OCDETF data warehouse that can 
quickly ingest, organize, analyze, and disseminate the 
voluminous drug trafficking investigative information of its 
agencies, as well as critical pieces of public source 
information.

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee has made funding for combating terrorism and 
crime the centerpiece of the fiscal year 2004 appropriations 
bill. The Committee recommends $18,508,920,000 in new budget 
(obligational) authority in the accompanying bill for the 
Department of Justice.
    Modular Cost Budgeting and Chronic Shortfalls.--Built into 
the cost of every new Justice Department employee are funds to 
partially cover so-called ``modular costs'', the costs of 
equipment, vehicles, facilities, and training integral to an 
employee's ability to perform his or her duty. Yet components 
are, almost without exception, desperately short of equipment, 
vehicles, facilities, and training. The reasons for this are 
unclear. However, it seems apparent that the modular cost 
approach has lulled components into ignoring necessary capital 
investments. It has also grossly inflated the cost of new 
employees without commensurate benefit. Built-in capital 
investment funds are siphoned off for purposes unknown while 
the Committee finds itself responsible for pulling together 
funds to address significant shortfalls in everything from 
computers to fingerprint powder. The Committee believes that 
the long-term health of the Department requires a new approach 
to budgeting. Therefore, the Justice Department is directed to 
drop modular cost budgeting beginning with the fiscal year 2005 
request. The costs associated with hiring new employees shall 
only include personnel salaries and benefits. Costs associated 
with new hires characterized broadly as ``Contractual Services 
and Supplies'', ``Acquisition of Assets'', and ``Items with 
Multiple Object Classes'' shall be budgeted directly in 
separate and identifiable capital investment lines in the 
request of each component. Justice Management Division is 
directed to submit a report on how this will be achieved not 
later than November 30, 2003. The Committee is prepared to 
impose a hiring freeze in fiscal year 2004 should the 
Department fail to abide by this directive.
    Consolidation of Decision Units.--The Committee does not 
agree with the Department's proposal to consolidate existing 
decision units. All accounts within the Department of Justice 
therefore shall continue to use their fiscal year 2003 decision 
units throughout the budget process, unless otherwise specified 
in the following recommendation.
    Cross-Cutting Efficiencies.--The Committee recommendation 
does not incorporate the Department's proposed savings 
resulting from ``cross cutting efficiencies''. While the 
Committee commends the Department's attempt to increase 
efficiencies in current operations, find new and different ways 
to do business, and in some cases reduce or eliminate lower 
performing or lower priority programs, the Committee does not 
believe the proposed savings are realizable in fiscal year 
2004. Rather, these targeted cuts would create havoc to these 
agencies and hamper their ability to accomplish their missions.
    The Committee directs the Department to review the proposed 
``cross-cutting efficiencies'' and submit a plan to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than February 13, 2004, 
setting forth a realistic time frame for which these savings 
can be absorbed.
    Department Coordination.--In light of the transfer of the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [ATF] to 
the Department of Justice and the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation's [FBI's] refocused mission, the Committee 
believes the Department of Justice must redefine the roles of 
each of its law enforcement agencies to ensure they are not 
duplicating efforts, particularly in the areas of drugs, 
explosives, and fugitive apprehension.
    The Committee directs the Department of Justice to submit a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations by February 13, 
2004, that identifies the core mission or missions for each of 
its law enforcement agencies. The report shall also include 
specific steps the Department has taken or plans to take, 
including examples, to eliminate duplicative functions, 
consolidate related activities, share critical information, and 
ensure cooperation among the agencies.
    As one step to eliminate duplication of efforts, the 
Committee believes the agency with primary jurisdiction over 
fugitive apprehension, the United States Marshals Service 
[USMS], should be solely responsible for fugitive cases that 
fall under the Unlawful Flight statutes. The Marshals Service 
has the expertise and the resources, including district and 
regional fugitive task forces and the international fugitive 
program, to effectively adopt this mission. Moreover, 
consolidation of these duties to one agency will provide State 
and local law enforcement with a single point of contact for 
fugitive matters and will allow the USMS to improve the 
coordination of all Federal, State, and local fugitive 
investigations. Therefore, the Committee directs the Attorney 
General to transfer all of the functions of the FBI with regard 
to the location and apprehension of State or local fugitives 
under the Unlawful Flight statutes to the USMS.

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $90,477,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................       5,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     133,772,000
House allowance.........................................     106,664,000
Committee recommendation................................     116,171,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $116,171,000. 
The recommendation is $17,601,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation includes a transfer of $5,437,000 from the 
United States Marshals Service, Salaries and Expenses account 
for management of seized assets.
    This account funds the development of policy objectives and 
the overall management of the Department of Justice.
    Office of Intelligence Policy and Review.--The Committee 
remains concerned about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance 
Act [FISA] warrant process. The Committee expects the Office of 
Intelligence Policy and Review [OIPR] to continue balancing 
Constitutional protections against investigative imperatives. 
In that capacity, the Committee expects OIPR to be directly 
involved at every stage of every wiretap case. In fiscal year 
2003, the Committee provided an additional $7,000,000 to OIPR 
for program enhancements, increasing OIPR's base budget by 81 
percent. These significant personnel and infrastructure 
enhancements should be sufficient to address the increase in 
FISA requests. OIPR is directed to continue to provide 
quarterly briefings to the Committees on Appropriations on 
FISA-related activities, issues, compliance with Congressional 
directives, perceived abuses, and needed statutory corrections.
    Financial Management System.--For almost a decade, the 
Department's policy on financial management systems has been 
for each component to take care of its own needs. The result 
has been stove-piped financial systems that are inflexible, 
unreliable, untimely, manually intensive, and that do not meet 
the needs of the components or the Department. The Department 
is now pursuing a Department-wide financial system with the 
hope that it will make financial reporting and program 
performance more timely, accurate, and accessible. The 
Committee supports the Department's efforts and will consider 
the use of existing resources for a Unified Financial 
Management System, subject to section 605 of this Act.
    Robert F. Kennedy [RFK] Building Security.--The Committee 
recently provided the Department with nearly $8,000,000 for 
security improvements to the RFK building and for pilot 
projects to determine the security needs of other Department 
facilities. The Committee will consider a reprogramming of 
available resources for additional security enhancements once 
the pilot projects are complete and a proposal for security 
requirements for all DOJ facilities has been submitted.
    Facilities.--The current piecemeal solution to office space 
has become increasingly burdensome and expensive. The Committee 
is aware that 1,000,000 square feet of leased Department of 
Justice space will be expiring in the next 3 years. The cost to 
renew these leases or move to newly leased space that will 
demand security upgrades will be astronomical. The Committee 
includes $1,547,000 for the Department to conduct a feasibility 
study for the consolidation of all Department facilities 
currently located within the District of Columbia metropolitan 
area. The study shall only consider locations west of the 
Catoctin Mountains and within 50 miles of the Old National Road 
and shall be submitted to the Committees on Appropriations not 
later than September 17, 2004.
    Information Technology Enhancements.--The Department has 
struggled to keep pace with the rapid change in information 
technology [IT], which has been only further complicated by the 
decentralized structure and extensive delegation of these 
responsibilities to the Department's components. Negative 
results have included frequent turnover of top Information 
Resources Management [IRM] executives; reactive rather than 
proactive IRM management; and fragmented or overlapping 
functions. To address these issues, the Committee approved a 
reorganization of the Office of the Chief Information Officer 
[CIO] that would allow the Office of the CIO to focus on 
sharing of information, securing and protecting information, 
providing reliable, trusted, and cost-effective IT services, 
and using IT to improve program effectiveness and performance. 
The Committee recommendation includes $2,500,000 for the CIO to 
strengthen the Office's role as manager and coordinator of IT 
projects at the Department.
    Increasing information sharing and reliance on IT, 
especially for law enforcement and national security purposes, 
comes at the risk of increasing the potential damage that could 
result from malicious attacks or the exposure and misuse of 
sensitive information. A number of Justice components are 
currently looking to various technology solutions to improve 
the security of their IT systems. However, there is no overall 
departmental approach or architecture to guide these efforts. 
As a result, these perceived solutions may simply offer an 
isolated and patchwork response and not an integrated and 
comprehensive defense. The Committee therefore includes 
$7,000,000 for the CIO to strengthen the Department's 
management and oversight of IT security.
    To ensure that the Department is enhancing rather than 
duplicating efforts of its components, the Committee directs 
the Attorney General to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than November 15, 2003, with a spend 
plan and explanation of the role the CIO will play with respect 
to the Department's components, prior to the obligation of any 
of these funds.

                   IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................................
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     $34,077,000
House allowance.........................................      20,677,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for this 
new account.
    The request seeks to meld a disparate group of activities 
under this heading. As noted last year, there are no advantages 
in merging funding for the Joint Automated Booking System, 
Automated Biometric Identification System/Integrated Automated 
Fingerprint Identification System integration, and other 
information technology enhancements into a single account. 
Historically, such mergers have hindered program progress and 
complicated program oversight. The other initiatives placed 
under this heading rightly belong under ``General 
Administration, Salaries and Expenses'' or as separate accounts 
under ``General Administration''.

                     JOINT AUTOMATED BOOKING SYSTEM

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $15,869,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      23,176,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $23,176,000. 
The recommendation is $23,176,000 above the budget request.
    This account centrally funds development, acquisition, and 
deployment of the Joint Automated Booking System [JABS]. The 
Committee has not adopted an administration proposal to merge 
funding for JABS, Automated Biometric Identification System/
Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System 
integration, and other information technology enhancements into 
a single new account.
    JABS incentive funds are to be distributed to the component 
or components making the best progress in installing and 
operating the system.
    JABS automates the collection of fingerprint, photographic, 
and biographical data during the booking process and provides a 
mechanism to rapidly and positively identify an individual 
based on a fingerprint submission to the FBI's Integrated 
Automated Fingerprint Identification System. The JABS booking 
submissions also provide ``real-time'' updating of the FBI's 
criminal master files that are available to all Federal, State, 
and local law enforcement agencies.
    JABS has proven to be one of the most successful programs 
at the Department. This year, JABS was awarded the Federal 
Executive Leadership Council's Showcase of Excellence Award. 
The Showcase of Excellence award recognizes projects that 
improve the quality of services delivered to people and that 
promote inter- or intra-agency collaboration that reduce 
duplicative systems.
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.--The 
recommendation includes $3,200,000 to deploy JABS to the Bureau 
of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives [ATF]. The fiscal 
year 2004 budget request did not anticipate ATF's move to the 
Department of Justice and therefore did not include funding for 
ATF's booking station requirements.
    User Fee.--The Department of Homeland Security [DHS] and 
other law enforcement agencies are increasingly accessing JABS 
and consequently driving up the cost of the system. The 
Committee does not believe that the Justice Department should 
bear the cost burden of this system alone. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Attorney General to submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations by March 31, 2004, that 
examines the implementation of a user fee for JABS, including 
all possible users, recommended fee levels, likely collections, 
and the potential impact such a fee would have on the system.

    AUTOMATED BIOMETRIC IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM/INTEGRATED AUTOMATED 
             FINGERPRINT IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM INTEGRATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $8,941,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for this 
account. This effort rightly falls under the purview of the 
Homeland Security Appropriations Subcommittee.

                   LEGAL ACTIVITIES OFFICE AUTOMATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $15,838,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      33,240,000
House allowance.........................................      30,136,000
Committee recommendation................................      66,240,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $66,240,000. 
The recommendation is $33,000,000 above the budget request.
    This account centrally funds acquisition, deployment, and 
maintenance of Legal Activities Office Automation [LAOA] 
systems, the largest components of which are the Justice 
Consolidated Network [JCN] and the Justice Consolidated Office 
Network [JCON].
    LAOA is the computer modernization program for many of the 
Department's management, litigating, and law enforcement 
components, including the Antitrust Division, the U.S. 
Attorneys, the U.S. Marshals Service, the U.S. Trustees, the 
Executive Office for Immigration Review, the Community 
Relations Service, the offices funded through the ``General 
Administration'' and ``General Legal Activities'' accounts, the 
Bureau of Prisons, and the Office of Justice Programs. These 
components make up approximately 71,000 Department employees, 
all of whom will be end users of LAOA. The Committee has pushed 
hard in previous years to increase the funds for, and widen the 
scope of, JCN and JCON to maximize the benefits of a common 
computer system across components. This year, the Committee 
recommendation incorporates the U.S. Parole Commission.

                       NARROWBAND COMMUNICATIONS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $63,936,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     140,083,000
House allowance.........................................     103,171,000
Committee recommendation................................     103,171,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $103,171,000. 
The recommendation is $36,912,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee is aware that there will be carryover balances 
available in fiscal year 2004 in excess of $56,200,000. None of 
these funds shall be obligated until a spend plan has been 
submitted and approved by the Committees on Appropriations.
    This account centrally funds development, acquisition, 
deployment, and operation and maintenance of the Justice 
Department's narrowband wireless communications network. By 
law, all Justice components operating Land Mobile Radio systems 
in the VHF band must convert by January 1, 2005.

                         COUNTERTERRORISM FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................        $993,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      20,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................       1,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for this 
account. The recommendation is identical to the request. The 
Committee is aware that there will be carryover balances 
available in fiscal year 2004 in excess of $70,274,000.
    The purpose of this fund is to cover the costs incurred in 
reestablishing the operational capability of a Justice 
Department office or facility which has been damaged or 
destroyed as a result of any domestic or international 
terrorist incident. It may also be used to cover the costs of 
providing support to counter, investigate, or prosecute 
domestic or international terrorism.

                   ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $190,290,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     197,240,000
House allowance.........................................     193,530,000
Committee recommendation................................     194,111,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $194,111,000. 
The recommendation is $3,129,000 below the budget request.
    The Executive Office for Immigration Review includes the 
Board of Immigration Appeals [BIA], immigration judges, and 
administrative law judges who decide through administrative 
hearings whether to admit or exclude aliens seeking to enter 
the country, and whether to deport or adjust the status of 
aliens whose status has been challenged. This account also 
funds the Office of the Pardon Attorney which receives, 
investigates, and considers petitions for all forms of 
executive clemency.
    BIA is the highest administrative body for interpreting and 
applying immigration laws. BIA hears appeals of decisions of 
immigration judges and certain decisions of Immigration and 
Naturalization Service officers in a wide variety of 
proceedings. Decisions of BIA are subject to judicial review in 
the Federal Courts.
    In September 2002, a regulation that streamlines BIA's 
appellate procedures from a three-judge panel to a single judge 
adjudicating appeals became effective. Now, review by three 
judges is only required where BIA must correct clear errors of 
fact, interpret the law, or provide guidance regarding the 
exercise of discretion. The purpose of this regulation was to 
enable BIA to resolve simple cases quickly and reserve its 
limited resources for more complex cases. The Committee 
recommendation includes the $4,000,000 offset proposed in the 
budget request for cost savings resulting from this regulation.
    The Committee is concerned, however, that any costs saved 
by BIA are now being spent three-fold by the Civil Division, 
which must defend BIA's decisions in Federal Court. BIA's 
expedited adjudication of its cases means more appeals of those 
decisions to the Federal Courts, many of which are filed for no 
other reason than to delay removal proceedings. Accordingly, 
the Committee directs BIA, in coordination with the Civil 
Division, to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than March 21, 2004, listing the 
single-judge decisions that have been appealed to the Federal 
Courts, and the Civil Division's costs to defend those 
decisions over the past 3 years.

                           DETENTION TRUSTEE

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $768,578,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      40,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     810,125,000
House allowance.........................................     810,125,000
Committee recommendation................................     849,876,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $849,876,000. 
The recommendation is $39,751,000 above the budget request.
    The Detention Trustee oversees Federal detainees.
    Prisoner Jail Days.--The Committee recommendation includes 
an additional $34,705,000 for an anticipated increase of 
405,924 prisoner jail days. This funding pays for the housing, 
subsistence, medical care, and medical guard services for 
detainees in the custody of the United States Marshals Service 
[USMS] and is regarded as a mandatory expense by the Committee.
    National Health Services Contract.--The Detention Trustee 
has begun the process of implementing a National Health 
Services contract for detainee medical requirements, oversight, 
and billing consolidation. Cost efficiencies are sure to 
follow. The Committee therefore includes the proposed 
$3,000,000 offset to the Detention Trustee budget, which 
reflects the savings resulting from this contract.
    Efficiency.--The Committee is concerned that the Detention 
Trustee is attempting to address detention needs by contracting 
to construct a facility. The fiscal year 2003 Appropriations 
Act language under this heading does not include construction 
as an allowable use of funds. Rather, the Detention Trustee was 
and is directed to utilize existing State, local, and private 
detention space to meet detention needs.
    Streamlining.--The recommendation does not include the 
requested offset of $6,000,000 for supposed cost reductions 
associated with moving prisoners to their designated Bureau of 
Prison [BoP] facility faster. The Committee believes this 
request is premature since actual processing efficiencies by 
district are still unknown. The Committee directs the Attorney 
General to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations 
not later than June 4, 2004, surveying each region's ability to 
reduce detention days from the time of sentencing to the time 
of commitment to a BoP facility, as well as the increased costs 
this shift will have on BoP.
    Independence of the Federal Detention Trustee.--Prior to 
the creation of the Detention Trustee in fiscal year 2001, the 
Bureau of Prisons [BoP], the United States Marshals Service 
[USMS], and the Immigration and Naturalization Service [INS] 
had to compete for control of bed space for detainees. These 
constant turf battles resulted in inadequate planning and 
severe mismanagement of detention space within the Department 
of Justice. The Detention Trustee has already started to 
address these problems. In fiscal year 2002, the Detention 
Trustee wrote and submitted two reports describing Federal 
detention practices relating to both criminal and immigration 
proceedings that will serve as a basis for which future process 
improvements can be assessed. The Detention Trustee has also 
been working towards improving Intergovernmental Agreements 
[IGAs] to ensure the Department achieves the ``best value'' 
when acquiring non-Federal detention resources.
    The Committee is aware that the Department has considered 
returning to the days of the turf wars. In September, 2002, the 
Department submitted a reorganization proposal to the Office of 
Management and Budget [OMB] that would have collapsed the 
Detention Trustee into BoP. This proposal never left OMB and 
the Department claims it has been permanently shelved. The 
Committee believes there is a continued need for the Detention 
Trustee to independently oversee detention resources for the 
Department. Even the INS has expressed an interest in 
continuing to rely on the Detention Trustee as the manager and 
clearinghouse for its detention space despite its transfer to 
the Department of Homeland Security. Accordingly, the Committee 
will not entertain proposals to eliminate or transfer the 
Detention Trustee to another component or Department.
    While the Trustee has management responsibility for 
detention and control of funding for bed space, detention 
personnel still remain under the control of the various 
components. Without control of personnel, the Trustee will be 
forced to regularly contend with Presidentially-appointed 
officials in the USMS and the BoP of this or any future 
Administration who may disagree with the Trustee's 
``guidance''. If the Trustee is to effectively manage bed 
space, he must control the experts that negotiate inter-
governmental agreements. Therefore, not later than 45 days 
after enactment of this Act, the Justice Department is directed 
to transfer such personnel from the USMS and BoP to the 
Detention Trustee as may be necessary to give the Trustee full 
operational control of bed space management. To the degree 
possible, such transfers should be voluntary and involve a 
minimum of disruption.
    Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System.--Like 
detention bed space, endless disputes over the Justice Prisoner 
and Alien Transportation System [JPATS] distracted managers 
from the complex task of operating an airline in a high 
security environment. As importantly, the lack of a 
sufficiently powerful manager left the program without an 
advocate in all-important budget debates. The result was a 
wide-body fleet in such a ruinous condition that only the 
dedication of the maintenance personnel and pilots has kept 
these aircraft in the air. These problems left managers little 
time to explore possible efficiencies in routing, scheduling, 
or other operational areas. The Committee believes the 
responsibility for the safe and secure transportation of 
prisoners should rest with only one component within the 
Department, the Detention Trustee. The Committee is aware that 
the Detention Trustee may be absorbing JPATS, but funding for 
the operations, maintenance, and management of JPATS remains 
with the United States Marshals Service [USMS] and the Bureau 
of Prisons [BoP]. The Committee recommendation therefore 
transfers funding for JPATS from USMS and BoP to the Detention 
Trustee.
    In addition, the Committee is aware that the Marshals 
Service is encountering greater difficulty in the transport of 
overseas fugitives to the United States, especially in cases 
where USMS is transporting combative or high profile fugitives, 
including those accused of terrorism and violent crimes. The 
Committee therefore directs the Detention Trustee to treat 
extraordinary extraditions or deportations as a priority 
mission for JPATS. The Detention Trustee shall notify the 
Committee on Appropriations should this mandate require 
additional aviation assets for the JPATS fleet.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $56,566,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................       2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      62,029,000
House allowance.........................................      56,245,000
Committee recommendation................................      60,840,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $60,840,000. 
The recommendation is $1,189,000 below the budget request.
    The Office of Inspector General [OIG] was recently given 
oversight of the Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] and the 
Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA]. Since then, the OIG has 
completed a number of major reviews, including the FBI's 
management of its information technology investments, the FBI's 
counterterrorism program, and the DEA's control of the 
diversion of controlled pharmaceuticals. Currently, the OIG has 
more than 40 ongoing reviews, including an examination of the 
FBI's Legal Attache program, the FBI's DNA Laboratory, the 
Hanssen espionage case, and the recent espionage case in Los 
Angeles involving FBI agents and an alleged Chinese double 
agent.
    The OIG has also received new responsibilities under the 
USA Patriot Act (Public Law 107-56), in which the OIG was 
directed to review all information and receive complaints of 
abuses of civil rights and civil liberties by Department of 
Justice employees and officials. In a 12-month period, the OIG 
has received more than 1,200 complaints suggesting Patriot Act-
related civil rights or civil liberties connections. The 2003 
Supplemental Appropriations Act included an additional 
$2,500,000 for the OIG to support these increased 
responsibilities. The Committee supports the significant role 
the OIG plays at the Department and will entertain requests for 
additional resources for OIG should they become necessary 
during the fiscal year.

                         U.S. Parole Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $9,876,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      10,862,000
House allowance.........................................      10,609,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,718,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,718,000. 
The recommendation is $144,000 below the budget request.
    The Commission is an independent body within the Department 
of Justice which makes decisions regarding requests for parole 
and supervision of Federal prisoners.
    In fiscal year 2001, the Committee directed the Justice 
Department to detail as many attorneys and personnel to the 
Commission as were necessary to address increased litigation 
and warrant work resulting from the transfer of the parole 
caseload from the District of Columbia. The Committee directs 
the Department to continue to detail as many attorneys and 
personnel as are necessary to the Commission, specifically 
detailing no less than four personnel at any one time from the 
Bureau of Prisons. The Attorney General shall submit a list of 
these detailed attorneys and personnel to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than January 15, 2004.

                            Legal Activities


                        GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $607,351,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     665,346,000
House allowance.........................................     620,533,000
Committee recommendation................................     632,637,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $632,637,000. 
The recommendation is $32,709,000 below the budget request.
    This appropriation funds the establishment of litigation 
policy, conduct of litigation, and various other legal 
responsibilities, through the Office of the Solicitor General, 
the Tax Division, the Criminal Division, the Civil Division, 
the Environmental and Natural Resources Division, the Civil 
Rights Division, the Office of Legal Counsel, and Interpol.
    The Committee recommendations, by division, are displayed 
in the following table:

                             LEGAL DIVISIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of the Solicitor General.........................           8,045
Tax Division............................................          78,985
Criminal Division.......................................         136,078
Civil Division..........................................         204,130
Environment and Natural Resources Division..............          78,496
Office of Legal Counsel.................................           5,745
Civil Rights Division...................................         110,168
INTERPOL USNCB..........................................          10,626
Office of Dispute Resolution............................             364
                                                         ---------------
      Total.............................................         632,637
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Professional Standards.--The more than 10,000 Justice 
Department attorneys making up the class suing the Justice 
Department for nearly $500,000,000 in unpaid overtime recently 
prevailed in their suit. Thus, some of the highest paid 
employees in the Federal service, with an average salary of 
more than $104,000, will now receive benefits heretofore 
limited to hourly wage employees. The Committee is not anxious 
to add to the ranks of the disgruntled.
    Corporate Fraud Task Force.--The Committee supports 
enhancing resources for the Criminal and Tax Divisions to 
investigate, prosecute, and litigate criminal and civil 
corporate fraud cases. The Committee directs both divisions to 
transfer the requested fiscal year 2004 increases to the 
Corporate Fraud Task Force from existing resources, subject to 
Section 605 of this Act.
    Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Administrative 
Expenses.--Claims filed under the Radiation Exposure 
Compensation Act [RECA] have increased five-fold since 2000. 
The 2004 workload is expected to reach nearly 5,000, compared 
to a 1,200 case workload in 2000. The Committee recommendation 
therefore includes an additional $1,000,000 for the Civil 
Division for processing RECA claims.
    Immigration Litigation.--Immigration litigation has been, 
not surprisingly, the fastest growing component of the Civil 
Division's workload. Court challenges handled by the Civil 
Division have more than doubled in the past 5 years, including 
a 68 percent increase from fiscal year 2001 to fiscal year 
2002. Increases are the result of enhanced enforcement of 
existing and new laws affecting immigrants, as well as the 
Board of Immigration Appeal's [BIA's] streamlining of 
administrative appeal procedures. BIA's streamlining has 
resulted in cases moving faster through the administrative 
process, which has meant increased appeals to the Federal 
Courts--a means of last resort before deportation. Therefore, 
the Committee recommendation includes an additional $3,500,000 
to address the increasing caseload for immigration litigation. 
The Committee expects the Civil Division to fully cooperate 
with BIA's review of the impact its streamlining has had on its 
caseload.
    Tribal Trust Fund Litigation.--At least 21 lawsuits have 
been filed by Indian Tribes seeking billions of dollars for 
alleged mismanagement of Tribal assets by the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs [BIA]. Some of the cases seek an order requiring the 
United States to perform multi-million dollar, multi-year 
accounting, and others seek a money judgment for losses the 
Tribes claim they have suffered. The Committee believes 
additional resources to defend against this litigation are 
essential, but believes they should be paid for by BIA and not 
the Department. Accordingly, the Committee directs the 
Environment and Natural Resources Division [ENRD] to seek 
reimbursement of not less than $3,060,000 by BIA not later than 
30 days after enactment of this Act.
    Hazardous Materials Transportation.--The Committee supports 
increases for the Hazardous Materials Transportation 
initiative, which will focus on investigating and prosecuting 
violators of hazardous material transportation and handling 
laws. The Committee directs ENRD to redirect existing resources 
for that purpose, subject to Section 605 of this Act.
    Interpol.--The Committee recommendation includes $932,000 
for the United States National Central Bureau [USNCB] for 
increased dues required by the International Criminal Police 
Organization (Interpol). The USNCB is responsible for paying 
dues to Interpol annually. The Interpol Executive Committee 
approved an increase in the 2004 dues at the Interpol General 
Assembly in October 2002 to address the emerging international 
criminal terrorist threats and the resulting need to 
communicate and exchange law enforcement information.

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $4,002,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       4,028,000
House allowance.........................................       4,028,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,028,000

    The Committee recommends a reimbursement of $4,028,000 for 
legal costs. The recommendation is identical to the budget 
request.
    This account covers Justice Department expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986.

                           Antitrust Division


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $133,133,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     141,898,000
House allowance.........................................     128,133,000
Committee recommendation................................     141,898,000

    The Committee recommendation assumes a total of 
$141,898,000 in budget (obligational) authority. The 
recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Antitrust Division investigates potential violations of 
Federal antitrust laws, represents the interests of the United 
States in cases brought under these laws, acts on antitrust 
cases before the Supreme Court, and reviews decisions of 
regulatory commissions relating to antitrust law.
    In light of the significant decrease in merger activity and 
the decline of pre-merger filings requiring review, the 
Division has assured the Committee that this funding level is 
sufficient to meet its mission of vigorously enforcing our 
Nation's antitrust laws.

                             U.S. Attorneys


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $1,493,993,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   1,556,784,000
House allowance.........................................   1,526,253,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,507,879,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,507,879,000. The recommendation is $48,905,000 below the 
budget request. The Committee is aware that the U.S. Attorneys 
will receive $158,371,000 in reimbursements in fiscal year 
2004.
    This account supports the Executive Office for U.S. 
Attorneys and the 94 U.S. Attorneys offices throughout the 
United States and its territories. The U.S. Attorneys serve as 
the principal litigators for the U.S. Government for criminal 
and civil matters. As in the past, Committee recommendation 
focuses the efforts of the U.S. Attorneys on those crimes where 
the unique resources, expertise, or jurisdiction of the Federal 
Government can, or must, be most effective.
    Professional Standards.--The more than 10,000 Justice 
Department attorneys making up the class that sued the Justice 
Department for nearly $500,000,000 in unpaid overtime recently 
prevailed in their case. Thus, some of the highest paid 
employees in the Federal service, with an average salary of 
more than $104,000, will now receive benefits heretofore 
limited to hourly wage employees. The Committee is not eager to 
add to the ranks of the disgruntled.
    Information Technology [IT] Infrastructure.--The Committee 
supports the use of existing resources for the U.S. Attorneys' 
IT infrastructure, subject to Section 605 of this Act, 
including the development of the Enterprise Case Management 
System [ECMS] as well as the Electronic Case Filing [ECF] 
system. ECMS will expedite the preparation and validation of 
statistical reports, as well as the administration and 
maintenance of the centralized system. ECF will reduce the time 
and burden of filing documents with the Federal Courts and the 
time to coordinate cases with investigative agencies. To ensure 
these improvements are consistent with the Department's overall 
IT approach and architecture, the Committee directs the U.S. 
Attorneys to consult with the Office of the Chief Information 
Officer prior to moving forward on this project.
    Corporate Fraud Task Force.--In fiscal year 2003, the U.S. 
Attorneys received an additional $13,000,000 for 76 full-time 
equivalents to support the Department's Corporate Fraud Task 
Force. This increase was not accounted for in the fiscal year 
2004 budget request. Should additional resources be needed for 
the vigorous pursuit and prosecution of corporate fraud cases, 
the U.S. Attorneys may redirect available resources, subject to 
Section 605 of this Act.
    Workforce Imbalance.--The Committee supports the U.S. 
Attorneys' desire to correct the balance between its attorneys 
and support personnel since a balanced staff will better 
leverage attorney resources. Therefore, the U.S. Attorneys may 
redirect available resources to increase paralegal, financial 
and IT support personnel, subject to Section 605 of this Act. 
The Committee expects the U.S. Attorneys to consider retraining 
eligible legal secretaries for these positions, since office 
automation advances, such as voice mail and computers, have 
changed workflow processes and the role of legal secretaries 
has significantly changed.
    Civil Defensive Litigation.--The Committee is aware that 
civil defensive cases are unique in that they are non-delegable 
and cannot be declined. The U.S. Attorneys' offices must defend 
these cases to protect the interests of the United States by 
safeguarding public funds and programs, and defending policy 
initiatives and statutes. The Committee is also aware that 
civil defensive cases are on the rise: from 155,660 in 1992 to 
160,383 in 2001. The Committee supports the reallocation of 
resources to better address this significant increase and 
complexity of caseload over the last several years, subject to 
Section 605 of this Act.
    Project Seahawk.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$10,000,000 for the continuation of Project Seahawk, a pilot 
project to enhance intermodal security and law enforcement 
within our Nation's coastal cities. The pilot will provide a 
national model for cities that experience heavy volumes of 
intermodal traffic by establishing a streamlined process to 
address criminal activity that may compromise or impede the 
movement of intermodal traffic within the U.S. Project Seahawk 
shall continue to be coordinated under the U.S. Attorneys and 
include Federal, State, and local law enforcement.
    In addition, the recommendation includes $3,766,000 to 
expand Project Seahawk to include New York City, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore, New Orleans, Galveston, and Long Beach.
    Legal Education.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$19,023,000 for legal education and distance learning at the 
National Advocacy Center [NAC] as requested by the 
Administration. NAC State and local training funds are provided 
under the Office of Justice Programs.
    Violent Crime Task Forces.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $1,500,000 to continue and expand task force 
activities associated with Operation Streetsweeper.
    Criminal Prosecution.--The Committee directs the Department 
to report on the number of cases referred for Federal 
prosecution by local, State, and Federal agencies under USC 922 
(a)(1)(a), USC 922(m), 922(b), 924(a)(3), USC 922(j), USC 
922(a)(6), USC 922(k) on rates of prosecution; on Department 
efforts to increase enforcement of these statutes; and 
impediments to enforcement that may necessitate a change in 
these statutes.

                        U.S. TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $155,736,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     175,172,000
House allowance.........................................     166,157,000
Committee recommendation................................     170,168,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $170,168,000 in budget 
authority. The recommendation is $5,004,000 below the budget 
request.
    The U.S. Trustee system provides administrative support to 
expeditiously move bankruptcy cases through the bankruptcy 
process and ensures accountability of private trustees 
appointed to administer bankruptcy estates.
    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$750,000 for the Bankruptcy Training Center at the National 
Advocacy Center, in support of the Trustees' continuing 
education program.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $1,104,000 for 
information technology [IT] infrastructure improvements, such 
as enhancements to IT security, bandwidth, and the Automated 
Case Management System. To ensure these improvements are 
consistent with the Department's overall IT approach and 
architecture, the Committee directs the U.S. Trustee to consult 
with the Office of the Chief Information Officer prior to the 
obligation of any of these funds.

                  FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $1,129,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       1,212,000
House allowance.........................................       1,205,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,207,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,207,000. 
The recommendation is $5,000 below the budget request, and 
fully provides for the adjudication of claims against: Germany 
relating to World War II; Cuba relating to the Castro regime; 
and Iraq relating to the U.S.S. Stark incident and Desert 
Shield/Storm.
    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission settles claims of 
American citizens arising from nationalization, expropriation, 
or other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

                         U.S. Marshals Service


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $676,051,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................       8,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     720,806,000
House allowance.........................................     678,672,000
Committee recommendation................................     602,274,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $602,274,000. 
The recommendation is $118,532,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation reflects the transfer of all 
joint Federal, State, local, and foreign law enforcement 
activities previously funded within the U.S. Marshals Service 
[USMS] to a new account titled ``Interagency Law Enforcement 
Support'', the transfer of the Justice Prisoner and Alien 
Transportation System [JPATS] Fund to the Office of the 
Detention Trustee, and the transfer of seized assets management 
to the Justice Management Division.
    The core missions of the USMS include the apprehension of 
fugitives, protection of the Federal judiciary, protection of 
witnesses, execution of warrants and court orders, and the 
custody and transportation of accused and unsentenced 
prisoners.
    The Committee recommendation does not support the Marshal's 
proposal to collapse its current decision units. Rather, the 
Committee recommendations are displayed in the following table:

                     UNITED STATES MARSHALS SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Activity                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protection of the Judicial Process.....................         309,917
Prisoner Transportation................................          14,941
Fugitive Apprehension..................................         165,779
D.C. Superior Court....................................          27,478
Service of Legal Process...............................          18,308
Training Academy.......................................           4,566
ADP/Telecommunications.................................          36,115
Management & Administration............................          53,337
Vacancy Savings........................................         (28,167)
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses.....................         602,274
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. The Committee recommendations 
are discussed in more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Courthouse Security Personnel.--The Committee is aware that 
USMS is not hiring up to its authorized levels. Specifically, 
the USMS is projecting to hire only 4,212 full-time equivalents 
[FTE] in fiscal year 2003, which is 282 FTE short of the 
authorized and funded level. While the Committee supports 
providing the Marshals with sufficient resources to meet its 
core missions, the Committee sees little reason to fund the 
requested additional personnel until USMS hires up to its 
current authorized and funded levels. Only then will the 
Marshals know its true needs.
    The Committee believes the USMS is manipulating these 
vacancies to recover and then redirect funds to other areas. By 
leaving the projected 282 FTE slots vacant, for example, the 
USMS gains nearly $28,167,000. Rather than provide the USMS 
with a slush fund that is below the radar of Congressional 
oversight, the Committee recommendation directs a portion of 
those funds to areas most in need of additional resources, 
including courthouse security equipment and construction. Prior 
to the obligation of any funding that is not specifically 
accounted for in the Committee recommendation, the USMS shall 
submit a spend plan, subject to approval, to the Committees on 
Appropriations. The USMS shall also submit a deployment plan 
for all personnel on board as of January 1, 2004, by position 
location, and assignments, to the Committees on Appropriations, 
not later than January 31, 2004.
    The Committee recommendation includes $2,766,000 (excluding 
a $500,000 transfer from the Justice Detainee Information 
System) to improve and maintain the Warrant Information Network 
and to continue subscriptions to various government and private 
networks and on-line services and $5,701,000 for Electronic 
Surveillance Unit recurring costs. This funding level shall be 
treated as a permanent increase to base.
    Special Assignments.--Special assignment funding is 
intended for contingencies such as the Vieques and World Bank 
protests. In the past, the USMS used this account to pay for 
long established missions or capital investments. That abuse 
was ended by the Committee. If routine items reappear under 
``Special Assignments'', the Committee will eliminate the 
subaccount and let the USMS handle contingency funding the way 
all other law enforcement agencies do, through the 
reprogramming process.
    Courthouse Security Equipment.--This subaccount funds 
security equipment, telephone systems, and cabling. The 
Committee recommendation provides $13,394,000 for courthouse 
security equipment. Each year hereafter, not less than this 
level of funding shall recur for USMS courthouse security 
equipment and the USMS shall submit a list of projects for such 
funding to the Committees on Appropriations not later than 30 
days after the date of enactment of this Act.
    The funding provided will outfit courthouses in the 
following locations:

                   USMS COURTHOUSE SECURITY EQUIPMENT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Detainee Facilities:
    Tucson, AZ..........................................             250
    Fayetteville, AR....................................             300
    Colorado Springs, CO................................             100
    Grand Junction, CO..................................             155
    Tallahassee, FL.....................................              95
    Athens, GA..........................................             350
    Davenport, IA.......................................             350
    Sioux City, IA......................................             350
    East St. Louis, IL..................................             160
    Peoria, IL..........................................             150
    Indianapolis, IN....................................              15
    Springfield, MA.....................................             750
    Bangor, ME..........................................              10
    Charlotte, NC.......................................             100
    Raleigh, NC.........................................             690
    Wilmington, NC......................................             250
    Newark, NJ..........................................             330
    Roswell, NM.........................................              95
    Santa Fe, NM........................................             375
    Rochester, NY.......................................             250
    Lawton, OK..........................................             230
    McAlester, OK.......................................              75
    Tulsa, OK...........................................             350
    Hato Rey, PR........................................              50
    Ponce, PR...........................................             235
    Del Rio, TX.........................................             300
    El Paso, TX.........................................             400
    Marshall, TX........................................             450
    Victoria, TX........................................              20
    Madison, WI.........................................              75
    Milwaukee, WI.......................................              75
    Casper, WY..........................................             225
    Jackson Hole, WY....................................              90
    Yellowstone, WY.....................................              75
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, detainee facilities.....................           7,775
                                                         ===============
Minor Repairs...........................................             350
ADT Security Equipment Maintenance......................           1,876
Security Engineering Services...........................             673
Safety Program..........................................           2,003
Information Security, Personnel, Equipment, and Related              717
 Costs (Physical).......................................
                                                         ---------------
      Total, USMS Security Equipment....................          13,394
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Fugitive Apprehensions.--Over the past few years, the 
Committee has established and funded task forces in New York 
City, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Atlanta. These task forces are 
intended to be dedicated full-time to the pursuit of the most 
dangerous fugitives, although USMS leadership has largely 
undercut the value of the latter two task forces by leaving 
personnel answerable to the districts. The Committee therefore 
directs that the Chicago and Atlanta fugitive task forces 
answer only to headquarters, not the districts, as is the case 
with the New York City and Los Angeles task forces. 
Nevertheless, the Committee recommendation includes an 
additional $9,476,000 to ensure the full annualization and 
necessary equipment and vehicles for these task forces. In 
addition, the Committee recommendation provides an increase of 
$2,750,000 over the fiscal year 2003 funding level for 
electronic surveillance unit [ESU] training and equipment, 
including funding for surveillance vans and light aircraft, 
bucket trucks, a central signal collection system, secure 
communications equipment, various tracking systems, and night 
vision equipment.
    International Fugitives.--To avoid creating a safe haven 
for felons in the Caribbean, the Committee established a 
permanent Marshals presence in Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, 
and Mexico last year. The Committee recommendation includes 
$3,016,000 for non-personnel costs for these offices.
    Vehicles.--The USMS' approach to fleet management is ``run 
to failure''. Though Federal guidelines call for replacing 
sedans after 3 years or 60,000 miles and sport utility vehicles 
after 4 years or 40,000 miles to avoid chronic problems with 
availability and excessive operations and maintenance costs, 
the USMS has no fleet replacement cycle. As a result, deputies 
are chasing fugitives or transporting prisoners in vehicles 
whose unreliability pose an unnecessary risk. The Committee 
recommendation includes $15,379,000 in base resources for 
vehicle purchases. This shall be treated as a permanent 
increase to the base. None of these vehicles are to be assigned 
to headquarters.
    Office of Inspector General Audit.--The Committee is aware 
that the Office of the Inspector General [OIG] is conducting an 
audit of the Marshals Service's budget activities during fiscal 
years 2002 and 2003. The audit will focus on ``(1) the 
executive direction provided by USMS management in implementing 
the budget; (2) issues surrounding upgrading and maintaining 
the USMS' motor vehicle fleet; (3) creation of new operational 
units within the USMS; and (4) reprogramming activities''. The 
Committee directs the Marshals to fully cooperate with this and 
any other audit or investigative activities conducted by the 
OIG.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $15,028,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................       1,371,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,964,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $25,964,000. 
The recommendation is $25,964,000 above the budget request. 
Each year hereafter, not less than this level of funding shall 
recur for USMS construction and the USMS shall submit a list of 
projects for such funding to the Committees on Appropriations 
not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act.
    This account funds construction, relocations, and furniture 
at existing courthouses.
    The Committee is aware that a national survey of Federal 
courthouses revealed that 95 percent of prisoner holding and 
transit facilities have serious security deficiencies. Of 392 
courthouses surveyed: 84 percent lack enough courtroom holding 
cells; 78 percent do not have secure prison elevators; 74 
percent do not have enclosed sallyports; 72 percent lack enough 
interview rooms; 57 percent do not have adequate cellblock 
space; and 38 percent lack cameras, monitors, and alarms.
    Years of neglect have created this deplorable situation, 
posing risks to the judicial family, the public, and the 
Marshals themselves. The Committee is intent on remedying 
courthouse deficiencies before a tragedy occurs. The Committee 
recommendations, by project, are displayed in the following 
table:

                            USMS CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Construction:
    Tucson, AZ..........................................           1,000
    Colorado Springs, CO................................             200
    Tallahassee, FL.....................................             125
    Benton, IL..........................................             100
    Rockford, IL........................................              90
    Indianapolis, IN....................................             100
    Bangor, ME..........................................             200
    Billings, MT........................................              20
    Charlotte, NC.......................................           2,200
    Santa Fe, NM........................................             500
    Cincinnati, OH......................................             250
    McAlester, OK.......................................             100
    Tulsa, OK...........................................             500
    Harrisburg, PA......................................             300
    Hato Rey, PR........................................             500
    Ponce, PR...........................................             250
    Charleston BPA, SC..................................           6,561
    North Charleston, SC................................           5,337
    Houston, TX.........................................           2,675
    Victoria, TX........................................             750
    St. Thomas, VI......................................             500
    Casper, WY..........................................             550
    Jackson Hole, WY....................................             100
    Yellowstone, WY.....................................             200
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, construction............................          23,108
                                                         ===============
Planning, Design, and Relocation [PDR]:
    Fresno, CA..........................................             350
    Colorado Springs, CO................................              20
    Tallahassee, FL.....................................              25
    Newnan, GA..........................................             110
    Davenport, IA.......................................              30
    Lincoln, NE.........................................             420
    Newark, NJ..........................................             175
    Santa Fe, NM........................................              75
    Tulsa, OK...........................................             125
    Eugene, OR..........................................             125
    Ponce, PR...........................................              50
    Casper, WY..........................................              50
    Yellowstone, WY.....................................              20
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, PDR.....................................           1,575
                                                         ===============
Minor repairs...........................................             531
Security specialist consultants/construction engineers..             750
                                                         ---------------
      Total, USMS Construction..........................          25,964
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee considers this an important step in reducing 
the backlog of critical security-related projects. As with 
courthouse security equipment, the Committee expects to be 
consulted prior to any deviation from the above plan.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $175,645,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     156,145,000
House allowance.........................................     156,145,000
Committee recommendation................................     156,145,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $156,145,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    This account provides for fees and expenses of witnesses 
who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in which the 
United States is a party, including fact and expert witnesses. 
These funds are also used for mental competency examinations as 
well as witness and informant protection.

                      COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $9,412,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       9,526,000
House allowance.........................................       9,526,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,526,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,526,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Community Relations Service provides assistance to 
communities and persons in the prevention and resolution of 
disagreements relating to perceived discriminatory practices.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $21,759,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      22,949,000
House allowance.........................................      21,759,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,949,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $22,949,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    This account provides funds to supplement existing 
resources to cover additional investigative expenses of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement 
Administration, and U.S. Marshals Service, such as awards for 
information, purchase of evidence, equipping of conveyances, 
and investigative expenses leading to seizure. Funds for these 
activities are provided from receipts deposited in the assets 
forfeiture fund resulting from the forfeiture of assets. 
Expenses related to the management and disposal of assets are 
also provided from the assets forfeiture fund by a permanent 
indefinite appropriation.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $369,712,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     541,844,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................     415,010,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $415,010,000. 
The recommendation is $126,834,000 below the budget request.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement Program, through 
its 9 regional task forces, utilizes the combined resources and 
expertise of its 11 member Federal agencies, in cooperation 
with State and local investigators and prosecutors, to target 
and disband major narcotics trafficking and money laundering 
organizations.
    The Committee recommendations, by agency, are displayed in 
the following table:

                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Investigations:
    Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives...........          11,600
    Drug Enforcement Administration.....................         172,846
    Federal Bureau of Investigation.....................         122,147
    State and Local Overtime Program....................             105
    United States Marshals Service......................           2,148
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, investigations..........................         308,846
                                                         ===============
Prosecutions:
    Criminal Division...................................           3,495
    Tax Division........................................             995
    United States Attorneys.............................         101,674
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, prosecutions............................         106,164
                                                         ===============
      Total, Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement.....         415,010
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Automated Investigative Technology.--The Committee 
recognizes the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force 
[OCDETF] program's need for a mechanism to systematically 
analyze and make connections among the volumes of drug report 
information gathered by investigative agents and support staff, 
including addresses, names, financial information, business 
relationships, debriefing information and drug intelligence. 
Only with such a mechanism can all of the pieces of nationwide 
trafficking organizations be known. The Committee is aware that 
the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force [FTTTF] already has a 
system in place that can automate and exploit huge volumes of 
information collected from multiple Federal agencies. The 
Committee recommendation therefore includes $22,017,000 within 
FTTTF for OCDETF to leverage the FTTTF architecture to create 
an OCDETF data warehouse that can quickly ingest, organize, 
analyze and disseminate the voluminous drug trafficking 
investigative information of its agencies, as well as critical 
pieces of public source information.

