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109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    109-296

======================================================================

 
RESOLUTION OF INQUIRY REQUESTING THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO 
   PROVIDE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CERTAIN DOCUMENTS IN HIS 
POSSESSION RELATING TO THE ANTICIPATED EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE 
                  COASTAL REGIONS OF THE UNITED STATES

                                _______
                                

 November 15, 2005.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Boehlert, from the Committee on Science, submitted the following

                             ADVERSE REPORT

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                       [To accompany H. Res. 515]

    The Committee on Science, to whom was referred the 
resolution (H. Res. 515), of inquiry requesting the President 
of the United States to provide to the House of Representatives 
certain documents in his possession relating to the anticipated 
effects of climate change on the coastal regions of the United 
States, having considered the same, report unfavorably thereon 
without amendment and recommend that the resolution not be 
agreed to.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Purpose of the Bill.............................................2
  II. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................2
 III. Summary of Hearings.............................................2
  IV. Committee Actions...............................................2
   V. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................2
  VI. Committee Views.................................................3
 VII. Compliance with Public Law 104-4 (Unfunded Mandates)............3
VIII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations................3
  IX. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives...........3
   X. Constitutional Authority Statement..............................3
  XI. Federal Advisory Committee Statement............................3
 XII. Congressional Accountability Act................................4
XIII. Committee Recommendations.......................................4
 XIV. Minority Views..................................................5
  XV. Proceedings of Full Committee Markup............................7

                         I. PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    House Resolution 515 requests the President of the United 
States to provide to the House of Representatives, not later 
than 14 days after the date of adoption of this resolution, all 
documents (including minutes and memos) in his possession 
relating to the effects of climate change on the coastal 
regions of the United States produced by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National 
Weather Service, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the 
National Assessment Synthesis Team, and the U.S. Geological 
Survey (USGS).

              II. BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION

    House Resolution 515 is a resolution of inquiry, which, 
pursuant to rule XIII, clause 7, of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, directs the Committee to act on the resolution 
within 14 legislative days, or a privileged motion to discharge 
the Committee is in order.
    Under the rules and precedents of the House, a resolution 
of inquiry is the means by which the House requests information 
from the President of the United States or the head of an 
executive department. According to `Deschler's Precedents,' it 
is a `simple resolution making a direct request or demand of 
the President or the head of an executive department to furnish 
the House of Representatives with specific factual information 
in the possession of the executive branch.'

                        III. SUMMARY OF HEARINGS

    The Committee held no hearings on the resolution.

                         IV. COMMITTEE ACTIONS

    On October 26, 2005, Congressman Dennis Kucinich of Ohio 
introduced H. Res. 515, which was referred to the Committee on 
Science.
    On November 9, 2005, the Committee on Science met to 
consider H. Res. 515. No amendments were offered. The 
resolution failed on a recorded vote of 11 yeas to 16 nays.
    Mr. Ehlers moved that the Committee adversely report the 
resolution to the House with the recommendation that the 
resolution not be agreed to and that the staff be instructed to 
prepare the legislative report and make necessary technical and 
conforming changes. With a quorum present, the motion was 
agreed to by voice vote.

               V. SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE BILL

    House Resolution 515 requests the President of the United 
States to provide to the House of Representatives, not later 
than 14 days after the date of adoption of this resolution, all 
documents (including minutes and memos) in his possession 
relating to the effects of climate change on the coastal 
regions of the United States produced by the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National 
Weather Service, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the 
National Assessment Synthesis Team, and the U.S. Geological 
Survey (USGS).