                  INTERAGENCY LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2003....................................................
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................    $551,784,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $551,784,000. 
The recommendation is $551,784,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee is aware that $232,900,000 is also available from 
the Asset Forfeiture Fund, bringing the total availability of 
funding for the Interagency Law Enforcement Support account to 
$804,684,000.
    This new account funds the administration and support of 
joint Federal, State, local, and foreign law enforcement 
activities. The Committee has consolidated investments across 
multiple accounts to better identify and highlight multi-agency 
investigations and initiatives. The Justice Department shall 
make the sustenance and expansion of joint operations a top 
priority.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                   INTERAGENCY LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPORT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
United States Marshals Service [USMS]: Fugitive Task               6,533
 Forces.................................................
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, USMS....................................           6,533
                                                         ===============
Asset Forfeiture Fund [AFF]:
    Equitable Sharing...................................         206,000
    Joint Federal/State and Local Law Enforcement                 20,575
     Operations.........................................
    Criminal Division, Organized Crime Drug Enforcement            6,325
     Task Force [OCDETF]................................
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, AFF.....................................         232,900
                                                         ===============
Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI]:
    Counterterrorism:
        Joint Terrorism Task Force [JTTF] Program
         Support:
            Background Investigations...................             911
            Equipment (Computers and Radios)............             853
            Travel/Training.............................           1,654
            Operational Costs...........................           1,146
            Vehicle Costs...............................             889
            Supplies....................................             802
            Rent and Renovations........................             869
            State and Local Overtime....................           5,000
    Training:
        FBI Academy State and Local Training:
            Personnel...................................          10,726
            Travel......................................             554
            Supplies....................................           1,585
            Maintenance/Utilities.......................             969
            Equipment...................................             236
            Meals.......................................             377
        Field State and Local Training:
            Personnel...................................           9,176
            Travel......................................             214
            Supplies....................................             114
            Maintenance/Utilities.......................              48
            Equipment...................................             122
    Critical Incidence Response Group:
        Personnel.......................................           3,607
        Travel/Training.................................             970
        Other ADP Services..............................             978
        Equipment.......................................             110
    Violent Crimes:
        Safe Streets Task Forces:
            Vehicle Rental and Maintenance..............           3,786
            Rent........................................             463
            Telephones/Utilities........................             259
            Office Supplies and Miscellaneous Services..             120
            State and Local Overtime....................           5,000
        Indian Country Training.........................             440
    Laboratory:
        Travel..........................................             880
        Automated Data Processing Services..............           5,503
        Miscellaneous Services..........................           3,695
        Training........................................             586
        Equipment.......................................           7,679
        Supplies........................................           2,282
    Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS):
        Personnel.......................................         130,574
        Travel..........................................           3,115
        Rent............................................           5,521
        Services........................................          55,432
        Supplies........................................           2,198
        Equipment.......................................          19,001
                                                         ---------------
          Subtotal, FBI.................................         288,444
                                                         ===============
Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA]:
    Hazardous Waste clean up (Methamphetamine)..........           4,100
    Lab Processing of drug evidence.....................           1,608
    Training for Interstate transit inspections.........             300
    El Paso Intelligence Center response to drug                     270
     interdictions......................................
    Marijuana Eradication...............................          10,113
    Overtime and Equipment for State and Local Task                3,950
     Force Officers.....................................
    Training............................................           3,260
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, DEA.....................................          23,601
                                                         ===============
Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives [ATF]:
    State, Local and International Training Division....           1,117
    Youth Crime Gun Interdiction Initiative.............             671
    Gang Resistance Education and Training..............          14,760
    Canine Training.....................................           1,590
    State and Local Training............................           3,421
    Crime Gun Traces....................................          24,900
    State and Local Overtime............................           2,500
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, ATF.....................................          48,959
                                                         ===============
Bureau of Prisons [BoP]:
    National Institute of Corrections...................          21,747
    Contract Confinement in State and Local Facilities..         162,500
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, BoP.....................................         184,247
                                                         ===============
      Total, Interagency Law Enforcement Support........         784,684
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The proposed distribution of funds should be handled as an 
omnibus reprogramming to be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 45 days after date of enactment 
of this Act.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $4,215,973,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................     367,192,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   4,639,569,000
House allowance.........................................   4,576,730,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,885,989,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,885,989,000. The recommendation is $753,580,000 below the 
budget request. The reduction is mostly attributable to the 
full use of $367,192,000 in fiscal year 2003 supplemental 
appropriations in fiscal year 2004 and the transfer of all 
joint Federal, State, local, and foreign law enforcement 
activities to a new account titled ``Interagency Law 
Enforcement Support''. The Committee is aware that up to 
$263,457,000 in additional uncommitted carryover will also be 
available to apply to this account. A reduction of $72,607,000 
is attributable to the Foreign Terrorist Tracking Task Force 
achieving independent status.
    The Committee disagrees with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation's [FBI] decision to non-recur a number of fiscal 
year 2003 initiatives and expects funding for the following 
programs to be fully recurred in fiscal year 2004: $6,548,000 
for the Joint Terrorism Task Forces; $21,025,000 for the 
computer intrusion program; $10,000,000 for digital storage/
retrieval; $3,032,000 for secure video conferencing; $4,000,000 
for regional mitochondrial DNA labs; and $10,000,000 for 
training.
    The Committee recommendation also does not support the 
FBI's proposal to collapse its current decision units. Rather, 
the Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

                     FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Activity                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Criminal, Security, and Other Investigations:
    Organized Criminal Enterprises.....................         415,907
    White-Collar Crime.................................         537,999
    Other Field Programs...............................       1,888,361
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal.........................................       2,856,167
                                                        ================
Law Enforcement Support:
    Training, Recruitment, Applicant...................         167,737
    Forensic Services..................................         181,350
    Information Management, Automation, and                     275,778
     Telecommunications................................
    Technical Field Support and Services...............         453,449
    Criminal Justice Services..........................         211,556
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal.........................................       1,289,870
                                                        ================
      Subtotal, Law Enforcement Support................       4,146,037
                                                        ================
Program Direction:
    Management and Administration......................         409,488
    Transfer to Interagency Law Enforcement Support....        (288,444)
    Fiscal Year 2003 Supplemental......................        (367,192)
                                                        ----------------
      Total, FBI.......................................       3,885,989
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. The Committee recommendations 
are discussed in more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Strategic Growth.--The FBI has undergone a transformation 
that has turned the Bureau from an investigative agency into an 
intelligence-gathering agency and has shifted its focus to 
counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and cybercrime. Many 
agents previously conducting violent crime, drug, and white-
collar crime investigations are now either permanently or 
temporarily conducting terrorism investigations. Decision-
making authority previously delegated to field divisions is now 
centered at headquarters. The FBI's new mission has attracted 
new dollars, increasing the Bureau's budget by 51 percent in 
just 3 years, from $3,041,095,000 in fiscal year 2000 to 
$4,583,165,000 in fiscal year 2003. This level of increases, 
however, cannot realistically be sustained. The FBI must make 
the best use of its current assets and must have a strategic, 
long-term plan before proposing continued growth. The FBI shall 
submit a 5-year plan to the Committees on Appropriations not 
later than May 10, 2004, detailing the FBI's roadmap to meet 
its top priority missions, including proposed agent and support 
personnel levels for each division, as well as plans for 
information technology operation, maintenance, and refreshment.
    Rightsizing and Rebalancing the Workforce.--The Committee 
has given the FBI significant flexibility to move resources and 
personnel to respond to the September 11, 2001 terrorist 
attacks, the war on terrorism, and the war in Iraq. In addition 
to the 1,600 agents permanently assigned to the 
Counterterrorism Division [CTD], for example, the FBI has 
temporarily assigned on average between 950 and 1,700 special 
agents and supervisors to CTD at various times in the last 2 
years. For the FBI to complete its transformation, it must 
realign its resources to properly reflect its new mission. The 
Committee therefore directs that all agents temporarily 
assigned to CTD as of April 1, 2003 be made permanent, 
effective immediately upon public release of this report.
    The FBI must also rebalance its workforce. Significant 
funding increases provided in recent years have been targeted 
for operations and have not been complemented by increases in 
administrative and other support functions. This disconnect has 
significantly hindered the FBI, as evidenced by a recent study 
by Resource Consultants, Inc. [RCI] which found that agents and 
key investigative support personnel, including intelligence, 
financial, and investigative analysts, and language 
specialists, are spending on average 18 percent of their time 
on clerical/administrative work, rather than investigative 
work. The FBI has also not had the administrative support to 
hire to authorized and funded personnel levels or to meet 
deadlines regarding Congressional reporting requirements and 
Congressional inquiries. Accordingly, the Committee 
recommendation includes an additional $75,871,000 for support 
personnel for the FBI's headquarters and field operations, 
including administrative functions, information and lead 
management, communications exploitation, analytical support, 
and support for executive offices and other entities. The FBI 
shall submit a deployment plan for such personnel to the 
Committees on Appropriations prior to the obligation of any of 
these funds.
    The Committee recommendation also includes an additional 
$1,405,000 for the National Security Law Unit, which provides 
critical legal support to the FBI's Counterterrorism Division.
    Joint Terrorism Task Forces.--For the first time, the FBI 
is coordinating efforts with Federal, State and local law 
enforcement in a meaningful way. Joint Terrorism Task Forces 
[JTTF] have become the conduit for information sharing and 
investigative cooperation. The Committee recommendation 
includes $25,200,000 to operate the JTTFs in all 56 field 
offices and selected resident agencies, $12,124,000 of which is 
provided in the Interagency Law Enforcement Support account. 
The Committee expects these funds to be properly recurred in 
fiscal year 2005.
    Additional funding will not be provided for the JTTF 
Information Sharing Initiative, however, until the initial 
pilot project is completed, proven successful, and the legal 
challenges to the system have been addressed.
    Counterintelligence Program.--The Intelligence Community 
has acknowledged that the United States is facing more complex 
threats to its people, information, and technology than ever 
before. Traditional notions of counterintelligence that focus 
on hostile intelligence services and theft of highly classified 
national defense information do not begin to cover the full 
range of threats that confront our most critical national 
interests. The United States is facing a growing challenge from 
non-traditional threats, including non-state actors, and there 
is a host of new sophisticated technologies and tools being 
deployed against the United States. In reponse, the FBI has 
centralized and strengthened its counterintelligence program. 
Centralization will ensure that the FBI has clear strategic 
objectives and is engaged in a cooperative and collaborative 
effort with other members of the Intelligence Community. The 
Committee recommendation includes additional resources to 
enable the FBI to develop, implement, and enhance this 
centralized program, including $21,848,000 for 313 support 
positions for Counterintelligence Investigations and Support; 
$24,590,000 for Surveillance Support and Training; and 
$9,542,000 for Tactical Operations. Funding for additional 
counterintelligence agents may be provided through the 
redirection of existing resources, subject to Section 605 of 
this Act.
    Cyber Investigations Initiative.--Cybercrime and 
cyberterrorism are constantly evolving and growing into greater 
potential threats to our national and economic security. The 
FBI must have the personnel and equipment to stay ahead of, or 
at least keep pace with, constant technological advances. The 
Committee recommendation therefore includes an additional 
$61,527,000 for the Cyber Investigations Initiative. Of that 
amount, $39,533,000 shall be for the Special Technologies and 
Applications Section to properly staff this newly-created 
Section; $18,040,000 shall be for the Computer Analysis 
Response Team, including training, and for the Regional 
Computer Forensic Laboratories [RCFLs], including personnel for 
the RCFL National Program Office; and $3,594,000 shall be for 
the Innocent Images National Initiative. Available resources 
may be used to support requested increases for the Internet Tip 
Line, subject to Section 605 of this Act.
    Technology Investments.--The Committee was impressed by the 
FBI's foresight to request additional funding for operations, 
maintenance, and refreshment for its technology investments. It 
is imperative that the FBI maintain operational readiness of 
its technology systems to support its missions. For operations 
and maintenance of the FBI's technology investments, the 
Committee recommendation includes $61,689,000 for Trilogy and 
$2,000,000 for the Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented 
Information [TS/SCI] Local Area Network [LAN]. The Committee 
recommendation also includes $10,500,000 for the second phase 
of the initiative to upgrade the Information Technology 
infrastructure at Legal Attache offices; $18,558,000 for the 
Trilogy Technology Refreshment Program; and $18,611,000 to 
begin deployment of TS/SCI LAN to the field divisions.
    Training.--The Committee has long supported basic and 
advanced training for FBI agents, analysts, and other support 
personnel. The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$17,559,000 for training, which includes $2,450,000 for 
intelligence analysis training; $14,027,000 for field and 
headquarters counterterrorism training; and $1,082,000 for 
cybercrime training.
    Emergency Response Teams.--The FBI currently has a variety 
of units able to respond to crisis situations, such as the 
Hostage Rescue Team, Foreign and Domestic Emergency Support 
Teams, National Capitol Response Team, Critical Incident 
Response Group, Special Weapons and Tactics Teams, and Flying 
Squads. Each of these teams is supported by other units that 
ensure they are properly equipped and deployed, such as the 
Rapid Deployment Logistics Unit, which focuses on pre-event 
readiness and actual deployment assistance, and the Crisis 
Response Unit, which focuses on communications and technical 
capabilities and equipment. The sheer number and variety of 
response teams illustrates the need to streamline functions to 
avoid duplication and inefficiencies. The Committee directs the 
FBI to submit a reorganization proposal to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than January 20, 2004 that 
consolidates all response functions.
    Until such duplications are eliminated and true purposes 
defined, the Committee will not provide funding increases to 
the existing response teams, except for aviation support, which 
will underpin whatever response capabilities result from the 
reorganization. The Committee is aware that the FBI's aviation 
fleet for response teams is not sufficient to meet the national 
security needs of the Bureau. Accordingly, the Committee 
recommendation includes $56,000,000 for two MH-60M helicopters 
and the required personnel, logistics, and training necessary 
to support these highly sophisticated helicopters. The FBI 
shall consult with the Committee prior to the deployment of 
such helicopters.
    Hazardous Devices School.--While the Committee has 
supported the FBI's past efforts to train public safety bomb 
technicians at the FBI's Hazardous Devices School [HDS], the 
Committee now believes that all explosives training should be 
consolidated under the law enforcement agency that has 
explosives as a core mission: the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
Firearms and Explosives [ATF]. Accordingly, the Committee 
directs the FBI to work with the ATF to develop and implement a 
plan to consolidate and relocate all ATF explosives training 
from Fort A.P. Hill to the HDS. The FBI shall continue to 
participate in explosives training, but ATF shall assume all 
management and training responsibilities for HDS.
    Forensic DNA Initiatives.--Forensic DNA analysis has 
rapidly developed into a vital tool used to support an 
increasing number of investigative efforts. It is now possible 
to obtain DNA profiles from evidence previously discarded as 
meaningless, such as fingernail scrapings, cigarette butts, 
stamps, envelope flaps, ski masks, baseball caps, weapons, 
eyeglasses, or toothbrushes. Biological material recovered from 
such items can be used by DNA examiners to identify an 
individual to a reasonable degree of scientific certainty. The 
FBI's DNA program supports cases ranging from the September 11 
terrorist attacks to ``cold cases'' which were originally 
examined prior to the advent of DNA profiling. To increase 
throughput of DNA cases and incorporate productivity 
improvements by replacing manual processes, the Committee 
recommendation includes an additional $2,692,000 for the DNA 
program.
    The recommendation also includes an additional $591,000 for 
the Federal Convicted Offender [FCO] program. The FCO program's 
authority to collect DNA samples was expanded by the USA 
Patriot Act (Public Law 107-56) to include additional crimes of 
violence and terrorism-related offenses. This funding will 
support additional positions to manage and type Federal 
convicted offender samples, purchase equipment, and fund 
additional expenses related to this effort.
    Criminal Justice Information Services Division.--The 
Committee recommendation includes $357,000,000, including fee 
collections, for the Criminal Justice Information Services 
Division [CJIS].
    In December 2001, the FBI developed a technology 
refreshment plan for all CJIS systems to upgrade system 
architecture to ensure that the system does not become 
antiquated. The improvements include updating hardware and 
software systems that are approaching obsolescence. Under no 
circumstances is the FBI to divert funding collected through 
the CJIS user fee for any purpose other than CJIS, its 
refreshment plan, or a subsequent modernization plan for the 
current facility.
    Background Clearances.--In fiscal year 2002, there was a 
300 percent increase in Law Enforcement Initiative clearances 
such as task force personnel, chaplains, Foreign Intelligence 
Surveillance Act technicians, and other non-compensated/non-FBI 
personnel. It is imperative that the FBI provide thorough and 
expeditious background checks. The Committee recommendation 
therefore includes an additional $5,050,000 for Background 
Investigative Contract Services and $968,000 for Contract 
Adjudicators to analyze the background checks.
    Polygraph Program.--The importance of the polygraph program 
at the FBI has never been more clear. Earlier this year, the 
second top-level counterintelligence agent in the same number 
of years was indicted for wrongdoing. This time, the agent was 
accused of improperly handling classified material and having 
an improper relationship with his asset. He was never 
polygraphed at the FBI. Nor was Robert Hanssen. Post-Hanssen, 
the polygraph program was expanded to include periodic 
polygraph examinations for individuals who have broad access to 
the FBI's most sensitive information and for employees leaving 
for and returning from permanent foreign assignments. The 
expanded polygraph program is intended to ensure the initial 
and continued trustworthiness of all persons who are being 
granted a security clearance by the FBI, whether that clearance 
entails access to unclassified FBI information and facilities 
or Sensitive Compartmentalized Intelligence information. The 
Committee recommendation includes $6,419,000 above the fiscal 
year 2003 level for additional positions, specialized training, 
equipment, travel, and expert quality control reviews for the 
polygraph program.
    Security.--The Committee supports the FBI's efforts to 
provide a safe and secure workplace for its personnel and will 
consider the use of available resources for requested 
enhancements for technical and physical security, police force 
and guard services, and defensive programs unit, subject to 
Section 605 of this Act.
    Communications Application.--The Committee does not support 
providing additional funding for Communications Applications. 
Such capabilities are already available to the FBI through the 
Drug Enforcement Administration's Special Operation Division.
    Legal Attaches.--The Committee is aware of the important 
role of the FBI's Legal Attache [Legat] offices, particularly 
with receiving and pursuing investigative leads in support of 
the war on terrorism. The Committee, however, strongly opposes 
further expanding the Legat program until the FBI has performed 
a comprehensive and meaningful review of the program. Such a 
review shall focus on the connection of each existing office to 
the pursuit of the FBI's top priority missions.
    Intellectual Property Rights.--Industrial espionage, by 
both erstwhile friends and obvious foes, has become the growth 
industry in the counterintelligence world. The struggle for 
domination among major powers is now played out in largely 
economic terms. Ideas and innovation are the sinews of national 
strength. Within the funds made available for 
counterintelligence activities, $5,000,000 shall only be 
available to combat industrial espionage and other threats to 
the intellectual property rights of manufacturers and 
researchers in the United States.
    Corporate Crime Reporting.--The Committee is concerned that 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] does not provide 
adequate information on corporate crime activities, such as 
pollution, accounting fraud, corruption, price fixing and tax 
evasion. While the FBI's Crime in the United States report 
provides information on street crime from 17,000 enforcement 
officials around the country, no similar report exists for 
corporate crime. The Committee expects the FBI to provide the 
Committee with information about the resources that it would 
take to produce a comprehensive report that includes all 
criminal, civil and administrative actions brought against a 
company, including resolution of the case. The report should 
also examine the trends and the number of civil cases referred 
by the Securities and Exchange Commission [SEC] and other 
agencies to U.S. Attorneys for criminal prosecution. Of these 
cases, the report should consider how many of those referrals 
were disposed, how many defendants were actually prosecuted, 
how many found guilty and how many were sent to jail.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $1,242,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................       1,242,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,791,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $44,791,000. 
The recommendation is $44,791,000 above the budget request. Of 
that amount, $33,617,000 shall be for a Cyber Counter-Terrorism 
Training Center that shall be located along the Boston Post 
Road to train all Justice law enforcement agencies in cyber 
investigations and computer forensics. The FBI shall submit a 
site and design proposal to the Committees on Appropriations 
prior to the obligation of any of these funds. In addition, 
$9,932,000 is recommended to complete the fit out of the new 
wing of the Engineering Research Facility.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $1,550,773,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   1,558,743,000
House allowance.........................................   1,601,327,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,512,281,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,512,281,000. The recommendation is $46,462,000 below the 
budget request. The Committee recommendation reflects the 
transfer of all joint Federal, State, local, and foreign law 
enforcement activities previously funded within the Drug 
Enforcement Administration [DEA] to a new account titled 
``Interagency Law Enforcement Support''. The Committee is aware 
that up to $179,000,000 in additional carryover will also be 
available to apply to this account.
    The Committee recommendation does not support the DEA's 
proposal to collapse its current decision units from ten to 
three units. Rather, the Committee recommendations are 
displayed in the following table:

                     DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Activity                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enforcement of Federal Laws and Investigations:
    Domestic Enforcement...............................         518,918
    Foreign Cooperative Investigations.................         208,199
    Drug and Chemical Diversion Control................          20,526
    State and Local Task Forces........................         200,028
    Enforcement and Prevention.........................           8,750
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal.........................................         956,421
                                                        ================
Investigative Support:
    Intelligence.......................................         129,294
    Laboratory Services................................          60,518
    Training...........................................          24,903
    Research, Engineering, and Technical Operations....         117,799
    ADP................................................         138,976
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal.........................................         471,490
                                                        ================
Program Direction:
    Management and Administration......................         107,971
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal.........................................         107,971
                                                        ================
Transfer to Interagency Law Enforcement Support........         (23,601)
                                                        ================
      TOTAL............................................       1,512,281
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. The Committee recommendations 
are discussed in more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Additional Domestic Enforcement Agents.--Since the 
September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Federal law enforcement 
agencies have shifted agents from drug-related cases to 
counterterrorism investigations. This necessary shift in 
Federal priorities has resulted in the DEA, the country's only 
Federal agency dedicated to the single mission of drug 
eradication, to fill the drug enforcement gap. While it is 
unrealistic to believe that increased funding would eliminate 
the drug trade in its entirety, the diversion of other Federal 
agents to homeland security demands that the DEA concentrate 
its efforts fully on disrupting the flow of narcotics into and 
within America. Therefore, the recommendation includes 
$10,000,000 for additional domestic enforcement agents.
    Additionally, the Committee has transferred Mobile 
Enforcement Team [MET] resources and existing personnel from 
State and Local Task Forces to Domestic Enforcement, as 
proposed in the budget request. The MET program was created in 
response to drug-related violent crime in local communities 
across the nation. METs work in conjunction with local law 
enforcement by assisting in targeting and arresting local 
dealers. While this program has been effective at removing low-
level ``street pushers,'' its effectiveness in eliminating the 
supply lines and major suppliers is suspect. The DEA is 
directed to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations 
not later than May 24, 2004, describing what the impact of 
eliminating the MET program will be on local communities.
    Regional Enforcement Teams.--While the Committee 
appreciates DEA's effort to restructure and focus on 
dismantling major drug networks, the agency cannot become rigid 
and formulaic; a component of the agency must be dedicated and 
prepared to respond to emerging drug trends. The Regional 
Enforcement Team [RET] program was established to give the DEA 
specialized, flexible teams ready to deploy resources and 
respond to the shift by major drug cartels away from 
centralized bases of operations in major metropolitan cities to 
larger numbers of regional command posts in smaller, less 
populated areas across the nation. RET team deployments have 
proven to be very successful at dismantling drug trafficking 
organizations in targeted areas at a very low cost per 
operation. Since the program's inception in 1999, the RET has 
been deployed twenty times and has had a significant impact on 
national investigations. The Committee continues to support 
this program and has included funding within Domestic 
Enforcement for its continuation.
    Overseas Offices.--The Committee remains concerned about 
the lack of oversight of DEA overseas offices and the 
evaluation process to determine their effectiveness. While the 
recommendation does not restrict the DEA from opening overseas 
offices in fiscal year 2004, due to the lack of information 
regarding foreign office evaluations, the recommendation does 
not include funding for more than the current number of 
overseas offices (57 Country Offices and 17 Resident Offices). 
The DEA may therefore only open a new office after first 
submitting a written report to the Committees on Appropriations 
providing justification for the new office and proposing the 
closure of an existing office.
    International Training.--The recommendation does not 
include the requested $1,500,000 for the International Training 
Program. To date, DEA's international counter-narcotics 
training for foreign narcotics law enforcement officers has 
been funded through a Memorandum of Understanding with the 
Department of State. The Committee encourages DEA to work with 
the Department of State to resolve any concerns regarding 
reimbursements for this program.
    Training.--The drug market in the United States remains one 
of the most lucrative in the world. The DEA and local law 
enforcement face enormous challenges in trying to stem the flow 
of drugs through the numerous traffic lanes that exist. One of 
the principal transit routes continues to be the Southwest 
border with Mexico. In fact, it is estimated that as much as 65 
percent of cocaine smuggled into the United States is routed 
through Mexico. While the DEA and other law enforcement 
agencies have done a remarkable job in addressing this problem, 
it is readily apparent that the United States will not be able 
to solve this problem alone. The United States must continue to 
work with Mexico as a partner to dismantle the organizations 
that control these transit routes. In order to do this, there 
must be a concerted effort to work with not only Mexican 
Federal Officials, but also with local Mexican law enforcement. 
There are currently five regional academies located throughout 
Mexico, including the southern states of Chiapas and Michoacan. 
The regional academies are administered by Sistema Nacional de 
Seguridad Publica, a division of Secretaria de Seguridad 
Publica, which is responsible for public security in Mexico. 
The Committee is aware that U.S. law enforcement agencies have 
provided training courses and technical assistance to the 
regional academies. The Committee commends past work in this 
area and expects all training of Mexican law enforcement 
officers (Federal, State, and local) provided by the DEA to be 
conducted in concert with the five regional academies. The DEA 
is instructed to provide the Committees on Appropriations a 
report no later than June 30, 2004, detailing Mexican training 
programs and enrollment rates, as well as training programs 
conducted in other foreign countries and their enrollment 
rates.
    Research, Engineering and Technical Operations.--Strides in 
technology continue to improve daily lives. Technology has 
simplified and streamlined everything from communications to 
banking. Unfortunately, the technology revolution has also 
assisted drug kingpins in their ability to launder money, 
communicate, and direct drug distributions. Therefore, within 
the amounts provided for Research Engineering and Technical 
Operations, $1,500,000 shall be for the DEA to work in 
collaboration with the Dante B. Fascell North South Center to 
analyze the role that information technology is playing in the 
drug trade.
    Demand Reduction Program/Integrated Drug Enforcement 
Assistance.--The Administration strategy to reduce drug use by 
10 percent over 2 years and 25 percent over 5 is based on three 
core principals: (1) preventing drug use before it starts, (2) 
treating drug users, and (3) disrupting the drug markets. 
Through the Demand Reduction Program and Integrated Drug 
Enforcement Assistance [IDEA], the DEA provides outreach to 
local communities to ensure effective programs are in place to 
enhance enforcement and prevention. The agency's Demand 
Reduction Program is unique in that it does not conduct 
research or disburse grants. Rather, the program provides a 
Demand Reduction Coordinator to work directly with local 
communities, offering support in the development of drug 
prevention and education programs. Similarly, IDEA is a 
coordinated anti-drug initiative that combines law enforcement 
with long-term community follow-up to reduce drug demand. The 
plan involves assisting local communities with the formation of 
a coalition designed to reduce demand through prevention, 
education and treatment. Both the Demand Reduction Program and 
the IDEA initiative have been highly successful in reducing 
demand for drugs. The recommendation provides $8,750,000 to 
continue these two programs.
    Methamphetamine.--Methamphetamine is a synthetic drug that 
is widely abused and manufactured within the United States. 
Through its production and chemical composition, the drug poses 
a major threat to the health of its users and to the 
environment. The Committee therefore remains committed to 
providing sufficient resources to the DEA to support 
methamphetamine enforcement and the safe cleanup of clandestine 
methamphetamine laboratories. The Committee encourages the DEA 
to continue its efforts to identify, target, disrupt and 
disseminate Priority Targets trafficking methamphetamine; train 
and assist State and local authorities to recognize and 
properly address the cleanup of small toxic labs [STLs]; 
identify and regulate major producers and distributors of 
important precursor chemicals to ensure they are not diverted 
for illicit use; and conduct demand reduction and other 
training programs to increase public awareness and educate law 
enforcement personnel, prosecutors, and other professionals on 
the dangers of methamphetamine.
    The Committee directs DEA to ensure sufficient personnel 
are assigned to methamphetamine cases. Additionally, the 
Committee directs DEA to provide quarterly reports to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the DEA's enforcement efforts, 
including efforts to target methamphetamine precursor chemicals 
to avoid their diversion and to promote demand reduction of 
methamphetamine.
    Modernization Program.--The Committee recognizes the need 
to upgrade the DEA's aviation fleet. For example, at least 10 
of the DEA's current LEH's are Vietnam-era surplus helicopters 
that are nearing the end of their useful lives. Therefore, the 
Committee supports the use of available resources, subject to 
section 605 of this Act, to procure additional fixed wing, 
rotary wing, lighter-than-air, and unmanned aerial vehicles 
using existing contract authority.
    ``Drug Diversion Control Fee'' Account.--The Committee has 
provided $91,499,000 for DEA's Drug Diversion Control Program. 
The Committee has not included requested enhancements because 
the final rule proposing a fee increase to support such 
enhancements has not yet been published. The request is 
therefore premature, as the DEA cannot yet collect the fees to 
support program increases. Should the DEA determine that these 
enhancements more accurately reflect the mission of the Drug 
Diversion Control Program than current activities, the DEA may 
redirect existing resources within this account through the 
reprogramming process.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $801,188,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     851,987,000
House allowance.........................................     831,199,000
Committee recommendation................................     829,593,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $829,593,000. 
The recommendation is $22,394,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation reflects the transfer of all 
joint Federal, State, local, and foreign law enforcement 
activities previously funded within the Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives [ATF] to a new account titled 
``Interagency Law Enforcement Support''.
    The ATF is responsible for enforcing Federal laws relating 
to alcohol, tobacco, firearms, explosives, and arson and 
regulations relating to firearms, explosives and arson.
    Safe Explosives Act.--The Homeland Security Act of 2002 
includes a provision, known as the Safe Explosives Act, that 
amends Title XI of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970. The 
Safe Explosives Act requires that all persons who wish to 
obtain explosives, even for limited use, must obtain a Federal 
license or permit and restricts the ability of felons and other 
prohibited persons from receiving or possessing explosive 
materials. The Act also increases qualifications for licensing 
and permits to include fingerprints, photographs and 
identifying information to conduct criminal history background 
checks on all applicants. As the law enforcement agency with 
the most training and experience with explosives, ATF was 
charged with implementing and enforcing this Act.
    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$10,000,000 to implement the Safe Explosives Act and $4,000,000 
to upgrade databases and systems, space alterations, and other 
costs related to creating the National Explosives Licensing 
Center [NELC] at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and 
Explosives National Tracing Center. The Committee expects ATF 
to submit a detailed spend plan prior to the obligation of any 
of these funds. The NELC will be responsible for reviewing and 
processing applications for all Federal explosives licenses and 
permits. The NELC staff will coordinate inspection applications 
with the appropriate field offices; serve as the official 
repository of explosives inspection reports and explosives 
license/permit applications; maintain the Federal explosives 
license database; issue licenses/permits and coupons; and 
provide explosives certifications and status information.
    Youth Gun Crime Interdiction Initiative.--The Committee 
recommendation includes an additional $13,000,000 for the Youth 
Gun Crime Interdiction Initiative [YCGII]. YCGII focuses agent 
and inspector resources on reducing youth violence by 
interrupting the illegal supply of firearms to youths and 
juveniles through crime gun tracing. This level of funding will 
allow the program to expand to an additional 10 cities, which 
will be selected based on a number of factors, including their 
youth and juvenile crime rates as reflected in the Uniform 
Crime Reports, identification of the city as a trafficking 
source or market, a history of firearms tracing, and the desire 
to participate in the program.
    Training.--ATF provides advanced and specialized training 
programs for Federal, State, local, and international law 
enforcement agencies, as well as industry at Fort A.P. Hill, 
the Canine Training Center, the Federal Law Enforcement 
Training Center, Eglin AFB, and a number of other ad hoc 
training sites. Training includes comprehensive explosives 
detection, explosives identification, explosives detection 
canine handlers, post blast investigation, advanced explosives 
destruction techniques, and underwater explosives recovery 
training. The Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] has its own 
explosives training at the Hazardous Devices School [HDS] 
located at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, AL. The Committee 
believes all explosives training should be consolidated under 
the law enforcement agency that has explosives as a core 
mission: ATF. Accordingly, the Committee directs the ATF, in 
consultation with the FBI, to develop and implement a plan to 
consolidate and relocate all ATF explosives training from Fort 
A.P. Hill to the HDS. Additionally, ATF will assume all 
management and training responsibilities for the HDS. However, 
the Committee expects the FBI to participate in and continue to 
utilize the HDS for explosives training. Further, Justice 
Management Division is directed to submit quarterly reports to 
the Committees on Appropriations beginning January 1, 2004, on 
the progress of consolidating explosives training under the ATF 
at the HDS.
    Coordination with the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade 
Bureau.--The regulatory and revenue collecting functions 
relating to alcohol and tobacco were transferred to the newly 
created Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau [TTB] within 
the Department of the Treasury under the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002. The enforcement functions relating to those 
industries, however, have remained the jurisdiction of ATF. The 
Committee believes coordination of these functions remains 
critical to meeting the missions of both agencies. The 
Committee therefore directs the ATF to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than May 20, 2004, to 
specify efforts being made to ensure ATF and TTB have 
coordinated regulatory, revenue collecting and enforcement 
missions.
    Overseas Offices.--Along with a number of Justice law 
enforcement agencies, including the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the 
United States Marshals Service, the Committee is aware that ATF 
has offices in Canada, Colombia, France, and Mexico. The 
Committee directs the ATF to submit a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations not later than May 1, 2004, detailing the 
mission of each office, the coordination efforts of each office 
with other law enforcement agencies within the region, and the 
Bureau's future plans for expansion of their overseas presence.

                         Federal Prison System

    The Committee does not support the budgeting format for the 
Federal Prison System as outlined in the Department of Justice 
budget submission. Therefore, as in previous years, the 
Committee aligns the budget request submitted by the Office of 
Management and Budget as follows:

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $4,044,788,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   4,677,214,000
House allowance.........................................   4,461,257,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,872,791,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,872,791,000. The recommendation is $804,423,000 below the 
budget request. This recommendation shall be expended in the 
following manner:

                          SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inmate Care and Programs..............................         1,493,305
Institution Security and Administration...............         1,897,523
Contract Confinement..................................           332,359
Management and Administration.........................           149,604
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses....................         3,872,791
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation reflects the transfer of all 
joint Federal, State, local and foreign law enforcement 
activities previously funded within the Bureau of Prisons [BOP] 
to a new account titled ``Interagency Law Enforcement 
Support''.
    The recommendation also transfers Justice Prisoner and 
Alien Transportation System [JPATS] funding to the Office of 
the Detention Trustee.
    Activation of New Prison Facilities.--The Committee 
recommendation includes funding for activation of eight new 
facilities which will add 9,280 beds:

                   ACTIVATION OF NEW PRISON FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
USP Hazelton, WV (1,088 beds)...........................          40,587
USP Canaan, PA (1,088 beds).............................          40,599
USP Terre Haute, IN (960 beds)..........................          12,192
FCI Victorville, CA (1,152 beds)........................          40,610
FCI Forrest City, AR (1,152 beds).......................          38,771
FCI Herlong/Sierra, CA (1,280 beds).....................          41,165
FCI Williamsburg, SC (1,280 beds).......................          38,054
FCI Bennettsville, SC (1,280 beds)......................          41,250
                                                         ---------------
      Total, Activations (9,280 beds)...................         293,228
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Female Inmates.--The Committee understands the BOP is 
working on a long-term plan for housing female inmates. The 
Committee directs the BOP to submit this detailed plan to the 
Appropriations Committee as soon as possible. The Committee 
encourages the BOP to consider the use of contract facilities 
and directs them to evaluate this option before finalizing 
these plans.
    The Committee commends the BOP on its work to address and 
prevent sexual misconduct. With funds provided in earlier 
appropriations acts, the National Institute of Corrections has 
made useful progress in providing training and technical 
support to correctional systems throughout the country to 
eliminate staff sexual misconduct with inmates, in providing 
training in investigating cases, and in training ``trainers'' 
in order that employees at every level will be more aware of, 
and better prepared to deal with, these cases. The Committee 
directs the BOP to continue these efforts and to report to the 
Committee by March 31, 2004 on progress made in this area.
    Bed Space Demands.--The Bureau of Prisons is directed to 
meet bed space needs using excess State, local, and private 
prison capacity, if these facilities meet Bureau of Prison 
standards.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $396,632,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................     202,840,000
Committee recommendation................................     345,805,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $345,805,000 for the 
construction, modernization, maintenance, and repair of prison 
and detention facilities housing Federal prisoners. This amount 
is $345,805,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee continues to strongly support the BOP's 
construction program, designed to provide sufficient inmate 
beds to manage overcrowding in facilities and maintain them in 
a safe and secure manner for staff, inmates and surrounding 
communities.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for 
facilities with prior year funding as follows:

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
FCI Yazoo City, MS......................................          33,160
USP Berlin, NH (with work camp and protective custody            154,500
 unit)..................................................
FCI Beckley, WV.........................................          41,000
FCI Glenville, WV.......................................          41,600
FCI Mid Atlantic........................................          40,300
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee does not support the inclusion of 
specifically directed appropriations listed as rescissions in 
the Bureau's budget submission. The Committee reiterates the 
direction in the Conference Report to the fiscal year 2003 
Appropriations Act that, ``No funds appropriated for the 
Federal Prison System in this or prior Appropriations Acts for 
the construction of new facilities may be rescinded or 
cancelled.'' The BOP shall move forward with all current 
projects as planned. The Bureau shall comply with this 
direction in all future budget submissions.

                    Federal Prison Industries, Inc.


                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $3,407,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       3,429,000
House allowance.........................................       3,429,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,429,000

    This Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses of $3,429,000 for the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Committee continues to strongly support Federal Prison 
Industries [UNICOR] and recognizes its importance in the 
efficient and safe management of Federal prisons. UNICOR 
provides prison inmates with the opportunity to learn important 
work habits, participate in meaningful employment which keeps 
them productively occupied during work hours, and develop 
improved job skills which reduces recidivism. The Committee 
also recognizes the necessity for UNICOR to grow as the inmate 
population increases. Finally, UNICOR is a self-supporting 
revolving fund the resources of which are derived from sales of 
its products. In the future, the BOP is directed to submit only 
UNICOR's appropriations language exhibit.

                       Office of Justice Programs

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $2,616,060,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   2,173,855,000
House allowance.........................................   3,491,261,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,630,637,000

    The Committee recommends $1,973,251,000 for the Office of 
Justice Programs [OJP]. The recommendation is $200,604,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee does not support the budgeting format for OJP 
as outlined in the Department of Justice budget submission. 
Therefore, as in previous years, the Committee aligns the 
budget request submitted by the Office of Management and Budget 
as outlined below.

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................................
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................     $40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      29,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $29,000,000. 
The recommendation is $29,000,000 above the budget request. In 
light of the new management and administrative responsibilities 
of the OJP office, the Committee recommends a staffing level of 
not more than 500 full-time equivalents.

                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $199,983,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   2,124,801,000
House allowance.........................................     209,131,000
Committee recommendation................................     136,500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $136,500,000. 
The recommendation is $1,988,301,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Institute of Justice........................            50,000
    Office of Science and Technology.................           [20,000]
    The National Law Enforcement and Corrections                [21,000]
     Technology Centers..............................
Bureau of Justice Statistics.........................            25,000
Missing Children.....................................            32,500
Regional Information Sharing System..................            29,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total, Justice Assistance......................           136,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Office of Science and Technology [OS&T;].--The Committee 
commends the efforts of the leadership of the National 
Institute of Justice's Office of Science and Technology and the 
continuing partnership that OS&T; has developed with the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    To implement the mission of OS&T;, the Committee recommends 
$20,000,000 for OS&T; from within the overall amount provided 
for NIJ.
    The National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology 
Centers [NLECTC].--The Committee commends the work that NIJ's 
OS&T;, and through it the NLECTC system, have done to improve 
the capabilities of the law enforcement and corrections 
communities. To further the work of the NLECTC system, the 
Committee recommends $21,000,000 for the continued support of 
the system. Of the amount provided, the Committee directs that 
funds be distributed in the following manner to the Centers:

     THE NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CORRECTIONS TECHNOLOGY CENTERS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Northeast Regional Center...............................           3,000
Southeast Regional Center...............................           3,000
Rocky Mountain Regional Center..........................           3,000
Western Regional Center.................................           3,000
National Center.........................................           3,000
Northwest Center........................................           3,000
Technology Specialty Centers............................           3,000
                                                         ---------------
      Total, Regional and Specialty Centers.............          21,000
------------------------------------------------------------------

    In addition to the above activities, within the amounts 
provided, NIJ is to provide grants for the following projects:
  --$4,500,000 for the National Crime Prevention Council 
        (McGruff Program);
  --$800,000 for the Haymarket Center's Rehabilitative 
        Confinement Program;
  --$200,000 for Merit School of Music's alternative to crime 
        and violence programs in Chicago, Illinois;
  --$850,000 for the Mistral Security Non-Toxic Drug Detention 
        and Identification Aerosol Technology;
  --$2,000,000 for the Ohio Palmprint AFIS Program; and
  --$1,500,000 for the National Judicial College.
    Missing Children Program.--The issue of child exploitation 
has been raised to the forefront of the national conscience due 
to the recent string of child pornography and missing children 
cases that have been highlighted in the media over the last few 
months. The Committee continues to strongly support the Missing 
and Exploited Children Program run by the Bureau of Justice 
Assistance. The Committee recommends $32,500,000 to continue 
and expand efforts to protect the Nation's children, especially 
in the areas of locating missing children, as well as the 
growing wave of child sexual exploitation found on the 
Internet.
    Within the amounts provided, the Committee has included the 
following:
    (1) $12,500,000 for the Internet Crimes Against Children 
Task Forces. These task forces assist State and local law 
enforcement agencies in acquiring the knowledge, equipment, and 
personnel resources necessary to successfully prevent, 
interdict, and investigate cases of child exploitation on the 
Internet. These task forces shall work in concert with I-Safe 
America to emphasize Internet safety education for grades K-12 
to prevent child predation on the Internet.
    (2) $20,000,000 for the National Center for Missing and 
Exploited Children [NCMEC]. The NCMEC is the clearinghouse and 
national resource center regarding the issue of missing and 
exploited children. In addition to the other critical work 
performed by the center, this appropriation will also allow the 
NCMEC to maintain the training programs provided by the Jimmy 
Ryce Law Enforcement Training Center, continue the successful 
CyberTipline program, continue the Police Technology Project 
(LOCATER) and expand the NetSmartz Workshop. Of the funds 
appropriated for the NCMEC, $3,000,000 shall be directed 
specifically for the Jimmy Ryce Law Enforcement Training 
Center.
    Regional Information Sharing System [RISS].--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $29,000,000. The RISS program 
provides funds to maintain six regionally-based information 
sharing centers which allow for information and intelligence 
services to be disseminated nationwide addressing major, multi-
jurisdictional crimes. The Committee commends the ongoing 
collaboration between RISS and Law Enforcement On-Line [LEO], 
particularly with regard to the decision to provide access to 
RISS Anti-Terrorism Information Exchange [ATIX] resources to 
any user holding a valid LEO account, regardless of whether the 
user also holds a RISS account. The Committee recognizes that 
the relationship between RISS and LEO is dynamic and evolving, 
and strongly supports further collaboration.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $2,030,990,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................   1,640,861,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,461,075,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,461,075,000. The recommendation is $1,461,075,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                     STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Local Law Enforcement Block Grant....................           150,000
    Boys and Girls Clubs.............................           [80,000]
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program..............           250,000
Indian Assistance....................................            18,000
Byrne Grants:
    Formula..........................................           500,000
    Discretionary....................................            88,575
Violence Against Women Act Programs..................           406,000
Drug Courts..........................................            43,500
Safe Return Program..................................               500
Law Enforcement Family Support Programs..............             1,000
Senior Citizens Against Marketing Scams..............             2,000
Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention.......................             1,500
                                                      ------------------
      Total, State and Local Law Enforcement                  1,461,075
       Assistance....................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Indian Country Grants.--The Committee understands that the 
Comprehensive Indian Resources for Community Law Enforcement 
[CIRCLE] initiative is working well. The Committee urges the 
Department to consider ways to expand the CIRCLE project into 
other communities.
    The Committee notes that the Department of Justice and 
other Federal agencies have provided grants to tribes in Alaska 
for courts, police officers, and law enforcement equipment. 
Because the previous administration recognized 227 separate 
tribes in Alaska, there are not sufficient funds for each tribe 
to have its own court system and police force. Therefore, the 
Committee has included a general provision in the bill 
clarifying that funds should not be made available to tribes in 
Alaska for courts or police until a more efficient delivery 
system can be developed such as consolidation. However, to 
ensure that judicial services continue in Alaska Native 
villages, the funds that have previously been granted to tribes 
will now be allocated to the State of Alaska to increase 
magistrates and fund the Village Public Safety Officer Program 
until such system can be developed.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee directs that 
grants be provided for the following prison construction 
projects:
  --$900,000 for the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe Detention 
        Facility; and
  --$2,900,000 for the Yankton Sioux Tribe Juvenile Detention 
        Facility.
    Edward Byrne Grants to States.--Within the amount provided 
for Byrne formula grants, the Committee urges Governors and 
relevant State and local officials to review the following 
proposals and provide grants if warranted: Arkansas 
Methamphetamine Lab Project, Criminal Justice Institute; 
Barron-Rusk County, Wisconsin Drug Task Force; Caddo Parish, 
Louisiana Methamphetamine Enforcement; Clackamas County 
Juvenile Justice Detention Facility; Catholic Charities of 
Maine Rapid Response Program; COPS Methamphetamine Drug Hot 
Spots Program, Arkansas State Police; Drug Endangered Children 
rapid response team in Iowa; Arizona methamphetamine program; 
Sedgwick County, Kansas rapid dispatch capability; Law 
Enforcement Innovation Center at Knoxville, Tennessee; Drug 
Interdiction Team to seize illegal drugs transported into Iowa; 
Enhancing illegal drug trafficking investigations by State and 
local authorities in Iowa; Arizona violent crime scene 
response; Georgia VeriTracks program; Greenbrook Project, 
Maryland; Iowa Drug-Free Workplace Education Project; Marion 
County, Oregon Methamphetamine Lab Surveillance and Seizure 
Program; Meth Safe housing pilot project, Iowa Office of Drug 
Control Policy; Methamphetamine enforcement efforts in Nevada; 
Methamphetamine enforcement, State of Indiana; Methamphetamine 
Interdiction Program in Northwest Louisiana; Methamphetamine 
Montana Initiative; Methamphetamine Program for Washington 
State; Multnomah County, Oregon Children's Receiving Center; 
National Fatherhood Initiative; Nebraska Methamphetamine Drug 
Hot Spots Program; Idaho methamphetamine initiative; Nebraska 
Statewide Drug Enforcement and Lab equipment; California 
Methamphetamine Strategy [CALMS]; Lewis & Clark Bicentennial 
Bi-State Safety Project; New York City Specially-Targeted 
Offenders Program; Nebraska Statewide Drug Treatment and 
Prevention; Oglala, South Dakota Youth Court/Court Systems; 
Maine Rural Substance Abuse Partnership; Oregon Meth Lab 
Surveillance and Seizure Program; Phoenix House Los Angeles 
Methamphetamine Initiative in California; Project Peacemaker; 
Savannah, Georgia Impact Program; ShareHouse Methamphetamine 
Treatment Project in North Dakota; South Central and East 
Central Iowa Meth Lab Task Forces; Texas State University 
Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center; St. 
Croix District Attorney's Office Initiative to Combat 
Methamphetamine; and Stop Meth Environments in Lane County, 
Oregon; Chicago Project for Violence Prevention; Elderly Fraud 
Prevention Initiative in Iowa; Arkansas State Police's 
Methamphetamine Drug Hot Spots Program; Methamphetamine Drug 
Program for Washington State.
    Within the amount provided for Byrne discretionary grants, 
the Committee expects the Bureau of Justice Assistance to 
review the following proposals and provide grants if warranted:
  --$2,000,000 for the First Tee program;
  --$250,000 for the Abilene, Texas, Emergency Response and 
        Public Safety Communications Systems Replacement;
  --$1,100,000 for an alcohol interdiction program designed to 
        investigate and prosecute bootlegging crimes as part of 
        a statewide effort to reduce fetal alcohol syndrome in 
        Alaska;
  --$150,000 for the Alabama Criminal Justice Training Center;
  --$210,000 for the Alaska DARE Coordinator;
  --$1,000,000 for the Alaska Native Justice Center;
  --$650,000 for the Alaska Public Safety Academy;
  --$750,000 for the Alaska Youth Community Policing 
        Initiative;
  --$500,000 for the Alcorn State University Minority Law 
        Enforcement program;
  --$1,500,000 to An Achievable Dream, Virginia;
  --$2,000,000 for the Baltimore City, Maryland, Drug 
        Enforcement and Eradication Program;
  --$126,000 for basic law enforcement equipment at the Kansas 
        Bureau of Investigation;
  --$300,000 for an Amber Alert/ORN Integration Program at the 
        Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and 
        Investigation;
  --$500,000 to establish the Belknap, New Hampshire, Regional 
        Special Operations program;
  --$175,000 for Bolivar County, Mississippi, Sheriff's 
        Department;
  --$2,000,000 for the California Anti-Terrorism Information 
        Center;
  --$250,000 for the Catholic Charities of Maine, Rapid 
        Response Program;
  --$500,000 for the Center on Domestic Violence at the 
        University of Colorado in Denver;
  --$1,146,000 for Child-Safe Personalized Weapons-Smart Gun, 
        New Jersey;
  --$300,000 for the Citizenship and Justice Academy, 
        Mississippi;
  --$300,000 for the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Safe Streets 
        Initiative;
  --$500,000 for the Community Action Neighborhood Empowerment 
        Program in Erie County, New York;
  --$100,000 to the city of Custer, South Dakota, for emergency 
        warning system equipment;
  --$1,000,000 for the Davidson County, Tennessee, Drug Court 
        Program;
  --$1,900,000 for a case management system for the Delaware 
        State courts;
  --$4,000,000 for the Eisenhower Foundation for the Youth Safe 
        Haven program;
  --$750,000 for Emergency Services Equipment Upgrade in 
        Midwest City, Oklahoma;
  --$1,000,000 for the Five County Southeastern Utah 
        Methamphetamine Project;
  --$4,400,000 for Hawaii County Comprehensive Methamphetamine 
        Response;
  --$5,000,000 for program operations at the Institute of 
        Security Technology Studies, New Hampshire;
  --$500,000 for the Iowa Tank Lock Methamphetamine Initiative;
  --$602,000 for Jackson, Mississippi, Public Safety Automated 
        Technologies;
  --$300,000 to the John Hope Settlement House in Providence, 
        Rhode Island, for a family support center;
  --$200,000 for the Las Vegas, Nevada, Metropolitan Police 
        Forces' Special Weapons and Tactics [SWAT] Team;
  --$500,000 for Law Enforcement Radio Infrastructure Project 
        in Wake County, North Carolina;
  --$750,000 for the Leadership Institute in Judicial Education 
        at the University of Memphis in Memphis, Tennessee;
  --$250,000 to the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement for 
        its Methamphetamine Task Force in Claiborne, Grant, 
        Natchitoches, Rapides, Vernon, Webster, and Winn 
        Parishes;
  --$500,000 for methamphatamine enforcement in Mississippi;
  --$750,000 for the Louisiana Methamphetamine Task Force;
  --$400,000 to Milton R. Abrahams Legal Clinic at Creighton 
        University, Nebraska;
  --$500,000 for the Institutional Security Program at 
        Mississippi University for Women;
  --$400,000 for the Missouri Fire Training Program;
  --$400,000 to the Montana Food Bank Network/Montana 
        Correctional Enterprises for cannery operations;
  --$100,000 for the Morgan County, Kentucky, Sheriff's 
        Department;
  --$2,500,000 for the Missouri MOSMART Program;
  --$300,000 for Mujeres Latinas En Accion, Illinois, to expand 
        its community-based program for domestic abuse and 
        sexual assault victims;
  --$2,000,000 to the Municipality of Anchorage, Alaska, for 
        statewide enhancement of local law enforcement agencies 
        to improve response to illegal drug and alcohol use;
  --$400,000 to the Medical University of South Carolina for an 
        innovative and effective program which helps single 
        head-of-household women with children reject a life of 
        crime and drugs and build a self supporting lifestyle;
  --$4,750,000 for the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys to 
        support the National District Attorneys Association's 
        participation in legal education training at the 
        National Advocacy Center;
  --$2,000,000 for the National Center for Justice and the Rule 
        of Law, Mississippi;
  --$500,000 to the University of South Carolina for the 
        National Center for Prosecutorial Ethics;
  --$500,000 for crime prevention programs run through the 
        National Crime Prevention Council (McGruff the crime 
        dog);
  --$1,600,000 for the National Fatherhood Initiative;
  --$150,000 for the University of North Dakota's Native 
        Americans Into Law program to recruit and retain 
        American Indian law students;
  --$250,000 to the Network Against Sexual Violence in 
        Missouri;
  --$1,000,000 for the New Mexico Administrative Office of the 
        Courts to support Dependency Drug Courts in three 
        judicial districts;
  --$500,000 for technology upgrades for the New Hampshire 
        Department of Motor Vehicles substation;
  --$500,000 for the New Hampshire Phoenix House information 
        technology upgrade project;
  --$250,000 for the North Kingstown, Rhode Island, Police 
        Department Emergency Operations Center;
  --$1,500,000 for continuation of Operation Streetsweeper;
  --$250,000 for Partners for Downtown Progress in Alaska;
  --$500,000 for the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Police Bureau's 
        Virtual Perimeter Video Surveillance system, which 
        allows live monitoring of multiple locations by robotic 
        cameras;
  --$122,000 for the Powder Springs Police Force in Cobb 
        County, GA for new equipment;
  --$750,000 to Prairie View Prevention Services in Sioux 
        Falls, South Dakota to continue methamphetamine use 
        prevention programs in South Dakota, and to facilitate 
        integration of prevention and treatment services for 
        at-risk youth;
  --$300,000 to the Prince George's County, Maryland, 
        Neighborhood Watch Program;
  --$750,000 for the New Jersey Department of State for Project 
        ACTION;
  --$250,000 for Project Return, Inc. in Nashville, Tennessee;
  --$5,000,000 for the Southeast National Law Enforcement and 
        Corrections Technology Center for the implementation of 
        Project SEAHAWK. Funding is provided for the 
        acquisition of communications equipment, computer 
        software and hardware technology, and research and 
        development needed to execute the project;
  --$300,000 for the Protection of Senior Citizens, 
        Indianapolis, Indiana, Housing Authority;
  --$1,000,000 for the inclusion of the New Hampshire 
        Department of Motor Vehicles in the public safety 
        communications network;
  --$1,000,000 for the Montana Public Safety Services Office;
  --$500,000 for equipment and supplies for the Ocean Springs, 
        Mississippi police department;
  --$3,000,000 for the Innovative Partnerships for High Risk 
        Youth demonstration project run by Public/Private 
        Ventures;
  --$250,000 for the University of Arkansas' program to reduce 
        Family Violence through Workplace Interventions;
  --$1,500,000 to fund meth lab task forces in Iowa's south 
        central and east central counties;
  --$300,000 for Marion County, Oregon, Methamphetamine Lab 
        Surveillance and Seizure Program;
  --$100,000 for the Multnomah County, Oregon Children's 
        Receiving Center;
  --$100,000 for the Ridge House in Nevada;
  --$500,000 for the Minot State University, North Dakota, 
        rural methamphetamine project;
  --$275,000 to the South Dakota Association of County 
        Commissioners to fund an upgrade in 9-1-1 wireless 
        systems statewide;
  --$2,000,000 for the SEARCH National Technical Assistance and 
        Training Program;
  --$750,000 for Fisk University's Security Enhancement 
        Initiative, Nashville, Tennessee;
  --$1,100,000 for Security Enhancements Programs for the South 
        Carolina Palmetto Expo Center;
  --$80,000 for the Shelbyville, Kentucky, Police Department;
  --$100,000 to the Alabama Sentencing Commission for a 
        simulation model of the Alabama sentenced offender 
        population;
  --$695,000 for the South Carolina Domestic Violence Reduction 
        Initiative, of which $150,000 is for Safe Passage which 
        assists victims in Chester, Lancaster, and York 
        Counties; $150,000 for Safer Harbor which assists 
        victims in Greenville and Anderson Counties; $175,000 
        for Safe Homes which assists victims in Spartanburg; 
        and $220,000 for the Cumbee Center to Assist Abused 
        Persons, which assists victims in Aiken, Barnwell, 
        Allendale, Edgefield, McCormick, and Saluda Counties;
  --$444,000 to the Southwest Montana Drug Task Force to deter 
        the use, distribution, and manufacture of dangerous 
        drugs;
  --$200,000 Stamford Geographic Information System, 
        Connecticut;
  --$1,000,000 for the Strategic Medical Intelligence 
        Initiative Partnership at the University of Pittsburgh 
        Medical Center;
  --$300,000 for the Children's Medical Assessment Center in 
        South Carolina to extend forensic healthcare services 
        to outlying rural areas, and to extend the tracking and 
        medical case management programs to all law enforcement 
        jurisdictions in the local Tri-County area;
  --$250,000 for the National Judicial College;
  --$250,000 for the National Council of Juvenile and Family 
        Court Judges;
  --$400,000 for MidAmerica Nazarene University's Criminal 
        Justice/Forensic Science Initiative, Kansas;
  --$1,000,000 for the Tools for Tolerance program, California;
  --$1,000,000 for Behavioral Health Research at the University 
        of Connecticut;
  --$250,000 for University of Southern Mississippi's Rural Law 
        Enforcement Training Initiative;
  --$200,000 for the UNLV Boyd School of Law;
  --$1,100,000 for the Vermont Drug Task Force;
  --$250,000 to the Washington Public Building Mapping System;
  --$100,000 for the Western District of Kentucky Federal 
        Fugitive Task Force;
  --$400,000 for the Institute for American Values;
  --$500,000 to continue the efforts of the Wisconsin 
        Methamphetamine Initiative; and
  --$250,000 for equipment and supplies for the Richton, 
        Mississippi police department.
    Violence Against Women Act Programs.--Within the funds 
appropriated, no less than $185,000,000 shall be used for 
general formula grants to the States. The fiscal year 2004 
funding will be used to develop and implement effective arrest 
and prosecution policies to prevent, identify, and respond to 
violent crimes against women, strengthen programs addressing 
stalking, and provide much needed victims services. This 
includes specialized domestic violence court advocates who 
obtain protection orders. In addition, programs should be 
strengthened to encourage reporting of domestic violence by 
providing assurances that law enforcement and attorney support 
systems would be available. This funding is to be distributed 
to States to significantly enhance the availability of 
services, prosecutors, and law-enforcement officials to women 
and children who are subjected to domestic violence. Within the 
amount provided, $950,000 shall be for a domestic violence 
protection unit in Alaska to enforce a zero tolerance policy 
for domestic violence. Within the amounts provided, $500,000 
shall be directed for the Standing Together Against Rape [STAR] 
program in Alaska.
    Drug Courts.--The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$43,500,000. The Committee notes that localities can also 
access funding for drug courts from the Local Law Enforcement 
Block Grants.

                         WEED AND SEED PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $58,542,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................      51,811,000
Committee recommendation................................      58,542,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $58,542,000. 
The recommendation is $58,542,000 above the budget request.

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $977,624,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     157,377,000
House allowance.........................................     682,993,000
Committee recommendation................................     656,636,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $656,636,000. 
The recommendation is $499,259,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee provides funding under this account as outlined 
below.
    The Committee is concerned by the Department of Justice's 
continued attempts to diminish the ability of the Community 
Oriented Policing Services [COPS] office to accomplish their 
mission. The mission of the COPS office is to advance community 
policing practices within law enforcement agencies and to 
significantly improve public safety in neighborhoods throughout 
the country through partnerships with communities, policing 
agencies, and other public and private organizations. While the 
Committee appreciates the Department's need to address its 
Federal counterterrorism responsibility, this need should not 
preclude the Department from executing other agency 
responsibilities such as local law enforcement programs aimed 
at ensuring community safety.
    Of particular concern to the Committee is the Department's 
continued insistence on understaffing the COPS office and the 
significant risk this inadequate staffing level can have on 
services as a result. The Committee understands that the 
current staffing level is only 153 of the 235 authorized (65 
percent manning). The Committee also understands that the 
office needs a minimum of 200 personnel to maintain the current 
quality services the States have come to expect from this 
office. Therefore, the Committee directs the COPS office to 
develop a plan to relieve this personnel shortage and report 
back to the Committees on Appropriations no later than 2 months 
after the date of enactment of this Act. Further, the 
Department of Justice is directed to provide a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations no later than April 1, 2004, 
detailing the actions the Department is undertaking to ensure 
adequate staffing levels within the COPS office.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Safety and Community Policing Programs..........         260,000
    Hiring.............................................        [200,000]
        Training and Technical Assistance..............         [20,000]
    Bullet Proof Vest Grant Program....................         [25,000]
    Indian Country.....................................         [20,000]
    Police Corps.......................................         [15,000]
Crime Fighting Technology Programs.....................         294,636
    Law Enforcement Technology Program.................         [83,960]
    Interoperable Communications Technology Program....        [140,000]
    Crime Identification Technology Act................         [36,626]
    DNA Backlog Elimination/Crime Lab Improvement               [34,050]
     Program...........................................
Prosecution Assistance.................................          30,000
    Gun Violence Reduction.............................         [15,000]
    Southwest Border Prosecutions......................         [15,000]
Community Crime Prevention.............................          37,000
    Project Sentry.....................................         [10,000]
    Offender Re-entry Program..........................          [5,000]
    Safe Schools Initiative............................         [17,000]
    Police Integrity Program...........................          [5,000]
Management and Administration..........................          35,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Community Oriented Policing Services......         656,636
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.

             PUBLIC SAFETY AND COMMUNITY POLICING PROGRAMS

    COPS Hiring Program.--The recommendation includes 
$200,000,000 for the hiring of school resource officers.
    Bullet-proof Vests Grant Program.--Of the funds provided, 
such sums as may be necessary are for NIST's Office of Law 
Enforcement Standards to continue support for the ballistic 
resistant and stab resistant material compliance testing 
programs, as well as for other technical support related to 
public safety weapons and protective systems.
    Indian Country.--The Committee recommends that 5 percent of 
the COPS funds be provided directly to tribal judicial systems 
to assist Tribal Courts with the caseload associated with 
increased arrests as a result of more stringent tribal law 
enforcement.

                  CRIME-FIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAMS

    Law Enforcement Technology Program.--Within the amount 
provided, the COPS office should examine each of the following 
proposals, provide grants if warranted, and submit a report to 
the Committees on its intentions for each proposal:
  --$550,000 for a radio system upgrade in Cary, North 
        Carolina;
  --$300,000 to Abbeville, South Carolina, Sheriff's Department 
        for mobile data computers and in-car cameras;
  --$1,000,000 to the City of Allentown, Pennsylvania, for 
        funding to develop computer mapping and weekly 
        accountability sessions;
  --$3,000,000 to the Anchorage, Alaska, 9-1-1 Dispatch 
        program;
  --$635,000 for the Arkansas Justice Xchange Project;
  --$1,050,000 for police technology grants to be equally 
        divided between the cities of Barre, St. Albans, and 
        Springfield, Vermont;
  --$500,000 the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and 
        Investigation Crime Laboratory System Improvement 
        Project;
  --$250,000 to Brown County, South Dakota to integrate the 
        Regional Communications Center into the South Dakota 
        State Radio System;
  --$850,000 to the City of Greenville, South Carolina, Police 
        Department for communication system upgrades;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the Southeastern Law Enforcement 
        Technology Center's Coastal Plain Police Communications 
        initiative for regional law enforcement communications 
        equipment;
  --$400,000 for the Colorado Sex Offender Registry;
  --$1,500,000 for Computer Aided Dispatch in Modesto, 
        California;
  --$50,000 for investigative capability of the Kansas Bureau 
        of Investigation's Computer Crime Section;
  --$3,000,000 for the Consolidated Advanced Technologies for 
        Law Enforcement (CAT lab) program at the University of 
        New Hampshire;
  --$750,000 for the Criminal Justice Information Integration 
        Project, City of Minneapolis;
  --$500,000 for the Minnesota Department of Public Safety's 
        CriMNet system;
  --$50,000 for the Dona Ana County, New Mexico, Sheriff's 
        Department for the purchase of a bomb robot;
  --$750,000 for the Downriver Mutual Aid, Michigan, to provide 
        equipment upgrades to the region's police departments;
  --$475,000 for Salem County, New Jersey, for its Emergency 9-
        1-1 Dispatch & Communication System;
  --$1,000,000 for Wayne County, Michigan, to develop a 
        countywide emergency communications system and complete 
        its Global Positioning System project;
  --$275,000 for Hoboken, New Jersey, emergency communications 
        system;
  --$1,000,000 for the Enforcement Technology Program in the 
        City of Macon, Georgia;
  --$175,000 to the Billings, Montana Police Department to 
        enhance the mobile data technology to provide constant 
        locations of all cars;
  --$400,000 for equipment upgrades, City of Gary, Indiana;
  --$500,000 for Fairbanks, Alaska, Criminal Justice Data 
        Sharing;
  --$1,000,000 for a firing range, City of Council Bluffs, 
        Iowa;
  --$250,000 for the Georgia Sheriff's Department Multi-Level 
        Law Enforcement Technology System;
  --$500,000 to Greenwood County, South Carolina, Sheriff's 
        Department for the purchase of mobile data computers 
        and communications upgrades;
  --$350,000 to the Hampton County, South Carolina, Sheriff's 
        Department for the purchase of computers and 
        surveillance equipment necessary to patrol high crime 
        areas of the county;
  --$1,500,000 for Harris County, Texas, to purchase and 
        install equipment for a redundant control emergency 
        communications center;
  --$2,500,000 for the Harrison County, Mississippi, Public 
        Safety Automated Systems;
  --$900,000 for the Internet Project at the Criminal Justice 
        Institute, University of Arkansas at Little Rock;
  --$1,300,000 for Passaic County, New Jersey, Interoperable 
        Communications project;
  --$250,000 for Jackson County, Mississippi, Critical Incident 
        Response Team;
  --$300,000 for the Jasper County, South Carolina, Sheriff's 
        Department for the purchase of mobile data computers 
        and in-car cameras;
  --$3,000,000 for the J-ONE information system in New 
        Hampshire;
  --$2,500,000 to the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, Borough 
        Emergency Operations Center;
  --$2,500,000 for the Land Mobile Radio project in Alaska;
  --$500,000 for Louisiana Statewide Digital Upgrade of 
        Interoperable Public Safety Communications System;
  --$3,000,000 to Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester Counties, 
        South Carolina, for a shared information system for 
        local law enforcement;
  --$200,000 for Lubbock, Texas, Law Enforcement Technology;
  --$150,000 for Marion County, Mississippi, COPS equipment;
  --$500,000 for the Matanuska Susitna, Alaska, Borough 
        Emergency Response Radio Network;
  --$100,000 for the Mayfield, Kentucky, Police Department;
  --$680,000 for Chippewa County, Michigan, to establish a 
        Michigan Public Safety Communications System;
  --$4,000,000 for equipment for the Mississippi Bureau of 
        Narcotics;
  --$120,000 to the Billings, Montana, Police Department for 
        Command and Control equipment;
  --$350,000 to the Newberry County, South Carolina, Sheriff's 
        Department for the purchase of mobile data computers;
  --$3,000,000 for technology and equipment for the New 
        Hampshire Department of Safety Statewide Interagency 
        Emergency Operations and Communications System Center;
  --$2,000,000 to provide digital radio equipment and 
        technology to the New Hampshire Department of Safety;
  --$250,000 to the New Hampshire Police Standards and Training 
        for technology and upgrades;
  --$1,000,000 for a replacement communications system for 
        Buchanan County, Missouri, the City of St. Joseph, and 
        Heartland Health Law Enforcement Communications System;
  --$3,000,000 for Northeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement 
        Council Communications Upgrades;
  --$480,000 for the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and 
        Investigation Fiber Interconnect Project;
  --$2,000,000 for the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety;
  --$900,000 to the Southeastern Law Enforcement Technology 
        Center for the deployment of shot spotter technology;
  --$125,000 for the Plymouth State College, New Hampshire, 
        police department for technology upgrades;
  --$500,000 for the City of Fairfield, California, Police CAD/
        RMS Dispatch and Records Project;
  --$1,250,000 for the Records Interoperability Initiative 
        through the Consolidated Advanced Technologies for Law 
        Enforcement;
  --$1,000,000 to the City of Memphis, Tennessee, to install a 
        regional law enforcement communications system;
  --$1,600,000 for the Mississippi Ridgeland Police Department;
  --$100,000 for the Simpson County, Kentucky, 9-1-1 Center;
  --$4,000,000 to the Southeastern Law Enforcement Technology 
        Center to partner with SPAWAR System Center Charleston 
        to advance research and development into software radio 
        technology;
  --$2,000,000 to South Carolina Law Enforcement Division to 
        continue funding for equipment to support a Federal and 
        State collaboration of investigators and forensics 
        experts to solve high technology crimes through one 
        center;
  --$500,000 to the South Dakota Police Chiefs' Association and 
        South Dakota Sheriffs' Association for technology and 
        equipment;
  --$1,000,000 to Louisville-Jefferson County, Kentucky, for 
        Public Safety Communications System for a common 
        interoperable voice and data communications system;
  --$250,000 to the Southeastern Law Enforcement Technology 
        Center to develop and deploy affordable spatial 
        analysis software tools;
  --$850,000 for Spartanburg County, South Carolina, for an 
        advanced 9-1-1 notification system;
  --$600,000 for Spokane, Washington, Intelligence/Information 
        Sharing Computer Systems;
  --$500,000 to the State of Wisconsin's Office of Justice 
        Assistance to create an integrated data-sharing system 
        linking the criminal justice system throughout the 
        State;
  --$125,000 for Tchula, Mississippi, for police equipment;
  --$250,000 for the Adams County, Illinois, Sheriff's 
        Department to upgrade law enforcement and communication 
        technologies and to modernize equipment;
  --$1,000,000 to the University of Kentucky's Law School 
        Electronic Access Project;
  --$2,000,000 for the UNH/Keene State College Chemical 
        Environmental Management System;
  --$400,000 for a Unified Public Safety Communications Center 
        in Osceola, Florida;
  --$500,000 to Union County, South Carolina, Sheriff's 
        Department for mobile data computers and communications 
        upgrades;
  --$350,000 for VeriTracks in Georgia;
  --$2,000,000 to the State of Alaska for training Village 
        Public Safety Officers and small village police offices 
        and acquisition of emergency response and search and 
        rescue equipment for rural communities;
  --$500,000 to procure and evaluate Voice Monitoring and 
        Logging equipment with embedded TACSCAN capability at 
        designated locations;
  --$500,000 to West Valley City, Utah Police Department for 
        public safety communications system upgrades;
  --$2,000,000 for the Wireless Network and Mobile Data 
        Terminal Program in the City of Jackson, Tennessee; and
  --$20,000 to the Yemassee, South Carolina, Police Department 
        for the purchase of radios and in-car cameras.
    COPS Interoperable Communications Technology Program.--The 
Committee recommends $140,000,000 to continue the Office of 
Community Oriented Policing Services [COPS] Interoperable 
Communications Technology Program, being designed and 
implemented by the COPS office, in consultation with the Office 
of Science and Technology [OS&T;] within the National Institute 
of Justice, as well as the Bureau of Justice Assistance [BJA]. 
The Committee continues to seek to utilize the expertise of all 
three organizations so as to create a grant program that is 
highly responsive to the immediate needs of the State and local 
law enforcement community and that takes full advantage of the 
expertise and lessons learned from OS&T;'s and BJA's research 
and development in the field of interoperable law enforcement 
communications, particularly project AGILE.
    This program should address the critical need of law 
enforcement to improve cross-jurisdictional communication and 
information sharing. The Committee directs the COPS office to 
develop and submit to the Committees on Appropriations, no 
later than 45 days after the implementation of this Act, 
proposed guidelines for the program. Consistent with the COPS 
office's existing grant programs, the COPS Interoperable 
Communications Technology Program should include a 25 percent 
local match requirement.
    The Committee understands and supports the need for minimum 
standards for law enforcement communications technology. 
Therefore, OS&T; should assist COPS in incorporating existing 
minimum standards into the formulation of this grant program. 
The Committee also provides, within available amounts, 
$1,000,000 to be transferred to NIST to continue the efforts of 
the Office of Law Enforcement Standards [OLES] regarding the 
development of a comprehensive suite of minimum standards for 
law enforcement communications.
    Crime Identification Technology Act.--The Committee 
recommends $36,626,000 to be used and distributed pursuant to 
the Crime Identification Technology Act of 1998, Public Law 
105-251, of which $10,000,000 is to be transferred to the NIJ 
to develop technologies to improve school safety.
    The Committee has provided $2,500,000 for the Alaska 
Criminal Justice Information System to integrate Federal, State 
and local criminal records along with social service and other 
records. It expects the system design to include the capability 
to provide background checks on potential child care workers 
for child care providers and families with the permission of 
the job applicant. The State should consult with the National 
Instant Check System for technical expertise.
    Within the overall amounts recommended, the OJP should 
examine each of the following proposals, provide grants if 
warranted, and submit a report to the Committees on its 
intentions for each proposal:
  --$1,000,000 for equipment for Fairleigh-Dickinson 
        University's, New Jersey, Computer Forensic Laboratory;
  --$700,000 to Western Forensic Science and Law Enforcement 
        Training Center, Colorado;
  --$300,000 for Orem City, Utah, Automatic Fingerprint 
        Identification System;
  --$170,000 for the Case Management/Central Docketing System 
        in Kansas;
  --$150,000 for the Coahoma County, Mississippi, Sheriff's 
        Department;
  --$9,400,000 for the South Carolina Judicial Department to 
        continue purchasing equipment for the integration of 
        the case docket system into a state-of-the-art 
        comprehensive database to be shared between the court 
        system and law enforcement;
  --$500,000 for the Minnesota Department of Public Safety's 
        CriMNet system;
  --$1,000,000 for the establishment of a forensic DNA analysis 
        lab at North Dakota State University;
  --$250,000 for Georgia State University to create an enhanced 
        capacity in urban communities to better understand 
        crime and to improve criminal justice and anti-crime 
        efforts through improved planning, assessment, and 
        evaluation of on-going and emerging crime problems;
  --$2,000,000 for Oakland County, Michigan, to initiate an 
        Identification Based Information System [IBIS];
  --$1,000,000 for the NEMESIS project in Saint Louis County, 
        Minnesota;
  --$600,000 for the Orem City, Utah Consolidated Records 
        Management System;
  --$3,000,000 for the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division 
        [SLED] to continue funding for necessary equipment for 
        SLED's criminal justice information system, to convert 
        existing databases and integrate systems for accurate 
        and rapid processing of information to support 
        identifications for criminal and civilian purposes;
  --$56,000 for the Kansas Telephone-Toll Analysis System; and
  --$4,000,000 for West Virginia University's Forensic 
        Identification Program.
    DNA Backlog Elimination.--Within the amount provided, 
$15,000,000 is available for Paul Coverdell Forensics Sciences 
Improvement grants, including $316,000 to improve the Idaho 
State Police's forensic capabilities.
    Within the overall amounts recommended for the DNA Backlog 
Elimination Programs, the OJP should examine each of the 
following proposals, provide grants if warranted, and submit a 
report to the Committees on its intentions for each proposal:
  --$1,000,000 to Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, to improve 
        its forensic laboratories;
  --$200,000 to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island 
        for a nanotechnology study of DNA sequencing methods;
  --$3,000,000 to the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division 
        for continued funding to support the growing State and 
        local law enforcement needs in the only full service 
        forensic laboratory in South Carolina;
  --$1,000,000 to the University of Alabama at Birmingham's 
        Forensic Science Institute;
  --$500,000 to establish a police science laboratory at 
        Holyoke Community College, Massachusetts;
  --$1,000,000 for Honolulu, Hawaii, Police Department's Crime 
        Lab Improvements;
  --$3,000,000 to Louisville, Kentucky, Regional Computer 
        Forensic Laboratory;
  --$3,300,000 for Marshall University's Forensic Science 
        Program;
  --$500,000 for medical examiner upgrades for the Jefferson 
        County, AL Medical Examiner's Office;
  --$1,000,000 for the Mississippi Crime Lab to address 
        forensic backlog;
  --$800,000 for the Ohio Attorney General's Office Crime 
        Laboratory System Improvement Project;
  --$500,000 for the Regional Crime Lab at Missouri Southern 
        State College;
  --$500,000 for forensics, crime scene collection, and drug 
        detection abilities upgrades at the Sandy City Utah 
        Crime Lab;
  --$500,000 for planning, design, and equipment for the State 
        of Vermont Forensic Laboratory;
  --$1,000,000 for Sam Houston State University to develop the 
        Texas Center for Forensic Sciences, with a primary 
        focus in the area of digital forensic science;
  --$1,000,000 for Texas Tech University's Institute for 
        Forensic Sciences; and
  --$250,000 for Washoe County, Nevada Sheriff's Department of 
        Forensics and DNA Analysis.
    Improving Forensic Capabilities.--The National Institute of 
Justice [NIJ], in conjunction with its own Office of Science & 
Technology, the American Society of Crime Lab Directors, the 
American Academy of Forensic Sciences, the International 
Association for Identification, and the National Association of 
Medical Examiners, is directed to develop a plan which will 
address the needs of the crime lab and medical examiner 
community beyond the ``DNA Initiative'' and report back to the 
Committees on Appropriations no later than 180 days from the 
date of enactment of this Act. The report should address the 
following: (1) manpower and equipment needs, (2) continuing 
education policies, (3) professionalism and accreditation 
standards, and (4) the level of collaboration needed between 
Federal forensic science labs and State/local forensic science 
labs for the administration of justice.

                       COMMUNITY CRIME PREVENTION

    Safe Schools Initiative.--The Committee recommends 
$17,000,000 for programs aimed at preventing violence in public 
schools, and to support the assignment of officers to work in 
collaboration with schools and community-based organizations to 
address the threat of terrorism, crime, disorder, gangs, and 
drug activities.
    Within the amount provided, the COPS office should examine 
each of the following proposals, provide grants if warranted, 
and submit a report to the Committees on its intentions for 
each proposal:
  --$750,000 for Alaska's Community in Schools Mentoring 
        Program;
  --$1,000,000 for the New England Amer-I-Can Program;
  --$1,700,000 for the University of Montana, Pathways to 
        Discovery Project, a community based after-school 
        program for at-risk youth;
  --$1,000,000 for the University of Montana to facilitate a 
        statewide community-based curriculum development 
        initiative that promotes responsible behavior and 
        reduces youth violence in schools and communities;
  --$250,000 for the Uhlich Children's Home, Illinois, to 
        support its school-based violence prevention, 
        mentoring, leadership, and training programs;
  --$1,000,000 for the School Securities Technologies 
        Assistance Resource Center at Sandia National 
        Laboratories in New Mexico;
  --$250,000 to the Sioux Falls School District, in Sioux 
        Falls, South Dakota for the Department of Corrections 
        to School Transition Project;
  --$250,000 for the Rock Island County, IL Regional Office of 
        Education to implement the Step Ahead Program; and
  --$1,500,000 to provide community-based, cost effective 
        alternative programs for juveniles who are, have been 
        or may be subject to compulsory care, supervision or 
        incarceration in public or private institutions in 
        several States including South Carolina.
    Management and Administration.--Within the recommended 
appropriation, the Committee provides $35,000,000 for 
Management and Administration [M&A;] of all COPS programs. 
Committee concerns regarding the fiscal year 2004 request for 
COPS M&A; are expressed above. In addition, reimbursable 
services provided by OJP will remain at the same level as the 
previous year.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $273,517,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................     462,282,000
Committee recommendation................................     232,330,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $232,330,000. 
The recommendation is $232,330,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                            JUVENILE JUSTICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Formula Grants (Part B)................................         100,000
Discretionary Grants (Part C)..........................          39,330
Youth Gangs (Part D)...................................           7,000
Discretionary Grants for State Challenge Activities               5,000
 (Part E)..............................................
Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP) (Part G).............          16,000
    Big Brother/Big Sister.............................          [6,000]
At Risk Children Program (Title V).....................          50,000
    Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program...........         [25,000]
Victims of Child Abuse Act.............................          15,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Juvenile Justice..........................         232,330
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Within the amount provided for (Part B), the Committee 
urges Governors and relevent State and local officials to 
review the following proposals and provide grants if warranted: 
A Child Is Missing Program in Rhode Island; After School 
Program, YMCA of Greater Indianapolis; Alabama Community 
Intensive Treatment Program; Azalea Road Park Program in North 
Carolina; Beating the Odds Program of Pennsylvania; Boys and 
Girls Home of Nebraska Juvenile Justice Programs; Words Can 
Heal Program of Colorado; New York City High Risk Neighborhood 
Delinquency Reduction Program; Disproportionate Minority Youth 
Confinement Pilot of Michigan; California Law Enforcement 
Internet Safety for Children; Champ Chicota Youth Mentoring 
Program in Louisiana; Children Who Witness Violence Program, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Children's Law Center of Maine; Community 
Empowerment Association's ``Friend-2-Friend'' Mentoring Program 
of Pennsylvania; Community Juvenile Justice Center of Montana; 
Community Outreach to Low-Income Families, Main Street 
Counseling of Orange, New Jersey; Comprehensive Child Abuse 
Center of Virginia; Family First Foundation of Pennsylvania; 
Iowa YMCA Rural Youth Mentoring Initiative; Juvenile Justice 
Center at Suffolk University; Leadership Academy, Abbeville, 
Alabama; Life Directions Peer Mentoring Partnership of Oregon; 
National Fatherhood Initiative; Louisiana Youth Seminar; Marion 
County, Oregon Juvenile Co-Occurring Disorders Pilot Project; 
Maine KidsPeace Therapeutic Foster Care Offices; Milwaukee 
Summer Stars; Kansas Temporary Lodging for Children Program; 
Milwaukee Youth Empowerment Sites; North Carolina KidsPeace 
Therapeutic Foster Care; Nevada Gang Database; New Mexico 
Cooperative Extension After-School Program; Omaha Council 
Bluffs Metropolitan YMCA; Our Club Program, Pulaski County, 
Arkansas Council for Children and Youth Services; Program for 
At Risk Youth, Greater Miami Tennis Foundation; Project Youth 
Anti-Violence Education in Kansas; Relief Nursery Services to 
Children of Incarcerated Parents in Oregon; River Rangers 
After-School Program of Rhode Island; Safer Learning Center of 
Illinois; SPEAK UP Hotline in New York; STOP the Violence--
Students Taking On Prevention of California; Teen Angels 
program in New Jersey; The Restitution Earned, Accountability 
Learned Program in Nevada; New York City Commercial Sexual 
Exploitation of Children Program; Tuscaloosa YMCA At-Risk Youth 
Program; University of Delaware's Center for Drug and Alcohol 
Studies; Urban League of Eastern Massachusetts After-School 
Program; Youth Shelter Project in Clatsop County, Oregon; and 
Youth, Prepared for Success, New Jersey Council of Urban 
Leagues.
    Within the amounts provided for Part C discretionary grants 
and all of the other funds provided under Juvenile Justice 
programs, the Committee directs OJJDP to provide the following 
grants:
  --$2,000,000 for the Alaska Child Abuse Investigation 
        Program;
  --$600,000 for the Alaska Children's Trust;
  --$750,000 to the Alaska Mentoring Demonstration Project;
  --$375,000 for the YMCA of Albuquerque, New Mexico, for 
        after-school programs for at-risk children;
  --$150,000 for the City of Battle Creek, Michigan to 
        implement the Around the CLOCK program;
  --$500,000 for the Birmingham Educational Technology Center;
  --$3,000,000 for the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation for youth 
        prevention programs aimed at leadership, teamwork, and 
        drug prevention;
  --$100,000 to Chicano Awareness Center Teen Court Program, 
        Nebraska;
  --$700,000 for Louisiana Children Advocacy Centers to assist 
        in child victim interrogation;
  --$75,000 for the Children's Treatment Program in the Sioux 
        Falls Rape and Domestic Abuse Center;
  --$100,000 for the City of Wrangell, Alaska, Youth Court;
  --$1,000,000 for Court House, Inc. Youth Programs, Colorado;
  --$475,000 for Covenant House New Jersey for its Rights of 
        Passage Program;
  --$1,500,000 for the Crimes Against Children Research Center, 
        New Hampshire;
  --$900,000 to the Wisconsin Families and Schools Together 
        [FAST] program;
  --$500,000 to the Oglala Sioux Tribe in Pine Ridge, South 
        Dakota, for the Flowering Tree program;
  --$2,000,000 to expand and replicate the Girl Scouts' Beyond 
        Bars and PAVE programs;
  --$1,000,000 for the Girls and Boys Town USA National 
        Projects;
  --$300,000 for the Iowa Child Advocacy Domestic Violence 
        Initiative;
  --$5,000,000 for continuation and expansion of the Junior 
        Achievement program;
  --$500,000 for the Juvenile and Offender Treatment and 
        Prevention Project in Tulsa County, Oklahoma;
  --$400,000 for the juvenile fire setting prevention program;
  --$423,000 for improvements to the Juvenile Justice 
        Information System in the State of Hawaii;
  --$1,400,000 for the Las Vegas, Nevada, Family Development 
        Foundation;
  --$750,000 for the Los Angeles, California, CLEAR Program;
  --$500,000 for LOVE Social Services in Fairbanks, Alaska;
  --$750,000 to the Low Country Children's Center in South 
        Carolina for continued support for a collaborative 
        effort among local organizations in Charleston that 
        provide full services to children who have been abused;
  --$800,000 for Pennsylvania's Martin Luther King, Jr. Center 
        for Non-Violence to continue its Life Skills program 
        which enables students to work alongside business and 
        industry mentors;
  --$1,900,000 for the National, Coordinated Law-Related 
        Education program;
  --$425,000 for the New Mexico Police Athletic League to 
        implement a statewide Law Enforcement Health Program 
        that will deal with girls' health and domestic violence 
        issues;
  --$60,000 for the Northern New Mexico Boys and Girls Club to 
        serve at-risk children in Taos County and Northern New 
        Mexico;
  --$300,000 for the Ohio Attorney General's Office Amber 
        Alert/SORN Program;
  --$100,000 to Omaha Boys and Girls Club Gang Prevention 
        Project;
  --$300,000 for the Open Door Youth Gang Alternative;
  --$250,000 to Opportunities Industrialization Centers of 
        America [OIC] for a program that works with adjudicated 
        youth and provides alternative sentencing and job 
        skills;
  --$250,000 to Our Home, Inc. in Huron South Dakota for 
        programming and equipment at its Parkston, South Dakota 
        juvenile group care facility;
  --$100,000 for the Grant Sawyer Center for Justice Studies at 
        the University of Nevada, Reno;
  --$500,000 for the outdoor education and outreach program run 
        by the Daniel Webster Council of the Boy Scouts of 
        America;
  --$250,000 to Prevent Child Abuse Vermont to test its child 
        abuse prevention model on a state-wide basis;
  --$50,000 for operations at the Prevent Child Abuse New 
        Hampshire program;
  --$150,000 for Rialto, California, Police Activities League 
        [PAL] Program;
  --$827,000 for Iowa Rural Mentoring Program;
  --$100,000 to the Rutland, Vermont, Area Prevention 
        Coalition;
  --$900,000 for the Wisconsin Safe and Sound Program based in 
        Milwaukee, Wisconsin;
  --$2,000,000 for the South Carolina Truancy and Dropout 
        Prevention Initiative;
  --$245,000 to South Dakota Coalition for Children;
  --$500,000 for the State of Wisconsin Office of Justice 
        Assistance to create a program that provides services 
        to children who witness adult domestic violence;
  --$150,000 to support Project Blanket, a drug and alcohol 
        prevention program for juveniles in jail operated by 
        Strength Incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania;
  --$300,000 for the Teen Shelter Project in Alabama;
  --$500,000 for the University of Southern Mississippi's 
        Family Network Partnership Program;
  --$1,000,000 to Western Kentucky University Spotlight Youth;
  --$1,000,000 for the Wynona Lipman Child Advocacy Center in 
        Newark, New Jersey;
  --$125,000 for the Jefferson County, Colorado, Youth System 
        Improvement Initiative; and
  --$500,000 for the Youth Violence Prevention Research Project 
        at the University of South Alabama.
    Enforcing the Underage Drinking Laws Program.--Within the 
funds provided in Title V, the Committee provides $25,000,000 
for grants to assist States in enforcing underage drinking 
laws. Within the program for underage drinking, OJP shall make 
an award to the Alaska Federation of Natives to continue an 
Underage Drinking Prevention Program in rural Alaska including 
assessment and education, focusing on the children of 
alcoholics.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee recommends 
$15,000,000 for the various programs authorized under the 
Victims of Child Abuse Act [VOCA]. Within the funds provided, 
$9,000,000 shall be for Regional Child Advocacy Centers 
Programs.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $53,028,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      49,054,000
House allowance.........................................      56,554,000
Committee recommendation................................      56,554,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $56,554,000. 
The recommendation is $7,500,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation provides all mandatory funding for death 
benefits under the Public Safety Officers Benefits Program. 
This program provides a lump-sum death benefit payment to 
eligible survivors of Federal, State, and local public safety 
officers whose death was the direct and proximate result of a 
traumatic injury sustained in the line of duty. In addition, 
$4,000,000 is provided to pay for disability benefits to public 
safety officers who are permanently disabled in the line of 
duty. Further, $3,500,000 is available for the program which 
provides payments for education purposes to the dependents of 
Federal, State, and local public safety officers who are killed 
or permanently disabled in the line of duty.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 101 makes up to $5,500 of the funds appropriated to 
the Department of Justice available for reception and 
representation expenses.
    Section 102 prohibits the use of funds in this title for 
certain activities.
    Section 103 prohibits the use of funds in this title for 
certain activities that could be undertaken by individuals.
    Section 104 requires female prisoners to be escorted when 
off prison grounds.
    Section 105 allows the Department of Justice to spend up to 
$10,000,000 for rewards for information regarding acts of 
terrorism against U.S. citizens or property at levels not to 
exceed $2,000,000 per reward and makes payments available for a 
judgment against the United States.
    Section 106 allows the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 107 allows the Attorney General to convey seized 
property of limited or marginal value.
    Section 108 sustains the Justice Department's grant making 
capabilities.
    Section 109 limits the funds available for certain law 
enforcement activities.
    Section 110 extends a demonstration project through 
September 30, 2004.
    Section 111 limits certain representation payments or 
reimbursements.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    The Committee recommends a total of $6,369,146,000 for the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative, the 
International Trade Commission, and the Department of Commerce 
for fiscal year 2004.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

            Office of the United States Trade Representative

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $34,772,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................       3,300,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      36,994,000
House allowance.........................................      41,994,000
Committee recommendation................................      36,994,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $36,994,000 
for the Office of the United States Trade Representative 
[USTR]. The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The USTR is responsible for developing and coordinating 
United States international trade, commodity, and direct 
investment policy, and leading negotiations with other 
countries on such matters. Its areas of responsibility include 
all matters relating to the World Trade Organization, including 
implementation of the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade 
agreements; trade, commodity, and direct investment matters 
dealt with by certain international institutions; industrial, 
agricultural and services trade policy; and trade-related 
intellectual property protection and environmental issues.
    The foreign policy agenda of the United States is 
increasingly dominated by economic interests rather than 
political interests. This is due largely to the growth of the 
global free market economy. However, it is also due, in part, 
to the floundering of certain U.S. agencies that are charged 
with representing those political interests. Regardless of the 
cause, trade negotiations now represent the better part of the 
United States' relations with other countries. The USTR has 
become, and will remain for the foreseeable future, a dominant 
force in American diplomacy. The recommendation acknowledges 
this reality.
    World Trade Organization [WTO].--The Committee is aware of 
the WTO Appellate Body's January 16, 2003, ruling regarding the 
Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act. The Committee directs 
the Office of the US Trade Representative, in consultation with 
the Department of Commerce, to immediately initiate 
negotiations within the World Trade Organization to seek 
express recognition of the existing right of WTO Members to 
distribute monies collected from antidumping and countervailing 
duties. The agency shall consult with and provide regular 
reports, every 60 days, to the Committee on negotiations.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $53,649,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      58,295,000
House allowance.........................................      57,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      58,295,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $58,295,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The International Trade Commission [ITC] is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations, providing Congress and the President with 
independent technical advice relating to United States 
international trade policy, and performing other statutory 
responsibilities such as quasi-judicial determinations on trade 
matters filed with the Commission.
    The Committee lauds the Commission on its IT program, 
specifically its long range approach to an advanced electronic 
filing system [EDIS II]. The Committee understands the critical 
need for, and potential cost savings of, this program and 
believes the ITC is working on a logical approach to this 
issue. The Committee expects the ITC to place greater emphasis 
on this effort and submit quarterly reports to the Committees 
on Appropriations on the status of the EDIS II project, 
beginning on March 31, 2004.
    An area of significant concern for the Commission is the 
statutory requirement for a balanced financial statement. The 
Committee expects the Commission to continue its best efforts 
to comply with the current statute and produce a balanced 
financial statement.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $359,838,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     382,123,000
House allowance.........................................     395,123,000
Committee recommendation................................     372,053,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $372,053,000. 
The recommendation is $10,070,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation anticipates $3,000,000 in fees, not $13,000,000, 
as proposed in the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by function, are displayed 
in the following table:

                               ITA FUNDING
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Trade development......................................          69,000
Market access and compliance...........................          32,178
Import Administration..................................          46,636
U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service....................         202,040
Administration/Executive Direction.....................          25,199
Offsetting Fee Collections.............................          (3,000)
                                                        ----------------
      Total ITA........................................         372,053
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Trade Development.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $69,000,000 for Trade Development. The 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the National Textile 
Center, $3,000,000 for the Textile/Clothing Technology 
Corporation, $1,000,000 for the Kansas World Trade Center, and 
$500,000 for the International Trade Processing Center.
    Market Access and Compliance.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $32,178,000 for Market Access and Compliance. 
The Committee directs the Office of Market Access and 
Compliance to continue with their compliance efforts and 
recommends $30,178,000 within available funds for this purpose.
    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 within available funds 
for ITA to continue to place and maintain support for 
compliance officers in China, Japan, and the European Union, 
and other key markets so that they can detect and swiftly 
address compliance problems U.S. companies face in these 
markets.
    Import Administration.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $46,636,000. The recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 for the Import Administration to continue to place 
and maintain overseas enforcement officers, and to monitor 
compliance with the World Trade Organization and other 
international commitments on antidumping and subsidies.
    The Committee recommendation includes $4,500,000 for the 
Import Administration to monitor import data and customs flows 
for surges in key markets and sectors, such as steel and 
lumber, and take immediate action when such surges are 
detected. Such action should include using resources to 
expedite unfair trade cases so United States-based companies 
can receive relief at the earliest possible date. In addition, 
the Import Administration must vigorously monitor foreign 
subsidies so that action can be taken if the subsidies violate 
trade agreements.
    United States and Foreign Commercial Service [US&FCS;].--The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $202,040,000.
    The Committee supports the Commercial Service's work on the 
Appalachian-Turkish Trade Project, a project to promote 
opportunities to expand trade, encourage business interests, 
stimulate foreign studies, and build a lasting and mutually 
meaningful relationship between the Appalachian States and the 
Republic of Turkey, as well as the neighboring regions, such as 
Greece. The Committee expects the Commercial Service to support 
the project.
    The Committee is aware of the Commercial Service's concern 
regarding the State Department's proposal for the Capital 
Security Cost-Sharing Program. The Committee directs the 
Department of Commerce to budget accordingly for this added 
cost in fiscal year 2005.
    Administration and Executive Direction.--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $25,199,000.
    Any changes to the funding levels provided for in this bill 
and report, including carryover balances, are subject to the 
standard reprogramming procedures set forth in section 605 of 
this Act.
    World Trade Organization.--The Committee is aware of the 
WTO Appellate Body's January 16, 2003, ruling regarding the 
Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset Act. The Committee directs 
the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, in consultation 
with the Department of Commerce, to immediately initiate 
negotiations within the World Trade Organization to seek 
express recognition of the existing right of WTO Members to 
distribute monies collected from antidumping and countervailing 
duties. The agency shall consult with and provide regular 
reports, every 60 days, to the Committee on negotiations.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $66,291,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      78,169,000
House allowance.........................................      68,203,000
Committee recommendation................................      73,060,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $73,060,000. 
The recommendation is $5,109,000 below the budget request.
    The Bureau of Industry and Security [BIS] is the principal 
agency involved in the development, implementation, and 
enforcement of export controls for dual-use technologies. The 
Export Enforcement Division detects, prevents, investigates, 
and assists in the sanctioning of illegal dual-use exports.
    Within the amount provided under this heading, $33,153,000 
is for export administration, $33,386,000 is for export 
enforcement, and $6,521,000 is for management and policy 
coordination.
    The Committee is aware that $4,675,000 in prior-year 
unobligated balances was available to the BIS in fiscal year 
2003. The BIS has assumed these funds to be part of its 
``base'' operating budget for fiscal year 2004. The Committee 
does not concur with this budgetary maneuver, particularly 
because the carryover is due to a decrease in the number of 
chemical weapons inspections, which will decrease further yet 
in fiscal year 2004. The Committee regards this funding as an 
unexplained increase and does not include it in the 
recommendation. The recommendation also does not include the 
$434,000 requested by BIS to restore the .65 percent across-
the-board rescission applied to the fiscal year 2003 Omnibus 
Appropriations Act, as is consistent with the Committee's 
recommendations for all other accounts funded under this Act.

                  Economic Development Administration

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $318,680,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     364,404,000
House allowance.........................................     318,680,000
Committee recommendation................................     387,680,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $387,680,000. 
The recommendation is $23,276,000 above the budget request.
    The Economic Development Administration [EDA] provides 
grants to local governments and nonprofit agencies for public 
works, planning, and other projects designed to facilitate 
economic development. Funding amounts for the two 
appropriations accounts under this heading are displayed below.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $288,115,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     331,027,000
House allowance.........................................     288,115,000
Committee recommendation................................     357,115,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $357,115,000. 
The recommendation is $26,088,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding of 
$272,115,000 for public works grants (title I), $24,000,000 for 
planning assistance, $10,500,000 for trade adjustment 
assistance, $40,900,000 for economic adjustment grants (title 
IX), $9,100,000 for technical assistance, and $500,000 for 
research.
    The Committee is aware of several proposals for economic 
development or adjustment assistance and strongly urges EDA to 
consider applications for the following proposals within 
applicable procedures and guidelines and provide a grant, if 
warranted: the Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, Dallas, 
Texas Alternative Zone to Commerce, the University of Southern 
Mississippi Manufacturing Improvements for Shipbuilding 
Project, the Mississippi Technology Alliance, the Boise State 
Technology & Entrepreneurial Center (TECenter), the University 
of Southern Mississippi National Center for Excellence in 
Economic Development and Entrepreneurship, the Economic 
Development Resource Office at Montana Tech, the Idaho U. 
extension program for e-commerce, the Montana State University-
Northern Applied Technology Center, the Minnesota Westside 
Intercept project, the Southwest Area Career Center, the 
University of Missouri St. Louis Information Technology 
Business Incubator, the Downtown Denver Railyard Redevelopment 
Project, the Natural Resources Research Institute's Taconite 
Demonstration Project, the Presque Isle Industrial Council, the 
River Valley Growth Council Insulated Housing Project, the 
University of Northern Iowa Alliance for International Business 
Development and Education, the Rural Northeast Oklahoma 
Economic and Business Development Program, the New Product 
Development and Commercialization Center for Rural 
Manufacturers, the Elmore County Development Authority, the 
Central Alabama Community College Entrepreneurial Center, the 
expansion and upgrade of the ship repair facility in Seward, 
Alaska, the Manufacturing Training and Technology Center at the 
University of New Mexico, and the Harney County, Oregon 
Business Incubator Startup.
    The Committee expects EDA to continue its efforts to assist 
communities impacted by economic dislocations relating to 
industry downswings as well as to assist communities impacted 
by downturns due to environmental concerns. This includes the 
timber, steel, and coal industries, United States-Canadian 
trade-related issues, communities in New England, the mid-
Atlantic, Hawaii, and Alaska impacted by fisheries regulations, 
and communities in the Southeast impacted by downturns due to 
the North American Free Trade Agreement [NAFTA].
    For several years the Committee has directed EDA to focus 
on communities in the Southeast that have been impacted by 
economic downturns resulting from the implementation of NAFTA. 
The Assistant Secretary shall report to the Committees on 
Appropriations by July 1, 2004 on the efforts to date EDA has 
put forth toward the impacted communities and the successes of 
those efforts.
    The Committee urges the EDA to consider whether the 
creation of the position of an EDA representative for Nevada is 
warranted.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $30,565,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      33,377,000
House allowance.........................................      30,565,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,565,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $30,565,000. 
The recommendation is $2,812,000 below the budget request.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $28,718,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      29,487,000
House allowance.........................................      29,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      28,718,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $28,718,000. 
The recommendation is $769,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee is aware that the Office of Native American 
Business Development has not established all of the Native 
American Business Centers in their organization plan. The 
Committee urges the Agency to establish all of the centers as 
outlined in their plan as soon as possible.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $62,515,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      84,756,000
House allowance.........................................      75,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      84,756,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $84,756,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the the budget request. The 
recommendation represents a 35.6 percent increase over the 
fiscal year enacted 2003 level. The fiscal year 2003 
appropriation for Economics and Statistical Analysis [ESA] 
represented a 15 percent increase above the prior fiscal year. 
The Committee has supported such large increases for this 
account in recognition of the fact that relevant, accurate, and 
timely economic measures are more important now than ever 
before. The health of the United States' economy is 
inextricably linked to our national security.
    The ESA is responsible for the collection, tabulation, and 
publication of a wide variety of economic, demographic, and 
social statistics and provides support to the Secretary of 
Commerce and other Government officials in interpreting the 
state of the economy and developing economic policy. The Bureau 
of Economic Analysis [BEA] and the Under Secretary for Economic 
Affairs are funded in this account.
    The Committee recommends $78,292,000 for BEA and $6,464,000 
for program support, as requested. The recommendation will 
allow the BEA to improve the accuracy of its reports by 
replacing extrapolated data with real-time monthly data from 
retail outlets. This will provide data users more current 
economic measures to make better informed business, monetary, 
and fiscal decisions. In addition, the recommendation will 
allow the BEA to conduct quarterly surveys to gather more 
frequent and comprehensive data for the Nation's largest and 
most volatile industries. The Committee acknowledges that the 
BEA needs to accomplish these new initiatives in order to 
remain adaptive to the dynamic United States economy.

                          Bureau of the Census

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $550,878,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     661,961,000
House allowance.........................................     661,961,000
Committee recommendation................................     550,878,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $550,878,000. 
The recommendation is $111,083,000 below the budget request. 
The Committee's recommendations for the Census Bureau accounts 
are described in more detail in the following paragraphs.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $181,811,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     220,908,000
House allowance.........................................     220,908,000
Committee recommendation................................     181,811,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $181,811,000. 
The recommendation is $39,097,000 below the budget request. 
This account provides for the salaries and expenses associated 
with the statistical programs of the Bureau of the Census, 
including measurement of the Nation's economy and the 
demographic characteristics of the population. These programs 
are intended to provide a broad base of economic, demographic, 
and social information used for decision-making by governments, 
private organizations, and individuals.
    The Committee has provided funding for the key programs of 
the Census Bureau. The Committee is particularly concerned that 
key reports on manufacturing and general economic and foreign 
trade statistics are maintained and issued on a timely basis.
    The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$3,300,000 for the Electronic Government (``E-Government'') 
initiative. This initiative responds to business demands for E-
Government services by permitting businesses to file 
electronically in any one of 100 surveys. This program will 
provide necessary new tools for collecting data and improving 
data quality.
    The Committee requests that the Bureau provide the 
Committees on Appropriations a report on the reimbursements it 
has received for work requested by other Federal agencies or 
private organizations. The report should be provided no later 
than May 1, 2004.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $369,067,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     441,053,000
House allowance.........................................     441,053,000
Committee recommendation................................     369,067,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $369,067,000. 
The recommendation is $71,986,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee is aware that the Census Bureau will also have 
available to it approximately $12,163,000 in recoveries of 
prior year obligations.
    This account provides for the constitutionally mandated 
decennial census, quinquennial censuses, and other programs 
which are cyclical in nature. Additionally, individual surveys 
are conducted for other Federal agencies on a reimbursable 
basis.
    The Committee recommends $215,476,000 for the 2010 
Decennial Census under the Demographic Statistics Program.
    For other programs under this account, the Committee 
recommends the following:

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic census............................................       61,258
Census of governments......................................        6,000
Intercensal demographics estimates.........................        9,000
Electronic information collection..........................        6,541
Geographic support.........................................       39,792
Data processing system.....................................       31,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $73,279,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      21,407,000
House allowance.........................................      32,544,000
Committee recommendation................................      85,542,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $85,542,000. 
The Committee recommendation is $64,135,000 above the budget 
request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $14,604,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      18,869,000
House allowance.........................................      14,604,000
Committee recommendation................................      15,042,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $15,042,000. 
The recommendation is $3,827,000 below the budget request. The 
Department has requested a 29 percent increase over the fiscal 
year 2003 enacted level for this account. Such an increase is 
unwarranted, given the fact that the budget request seeks to 
discontinue the Public Telecommunications Facilities Planning 
and Construction [PTFPC] grant program, which, until fiscal 
year 2004, represented nearly 60 percent of the National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration [NTIA] 
budget. The recommendation does not include an increase for 
salaries and expenses of NTIA because of the large reduction to 
PTFPC.
    The Committee retains language from previous years allowing 
the Secretary of Commerce to collect reimbursements from other 
Federal agencies for a portion of the cost of coordination of 
spectrum management, analysis, and operations. The Committee 
directs the NTIA to leverage these funds to establish a 
paperless system for spectrum issue resolution, certification, 
satellite coordination, and frequency authorization.

       PUBLIC BROADCASTING FACILITIES, PLANNING, AND CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $43,273,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       2,538,000
House allowance.........................................       2,538,000
Committee recommendation................................      55,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $55,000,000. 
The recommendation is $52,462,000 above the budget request. The 
Public Telecommunications Facilities Planning and Construction 
[PTFPC] program awards competitive grants that help public 
broadcasting stations, State and local governments, Indian 
tribes, and nonprofit organizations construct facilities to 
bring educational and cultural programming to the American 
public using broadcasting and non-broadcasting 
telecommunications technologies. The primary focus of the PTFPC 
program has been assisting public broadcasters in making the 
transition from analog to digital broadcasting.

                    TECHNOLOGY OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $15,402,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................      15,402,000
Committee recommendation................................      15,500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $15,500,000. 
The recommendation is $15,500,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee directs the NTIA to limit eligibility for this 
program.
    For the last 2 fiscal years, the Administration has slated 
the Technology Opportunities Program [TOP] for elimination. The 
reason for the elimination, according to the Department, is 
that the program has fulfilled its mission. However, there are 
great numbers of Americans that could benefit from the TOP 
program. The Committee therefore recommends continued funding 
for this program.
    The Committee is aware of several proposals for information 
infrastructure grants and strongly urges NTIA to consider 
applications for the following proposals within applicable 
procedures and guidelines and to provide a grant, if warranted, 
to: (1) the Lawson State Community College Information 
Technology Training and Placement Center, (2) the Eastern New 
Mexico University Communications Center, (3) the American 
Indian Higher Education Consortium's Indians into Technology 
Program, and (4) Southern Louisiana University for an E-
government initiative.
    The Regional Information Sharing System [RISS] program 
under the Department of Justice provides technology support 
funding for law enforcement entities. The Committee 
recommendation therefore prohibits law enforcement entities 
eligible to receive funding under the RISS program from 
applying for TOP funds. The Committee expects NTIA to give 
preference to applications from consortia for which no other 
funding source exists.