                          VI. COMMITTEE VIEWS

    The resolution seeks information the President has relating 
to climate change. However, it is not clear what documents the 
sponsors of the resolution are seeking, why the sponsors are 
seeking the documents, the degree to which the information they 
seek can be achieved more easily through other means or even is 
publicly available, or what decisions the President has made 
with the documents that justify a resolution of inquiry. The 
Committee further believes that the resolution is so broadly 
worded as to capture almost any document relating to climate 
change within a significant portion of the executive branch.
    The amount of data the federal agencies have produced 
``relating to the effects of climate change on the coastal 
regions of the United States'' is enormous. The United States 
has invested heavily for over 15 years in efforts to understand 
the highly complex physical phenomenon that is the Earth's 
climate, how and why it is changing, and what effects those 
changes may have.
    The Administration estimates that these efforts are funded 
at approximately $3 billion a year. More than a dozen agencies 
are involved. For example, NASA launches research satellites to 
detect trace greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. NSF makes 
thousands of grants to individual researchers in universities 
across the nation who study climate change. NOAA's research 
labs try to better understand the carbon cycle, the role of the 
oceans in climate, and the gaseous content of the atmosphere. 
And USGS produces high resolution maps showing precisely how 
every acre of the U.S. coast rises from the sea.
    The Committee believes that complying with this resolution 
would require enormous resources to no apparent end. Complying 
with the resolution would not advance any public policy goal. 
Therefore, the Committee believes that such a resolution must 
be reported adversely and not brought before the House.

                 VII. COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 104-4

    H. Res. 515 contains no unfunded mandates.

         VIII. COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The Committee held no oversight activities with respect to 
clause 3(c)(1) of rule XII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

       IX. STATEMENT ON GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    The rule requiring a statement of performance goals and 
objectives is inapplicable.

                 X. CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority for H. Res. 515.

                XI. FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    H. Res. 515 does not create any advisory committees.

                 XII. CONGRESSIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

    The Committee finds that H. Res. 515 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                    XIII. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    On November 9, 2005, a quorum being present, the Committee 
on Science adversely reported H. Res. 515, by voice vote.

                          XIV. MINORITY VIEWS

    We fully recognized this Resolution would not receive 
favorable consideration by this Committee or the House of 
Representatives. We supported the Resolution in Committee to 
send a message regarding our broader concerns about the lack of 
cooperation this Administration has demonstrated repeatedly 
with respect to supplying accurate and complete information in 
a timely fashion to the Congress.
    We have a responsibility to oversee the programs and 
policies authorized by Congress. We cannot fulfill that 
responsibility if the Administration does not act in a 
forthright manner to supply information about the expenditures 
and activities of the programs they are managing.
    We simply cannot agree with the Chairman's assertion during 
the markup of this Resolution that our requests for information 
have been responded to in a thorough and timely fashion either 
in this Committee or in the Congress more broadly.
    To cite just a few examples within the Committee's 
jurisdiction, requests for information from NASA on such topics 
as the Space Station Contingency Plan and their Strategic 
Resources Review received vague responses containing little 
substance. An information request dating back to 2002 on the 
plan for addressing the Soyuz in relation to NASA's decision to 
cancel the U.S. crew return vehicle in 2002 and the 
requirements of the Iran Nonproliferation Act received a 
response in the form of a suggested amendment to the INA just 
this year.
    As Ranking Member Representative Bart Gordon indicated in 
his opening statement, we do not wish to dwell on the past 
experiences with information requests. We want to work with our 
Republican colleagues and the Administration to fulfill our 
obligation to the public to oversee the programs in our charge 
and to develop good public policy. We must have good 
information supplied in a timely fashion to accomplish this 
important goal.

                                   Bart Gordon.
                                   Jerry F. Costello.
                                   Lynn C. Woolsey.
                                   David Wu.
                                   Brad Sherman.
                                   Russ Carnahan.
                                   Brian Baird.
                                   Eddie Bernice Johnson.
                                   Michael M. Honda.
                                   Dennis Moore.
                                   Brad Miller.
                                   Mark Udall.
                                   Sheila Jackson-Lee.
                                   Jim Costa.
                                   Jim Matheson.
                                   Charlie Melancon.
XV. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H. RES. 515, OF INQUIRY 
 REQUESTING THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES TO PROVIDE TO THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES CERTAIN DOCUMENTS IN HIS POSSESSION RELATING TO THE 
  ANTICIPATED EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE COASTAL REGIONS OF THE 
                             UNITED STATES



   MARKUP ON H. RES. 515, OF INQUIRY REQUESTING THE PRESIDENT OF THE 
   UNITED STATES TO PROVIDE TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CERTAIN 
  DOCUMENTS IN HIS POSSESSION RELATING TO THE ANTICIPATED EFFECTS OF 
       CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE COASTAL REGIONS OF THE UNITED STATES