                      Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $1,182,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   1,395,055,000
House allowance.........................................   1,138,700,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,217,460,000

    The Committee recommends total budgetary resources of 
$1,217,460,000. The recommendation is $177,595,000 below the 
budget request.
    The United States Patent and Trademark Office [USPTO] is 
charged with administering the patent and trademark laws of the 
United States. USPTO examines patent applications, grants 
patent protection for qualified inventions, and disseminates 
technological information disclosed in patents. USPTO also 
examines trademark applications and provides Federal 
registration to owners of qualified trademarks. The USPTO is 
subject to the policy direction of the Secretary of Commerce, 
but the agency has independent control of its budget, 
expenditures, personnel, procurement and other administrative 
and management functions. Patent laws administered by the USPTO 
encourage invention, innovation, and investment. The USPTO 
plays a critical role in promoting the continued development of 
intellectual property in this country. For established 
companies, new patents improve competitiveness, increase 
productivity, help bring new products and services to market, 
and create jobs.
    In fiscal year 2002, the Committee directed the USPTO to 
develop a 5-Year Strategic Plan. There is currently legislation 
pending in the Senate and House of Representatives that would 
make available to the USPTO additional resources to implement 
the Strategic Plan. This legislation proposes a fee 
restructuring that would result in an additional $192,000,000 
for the USPTO in fiscal year 2004. The USPTO maintains that 
these additional funds are critical to its achievement of the 
objectives outlined in the Strategic Plan, namely, to enhance 
the quality of patent and trademark examining, continue with E-
government initiatives, redirect patent examiner expertise back 
to the core government function of examination, expand 
bilateral and multilateral agreements to strengthen 
intellectual property rights globally and reduce duplication of 
effort among intellectual property offices, and begin reducing 
pendency. The Committee vigorously supports the USPTO's efforts 
to attain these objectives, but questions the assumption that 
past failure to attain these objectives was the result of 
inadequate funding and that future ability to attain these 
objectives is dependent upon the hiring of hundreds, if not 
thousands, of additional personnel. In particular, the 
Committee is aware of technologies that would greatly improve 
the quality of patent examinations at very low cost.
    Because the legislation has not been enacted, the USPTO 
does not yet have the authority to increase its fees. The 
fiscal year 2004 request for the USPTO, which assumes the fee 
increase, is therefore artificially high. While the Committee 
supports the objectives of the Strategic Plan, the Committee's 
302(b) allocation will not allow it to absorb the difference 
between funding requested and funding available. Until the 
legislation and the fee increase are enacted into law, the 
Committee expects USPTO to immediately begin implementing the 
programs and achieving the objectives of the Strategic Plan 
within current funding levels.
    Any deviations from the funding distribution provided for 
in this Act and in its accompanying statement, including 
carryover, are subject to the standard reprogramming procedures 
set forth in section 605 of this Act.

                       Technology Administration


       UNDER SECRETARY FOR TECHNOLOGY/OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY POLICY

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $9,822,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       8,015,000
House allowance.........................................       7,822,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the 
Technology Administration. The recommendation is $8,015,000 
below the budget request. Instead, the Committee recommendation 
redistributes the functions under this heading to other 
organizations within this title.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $707,505,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     496,818,000
House allowance.........................................     460,059,000
Committee recommendation................................     835,228,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $835,228,000. 
The recommendation is $338,410,000 above the budget request. 
The recommendation provides that up to $7,772,000 may be 
transferred from the Scientific and Technical Research and 
Services account to the working capital fund, which the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST] uses to 
purchase equipment for its laboratories.
    NIST is directed to consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations before proceeding with further implementation of 
competitive outsourcing.
    A description of each NIST account and the corresponding 
Committee recommendation follows:

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $357,075,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     379,849,000
House allowance.........................................     357,862,000
Committee recommendation................................     383,375,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $383,375,000. 
The recommendation is $3,526,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation assumes $1,000,000 in prior year unobligated 
balances, bringing the total amount available for this account 
to $384,375,000. The fiscal year 2003 enacted levels were not 
available at the time the fiscal year 2004 budget request was 
developed. Consequently, the fiscal year 2004 budget request, 
as presented, has no basis. The recommendation provides the 
maximum funding deemed prudent for this account.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Electronics and Electrical Engineering..................          50,114
Manufacturing Engineering...............................          23,034
Chemical Science and Technology.........................          44,077
Physics.................................................          51,725
Material Science and Engineering........................          59,865
Building and Fire Research..............................          24,456
Computer Science and Applied Mathematics................          56,732
Technology Assistance...................................          18,458
National Quality Program................................           6,207
Research Support Activities.............................          49,707
                                                         ---------------
      Total, STRS.......................................         384,375
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Within the funds made available for Electronics and 
Electrical Engineering, $4,000,000 is for the Office of Law 
Enforcement Standards, $1,500,000 is for the For Inspiration 
and Recognition of Science and Technology [FIRST] Program, and 
$500,000 is for the Boston Museum of Science and FIRST to 
develop a joint engineering exhibition. Within the funds made 
available for Manufacturing Engineering, $1,000,000 is for a 
spreadsheet engineering initiative at the Tuck School of 
Business. Within the funds made available for Chemical Science 
and Technology, $1,000,000 is to restore reductions in 
environmental measurements at the Hollings Marine Laboratory. 
Within the funds made available for Building and Fire Research, 
$600,000 is for a school safety and preparedness project at the 
National Infrastructure Institute and $4,000,000 is for NIST to 
continue its investigation into the World Trade Center 
collapse, as requested. Within the funds made available for the 
National Quality Program/Malcolm Baldrige National Quality 
Award, $600,000 is for the National Medal of Technology 
Program. Within the funds made available for Research Support 
Activities, $5,100,000 is for maintenance and operation costs 
and $5,500,000 is for equipment costs associated with the 
Advanced Measurement Laboratory. The Committee directs that no 
funds be used for FAIR Act studies in support of the A-76 
contracting process.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $284,760,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      39,607,000
House allowance.........................................      39,607,000
Committee recommendation................................     369,223,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $369,223,000. 
The recommendation is $329,616,000 above the budget request.
    Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program [MEP].--The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $106,623,000 to fully 
fund all of the MEP centers. The recommendation is $94,023,000 
above the request.
    Advanced Technology Program [ATP].--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $259,600,000. The recommendation 
is $206,993,000 above the request. This amount, when combined 
with approximately $8,283,000 in carryover, will fully fund ATP 
awards and provide $50,000,000 for the creation of focused 
competitions for technologies relating to homeland security. 
Within the amounts made available for ATP, $46,833,000 shall be 
used for administrative costs, internal laboratory support, and 
for Small Business Innovation Research Program requirements. 
The National Institute of Standards and Technology may not 
apply a contracts and grants processing surcharge to the ATP 
program.
    Homeland Security Competition.--The Committee is aware of 
the critical need to support research and development [R&D;] 
into new technologies to combat terrorism. The mission of ATP--
to provide an early-stage investment for the development of 
innovative technologies that promise both commercial and 
security benefits for the Nation--is ideally suited to help 
meet this need. There is a precedent within the ATP program for 
funding R&D; for homeland security technologies. The ``Gene 
Chip'', for example, has enabled the creation of a less 
expensive and more portable means of detecting chemical and 
biological weapons. The Committee is aware that there are large 
government-wide funding increases in fiscal year 2004 for R&D; 
into new technologies to combat terrorism. However, it is not 
clear yet how agencies responsible for homeland security will 
select and vet projects. ATP has a proven record of tapping the 
most promising technologies, and overseeing their rapid 
development and eventual commercialization. ATP awards are made 
on the basis of rigorous peer-reviewed competitions and include 
input from the National Academy of Engineering. Grant proposals 
are evaluated by one of several technology-specific boards 
staffed by experts. The recommendation therefore includes 
$50,000,000 for dedicated, thematic competitions for emerging 
homeland security technologies. The Department of Commerce is 
directed to report to the Committee on its plan for the 
initiation of these competitions within 60 days of enactment of 
this Act.
    Technology Program Consolidation.--The Committee recommends 
the transfer of the Office of Technology Competitiveness and 
the Office of Manufacturing Competitiveness from the Office of 
the Under Secretary for Technology to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology's Industrial Technology Services. The 
recommendation includes $3,000,000 for the ongoing activities 
of these two offices.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $65,670,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      69,590,000
House allowance.........................................      62,590,000
Committee recommendation................................      84,630,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $84,630,000. 
The recommendation is $15,040,000 above the budget request and 
fully funds the highest priority safety, capacity, maintenance, 
and repair projects at NIST. Of the amounts provided, 
$28,770,000 is for central utility plant and primary electrical 
upgrades at NIST's Boulder, Colorado laboratory, $5,000,000 is 
for expenses relating to the relocation and equipping of NIST's 
Advanced Measurement Laboratory [AML] in Gaithersburg, 
Maryland, $3,360,000 is for the renovation of Building 220 on 
the Gaithersburg campus, and $24,000,000 is for safety, 
capacity, maintenance, and major repairs.
    The Committee has been supportive of NIST's requests for 
additional resources to improve its aging infrastructure. With 
the AML nearing completion, NIST must now address its remaining 
facility needs. In 1998, NIST published the Facilities 
Improvement Plan. However, much has changed since this document 
was prepared. The Committee therefore directs that NIST update 
its Facilities Improvement Plan prior to the obligation of any 
funds provided under this account. This plan should detail 
NIST's short-term and long-term priorities, provide current 
cost estimates, and timelines for completion. Additionally, the 
updated facilities plan should address how the facility 
improvements correspond with NIST's strategic planning. The 
updated plan will guide the replacement, renovation, and repair 
of the Institute's buildings so that NIST can continue to 
provide U.S. industry and science with the best possible 
measurement system.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $3,187,723,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   3,338,889,000
House allowance.........................................   3,219,764,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,779,392,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,779,392,000 
for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. 
Transfers total $52,000,000. The recommendation is $440,503,000 
above the budget request. During this time of continued 
budgetary constraint, the Committee recommendation continues to 
make funding for ocean, coastal, fisheries, and atmospheric 
programs a high priority.
    As in past years, the Committee expects NOAA and the 
Department to adhere to the direction given in this section of 
the Committee report, particularly language regarding 
consultation with Congress, and to observe the reprogramming 
procedures detailed in section 605 in the general provisions of 
the accompanying bill. Unlike past years, however, the 
Committee intends to enforce congressional direction 
ruthlessly.
    Fisheries in Distress.--In the past few years, the 
Committee has been showered with requests for emergency relief 
for devastated fisheries from the Bay of Fundy to the Bering 
Sea. The causes for the collapse of fisheries are many and 
varied. The one consistency is that no region of the country is 
unaffected. It is no exaggeration to say that the fate of a 
multi-billion dollar industry that puts food on many a table 
hangs in the balance. NOAA, increasingly entangled in 
litigation, has lost control of the situation. The Committee's 
response has been ad hoc and reactive, little better than a 
band aid on a gaping wound. It can only be hoped that the Pew 
and Ocean Commission reports will prove the call to arms that 
they are intended to be. In the meantime, the Committee expects 
to join the National Marine Fisheries Service in a major 
exploration of the causes of collapse, current and future 
management activities and options, and the likelihood of 
sustainable recovery.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $2,298,481,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   2,392,300,000
House allowance.........................................   2,180,454,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,696,520,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$2,696,520,000. The recommendation is $304,220,000 above the 
budget request. Committee recommendations for specific line 
offices are displayed in the following table:

                NOAA OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Ocean Service................................           508,619
National Marine Fisheries Service.....................           672,452
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research......................           394,470
National Weather Service..............................           696,857
National Environmental Satellite and Data Information            148,840
 Services.............................................
Program Support.......................................           327,282
                                                       -----------------
      Total Operations, Research, and Facilities               2,748,520
       (including transfers)..........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendations are discussed in more detail 
below.
    Pacific Salmon Funding.--The Committee remains concerned 
that it lacks assurances that funding provided for Pacific 
Salmon will contribute to the recovery of species listed under 
the Endangered Species Act [ESA]. The Committee has continually 
noted that the Secretary could potentially face severe adverse 
legal consequences for failure to make progress under the ESA, 
and that just providing funding for habitat restoration was not 
enough. For a plan to have at least a modicum of certainty of 
success, it must address the ``four H's''--habitat, hatcheries, 
hydropower, and harvest--and section 6 agreements that would 
set forth commitments by the Secretary, States, Treaty Tribes, 
and other relevant entities. Unfortunately, the Committee's 
warnings have been underscored by the recent district court 
decision finding that the Secretary's Pacific salmon recovery 
plans for the Columbia River, which rely solely upon off-site 
habitat and hatchery programs--only two of the ``four H's'' 
that play a part in salmon recovery--did not provide any 
certainty of success. In concluding NOAA failed to comply with 
the ESA, the court specifically noted ``the absence in the 
record of any binding commitments by the States, Treaty Tribes, 
and private parties to fund or implement the responsibilities 
devolved upon them by NOAA as well as the lack of certainty as 
to the range-wide off-site mitigation actions.'' The Committee 
takes this caution seriously. Consequently, the Committee 
directs the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS] 
Administrator to provide no funding for any recovery program 
for ESA-listed salmon unless that program can be shown to be 
part of an effort to address the ``four H's'' and section 6 
agreements. The Committee directs the NMFS Administrator to 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on each proposal for 
which funding is provided detailing what steps the proposal 
includes addressing habitat, hatcheries, hydropower, and 
harvest issues relating to the recovery of the stock for which 
the proposal has been submitted.
    In addition, the Committee continues to note the lack of 
accountability and performance standards for resources 
distributed to restore endangered and threatened salmon through 
the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund. The ESA imposes 
substantial legal obligations on the Secretary of Commerce with 
regard to the not less than twenty-six runs of Pacific salmon 
listed as endangered. As noted above, failure to make progress 
toward recovery under the ESA poses adverse legal consequences 
for NOAA. Further, the ``Executive Report for the Washington 
Comprehensive Monitoring Strategy and Action Plan for Watershed 
Health and Salmon Recovery'' states that current monitoring 
activities are not comprehensive and are lacking in nearly 
every category. In light of the considerable funds that have 
been provided to date for salmon recovery, it is unacceptable 
that no mechanism yet exists for providing assurances that the 
stocks are, in fact, recovering. The Executive Report also 
noted that validation monitoring is the only type of monitoring 
that can establish ``cause and effect'' relationships between 
fish, habitat, water quality, water quantity, and management 
actions. The Committee directs that 2 percent of the funding 
provided through the Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund shall 
be used for validation monitoring. The Committee directs NOAA 
to provide an annual report to the Committee no later than 
March 30 of each year on the projects funded through the 
Pacific Salmon Recovery Fund and the results of the validation 
monitoring for funded projects.

                         NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $508,619,000 
for the National Ocean Service [NOS]. Committee recommendations 
are displayed in the following table:

                         NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOS Operations--Salaries and Expenses.................           150,051
                                                       =================
Navigation Services:
    Mapping & Charting:
        Coastal Mapping:
            Coastal Mapping...........................               535
            MS/LA Digital Coast.......................             2,000
            Shoreline Mapping.........................             7,465
                Chesapeake Bay........................             2,000
        Hydrographic Surveys:
            Address Survey Backlog/Contracts..........            24,300
                EEZ Outer Continental Shelf Ocean                  3,200
                 Bottom Claims........................
                Gulf of Alaska........................             2,500
                North Pacific.........................             1,000
                North Pacific Maritime Boundary Line..             1,500
            Hydrographic Surveys......................             1,339
            Vessel Lease/Time Charter.................            11,100
        Joint Hydrographic Center.....................             4,250
        Joint Hydrographic Center--Bathymetric                     3,200
         Research.....................................
        Marine Modeling & Geospatial Technology.......             2,146
        Nautical Charting:
            Electronic Navigational Charts............             5,350
            Nautical Charting.........................             6,759
            Navigational Services.....................             1,885
                                                       -----------------
              Subtotal, Mapping and Charting..........            80,529
                                                       =================
    Geodesy:
        Geodetic Survey (Height Modernization):
            Pacific Regional Geodetic Survey (CA/OR/               1,500
             WA)......................................
                Washington............................             1,000
            SE Regional Geodetic Survey (NC/SC/GA/FL/              1,000
             AL/MS/LA)................................
                Louisiana.............................               500
                Mississippi...........................             1,000
                North Carolina........................             1,000
                South Carolina........................               500
            Upper Great Lakes RGS (MI/IN/IL/WI/MN)....               500
        National Spatial Reference System.............             2,150
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Geodesy...........................             9,150
                                                       =================
    Tide & Current Data:
        Alaska Current & Tide Data....................             1,500
            Upper Cook Inlet Tidal Research...........               500
        Nat'l Water Level Observation Network (NWLON).             1,500
        National Water Level Program..................             1,620
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Tide & Current Data...............             5,120
                                                       =================
          Total, Navigation Services..................            94,799
                                                       =================
Ocean Resources, Conservation, & Assessment:
    Coastal Assessment Program:
        Aquatic Research Consortium--MS...............             2,500
    Coastal Observing Systems:........................
        Alliance for Coastal Technologies.............             2,500
        CA Ctr. for Integrative Coastal Research (CI-              1,000
         CORE)........................................
        Carolina Coastal Ocean Observing & Prediction              2,500
         Sys..........................................
        Center for Coastal Ocean Observation &                     2,500
         Analysis.....................................
        Center for Integrated Marine Technologies.....             2,500
        Coastal Marine Research & Monitoring Program..             2,500
        Coastal Observation Technology System.........             2,500
        Coastal Ocean Research & Monitoring Program...             2,500
        Coordination/Competitive Grant Pilot Fund.....             5,000
        Gulf of Alaska Ecosystem Monitoring...........               750
        Long Island Sound Coastal Observing System....             1,800
        Wallops Ocean Observation Project.............             2,000
    Coastal Rest. & Enhance. thru S&T; (CREST).........               500
    Coastal Services Center...........................            19,000
    Coastal Storms....................................             2,750
    Coastal Watershed Groundwater Assessment--NH......               500
    Coop Institute for Coastal and Estuarine Enviro                6,550
     Tech.............................................
    Coral Reef Program:
        National Program..............................            26,050
        Florida--National Coral Reef Institute........             1,000
        Hawaii Initiative.............................             1,500
            Nature Conservancy of HI Marine Program...               250
        Puerto Rico Coral Reef Initiative.............               500
    JASON Education and Outreach......................             1,000
    Lake Pontchartrain................................               100
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation--NFWF.......             1,500
    Pacific Services Center...........................             2,000
        B-WET Hawaii..................................               500
    Sarasota Bay--Mote................................               250
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Coastal Assessment Program............            94,500
                                                       =================
Response and Restoration:
    Aquatic Resource Environmental Initiative--KY.....               100
    Center for Marine Spill Response Technology.......             2,000
    Coastal Protection and Restoration Project........               664
    Damage Assessment Program.........................             2,282
    Edisto Beach Marsh Restoration....................               100
    Estuarine and Coastal Assessment..................               600
    Estuarine Restoration Program.....................               600
    Marine Debris Removal:
        Alaska........................................               500
        South Carolina................................               175
    Oil Pollution Act of 1990.........................               809
    Spill Response and Restoration Program............               810
    Water Control Impoundments SC.....................               250
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Response and Restoration..............             8,890
                                                       =================
Coastal Research:
    Long-term Estuary Assessment Group (LEAG).........             1,200
    Murrell's Inlet Special Area......................               200
    Prince William Sound Science Center...............               500
    South Florida Ecosystem...........................               100
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Coastal Research......................             2,000
                                                       =================
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS):
    Ctr for Coastal Environ'l Health & Biomoleclr                  7,923
     Research.........................................
        Extramural Research (HAB/Pfisteria/Hypoxia)...             3,857
        LUCES & high salinity estuaries (Baruch)......             2,000
        Oxford, MD....................................             3,000
            Extramural Research (HAB/Pfisteria/                    3,857
             Hypoxia).................................
    Center for Coastal Fisheries Habitat Research.....             1,148
        Extramural Research (HAB/Pfisteria/Hypoxia)...             3,857
    Center for Coastal Monitoring & Assessment........             2,196
        Extramural Research (HAB/Pfisteria/Hypoxia)...             3,857
    Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research.......             3,857
    Marine Environment Health Research Lab (MERHL)....             4,000
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, NCCOS.................................            39,552
                                                       =================
Coastal Management:
    CZM Grants........................................            70,963
    Marine Protected Areas............................             2,269
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System........            20,320
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Coastal Management....................            93,552
                                                       =================
Marine Sanctuary Program:
    Marine Sanctuary Continuing Activities............            21,282
    Northwest Straits Citizens Advisory Commission....             1,200
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Marine Sanctuary Program..............            22,482
                                                       =================
Payment to OMAO.......................................             2,793
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL, NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE--ORF........           508,619
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. Some of the Committee 
recommendations displayed in the table above are described in 
more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Budget Structure.--The Committee recommendation divides the 
budget for NOS into two broad categories: salaries and expenses 
[S&E;] and programs. Reductions in some program lines reflect 
the teasing out of S&E; from each line and the consolidation of 
all S&E; in one line, ``NOS Operations--Salaries & Expenses''. 
The Committee commends NOS for its thorough grasp of its own 
budget and its willingness to work with Congress to improve the 
above table. Funds provided under program, project, or activity 
lines shall not be used for S&E;, nor shall program funds be 
available to pay internal or external ``taxes'' charged by NOS, 
NOAA, or the Department of Commerce.
    Navigation.--The Committee recommends $3,200,000 for 
bathymetric surveys off the Southeast Coast of the United 
States and the Gulf of Alaska in accordance with the data needs 
identified by a Joint Hydrographic Center on the potential 
expansion of United States lands beyond the Exclusive Economic 
Zone. Within the funding recommendation for Shoreline Mapping, 
the Committee recommends that NOS focus on mapping the 
shoreline of the North Slope of Alaska.
    Geodetic Survey (Height Modernization).--To achieve 
efficiencies, the Committee recommendation combines height 
modernization efforts in several States into Southeast, Upper 
Great Lakes, and Pacific regional geodetic survey pilots. NOS 
is directed to develop and submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations plans for the pilots, including detailed cost 
and schedule information, not later than April 1, 2004. The 
plans should serve as models for other regions. In addition, 
funds provided under this heading require a 100 percent match 
from State, local, or private sources. Should participants' 
match fall short of appropriated levels, NOS may, on a dollar 
for dollar basis, partially release funds matching the lesser 
amounts available to participants as long as NOS can certify 
that at least a minimum operating capability will be achieved. 
The balance of funds in such an eventuality shall be 
transferred to the NOS ``National Spatial Reference System'' 
line.
    Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System [PORTS].--The 
intent of Section 103(a) of the recently-passed Hydrographic 
Services Improvement Act has become the source of considerable 
confusion. Some interpret 103(a) to mean that NOS is now 
responsible for all costs associated with real-time 
hydrographic monitoring systems, including PORTS. Others 
believe that 103(a) in no way undercuts the cost sharing 
arrangement that underpins this very popular and successful 
program. One thing that is clear is that PORTS would be 
immediately unaffordable were NOS to bear the full cost of the 
program. Lacking a definitive interpretation, no funds are 
recommended for PORTS until the ambiguity is cleared up.
    Various.--The Committee recommendation consolidates all 
NOAA coral reef appropriations under NOS. A spending plan for 
coral reef funding shall be delivered to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than January 15, 2004. The Committee 
recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the Baruch Institute's 
research and monitoring of small, high-salinity estuaries, of 
which $1,200,000 is for the Land Use-Coastal Eco-System Study 
[LUCES] program.
    Ocean and Coastal Observing Systems.--The Committee has 
provided $20,000,000 during the past 2 years for establishment 
of an integrated interagency ocean and coastal observing 
system. A recently-delivered report outlines NOAA's strategy 
for establishing a national network: (1) inventory existing or 
planned local or regional systems, their capabilities, and 
costs, and (2) establish a management framework to coordinate 
coverage and investments. Unfortunately, these prerequisites 
will not be completed until year's end.
    The Committee strongly supports NOAA's efforts to 
coordinate the growing number of individual micro-regional 
coastal observing systems and pilot projects into truly 
regional systems. This effort is essential to ensuring 
technical connectivity and data compatibility among all the 
systems so that they may support a national system that 
provides benefits to the public and improves the availability, 
timeliness, quality, and value of information for Federal 
missions as well as local decision makers and academia. 
However, this coordination effort will not succeed if the 
growth and number of these independent regional systems 
outstrips the ability of the Federal Government to ensure long-
term funding, integration and basic coordination of the plans 
for the proposed federation of regional systems.
    Therefore, the Committee recommendation limits specific 
funding of systems to those funded in previous years. However, 
to accommodate continued development and integration of the 
system, the Committee has established: (1) a dedicated coastal 
observation fund that may be used by the Assistant 
Administrator [AA] of NOS to support system coordination 
efforts and expand existing individual systems into a regional 
framework; and (2) a competitive grant pilot fund whereby 
parties interested in joining the system may compete, and if 
deemed by the AA as contributing to the concept of a national 
system, may receive funding. The NOAA Administrator is directed 
to report to the Committees on Appropriation no later than 
April 25, 2004 on the future shape of these systems and their 
integration into the Federal system, including: (1) the non-
Federal contribution of each of the individual systems to the 
envisioned regional or national system, and (2) a description 
of the benefits to Federal missions and the public at large of 
such systems.
    NOS is urged to consider the: (1) Gulf of Maine Ocean 
Observing System [GoMOOS], (2) Southern California Coastal 
Ocean Observing System [SCCOOS], (3) Coastal-Global Ocean 
Observing System [C-GOOS], and (4) Louisiana State University 
Wave Current Information System [WAVCIS] for awards under the 
competitive grant pilot program.
    Coastal Ocean Science.--The Committee commends the recent 
efforts of NOS to better account for the base funding levels 
and specific programmatic increases of the National Centers for 
Coastal Ocean Science [NCCOS] laboratories. In order to assure 
that mismanagement does not reoccur in future years, the 
Committee recommendation reflects those efforts and 
consolidates into one subaccount all funding for NCCOS and 
specifies the appropriate funding level for each of the NCCOS 
laboratories. The Committee recommendation also consolidates 
all funding for the Oxford Laboratory, previously included in 
two line offices, into one line. Finally, for the past several 
years the external research community has suffered the 
equivalent of a bad roller coaster ride in terms of knowing the 
amount of external research funding available at the beginning 
of each fiscal year. The Committee recommendation provides 
certainty and accountability by specifying the exact level of 
funding available for external research.

                   NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $672,452,000 
for the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]. Committee 
recommendations are displayed in the following table:

                    NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marine Mammals & Sea Turtles:
    California Sea Lions/Protected Species Management                750
     (PSM)............................................
    Cook Inlet Beluga.................................               150
    Dolphins:
        Bottlenose Dolphin:
            Data Analysis.............................             1,500
            Research..................................             2,500
            Take Reduction Teams......................             1,500
        Dolphin Encirclement..........................             2,293
    Manatees--New College (MMP).......................               250
    Marine Mammal Protection (MMP)/NMFS Activities....             3,000
    Marine Mammal Strandings:
        Alaska SeaLife Center.........................             1,000
        Charleston Health and Risk Assessment.........               800
        Prescott Grant Program........................             4,000
    Marine Mammals, Sea Turtles & Other Species/                   3,000
     Endangered Species Act (ESA).....................
    Native Marine Mammals:
        Alaska Eskimo Whaling Commission..............               500
            Participation of AEWC in International                   100
             Whaling Commission Meetings..............
        Alaska Harbour Seals..........................               150
        Aleut Pacific Marine Resources Observers......               125
        Beluga Whale Committee........................               225
        Bristol Bay Native Association................                50
    National Fish & Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) Species               750
     Mgmt (PSM).......................................
    North Pacific Southern Resident Orca Population                1,500
     (PSM)............................................
    Right Whale Activities (ESA)......................            12,500
    Sea Turtles:
        ESA...........................................             7,900
        Hawaiian Sea Turtles..........................             7,800
        Rancho Nuevo Sea Turtles......................               350
        Southeastern Sea Turtles......................               300
    Seals:
        Harbor Seals:
            Alaska Native Harbor Seal Commission......               600
            NMFS Activities...........................             2,000
            Sealife Center............................             1,200
            State of Alaska...........................             1,200
        Hawaiian Monk Seals...........................               825
        Ice Seals (MMP)...............................               250
    Steller Sea Lions:
        Endangered Species Act........................               850
        N. Pacific Universities MM Consortium (and                 3,000
         Harbor Seal Research)........................
        Recovery Plan:
            Alaska Fisheries Foundation...............             1,000
            Alaska Sea Life Center....................             6,000
            Fisheries Management (North Pacific                    2,000
             Council).................................
            NMFS Activities...........................             5,000
            State of Alaska...........................             2,000
            Univ of AK Gulf Apex Predator.............             1,000
            Winter Food Limitation Research (Prince                1,000
             William Sound SC)........................
                                                       -----------------
              Subtotal, Marine Mammals & Sea Turtles..            80,918
                                                       =================
Fish:
    Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation...........             1,500
    Alaska Fisheries Information Network (AKFIN)......             3,600
    Alaska Groundfish Monitoring:
        Bering Sea Fishermen's Association Community                 175
         Development Quota (CDQ)......................
        Crab Research NMFS............................               473
        NMFS Activities...............................             2,087
        NMFS Field Fishery Monitoring.................               300
        NMFS Rockfish Research........................               340
        Winter Pollock Survey.........................             1,000
    Alaska Near Shore Fisheries State of Alaska.......             1,250
    Alaskan Groundfish Surveys:
        Calibration Studies...........................               240
        NMFS Activities...............................               661
    American Fisheries Act:
        Implementation................................             3,525
        N. Pacific Council............................               499
        National Standards 4 and 8 State of Alaska....               499
        NMFS Activities...............................             2,174
    Anadromous Fish Commission--North Pacific.........               750
    Anadromous Grants.................................             2,100
    Atlantic Billfish Research........................             2,500
    Atlantic Herring and Mackerel.....................               800
    Bering Sea Pollock Research.......................               945
    Bluefin Tuna Tagging:
        Monterey......................................               425
        UNH...........................................             1,020
    Bluefish/Striped Bass.............................               527
        Chesapeake Bay................................               500
        Long Island Sound.............................               500
    Cashes Ledge (Gulf of Maine) Ecosystem Pilot......             1,000
    Charleston Bump...................................               650
        Billfish Tagging..............................               500
    Expand Stock Assessments--Improve Data Collection.            20,014
        California Oceanic Cooperative Fisheries                   1,200
         Investigation (CalCOFI)......................
        Narragansett Bay (Phase II)...................             1,000
    Fish Statistics...................................            13,900
        Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission...             2,000
        Economics & Social Sciences Research..........             4,200
        National Standard 8...........................             1,000
    Fisheries Development Program:
        Hawaiian Fisheries Development................               750
        Product Quality and Marketing:
            Gulf Shrimp...............................             3,000
            South Atlantic Shrimp.....................             3,000
        Product Quality and Safety/Seafood Inspection.             8,685
    Fisheries Management Programs.....................            27,657
    Gulf Fisheries Information Network (GULF FIN) Data             3,500
     Collection Effort................................
    Gulf of Maine Groundfish Survey...................               567
    Halibut Data Collection...........................               450
    Halibut/Sablefish.................................             1,200
    Hawaii Stock Management Plan (Oceanic Institute)..               750
    Highly Migratory Shark Fishery Research Program                2,000
     (Mote)...........................................
    Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants..............             2,590
    International Fisheries Commission State of Alaska               400
    Interstate Fish Commissions:
        3 Commissions.................................               750
        Atlantic Cooperative Management...............             7,250
    Large Pelagics Research Program (UNH).............             3,100
    Marine Fisheries Initiative (MARFIN):
        NMFS Activities...............................             2,500
    Monkfish Trawl....................................             1,000
    Northeast Fisheries Management....................             1,000
    Pacific Coast Fisheries Information Network                    3,000
     (PACFIN) Catch Effort Data.......................
    Recreational Fishery Harvest Monitoring/Rec.                   3,950
     Fisheries Info Ntwk (RECFIN).....................
        RECFIN--SC (inshore recreational species                     500
         assessment/tagging)..........................
    Red Snapper Monitoring and Research...............             5,000
    Reduce Fishing Impacts on Essential Fish Habitat                 750
     (EFH)............................................
    Reducing Bycatch..................................             5,000
        Gulf/Atlantic Turtle Excluder Device (GSAFD)..             2,000
    Regional Councils.................................            15,547
    Salmon:
        Atlantic Salmon:
            ESA.......................................             2,217
            Recovery Plan.............................               450
            Research..................................               710
            State of Maine Salmon Recovery (PSM)......             2,128
        Chinook Salmon:
            Management................................               150
            Pacific Salmon Treaty--Chinook Salmon                  1,844
             Agreement................................
            Research at Auke Bay......................               300
            State of Alaska...........................             1,840
            Yukon River Chinook Salmon:
                State of Alaska.......................             1,000
                Yukon River Drainage Fisheries Assoc..               499
        Pacific Salmon:
            Columbia River:
                Biological Opinion (BIOP)                         15,100
                 Implementation, including ESA........
                Endangered Species Studies............               299
                Hatcheries and Facilities.............            11,485
                Hatcheries--Monitor, Evaluation and                1,700
                 Reform...............................
            Pacific Salmon Treaty.....................             5,612
            Recovery (ESA)............................            21,197
            SW Conservation Project--SW Alaska                     4,250
             Conservation Coalition...................
            Western Alaska Salmon Failure--Bering Sea              3,500
             Fisherman's Assoc........................
        Virginia Fisheries Trawl Survey...............               500
        West Coast Groundfish.........................             3,520
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Fish..............................           258,051
                                                       =================
Crustaceans & Mollusks:
    Bering Sea Crab (State of Alaska).................             1,000
    Blue Crab Advanced Research Consortium............             2,500
    Chesapeake Bay Oyster Restoration.................             2,000
    Horseshoe Crab Research (HCRC)....................             1,300
    Lobster Sampling..................................               300
    Louisiana Shrimper Assistance.....................             2,000
    Mobile Bay Oyster Recovery........................             2,000
    Oyster Restoration (Chesapeake--VIMS).............             2,250
    Scallop Fishery Assessment (MFI)..................             2,500
    Shrimp Pathogens: South Carolina..................               650
    South Carolina Oyster Recovery....................             1,000
    South Carolina Shrimper Assistance................             2,000
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Crustaceans & Mollusks................            19,500
                                                       =================
Enforcement & Observers:
    Enforcement & Surveillance:
        Driftnet Act Implementation...................             1,375
            Ghostnet--High Seas Driftnet Detection....               250
            NMFS Activities...........................             1,800
            Pacific Rim Fisheries.....................               150
            Science Observer Russian Exclusive                       250
             Economic Zone (EEZ)......................
            State Participation--AK/WA................               200
    Enforcement & Surveillance:
        Cooperative Agreements w/States...............             9,500
        Vessel Monitoring System......................             2,500
    Observers/Training:
        Atlantic Coast Observers......................             3,350
        East Coast Observers..........................               350
        Hawaii Longline Observer Program..............             4,000
        N. Pacific Marine Resources Observers.........             1,875
        N. Pacific Observer Program...................               800
        NE Groundfish Court-Ordered Observers.........             7,500
        S. Atlantic/Gulf Shrimp Observers.............               800
        West Coast Groundfish Observers...............             5,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Enforcement & Observers...........            39,700
                                                       =================
Habitat Conservation & Restoration:
    Bay Watersheds Education and Training Program.....             2,500
    Connecticut River Partnership.....................               300
    Cooper River Corridor Management..................               125
    Fisheries Habit Restoration:
        Bronx River Restoration.......................             1,000
        Community-Based Restoration Grants............            12,000
        Kenai Peninsula...............................               700
        LA DNR........................................               150
        Pinellas County Environmental.................               150
    Habitat Conservation..............................             9,218
    Instream Flow Pilot Program (UNH).................               600
    Marsh Restoration--NH.............................             1,000
    Narragansett Bay Marine Education Program (Save                  500
     the Bay).........................................
    Refine EFH Designations...........................             1,000
    Sea Grass Restoration (Chesapeake)................               894
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Habitat Conservation & Restoration....            30,137
                                                       =================
Other Activities Supporting Fisheries:
    Antarctic Research................................             1,550
    Center for Marine Education and Research (MS).....             3,000
    Conservation & Recovery with States...............             1,000
    Consortium for Fisheries & Wildlife Conflict                     500
     Resolution (UNH/NEA/VIMS/Duke)...................
    Cooperative Research:
        Cooperative Marine Education & Research.......               200
        Cooperative Research--North Pacific Research               3,000
         Board........................................
        National Cooperative Research.................             2,750
        NE Cooperative Research.......................             5,750
        Northeast Consortium..........................             5,000
        SC Cooperative Research.......................             2,500
        SE Cooperative Research.......................             3,250
        West Coast Groundfish Cooperative Research....             1,000
    Ecosystem Management:
        Gulf of Mexico................................             6,000
        Middle Atlantic...............................             6,000
        New England...................................             6,000
        South Atlantic................................             6,000
    Endangered Species Act--Fish, Crustaceans,                     2,682
     Mollusks.........................................
    FMP Extended Jurisdiction, State of Alaska........             1,500
    Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities Coalition......               425
    Hawaiian Community Development....................               500
    Information Analysis and Dissemination............            22,508
    Joint Institute for Marine & Atmospheric Research              2,500
     (JIMAR), HI......................................
    Magnuson-Stevens Implementation off Alaska........             7,250
    Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment &                      1,250
     Prediction Pgm (MarMap)..........................
    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)..........             8,000
        NEPA Permit Approval Streamlining.............             4,000
    New England Multi-Species Survey (SMAST)..........             3,000
    Science Consortium on Ocean Research (SCORE)--NH/              1,500
     FL/WA............................................
    Southeast Area Monitoring & Assessment Program                 1,750
     (SEAMAP).........................................
    South Carolina Taxonomic Center...................               500
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Other Activities Supporting Fisheries.           110,865
                                                       =================
Overhead:
    Expedite Grant Applications & Awards..............            21,334
    Fisheries Enforcement.............................            23,734
    Other NMFS Activities.............................            11,700
        Pacific Islands Regional Office...............             5,000
    Protect Endangered & Threatened Species...........            63,838
        NW Fisheries Science Center (West Coast                    1,700
         Groundfish Team).............................
    Regulatory Streamlining & Modernization...........             1,500
        Expedite Permit Applications & Approvals......             3,775
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Overhead..........................           132,581
                                                       =================
Payment to OMAO.......................................               700
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL, NATIONAL MARINE FISHERERIES                   672,452
       SERVICE--ORF...................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. Some of the Committee 
recommendations displayed in the table above are described in 
more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Base Funding.--For the second year in a row, NMFS has 
chosen not to provide the Committee with a coherent description 
of what is contained in the so-called ``base'' lines. Therefore 
the Committee is unable to differentiate between fixed and 
variable costs within the lines that make up the NMFS account. 
The Committee has done what it could to eliminate or limit the 
worst budget excesses, but much work remains to be done. Only 
funds provided under the heading ``Overhead'' may be used for 
NMFS salaries, benefits, or expenses, including rent, 
utilities, communications, contract and consulting services, 
supplies, materials, and equipment, travel and transportation 
of people and things, and printing and reproduction. Funds 
provided under program, project, or activity lines shall not be 
used for overhead, including internal or external ``taxes'' 
charged by NMFS, NOAA, or the Department of Commerce.
    Regional Office Financial Accountability.--The Committee 
has been working to provide budget transparency for each of the 
line offices as well as for NOAA headquarters. While the 
Committee has been able to obtain clarity with respect to some 
line office accounts, the Committee's efforts to separate and 
clarify NMFS funding levels for programs, personnel, and 
expenses have been stymied by the Service. One explanation 
offered for NMFS' inability to provide the requested budget 
information is that the decentralized line office structure 
provides funding to the regional offices from multiple NMFS 
accounts without any effort by the regional offices or 
headquarters to track or report on either the total funding 
level provided to the regional offices or the regions' use of 
the funding. Therefore, the Committee directs the regional 
offices, in consultation with the program offices from which 
they receive funding, and through the NMFS Administrator, to 
submit a spending plan for their activities no later than 
January 1, 2004. The plan should include the following 
information: (1) the level of funding received by each regional 
office from each NMFS baseline for salaries and expenses versus 
program activities; and (2) the level of funding received by 
each regional office from each program line for salaries and 
expenses versus program activities.
    International Conservation of Sea Turtles.--The Committee 
remains concerned by the increasing threat to sea turtles, 
particularly those listed under the Convention on International 
Trade on Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora [CITES], 
from activities conducted outside of U.S. control, including 
incidental capture in the longline and shrimp trawl fisheries 
of other nations. In the past, the Department of State has 
ignored the Committee's direction to: (1) negotiate strong, 
enforceable management, reporting, and data collection measures 
(including economic measures) focused on reducing incidental 
capture of sea turtles in commercial fisheries under regional 
management agreements for living marine resources; (2) develop 
a trans-Pacific international turtle conservation agreement to 
include Pacific island and Pacific rim nations; and (3) with 
the Secretary of Commerce, seek international agreements to 
establish standards and measures for bycatch reduction that are 
comparable to U.S. standards. The Committee therefore directs 
the Secretary of Commerce to assume these responsibilities. The 
Secretary of Commerce shall report back to the Committee by 
February 1, 2004, detailing actions taken to comply with this 
and previous direction during fiscal years 2002 and 2003.
    The Committee is also concerned that the conservation 
benefits of the new U.S. regulations requiring use of larger 
turtle excluder devices [TEDs], which take effect this year, 
will be lost if such requirements are not also applicable in 
other shrimp trawling nations who seek to import shrimp to the 
United States, as required in the 1990 ``shrimp-turtle law'' 
(Public Law 101-162). While American fishermen are being asked 
to take on additional economic burdens, shrimp fleets in some 
other nations have barely demonstrated compliance with the 
previously established TED requirements as well as the 
obligations of the Inter-American Sea Turtle Convention. This 
has not provided American shrimpers the level conservation 
playing field intended by Congress in the 1990 law. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce to take immediate 
steps to ensure that these newly promulgated turtle protection 
requirements are met by other nations who import shrimp to the 
United States, pursuant to the requirements of Public Law 101-
162 by May 4, 2004. The Committee also directs the Secretary to 
submit a report, within 90 days of enactment of this Act, 
setting forth the following: (1) specific criteria used by the 
Secretary to determine whether to certify that a nation's 
regulatory program is ``comparable'' to the U.S. program under 
Public Law 101-162; (2) a list of nations that the Secretary 
has de-certified under the law from 2000-2003; (3) case-
specific inspection findings, rationales, and criteria 
(including trip reports and cables) used in 2000-2003 to 
determine whether or not to certify nations pursuant to Public 
Law 101-162; (4) a timeline and detailed actions that the 
Secretary will take to ensure the new TED measures are adopted 
by shrimp-importing nations prior to May 2004, the next 
certification date; (5) describe any failure to maintain or use 
TEDs noted during dockside or at-sea inspections in shrimp 
importing nations, and explain why, in instances where such 
failures were noted, the nation was not de-certified.
    The Committee recommendation includes $12,500,000 for North 
Atlantic right whale activities, to be distributed in the 
manner described in the following table:

                    NORTHERN RIGHT WHALE PRESERVATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Reduce ship strikes....................................           3,730
    Whale detection technologies.......................          [1,255]
Reduce entanglement....................................           2,500
    Gear modification..................................            [500]
    Pilot Buyback/Recycling--Gear Purchase Program.....          [1,500]
    Training/Disentanglement Teams.....................            [500]
Biology................................................           1,755
Recovery coordination..................................             140
Competitive Grants/Personnel Costs.....................           2,950
State programs.........................................           1,425
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. The Office of Protected 
Resources shall submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on fiscal year 2003 accomplishments not later 
than January 15, 2004.
    Decline of Pacific Marine Mammals.--The Committee expects 
NOAA to continue its research initiative on Pacific decadal 
oscillation, predator-prey relationships with particular 
emphasis on killer whale predation on sea lion pups, and to 
explore other factors in the marine environment that may be 
contributing to the decline of Stellar sea lions and other 
marine mammal populations.
    Enforcement of International Dolphin Agreement.--The 
Committee remains concerned that Mexico and other non-United 
States parties to the International Dolphin Conservation 
Program [IDCP], of which the United States is a member, are not 
fully complying with the requirements of the IDCP, particularly 
with respect to accurate reporting of dolphin interactions and 
mortality. The Committee recommendation includes $2,293,000 for 
research and monitoring activities associated with dolphin 
encirclement in the eastern tropical Pacific [ETP] and the IDCP 
to be distributed in the manner described in the following 
table:

                 INTERNATIONAL DOLPHIN CONSERVATION PLAN
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research Activities:
    Fishery Effects........................................         250
    Gear for Reduction of by-catch.........................         250
    Ecosystem Studies......................................         238
    Collection and Analysis of Biological Samples..........          60
    Coastal Stocks Research................................          40
    Small Vessel sets on Dolphins..........................         200
    Research Cruises.......................................         945
    Days at Sea for Research Cruise........................         125
    Research Program Management............................          75
Implementation and Monitoring Activities:
    Local Management Fund..................................          40
    Travel for document verification.......................          20
    Data entry and document contracts......................          50
                                                            ------------
      Total................................................       2,293
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Increased funding is provided for additional biological 
sampling, further research on cow-calf separation, herd sizes 
on which sets are made, and development of alternative gear for 
reducing by-catch of dolphins, turtles and other species in the 
ETP and the occurence of and impacts on dolphin populations 
from vessels with a carrying capacity of less than 400 short 
tons that are reportedly setting on dolphins in the ETP. 
Funding for salaries and expenses, and agency assessments has 
been more accurately aligned under the salaries and expenses 
heading. The Committee further directs NOAA, in consultation 
with key United States stakeholders, to continue evaluating and 
documenting any lack of compliance by the non-United States 
parties to the IDCP with its provisions, including through on-
site visits and discussions with government officials, 
observers and others with first-hand knowledge of country 
practices, and to submit a written report describing the 
findings to the Committee no later than May 1, 2004. The report 
should include an updated evaluation of compliance with the on-
board observer program, an updated report of dolphin 
interactions and mortality, the latest operational requirements 
for vessels, the extent to which vessels with a carrying 
capacity of less than 400 short tons are setting on dolphins, 
and all actions taken in the past year by parties to follow-up 
on infractions identified by the international review panel.
    Gulf/Atlantic Turtle Excluder Device.--Funds made available 
under this heading shall be provided to the Gulf and South 
Atlantic Fisheries Development Foundation to conduct a field 
testing program of the new, larger Turtle Excluder Device 
required by regulation in order to determine and document the 
most effective and efficient use and configuration of such 
devices in terms of sea turtle exclusion and shrimp retention.
    Fisheries Research and Management.--Of the amount provided 
for the recreational fishing information network [RECFIN] 
program, the Committee expects that $500,000 will be used to 
continue the effort to enhance the annual collection and 
analysis of economic data on marine recreational fishing. The 
Committee also expects that the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf 
States shall each receive one-third of the remaining RECFIN 
funds. The Committee recommends that the $750,000 for the 
Interstate Fish Commissions be equally divided among the three 
commissions. As in prior fiscal years, funds appropriated for 
the Hawaii Fisheries Development and Hawaii Stock Management 
Plan programs shall be administered by the Oceanic Institute.
    Seafood Inspections.--The Committee firmly opposes efforts 
to list the activities of the NOAA Seafood Inspection program 
under the FAIR Act inventory as providing ``not inherently 
governmental functions''. Such a determination would be 
contrary to both common sense and public welfare. The NOAA 
Seafood Inspection program inspects or certifies approximately 
seventeen percent of the fishery products consumed in the 
United States, provides inspection and certification of more 
than 142,000,000 pounds of U.S. exports, and routinely 
evaluates the safety, wholesomeness, proper labeling, and 
quality of fish and fishery products. In addition to ensuring 
specific product safety, the adequacy of sanitation and 
hygienic practices of processing facilities and the processes 
used in the manufacture of food are also inspected. Both the 
United States Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug 
Administration have already determined that their food 
inspection functions are inherently governmental, and any other 
determination for the NOAA program would damage efforts to 
improve seafood safety and undermine efforts to better 
coordinate and improve Federal seafood safety efforts, 
including efforts to protect against bioterrorist threats.
    Hatcheries.--The Committee intends funding for the Mitchell 
Act hatcheries to meet production, mass marking, and monitoring 
and evaluation needs.
    Fisheries Enforcement.--Since 9/11, port security has 
become the primary mission of the Coast Guard. A minor 
responsibility in peacetime, the Coast Guard had committed few 
ships and personnel to port security prior to 9/11. As a 
result, the Coast Guard has had to redirect assets dedicated to 
the enforcement of fisheries laws to the new port security 
mission. Today, and for the foreseeable future, the Coast Guard 
will be unable to enforce these laws. NOAA and State 
departments of natural resources must fend for themselves. That 
being so, the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and 
Atmosphere, in consultation with the Commandant of the United 
States Coast Guard, shall report to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than December 1, 2003 on the 
feasibility of transferring from the Coast Guard to NOAA such 
authorities, liabilities, and assets as are necessary for NOAA 
to enforce the fisheries laws of the United States that were 
being enforced by the Coast Guard on September 10, 2001.
    Enforcement and Surveillance.--The Committee recommends 
continued support at last year's level for marine forensics and 
southeast fisheries' law enforcement.
    Ecosystem Management.--NMFS' approach to managing marine 
resources, as reflected in the chart above, is mission-, 
action-, or species-specific. NMFS personnel in New England 
are, for example, criss-crossing the Gulf of Maine researching, 
assessing, surveying, or otherwise scrutinizing right whales, 
dogfish, and lobster, but doing so in isolation or at best with 
little coordination. Whether because it is too complex or 
crosses too many disciplines, the study of all life within a 
column of water in a comprehensive, coordinated way is not 
being done. As a result, there is no understanding of, or 
preparation for, potential unintended consequences on 
ecosystems as NMFS' renders its decisions in a species-specific 
manner. The Committee believes that ecosystem management is the 
wave of the future, though it acknowledges that a revolution in 
ocean politics will have to occur first. The recommendation 
includes modest funding to initiate regional ecosystem 
management pilot projects in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico. 
The pilots purposely cover bodies of water that are contiguous, 
because the one influences the others. The Committee expects 
the four pilots to be closely coordinated and for each pilot to 
integrate with existing NMFS or local oceans programs. 
Ultimately, should the pilots prove successful, the Committee 
would expect to fold more specific initiatives into the larger 
ecosystem approach. NMFS is directed to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than December 1, 2003 on 
its plans for implementing the pilots.
    Stewardship of Capital Investments.--The Committee is aware 
that a number of NMFS facilities are in deplorable condition, 
including labs in Beaufort, NC and Mukilteo, WA. A Committee-
directed facilities master plan was due June 30, 2003. 
Hopefully, when received, it will answer questions regarding 
the need to replace, rehabilitate, consolidate, or close NMFS 
labs. While reserving judgment on the fate of specific 
facilities, the Committee recommendation does transfer funding 
for ``NMFS Facilities Maintenance'', previously provided under 
this heading, to the Program Support subaccount. The Committee 
believes that NOAA headquarters is more inclined than NMFS to 
protect taxpayers' investments. For the same reason, funds for 
``Computer Hardware and Software'', previously provided under 
this heading, have been transferred to the Procurement, 
Acquisition, and Construction account. NOAA headquarters is 
directed to submit spending plans to the Committees on 
Appropriations prior to the obligation of any NMFS facilities 
maintenance or computer funds.

                    OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $394,470,000 
for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research [OAR]. Committee 
recommendations are displayed in the following table:

                    OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes...................            48,907
    Climate & Global Change Program...................            71,051
        Accelerating Climate Models--IRI..............             1,500
        Aerosols--Climate Interaction.................             2,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Climate & Global Change Program...            74,551
                                                       =================
    Climate Observations & Services:
        ARGO-Related Costs............................            10,950
        Baseline Operations...........................             2,500
        Carbon Cycle..................................             4,300
        Climate Change Assessments....................               650
        Climate Data & Info and CLASS in PAC..........             1,000
        Climate Modeling Center (GFDL)................             5,000
        Climate Reference Network.....................             3,000
        Global Climate Atmospheric Observing System...             4,000
        Regional Assessments, Education and Outreach..             2,750
        Weather-Climate Connection....................               900
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Climate Observations & Services...            35,050
                                                       =================
    Climate Partnership Programs:
        Abrupt Climate Change Research................             1,600
        Arctic Research Initiative (SEARCH)...........             2,074
        Central CA Ozone Study........................               250
        East Tennessee Ozone Study....................               300
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Climate Partnership Programs......             4,224
                                                       =================
          Total, Climate Research.....................           162,732
                                                       =================
Weather & Air Quality Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes...................            37,713
    U.S. Weather Research Program:
        Energy Security (CA)..........................             2,000
        Hurricane & Tropical Storm Research...........             5,314
        Targeted Wind Sensing.........................             2,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, U.S. Weather Research Program.....             9,314
                                                       =================
    Weather & Air Partnership Programs:
        AIRMAP........................................             5,000
        New England Air Quality Study.................             3,000
        Remote Sensing Research (ISU/BCAL)............             1,000
        STORM.........................................             1,000
        Tornado Severe Storm Research (PAR Evaluation)             1,500
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Weather & Air Partnership Programs            11,500
                                                       =================
          Total, Weather & Air Quality Research.......            58,527
                                                       =================
Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes...................            19,148
    Chesapeake Bay ``dead zone'' research                          4,500
     (prevention)--Oxford.............................
        Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
         (Michigan):
            Lake Erie ``dead zone'' research (Stone                  448
             Lab).....................................
            Lake Erie observation buoys...............             2,000
            Solvent research (Notre Dame).............               250
        Milfoil (NH)..................................               590
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes               26,936
           Research...................................
                                                       =================
    National Sea Grant College Program:
        Continuing Activities.........................            66,160
        Fish Extension................................             2,000
        Gulf of Mexico Oyster Initiative..............             1,000
        Marine Invasive Species Program...............               250
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, National Sea Grant College Program            69,410
                                                       =================
    National Undersea Research Program (NURP):
        Aquarius II...................................             1,200
        Continuing Activities.........................            15,000
        National Institute for Undersea Science and                5,000
         Technology...................................
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, National Undersea Research Program            21,200
           (NURP).....................................
                                                       =================
    Ocean Exploration.................................            13,200
        Submersible Microtechnology Research..........               994
    NMNH East Wing (Oceans)...........................             2,000
    Ocean & Coastal Partnership Programs:
        Aquatic Ecosystems--Canaan Valley Institute...             2,300
        Arctic Research...............................             2,000
        Cooperative Institute for Arctic Research.....               350
        Cooperative Institute for New England                      3,000
         Mariculture and Fisheries....................
        Gulf of Maine Habitat Restoration Initiative               1,000
         (GOM Council)................................
        Institute for Science, Technology & Public                 1,000
         Policy (Texas A&M;)...........................
        Lake Champlain Research Consortium............               300
        National Invasive Species Act:
            Alaska....................................             1,500
            Nutria--Chesapeake Bay....................               545
            Prevent & Control Invasive Species........               800
        NOAA Marine Aquaculture Program...............             3,131
            Pacific Tropical Ornamental Fish..........               500
        Ocean Health Initiative.......................            10,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Ocean & Coastal Partnership                   26,426
           Programs...................................
                                                       =================
          Total, Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes                 160,166
           Research...................................
                                                       =================
High Performance Information Technology...............            12,945
Payment to OMAO.......................................               100
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NOAA RESEARCH--ORF..................           394,470
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. Some of the Committee 
recommendations displayed in the table above are described in 
more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Budget Structure.--For the second year in a row, OAR has 
chosen not to provide the Committee with a coherent description 
of what is contained in the so-called ``base'' lines. 
Therefore, the Committee is unable to differentiate between 
fixed and variable costs within the lines that make up the OAR 
account. OAR leadership is playing a dangerous game, being 
particularly vulnerable to budget reductions for reasons known 
all too well. The recommendation continues a trend begun last 
year to look outside OAR for research expertise. Funds provided 
under program, project, or activity lines shall not be used for 
overhead, including internal or external ``taxes'' charged by 
OAR, NOAA, or the Department of Commerce.
    Tinkering.--OAR is supposed to be conducting applied 
research that directly supports the operations of other NOAA 
line offices. Too often, however, OAR research appears 
disconnected from the immediate-, near-, and even medium-term 
needs of the rest of NOAA. The result is that the line offices 
have developed their own research programs in parallel with 
that of OAR. Budget pressures leave no room for ``science 
projects'', nor duplication of effort. The Committee suspects 
that the drift of research in unproductive directions is 
largely due to the artificial separation of OAR from the line 
offices it supports. NOAA is directed to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the costs and benefits of 
breaking OAR up into its constituent parts and distributing 
those parts as desirable to the other line offices. The report 
should specifically address how the newly configured research 
sector will directly assist line offices in developing timely 
solutions to problems confronting NOAA now and in the next 5 
years.
    Solar Observation.--The ``Atmospheric'' in NOAA does not 
extend to the astral. Absolutely no funds are provided for 
solar observation. Such activities are rightly the bailiwick of 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Air 
Force.
    Phased Array Radar [PAR] Evaluation.--Elements of this 
initiative are perplexing. The National Severe Storms Lab 
intends to couple a Navy SPY-1 phased array radar (found on 
Aegis-class cruisers) with artificial intelligence-based 
decision support systems in the hopes of almost doubling 
tornado warning times. This is a desirable goal, but depends, 
in large part, on the successful commercialization of the SPY-
1. That quest, achieving desired performance at a far lower 
cost, would seem to be an engineering and manufacturing feat, 
not the outcome of weather research. At the same time, the now 
venerable SPY-1 is older than the WSR-88D NEXRAD weather radar 
it would replace. The WSR-88D is not scheduled for retirement 
for decades. By then, phased array radar performance should be 
far better at far lower cost. Unsure where this project is 
ultimately headed, the Committee recommendation funds SPY-1 
tornado detection and tracking testing under this heading. A 
parallel assessment of the practicality of commercializing the 
SPY-1 or a successor for weather forecasting is funded under 
the National Weather Service.
    NISA Alaska.--The Committee recommends $1,500,000 to 
address the proliferation of exotic species such as Atlantic 
salmon in the marine environment in the North Pacific. Of this 
amount, $750,000 is for the Pacific States Marine Fisheries 
Commission to prevent the escapement of Atlantic salmon from 
Alaska streams and to address other invasive species issues 
including mitten crab and green crab.
    Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Research.--The Committee is 
alarmed by recent reports regarding the formation of a massive 
``dead zone'' in the Chesapeake Bay. The recommendation 
includes research funds to develop immediate and near-term 
preventive measures to reduce the runoff of phosphorous and 
nitrogen into the Bay. Within the amount provided for the Great 
Lakes Environmental Research Lab, the Committee recommends that 
NOAA support research programs on aquatic invasive species 
mitigation and reduction in the Lake Champlain Basin. Of the 
amount provided for the National Undersea Research Program, 
$7,500,000 is for research conducted through the east coast 
NURP centers and $7,500,000 is for the west coast NURP centers, 
including the Hawaiian and Pacific Center and the West Coast 
and Polar Regions Center. The Committee expects level funding 
will be available for Aquarius, ALVIN, and program 
administration.

                        NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $696,857,000 
for the National Weather Service [NWS]. Committee 
recommendations are displayed in the following table:

                        NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Research:
    Salaries, Benefits, and Expenses:
        Local Warnings and Forecasts..................           505,675
        Central Forecast Guidance.....................            45,102
        Systems Operation & Maintenance (O&M;):
            Advanced Weather Interactive Processing               37,570
             System (AWIPS)...........................
            Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS).             8,248
            Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD)....            42,340
                                                       -----------------
              Subtotal, Salaries, Benefits, and                  638,935
               Expenses...............................
                                                       =================
    Programs:
        Advanced Hydrological Prediction Services.....             6,098
        Air Quality Forecasting Pilot Program.........             3,000
        Alaska Data Buoys.............................             1,700
        Aviation Weather..............................             2,500
        Delaware River Basin Flood System.............               900
        High Resolution Temperature Forecasting.......             4,200
        Hurricane Mitigation Alliance (SUSF)..........             3,750
        Microforecasting/Mesonets:
            Data Collection:
                DE Environmental Observing System                    312
                 (DEOS)...............................
                KY Environmental Monitoring Network                  667
                 (WKU)................................
                North Dakota Ag Weather Network.......               340
            Data Assimilation, Analysis, &
             Distribution:
                DRI Great Basin Water & Climate                      750
                 Initiative...........................
                JSU Assembling Sys/Atmospheric                       990
                 Dispersion Frcstg....................
                USU Weather & Climate Database Mgmt                  500
                 System...............................
        Mt. Washington Observatory....................             1,000
        NC Flood Warning System.......................             1,215
        New England Weather Technology Initiative.....               500
        NOAA Profiler Network.........................             4,150
        Pacific Island Compact........................             3,550
        Phased Array Radar (PAR) Engineering/                      1,500
         Manufacturing................................
        Susquehanna River Basin Flood System..........             1,300
        Sustain Cooperative Observer Network..........             1,890
        Tsunami Hazard Mitigation.....................             4,300
            Pacific Ocean Monitoring Buoy Augmentation               600
            Tsunami Warning & Environ'l Obs for AK                 2,000
             (TWEAK)..................................
        Weather Radio Transmitters:
            Weather Radio Transmitters Base...........             2,320
        WFO Maintenance...............................             7,390
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Programs..........................            57,422
                                                       =================
Payment to OMAO.......................................               500
                                                       =================
          GRAND TOTAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE--ORF...           696,857
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. Various Committee 
recommendations displayed in the table above are described in 
more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Budget Structure.--The Committee recommendation divides the 
budget for NWS into two broad categories: salaries and expenses 
[S&E;] and programs. The Committee commends NWS for its thorough 
grasp of its own budget and its willingness to work with 
Congress to improve the above table. Funds provided under 
program, project, or activity lines shall not be used for S&E;, 
nor shall program funds be available to pay internal or 
external ``taxes'' charged by NWS, NOAA, or the Department of 
Commerce.
    Network Integrity.--The ``1995 Secretary's Report to 
Congress on Adequacy of NEXRAD Coverage and Degradation of 
Weather Services'' requested further studies of several sites, 
including Williston, ND and Erie, PA. This year, as in the 
past, the Committee recommendation includes such sums as are 
necessary to continue current operations at these sites.
    NEXRAD Coverage.--The area running from northern California 
through central Oregon to the Washington border is one of the 
few regions of the country not covered by a NEXRAD facility. 
The NWS is directed to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations as to whether such a facility is required and, 
if so, where such a facility should be sited to maximize 
coverage and integration into the national weather radar 
network.
    NOAA Profiler Network [NPN].--The abrupt decision to 
shutdown the NPN came as a surprise. Though the Committee is 
aware that the 404 MHz frequency being used by the NPN will be 
unavailable by mid-decade, no analysis has been done to 
determine the value of the data produced by the NPN, the method 
and cost of collecting valuable NPN data by other means, or the 
cost of shutting the NPN down. Lacking adequate justification, 
the Committee recommendation funds NPN operations for at least 
1 more year. The NWS is directed to undertake a cost and 
operational effectiveness analysis [COEA] comparing the 
$10,000,000 cost to upgrade the NPN over the next decade versus 
the short, medium, and long-term costs of ending the NPN 
program. The COEA shall be delivered to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than March 31, 2004.
    Phased Array Radar [PAR] Engineering and Manufacturing.--As 
mentioned elsewhere, the Committee recommendation includes 
funds for an assessment of the practicality of commercializing 
the Navy's SPY-1 radar or a successor for weather forecasting. 
To be successful, a civilian version of the SPY-1 will need to 
have comparable or better performance at far lower cost. The 
NWS should coordinate with the Navy, the manufacturer, and the 
National Severe Storms Lab to get the fullest understanding of 
the costs and benefits of converting a military radar for 
civilian weather forecasting. The NWS shall submit a 
feasibility study to the Committees on Appropriations not later 
than May 1, 2004.
    Microforecasting/Mesonets.--Funds provided under this 
heading require a 100 percent match from State, local, or 
private sources. Should participants' match fall short of 
appropriated levels, NWS may, on a dollar for dollar basis, 
partially release funds matching the lesser amounts available 
to participants as long as NWS can certify that at least a 
minimum operating capability will be achieved. The balance of 
funds in such an eventuality shall be transferred to the NWS 
maintenance lines on a priority basis. NWS shall also certify 
prior to the release of funds that proposed mesonets do not 
reopen the debate over the: (1) consolidation of Federal 
weather forecasting offices, or (2) transfer of agriculture-
related weather activities to the Department of Agriculture.
    Flash Floods.--Prior to release of funds for the Delaware 
River Basin Flood System and the North Carolina Flood Warning 
System, NWS is directed to submit reports on the total cost of 
these systems, including installation, operation, maintenance, 
and upgrade, as well as the need for the systems, based on 
historical flood data and the current level of development in 
flood plains. Also, funds provided for flood systems require a 
100 percent match from State, local, or private sources.
    NOAA Weather Radio [NWR].--The NWS shall report back to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than December 1, 2003 on 
the merits of expanding the NWR network to include Kemmerer and 
Dubois, Wyoming. If merited, the Committee expects the NWS to 
budget for this expansion in fiscal year 2005.

    NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA, AND INFORMATION SERVICE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $148,840,000 
for the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information 
Service [NESDIS]. Committee recommendations are displayed in 
the following table:

     NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA, AND INFORMATION SERVICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems:
    Product Processing and Distribution...............            23,771
    Satellite Command and Control.....................            36,871
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Environmental Satellite Observing                 60,642
       Systems........................................
                                                       =================
    Product Development, Readiness & Application:
        Global Wind Demonstration.....................             4,000
        Joint Center/Accelerate Use of Satellites.....             1,500
        NESDIS Activities.............................            19,500
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Product Development, Readiness &              25,000
           Application................................
                                                       =================
    Interagency Global Positioning System Executive                  600
     Board Secretariat (IGEB).........................
    Office of Space Commercialization.................               600
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Satellite Systems........................            86,842
                                                       =================
NOAA's Data Centers & Information Services:
    Archive, Access & Assessment:
        Archive, Access & Assessment/Climate Database
         Modernization:
            KY........................................             2,900
            MD........................................             2,900
            Quality assurance/quality control (NC)....             2,900
            WV........................................             2,900
        NESDIS Activities.............................            26,750
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Archive, Access & Assessment......            38,350
                                                       =================
    Coastal Data Development..........................             4,513
    Coastal Remote Sensing--CSC.......................               500
    Regional Climate Centers..........................             4,000
        International Pacific Research Center (U of                2,000
         HI)..........................................
    Environmental Data Systems Modernization..........            12,335
                                                       -----------------
      Total, NOAA's Data Centers & Information                    61,698
       Services.......................................
                                                       =================
Payment to OMAO.......................................               300
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE,              148,840
       DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE--ORF..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Budget Structure.--The Committee did not find the ``base'' 
breakout submitted by NESDIS particularly enlightening in terms 
of differentiating between fixed and variable costs within the 
lines that make up the NESDIS account, although it did identify 
with precision where the salaries of full time equivalents are. 
It should be a simple task for NESDIS to divide its budget, on 
a line by line basis, into two broad categories: salaries and 
expenses [S&E;] and programs. NESDIS is directed to do so and 
submit the results to the Committees on Appropriations not 
later than October 1, 2003. Also, funds provided under program, 
project, or activity lines shall not be used for overhead, 
including internal or external ``taxes'' charged by NESDIS, 
NOAA, or the Department of Commerce.
    Data Dissemination.--The Committee is concerned that with 
the significant increase in oceanographic and environmental 
data collection in Hawaii and the American Flag Territories, 
including the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, NOAA has 
inadequate capacity to provide timely data and services to the 
region. The Committee directs NOAA through the National Ocean 
Service, the National Oceanographic Data Center, and the 
National Climatic Data Center to submit a report to Congress 
that details the region's oceanographic and environmental data 
and information requirements, identifies gaps in existing 
service, makes recommendations for the establishment of a 
Pacific Ocean and Environment Information Center that would 
address such needs, and identifies potential coordination or 
partnerships with other Federal facilities in the region that 
might enhance the effectiveness of such a center.

                            PROGRAM SUPPORT

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $327,282,000 
for NOAA program support. Committee recommendations are 
displayed in the following table:

                             PROGRAM SUPPORT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Services:
    Commerce Administrative Management System (CAMS)..             8,229
    Educational Partnership Program/Minority Serving               7,500
     Institutions (EPPMSI)............................
    E-gov.............................................             3,000
    Information Technology (IT) Security..............             1,050
    National Ocean Science Competition................             1,500
    Office of Acquisition & Grants....................             2,700
        Grants On-Line................................             1,200
    Office of the Chief Administrative Officer........            15,255
        Facilities Staff..............................             1,250
    Office of the Chief Financial Officer.............            11,791
    Office of the Chief Information Officer...........             3,800
    Office of Human Resources.........................             2,484
    Office of Program Analysis & Evaluation...........             1,553
    Payment to the DoC Working Capital Fund...........            38,758
    Payment to the NOAA Business Management Fund......            60,104
    Program Planning and Integration..................             2,000
    Under Secretary and Associate Offices.............            17,524
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Corporate Services.......................           179,698
                                                       =================
Facilities:
    Energy Management.................................               550
    Environmental Compliance..........................             2,564
    Maintenance, Repairs and Safety (non-NWS):
        Backlog.......................................            13,000
        Cyclical......................................             6,684
    Pribilof Islands Cleanup..........................            10,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Facilities...............................            32,798
                                                       =================
Marine Operations & Maintenance:
    Marine Services:
        AGATE PASS (Coastal YTT) Operations...........               350
        FAIRWEATHER Operations........................             5,700
        HIIALAKAI (Vindicator) Operations.............             4,200
        LITTLEHALES Operations........................               350
        Marine Services (Fleet Operations)............            68,797
            NOAA Corps Pay Differential...............             1,000
        Univ-Nat'l Oceanographic Lab Sys (UNOLS) (Days             2,500
         at Sea--West Coast)..........................
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Marine Services...................            82,897
                                                       =================
    Fleet Planning and Maintenance:
        AGATE PASS (Coastal YTT) Maintenance..........               250
        FAIRWEATHER Maintenance.......................               800
        Fleet Planning and Maintenance................            11,277
        LITTLHALES Maintenance........................               100
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Fleet Planning and Maintenance....            12,427
                                                       =================
          Total, Marine Operations and Maintenance....            95,324
                                                       =================
Aviation Operations:
    Aircraft Services.................................            18,267
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Aircraft Services........................            18,267
                                                       =================
Future Health Care Benefits for Current Officers......             1,195
                                                       =================
      Total, Marine and Aviation Operations...........           114,786
                                                       =================
      GRAND TOTAL PROGRAM SUPPORT--ORF................           327,282
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Truth in Budgeting.--NOAA covers the costs of certain 
central services through a system of internal ``taxation''. The 
costs of other central services are covered through a payment 
to the Department of Commerce's Working Capital Fund. Rather 
than budget for these expenses, NOAA has always skimmed funds 
from program, project, and activity lines. Congressional 
supporters of NOAA have been understandably frustrated by these 
hidden taxes on essential programs. The Committee 
recommendation eliminates the taxation system by adding new 
lines under Program Support that totally fund central services. 
Henceforth, funding in program, project, and activity lines 
shall be available only for those programs, projects, and 
activities unless NOAA submits, and Congress approves, a 
reprogramming.
    Information Security.--Rather than reinvent the wheel, the 
Chief Information Officer [CIO] should consult with the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation [FBI] on information security. Like 
NOAA, the FBI started from zero on security. In the new 
Security Division/Information Assurance Section, the FBI 
married the right people to the right programs and brought 
information security to the Bureau on time and within budget. 
The CIO would benefit from the many lessons learned from the 
FBI experience. The recommendation includes seed money to start 
this process.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $16,989,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      20,043,000
House allowance.........................................      16,989,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,743,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,743,000. 
The recommendation is $700,000 above the budget request.
    This account funds the U.S. share of the expenses of 
international fisheries commissions; participation in the 
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea; 
participation in the North Pacific Marine Sciences 
Organization; travel expenses of the U.S. commissioners and 
their advisors; and salaries of non-Government employees of the 
Pacific Salmon Commission for days actually worked as 
commissioners and panel members and alternates.
    The Committee recommendations, by commission, organization, 
or council, are displayed in the following table:

                   INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Antarctic Treaty......................................                75
Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine                   74
 Living Resources.....................................
Expenses of the U.S. Commissioners....................               140
Great Lakes Fishery Commission........................            12,948
Inter-American Sea Turtle Convention Commission.......               120
Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission...............             2,100
International Commission for the Conservation of                     165
 Atlantic Tunas.......................................
International Council for the Exploration of the Seas.               122
International Pacific Halibut Commission..............             2,180
International Whaling Commission......................               116
North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization.......                27
North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission..............               104
North Pacific Marine Science Organization.............               166
Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization.............               156
Pacific Salmon Commission.............................             2,250
                                                       -----------------
      Total...........................................            20,743
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Of the amount provided for the Great Lakes Fishery 
Commission [GLFC], not less than $700,000 shall be used to 
eradicate lampreys in Lake Champlain. The GLFC is directed to 
give priority to States that have provided matching grants when 
distributing lampricide funds.

                     LITIGATION AND SETTLEMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................................
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      $5,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,000,000. 
The recommendation is $5,000,000 above the budget request.
    This new account funds certain legal costs associated with 
the growing number of lawsuits filed against the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. The funds are 
only intended for extraordinary costs associated with 
unanticipated filings or settlements. In the past, NOAA has had 
to loot programmatic accounts to cover unbudgeted litigation 
costs.

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $678,412,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      65,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     822,399,000
House allowance.........................................     794,059,000
Committee recommendation................................     990,127,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $990,127,000. 
The recommendation is $167,728,000 above the request.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOS:
    Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program
     (CELCP):
        Discretionary.................................             2,125
        Orange Beach (Robinson Island), AL............             2,000
        Brea/Tonner Creek, CA.........................               500
        Elkhorn Slough/Moss Landing, CA...............             1,500
        San Pablo Bay, CA.............................             1,000
        Sand Hill Bluff (Santa Cruz Co.), CA..........             2,000
        Salt Island Overlook (Westbrook), CT..........               300
        Coastal Lands, HI.............................             3,000
        Westwego, LA..................................             1,600
        Monomoy River (Harwich), MA...................             2,500
        Chesapeake, Eastern Shore (Glatfelter                      6,000
         properties), MD..............................
        Royal River (Yarmouth), ME....................             1,600
        Saugatuck Dunes, MI...........................             2,500
        Watervale Dunes, MI...........................             3,000
        Deer Island, MS...............................             2,000
        Seacoast, NH..................................             2,000
        Barnegat Bay, NJ..............................             3,000
        Gunning Island, NJ............................             1,500
        Lotus Point (Lake Erie), NY...................               375
        Bass Islands, OH..............................             3,000
        Grand River (Lake County), OH.................             1,000
        Lake Erie Shoreline (Canal Basin), OH.........             5,000
        South Slough Watershed, OR....................             2,000
        Third Beach (Middletown), RI..................               750
        Crow's Nest (Stafford Co.), VA................             4,000
        Bainbridge Island, WA.........................             3,000
        Maury Island, WA..............................             2,000
        Saxine Creek/Bibon Swamp (Bayfield County), WI               750
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Coastal and Estuarine Land                    60,000
           Conservation Program.......................
                                                       =================
    Estuarine Land Acquistion & Construction:
        ACE Basin.....................................             4,500
        Apalachicola NERR, FL.........................             1,500
        Delaware NERR:
            St. Jones River...........................               250
            Blackbird Creek...........................             2,250
        Jacques Cousteau NERR, NJ.....................             3,000
        NERRS Discretionary...........................            10,000
        Old Woman Creek NERR, OH......................               400
        Port Aransas, TX..............................             3,375
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Estuarine Acquisition &                       25,275
           Construction...............................
                                                       =================
    Sec. 2 (FWCA) Coastal/Estuarine Land Acquisition:
        Bonneau Ferry, SC.............................            14,000
        Great Bay Partnership, NH.....................             6,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Sec. 2 (FWCA) Coastal/Estuarine               20,000
           Land Acquisition...........................
                                                       =================
    Marine Sanctuaries Construction...................             1,625
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Marine Sanctuary Construction.........             1,625
                                                       =================
    Other NOS Facilities:
        Cedar Point Coastal Research Facility, MS.....             2,000
        Fort Johnson Joint Laboratory (SCDNR)                      2,000
         Modernization................................
        Kasitsna Bay Laboratory.......................             4,000
        Marine Environmental Health Research                       6,000
         Laboratory Expansion & Equip.................
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Other NOS Facilities..............            14,000
                                                       =================
          Total NOS--PAC..............................           120,900
                                                       =================
NMFS:
    Systems Acquisition: Computer Hardware & Software.             3,492
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, NMFS Systems Acquisition..............             3,492
                                                       =================
    Construction:
        Honolulu Lab..................................            12,000
        Pascagoula Laboratory.........................             2,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, NMFS Construction.................            14,000
                                                       =================
          Total, NMFS--PAC............................            17,492
                                                       =================
OAR:
    Systems Acquisition: Research Supercomputing                   7,550
     (GFDL)...........................................
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, OAR Systems Acquisition...............             7,550
                                                       =================
    Construction: Barrow Arctic Research Center (Phase             8,500
     I)...............................................
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, OAR Construction......................             8,500
                                                       =================
      Total, OAR--PAC.................................            16,050
                                                       =================
NWS:
    Systems Acquisition:
        Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System            14,134
         (AWIPS)......................................
        Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS).....             5,125
        Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD)........            12,000
        NWS Telecommunications Gateway (NWSTG) Legacy              2,870
         Replacement..................................
        Radiosonde Network Replacement................             6,989
        Weather and Climate Supercomputing............            19,285
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, NWS Systems Acquisition...........            60,403
                                                       =================
    Construction: WFO Construction....................            13,630
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, NWS Construction......................            13,630
                                                       =================
      Total, NWS--PAC.................................            74,033
                                                       =================
NESDIS:
    Systems Acquisition:
        Geostationary Systems.........................           277,554
        Polar Orbiting Systems........................           391,083
            NPOESS Pre-/Unplanned Product Improvements            10,510
                                                       -----------------
              Subtotal, NESDIS Systems Acquisition....           679,147
                                                       =================
    Construction: Suitland Facility...................             8,217
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, NESDIS Construction...................             8,217
                                                       =================
      Total, NESDIS--PAC..............................           687,364
                                                       =================
Program Support:
    Aircraft Upgrade & Replacement:
        G-IV Instrumentation Upgrades.................             4,600
        Required Regulatory Upgrades to Aircraft......             1,343
        WP-3D Navigation Upgrade......................             1,645
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Aircraft Upgrade & Replacement....             7,588
                                                       =================
    Fleet Upgrade & Replacement:
        Fisheries Research Vessel.....................            53,000
        Hiialakai (Vindicator) equipment fit out......             2,500
        Ship Acquisition, Conversion & Maintenance                 5,500
         (climate/hydro/fisheries/enforce/explore)....
        Sonar for Long-Range Fisheries Research.......             5,700
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, OMAO Fleet Upgrade & Replacement..            66,700
                                                       =================
          Total, Program Support--PAC.................            74,288
                                                       =================
          GRAND TOTAL PAC.............................           990,127
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan. Some of the Committee 
recommendations displayed in the table above are described in 
more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Land Acquisition and Construction.--The funds included in 
the Committee recommendation will be used expressly to acquire 
lands or interests in lands that include significant 
conservation, recreation, ecological, historical or aesthetic 
values or to construct interpretive, scientific, or stewardship 
facilities at the sites. In keeping with the statute, Section 2 
(Fish & Wildlife Coordination Act) acquisition projects are not 
dependent upon receipt of local, State, or private matching 
funds.
    Other NOS Facilities.--The Committee is very concerned 
about the repeated delays and inaccurate cost estimates related 
to the Katsisna Bay Laboratory redevelopment project. The 
Committee is providing $4,000,000 to complete Phases I and II 
of this project. The Committee expects that: (1) all 
construction on phases I and II to be complete by September 15, 
2004; (2) any cost overruns will be paid for out of the Program 
Support funds related to the operation of the Under Secretary's 
office; (3) no funds will be expended on activities not listed 
as priority I and II items in the January 2002 Katsisna Bay 
Laboratory Redevelopment Master Plan; and (4) any funds 
remaining at the end of fiscal year 2004 will be deobligated 
and returned to the United States Treasury.
    All Hazard National Warning Network NOAA Weather Radio.--
Timely local warning of natural and man-made disasters has been 
identified by the Administration as a priority. The fiscal year 
2004 request seeks funds to improve the timeliness of NOAA 
Weather Radio [NWR] network alerts. While the goal is 
commendable, the Committee questions the method. Though NWRs 
are popular in areas of the country particularly susceptible to 
violent weather, less than 10 percent of Americans are reported 
to own one. The Committee is aware of a number of other 
technological solutions, such as telephony-based warning 
systems, that could more quickly reach a far larger percentage 
of at-risk populations. Before investing in NWR network 
improvements, the Committee would like to review the 
Administration's overall plan for emergency broadcasts. 
Therefore, NOAA, in cooperation with the Federal Communications 
Commission, the Department of Homeland Security, and other 
relevant agencies, is directed to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations a comprehensive, inter-agency plan detailing the 
costs and benefits of the various technological solutions for 
timely local warning of disasters, proposed and planned 
investments based upon that assessment, and performance 
improvements expected.
    Turbo Commander Replacement.--Rather than replace this 
aircraft, NWS is directed to contract out its snow survey work. 
NWS should submit its plan for doing so to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than November 1, 2003.
    Fisheries Research Vessel.--The recommendation includes 
full funding for the third vessel of the class to allow NOAA to 
exercise an advantageously-priced contract option.

                  PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $129,155,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      90,000,000
House allowance.........................................      90,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      90,000,000

    The Committee recommends $90,000,000 for Pacific Coastal 
Salmon Recovery Fund. The recommendation is identical to the 
budget request. Within the funding for the Pacific Coastal 
Salmon Recovery Fund, the Committee recommends $26,000,000 for 
the State of Washington, $26,000,000 for the State of Alaska, 
$11,000,000 for the State of Oregon, $11,000,000 for the State 
of California, $8,500,000 for the Pacific Coastal Tribes, 
$5,000,000 for the State of Idaho, and $2,500,000 for the 
Columbia River Tribes. Of the funds provided for the State of 
Alaska, $5,000,000 is for the Arctic Yukon-Kushokwim 
Sustainable Salmon initiative, $1,000,000 is for construction 
of salmon mitigation passes, $1,000,000 is for the Cook Inlet 
Fishing Community Assistance Program, $500,000 is for the Yukon 
River Drainage Association, $500,000 is for Fort Richardson 
fisheries, $500,000 is for Elmendorf AFB hatcheries, $500,000 
is for Fort Wainwright fisheries, $450,000 is for universal 
quality standards, $450,000 is for competitive analysis of 
global salmon, $250,000 is to restore the king salmon runs in 
Coffman Cove, $250,000 is to enable the State of Alaska to 
participate in discussions regarding the Columbia River 
hydrosystem management, and $100,000 is for United Fishermen of 
Alaska's subsistence program. Of the amount provided for the 
State of Washington, $5,000,000 is for the Washington State 
Department of Natural Resources and other State and Federal 
agencies for purposes of implementing the State of Washington's 
Forest and Fish Report. The funding shall be spent in 
accordance with the terms and conditions of the Forest and Fish 
Report and consistent with the requirements of the Endangered 
Species Act and Clean Water Act. Also within the amount 
provided for the State of Washington, $1,590,000 is for the 
purchase of two new mass marking trailers. Of the amount 
provided to the State of Oregon, $1,100,000 is for conservation 
mass marking at the Columbia River Hatcheries.

                      FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................          $1,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................         956,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................           1,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,000 for the 
fishermen's contingency fund. The recommendation is $955,000 
below the request. The Committee expects NOAA to cover 
necessary expenses by using carryover funds.
    The fishermen's contingency fund provides compensation to 
U.S. fishermen for damage or loss of fishing gear and any 
resulting loss because of natural or man-made obstructions 
related to oil and gas exploration, development, and production 
on the Outer Continental Shelf.

                     FOREIGN FISHING OBSERVER FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................          $1,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................         191,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................           1,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,000 for the 
foreign fishing observer fund. The recommendation is $190,000 
below the request. The Committee expects NOAA to cover 
necessary expenses by using carryover funds.
    Fees paid into the fund are collected from owners and 
operators of certain foreign fishing vessels that fish within 
the U.S. fishery conservation zone. The fund supports salaries 
of U.S. observers and program support personnel, other 
administrative costs, and the cost of data management and 
analysis.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2003....................................        $287,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee notes that an appropriation is not necessary 
for the fisheries finance program account.

                         Department Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $44,662,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      57,191,000
House allowance.........................................      44,662,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,662,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $44,662,000 
for Departmental Management. The recommendation is $12,529,000 
below the budget request. The Committee notes that the 
Department's request for fiscal year 2004 represents nearly a 
19 percent increase over the fiscal year 2003 level, which 
represented a 19 percent increase over the fiscal year 2002 
level.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $20,501,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      23,378,000
House allowance.........................................      22,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      21,116,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $21,116,000. 
The recommendation is $2,262,000 below the budget request.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    Section 201 makes Commerce Department funds available for 
advanced payments only upon certification of officials 
designated by the Secretary that such payments are considered 
to be in the public interest.
    Section 202 makes appropriations for salaries and expenses 
available for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for 
services, uniforms, and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 203 prohibits any funds from being used to support 
hurricane reconnaissance aircraft and activities that are under 
the control of the U.S. Air Force or the U.S. Air Force 
Reserve.
    Section 204 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce accounts. The language provides 
that no account may be decreased by more than 5 percent or 
increased by more than 10 percent. The language also makes the 
transfers subject to the Committee's standard reprogramming 
procedures.
    Section 205 permits the Department of Commerce franchise 
fund to retain a percentage of earnings from services provided 
for capital investments.
    Section 206 provides funding for 4 grants and a cooperative 
agreement.
    Section 207 promotes seafood consumption.
    Section 208 limits the increases the Department may request 
for a certain account.
    Section 209 improves a National Institute of Standards and 
Technology program.
    Section 210 allows the Secretary of Commerce to enter into 
cooperative agreements with joint and cooperative institutes.
    Section 211 terminates the interest of the Economic 
Development Administration in and to certain property.
    Section 212 clarifies the relationship between the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and one of its joint 
labs.
    Section 213 extends emergency steel loan guarantees.
    Section 214 upholds the right of Congress to establish 
immigration quotes.

                        TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

    The funds provided in title III of the accompanying bill 
are for the operation and maintenance of the U.S. Courts and 
include the salaries of judges, magistrates, supporting 
personnel, and other expenses of the Federal judiciary.
    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$5,076,665,000 for the judiciary. The recommendation is 
$353,344,000 below the budget request. The Committee is aware 
that a total of $276,200,000 in fees, reimbursables, and 
carryover is available in various accounts across this title to 
supplement direct appropriations, as well as additional funding 
as a result of the fiscal year 2003 supplemental.
    Steady growth in costs associated with defender services, 
court security, GSA rental payments, and pay and benefits at a 
time of declining resources continues to put serious pressure 
on the judiciary budget. The Committee urges the judiciary to 
make every effort to contain ``mandatory'' costs, particularly 
staff salaries.

                   Supreme Court of the United States

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $45,458,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................       1,535,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      57,477,000
House allowance.........................................      55,360,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,414,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $59,414,000 
for the Justices, their supporting personnel, and the costs of 
operating the Supreme Court, excluding the care of the building 
and grounds. The recommendation is $1,937,000 above the budget 
request.
    Data Systems.--The Committee lauds the Court for their 
successes in their information technology [IT] modernization 
program in recent years, and believes even more emphasis should 
be placed on the IT systems planned for the future. Therefore, 
of the funds provided, the Committee directs that $2,500,000 
shall be used for Data System Operational Support as outlined 
in the budget request. The personnel required to implement, 
monitor and maintain these systems will be as specified in the 
paragraph below.
    The Committee is aware of unfunded requirements in the 
Court's automation program. The Committee believes the computer 
operating system conversion is a vital cornerstone of the 
Supreme Court's future efforts. The Committee is also aware 
that due to the nature of the Court calendar the IT staff has a 
reduced time frame within which they are able to implement 
large-scale system changes. Therefore, within the funds 
provided, the Committee directs $3,400,000 be expended as 
described in the Data Systems Office's computer operating 
system conversion project plan as presented to the Committee.
    Personnel Increases.--The Committee understands the Supreme 
Court's total long-term requirements for an increase in 
personnel, such as increasing the security posture for the 
Court, are a top priority. Therefore, within the funds 
provided, the Court shall make the following personnel 
increases as outlined in the budget request:

                           PERSONNEL INCREASES
                         [Dollars in thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Job description                       FTE      Cost
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Automation Support Unit Technicians...................      2.0     $103
Systems Accountants...................................      3.0      286
Telephone Operators...................................      2.0       72
Programmer-Analyst/SW Developer.......................      1.0       54
Secretary (for Data Office)...........................      1.0       45
Library Technology Assistant..........................      1.0       45
Special Collections Librarian.........................      1.0       45
                                                       -----------------
      Total...........................................     11.0      650
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee understands that by recommending approval of 
the Court's request for additional Systems Accountants the 
Court will use these new government employees to replace 
contract personnel, at a considerable savings to the Court. The 
Court is directed to report to the Committee on Appropriations 
the actual amount of this savings.
    Other Program Increases.--Within the funds provided, the 
Committee supports the Metrocheck transit subsidy program 
increase as requested. The Committee directs the Supreme Court 
to submit the financial plan, to include expected annual O&M; 
cost, for the proposed firearms training system as soon as 
these costs are determined.

                    CARE OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $41,355,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       4,658,000
House allowance.........................................      10,591,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,658,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,658,000 for 
personnel and other services relating to the Supreme Court 
building and grounds, which is supervised by the Architect of 
the Capitol. The recommendation is identical to the budget 
request.

             U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $20,195,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................         973,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      22,422,000
House allowance.........................................      20,665,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,662,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,662,000. 
The recommendation is $1,760,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee does not support the request for a video 
conference project ($215,000) without further justification. 
The Committee does, however, support the request for courtroom 
renovations as described in the budget request.
    The Committee supports the addition of a supervisory level 
on-site deputy U.S. Marshal.
    The Committee does not support a Deputy Circuit Executive 
($130,000), as the budget justification has not shown a 
workload need, in relation to the other Circuits, for such a 
position.

                   U.S. Court of International Trade


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $13,609,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................          50,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      14,206,000
House allowance.........................................      14,068,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,210,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $13,210,000. 
The recommendation is $996,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee understands the U.S. Court of International Trade 
will have a carryover balance of $195,976 in fiscal year 2003 
funds to augment this appropriation.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $3,777,015,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   4,188,352,000
House allowance.........................................   4,004,176,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,894,021,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,894,021,000. The recommendation is $294,331,000 below the 
budget request. Of the $294,331,000 reduction from the budget 
request, $158,970,000 shall be distributed in the following 
manner:

                         REDUCTIONS FROM REQUEST
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Supplies................................................         (3,000)
Non-pay Inflationary and Contractual Services...........         (7,000)
Cafeteria-style Flexible Benefits.......................        (15,886)
Unfunded Fiscal Year 2003 Workload Requirements.........        (97,000)
Increase of 427 FTE's...................................        (28,200)
Courtroom Audio Systems.................................         (4,384)
Court Operations Support Center.........................         (2,500)
Background checks.......................................         (1,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee understands that $276,200,000 is available 
from fees and carryforward balances to augment appropriated 
amounts. As the Judiciary recomputes their actual balances in 
these accounts throughout fiscal year 2003, the Committee will 
expect reprogramming request within accounts as consistent with 
Section 605 of this Act.
    Within the amount recommended, $1,816,000 shall be used to 
complete the renovation of the new Federal District Courthouse 
in Natchez, Mississippi.
    The Committee has seen no statistical support for the 
requested staff increase. The sophisticated scientific formula 
offered in the budget request does not justify such a large 
increase, particularly when courts are using funds for existing 
vacancies to finance automation equipment. Therefore, the 
Committee does not support the request for the additional staff 
members. The Committee is concerned about supporting the 
current employees and ensuring no one is forced into a 
Reduction-In-Force situation.
    The Committee fully supports the Judiciary's budget request 
for the Judiciary Information Technology Fund [JITF]. The 
Committee would like to see an even greater emphasis on 
automation in the local courts. To this end, the Committee 
expects the full recommended appropriation for the JITF, as 
reflected in the budget request, be deposited into this 
account. The Committee lauds the Judicial Committee on 
Information Technology (IT Committee) and their Chairman for 
their successes helping the Courts run more efficiently through 
the use of new automation. Of particular note, the Committee is 
impressed and encouraged by the new Case Management/Electronic 
Case File system [CM/ECF]. This new and innovative system 
allows judges, their staffs, the bar and the general public to 
work within the judicial system with greater efficiency. This 
new system is currently implemented in many bankruptcy and 
district courts and will soon begin implementation in the 
appellate courts. The CM/ECF system is already showing its 
potential to revolutionize the management and handling of case 
files and within the next few years should show significant 
cost savings throughout the Judiciary. The Committee on 
Appropriations expect a report on the savings generated by this 
program at the earliest possible date.
    The Committee understands that the time required to hear 
Court cases can be reduced by as much as 15 percent through the 
use of new automation in the courtroom. The Committee is 
concerned about the pace of courtroom modernization and urges 
the Judiciary to place an increased emphasis on courtroom 
technologies and accelerate the pace of modernization efforts.
    The Committee has learned that many courts are in need of 
additional automation support. The Judiciary receives great 
benefits from the development of automation initiatives at the 
local court level. These local initiatives are tremendously 
beneficial to the local courts and the sharing of the 
technology with other courts will realize savings to the entire 
Judiciary. The Committee lauds the Office of Information 
Technology for including an Information Technology Grant 
program in the ``Long Range Plan for Information Technology in 
the Federal Judiciary'', specifically, goal 7, initiative 1. 
The Committee fully supports this program. However, the 
Committee understands that even though the Judiciary has been 
including requests for funds for IT grants in their ``base'' 
request in fiscal year 2004 and prior years, no grants have 
been distributed to the courts. To assist in this effort, and 
accelerate the pace of this program, the Committee directs that 
no less than $2,500,000 of the funds appropriated for the JITF 
be set aside specifically for the Local Initiatives Program to 
be used to establish and operate a National Clearinghouse, 
conduct training at the Circuit level, and provide Information 
Technology Grants. These funds are also in addition to the 
$339,500 the Administrative Office [AO] outlined in the fiscal 
year 2004 financial plan for IT Grants and the carryforward 
from the $176,200 in the fiscal year 2003 financial plan. This 
program shall come under the exclusive and direct management 
and oversight of the Chairman, Committee on Information 
Technology. The Committee directs the AO to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations the proposed process and structure 
to operate the Clearinghouse, evaluate initiatives and oversee 
the Local Initiatives Program, within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act. In addition, the AO shall report on the status of 
this program no later than April 1, 2004 and October 1, 2004. 
The status report shall contain an activity report from the 
Clearinghouse, a list of the courts that received the grants in 
fiscal year 2003 and fiscal year 2004, the project supported, 
and the amount of the grant.
    Budget Decentralization.--The Committee understands that 
the Judiciary's budget decentralization program is extremely 
beneficial to the local courts and compliments the 
Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts [AO] for its support. 
This program is the only way some courts can operate. It gives 
the courts some flexibility to handle situations unique to 
their particular needs. The Committee expects this program to 
continue.
    Court Formulas.--Even though budget decentralization is a 
good first step, the Committee has learned from numerous courts 
that the formulas used to determine staffing requirements and 
court allocations do not work. There is no place where logic is 
given sufficient weight in the equation. Some courts have to 
use staffing allocations just to operate the court, knowing 
this adds an extra burden on the remaining staff, while other 
courts have more than sufficient staffing levels. The present 
formulas are not flexible enough to consider differences in 
court operations. If caseload numbers are the main value of the 
staffing formula the courts with unique situations do not 
receive appropriate credit. In addition, formulas that only 
consider the District level and not the Divisional level 
seriously shortchange courts such as El Paso, which is a 
division unto itself, has the highest caseload level in the 
Judiciary and has a severe shortage of staff. The shortage in 
staff is evident in every office, but most apparent in the 
Probation and Pretrial Services office. The fact that the El 
Paso court operates as smoothly as it does in such austere 
conditions is a testament to the professionalism and dedication 
of the Judges and staff in the court. Therefore, the Committee 
sees the formula problem as a severe detriment to the courts 
and directs the AO to immediately review the entire court 
formula program and make the necessary adjustments. As soon as 
this review is complete, but not later than March 31, 2004, a 
copy of the review and recommended adjustments shall be 
forwarded to the Committees on Appropriations.
    Court Operations Support Center [COSC].--The Committee is 
concerned about the daily operation of the COSC and as such 
directs the Administrative Office to submit to the Committees 
on Appropriations a report on the job classifications and grade 
level of the 47 personnel assigned to the COSC. In addition, 
the report shall contain a detailed financial plan outlining 
the annual operating cost. This report shall be submitted no 
later than May 3, 2004.

                       VACCINE INJURY TRUST FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $2,766,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       3,293,000
House allowance.........................................       3,293,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,293,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,293,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                           Defender Services

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $534,961,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     635,481,000
House allowance.........................................     613,948,000
Committee recommendation................................     595,006,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $595,006,000. 
The recommendation is $40,475,000 below the budget request.
    This account funds the operations of the Federal public 
defender and community defender organizations and the 
compensation, reimbursement, and expenses of attorneys 
appointed to represent persons under the Criminal Justice Act 
[CJA], as amended.
    Criminal Justice Act Panel Attorney Rates.--In fiscal year 
2002, the Committee provided a significant increase in CJA 
panel attorney hourly rates. This large increase was funded and 
approved by Congress because the hourly rates authorized in 
1986 had not kept pace with inflation and many Federal judges 
were reporting difficulty in finding qualified counsel willing 
to accept CJA appointments at rates that were one-third to one-
half the rates charged in private practice.
    This year, the request included an additional increase in 
the CJA hourly rate from $90 to $113 for non-capital cases and 
from $125 to $157 for capital cases. The Committee has not seen 
any empirical evidence from the Administrative Office [AO] to 
support such a large increase. In future budget submissions, 
the AO is asked to include such data as an accompaniment to the 
request. The Committee urges the AO to survey appropriate 
judges and report as soon as practical to the Committee 
statistical data supporting the issues as reported by the 
judges.
    Of the $40,475,000 reduction from the budget submission, 
$15,255,000 shall be distributed in the following manner:

                         REDUCTIONS FROM REQUEST
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Panel Attorney Adjustment (2 percent)...................           (989)
Panel Attorney Adjustment (2 percent)...................           (258)
Supplies................................................           (397)
Panel Attorney Rate Increase............................        (10,378)
Panel Attorney Rate Increase............................         (2,633)
New Offender Offices....................................           (600)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Fees of Jurors and Commissioners

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $54,281,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      53,181,000
House allowance.........................................      53,181,000
Committee recommendation................................      53,181,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $53,181,000. 
The recommendation reflects the judiciary's reestimate of 
fiscal year 2004 requirements.
    This account provides for the fees and allowances of grand 
and petit jurors and for the compensation of land commissioners 
and jury commissioners.

                             Court Security

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $266,655,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     311,171,000
House allowance.........................................     288,941,000
Committee recommendation................................     266,058,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $266,058,000. 
The recommendation is $45,113,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee is concerned about the security of the U.S. 
Courthouses and the safety of all judicial employees and urges 
the Administrative Office [AO] to work closely with the U.S. 
Marshals Service to forge an effective and lasting 
accommodation to achieve this common goal. In past years 
several attempts have been made to align the funding with 
either the AO or the Service, or a combination of both. The 
Committee has not received the study on the management of this 
program and the unique relationship between the U.S. Marshals 
Service and the Federal Judiciary as requested last year. 
However, the Committee is anxious to assist in this area and 
will review any proposal that most efficiently protects these 
vital resources.

                Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $63,087,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      71,908,000
House allowance.........................................      66,968,000
Committee recommendation................................      63,717,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $63,717,000. 
The recommendation is $8,191,000 below the budget request.
    Of the $8,191,000 reduction from the budget request, 
$1,820,000 shall be distributed in the following manner:

                         REDUCTIONS FROM REQUEST
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Equipment/Supplies......................................            (30)
Cyclical Replacement....................................           (400)
Staffing Increases......................................           (958)
Cafeteria-style Flex Benefits...........................           (432)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee understands the need for cyclical replacement 
of automation equipment in the AO and lauds the Office of 
Internal Services for their efforts to control inventory and 
catalogue all automation equipment purchased in the AO. The 
Committee is impressed as well with their diligence in holding 
down costs in this area. However, the Committee understands 
there is a problem controlling all new computer/automation 
equipment purchased for the AO within each Directorate. This 
confounds the AO's cyclical replacement process. Therefore, the 
Committee does not fund the $400,000 request for additional 
equipment.
    The Committee has not been informed as to the AO's plan for 
complying with the National Archives & Records Administration 
records management requirements for the AO or the courts. The 
Committee understands the present storage schedules need to be 
updated to reflect current records and electronic systems. 
Absent any mention in the budget request, the Committee is 
concerned with funding additional program increases in the 
future. The Committee urges the AO to develop a comprehensive 
records management plan for the Judiciary, to include current 
and outyear funding requirements, and inform the Committee of 
this plan as soon as possible.
    The Committee has seen no statistical support for the 
requested staff increase that ties directly to the staffing 
levels in the courts. The sophisticated scientific formula 
offered in the budget request does not justify the request. 
Therefore, the Committee does not recommend an appropriation 
for the additional nine staff members ($958,000). The Committee 
is more concerned with supporting the current employees and 
ensuring no one is forced into a Reduction-In-Force situation.
    The Committee understands the request for cafeteria-style 
flex benefits has not been supported by the Authorizing 
Committees. In addition, the request is not consistent in each 
account throughout the Judiciary's budget submission. 
Therefore, the Committee does not support the request 
($432,000) at this time.
    The Committee is very concerned with the unusually large 
amount of funds spent on travel and travel related expenses by 
AO personnel. The Committee urges the AO to take a harder look 
at the amount of travel by AO personnel and attempt to realize 
some cost avoidance in this area before making adjustments to 
allotments to local courts. The AO shall report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on a semi-annual basis the total 
amount of travel funds expended by AO personnel, broken down by 
Directorate.

                        Federal Judicial Center


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $20,720,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      21,660,000
House allowance.........................................      21,440,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,434,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $22,434,000. 
The recommendation is $774,000 above the budget request.
    The Federal Judicial Center [FJC] improves the management 
of Federal judicial dockets and court administration through 
education for judges and staff and research, evaluation, and 
planning assistance for the courts and the judicial conference. 
The Committee lauds the FJC's education and training program as 
a model for the entire judiciary.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds


                    PAYMENT TO JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $35,300,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      29,000,000
House allowance.........................................      29,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      29,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $29,000,000 
for payments to the Judicial Officers' Retirement Fund and the 
Claims Court Judges Retirement Fund. The recommendation is 
identical to the budget request.
    These funds cover the estimated annuity payments to be made 
to retired bankruptcy judges and magistrate judges, claims 
court judges, and spouses and dependent children of deceased 
judicial officers.

                       U.S. Sentencing Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $12,011,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      13,200,000
House allowance.........................................      12,746,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,011,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $12,011,000. 
The recommendation is $1,189,000 below the budget request.
    The purpose of the Commission is to establish, review, and 
revise sentencing guidelines, policies, and practices for the 
Federal criminal justice system. The Commission is also 
required to monitor the operation of the guidelines and to 
identify and report necessary changes to the Congress.

                   General Provisions--The Judiciary

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the judiciary, all of which were included in previous 
appropriations acts.
    Section 301 allows the Judiciary to expend funds for 
employment of experts and consultant services.
    Section 302 allows the Judiciary, subject to the 
Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 303 limits official reception and representation 
expenses incurred by the Judicial Conference of the United 
States to no more than $11,000.
    Section 304 provides a cost of living adjustment for 
Justices and judges.
    Section 305 provides a pay raise for Justices and judges.

            TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$8,030,612,000. The recommendation is $613,630,000 below the 
budget request. Security, technology, and infrastructure 
accounts have received the maximum funding deemed prudent.