                              ----------                              


                      WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2005

                          House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.
    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:10 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Sherwood L. 
Boehlert [Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Boehlert. The Committee on Science will come to 
order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science meets to 
consider the following measure: H. Res. 515, of inquiry 
requesting the President of the United States to provide to the 
House of Representatives certain documents in his possession 
relating to the anticipated effects of climate change on the 
coastal regions of the United States. I ask unanimous consent 
for the authority to recess the committee at any point during 
consideration of these matters and without objection, it is so 
ordered.
    Let us proceed with the markup, and I will start with an 
opening statement. The question is, is this markup really 
necessary, and the answer is yes and no. I want to welcome 
everyone here. I wish we didn't have to take time for this 
resolution but under rules of the House, committees must act on 
resolutions of inquiry within 14 days or they can be brought up 
under a privileged motion on the House floor, and I certainly 
don't want to be responsible for the whole House having to 
devote time to this measure when there are so many other 
pressing matters on our agenda.
    I want to make it clear at the outset that any debate or 
vote on this measure should not be seen as any kind of a 
barometer on what the House thinks or is willing to do about 
global climate change. You know where I am coming from. 
Personally, I know it is for real. That is what the scientific 
consensus tells us. I know man has contributed to it. There is 
no doubt in my mind about that, and I noticed just the other 
day, even the National Association of Evangelical Churches has 
been saying publicly that our stewardship of this planet Earth 
is critically important and we better get on dealing with 
sensitive subjects. Personally, I support mandatory caps on 
carbon dioxide and I think there is growing concern around the 
country about climate change, and let me say I am particularly 
proud of my green credentials and I think there is no one who 
is more outspoken about the need to address the environment in 
a meaningful, responsible way.
    But I don't think this resolution would advance the debate 
on climate change one iota. Rather, the solution is broadly 
drafted and excuse me for suggesting this, but a partisan 
political ploy that tries to create an artificial issue about 
documents. I don't know how that helps anyone. I don't see how 
that significantly advances the debate.
    It is difficult even to determine how anyone would comply 
with the resolution. What documents are being sought? Every 
administration document relating to climate change and U.S. 
coasts? How many truckloads of material would that require?
    What would we do with the information if we got it? What 
would we find? What new insight would we arrive at concerning 
climate change or climate policy? The resolution reminds me 
about the old line about dogs chasing cars. What would they do 
if they actually caught one? What would anyone do if this 
resolution succeeded?
    Let me tell you how I try to be guided in dealing with a 
subject like global climate change. I try to listen more than I 
talk, listen to the National Academy of Science, listening to 
eminent scientists in the field and I don't just listen to the 
people who happen to agree with the conclusion I have arrived 
at. I listen to the people on the other side of the argument. 
And you know what? The people on the other side of the argument 
are dwindling to a few and the consensus is growing on the side 
of the argument that this is for real and we have to deal with 
it in a responsible way.
    The more I have read the short resolution, the more 
baffling I find it. Information on the potential impact of 
climate change on U.S. coasts is readily available. The 
potential impacts of climate change on coastal areas are the 
subject of countless scientific papers. This Committee more 
than any other committee of the Congress knows that.
    So what prompted this? Has anyone sought specific documents 
for specific reasons under standard procedures and been denied? 
Not that we know of.
    But then again, there is not much that we know of related 
to this resolution because it was introduced without any 
serious discussion with me and I do want to point out that the 
author extended the courtesy to me to personally present to me 
a copy of the resolution so I wasn't blindsided, but there was 
no, you know, serious discussion.
    By now, I assume no one has any doubts about where I stand 
in the matter. Now, there is division on both sides of this on 
that sensitive subject but no one should have any 
misunderstanding about my position. It is for real. We have got 
to deal with it in a meaningful way. I don't just say that to 
the press. I have said it to the President of the United States 
in one-on-one meetings with him.
    I should add that we hope to have a subcommittee hearing on 
the subject next month on the Administration's draft Climate 
Change Technology plan. That is something we are following very 
carefully.
    So we will continue to work on this important issue 
unimpeded, I hope, by gamesmanship. That offers nothing of 
substance to the ongoing discussion that has to engage more of 
us all the time.
    [Statement of Mr. Boehlert follows:]

 Opening Statement of Chairman Sherwood Boehlert for Markup on H. Res. 
                                  515