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $3,776,848,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      98,420,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   4,163,544,000
House allowance.........................................   4,099,961,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,874,778,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,874,778,000. The recommendation is $288,766,000 below the 
budget request.
    This appropriation account provides for the formulation and 
execution of U.S. foreign policy, including the conduct of 
diplomatic and consular relations with foreign countries, 
diplomatic relations with international organizations, and 
related activities. This account primarily funds the overseas 
programs and operations of the Department of State.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommendation 
includes $175,000 to support the United States' membership in 
the Arctic Council and $40,000 for the Bering Straits 
Commission. The former includes funds for representation 
expenses and travel for U.S. delegates.
    The Committee recommendations, by bureau or operation, are 
displayed in the following table:

                     DIPLOMATIC & CONSULAR PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Regional Bureaus:
    Bureau of African Affairs.........................           246,974
    Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs..........           249,258
    Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs...........           516,580
    Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs....................           159,800
    Bureau of South Asian Affairs.....................            73,251
    Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs..............           242,944
    Bureau of International Organization Affairs......            50,731
    Office of International Conferences...............             3,122
    FSN Separation Liability Trust Fund...............             8,224
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Regional Bureaus......................         1,550,884
                                                       =================
Functional Bureaus:
    Ambassador's Fund for Cultural Preservation.......             1,750
    Bureau of Arms Control............................            22,969
    Bureau of Consular Affairs........................             2,438
    Counterterrorism Research and Development/Office               1,800
     of the Coordinator for Counterterrorism..........
    Bureau of Democracy Human Rights and Labor........            11,705
    Bureau of Diplomatic Security.....................           230,822
    Diplomatic Telecommunications Service Program                 46,884
     Office...........................................
    Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs...........            26,978
    Bureau of Information Resource Management.........           165,287
    Bureau of Intelligence and Research...............            43,376
    Bureau of Non-Proliferation.......................            24,352
    Bureau of Oceans and Int'l Environmental and        ................
     Scientific Affairs...............................
    Bureau of Political Military Affairs..............            26,896
    Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration.....               486
    Bureau of Public Affairs..........................            30,182
    Bureau of Verification and Compliance.............            14,069
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Functional Bureaus....................           649,994
                                                       =================
Management:
    Office of the Secretary...........................            72,905
    Deputy Secretary for Management and Resources.....             6,024
    Bureau of Resource Management.....................            81,438
    Office of Protocol................................             6,050
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Management............................           166,417
                                                       =================
Administration:
    Bureau of Administration..........................           332,727
    Bureau of Human Resources.........................           109,304
    Bureau of Human Resources--Special Complement.....            76,046
    Diplomatic Readiness Initiative Year III..........            67,428
    Foreign Service Institute.........................           104,515
    Continuing Overseas Language Training.............            10,000
    Bureau of Legislative Affairs.....................  ................
    Post Assignment Travel............................           129,484
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Administration........................           829,504
                                                       =================
Offices:
    Office of Foreign Missions........................             4,273
    Office of International Criminal Justice..........             1,071
    Office of International Information Programs......            45,023
    Office of International Health Affairs............             2,000
    Office of Strategic Planning for Public Diplomacy.             2,000
    Office of the Legal Advisor.......................  ................
    Office of the Medical Director....................            29,239
    Trafficking in Persons............................  ................
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Offices...............................            83,606
                                                       =================
      Subtotal, Diplomatic and Consular Programs, Non-         3,280,405
       Security.......................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table are described in more detail in the following paragraphs.

                         DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT

    Reprogrammings.--The Committee reminds the Department that 
reprogramming notifications are required in the case of (1) a 
reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or temporary, in 
excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, between 
programs or activities; (2) increasing funds or personnel by 
any means for any project or activity for which funds have been 
denied or restricted; (3) creating new programs, offices, 
agencies, or commissions, or substantially augmenting existing 
programs, offices, agencies, or commissions; (4) relocating 
offices or employees; (5) reorganizing offices, programs, or 
activities, including consolidations, expansions, and changes 
in names or designations; (6) contracting out or privatizing 
any functions or activities presently performed by Federal 
employees funded by this subcommittee; (7) initiating 
construction projects in excess of $500,000 not specifically 
approved by the Committee; and (8) adding, expanding, 
converting, or altering of space in any newly constructed 
facility for a period of 1 year after contract close-out of the 
new facility. These requirements are clearly stated in the 
introductions of the fiscal year 2003 and fiscal year 2004 
Senate reports. The Committee has restated them under this 
title for the convenience of the State Department.
    The Committee is aware of two instances during fiscal year 
2003 in which the Department of State undertook reorganizations 
without submitting reprogramming requests. The first instance 
involved the realignment of the Bureau of Political Military 
Affairs. This change required a reprogramming under sections 
(3) and (5), as stated above. The Committee did not receive the 
required reprogramming request, but merely a letter of 
notification from the Department, dated November 11, 2002. The 
second instance involved changing the status of the Office of 
International Information Programs from ``Office'' to 
``Bureau''. This change required a reprogramming under section 
(5), as stated above. The Committee did not receive the 
required reprogramming request, but merely a letter of 
notification from the Department, dated April 4, 2003. As a 
consequence of the Department's failure to follow proper 
reprogramming procedures, the Committee does not recognize 
either change. The Committee encourages the Department to 
submit the required reprogrammings to the Committee in order 
that these changes, if approved, may receive rightful 
consideration during the fiscal year 2005 appropriations 
process.
    Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor [DRL].--The 
Committee is aware that the DRL is delinquent on its 
reimbursement payments to the Drug Enforcement Administration 
[DEA] for the international counter-narcotics training DEA 
provides to foreign narcotics law enforcement officers under an 
agreement with the State Department. The Committee directs 
that, within the amounts provided for DRL, $1,500,000 be 
transferred to the DEA for the expenses it incurred while 
carrying out its obligations under the aforementioned 
agreement. The Committee directs that this joint program 
continue, but directs the Department of State henceforward to 
meet its financial obligations under the terms of the 
agreement.
    Financial Operations.--The Committee commends the 
Department of State for the significant improvements it has 
made in its financial operations. For the past 7 years, the 
Department has had clean audited financial statements. 
Additionally, the Department has streamlined and centralized 
its overseas and domestic financial operations in Charleston, 
South Carolina. From Charleston, the Department currently pays 
over 25,000 Americans both domestically and overseas and over 
35,000 local national employees in 180 different countries, bi-
weekly, in local currencies. The Office of Management and 
Budget has undertaken an effort to consolidate payroll 
operations among the Federal agencies. The Committee 
understands that the purpose of this effort is to create 
efficiencies. However, the State Department's financial 
operations are vastly different from other U.S. agencies' 
financial operations because they are global. Before the 
Department expends any resources to consolidate payroll 
operations, the Department must demonstrate to the Committees 
on Appropriations that doing so would result in cost-savings to 
the American taxpayers. Also, before joining a consolidated 
payroll effort, the Department must submit a reprogramming, in 
accordance with section 605 of this Act.

                            GLOBAL PRESENCE

    Right-sizing.--The Department of State currently has no 
comprehensive process in place for developing the staffing 
projections that are essential to the right-sizing process. 
Right-sizing refers to the reconfiguration of overseas U.S. 
Government personnel to the minimum number necessary to support 
U.S. national security interests. A key component of the 
planning process for a new embassy compound is the development 
of staffing projections. Staffing projections present the 
number of staff likely to work in the facility and the type of 
work they will perform. These are the two primary drivers of 
the size and cost of new facilities. Currently, individual 
embassies and consulates, in consultation with bureaus and 
offices at headquarters, are responsible for developing the 
staffing projections, which the Bureau of Overseas Buildings 
Operations [OBO] uses to design the new compounds and prepare 
funding requests. To ensure that new compounds are designed as 
accurately as possible, OBO designed a system for collecting 
future staffing requirements that invites the participation of 
embassy personnel, officials in the regional bureaus, and 
officials from other relevant Federal agencies. Embassy 
management and the regional bureaus must review and validate 
all projections before submitting them to OBO.
    As the real property manager for all U.S. properties 
overseas, OBO has become the default arbiter of all questions 
pertaining to right-sizing. However, OBO is dependant on the 
regional bureaus at the State Department and other U.S. 
agencies for staffing projections and decisions. OBO is not in 
position to validate or downscale these staffing projections, 
yet is continually blamed for its tenants' ever-increasing 
demand for space at overseas posts. OBO has urged headquarters, 
the regional bureaus, and embassy management to develop a 
framework for making staffing projections. The fact that OBO 
has met with resistance at every turn has not gone unnoticed by 
the Committee. Worse, an April 2003, General Accounting Office 
[GAO] report found that the embassies and regional bureaus were 
not even consistently utilizing OBO's system in developing 
their staffing projections. The GAO report found that many 
embassies had not conducted a thorough analysis of their future 
staffing needs. The GAO report also found that the process of 
developing staffing projections had been managed poorly both in 
the field and at Department headquarters. GAO noted that 
officials at post did not appear to appreciate the importance 
of the staffing projection process as it relates to the size 
and cost of new diplomatic facilities. Finally, the GAO report 
found that none of the embassies surveyed had received formal, 
detailed guidance on how to develop their projections from the 
regional bureaus. Based on this, the Committee must assume that 
the regional bureaus received no guidance from headquarters on 
how they should assist posts in developing their projections or 
on how the bureaus themselves should evaluate posts' 
submissions. This GAO report raises serious concerns about the 
validity of the Department's past and current staffing 
projections. The Committee directs the Department to develop a 
framework for conducting right-sizing analyses, including 
staffing projections, that will ensure that projected needs are 
the minimum necessary to support U.S. national security 
interests. The Committee further directs that the framework 
include the ``tiger team'' concept used by the Department to 
deploy OpenNet Plus. During the deployment of this global 
information technology network, tiger teams were sent around 
the world to all of the embassies to install the software and 
hardware and conduct the training necessary for the deployment 
of OpenNet Plus. The tiger teams were critical because the 
embassies had neither the time nor the expertise to do this 
work themselves. The same can be said of the embassies' ability 
to conduct thorough and objective evaluations of their past 
staffing needs and projections of their future staffing needs. 
The Committee will not entertain any reprogramming requests for 
the Diplomatic and Consular Programs account before the 
Department has reported on its plans for meeting this 
directive.
    U.S. Mission to the Republic of Kazakhstan.--The Committee 
commends the United States Ambassador to the Republic of 
Kazakhstan and the work he and his staff are doing in this 
extremely challenging region of the world. The Committee 
supports the Ambassador's decision to consolidate post 
operations in Astana, after the capital of the Republic of 
Kazakhstan was moved to Astana from Almaty. The Committee 
supports the Ambassador's decision to leave a small presence 
post in Almaty to handle local requirements and recommends such 
sums as are necessary for this purpose. The Ambassador's 
decision is consistent with the concepts of regionalization and 
rightsizing, which the Committee believes should be more 
thoroughly integrated into all Department planning.

                            HUMAN RESOURCES

    Diplomatic Readiness Initiative.--The Committee supports 
the Department's Diplomatic Readiness Initiative [DRI], under 
which the Department will hire 1,158 new Foreign Service 
Officers over 3 years. The initiative has allowed the 
Department to better meet its full human resources requirements 
and to reform its recruitment and hiring processes. The 
recommendation includes $90,000,000 for the third and final 
year of DRI. This amount includes $22,572,000 under Worldwide 
Security Upgrades for an additional 68 consular officers, which 
is identical to the amount requested. None of the funds 
provided for DRI in this Act or any other appropriations Act 
shall be used to hire any Foreign Service Officer who is not 
available for worldwide assignment. The Committee directs the 
Department to submit, no later than September 30, 2004, a 
report evaluating the success of the DRI initiative and its 
impact on Department operations.
    Foreign Language Proficiency.--The Committee is aware of 
the continued shortage of personnel at the State Department who 
possess the language skills required for their positions. If 
our diplomats truly are our ``first line of defense'' against 
foreign threats, then their ability to converse fluently in the 
languages of the countries to which they are posted is critical 
to national security. Foreign language proficiency should weigh 
more heavily in the determination of who is hired into and who 
advances within the Foreign Service. The Committee directs the 
Department to increase its emphasis on foreign language 
proficiency in the hiring and promotion of Foreign Services 
Officers. The Committee directs the Department to report on the 
changes it makes to its hiring and promotion practices no later 
than April 14, 2004.
    Continuing Language Education.--Language skills ensure that 
dependents of Department of State personnel are not overwhelmed 
by isolation and alienation, resulting in lowered post morale. 
Within available funds, the Committee recommendation directs 
that $10,000,000 shall be available only for continuing 
language education programs for both employees and dependents 
at posts worldwide. Language classes should also be open to 
non-State Department (Federal) employees on a space-available, 
reimbursable basis.

                          DIPLOMATIC SECURITY

    Worldwide Security Upgrades.--The recommendation includes a 
total of $594,373,000 for Worldwide Security Upgrades. The 
Committee recommendations are displayed in the following table:

                       WORLDWIDE SECURITY UPGRADES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ongoing Security Activities:
    Additional Consular Officers........................          22,572
    Guards/Worldwide Protection.........................         137,046
    Physical Security Equipment.........................          18,912
    Technical Support/Infrastructure....................          68,932
    Information/Systems Security........................          51,825
    Armored Vehicles....................................          10,536
    Personnel/Training..................................         119,780
    Chemical/Biological Program.........................           4,057
    Radio Program.......................................           7,413
    Perimeter Security Enhancements.....................          70,000
    TOPOFF II...........................................           3,000
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, Ongoing Security Activities.............         514,073
                                                         ===============
New Programs:
    Secure Operations...................................          52,000
    National Information Assurance Certification and              28,300
     Accreditation Process..............................
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal, New Programs............................          80,300
                                                         ===============
      Subtotal, Worldwide Security Upgrades.............         594,373
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table are described in more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Marine Security Guard [MSG] Program.--During the 19th 
century, the United States Navy was frequently called upon to 
protect American lives and property in remote parts of the 
world. Marine detachments took part in these operations and, on 
occasion, were called upon to protect U.S. diplomatic missions. 
The first such instance took place in 1835, when four marines 
from the U.S.S. Brandywine were assigned to protect the U.S. 
Consulate in Lima, Peru. The followng year, a single Marine was 
permanently detailed to this task. Following this, legation 
guard detachments were stationed at various times in Tokyo, 
Seoul, and Managua. Over time, it became clear that civilian 
guards were unable to maintain adequate security at overseas 
missions, and the Department accordingly turned to the United 
States Armed Forces. Finally, on December 15, 1948, the 
Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Navy signed a 
memorandum of agreement which established the present Marine 
Security Guard program. Today Marines are assigned to Foreign 
Service posts throughout the world.
    After that, the mission of the Marine Security Guard [MSG] 
detachments assigned to U.S. diplomatic facilities evolved from 
one of protecting people to one of protecting information. The 
reasons why this evolution was necessary have, in recent years, 
been overcome by technologies that assure the integrity of 
sensitive information. Terrorists have proven their ability to 
plan and execute sophisticated attacks such as those carried 
out in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya in 1998, New 
York, Washington, and Pennsylvania in 2001, and Riyadh, Saudi 
Arabia in 2003. In this new global security environment, the 
primary mission of MSG detachments must be to protect embassy 
personnel. The Committee commends the Department for its 
efforts to revise its Memorandum of Agreement with the 
Department of Defense as it pertains to the mission of Marine 
Corps personnel assigned to U.S. diplomatic posts.
    Growth and Planning.--The Department's security program has 
grown exponentially over the last 6 years. Since 1999, the 
Committee has made $3,132,600,000 available to the Department 
for non-capital security alone. Also in that time, the number 
of Diplomatic Security agents employed by the Department 
increased by nearly 73 percent, from 782 to 1,350 personnel. 
While some growth was necessary in order for the Department to 
respond to the emerging threat of terrorism, growth in the 
Bureau of Diplomatic Security [DS] followed no pre-developed 
model or plan. Until recently, the Bureau made staffing and 
resource decisions without the benefit of a comprehensive 
strategy. The absence of a strategy made it impossible for the 
Committee to make informed funding decisions about the 
Department's security requirements. The Committee commends the 
Assistant Secretary for Diplomatic Security for recognizing 
this serious deficiency and for his efforts to build a staffing 
model that will allow DS to become the kind of robust, 
efficient, and dynamic security operation the Department needs. 
The Committee received a draft strategy on June 16, 2003, and 
is in the process of reviewing it.
    The Department's request for Worldwide Security Upgrades 
for fiscal year 2004 is $97,296,000 above the fiscal year 2003 
funding level. Providing such a substantial increase and 
locking these funds into specific categories in the midst of 
the Assistant Secretary's top-to-bottom review would serve 
neither the Department nor the American taxpayers. The 
recommendation therefore includes the fiscal year 2003 level 
for ongoing security activities (with the exception of 
perimeter security enhancements, which is addressed in a 
separate section below) plus $52,000,000 for the Center for 
Antiterrorism and Security Training, as requested by the 
Department in fiscal year 2003, and $28,300,000 to establish a 
program for compliance with the National Information Assurance 
Certification and Accreditation process requirements. The 
Committee would entertain a reprogramming request, a 
supplemental request, or a combination of the two to provide 
for any needs that may be identified in the course of this 
internal review.
    TOPOFF III.--The Committee commends the Office of the 
Coordinator for Counterterrorism for its performance in the Top 
Officials II [TOPOFF II] national domestic counterterrorism 
exercise series. The Department of State, working in 
partnership with the Department of Homeland Security, 
contributed to the design, development, conduct, and evaluation 
of this exercise. TOPOFF II was a two-year effort which 
included a series of national exercise activities and 
culminated in a full-scale, no-notice exercise in May of 2003, 
in Seattle, Washington, Chicago, Illinois, and in Vancouver, 
British Columbia, and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. This is the 
first exercise of its size conducted by the United States in 
cooperation with another country. The Committee urges the 
Secretary of State to consider inviting Mexico to participate 
in TOPOFF III. Within the funds made available for Worldwide 
Security Upgrades, $3,000,000 is for the Department's continued 
participation in the TOPOFF exercise series.
    Border Security.--The recommendation includes $736,000,000, 
the full amount requested, for the Department's border security 
program. The border security program, funded from Machine 
Readable Visa [MRV] fees paid by persons seeking non-immigrant 
visas to the United States, is a critical component of the 
Department's efforts to assist and protect United States 
citizens overseas and safeguard the nation's borders. 
Disruption of the border security program due to an MRV fee 
shortfall must be avoided at all costs. The recommendation 
therefore includes language providing for the automatic 
transfer of funding from the Diplomatic and Consular Programs 
account to the account that funds the Department's Border 
Security Program in the event of continued MRV fee shortfalls 
in fiscal year 2004.
    Security Enhancements.--At this time of heightened threat 
to American posts abroad, the benefits of the security 
enhancement funds the Committee has provided to the Department 
since the Dar Es Salaam and Nairobi bombings in 1998 are being 
realized. Continual security upgrades to existing properties 
are as important as the Department's security construction 
program. Accordingly, the Committee recommendation includes 
$26,600,000 above the request for perimeter security 
enhancements under Worldwide Security Upgrades.
    Office of Foreign Missions.--The Committee continues to 
believe that the Office of Foreign Missions [OFM] would be more 
appropriately aligned with other management functions within 
the Department, rather than with the Bureau of Diplomatic 
Security [DS]. The Committee therefore directs that OFM be 
moved out of DS and placed under the Deputy Secretary of State 
for Management and Resources [M].

                            PUBLIC DIPLOMACY

    The Committee acknowledges the critical role that public 
diplomacy plays both in addressing the root causes of terrorism 
and in U.S. foreign relations generally.
    Public Diplomacy Strategy.--In 2002, the Committee directed 
the Department to promulgate a comprehensive, sustained, and 
dynamic public diplomacy strategy. The Department has made 
three attempts to satisfy the Committee's requirements. The 
first strategy, transmitted in September, 2002, contained a 
mere checklist of actions taken by the Department in the area 
of public diplomacy in response to the September 11 attacks. 
The second strategy, transmitted in February, 2003, articulated 
the goals of the Department's public diplomacy program and 
organized its public diplomacy initiatives into themes. This 
document was the most useful public diplomacy planning tool 
produced by the Department to date, and the Committee credits 
the Special Coordinator for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs 
for his oversight of this project. The document, however, was 
not forward-looking. It did not contain a plan for how the 
Department's public diplomacy function should evolve to meet 
emerging priorities and needs. The third strategy, transmitted 
in June, 2003, is the first document to provide a solid 
foundation from which the Department may now build the 
comprehensive, dynamic, and sustained public diplomacy strategy 
the Committee has long envisioned.
    The Committee has identified at least five ways in which 
the Strategy should be refined by the Department before it is 
implemented. First and most importantly, the Strategy's 
objectives must be tied to budgetary resources. The refined 
Strategy should contain cost estimates for the programs it 
entails as well as a plan for achieving its overall objectives 
within a realistic budget ceiling. The refined Strategy should 
also contain recommendations to the Secretary of State and to 
the Committees on Appropriations on how public diplomacy 
funding can be more effectively allocated in order to meet the 
objectives laid out in the Strategy. In generating these 
recommendations, the Office of Strategic Planning for Public 
Diplomacy [OSP/PD] should consider whether the Department's 
current practice of allocating the bulk of its public diplomacy 
funds to the regional and functional bureaus is prudent, or 
whether public diplomacy funds should be managed centrally by 
the Undersecretary for Public Diplomacy.
    Second, mechanisms must be built into the Strategy that 
allow the Department the flexibility to shift public diplomacy 
programs and resources in response to changing world events and 
U.S. interests. These mechanisms could include: an 
organizational structure that permits the Department to quickly 
reorganize its public diplomacy assets; regular reviews to 
ensure that the Department's public diplomacy programs are 
consistently meeting their objectives; and modified budget 
practices that permit the Department to quickly reallocate 
public diplomacy resources.
    Third, the Strategy must provide more guidance on how the 
Department's public diplomacy components should be coordinating 
their efforts. As currently written, the Strategy only 
addresses the issue of coordination in the context of the 
integration of the former United States Information Agency 
[USIA]. The refined Strategy must clarify how the various 
public diplomacy components (the Bureau of Educational and 
Cultural Affairs, the regional bureaus, the Bureau of Public 
Affairs, and Office of International Information Programs) 
should coordinate their program planning and execution. It will 
be the responsibility of the OSP/PD to ensure that this 
coordination is occurring once the Strategy is implemented.
    Fourth, the Strategy must do more ``thinking outside the 
box''. The role of the OSP/PD must eventually be to devise 
unique and innovative ways of accomplishing the Department's 
public diplomacy objectives. Creative thinking will be crucial 
to the achievement of one objective in particular, that of 
boosting engagement with foreign publics. The Strategy 
identifies increased engagement with foreign publics as a 
priority, but lacks specific suggestions for how the Department 
can achieve this. Even if there were a proven method of 
reaching foreign publics, this method would not be successful 
in every country and region of the world. If the Department is 
going to surmount such challenges in pursuit of its public 
diplomacy objectives, creative and strategic thinking must be 
built into the Public Diplomacy Strategy.
    Fifth, the Strategy must incorporate the Broadcasting Board 
of Governors [BBG]. BBG brings considerable public diplomacy 
experience and assets to the table. The Strategy must define 
the relationship between the State Department and the BBG and 
should clarify and harmonize both agencies' missions as they 
relate to public diplomacy. Coordination with the BBG should be 
seamless and it is the responsibility of the Undersecretary for 
Public Diplomacy and OSP/PD to ensure this.
    The Department is directed to submit the revised Public 
Diplomacy Strategy to the Committees on Appropriations no later 
than March 1, 2004.
    The Committee commends the Department for including in the 
Strategy a plan to expand information outreach programs to 
convey to foreign publics the United States' commitment to 
helping the developing nations of the world. The Committee 
agrees with the Department of State that the United States must 
do a better job of educating foreign publics about the size and 
breadth of our international assistance and international 
volunteer/service programs. Although an improved global image 
is not the goal of these programs, it can and should be one of 
their many benefits. In the process of refining its Public 
Diplomacy Strategy, the Department should include in the 
Strategy a detailed plan for how the United States' 
considerable assistance to and volunteer service in developing 
countries can be utilized as an effective public diplomacy 
tool.
    Along these lines, the Committee vigorously supports the 
concept of Information Resource Centers [IRCs]. The purpose of 
the Department's IRCs is to expand the advocacy information 
available at embassies and to provide information to the local 
communities on various development issues--essentially to serve 
as the ``face of public diplomacy''. The Committee directs the 
Department to expand the number of IRCs from within available 
funding in the Diplomatic and Consular Programs account.
    The Committee supports the Department's recent decision to 
create an Office of Strategic Planning for Public Diplomacy 
[OSP/PD]. The recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the 
establishment and operation of this office. The OSP/PD shall be 
responsible for refining the Department's Public Diplomacy 
Strategy (the Strategy). Once the Strategy is complete, OSP/PD 
will be responsible for overseeing its implementation and 
monitoring its effectiveness. The OSP/PD will also be 
responsible for making annual recommendations to the Secretary 
of State and to the Committees on Appropriations on how the 
Strategy may be improved. The OSP/PD is directed to submit to 
the Committees on Appropriations quarterly reports on the 
further development, implementation, and effectiveness of the 
Strategy.
    Arab-Muslim Relations Coordinating Committee.--The 
recommendation includes $500,000 to establish the United 
States-Arab/Muslim Relations Coordinating Committee [ARCC], 
which shall constitute a subdivision of the OSP/PD. The purpose 
of ARCC shall be to coordinate and evaluate the Department's 
public diplomacy efforts as they relate to Arab/Muslim 
countries. The ARCC shall assist the OSP/PD in developing the 
Public Diplomacy Strategy to ensure that the Strategy 
effectively confronts the unique challenges faced by the United 
States in its relations with Arab/Muslim countries. The 
Committee directs ARCC to participate in the quarterly reports 
of the OSP/PD.
    Cultural Antiquities Task Force.--The recommendation 
includes $500,000 for the Cultural Antiquities Task Force (Task 
Force). The purpose of the Task Force shall be to conduct 
training for embassy staff to be sensitive to local and 
regional antiquities and forms of cultural expression, to 
survey press and police reports pertaining to the preservation 
or theft of antiquities or forms of cultural expression, and to 
provide effective reporting to chiefs of mission and bureau 
heads on the preservation of the antiquities and cultures of 
host nations. The Task Force should coordinate closely with the 
Department's Art Theft Program and the President's Cultural 
Property Advisory Committee.
    Looting of Iraqi National Antiquities.--The first 
undertaking of the Cultural Antiquities Task Force (Task Force) 
will be to: (1) coordinate with Federal law enforcement 
agencies and Interpol to prevent the further looting, damaging, 
and trafficking of Iraq's historically and culturally 
significant works; (2) to create a database containing the 
names of persons known to have contributed to the looting, 
damaging, or trafficking of any foreign country's historically 
or culturally significant works, including persons who 
knowingly sell or auction such works; (3) to assist various 
international organizations in their efforts to compile 
documentation on and create a database of works that were 
looted from Iraq's museums during the United States-led 
campaign to liberate Iraq; and (4) to help ensure U.S. 
cooperation on international efforts to account for and recover 
such works. The Secretary shall report to the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than April 15, 2004 on the Department's 
progress in implementing these directives and on the specific 
steps that should be taken to improve the U.S.' policies and 
procedures for protecting historically or culturally 
significant works in the future. The Committee directs that any 
person whose name appears in the database referenced in section 
(2) above be excluded from receiving a non-immigrant visa for 
entry into the United States. Further, the Committee directs 
that all names appearing in the database referenced in section 
(2) above also appear in the Department's Consular Lookout and 
Support System [CLASS] database and be designated as ineligible 
to receive a U.S. non-immigrant visa. Finally, the Committee 
directs the Department to continue to work to keep cultural 
heritage issues prominent in postwar reconstruction plans for 
Iraq and to assist in recovering historically and culturally 
significant objects for Iraq.
    Respecting Other Cultures.--The Ambassador's Fund for 
Cultural Preservation was initiated by the Committee in 2001. 
The purpose of this program is to provide direct grant support, 
through U.S. Ambassadors, to less developed countries to assist 
them in the preservation of forms of cultural expression. Forms 
of cultural expression may include historic sites and 
manuscripts, museum collections, and traditional forms of 
music, dance, and language. Under the program, U.S. Ambassadors 
serving in less developed countries submit competitive 
proposals for awards for one-time or recurring projects. Awards 
are based on the importance of the site, object, or form of 
expression, the country's need, and the potential of the award 
to make a meaningful contribution to the society of the 
country. By taking a leading role in efforts to preserve 
cultural heritage, the United States shows its respect for 
other cultures. As one Assistant Secretary of State said, ``The 
Ambassador's Fund demonstrates in measurable ways the U.S.' 
commitment to understanding and preserving the heritage of 
others''. The Committee considers the Ambassador's Fund for 
Cultural Preservation a vital component of U.S. public 
diplomacy. The Committee recommendation therefore includes 
$1,750,000 for this Fund, a significant increase over last 
year. Nowhere is there a greater need to achieve understanding 
than in the Middle East. Therefore, within amounts available 
for the Ambassador's Fund for Cultural Preservation, at least 
$700,000 is for projects in the Middle East.

                             GLOBAL ISSUES

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome [SARS].--The Committee 
commends the Office of International Health Affairs [IHA] for 
the excellent work it is doing in response to the SARS 
epidemic. The mission of IHA is to improve global health and, 
in so doing, increase security, promote economic growth, and 
strengthen civil society. The United States is, by necessity, a 
leader in global health affairs. The Committee commends the 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Science for 
recognizing the importance of communication and collaboration 
among global health leaders and heads of state in the area of 
emerging infectious diseases. The Department of State is 
uniquely qualified to facilitate this international 
collaboration. Accordingly, the recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 for IHA. This funding increase will allow IHA to 
hire at least 3 additional full time equivalents. The Committee 
recognizes that every U.S. diplomat has the opportunity to 
improve the public health of their host country through 
diplomacy, public outreach and awareness activities, and 
information gathering. Accordingly, the Committee directs the 
Director General of the State Department to incorporate public 
health training into the curriculum at the Foreign Service 
Institute.
    International Trade.--Every year, the State Department 
attempts to pursue international trade activities that fall 
under the jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce's 
International Trade Administration, and in particular under the 
jurisdiction of the United States and Foreign Commercial 
Service. The State Department's efforts to expand its 
jurisdiction in this area counters the intent of the Committee, 
which notes the expansive and intractable foreign policy issues 
already confronting the Department. As in prior years, no 
funding is recommended for these activities.
    International Child Abductions.--The Committee remains 
concerned about the adequacy of the Department's efforts to 
counter the serious problem of international child abductions. 
The Committee directs that, henceforward, the Department 
require that children over the age of 1 year old be present for 
the adjudication of a United States passport. The Office of 
Inspector General has determined that this small change in 
policy could help prevent many cases of international child 
abductions.
    In addition, the recommendation includes $2,000,000 for a 
grant to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children 
to develop best practice models to combat child pornography, to 
create an international database to track victims of 
international child pornography, and to promote information-
sharing worldwide.

                                 OTHER

    No funding is recommended for the Deputy Assistant 
Secretary in charge of Brazilian/Southern Cone Affairs or for 
the Office of Brazilian/Southern Cone Affairs.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $182,119,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     157,000,000
House allowance.........................................     142,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     207,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $207,000,000. 
The recommendation is $50,000,000 above the budget request. The 
Information Resource Management [IRM] Central Fund, comprised 
of the Capital Investment Fund [CIF] and expedited passport 
fees, allows the Department of State to develop secure and 
integrated Information Technology [IT] and communications 
systems and to maintain its global IT and communications 
infrastructures. The CIF, comprised of direct appropriations, 
is reserved for new IT investments.
    The Committee recommendations, by program area, are 
displayed in the following table:

                            IRM CENTRAL FUND
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
State Messaging and Archive Retrieval Toolset [SMART].            38,000
Modernization of Worldwide IT Infrastructure:
    Worldwide OpenNet Infrastructure..................            59,855
    Worldwide Classnet Infrastructure.................            24,304
    Bandwidth.........................................            50,000
Infrastructure Initiatives:
    Secure Voice Program..............................             1,057
    Post High Frequency Communications................               720
    Public Key Infrastructure.........................             7,345
    Other IT Infrastructure...........................            20,369
    Tools for 21st Century Diplomacy..................             7,000
    Centrally Managed Infrastructure..................            24,917
        Wide Area Network [WAN]/Thin Client Prototype.            20,000
Applications and Software Development:
    Integrated Logistics Management System [ILMS].....            23,951
    Global Financial Management System [GFMS].........             5,548
    Integrated Personnel Management System [IPMS].....            11,900
    Other Applications................................            21,686
Project Management and Training.......................             4,348
                                                       -----------------
      Total, IRM Central Fund.........................           321,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Of the funds made available for the IRM Central Fund in 
fiscal year 2004, $207,000,000 is from direct appropriations 
and $114,000,000 is from expedited passport fees. If fee 
collections for fiscal year 2004 do not meet the projected 
total of $114,000,000, the Committee directs the Department to 
transfer the balance of funds from the Diplomatic and Consular 
Programs account to ensure that all of the Department's IT 
needs are met.
    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Momentum.--Providing the Department of State with state of 
the art communications, data management, and knowledge 
management systems has been one of the Committee's top 
priorities. As a result, the Department's global IT assets are 
in the best shape they have ever been in. The OpenNet Plus 
initiative, which provided secure Internet access to Department 
desktops worldwide, was completed in May 2003. The Classified 
Connectivity Program [CCP], which replaced the Department's 
obsolete classified infrastructure, is scheduled for completion 
in December 2003. The Committee commends the Chief Information 
Officer [CIO] of the Department and the Bureau of Information 
Resource Management for their success on these two global 
initiatives.
    The next major global information technology [IT] 
initiative that the State Department will undertake is the 
State Messaging and Archive Retrieval Toolset [SMART]. SMART 
will provide Department personnel sophisticated, integrated 
desktop tools like modern messaging (including cabling), 
archiving, and information-sharing. It will replace the 
Department's ancient cabling system and integrate both the 
OpenNet e-mail system and the classified CCP network. The 
Committee cautions the Department not to lose momentum in its 
efforts to modernize all corners of the Department's IT 
infrastructure, even while facing possible funding shortfalls 
in other priority areas. The recommendation includes 
$38,000,000 for the SMART program, instead of the requested 
$15,000,000. The Committee directs the Department to utilize 
these additional funds to expedite the deployment of the SMART 
system. No funds from this account shall be used to pay costs 
associated with providing access to SMART or OpenNet Plus to 
any other U.S. foreign affairs agency.
    Maintaining the Department's Global IT Infrastructure.--The 
Committee has invested hundreds of millions of dollars to 
overhaul the State Department's IT infrastructure. It is the 
Department's responsibility to make sure that these investments 
are not lost. The Committee is aware of two steps the 
Department has taken to ensure its IT infrastructure does not 
fall back into disrepair. First, the Department has created the 
Capital Planning and Investment Control Process. The purpose of 
this process is to determine how the Department can best 
utilize available resources to achieve its IT goals. The 
Department is directed to provide quarterly reports to the 
Committees on Appropriations on all planning and spending 
decisions made as a result of this effort. Second, the fiscal 
year 2004 budget request includes new ``worldwide 
infrastructure'' accounts intended to protect funding for 
hardware and software refresh and upgrades. In the past, the 
regional bureaus have been responsible for refreshing and 
upgrading their own hardware and software. This was one of the 
main reasons why the Department's IT infrastructure 
deteriorated so badly, as regional bureaus intrinsically place 
a higher priority on programs than on infrastructure.
    Tools for 21st Century Diplomacy.--Modern technology has 
fundamentally changed the way the United States conducts 
diplomacy. The Department's newly-overhauled information 
technology infrastructure is a critical tool for today's 
diplomat. The Department is now able to use technologies like 
e-mail, the Internet, instant messaging, teleconferencing, and 
satellite communications to execute its core missions. The 
Committee urges the Department to consider how it can apply 
other new technologies to the day-to-day tasks of conducting 
U.S. diplomacy. To this end, the recommendation includes 
$7,000,000 for the State Department to expand the use of 
handheld computer devices. There are a host of possible uses 
for handheld digital technology in the conduct of U.S. 
diplomacy. Export control officers could use this technology in 
conducting end-use checks. Consular officers could use it to 
access real-time information while assisting American citizens. 
Diplomats in the field could use voice-to-voice phrase 
translations to help them converse in foreign languages and 
dialects. The technology could serve as a mobile or at-home 
warning system for embassy personnel in emergencies. Digital 
photographs could be transmitted and used for purposes of 
identification. Handheld devices containing blueprints of an 
embassy could be used by the Foreign Emergency Support Teams 
[FESTs] in rescue operations. Devices equipped with diagnostic 
capabilities could be used by embassy doctors. Finally, 
handheld digital technology has the potential to change the way 
temporary duty assignment [TDY] personnel are deployed around 
the world by removing the need for ``spare'' computer terminals 
and extraneous workspace. The Committee directs the Department 
to report on the use of these funds no later than 60 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act.
    Centralized Management of Information.--In a time of 
increased threat to our overseas posts, the ability to store 
and manage information (particularly classified information) 
domestically can greatly enhance the security of that 
information. In fiscal year 2003, the Committee provided 
funding for a pilot program for a technology that will allow 
the Department to minimize the amount of electronic classified 
information stored at post and permit computer terminals to be 
``sanitized'' of such information when not in use. The 
recommendation for fiscal year 2004 includes $20,000,000 for 
the Department to further develop the virtual Wide Area Network 
[WAN] (also referred to as the ``Thin Client'') architecture 
and prototype. This project should be developed in tandem with 
and integrated into the State Messaging and Archive Retrieval 
Toolset [SMART] initiative. The Committee expects the Bureau of 
Information Resource Management to continue to collaborate 
closely with the Bureau of Diplomatic Security and with other 
relevant agencies on this project. This will ensure that any 
technologies deployed by the Department meet all of the 
security requirements set forth by DS and by other relevant 
agencies.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $29,074,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      31,703,000
House allowance.........................................      29,777,000
Committee recommendation................................      31,703,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $31,703,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    Post Inspection Program.--For the past 2 years, the 
Committee has denied the Department's requests to lift the 
waiver of legislation mandating a 5-year post inspection cycle. 
The Committee's reasoning was that the policy of inspecting 
every post every 5 years, if reinstated, would lead to a 
decrease in the quantity and quality of the reports on posts of 
high importance to U.S. national interests. The Committee 
invited the OIG to submit a report to the Committee on how OIG 
might re-engineer its inspection process in order to meet a 5 
year inspection cycle within existing resources. The report, 
received by the Committee in July, 2003, concluded that the 
OIG's proposed changes to its inspection program are not likely 
to reduce costs. The report's conclusions suggest, and the 
Committee agrees, that in order to remain within reasonable 
funding levels, the OIG must choose between quantity and 
quality. The Committee chooses quality. The waiver shall remain 
in place, and the OIG is directed to put diplomatic posts of 
high importance on an inspection cycle of 5 years or less, and 
to conduct inspections of diplomatic posts of low importance on 
an ad-hoc, problem-specific basis.
    Inspections Procedures.--The Committee supports the OIG's 
efforts to improve its inspections procedures, and is 
particularly interested in the efficiencies that this process 
might identify. The Committee is aware that, during this 
process, the area of security and intelligence inspections will 
receive special scrutiny. The Committee supports the evolution 
of the security inspection process from one that merely 
evaluates whether posts have met a series of criteria relating 
to physical security to one that considers an embassy's 
security profile in its totality. The Committee expects that 
any new security inspection process that results from this 
review will integrate risk and threat assessments. To this end, 
the recommendation includes language providing that such sums 
as necessary may be transferred from Worldwide Security 
Upgrades account under Diplomatic and Consular Programs to the 
OIG for the purpose of conducting risk and threat assessments 
as part of the Inspector General's regular responsibilities for 
evaluating the security of facilities and information at 
overseas posts. Of the amounts transferred for this purpose, 
priority should be given to information technology inspections.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $243,712,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     345,346,000
House allowance.........................................     345,346,000
Committee recommendation................................     255,292,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $255,292,000. 
The recommendation is $90,054,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation does not include the additional $100,040,000 
requested by the Department for exchanges traditionally funded 
in other appropriations bills.
    This account allows the Department of State to support the 
travel of approximately 8,000 Americans abroad and 17,000 
foreign visitors to the United States each year for the 
purposes of studying, teaching, conducting research, and 
professional development. The exchange of persons promotes 
friendly, sympathetic, and peaceful relations between the 
United States and other countries by fostering mutual 
understanding and countering anti-American sentiment. 
Educational and cultural exchanges are a core component of the 
State Department's public diplomacy program. Accordingly, the 
majority of the educational exchanges traditionally funded in 
this appropriations bill were funded above the requested level.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed, by program, in 
the following table:

                   EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academic Exchanges:
    Fulbright Program................................           132,870
        Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program........            [6,180]
        Students, Scholars, and Teachers.............          [126,690]
    Global Academic Exchanges........................             6,373
        Educational Advising and Student Services....            [2,855]
        English Language Programs....................            [3,518]
    Special Academic Exchanges.......................             7,208
        American Overseas Research Centers...........            [3,708]
        Disability Exchange Clearinghouse............              [500]
        Dante B. Fascell North-South Center..........            [2,000]
        East Timor Exchanges.........................              [500]
        South Pacific Exchanges......................              [500]
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, Academic Exchanges...............           146,451
                                                      ==================
Professional and Cultural Exchanges:
    Citizen Exchange Program.........................            17,510
    International Visitor Program....................            51,876
    Special Professional and Cultural Exchanges......             9,790
        Africa Workforce Development.................              [400]
        Arctic Winter Games..........................              [350]
        Atlantic Corridor............................              [500]
        George Mitchell Scholarships Program.........              [500]
        Institute for Representative Government......              [500]
        Irish Institute..............................              [750]
        Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program............            [2,290]
        Ngwang Choephel Fellows (Tibet)..............              [500]
        Northern Forum...............................              [500]
        PSC U.S.-Pakistan Educator Development                     [400]
         Program.....................................
        Seed Programs................................              [500]
        Special Olympics.............................            [2,000]
        Winter Cities Conference.....................              [600]
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, Professional and Cultural                    79,176
           Exchanges.................................
                                                      ==================
Exchanges Support:
    Employee Compensation and Benefits...............            25,410
    Program Direction and Administration.............             4,255
                                                      ------------------
      Subtotal, Exchanges Support....................            29,665
                                                      ==================
      Total, Educational and Cultural Exchanges......           255,292
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Fulbright Program.--The Committee commends the Department 
for the swift reestablishment of the Fulbright Program with 
Afghanistan, after a nearly 24-year hiatus. The reactivation of 
the program signifies the United States' commitment to 
rebuilding the once vibrant bilateral relations in education 
and culture, and acknowledges Afghanistan's resurgence as a 
full partner in academic exchange. The Committee understands 
that the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Exchange has 
designed a 1-year, non-degree Fulbright program in the United 
States for graduating university seniors and for academically 
qualified women who were deprived of the opportunity for formal 
study during the Taliban era. The Committee encourages the 
Department to reprogram additional funds for this program 
during fiscal year 2004. The Committee further encourages the 
Department to stand up a Fulbright Program in Iraq as soon as 
practicable.
    Seed Programs.--The Committee has resumed a modest program 
begun in fiscal year 2000 to provide one-time funding to 
international exchange start-ups. The recommendation includes 
$100,000 for each of the following programs: (1) the US/Asia 
Network, (2) Bemidji State University Central Asian Institute, 
(3) the Council of International Programs USA's Community 
Leadership Program, (4) Mobility International USA 
Clearinghouse for a program with Muslim countries, and (5) 
International Education Corps.
    Partnerships for Learning.--The Committee vigorously 
supports exchanges that reach beyond ``elites'' to target 
youth, the underprivileged, members of the international media, 
and emerging leaders, as in the Partnerships for Learning [P4L] 
program. The P4L program is an overarching theme for exchanges 
under which resources are shifted from lower priority regions 
to higher priority ones. Presently, the focus of the P4L 
program is engagement with the Muslim world. Within the funding 
made available for Educational and Cultural Exchanges, 
$12,000,000 will fall within the auspices of the P4L program. 
The Committee understands that, as part of the P4L program, the 
Department intends to establish biannual seminars for foreign 
journalists to study the context of policy development in the 
United States.
    Other.--Of the funds made available to the Council of 
American Overseas Research Centers, $33,000 is for a grant for 
research to develop a diamond fingerprinting technology that 
will facilitate the monitoring of the international trade in 
conflict diamonds.

                       REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $6,443,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       9,000,000
House allowance.........................................       9,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,643,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,643,000. 
The recommendation is $2,357,000 below the budget request.
    Representation allowances provide partial reimbursement to 
Foreign Service officers for expenditures incurred in their 
official capacities abroad in establishing and maintaining 
relations with officials of foreign governments and appropriate 
members of local communities.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $10,929,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      10,000,000
House allowance.........................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    This account reimburses local governments and communities 
for the extraordinary costs incurred in providing protection 
for international organizations, foreign missions and 
officials, and foreign dignitaries under certain circumstances.
    The Committee directs that local jurisdictions incurring 
such costs submit a certified billing for such costs in 
accordance with program regulations. The Committee also 
recommends that in those instances where a local jurisdiction 
will realize a financial benefit from a visit from a foreign 
dignitary that such circumstances should be taken into account 
by the Department in assessing the need for reimbursement under 
this program. The Committee expects the Department to treat 
such submissions diligently and provide reimbursement to local 
jurisdictions on a timely basis if claims are fully justified.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

Appropriations, 2003....................................  $1,255,288,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................     149,500,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   1,514,400,000
House allowance.........................................   1,394,335,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,416,592,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,416,592,000. The recommendation is $97,808,000 below the 
budget request. The recommendation represents a 12.8 percent 
increase over fiscal year 2003. The recommendation assumes 
$165,696,000 in proceeds from the sale of real property, 
bringing the total amount available for this account to 
$1,582,288,000.
    This account allows the Department of State to manage the 
United States Government's real property assets overseas in 
order to provide United States diplomatic and consular missions 
with secure, safe, and functional facilities. These facilities 
house all United States Government employees overseas, not just 
State Department personnel. The Department manages over 15,000 
residential, office, and functional properties at 260 
diplomatic posts, which are worth an estimated $12,500,000,000.
    The Committee recommendations, by project or program, are 
displayed in the following table:

             EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE
                         [Dollars in thousands]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                       Building size     recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Worldwide Security Upgrades:
    Capital Projects...............  ................           747,800
        Accra, Ghana...............  small                      [55,000]
        Algiers, Algeria...........  small                      [60,000]
        Beirut, Lebanon............  small                      [38,000]
        Belgrade, Serbia and         small                      [70,000]
         Montenegro.
        Berlin, Germany............  large                     [128,000]
        Lome, Togo.................  small                      [58,500]
        Karachi, Pakistan..........  medium                     [89,700]
        Panama City, Panama........  large                     [118,000]
        Rangoon, Burma.............  medium                     [76,500]
        Surabaya, Indonesia........  small                      [54,100]
    Other Site Acquisitions and      ................            52,000
     Planning.
    Compound Security..............  ................           100,000
    Security of U.S.-Affiliated      ................            40,000
     Facilities.
    Consular Workspace Improvement   ................            12,500
     Initiative.
    Main State/Domestic Renovations  ................            25,000
                                    ------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Worldwide Security   ................           977,300
       Upgrades.
                                    ====================================
Operations:
    Planning and Development.......  ................             8,865
    Real Estate and Property         ................             6,150
     Management.
    Project Execution..............  ................            91,430
        Construction and             ................           [26,243]
         Commissioning.
        Design and Engineering.....  ................           [16,387]
        Energy Conservation........  ................            [4,000]
        Seismic Program............  ................            [1,200]
        Security Management........  ................           [31,650]
        Interiors and Furnishings..  ................           [11,950]
    Operations and Maintenance.....  ................           351,500
        Leaseholds.................  ................          [100,000]
        Buyout of Uneconomic Leases/ ................           [55,000]
         Opportunity Purchases.
        Maintenance and Repair of    ................           [73,500]
         Buildings.
        Art in Embassies Program...  ................            [1,500]
        Facilities Rehabilitation    ................           [41,000]
         and Support System
         Replacement.
        Facility Management........  ................           [60,000]
        Fire Protection............  ................            [8,700]
        Safety, Health, and          ................            [3,700]
         Environmental Management.
        Post Communications........  ................            [8,100]
    Information Management and       ................            18,025
     Support.
                                    ------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operations.........  ................           475,970
                                    ====================================
Headquarters: Salaries and Training  ................             7,500
                                    ------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Headquarters.......  ................             7,500
                                    ====================================
      Total, Embassy Security        ................         1,460,770
       Construction and Maintenance.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Of the funding made available for capital projects, 
$44,178,000 is from unobligated balances in the asset 
management account. Of the funding made available for 
facilities rehabilitation, $300,000 is for the renovation of 
the cafeteria kitchen at U.S. Embassy Mexico. The Committee 
notes that this is less than half the cost of kitchen 
renovations undertaken in Department-provided housing for the 
U.S. Mission to the United Nations. Some of the Committee 
recommendations displayed in the table above are described in 
more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Budgeting Practices.--The Committee commends the Bureau of 
Overseas Buildings Operations for its efforts to fence funding 
for security projects by limiting the use of worldwide security 
upgrades funding only for capital projects that are included in 
the Long-Range Overseas Building Plan [LROBP]. However, in the 
post-September 11 world, any construction project that the 
United States undertakes overseas, no matter what the country, 
is related to security in some form or fashion. The distinction 
between security capital projects and non-security construction 
is, consequently, an empty one. In fiscal year 2003, the 
Department requested funding for the new office building [NOB] 
in Beijing, China under the non-security construction account. 
In fiscal year 2004, the Department requesting funding for an 
NOB in Berlin, Germany under the non-security construction 
account. Requesting these projects under the non-security 
construction account implies that they are not security-driven. 
The recommendation eliminates the distinction between the two 
accounts and directs that, henceforward, projects receiving 
worldwide security upgrades funding not be limited to projects 
included in the LROBP.
    Asset Management Funds.--The asset management account was 
established to segregate the proceeds of sale of real property 
from direct appropriations and reimbursements to the Embassy 
Security, Construction, and Maintenance account. Asset 
management funds are used exclusively for the purchase of 
properties or the construction of facilities overseas. The 
Committee directs the Department to provide the same level of 
detail in its budget request for projects requested under the 
assets management account as those under the capital projects 
account. As in past years, no new funding is recommended for 
this account.
    The Committee recommendations for funds available within 
the asset management account are displayed in the following 
table:

                            ASSET MANAGEMENT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Beijing, China New Compound Site......................            16,096
Kingston, Jamaica Office Building and Housing.........            10,822
Luanda, Angola New Embassy Complex....................            51,000
New Delhi, India Housing Expansion....................             1,000
New Delhi, India Power Plant Upgrade and Expansion....             2,600
Sao Paulo, Brazil Project Cost Difference and GSO                 15,000
 Warehouse............................................
Taipei, Taiwan New Office Compound....................            25,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Asset Management Funding.................           121,518
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Soft Targets.--In fiscal year 2003, the Committee directed 
the Department of State to formulate a strategy for addressing 
threats to overseas facilities that are frequented by Americans 
or symbolic of the United States, but that are not official 
U.S. facilities. The Committee that year provided $15,000,000 
for the Department to begin addressing the security 
vulnerabilities of these so-called ``soft targets''. The 
recommendation for this initiative for fiscal year 2004 is 
$40,000,000.
    The May 2003, suicide attacks against Western housing 
compounds in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia highlight the growing problem 
of soft targets. The attacks, which killed 10 Americans, were 
directed not at the U.S. Embassy, but at the employees and 
their families of a U.S.-based company. The attacks demonstrate 
that an inverse relationship exists between the security of our 
embassies and the security of non-official facilities: as our 
embassies become more heavily fortified, non-official U.S.-
affiliated facilities overseas become more attractive targets 
to terrorists. The Riyadh attacks underscore the urgent need 
for the Department to complete its strategy for addressing the 
problem of soft targets. The Committee directs that the 
strategy examine the problem of threats to properties owned or 
controlled by private and commercial U.S. entities. The 
strategy should include guidelines for how posts will interface 
and coordinate with representatives of U.S. businesses 
operating in high-threat areas to ensure that the Department is 
providing them as much support as is necessary and feasible.
    The Committee continues to be extremely concerned about the 
safety of American schools abroad, including international 
schools attended by American children. Accordingly, within the 
funding made available to address the security vulnerabilities 
of soft targets, $20,000,000 is for security enhancements at 
overseas schools. These funds shall be made available, on the 
basis of need, to overseas schools that do not receive 
financial assistance from the U.S. Department of State, as well 
as those that do receive such financial assistance. Funds shall 
be used to provide security enhancements desired by the 
schools, including contract security guards and rapid response 
teams.
    The Department is directed to consult with the Committee 
prior to the release of any of the funds provided for purposes 
described in this section, in accordance with section 605 of 
this Act.
    Consular Workspace Improvement Initiative.--The 
Department's consular mission is critical to our national 
security. Consular workspace must be adequately sized and 
outfitted in order to ensure that the processing of visas and 
visa applicants takes place in an organized and efficient 
manner. To ensure this, and to improve the overall working 
environment for Consular Affairs Officers, the Committee in 
fiscal year 2003 created the Consular Workspace Improvement 
Initiative. The quality of consular workspace and the 
efficiency and accuracy of consular work are directly linked. 
There is an immedite and growing need for additional consular 
windows and interview space, enlarged reception and waiting 
areas, office space, and document storage space, particularly 
in light of the many new requirements imposed on Consular 
Affairs in the wake of September 11, 2001. The Department 
should once again identify posts for consular workspace 
rehabilitation where errors in visa issuance present the 
greatest threat to our national security, as determined by the 
Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations [OBO] in consultation 
with the Bureau of Consular Affairs. Within funding made 
available under Worldwide Security Upgrades, $12,500,000 is for 
this initiative.
    Buyout of Uneconomic Leases.--High lease costs deplete 
Department resources. By selectively acquiring properties in 
cities with volatile rental markets, the Department can 
generate significant out-year savings. The Committee 
recommendation therefore provides $55,000,000 for opportunity 
purchases and directs OBO to aggressively pursue opportunities 
to purchase properties rather than lease, whenever practicable.

                         CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.--In 2002, the Department decided to 
consolidate Rio de Janeiro operations into leased facilities, 
rather than construct a new embassy building. This decision has 
left the Department holding several properties in Rio de 
Janeiro that it cannot sell due to a 1991 Brazilian law that 
requires individuals and businesses to be current on their 
social security payments to the Government of Brazil before 
they can legally transfer property title. In 1996, the State 
Department discontinued the payment of employer contributions 
into the Brazilian Social Security System [INSS] for Foreign 
Service National [FSN] employees because the Department deemed 
INSS to be fiscally unsound. The Department set up its own 
pension system for FSN's. As a result, the United States now 
``owes'' approximately $10,000,000 in arrears to the Government 
of Brazil. The Committee commends the Department for its 
principled stance on this matter. The Committee directs the 
Department not pay the INSS arrears, either through a transfer 
of funds or properties, and to lease all Department-owned 
properties in Rio de Janeiro. Further, the Committee directs 
the Department to close the United States Consulate General in 
Rio de Janeiro. The recommendation includes, out of asset 
management funds, $11,000,000 for the funding shortfall 
associated with the Sao Paulo, Brazil construction project that 
has occurred as a result of the Brazilian Government's refusal 
to allow the Department to sell the Rio de Janeiro properties 
and $4,000,000 for the cost of constructing a General Services 
Operations [GSO] warehouse and embassy cafeteria, which were 
inadvertently omitted from the original building plan for Sao 
Paulo.
    Beirut, Lebanon.--Since it was bombed over 20 years ago, 
United States Embassy Beirut has had to operate under extremely 
difficult conditions. The buildings on the compound are unsafe, 
rusting, and badly deteriorated. The embassy is overcrowded, 
with people even working in a windowless basement next to old 
mechanical equipment. Embassy operations are also scattered 
among several trailers, themselves badly deteriorated, that 
were set up on the compound 17 years ago. Since Lebanon's civil 
war ended in 1976, an improved security environment has led to 
a dramatic expansion of embassy operations and staffing to meet 
U.S. policy objectives. Conditions conducive to full operations 
will likely prevail over the next decade and beyond. The 
Committee recognizes an urgent need to replace the current ad 
hoc embassy buildings with a modern chancery building. The 
Committee does not concur with the Department's decision to 
move the embassy to a new location outside the city. The 
recommendation includes $38,000,000 to demolish the unfinished 
abandoned facility, to erect temporary facilities and for costs 
associated with site preparation and initial security.
    Kingston, Jamaica.--The Committee supports the Department's 
decision to consolidate the operations of the United States 
Embassy in Kingston, Jamaica which are currently divided among 
three buildings in the city. The Department intended to 
renovate the recently-purchased, 10-story Crown Plaza Hotel to 
provide space for a chancery and staff housing. The Committee 
provided $71,800,000 for this project in fiscal year 2003. The 
Committee no longer believes that this plan is sound, and 
directs the Department to construct a new medium office 
building on an 8-acre property already owned by the Department. 
The Committee further directs that the Crown Plaza Hotel be 
utilized entirely for staff housing. The recommendation 
includes an additional $10,822,000 out of asset management 
funds for the cost difference of this revised plan, bringing 
the total amount available for Kingston to $82,622,000.
    Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro.--The Committee is aware of 
the pressing need to construct a new embassy compound in 
Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro. During the 78 days of the 
NATO-led intervention in Yugoslavia (now Serbia and 
Montenegro), the United States embassy was badly vandalized and 
suffered extensive damage when water pipes burst. The 
Department has requested funding to construct a large office 
building (11,300 square meters or greater) on a new site in 
downtown Belgrade. The Office of Overseas Building Operations 
Long Range Overseas Building Plan [LROBP], issued in July, 
2002, lists the future United States embassy in Belgrade as a 
medium building (between 7,400 and 11,300 square meters). An 
April, 2003, General Accounting Office [GAO] report suggests 
that the Department did not conduct a comprehensive assessment 
of the number and types of State Department personnel this new 
building should accommodate. In light of the unexplained change 
in the size of this project from the LROBP to the fiscal year 
2004 request, the Committee agrees with the GAO. The 
recommendation therefore includes $70,000,000 for the 
Department to construct a small office building, (4,300 square 
meters or less) in Belgrade.
    Berlin, Germany.--The recommendation includes $128,000,000 
within the security construction account for costs associated 
with the design and construction of a new chancery on the 
historic Pariser Platz in Berlin, Germany. The new office 
building [NOB] will house all of the operations of United 
States Embassy Berlin, Germany, with the exception of the 
embassy's warehouse and General Services [GSO] functions. The 
Committee directs the Department to construct a large office 
building, rather than the ``extra-large'', 23,900 square meter 
building proposed by the Department. The Committee directs that 
all positions not required to be in Berlin be relocated to the 
United States Consulate General in Frankfurt, Germany. With the 
Committee's support, the Department has purchased and renovated 
additional, spacious facilities in Frankfurt to serve as a 
``hub'' for the Department's regional operations. The 
Department itself proposed to the Committee the option of 
relocating some personnel from Berlin to Frankfurt because of 
the expected size constraints of the NOB in Berlin.
    The Committee understands that, in directing the Department 
to ``change course midstream'' and construct a smaller-sized 
office building, approximately $12,000,000 in work on the 
building design will be lost. The Committee is willing to 
accept this loss, and points out that approximately $62,000,000 
will be saved as a result of this decision to downsize. The 
Committee further points out that the Department directed the 
Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations to move forward with 
the Berlin project without the required waiver in place and 
without consulting the Committees on Appropriations on this 
politically sensitive decision.
    No funds shall be obligated for the design or construction 
of a new chancery in Berlin until both of the necessary 
security waivers are signed and transmitted to the Committees 
on Appropriations.
    Karachi, Pakistan.--The recommendation includes $89,700,000 
for the Department to construct a new Consulate General 
building in Karachi, Pakistan. The design/construction phase of 
this project was not scheduled to begin until fiscal year 2005. 
However, the Committee directs that it begin in fiscal year 
2004. The building presently occupied by Consulate General 
Karachi was built in 1960. Employees of the Consulate General 
have come under attack on four separate occasions during the 
last decade. On two such occasions, the Consulate building 
itself was attacked. The most recent attack occurred in 
February, 2003, when a gunman opened fire on the police 
assigned to provide perimeter security for the Consulate. In 
May, 2003, United States and Pakistani authorities broke up the 
plan of 6 suspected Al Qaeda members to fly an explosives-
packed aircraft into Consulate General Karachi. The Committee 
deems the Consulate to be in urgent need of reconstruction. The 
Committee has provided funds for this project instead of the 
three United States Agency for International Development 
construction projects requested by the Department in fiscal 
year 2004. The Committee will not assume responsibility for 
these projects, which fall rightfully under the jurisdiction of 
another appropriations subcommittee.
    Reprogrammings.--The Department is directed, under the 
terms and conditions that follow, to submit for the Committee's 
review and approval within 60 days of enactment of this Act 
only those projects or subaccounts funded under this account, 
whether from direct appropriations or proceeds of sales, that 
deviate from the above chart and accompanying direction. Any 
deviation shall include project-level detail and shall be 
treated as a reprogramming under section 605 of this Act in the 
case of any addition greater than $500,000, a deletion, a 
project cost overrun exceeding 25 percent, or a project 
schedule delay exceeding 6 months. Reprogramming requirements 
also extend to the ``rebaselining'' of a given project's cost 
estimate, schedule, or scope of work. By focusing the financial 
plan only on deviations, the Committee expects the Bureau of 
overseas buildings operations to move projects toward contract 
obligation promptly after funds are appropriated. Immediate 
access to funds for projects or activities that are unchanged 
from the above chart will allow the Department to negotiate 
contracts and obligate funds more efficiently over the course 
of the fiscal year.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $6,458,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      50,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       1,000,000
House allowance.........................................       1,000,000
Committee recommendation................................           1,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,000. The 
recommendation is $999,000 below the budget request. A total of 
$50,000,000 was appropriated for this account in the fiscal 
year 2003 supplemental (Public Law 108-11). The Committee notes 
that approximately $22,665,000 in prior year unobligated 
balances will be available for this account in fiscal year 
2004.
    This account provides resources for the Department of State 
to meet emergency requirements while conducting foreign 
affairs. The Committee recommendation provides funds for: (1) 
travel and subsistence expenses for relocation of Americans, 
U.S. Government employees, and their families from troubled 
areas to the United States and/or safe-haven posts; (2) 
allowances granted to State Department employees and their 
dependents evacuated to the United States for the convenience 
of the Government; (3) payment of rewards for information 
concerning terrorists and war criminals; and (4) representation 
expenses for senior Administration officials.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $1,211,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       1,219,000
House allowance.........................................       1,219,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,219,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,219,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    This account provides emergency loans to assist destitute 
Americans abroad who have no other source of funds to return to 
the United States. In the past, less than 20 percent of 
repatriation loans have ever been repaid. The Committee 
strongly endorses efforts by the Bureau of Consular Affairs to 
limit assistance only to victims of unforeseen circumstances or 
travelers whose mental instability presents a risk to 
themselves or others.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $18,330,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      19,773,000
House allowance.........................................      18,782,000
Committee recommendation................................      19,893,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $19,893,000. 
The recommendation is $120,000 above the budget request.
    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the American Institute in Taiwan 
[AIT]. The Institute administers programs in the areas of 
economic and commercial services, cultural affairs, travel 
services, and logistics. The Department of State contracts with 
the AIT to carry out these activities.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $138,200,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     134,979,000
House allowance.........................................     134,979,000
Committee recommendation................................     134,979,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $134,979,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    This appropriation is authorized by the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980 which provides for an appropriation to the fund in 30 
equal annual installments of the amount required for the 
unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries, or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed.

              International Organizations and Conferences


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $860,371,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................   1,010,463,000
House allowance.........................................   1,010,463,000
Committee recommendation................................     921,888,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $921,888,000. 
The recommendation is $88,575,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation assumes $11,681,000 in U.N. buydown and 
$7,000,000 in carryover from the fiscal year 2002 supplemental 
(Public Law 107-206), bringing the total amount available for 
this account to $940,569,000.
    This account funds payment of the obligations of United 
States membership in international organizations as authorized 
by treaties or specific acts of Congress.
    The Committee recommendations, by organization, are 
displayed in the following table:

              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
United Nations and Affiliated Agencies:
    Food and Agriculture Organization [FAO]...........            72,457
    International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA].........            54,282
    International Civil Aviation Organization [ICAO]..            12,464
    International Labor Organization [ILO]............            50,425
    International Maritime Organization [IMO].........             1,189
    International Telecommunication Union [ITU].......             6,558
    United Nations--Regular Budget....................           328,921
    United Nations--War Crimes Tribunals..............            27,213
    United Nations--War Crimes Commissions............             2,000
    Universal Postal Union [UPU]......................             1,316
    World Health Organization [WHO]...................            93,615
    World Intellectual Property Organization [WIPO]...               880
    World Meteorological Organization [WMO]...........             8,318
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, U.N. and Affiliated Agencies..........           659,638
                                                       =================
Inter-American Organizations:
    Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on                   16,560
     Agriculture [IICA]...............................
    Organization of American States [OAS].............            54,196
    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]...........            56,367
    Pan American Institute of Geography and History                  324
     [PAIGH]..........................................
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Inter-American Organizations..........           127,447
                                                       =================
Regional Organizations:
    Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation [APEC]..........               601
    Colombo Plan Council for Technical Cooperation                    15
     [CPCTC]..........................................
    NATO Parliamentary Assembly.......................               635
    North Atlantic Treaty Organization [NATO].........            46,695
    Organization for Economic Cooperation and                     62,463
     Development [OECD]...............................
    The Pacific Community [PC]........................             1,048
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Regional Organizations................           111,457
                                                       =================
Other International Organizations:
    Customs Cooperation Council [CCC].................             2,770
    Hague Conference on Private International Law                    111
     [HCOPIL].........................................
    International Agency for Research on Cancer [IARC]             1,692
    International Bureau of the Permanent Court of                    21
     Arbitration [IBPCA]..............................
    International Bureau for the Publication of                       89
     Customs Tariffs [IBPCT]..........................
    International Center for the Study of the                        692
     Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property
     [ICCROM].........................................
    International Coffee Organization [ICO]...........               500
    International Cotton Advisory Committee [ICAC]....               256
    International Hydrographic Organization [IHO].....                84
    International Institute for the Unification of                    98
     Private Law [IIUPL]..............................
    International Rubber Study Group [IRSG]...........               124
    International Seed Testing Association [ISTA].....                 7
    International Tropical Timber Organization [ITTO].               195
    International Union for the Conservation of Nature               260
     and Natural Resources [IUCN].....................
    International Union for the Protection of New                    166
     Varieties of Plants [UPOV].......................
    Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical                  19,764
     Weapons [OPCW]...................................
    World Trade Organization [WTO]....................            15,198
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Other International Organizations.....            42,027
                                                       =================
      Total, Contributions to International                      940,569
       Organizations..................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table are described in more detail in the following paragraph.
    United Nations Regular Budget.--The Department has 
requested $340,700,000 for the United States' assessed share of 
the United Nations' [U.N.] regular budget for the second 
calendar year of the 2002-2003 biennium. This is $61,373,000 
above the fiscal year 2003 enacted level. This increase is 
explained by the need for enhanced security measures for U.N. 
headquarters and U.N. duty stations, a new U.N. operation in 
Afghanistan, costs relating to the Counter-terrorism Committee, 
and revised estimates for rates of inflation and exchange. The 
recommendation supports these increases, as they are either 
unavoidable or the result of activities endorsed by this 
Committee.
    The recommendation does not include funding for the United 
States share of costs associated with the U.N. Human Rights 
Commission, approximately $11,779,000. The makeup of the Human 
Rights Commission has gone unquestioned by the leadership of 
the United Nations for too long. Elections held in April, 2003 
continued the domination of the Human Rights Commission by 
nations that are known human rights violators. The Committee 
refuses to allow American tax dollars to be spent in support of 
an organization that serves merely to provide an air of 
legitimacy to nations that commit the very crimes this 
organization was created to combat.
    Within the funding made available for the United States' 
contribution to the United Nations regular budget, $10,000,000 
is for the reimbursement of the city of New York for the 
unanticipated costs it incurred providing protection to foreign 
officials associated with the United Nations in the aftermath 
of September 11, 2001.
    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization [UNESCO].--The recommendation does not include 
funding for United States membership to UNESCO. The United 
States withdrew from UNESCO in 1984 because of concerns over 
chronic corruption, rampant budgetary mismanagement, anti-
Western bias, inappropriate politicization, misinformation 
campaigns, and flagging results from the organization. Last 
fall, the Administration announced that the United States would 
rejoin UNESCO because it had reformed. While the Committee 
agrees that the current Director General has been able to 
implement some reforms, the Committee does not consider UNESCO 
reformed. The Committee is aware that approximately 60 percent 
of UNESCO's biennial budget goes to personnel, while programs 
receive only 40 percent. The Department of State itself called 
UNESCO's lack of consistency in presentation of personnel and 
program costs ``a problem.'' The Director General has admitted 
that UNESCO's mission and programs are too broad and duplicate 
the efforts of many other international organizations. The 
Department of State has not made the case to the Committee 
either that UNESCO has reformed or that membership confers 
sufficient benefits to the United States to justify the cost of 
rejoining, $88,100,000 in fiscal year 2004. (Due to exchange 
rate fluctuations affecting the value of the dollar versus the 
euro, and because UNESCO adopted a budget of $610,000,000 
instead of a zero nominal growth budget of $544,000,000, the 
United States' full assessment for UNESCO is estimated to be 
$16,700,000 higher than the $71,400,000 requested by the 
Department in its fiscal year 2004 budget submission.)
    The Committee directs the Office of Inspector General of 
the Department of State to conduct an annual audit of UNESCO to 
determine the status of reform; the qualifications of UNESCO's 
staff; its procedures for hiring and promoting personnel; the 
ability of UNESCO's inspector general (or the equivalent 
authority) to conduct impartial, detailed, and accurate audits; 
a detailed breakdown of expenditures; and how United States 
membership would advance both the goals of the organization and 
the priorities of the United States.
    Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development 
[OECD].--The Committee is aware of an instance in which the 
OECD released a report on a particular subject which, at the 
time of release, was being debated in the U.S. Congress. The 
Committee understands that the release of this report was not 
intended to coincide with congressional action on the issue. 
However, the release of the report nevertheless unduly 
influenced congressional debate on the matter. Such scenarios 
must be prevented in the future. Accordingly, the Committee 
directs that the United States' Permanent Representative to the 
OECD hereafter submit to the Committees on Appropriations each 
list of OECD reports that is submitted by the OECD to the 
United States' Permanent Representative to the OECD and the 
Interagency Committee for U.S. approval. This list of reports 
should be provided to the Committee immediately after it is 
transmitted to the United States' Permanent Representative to 
the OECD. The Committee further directs that the United States' 
Permanent Representative to the OECD submit to the Committee 
the list of OECD reports that the United States' Permanent 
Representative to the OECD and the Interagency Committee have 
approved and disapproved. The list of approved and disapproved 
reports should be transmitted to the Committee 15 days prior to 
the United States' Permanent Representative to the OECD's and 
the interagency committee's notification to the OECD of their 
approval or disapproval of any OECD reports.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $669,331,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     550,200,000
House allowance.........................................     550,200,000
Committee recommendation................................     482,649,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $482,649,000. 
The recommendation is $67,551,000 below the budget request.
    The recommendation assumes that $43,700,000 in United 
States peacekeeping credits will be available in fiscal year 
2004. The credits are due to the Committee's disapproval of a 
Department of State request to reprogram fiscal year 2003 
funding for a United Nations activity for which no funding was 
requested in the President's fiscal year 2003 budget 
submission. The recommendation assumes the availability of 
these funds for use toward the United States' fiscal year 2004 
United Nations peacekeeping obligations. This amount, when 
combined with the recommendation, brings the total amount 
available for Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
Activities to $526,349,000, the maximum funding deemed prudent 
for this account. The recommendation also reflects the 
Committee's directive that the war crimes tribunals complete 
their work by a date certain.
    This account provides funds for the United States' share of 
the expenses of United Nations peacekeeping operations. The 
Committee recommendations, by mission, are displayed in the 
following table:

         CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
U.N. Disengagement Observer Force on the Golan Heights            10,065
 [UNDOF]..............................................
U.N. Interim Force in Lebanon [UNIFIL]................            30,795
U.N. Iraq/Kuwait Observer Mission [UNIKOM]............             4,784
U.N. Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara                 10,785
 [MINURSO]............................................
U.N. Mission in Kosovo [UNMIK]........................            85,225
U.N. Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus [UNFICYP]...........             5,809
U.N. Observer Mission in Georgia [UNIMOG].............             8,998
U.N. Mission in Sierra Leone [UNAMSIL]................            84,014
U.N. Transitional Administration in East Timor                     9,358
 [UNTAET].............................................
U.N. Operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo              210,012
 [MONUC]..............................................
U.N. Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea [UNMEE]..........            53,504
War Crimes Tribunal Rwanda............................             6,000
War Crimes Tribunal Yugoslavia........................             7,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Contributions for International                     526,349
       Peacekeeping Activities........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    None of the funds provided under this heading shall be 
obligated until the Department has submitted a reprogramming, 
pursuant to section 605 of this Act, and the Committee has 
acted upon such reprogramming.
    War Crimes Tribunals for the Former Yugoslavia and 
Rwanda.--The United Nations [U.N.] established the 
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia 
[ICTY] in 1993 and the International Criminal Tribunal for 
Rwanda [ICTR] in 1994 in response to the serious violations of 
international humanitarian law committed in these countries. 
The purpose of the tribunals is to prosecute war crimes that 
occurred in these countries and to punish those who oversaw the 
atrocities or participated in them extensively.
    People who commit mass atrocities must be brought to 
justice. This is the underlying principle of the war crimes 
tribunal--a principle which the Committee vigorously supports. 
The Committee also supports the concept of the war crimes 
tribunal, but only when the war crimes tribunal has a discrete 
topic and a discrete set of cases that have been approved by 
the U.N. Security Council. When structured this way, a war 
crimes tribunal's reach does not become overly-broad and its 
prosecutions politicized. The Special Court for Sierra Leone is 
an example of such a war crimes tribunal.
    Both ICTY and ICTR have been criticized for being slow and 
unprofessional, for having inadequate staff, for the passivity 
of their judges, and for their insufficient oversight of 
expenditures and employees. The United States has invested 
$260,262,000 in these two war crimes tribunals to date. Yet, as 
with so many U.N. endeavors, the Yugoslavia and Rwanda war 
crimes tribunals have had to answer to no one. The Committee 
commends the Department of State for its willingness to 
constructively criticize the Yugoslavia and Rwanda war crimes 
tribunals. While some members of the international community 
believe that this criticism ``interferes'' with the work of the 
tribunals, this Committee believes that criticism, when 
constructive, elicits accountability.
    The Committee directs the ICTR to complete its work by 2004 
and the ICTY to complete its work by 2006, respectively. Any 
cases remaining after this time should be tried in domestic 
courts. Accordingly, the United States must increase its 
efforts to assist the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda in 
rebuilding their justice systems. The recommendation includes a 
total of $13,000,000 for ICTR and ICTY operations for fiscal 
year 2004 and for the United Nations to develop an exit 
strategy by which the Rwanda and Yugoslavia tribunals will have 
ended by September 30, 2004, and September 30, 2006, 
respectively. The Committee expects that the ``ramping down'' 
of the Yugoslavia tribunal will be reflected in the 
Department's fiscal year 2005 and fiscal year 2006 budget 
requests. The Committee will not consider requests for funding 
for ICTY after fiscal year 2006.
    Sierra Leone.--The Committee reiterates its support for the 
work of the Special Court for Sierra Leone. The Committee 
directs the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone [UNAMSIL] to 
provide the full security, logistic, and technical support 
required by the Court.
    The purpose of the Special Court for Sierra Leone is to 
prosecute those who bear the greatest responsibility for the 
appalling violations of international and Sierra Leonean law 
and crimes against humanity perpetrated during the conflict in 
Sierra Leone. The court aims not to punish every crime 
committed during the war, but rather to prosecute those people 
who organized and oversaw the atrocities. The war in Sierra 
Leone featured the mass use of rape as a weapon of terror, the 
abduction of thousands of children who were forced to become 
combatants, and the hacking off of the arms, legs, lips, and 
ears of civilians, including children as young as 2 years old. 
The Committee praises the Special Court for its resolve in 
indicting and prosecuting the leaders of neighboring countries 
who actively encouraged the conflict in order to control the 
output of Sierra Leone's diamond mines. The foreign leaders who 
fueled the Sierra Leone conflict from afar by supplying 
weapons, supplies, and safe havens are just as responsible for 
the atrocities as those who ordered them done. The Committee 
commends the Special Court's recent indictment of one such 
leader who, more than any other single individual, was 
responsible for inciting and fueling the Sierra Leone conflict.
    The Special Court for Sierra Leone has been successful thus 
far because of three distinct attributes: it resides in the 
country where the atrocities occurred, allowing the Sierra 
Leonean people to bear witness to the conflict's closure; it 
has a clear mandate and a defined time period; and its judges 
and lawyers come both from Sierra Leone and other countries. As 
noted above, the swift action and overall success of the Court 
so far contrasts with the U.N.-run tribunals for war crimes 
committed in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. The Special 
Court for Sierra Leone model is the most appropriate choice for 
the court that will inevitably be stood up to prosecute the 
crimes that occurred (and continue to occur) in the conflict in 
the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Committee directs 
the United States Ambassador to the United Nations to advocate 
this in the Security Council.
    United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus [UNFICYP].--
UNFICYP was set up in 1964 to prevent further fighting between 
the Greek and Turkish communities on the island of Cyprus. 
After the hostilities of 1974, the mission's mandate was 
expanded. The mission remains active on the island to supervise 
ceasefire lines, maintain a buffer zone separating the two 
sides, and undertake humanitarian activities. Greek Cypriot and 
Turkish Cypriot leaders on April 23, 2003, opened checkpoints 
along the buffer zone, or ``green line''. Since the opening, 
tens of thousands of Cypriots from both sides have peacefully 
crossed the dividing line.
    In light of UNFICYP's completion of its mandate--
demonstrated by the peaceful border crossings of thousands of 
Greek and Turkish Cypriots--and the imminent accession of both 
Cyprus and Turkey to the European Union, the Committee directs 
the United States Representative to the United Nations to 
encourage the United Nations to develop an exit strategy for 
this peacekeeping mission. The recommendation provides full 
funding for the United States' share of the costs of UNFICYP 
for fiscal year 2004 and supports a continued United Nations 
presence there until the end of the fiscal year.
    Peacekeeping Reports.--The Committee last year directed the 
Department to resume transmission of United Nations Security 
Council reports on peacekeeping to the Committees on 
Appropriations. Despite this direction, the transmission of 
these reports has slowed to a trickle. The Committee will not 
consider reprogramming requests for any U.N. peacekeeping 
mission for which the Department has not submitted regular 
reports. These reports are a crucial source of information for 
the Committee, and the Committee will not be forced into making 
decisions concerning U.N. peacekeeping missions without them.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $25,316,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      31,562,000
House allowance.........................................      25,668,000
Committee recommendation................................      28,312,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $28,312,000. 
The recommendation is $3,250,000 below the budget request.
    The recommendation does not include the increases requested 
by the International Boundary and Water Commission [IBWC] to 
enhance its planning capabilities for short-term and long-term 
projects. The Committee directs IBWC to contract out 
administrative, human resources management, procurement, 
finance and accounting, payroll, and property functions so that 
it can meet the increasing demand for IBWC services without 
having to rely on budget increases. The recommendation includes 
$658,000 for mandatory pay and inflation increases and $250,000 
for United States environmental compliance requirements.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

               INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION
                          SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Administration..........................................           6,300
Engineering.............................................           2,761
Operations and maintenance..............................          19,251
                                                         ---------------
      Total, International Boundary and Water Commission          28,312
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee regrets the Commission's use of the word 
``mandatory'' to describe certain requested increases in the 
Commission's Operations and Maintenance budget for fiscal year 
2004. The Committee finds the use of the word ``mandatory'' in 
an official budget presentation document inappropriate except 
in cases where it refers to mandatory spending, as recognized 
by Congress and the Office of Management and Budget.
    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $5,415,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       8,901,000
House allowance.........................................       5,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,201,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,201,000. 
The recommendation is $700,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation includes funding for three new initiatives: the 
reconstruction of the American Canal, the Advanced Primary 
Plant completion, and an assessment of the impact of the 
discharge of the South Bay International Wastewater Treatment 
Plant. The recommendation does not include funding for Rio 
Grande Boundary Preservation. No explanation was given for this 
project in the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by project, are displayed in 
the following table:

        INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Boundary-Wide Construction:
    Facilities Renovation.............................               600
    Heavy Equipment Replacement.......................               250
    Land Mobile Radio Systems Replacement.............               500
    Hydrologic Data Collection System Rehabilitation..               251
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Boundary-Wide Construction............             1,601
                                                       =================
Rio Grande Construction:
    Rio Grande Canalization...........................               800
    Rio Grande Flood Control System Rehabilitation....               500
    Safety of Dams Rehabilitation.....................               750
    Reconstruction of the American Canal..............               700
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Rio Grande Construction...............             2,750
                                                       =================
Western Boundary Construction:
    Colorado River Boundary and Capacity Preservation.               100
    Secondary Treatment of Tijuana Sewage.............             2,000
    Advanced Primary Plant Completion.................               800
    Surfriders Consent Decree Compliance..............               950
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Western Boundary Construction.........             3,850
                                                       =================
      Total, IBWC Construction........................             8,201
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $9,410,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      11,204,000
House allowance.........................................       8,944,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,942,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,942,000. 
The recommendation is $262,000 below the budget request.
    This account funds the United States' share of expenses of 
the International Boundary Commission [IBC], the International 
Joint Commission [IJC], and the Border Environment Cooperation 
Commission [BECC].
    The Committee recommendations, by commission, are displayed 
in the following table:

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
International Boundary Commission:
    Commission Operations.............................               648
    New Brunswick, Maine-Quebec Project...............               136
    Washington/Idaho/Montana-British Columbia/Alberta                208
     Project..........................................
    Minnesota/North Dakota-Manitoba Project...........               126
    Minnesota-Manitoba/Ontario........................                14
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, International Boundary Commission.....             1,132
                                                       =================
International Joint Commission:
    United States Section.............................             7,130
    Special and Technical Investigations by the U.S.                 547
     Geological Survey................................
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, International Joint Commission........             7,677
                                                       =================
Border Environment Cooperation Commission:
    Studies and Investigations/Solid Waste Projects...             2,078
    Public Involvement and Outreach...................                55
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Border Environment Cooperation                     2,133
       Commission.....................................
                                                       =================
      Total, American Sections, International                     10,942
       Commissions....................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee does not recommend the requested 13 percent 
increase in the International Boundary Commission's operating 
budget.
    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.

                                 Other


        INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN-WESTERN DIALOGUE

Appropriations, 2003....................................................
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      $7,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,000,000 for 
operational costs of the International Center for Muslim-
Western Dialogue (the Center). The recommendation is $7,000,000 
above the request. The Center is located in the historic 
Palazzo Corpi, formerly the U.S. Consulate building in 
Istanbul, Turkey. The purpose of the Center is to develop 
programs of cooperative study, training, and research for 
students and scholars to exchange views and ideas. The 
Committee recommends that the Center develop regional-based 
dialogue groups on such topics as post-war Iraq and the 
empowerment of women in Iraq's government and leadership, among 
others. The Committee encourages non-profit organizations to 
play a continuing role in the administration of the Center and 
in the execution of its programs. The Secretary of State shall 
submit monthly reports on the status of creating the Center to 
the Committees on Appropriations.

                     PAYMENT TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $10,376,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       9,250,000
House allowance.........................................      10,376,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the 
Asia Foundation. The recommendation is $9,250,000 below the 
budget request.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program


           EISENHOWER EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM TRUST FUND

Appropriations, 2003....................................        $497,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................         500,000
House allowance.........................................         500,000
Committee recommendation................................         500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $500,000 from 
interest and earnings in the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program Trust Fund, authorized by the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-454). The recommendation 
is identical to the request.
    The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program was created in 
1953 to honor President Eisenhower. The Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Act of 1990 authorized a permanent endowment for the 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program and established a trust 
fund in the United States Treasury for this purpose. A total of 
$7,500,000 has been provided to establish a permanent endowment 
for the program, from which the interest and earnings are 
appropriated to Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, Inc.

                    Israeli Arab Scholarship Program

Appropriations, 2003....................................        $373,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................         375,000
House allowance.........................................         375,000
Committee recommendation................................         375,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $375,000 from 
interest and earnings in the Israeli Arab Scholarship Endowment 
Fund, authorized by Section 214 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-
138). The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Israeli Arab Scholarship Program funds scholarships for 
Israeli Arabs to attend institutions of higher education in the 
United States. A permanent endowment of $4,978,500 was 
established in 1992 with funds made available under section 
556(b) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related 
Programs Appropriations Act of 1990, as amended. The interest 
from the endowment is credited to the Fund and made available 
subject to annual appropriations to carry out the scholarship 
program.

                            East-West Center

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $17,883,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      14,280,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      19,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $19,000,000. 
The recommendation is $4,720,000 above the request.
    The East-West Center is an educational and research 
organization established by Congress in 1960 to strengthen 
understanding and relations between the United States and the 
countries of the Asia-Pacific region. The Center helps promote 
the establishment of a stable, peaceful and prosperous Asia-
Pacific community in which the United States is a natural and 
leading partner. The Center carries out its mission through 
programs of cooperative study, training, and research. 
Professionals and students from the United States, Asia, and 
the Pacific study and work together at the East-West Center to 
better understand issues of common and critical concern and 
explore mutually beneficial ways of addressing them.

                    National Endowment For Democracy

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $41,727,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      36,000,000
House allowance.........................................      42,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      36,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $36,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The National Endowment for Democracy [NED] is a private, 
non-profit organization created in 1983 to strengthen 
democratic institutions around the world. NED's mission is to 
support peaceful and stable transitions to more open political 
and economic systems characterized by effective governance and 
legal systems, engaged and responsible civil societies, and 
open markets. Although NED was first created to help the United 
States win the cold war, its mission of promoting democracy is 
still relevant today, particularly in the war against 
terrorism.
    The Committee commends NED for developing programs to 
promote the education of women in predominately Muslim 
countries. Women's rights in Afghanistan have been greatly 
enhanced by NED's creation of a women's library and resource 
center, its leadership partnerships with media, and its 
development of E-learning resources. Within available funds, 
$2,000,000 is for grants to expand these and other similar 
programs through the International Center for Muslim-Western 
Dialogue. The Committee further commends NED for its work with 
Lebanese Shiite schools to develop women's rights education 
programs. The Committee encourages NED to consider a grant, if 
warranted, for the Legal Education Program for Emerging 
Democracies at Ohio Northern University.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $465,850,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      30,500,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     525,204,000
House allowance.........................................     552,105,000
Committee recommendation................................     518,149,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $518,149,000. 
The recommendation is $7,055,000 below the request. The 
recommendation assumes $1,000,000 in reimbursements under the 
Voice of America account. This amount, when combined with 
direct appropriations, results in a total of $519,149,000 in 
available funding for Broadcasting Board of Governors [BBG] in 
fiscal year 2004.
    This appropriation account funds the operating and 
engineering costs of Voice of America [VOA], Radio Free Europe/
Radio Liberty [RFE/RL], Radio Free Asia [RFA], the Middle East 
Television Network [METN], Worldnet Television, and the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors.
    The Committee recommendations, by function, are displayed 
in the following table:

               INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS [IBO]
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
International Broadcasting Bureau [IBB]:
    Voice of America [VOA]:
        Domestic Operations..........................           128,850
            Office of the Director...................            [3,585]
            Broadcast Operations.....................           [17,228]
            Latin American Division..................            [3,715]
            European Division........................            [8,359]
            East Asia and Pacific Division...........           [24,979]
            South and Central Asia Division..........            [8,722]
            Africa Division..........................            [9,492]
            Eurasia Division.........................            [7,640]
            Near East and North Africa Division......            [7,393]
            Middle East Radio Network/Radio Sawa.....           [11,204]
            English Programs Division................            [7,176]
            Special English and Music Division.......            [4,535]
            News Division............................           [14,822]
        Domestic Bureaus.............................               734
        Overseas Bureaus.............................             8,990
        VOA TV.......................................            21,083
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, VOA..............................           159,657
                                                      ==================
    Engineering and Technical Services:
        Headquarters.................................            60,609
        Transmitting Stations........................            66,129
        Monitors.....................................             1,075
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, Engineering......................           127,813
                                                      ==================
    Agency Direction:
        Board of Governors...........................             2,139
        Chief Financial Officer......................             4,787
        Accounting and Payroll.......................             1,222
        Intl Cooperative Administrative Support                   4,357
         Services [ICASS]............................
        Research.....................................             7,500
        General Counsel..............................               995
        Director, IBB................................             1,291
        Policy.......................................             1,088
        Civil Rights.................................               967
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, Agency Direction.................            24,346
                                                      ==================
    Management.......................................            47,150
    Program Support..................................            25,244
                                                      ------------------
      Subtotal, IBB..................................           384,210
                                                      ==================
Independent Grantee Organizations:
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty [RFE/RL]:
        Broadcasting.................................            50,855
            Office of the Director...................            [2,462]
            Marketing and Affiliates.................            [1,699]
            Broadcast Services.......................           [46,694]
        Management and Administration................            26,739
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, RFE/RL...........................            77,594
                                                      ==================
    Radio Free Asia [RFA]:
        Broadcasting.................................            18,400
        Management and Administration................             8,945
                                                      ------------------
          Subtotal, RFA..............................            27,345
                                                      ==================
    Middle East Television Network [METN]............            30,000
                                                      ------------------
      Subtotal, Grantees.............................           134,939
                                                      ==================
      Total, IBO.....................................           519,149
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table are described in more detail in the following paragraphs.

                   INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING BUREAU

    Voice of America [VOA].--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $159,657,000 for VOA. The recommendation 
includes funding for VOA's European Division to continue, at 
fiscal year 2003 levels, the Estonian Service and the Czech, 
Hungarian, Lithuanian, Polish, Bulgarian, and Romanian 
multimedia units. The recommendation also includes $24,979,000, 
the full amount requested, for VOA's East Asia and Pacific 
Division. The recommendation for this division represents an 
increase of $3,386,000 above fiscal year 2003, and will allow 
VOA to significantly increase broadcasting to Indonesia. The 
recommendation also includes $9,492,000, the full amount 
requested, for VOA's Africa Division.
    The Committee recognizes that broadcasting to the Middle 
East and South and Central Asia is critical to the United 
States-led war on terror. The recommendation therefore includes 
$8,722,000 for VOA's South and Central Asia Division and 
$11,204,000 for the Middle East Radio Network, or Radio Sawa. 
Both of these levels are identical to the budget request. The 
recommendation also includes $7,393,000 for VOA's Near East and 
North Africa Division. The recommendation represents an 
increase above the request.
    Africa Broadcasting.--The problem of AIDS in Africa is 
ubiquitous. Radio broadcasting is an underutilized tool in the 
fight against the African AIDS epidemic. Its accessibility to 
even the most impoverished communities make it an ideal way to 
transmit information about the disease. Radio broadcasts could 
be a major component of sustained prevention efforts undertaken 
by the governments of many African countries, humanitarian 
organizations, and U.S. assistance programs. The Committee 
directs VOA to continue to include AIDS education in its 
regular programming. VOA is directed to report to the Committee 
on its progress no later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    Engineering and Technical Services.--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $127,813,000 for engineering and 
technical services. The recommendation is $1,050,000 below the 
request. The difference is due to the fact that a certain 
country granted BBG permission to place a Radio Sawa 
transmitter on its soil and later reneged on its commitment.
    Agency Direction.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $24,346,000 for Agency Direction. The 
recommendation includes $7,500,000 for research.
    Security of Worldwide Broadcasting Facilities.--In fiscal 
year 2003, the Committee directed the BBG to develop, in 
consultation with the Department of State and other relevant 
United States agencies, a 5-year capital worldwide security 
plan. The Committee expects that this plan, once approved by 
the Committee, will serve as a planning document for BBG's 
fiscal year 2005 budget submission, as it pertains to 
facilities and security.
    Management.--The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$47,150,000 for the management of the BBG. The recommendation 
includes $26,662,000 for Administration, instead of the 
$30,520,000 proposed in the budget request. The budget request 
for Administration for fiscal year 2004 represented a 15 
percent increase over the fiscal year 2003 level. The Committee 
has determined that such a request is not warranted. The 
recommendation includes $2,860,000, the full amount requested, 
for security.
    Program Support.--The recommendation includes full funding 
of $7,023,000 for the BBG's marketing and program placement 
initiative.
    Internet Access.--The Committee is aware of promising 
technologies that could penetrate the Internet ``firewall'' 
used by the Red Chinese to deny individuals access to certain 
areas of the worldwide web. The Committee recommendation for 
program support includes $1,000,000 for the broadcast services 
to administer a pilot program using Internet-oriented 
technologies that may prove capable of penetrating the Red 
Chinese firewall of censorship. The BBG is directed to provide 
the Committee with a spending plan no later than March 22, 2004 
describing the technologies that are being considered for the 
pilot program.

                                GRANTEES

    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty [RFE/RL].--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $77,594,000 for RFE/RL. The 
recommendation includes funding for the continuation, at fiscal 
year 2003 levels, of RFE/RL's Bulgarian, Estonian, Latvian, 
Lithuanian, and Romania-Moldova Services. The recommendation 
includes $2,676,000 for Radio Farda, $5,510,000 for Radio Free 
Afghanistan, and $2,140,000 for Radio Free Iraq. Each of these 
levels is identical to the budget request.
    Security of RFE/RL Headquarters.--The Committee has been 
briefed on the plan to relocate RFE/RL headquarters from St. 
Wenceslas Square in Prague, the Czech Republic, to a new 
location. The Committee intends to ensure that the eventual 
RFE/RL headquarters building meets all of the necessary and 
appropriate security requirements. The BBG and RFE/RL are 
directed to submit to the Committee a report with no less than 
four options for relocation. In addition, BBG and RFE/RL should 
consider alternative sites in other countries in the region, 
and include in the report several recommendations for 
relocating elsewhere. The BBG and RFE/RL are directed to work 
with the Director of the Department of State's Bureau of 
Overseas Buildings Operations [OBO] in preparing this report 
which is to be submitted to the Committee no later than 
February 29, 2004. The Committee will not approve any funding 
for this project unless the plan has the approval of OBO.
    Radio Free Asia [RFA].--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $27,345,000 for RFA. Within the funding 
provided for Broadcasting, $2,838,000 is for RFA's Tibetan 
Service and $1,254,000 for its Uyghur Service. Within funding 
made available for Management and Administration, $497,000, the 
full amount requested, is for audience research.
    Jamming.--The Committee notes with concern continued 
reports of increased jamming of Radio Free Asia broadcasts to 
Tibet. Jamming is intended to stem the flow of truthful and 
free media into closed societies such as Tibet. The Committee 
has provided funds in prior years to address this problem. The 
Committee directs the broadcast services to expand their 
efforts to counteract the practice of jamming.
    Middle East Television Network [METN].--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $30,000,000 for the METN. The 
recommendation is identical to the request.

                          BROADCASTING TO CUBA

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $24,834,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      26,901,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      28,101,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $28,101,000. 
The recommendation is $1,200,000 above the budget request.
    This appropriation account funds the operating and 
engineering costs of Radio and Television [TV] Marti programs. 
Radio and TV Marti are dedicated to providing a reliable source 
of news and information that is accurate and objective, and to 
the promotion of freedom and democracy in Cuba.
    Jamming.--The Committee commends the Office of Cuba 
Broadcasting [OCB] for the successful completion of its 
conversion to digital audio, video, and computer networking 
technologies. However, Radio and TV Marti must be further 
modernized. A critical part of this modernization will be 
increased efforts to overcome Cuban jamming. Therefore, within 
the funding made available for Cuba Broadcasting, $1,200,000 is 
to enhance efforts to defeat jamming. The Committee directs the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors and OCB to use all available 
means to overcome the jamming of Radio and TV Marti, including 
broadcasting via the Internet and satellite. The Committee 
notes that, while the Cuban government still imposes penalties 
on citizens who attempt to receive radio and television signals 
from international sources, satellite dish ownership in Cuba is 
increasing. It has been said that ``The second major indoor 
sport in Havana, next to watching satellite TV, is hiding the 
dish''. The average Cuban still does not have access to the 
Internet for personal use due to the high cost, access 
restrictions by the Cuban government, and an inadequate 
national Internet infrastructure. The Committee is aware, 
however, of programs run by international and non-governmental 
organizations that help developing nations build their Internet 
capacities. The Committee supports such programs and notes that 
bringing the Internet and other information technologies to 
developing countries not only hastens development, it hastens 
the transition to democracy by ``democratizing information''.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $12,657,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      11,395,000
House allowance.........................................      11,395,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,395,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $11,395,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee notes that no funding was requested for new 
construction projects in fiscal year 2004.
    This account funds necessary maintenance, improvements, 
replacements, and repairs of broadcasting sites; satellite and 
terrestrial program feeds; and engineering support activities, 
broadcast facility leases, and land rentals.
    The Committee recommendations, by function, are displayed 
in the following table:

                 BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS [BCI]
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Maintenance, Improvements, Replace and Repair [MIRR]:
    Continuing Maintenance and Repair.................             4,335
    VOA TV............................................               765
    Security..........................................             2,410
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, MIRR..................................             7,510
                                                       =================
Upgrade of Existing Facilities:
    Poro Relocation...................................             1,250
    Greek Agreement...................................             1,835
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Upgrades..............................             3,085
                                                       =================
Satellite and Terrestrial Program Feeds...............               800
                                                       =================
      Total, BCI......................................            11,395
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agencies

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 401 permits funds appropriated in this Act for the 
Department of State to be available for allowances and 
differentials, services, and hire of passenger transportation.
    Section 402 permits up to 5 percent of any appropriation 
made available in the bill for the Department of State and the 
U.S. Information Agency to be transferred between their 
respective appropriations. The language also provides that no 
appropriation shall be decreased by more than 5 percent or 
increased by more than 10 percent by any such transfer. The 
language also provides that any transfer pursuant to this 
subsection shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under 
section 605 of the accompanying bill and shall not be available 
for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the 
procedures set forth in that section.
    Section 403 prohibits the Department of State from making 
multiple requests to reprogram funds.
    Section 404 prohibits the use of Department of State funds 
to support the Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation.
    Section 405 provides that Israel shall be recorded as the 
place of birth on registrations of birth, certifications of 
nationality, and passport applications for U.S. citizens born 
in Jerusalem.
    Section 406 initiates the process of right-sizing.
    Section 407 prohibits the Department of State from making 
requests for funds for certain types of construction projects 
under this or future Department of State and Related Agency 
Appropriations Acts.
    Section 408 requires the Secretary of State to submit the 
budget of the United Nations [U.N.] as part of the State 
Department's annual budget submission. The United States' 
annual dues payment to the United Nations represents more than 
17 percent of the entire Department of State appropriation. 
That such a large portion of this Act escapes congressional 
oversight merely because it is spent by the United Nations, as 
opposed to an agency of the United States Government, is a 
disservice to the American taxpayer. Henceforward, the U.N. 
budget will receive the same scrutiny as do all other accounts 
included in the budget request.
    Section 409 strikes a provision that inhibits the Secretary 
of State in carrying out his responsibilities for ensuring the 
safety of all non-military United States Government personnel 
stationed abroad.
    Section 410 ensures the continuity of funding for the 
Department's border security program in the event of a machine 
readable visa [MRV] fee shortfall.
    Section 411 addresses the visa backlog.
    Section 412 lessens restrictions on foreign assistance.

                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................        $496,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................         499,000
House allowance.........................................         499,000
Committee recommendation................................         659,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $659,000. This 
amount is $160,000 above the budget request. The recommendation 
will allow the Commission to fund its administrative expenses 
through appropriated funds while relying on privately donated 
funds for the actual purchase and restoration of property.
    The purpose of the Commission is to encourage the 
preservation of cemeteries, monuments, and historic buildings 
associated with the foreign heritage of the American people.
    Revolutionary War Heroes.--The Committee was pleased with 
the Commission's preliminary survey (phase I) of sites abroad 
associated with the lives and deeds of foreign-born heroes of 
the American Revolution. The Commission has identified at least 
31 Revolutionary period heroes that are, or should be, 
commemorated abroad that qualify for site assessment (phase 
II). Phase II will involve: (1) collection of first hand 
information at foreign commemorative sites, (2) formulation of 
recommendations regarding necessary repairs to, or expansion 
of, existing monuments, rewriting of commemorative 
inscriptions, and placement of new commemorative markers or 
monuments, and (3) dissemination of information on 
commemorative sites to American citizens and foreign 
governments and organizations. The Committee recommendation 
includes $160,000 to conduct phase II. The Committee looks 
forward to receiving a report on the completion of phase II at 
the earliest convenience of the Commission.

                       Commission on Civil Rights


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $9,037,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       9,096,000
House allowance.........................................       9,096,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,096,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,096,000 for 
the salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

             Commission on International Religious Freedom

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $2,865,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       3,000,000
House allowance.........................................       3,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,000,000. 
The recommendation is $1,000,000 below the budget request.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $1,572,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       1,615,000
House allowance.........................................       1,615,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,615,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,615,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Commission was established in 1976 to ensure compliance 
with the final act of the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe with particular regard to provisions 
dealing with humanitarian affairs.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $1,371,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       1,800,000
House allowance.........................................       1,800,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,400,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,400,000. 
The recommendation is $400,000 below the budget request.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $306,815,000
Supplemental appropriations, 2003.......................      15,000,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     334,754,000
House allowance.........................................     328,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     334,754,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $334,754,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Congress supported the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission [EEOC] by appropriating $15,000,000 in the fiscal 
year 2003 supplemental to avert a financial crisis and prevent 
massive furloughs. In this bill the Committee fully supports 
the EEOC's budget request to allow the Commission the resources 
to correct the situation that precipitated this crisis.
    The Committee understands the EEOC is proposing a 
restructuring of the Commission and State facilities in 
accordance with the study performed by the National Academy of 
Public Administration [NAPA]. However, the Committee has 
concerns about the impact this restructuring will have on the 
quality of service to the States. The Committee urges the 
Commission to concentrate on a plan to reduce headquarters 
staffing by encouraging early retirements and increased natural 
attrition.
    The Committee directs that before any restructuring takes 
place, the Commission comply with reprogramming requirements as 
outlined in Section 605. The Committee encourages the 
Commission to brief this Committee at the earliest opportunity 
on the details of any restructure plan.

                   Federal Communications Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $270,987,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     280,798,000
House allowance.........................................     278,958,000
Committee recommendation................................     277,798,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $277,798,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Federal Communications Commission 
[FCC], of which $251,984,000 is to be derived from the 
collection of fees. The recommendation is $3,000,000 below the 
budget request.
    The FCC is an independent regulatory agency exercising 
authority delegated to it by Congress under the Communications 
Act of 1934 as amended by the Telecommunications Act of 1996. 
The primary mission of the FCC is to promote competition, 
innovation, and deregulation in the communications industry. 
The FCC is charged with regulating interstate and international 
communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable. 
The mandate of the FCC under the Communications Act is to make 
available to all people of the United States a rapid, 
efficient, nationwide, and worldwide wire and radio 
communication service. The FCC performs four major functions to 
fulfill this charge: spectrum allocation, creating rules to 
promote fair competition and protect consumers where required 
by market conditions, authorization of service, and 
enforcement.
    The recommendation includes funding increases that will 
greatly enhance the FCC's ability to achieve its core 
objectives. The recommendation includes an increase of 
$2,600,000 to hire an additional 20 full time equivalents to 
enhance the FCC's engineering expertise.
    The recommendation reflects the Committee's continued 
support for improvements to the Commission's critical systems. 
The recommendation has fully funded the Commission's request 
for technology enhancements. Also, the recommendation includes 
funding to enable the FCC to comply with government-wide 
standards for systems security, accessibility, and financial 
management.
    Contract Audit Support.--The recommendation does not 
include the $3,000,000 requested for the Office of Inspector 
General [OIG] to hire contractors to conduct audits of the 
Universal Service Fund [USF] and the E-Rate Program. The use of 
appropriated funds for these audits is inappropriate, as the 
USF is maintained in accounts outside the Treasury and is 
administered by a not-for-profit corporation rather than a 
Federal agency. The Committee agrees with the FCC's Inspector 
General, who stated in an April, 2002 memorandum: ``It is 
appropriate and consistent with applicable regulations to 
utilize the Universal Service Fund to fund [the FCC's] 
oversight of the Schools and Libraries [E-Rate] Program''. The 
Committee directs the FCC to utilize funds in the USF to pay 
for costs associated with the auditing of the USF.
    Broadcast Television Standards.--The Committee is concerned 
about the declining standards of broadcast television and the 
impact this decline is having on America's children. An 
analysis of all prime-time programming has found that overall 
sexual content, foul language, and violence have tripled over 
the past decade. In December 1999, the FCC issued a notice of 
inquiry regarding the public interest obligations of 
broadcasters during and after the transition to digital 
transmission. The Committee directs the FCC to continue to 
report to Congress on the issues associated with resurrecting a 
broadcast industry code of conduct for content of programming 
that, if adhered to by the broadcast industry, would protect 
against the further erosion of broadcasting standards.
    Wireless Portability.--The Committee is pleased that the 
FCC is developing implementation requirements for local number 
portability. The Committee urges the FCC to complete these 
requirements prior to the implementation deadline and to 
address wireline to wireless portability in a timely manner.

                        Federal Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $176,553,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     191,132,000
House allowance.........................................     183,041,000
Committee recommendation................................     189,032,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $189,032,000. 
The recommendation is $2,100,000 below the budget request.
    The Federal Trade Commission [FTC] administers a variety of 
Federal antitrust and consumer protection laws. Activities in 
the antitrust area include detection and elimination of illegal 
collusion, anticompetitive mergers, unlawful single-firm 
conduct, and injurious vertical agreements. The FTC regulates 
advertising practices, service industry practices, marketing 
practices, and credit practices as it addresses fraud and other 
consumer concerns.
    The recommendation includes $164,399,000 for the ongoing 
operations of the FTC, of which $2,100,000 is for physical 
security enhancements to headquarters, $6,533,000 for 
anticipated increases in expenses in fiscal year 2004, as 
described in greater detail below, and $18,100,000 for the Do-
Not-Call initiative, also described in greater detail below. Of 
the amounts provided, $112,000,000 is from Hart-Scott-Rodino 
pre-merger filing fees and $18,100,000 is from Do-Not-Call 
fees. The total amount of direct appropriations for this 
account is therefore $59,032,000. This represents an increase 
of $50,579,000 over the fiscal year 2003 direct appropriation. 
The Committee notes that this increase is necessary due to a 
significant drop-off in offsetting fee collection receipts 
beginning in 2001.
    Child Protection.--The FTC in September of 2000 released a 
report entitled: ``Marketing Violent Entertainment to Children: 
A Review of Self-Regulation and Industry Practices in the 
Motion Picture, Music Recording & Electronic Game Industries''. 
The report was very critical of the entertainment industry and 
its persistent and calculated marketing of violent games, 
movies, and music to children. In response to this report, the 
entertainment industry has promised to impose tougher 
regulations on itself and to voluntarily comply with the 
report's recommendations. The FTC should continue with and 
expand upon its efforts in this area. The Committee directs the 
Commission to continue to engage in consumer research and 
workshops, underage shopper-retail compliance surveys, and 
marketing data collection.
    Internet.--The FTC is charged with monitoring compliance 
with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act. The 
recommendation provides the Commission the funding resources it 
needs to meet the challenges of increased fraud on the 
Internet. The Committee commends the FTC for recognizing the 
unique and difficult challenge posed by the Internet, an 
international phenomenon that lacks borders, to the safety of 
our children.
    Do-Not-Call Initiative.--The recommendation includes 
$18,100,000 for the FTC's Do-Not-Call initiative, of which the 
entire amount is to be derived from the collection of fees. The 
Do-Not-Call initiative was launched pursuant to the FTC's 
amended Telemarketing Sales Rule. The Do-Not-Call initiative 
will establish a national database of telephone numbers of 
consumers who choose not to receive telephone solicitations 
from telemarketers. The Do-Not-Call initiative has received 
broad support from, and will provide significant benefits to, 
consumers from all corners of the United States. The 
recommendation represents an increase of $2,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2003 level. This increase will support a range of 
infrastructure technology improvements that are needed to 
support the Do-Not-Call initiative. These improvements will 
allow the FTC to manage the expected large volume of consumer 
complaints within the Sentinel system and will allow the FTC to 
share information with its law enforcement partners. Sentinel 
is a secure website through which the FTC's law enforcement 
partners access consumer complaint information. Currently, over 
700 Federal, State and local law enforcement partners access 
Sentinel. With the addition of Do-Not-Call complaint data, the 
FTC anticipates that a significant number of ``new'' partners 
and users, such as public utility companies, will need to use 
Sentinel to access those data.
    The Committee directs the FTC to conduct a study to 
determine if uncompetitive or unfair practices, or practices 
which tend to restrain trade, are being used by companies that 
provide commercial trucking fleet card programs, and the 
effects of these practices on the truck stop industry. The FTC 
is directed to submit this report to the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $336,645,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     329,300,000
House allowance.........................................     338,848,000
Committee recommendation................................     338,848,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $338,848,000. 
The recommendation is $9,548,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation includes $312,251,000 for basic field 
programs, to be used for competitively awarded grants and 
contracts, $13,900,000 for management and administration, 
$3,400,000 for client self-help and information technology, 
$2,600,000 for the Office of the Inspector General, and 
$6,697,000 for grants to offset losses due to census 
adjustments.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommendation continues the administrative 
provisions contained in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations act 
(Public Law 105-119) regarding operation of this program to 
provide basic legal services to poor individuals and the 
restrictions on the use of Legal Services Corporation [LSC] 
funds.
    Grantees must agree not to engage in litigation and related 
activities with respect to a variety of matters including: (1) 
redistricting; (2) class action suits; (3) representation of 
illegal aliens; (4) political activities; (5) collection of 
attorney fees; (6) abortion; (7) prisoner litigation; (8) 
welfare reform; (9) representation of charged drug dealers 
during eviction proceedings; and (10) solicitation of clients. 
The exception to the restrictions in a case where there is 
imminent threat of physical harm to the client or prospective 
client remains in place.
    The manner in which LSC grantees are audited through 
contracts with certified public accountants for financial and 
compliance audits are continued along with the provisions on 
recompetition and debarment.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $3,030,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       1,856,000
House allowance.........................................       1,856,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,030,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,030,000. 
The recommendation is $1,174,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee directs the Commission to review the biological 
viability of the most endangered marine mammal populations and 
make recommendations regarding the cost-effectiveness of 
current protection programs. The Committee further directs the 
Commission to review available evidence regarding the theory 
that rogue packs of killer whales are wiping out discreet 
populations of the most endangered marine mammals. The results 
of both reviews shall be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations at the Commission's convenience.

          National Veterans' Business Development Corporation

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $1,987,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       2,000,000
House allowance.........................................       2,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee expects funding for the Corporation to be included 
under either the Small Business Administration or the Veterans 
Administration in fiscal year 2005 and thereafter.

                   Securities and Exchange Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $745,789,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     841,500,000
House allowance.........................................     841,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     841,500,000

    The Committee recommends a total budget (obligational) 
authority of $841,500,000 for the salaries and expenses of the 
United States Securities and Exchange Commission [SEC], of 
which the entire amount is to be derived from the collection of 
fees. This amount is identical to the budget request.
    The mission of the SEC is to administer and enforce the 
Federal securities laws in order to protect investors and to 
maintain fair, honest, and efficient markets. This includes 
ensuring full disclosure of financial information, regulating 
the Nation's securities markets, and preventing and policing 
fraud and malpractice in the securities and financial markets. 
The strength of the American economy and our Nation's financial 
markets is dependent upon investors' confidence in the 
financial disclosures and statements released by publicly-
traded companies. Recent accounting scandals have badly shaken 
the public's faith in U.S. financial markets. The Committee 
commends the SEC for its efforts to bolster investor confidence 
and for its ongoing implementation of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 
2002. The resources recommended by the Committee will allow the 
SEC to increase its efforts in this area in the coming year. 
The Committee directs the SEC to continue to provide quarterly 
reports to the Committees on Appropriations on the measures it 
is taking to restore the public's confidence in the financial 
markets.
    Staffing.--The recommendation supports the continued hiring 
of the more than 840 new staff approved for the Commission in 
fiscal 2003 and the Agency's multi-year information technology 
efforts. Notwithstanding the enactment of pay parity 
legislation, the Committee understands that the SEC continues 
to have difficulty hiring accountants and examiners and is 
seeking legislation that would permit them to be hired in the 
same way that the Commission currently hires attorneys. The 
Committee appreciates the Commission's need to hire more 
accountants in order to fulfill its full disclosure 
responsibilities and is concerned that continued hiring 
difficulties may threaten the Commission's effectiveness. The 
Committee directs the SEC to report quarterly on its hiring of 
accountants and any hiring flexibilities that it believes may 
be necessary.
    Pay Parity.--The recommendation includes sufficient funding 
for the Commission to continue implementation of the pay parity 
program authorized in the ``Investor and Capital Markets Fee 
Relief Act'' of 2002. Pay parity is intended to bring the 
salaries of SEC employees in line with those of other Federal 
financial regulatory agencies. The Commission's ability to 
retain the necessary number of qualified staff persons is 
critical to its success in restoring confidence in U.S. 
financial markets.
    Enforcement.--The Committee directs the Commission to 
continue to espouse, as its top priority, the investigation and 
prosecution of financial fraud and reporting cases. The 
Committee commends the SEC for its heightened enforcement 
efforts and recent initiatives to protect investors through 
strengthened corporate disclosure, accounting, and reporting 
requirements.
    Data Management.--For the past 2 years, the Committee has 
provided funding increases for the SEC to upgrade its document 
management system. An updated document management system will 
enhance the SEC's ability to conduct analyses and examinations. 
The Committee understands that the Commission has completed the 
preliminary requirements analysis necessary to procure its 
document management system and will soon begin a multi-year 
development effort. This effort will begin as a pilot in the 
Division of Enforcement and will allow for the tagging, 
indexing, and imaging of investigative documents and will 
greatly reduce the SEC's reliance on paper documents. The 
Committee directs that $8,000,000 in prior year unobligated 
balances be utilized towards this effort. In addition, the 
recommendation for fiscal year 2004 includes $12,000,000 for 
this effort.
    The Committee is also aware that the SEC will, in fiscal 
year 2004, begin a top-to-bottom assessment of the business 
practices of the Division of Corporation Finance, with 
particular emphasis on the collection, storage, format, review, 
and dissemination of corporate filings to investors. The 
Committee supports this effort and recommends $2,500,000 for 
the fiscal year 2004 costs of this multi-year project.
    Exercising of Options.--The Committee is concerned by 
instances in which corporate insiders enrich themselves at the 
expense of stockholders by exercising stock options immediately 
prior to companies' financial collapse. The exercising of stock 
options may even contribute, in some cases, to the bankruptcy 
of teetering corporations. In fiscal year 2003, the Committee 
directed the SEC to provide a monthly report listing the 
exercising of stock options by corporate officers and directors 
under section 12 of the Securities and Exchange Act. The 
Committee directs the SEC to continue to submit these reports 
on a bimonthly basis.

                     Small Business Administration

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $731,672,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     800,888,000
House allowance.........................................     745,557,000
Committee recommendation................................     751,672,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $751,672,000, 
for the Small Business Administration [SBA]. The recommendation 
is $49,216,000 below the budget request. The total funding is 
distributed among the SBA appropriation accounts as described 
below.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $312,413,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     360,155,000
House allowance.........................................     326,592,000
Committee recommendation................................     332,413,000

    The Committee recommends a direct appropriation of 
$332,413,000 for the salaries and expenses account. The 
recommendation is $27,742,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee believes SBA will have an additional $3,000,000 in 
receipts available for operating expenses.

                NON-CREDIT BUSINESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $137,575,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     141,055,000
House allowance.........................................     135,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     141,055,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $141,055,000 
for SBA's non-credit business assistance programs. The 
recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee recommends the following amounts for these programs:

                 NON-CREDIT BUSINESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Small Business Development Centers......................          88,000
USEAC Program...........................................           3,100
Drug-free Workplace Grants..............................           3,000
National Ombudsman......................................             500
SCORE...................................................           5,000
BICs....................................................             475
Women's Business Centers................................          12,000
Small Disadvantaged Business............................           1,500
Women's Council.........................................             750
7(j) Technical Assistance...............................           3,600
Microloan Technical Assistance..........................          15,000
Microloan Training......................................             280
Advocacy Research/Database..............................           1,100
Veteran's Business Development Assistance...............             750
PRO-Net.................................................             500
SBIR Technical Assistance...............................             500
SBIR--FAST..............................................           3,000
HUBZone Progam..........................................           2,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Within the amount provided for Women's Business Centers, 
$500,000 is provided for the South Carolina Women's Business 
Center.
    The Committee is encouraged by SBA's work on an electronic 
grant system. The Committee expects SBA to meet the October 31, 
2003 deadline for submitting a plan to implement the system.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2003....................................     $12,341,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................      14,500,000
House allowance.........................................      13,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,341,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $12,341,000 
for the Office of Inspector General. The recommendation is 
$2,159,000 below the budget request. The bill contains language 
making $500,000 available to the Inspector General's office 
from funds made available to the disaster loan program for its 
activities.

                     BUSINESS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $216,668,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     225,770,000
House allowance.........................................     215,715,000
Committee recommendation................................     216,668,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $216,668,000 
for the business loans program account. The recommendation is 
$9,102,000 below the budget request. Of the amount provided, 
$129,000,000 is for administrative expenses related to this 
account. The administrative expenses may be transferred to and 
merged with SBA salaries and expenses to cover the common 
overhead expenses associated with the business loan programs.
    The Committee is concerned about the SBA Office of 
Inspector General's [IG] report (3-034) stating SBA needs to, 
``make significant improvements in financial management and 
reporting, particularly maintaining proper accounting for and 
accountability of the Master Reserve Fund [MRF].'' 
Additionally, the IG report states SBA needs to make 
significant improvements maintaining control over all aspects 
of the loan accounting and budgeting process. The Committee 
directs SBA to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the actions they plan to take to correct 
these situations.

                     DISASTER LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2003....................................    $190,250,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................     200,463,000
House allowance.........................................     190,250,000
Committee recommendation................................     190,250,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $190,250,000 
for the disaster loan program. The recommendation is 
$10,213,000 below the budget request. The recommendation does 
not include $3,000,000 for gainsharing. Of the amount provided, 
$79,109,000 is for direct loan subsidies.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee wishes to underscore the reprogramming 
requirements outlined in section 605. This recommendation 
includes an administrative provision in the bill language, as 
in last year's bill, providing the authority to transfer funds 
between the Small Business Administration's appropriations 
accounts. The language provides that no account may be 
decreased by more than 5 percent or increased by more than 10 
percent. The language also makes the transfers subject to the 
Committee's standard reprogramming procedures under section 
605. In addition, a reprogramming notification is required in 
any proposed organization, whether or not funding transfers 
will be associated with the proposed reorganization.
    Because of the unique legal status of Alaska Natives, 
Native Hawaiians, and residents living in the territories, the 
offices handling SBA programs on reservations often lack the 
knowledge and ability to make SBA programs work outside the 
continental United States. To address this failure, a new 
position will be established to focus on these unique 
communities.
    The Committee is disturbed that disaster loans in Alaska 
have been sold to foreign companies who lack the ability and 
motivation to work with commercial fisherman still struggling 
from declining runs to restructure their debt. In some cases, 
fishing vessels have been seized for small arrearages instead 
of working to develop a more flexible payment schedule. To 
ensure these loans can be managed with the maximum flexibility 
and with the full range of tools available to the SBA, the 
Committee directs that disaster loans in Alaska continue to be 
managed by SBA and not be sold for processing.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................      $2,981,000
Budget estimate, 2004...................................       8,000,000
House allowance.........................................       3,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,000,000. 
The recommendation is $3,000,000 below the budget request.
    The Institute was created in 1984 to further the 
development and adoption of improved judicial administration in 
State courts.
    Of the amount provided, $1,500,000 is for the State of 
Wisconsin ``Justice Gateway'' Information Integration System, 
$700,000 is for the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Court System, 
$1,000,000 is for the San Francisco Justice Information 
Tracking System, $500,000 is for the Institute for the Study of 
Justice and Security, and $1,300,000 is for pro se pilot 
projects in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York.

      United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2003....................................................
Budget estimate, 2004...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      $2,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,000,000. 
The recommendation is $2,000,000 above the budget request.

                      TITLE VI--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments and agencies funded in the accompanying 
bill.
    Section 601 prohibits any appropriation act from being used 
for publicity or propaganda purposes not authorized by law.
    Section 602 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
year unless expressly so provided.
    Section 603 provides that the expenditure for any 
appropriation contained in the act for any consulting service 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 604 provides for severability should a provision of 
this Act be found to be unconstitutional.
    Section 605(a) stipulates Committee policy concerning the 
reprogramming of funds. Section 605(a) prohibits the 
reprogramming of funds which: (1) create new programs; (2) 
eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) increases funds 
or personnel by any means for any project or activity for which 
funds have been denied or restricted; (4) relocates offices or 
employees; (5) reorganizes offices, programs, or activities; 
(6) contracts out or privatizes any function or activity 
presently performed by Federal employees--unless the 
Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate are notified 
15 days in advance.
    Section 605(b) prohibits a reprogramming of funds in excess 
of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, that (1) augments 
existing programs, projects, or activities; (2) reduces by 10 
percent funding for any existing program, project, or activity, 
or numbers of personnel by 10 percent as approved by Congress; 
or (3) results from any general savings due to a reduction in 
personnel which would result in a change in existing programs, 
activities, or projects as approved by Congress unless the 
Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate are notified 
15 days in advance.
    Section 606 prohibits construction, repair, overhaul, 
conversion, or modernization of NOAA ships outside of the 
United States.
    Section 607 limits funding for United Nations peacekeeping 
missions that fail to meet certain criteria.
    Section 608 prohibits implementation of a Memorandum of 
Agreement.
    Section 609 responds to the Office of Management and 
Budget's Circular A-11 as it concerns the reporting of prior 
year unobligated balances.
    Section 610 ties grant eligibility to retired law 
enforcement disability benefits.
    Section 611 limits the availability of funds for tobacco 
promotion.
    Section 612 prohibits funds from being used to issue a visa 
to any alien involved in extrajudicial and political killings 
in Haiti and establishes working conditions for plaintiffs in a 
recently settled Federal lawsuit.
    Section 613 prohibits a user fee from being charged for 
background checks conducted pursuant to the Brady Handgun 
Control Act of 1993 and prohibits implementation of a 
background check system that does not require and result in the 
immediate destruction of certain information.
    Section 614 delays obligation of some receipts deposited 
into the Crime Victim Fund.
    Section 615 limits the placement of maximum or high 
security prisoners to appropriately secure facilities.
    Section 616 restricts Federal prisoner access to certain 
amenities.
    Section 617 limits transfers of funds between agencies.
    Section 618 provides certain grants.
    Section 619 prohibits the agencies funded under this Act 
from engaging in unsound budget practices.
    Section 620 improves the provision of services by the Small 
Business Administration.
    Section 621 clarifies authority between two of the agencies 
funded in this Act.
    Section 622 clarifies the status of certain commissioners.
    Section 623 establishes outyear funding targets for the 
Coastal Zone Management Act.
    Section 624 establishes a cap on media ownership.
    Section 625 improves access to vision care by giving 
patients the rights to receive a copy of their contact lens 
prescription and to prompt, presumed verification of their 
prescription.
    Section 626 addresses fixed terrestrial communications 
services.

                         TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                         General Administration

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $499,000 from the 
unobligated balances available in the ``Working Capital Fund''.

                         COUNTERTERRORISM FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $50,000,000 from 
the unobligated balances available in the ``Counterterrorism 
Fund''. These funds, provided in various supplementals and 
appropriations bills, are grossly in excess of need, and 
reflect the continuing desire of the Office of Management and 
Budget to corrupt the purpose of this account. For the last 
time, the Committee reminds interested parties that the 
Counterterrorism Fund exists solely to provide the Justice 
Department with response and restoration funds in the immediate 
wake of a terrorist attack. If, hereafter, the impulse to 
convert this account into a slush fund proves too powerful, the 
Fund will be eliminated and contingencies addressed in the 
usual way: reprogrammings.

                            Legal Activities

                         ASSET FORFEITURE FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $499,000 from the 
unobligated balances available in the ``Asset Forfeiture 
Fund''.

                       Office of Justice Programs

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $9,500,000 in 
prior year unobligated balances from the various accounts under 
this heading. The funds to be rescinded shall be limited to 
those identified in the reprogramming submitted by the Office 
of Justice Programs to Congress on July 1, 2003.

              DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

                              (RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $3,000,000 from 
the unobligated balances available in the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, ``Construction of Research 
Facilities'' account.

                       TITLE VIII--OTHER MATTERS

    This title further addresses issues relevant to the 
Committee recommendation.

                      TITLE IX--ALASKAN FISHERIES

    This title addresses changes in the management of North 
Pacific fisheries.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
items of appropriation not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    The following appropriations have not been authorized 
either in whole or in part and fall under this rule:
    Title II--Department of Commerce and related agencies: 
Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, salaries and expenses; 
International Trade Commission, salaries and expenses; Export 
Administration, operations and administration; International 
Trade Administration, operations and administration; economic 
development assistance programs; Patent and Trademark Office; 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, scientific and 
technical research and services; NIST industrial technology 
services; NIST construction of research facilities; National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration operations, research, 
and facilities; NOAA construction; and Minority Business 
Development Agency.
    Title V--Related agencies: Department of Transportation; 
Maritime Administration, operations and training; Commission on 
Civil Rights; Federal Communications Commission (except 
offsetting fee collections); Legal Services Corporation; and 
Securities and Exchange Commission.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on September 4, 
2003, the Committee ordered reported en bloc: S. 1585, an 
original bill making appropriations for the Departments of 
Commerce, Justice, and State, the judiciary, and related 
agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004; an 
original bill making appropriations for the Departments of 
Transportation and Treasury, the Executive Office of the 
President, and certain independent agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2004; and S. 1584, an original bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and 
Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry independent 
agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 2004; each subject to 
amendment and each subject to the budget allocations, by a 
recorded vote of 29-0, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Stevens
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Campbell
Mr. Craig
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. DeWine
Mr. Brownback
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Ms. Landrieu

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of the rule XXVI requires that Committee 
reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by this bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.
    With respect to this bill, it is the opinion of the 
Committee that it is necessary to dispense with these 
requirements in order to expedite the business of the Senate.

  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2003 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2004
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                           Senate Committee recommendation compared with (+
                                                                                                                                 or -)
               Item                       2003             Budget       House allowance     Committee    ----------------------------------------------------
                                     appropriation   estimate        deg.        recommendation        2003             Budget            House
                                                                                                           appropriation   estimate  allowance
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -----------------------------------


TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE AND

          RELATED AGENCY

Foreign terrorist tracking task             61,597   .................          72,607          +11,010          +72,607
 force............................

       DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

      General Administration

Salaries and expenses.............          90,477           133,772           116,171          +25,694          -17,601
    Supplemental appropriations              5,000   .................  ...............          -5,000   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
Joint automated booking system....          15,869   .................          23,176           +7,307          +23,176
Automated Biometric Identification           8,941   .................  ...............          -8,941   ...............
 System--Integrated Identification
 system integration...............
Identification systems integration  ...............           34,077    ...............  ...............         -34,077
Narrowband communications.........          63,936           140,083           103,171          +39,235          -36,912
    Transfer from Treasury........           7,391   .................  ...............          -7,391   ...............
Counterterrorism fund.............             993   .................  ...............            -993   ...............
    Supplemental appropriations             20,000   .................  ...............         -20,000   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
Administrative review and appeals.         190,290           197,420           194,111           +3,821           -3,309
Detention trustee.................         768,578           810,125           849,876          +81,298          +39,751
    Supplemental appropriations             40,000   .................  ...............         -40,000   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
Office of Inspector General.......          51,599            62,029            60,840           +9,241           -1,189
    Supplemental appropriations              2,500   .................  ...............          -2,500   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General                     1,265,574         1,377,506         1,347,345          +81,771          -30,161
       administration.............
                                   =====================================================================================================================
  United States Parole Commission

Salaries and expenses.............          10,420            11,051            10,718             +298             -333

         Legal Activities

General legal activities:
    Direct appropriation..........         605,368           663,350           630,641          +25,273          -32,709
    Radiation exposure                       1,983   .................  ...............          -1,983   ...............
     compensation act.............
        Non-defense...............  ...............            1,996             1,996           +1,996   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal................         607,351           665,346           632,637          +25,286          -32,709

Vaccine injury compensation trust            4,002             4,028             4,028              +26   ...............
 fund (permanent).................
Legal activities office automation          15,838            33,240            66,240          +50,402          +33,000

Antitrust Division................         133,133           141,898           141,898           +8,765   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections--          -133,133          -112,000          -112,000          +21,133   ...............
     current year.................
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........  ...............           29,898            29,898          +29,898   ...............

United States Attorneys...........       1,493,993         1,556,784         1,507,879          +13,886          -48,905

United States Trustee System Fund.         155,736           175,172           170,168          +14,432           -5,004
    Offsetting fee collections....        -149,736          -167,172          -162,168          -12,432           +5,004
    Interest on U.S. securities...          -6,000            -8,000            -8,000           -2,000   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........  ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............

Foreign Claims Settlement                    1,129             1,212             1,207              +78               -5
 Commission.......................

United States Marshals Service:
    Salaries and expenses (non-            676,051           720,806           602,274          -73,777         -118,532
     CSE).........................
        Supplemental                         8,000   .................  ...............          -8,000   ...............
         appropriations (Public
         Law 108-11)..............
    Courthouse security equipment.  ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Construction..................          15,028   .................          25,964          +10,936          +25,964
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States                 699,079           720,806           628,238          -70,841          -92,568
       Marshals Service...........

Fees and expenses of witnesses....         175,645           156,145           156,145          -19,500   ...............
Community Relations Service.......           9,412             9,526             9,526             +114   ...............
Assets forfeiture fund............          21,759            22,949            22,949           +1,190   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Legal activities.....       3,028,208         3,199,934         3,058,747          +30,539         -141,187
                                   =====================================================================================================================
    Interagency Law Enforcement

Interagency crime and drug                 369,712           541,844           415,010          +45,298         -126,834
 enforcement......................
Interagency law enforcement         ...............  .................         551,784         +551,784         +551,784
 support..........................

  Federal Bureau of Investigation

Salaries and expenses.............       3,680,923         4,149,465         3,395,885         -285,038         -753,580
    Supplemental appropriations            367,192   .................  ...............        -367,192   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
Counterintelligence and national           472,211           490,104           490,104          +17,893   ...............
 security.........................
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........       4,520,326         4,639,569         3,885,989         -634,337         -753,580

Construction......................           1,242   .................          44,791          +43,549          +44,791
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Bureau of           4,521,568         4,639,569         3,930,780         -590,788         -708,789
       Investigation..............
                                   =====================================================================================================================
  Drug Enforcement Administration

Salaries and expenses.............       1,639,223         1,677,304         1,603,780          -35,443          -73,524
    Diversion control fund........         -88,450          -118,561           -91,499           -3,049          +27,062
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Drug Enforcement            1,550,773         1,558,743         1,512,281          -38,492          -46,462
       Administration.............
                                   =====================================================================================================================
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and             788,273           838,987           829,593          +41,320           -9,394
 Firearms.........................

    GREAT grants..................          12,915            13,000    ...............         -12,915          -13,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total.......................         801,188           851,987           829,593          +28,405          -22,394
                                   =====================================================================================================================
       Federal Prison System

Salaries and expenses.............       4,044,788         4,677,214         3,872,791         -171,997         -804,423
Buildings and facilities..........         396,632   .................         345,805          -50,827         +345,805
    Rescission....................  ...............         -187,900    ...............  ...............        +187,900
Federal Prison Industries,                   3,407             3,429             3,429              +22   ...............
 Incorporated (limitation on
 administrative expenses).........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System       4,444,827         4,492,743         4,222,025         -222,802         -270,718
                                   =====================================================================================================================
    Office of Justice Programs

Management and administration.....  ...............  .................          29,000          +29,000          +29,000
Bureau of Justice assistance......         199,983         2,136,423           136,500          -63,483       -1,999,923
    (By transfer).................          (6,632)  .................  ...............         (-6,632)  ...............
    Rescission....................  ...............          -11,622    ...............  ...............         +11,622
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Justice             199,983         2,124,801           165,500          -34,483       -1,959,301
       Programs...................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
State and local law enforcement
 assistance:
    Local law enforcement block            397,400   .................         150,000         -247,400         +150,000
     grant........................
        Boys and Girls clubs               (80,000)  .................         (80,000)  ...............        (+80,000)
         (earmark)................
        National Institute of              (20,000)  .................  ...............        (-20,000)  ...............
         Justice (earmark)........
        Citizen corps (earmark)...          (3,000)  .................  ...............         (-3,000)  ...............
    State criminal alien                   248,375   .................         250,000           +1,625         +250,000
     assistance program...........
    Indian assistance.............          17,883   .................          18,000             +117          +18,000
        Tribal prison construction          (5,000)  .................  ...............         (-5,000)  ...............
        Indian tribal courts                (8,000)  .................  ...............         (-8,000)  ...............
         program..................
        Indian grants.............          (5,000)  .................  ...............         (-5,000)  ...............
    Cooperative agreement program.           4,968   .................  ...............          -4,968   ...............
    Byrne grants (formula)........         496,750   .................         500,000           +3,250         +500,000
    Byrne grants (discretionary)..         149,933   .................          88,575          -61,358          +88,575
    Juvenile crime block grant....         188,765   .................  ...............        -188,765   ...............
    Violence Against Women grants.         387,629   .................         406,000          +18,371         +406,000
    State prison drug treatment...          64,577   .................  ...............         -64,577   ...............
    Drug courts...................          44,708   .................          43,500           -1,208          +43,500
    Other crime control programs..           5,653   .................           5,000             -653           +5,000
    Assistance for victims of                9,935   .................  ...............          -9,935   ...............
     trafficking..................
    Prescription drug monitoring..           7,451   .................  ...............          -7,451   ...............
    Prison rape prevention........          12,915   .................  ...............         -12,915   ...............
    Terrorism prevention and                14,902   .................  ...............         -14,902   ...............
     response training............
    Prior year unobligated                 -20,854   .................  ...............         +20,854   ...............
     balances.....................
    Associated outlays............  ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and local law         2,030,990   .................       1,461,075         -569,915       +1,461,075
       enforcement................

Weed and seed program fund........          58,542   .................          58,542   ...............         +58,542

Community oriented policing
 services:
    Public safety and community            350,942           163,755           260,000          -90,942          +96,245
     policing grants..............
        Hiring....................        (200,000)  .................        (200,000)  ...............       (+200,000)
        Methamphetamine...........         (57,132)  .................  ...............        (-57,132)  ...............
    Crime fighting technologies...         397,963   .................         294,636         -103,327         +294,636
        COPS technology...........        (189,954)  .................         (83,960)       (-105,994)        (+83,960)
        Upgrade criminal history           (40,000)  .................         (36,626)         (-3,374)        (+36,626)
         records (CITA)...........
        DNA identification/crime           (81,538)  .................         (34,050)        (-47,488)        (+34,050)
         lab......................
        COPS Interoperability.....         (20,000)  .................        (140,000)       (+120,000)       (+140,000)
            Supplemental                    54,750   .................  ...............         -54,750   ...............
             appropriations
             (Public Law 108-11)..
    Community prosecutors.........          84,448   .................          30,000          -54,448          +30,000
    Crime prevention..............          56,736   .................          37,000          -19,736          +37,000
        Safe schools initiative...         (17,000)  .................         (17,000)  ...............        (+17,000)
    Justice assistance grants       ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............
     program......................
    Management administration.....          32,785   .................          35,000           +2,215          +35,000
    Rescission....................  ...............           -6,378    ...............  ...............          +6,378
    Associated outlays............  ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Community oriented            977,624           157,377           656,636         -320,988         +499,259
       policing services..........

Juvenile justice programs.........         273,517   .................         232,330          -41,187         +232,330
    (Transfer out)................         (-6,632)  .................  ...............         (+6,632)  ...............

Public safety officers benefits:
    Death benefits................          49,054            49,054            49,054   ...............  ...............
    Disability benefits...........           3,974   .................           4,000              +26           +4,000
    Educational benefits..........  ...............  .................           3,500           +3,500           +3,500
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Public safety                  53,028            49,054            56,554           +3,526           +7,500
       officers benefits program..
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Justice           3,593,684         2,331,232         2,630,637         -963,047         +299,405
       Programs...................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, Department of Justice      19,585,954        19,004,609        18,508,920       -1,077,034         -495,689
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department        19,647,551        19,004,609        18,581,527       -1,066,024         -423,082
       of Justice and Related
       Agency.....................
          (Transfer out)..........         (-6,632)  .................  ...............         (+6,632)  ...............
          (By transfer)...........          (6,632)  .................  ...............         (-6,632)  ...............
                                   =====================================================================================================================
 TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
       AND RELATED AGENCIES

         RELATED AGENCIES

 Office of the United States Trade
          Representative

Salaries and expenses.............          34,772            36,994            36,994           +2,222   ...............
European communities music                   3,300   .................  ...............          -3,300   ...............
 licensing dispute (Public Law 108-
 11)..............................

  International Trade Commission

Salaries and expenses.............          53,649            58,295            58,295           +4,646   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Related agencies.....          91,721            95,289            95,289           +3,568   ...............
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

International Trade Administration

Operations and administration.....         367,838           395,123           375,053           +7,215          -20,070
    Offsetting fee collections....          -8,000           -13,000            -3,000           +5,000          +10,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........         359,838           382,123           372,053          +12,215          -10,070

  Bureau of Industry and Security

Operations and administration.....          59,088            78,169            73,060          +13,972           -5,109
    CWC enforcement...............           7,203   .................  ...............          -7,203   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Industry             66,291            78,169            73,060           +6,769           -5,109
       and Security...............

       Economic Development
          Administration

Economic development assistance            288,115           331,027           357,115          +69,000          +26,088
 programs.........................
Salaries and expenses.............          30,565            33,377            30,565   ...............          -2,812
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Economic Development          318,680           364,404           387,680          +69,000          +23,276
       Administration.............

   Minority Business Development
              Agency

Minority business development.....          28,718            29,487            28,718   ...............            -769
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Trade and                     865,248           949,472           956,800          +91,552           +7,328
       Infrastructure Development.
                                   =====================================================================================================================
     ECONOMIC AND INFORMATION
          INFRASTRUCTURE

 Economic and Statistical Analysis

Salaries and expenses.............          71,689            84,756            84,756          +13,067   ...............

       Bureau of the Census

Salaries and expenses.............         181,811           220,908           181,811   ...............         -39,097
Periodic censuses and programs....         369,067           441,053           369,067   ...............         -71,986
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of the Census.         550,878           661,961           550,878   ...............        -111,083

  National Telecommunications and
    Information Administration

Salaries and expenses.............          14,604            18,869            15,042             +438           -3,827
Public telecommunications                   43,273             2,538            55,000          +11,727          +52,462
 facilities, planning and
 construction.....................
Information infrastructure grants.          15,402   .................          15,500              +98          +15,500
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National                       73,279            21,407            85,542          +12,263          +64,135
       Telecommunications and
       Information Administration.

United States Patent and Trademark
              Office

Current year fee funding..........       1,015,229         1,203,055         1,217,460         +202,231          +14,405
Prior year carryover..............         166,771   .................  ...............        -166,771   ...............
Proposed legislation..............  ...............          192,000    ...............  ...............        -192,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Patent and Trademark        1,182,000         1,395,055         1,217,460          +35,460         -177,595
       Office.....................

      Offsetting fee collections..      -1,015,229        -1,203,055        -1,217,460         -202,231          -14,405
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, Economic and                  862,617           960,124           721,176         -141,441         -238,948
       Information Infrastructure.
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

     Technology Administration

    Office of Technology Policy

Salaries and expenses.............           9,822             8,015    ...............          -9,822           -8,015
NTIS revolving fund...............  ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............

  National Institute of Standards
          and Technology

Scientific and technical research          357,075           379,849           383,375          +26,300           +3,526
 and services.....................
Industrial technology services....         284,760            39,607           369,223          +84,463         +329,616
Construction of research                    65,670            69,590            84,630          +18,960          +15,040
 facilities.......................
Working capital fund..............  ...............            7,772             7,772           +7,772   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Institute of         707,505           496,818           845,000         +137,495         +348,182
       Standards and Technology...

 National Oceanic and Atmospheric
          Administration

Operations, research, and                2,298,481         2,389,300         2,696,520         +398,039         +307,220
 facilities.......................
    (By transfer from Promote and          (65,000)          (75,000)          (52,000)        (-13,000)        (-23,000)
     Develop Fund)................
    (By transfer from Coastal zone  ...............            3,000    ...............  ...............          -3,000
     management)..................
    Deobligations returned........  ...............  .................         -15,000          -15,000          -15,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operations, research,       2,298,481         2,392,300         2,681,520         +383,039         +289,220
       and facilities.............

International fisheries                     16,989            20,043            20,743           +3,754             +700
 commissions......................
Litigation and settlement fund....  ...............  .................           5,000           +5,000           +5,000
Procurement, acquisition and               754,096           842,399           990,127         +236,031         +147,728
 construction.....................
    Supplemental appropriations             65,000   .................  ...............         -65,000   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Procurement,                  819,096           842,399           990,127         +171,031         +147,728
       acquisition and
       construction...............

Pacific coastal salmon recovery...         129,155            90,000            90,000          -39,155   ...............
Coastal zone management fund......          -3,000            -3,000            -3,000   ...............  ...............
Fishermen's contingency fund......               1               956                 1   ...............            -955
Foreign fishing observer fund.....               1               191                 1   ...............            -190
Fisheries finance program account.          -8,000            -4,000            -5,000           +3,000           -1,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and        3,252,723         3,338,889         3,779,392         +526,669         +440,503
       Atmospheric Administration.
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, Science and                 3,970,050         3,843,722         4,624,392         +654,342         +780,670
       Technology.................

      Departmental Management

Salaries and expenses.............          44,662            57,191            44,662   ...............         -12,529
Office of Inspector General.......          20,501            23,378            21,116             +615           -2,262
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental                   65,163            80,569            65,778             +615          -14,791
       management.................

Tourism promotion (sec. 210)......          49,675   .................  ...............         -49,675   ...............
EDA conveyance (sec. 211).........  ...............  .................           1,000           +1,000           +1,000
Extension of steel loan guarantees  ...............  .................  ...............  ...............  ...............
 (Sec. 213).......................
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of               5,721,032         5,738,598         6,273,857         +552,825         +535,259
       Commerce...................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department        5,812,753         5,833,887         6,369,146         +556,393         +535,259
       of Commerce and related
       agencies...................
          Appropriations..........      (5,812,753)       (5,833,887)       (6,369,146)       (+556,393)       (+535,259)
          (By transfer)...........         (65,000)          (75,000)          (52,000)        (-13,000)        (-23,000)
                                   =====================================================================================================================
     TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

Supreme Court of the United States

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of justices..........           1,872             1,896             1,896              +24   ...............
    Other salaries and expenses...          43,586            55,581            57,518          +13,932           +1,937
    Supplemental appropriations              1,535   .................  ...............          -1,535   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses          46,993            57,477            59,414          +12,421           +1,937

Care of the building and grounds..          41,355             4,658             4,658          -36,697   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Supreme Court of the           88,348            62,135            64,072          -24,276           +1,937
       United States..............

United States Court of Appeals for
        the Federal Circuit

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of judges............           2,225             2,237             2,237              +12   ...............
    Other salaries and expenses...          17,970            20,185            18,425             +455           -1,760
    Supplemental appropriations                973   .................  ...............            -973   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses          21,168            22,422            20,662             -506           -1,760

      United States Court of
        International Trade

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of judges............           1,678             1,721             1,721              +43   ...............
    Other salaries and expenses...          11,931            12,485            11,489             -442             -996
    Supplemental appropriations                 50   .................  ...............             -50   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses          13,659            14,206            13,210             -449             -996

    Courts of Appeals, District
    Courts, and Other Judicial
             Services

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of judges and                 263,854           274,504           274,504          +10,650   ...............
     bankruptcy judges............
    Other salaries and expenses...       3,513,161         3,913,848         3,619,517         +106,356         -294,331
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........       3,777,015         4,188,352         3,894,021         +117,006         -294,331

Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust            2,766             3,293             3,293             +527   ...............
 Fund.............................
Defender services.................         534,961           635,481           595,006          +60,045          -40,475
Fees of jurors and commissioners..          54,281            53,181            53,181           -1,100   ...............
Court security....................         266,655           311,171           266,058             -597          -45,113
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Courts of Appeals,          4,635,678         5,191,478         4,811,559         +175,881         -379,919
       District Courts, and Other
       Judicial Services..........

   Administrative Office of the
       United States Courts

Salaries and expenses.............          63,087            71,908            63,717             +630           -8,191

      Federal Judicial Center

Salaries and expenses.............          20,720            21,660            22,434           +1,714             +774

     Judicial Retirement Funds

Payment to Judiciary Trust Funds..          35,300            29,000            29,000           -6,300   ...............

     United States Sentencing
            Commission

Salaries and expenses.............          12,011            13,200            12,011   ...............          -1,189

        General Provisions

Judges pay raise (sec. 304).......  ...............            4,000             4,000           +4,000   ...............
Judges pay raise (sec. 305).......  ...............  .................          36,000          +36,000          +36,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General provisions...  ...............            4,000            40,000          +40,000          +36,000
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, title III, the              4,889,971         5,430,009         5,076,665         +186,694         -353,344
       Judiciary..................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
 TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND
          RELATED AGENCY

 Administration of Foreign Affairs

Diplomatic and consular programs..       3,248,008         3,516,843         3,280,405          +32,397         -236,438
    (Transfer out)................         (-4,000)          (-4,000)          (-4,000)  ...............  ...............
    Supplemental appropriations             98,420   .................  ...............         -98,420   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
    Worldwide security upgrades...         549,405           646,701           594,373          +44,968          -52,328
    (Transfer out)................  ...............  .................        (-20,000)        (-20,000)        (-20,000)
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Diplomatic and              3,895,833         4,163,544         3,874,778          -21,055         -288,766
       consular programs..........

Capital investment fund...........         182,119           157,000           207,000          +24,881          +50,000
Office of Inspector General.......          29,074            31,703            31,703           +2,629   ...............
    (By transfer).................  ...............  .................         (20,000)        (+20,000)        (+20,000)
Educational and cultural exchange          243,712           345,346           255,292          +11,580          -90,054
 programs.........................
Representation allowances.........           6,443             9,000             6,643             +200           -2,357
Protection of foreign missions and          10,929            10,000            10,000             -929   ...............
 officials........................
Embassy security, construction,            505,195           653,000           483,470          -21,725         -169,530
 and maintenance..................
    Supplemental appropriations            149,500   .................  ...............        -149,500   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
    Worldwide security upgrades...         750,093           861,400           933,122         +183,029          +71,722
Emergencies in the diplomatic and            6,458             1,000                 1           -6,457             -999
 consular service.................
    Supplemental appropriations             50,000   .................  ...............         -50,000   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
    (By transfer).................          (4,000)           (4,000)           (4,000)  ...............  ...............
    (Transfer out)................         (-1,000)          (-1,000)          (-1,000)  ...............  ...............

Repatriation Loans Program
 Account:
    Direct loans subsidy..........             608               612               612               +4   ...............
    Administrative expenses.......             603               607               607               +4   ...............
    (By transfer).................          (1,000)           (1,000)           (1,000)  ...............  ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Repatriation loans              1,211             1,219             1,219               +8   ...............
       program account............

Payment to the American Institute           18,330            19,773            19,893           +1,563             +120
 in Taiwan........................
Payment to the Foreign Service             138,200           134,979           134,979           -3,221   ...............
 Retirement and Disability Fund...
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Administration of           5,987,097         6,387,964         5,958,100          -28,997         -429,864
       Foreign Affairs............

  International Organizations and
            Conferences

Contributions to international             860,371         1,010,463           921,888          +61,517          -88,575
 organizations, current year
 assessment.......................
Contributions for international            669,331           550,200           482,649         -186,682          -67,551
 peacekeeping activities, current
 year.............................
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International               1,529,702         1,560,663         1,404,537         -125,165         -156,126
       Organizations and
       Conferences................

     International Commissions

International Boundary and Water
 Commission, United States and
 Mexico:
    Salaries and expenses.........          25,316            31,562            28,312           +2,996           -3,250
    Construction..................           5,415             8,901             8,201           +2,786             -700
American sections, international             9,410            11,204            10,942           +1,532             -262
 commissions......................
International fisheries                     16,989            20,043    ...............         -16,989          -20,043
 commissions......................
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International                  57,130            71,710            47,455           -9,675          -24,255
       commissions................

               Other

International Center for Middle     ...............  .................           7,000           +7,000           +7,000
 Eastern-Western dialogue.........
Payment to the Asia Foundation....          10,376             9,250    ...............         -10,376           -9,250
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship                 497               500               500               +3   ...............
 program..........................
Israeli Arab scholarship program..             373               375               375               +2   ...............
East-West Center..................          17,883            14,280            19,000           +1,117           +4,720
National Endowment for Democracy..          41,727            36,000            36,000           -5,727   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of State..       7,644,785         8,080,742         7,472,967         -171,818         -607,775
                                   =====================================================================================================================
          RELATED AGENCY

  Broadcasting Board of Governors

International Broadcasting                 465,850           525,204           518,149          +52,299           -7,055
 Operations.......................
    Supplemental appropriations             30,500   .................  ...............         -30,500   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........
Broadcasting to Cuba..............          24,834            26,901            28,101           +3,267           +1,200
Broadcasting capital improvements.          12,657            11,395            11,395           -1,262   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Broadcasting Board of         533,841           563,500           557,645          +23,804           -5,855
       Governors..................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Department        8,178,626         8,644,242         8,030,612         -148,014         -613,630
       of State...................
          (Transfer out)..........         (-5,000)          (-5,000)         (-25,000)        (-20,000)        (-20,000)
          (By transfer)...........          (5,000)           (5,000)          (25,000)        (+20,000)        (+20,000)
                                   =====================================================================================================================
     TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

Commission for the Preservation of
     America's Heritage Abroad

Salaries and expenses.............             496               499               659             +163             +160

    Commission on Civil Rights

Salaries and expenses.............           9,037             9,096             9,096              +59   ...............

    Commission on International
         Religious Freedom

Salaries and expenses.............           2,865             3,000             2,000             -865           -1,000

    Commission on Ocean Policy

Salaries and expenses.............           1,987   .................  ...............          -1,987   ...............

    Commission on Security and
       Cooperation in Europe

Salaries and expenses.............           1,572             1,615             1,615              +43   ...............

Congressional-Executive Commission
 on the People's Republic of China

Salaries and expenses.............           1,371             1,800             1,400              +29             -400

   Equal Employment Opportunity
            Commission

Salaries and expenses.............         306,815           334,754           334,754          +27,939   ...............
    Supplemental appropriations             15,000   .................  ...............         -15,000   ...............
     (Public Law 108-11)..........

 Federal Communications Commission

Salaries and expenses.............         270,987           280,798           277,798           +6,811           -3,000
    Offsetting fee collections--          -269,000          -251,984          -251,984          +17,016   ...............
     current year.................
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........           1,987            28,814            25,814          +23,827           -3,000

     Federal Trade Commission

Salaries and expenses.............         176,553           191,132           189,032          +12,479           -2,100
    Offsetting fee collections--          -150,000          -112,000          -112,000          +38,000   ...............
     current year.................
    Offsetting fee collections,            -18,100           -18,000           -18,000             +100   ...............
     telephone database...........
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........           8,453            61,132            59,032          +50,579           -2,100

    Legal Services Corporation

Payment to the Legal Services              336,645           329,300           338,848           +2,203           +9,548
 Corporation......................

     Marine Mammal Commission

Salaries and expenses.............           3,030             1,856             3,066              +36           +1,210

 National Commission on Terrorism
  Attacks Upon the United States

Salaries and expenses (Public Law           11,000   .................  ...............         -11,000   ...............
 108-11)..........................

    National Veterans Business
      Development Corporation

Salaries and expenses.............           1,987             2,000             2,000              +13   ...............

Securities and Exchange Commission

Salaries and expenses.............         745,789           841,507           841,500          +95,711               -7
Prior year unobligated balances...         -29,439   .................  ...............         +29,439   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation........         716,350           841,507           841,500         +125,150               -7

   Small Business Administration

Salaries and expenses.............         312,413           360,155           332,413          +20,000          -27,742
Office of Inspector General.......          12,341            14,500            12,341   ...............          -2,159
Business Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy..........           3,702             1,910             1,910           -1,792   ...............
    Guaranteed loans subsidy......          84,805            94,860            85,758             +953           -9,102
    Administrative expenses.......         128,161           129,000           129,000             +839   ...............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Business loans                216,668           225,770           216,668   ...............          -9,102
       program account............

Disaster Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy..........          72,665            79,109            79,109           +6,444   ...............
    Administrative expenses.......         117,585           118,354           111,141           -6,444           -7,213
    Gainsharing...................  ...............            3,000    ...............  ...............          -3,000
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Disaster loans                190,250           200,463           190,250   ...............         -10,213
       program account............
                                   ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Small Business                731,672           800,888           751,672          +20,000          -49,216
       Administration.............

      State Justice Institute

Salaries and expenses.............           2,981   .................           5,000           +2,019           +5,000

 United States-China Economic and
    Security Review Commission

Salaries and expenses.............  ...............  .................           2,000           +2,000           +2,000
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, title V, Related            2,153,248         2,416,261         2,378,456         +225,208          -37,805
       agencies...................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS

       DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

      General Administration

Working Capital fund (rescission).         -78,000   .................            -499          +77,501             -499
Counterterrorism fund (rescission)  ...............  .................         -50,000          -50,000          -50,000

         Legal Activities

Assets forfeiture fund                     -50,874   .................            -499          +50,375             -499
 (rescission).....................

  Immigration and Naturalization
              Service

Immigration emergency fund                    -580   .................  ...............            +580   ...............
 (rescission).....................

    Office of Justice Programs

Various accounts (rescission).....  ...............  .................          -9,500           -9,500           -9,500

      DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

  National Institute of Standards
          and Technology

Construction of research            ...............  .................          -3,000           -3,000           -3,000
 facilities (rescission)..........

 National Oceanic and Atmostpheric
          Administration

Coastal impact assistance                   -7,000   .................  ...............          +7,000   ...............
 (rescission).....................

      Departmental Management

Emergency oil and gas guaranteed              -920   .................  ...............            +920   ...............
 loan program account (rescission)
Emergency steel guaranteed loan     ...............          -97,000    ...............  ...............         +97,000
 program account (rescission).....

         RELATED AGENCIES

 Federal Communications Commission

Salaries and expenses (rescission)          -5,700   .................  ...............          +5,700   ...............

   Small Business Administration

Salaries and expenses (rescission)         -13,750   .................  ...............         +13,750   ...............
Business Loans Program Account:
    Guaranteed loans subsidy               -10,500   .................  ...............         +10,500   ...............
     (rescission).................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Total, title VII,                   -167,324           -97,000           -63,498         +103,826          +33,502
       Rescissions................
                                   =====================================================================================================================
      Grand total:
          New budget                    40,514,825        41,232,008        40,372,908         -141,917         -859,100
           (obligational)
           authority..............
              Appropriations......     (40,682,149)      (41,534,908)      (40,436,406)       (-245,743)     (-1,098,502)
              Rescissions.........       (-167,324)        (-302,900)         (-63,498)       (+103,826)       (+239,402)
          (Transfer out)..........        (-11,632)          (-5,000)         (-25,000)        (-13,368)        (-20,000)
          (By transfer)...........         (76,632)          (80,000)          (77,000)           (+368)         (-3,000)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------