    I want to welcome everyone to what I hope will be a brief mark-up 
of what I see as a frivolous resolution on a serious subject, global 
climate change. I wish we did not have to take time on this resolution, 
but under the rules of the House, Committees must act on resolutions of 
inquiry within 14 days or they can be brought up under a privileged 
motion on the House floor. And I certainly don't want to be responsible 
for the whole House having to devote time to this measure.
    I want to make clear at the outset that any debate or vote on this 
measure should not be seen as any kind of barometer of what the House 
thinks, or is willing to do about, global climate change. Personally, I 
support mandatory caps on carbon dioxide, and I think there is growing 
concern about climate change around the country.
    But I don't think that this resolution would advance the debate on 
climate change one iota. Rather, this resolution is a broadly drafted, 
partisan political ploy that tries to create a phony issue about 
documents. I don't see how that helps anyone.
    It's difficult even to determine how anyone would comply with the 
resolution. What documents are being sought? Every Administration 
document related to climate change and U.S. coasts? How many truckloads 
of materials would that be?
    Moreover, what would we do with this information if we got it? What 
would we find? What new insight would we arrive at concerning climate 
change or climate policy? The resolution reminds me about the old line 
about dogs chasing cars: What would they do if they caught one? What 
would anyone do if this resolution succeeded?
    The more I've read this short resolution, the more baffling I've 
found it. Information on the potential impact of climate change on U.S. 
coasts is readily available. The potential impacts of climate change on 
coastal areas are the subject of countless scientific papers.
    So what prompted this? Has anyone sought specific documents for 
specific reasons under standard procedures and been denied? Not that we 
know of.
    But then again, there's not much that we know of related to this 
resolution because it was introduced without any discussion with me, 
even though, under House rules, it has to move swiftly. This is not the 
way things work around here if one wants to solve a problem rather than 
try to score a political point.
    By now, I assume no one has any doubts about where I stand on this 
matter. I urge my colleagues to swiftly defeat this resolution so this 
Committee can return to more worthy business--including looking further 
into climate change. I should add that we hope to have a subcommittee 
hearing in the next month on the Administration's draft Climate Change 
Technology Program plan.
    So we will continue to work on this important issue--unimpeded, I 
hope, by political gamesmanship.

    Chairman Boehlert. With that, the Chair is pleased to 
recognize Mr. Gordon.
    Mr. Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and thank you for 
scheduling this meeting on House Resolution 515. Anyone who has 
spent time with you on the Science Committee knows you have a 
sincere interest in the issue of climate change. You have 
always addressed this issue in a thoughtful and serious, 
bipartisan fashion and I know that your green slip is 
particularly showing this week on votes that will be coming up 
soon.
    In general, our Committee has demonstrated bipartisan 
support for a wide variety of climate science and energy 
research programs at many of the agencies in our jurisdiction, 
and like you, I believe we need strong science programs and 
strong analysis to assess the magnitude and possible impacts of 
a shift in the Earth's climate. Good information is an 
essential ingredient in the development of good policy.
    I believe you would agree, it is not enough to just fund 
strong science programs and it is not enough just to produce 
scientific results and analysis.
    To stimulate debate and craft good policy, information must 
be made public.
    Unfortunately, this Administration at times has not 
regarded Congress and the public as true partners in crafting 
the policy directions of this country.
    Let us face it--sharing information with Congress and the 
public has not been this Administration's strong suit. 
Individual Members' and Committees' requests for information 
have not received the serious attention and responses that we 
must have to fulfill our responsibility to oversee the programs 
and policies we authorize.
    As a result, some Members are resorting to introducing 
resolutions of inquiry to send a message to the Administration. 
The message is simple. Respond to our requests and provide the 
Congress with the information and analysis we require to serve 
our constituents. We want solid, unbiased factual information, 
not selective information that has been manipulated to serve a 
narrow political interest.
    Whether we are talking about climate change or the cost of 
a Medicare prescription drug plan, Congress must have good 
information.
    Mr. Chairman, we all know this Resolution will go no 
further than this Committee meeting today. However, I am 
supporting the resolution to send a message to the 
Administration.
    I do not want to dwell on past mistakes, but I think we 
should learn from them.
    I hope the Administration will in the future cooperate with 
Congress and provide information in a timely fashion. We must 
work together to face up to our nation's challenges and to 
develop clear policies to address them.
    I want to work with you and the Administration to ensure we 
give the American people the good public policy they deserve.
    [Statement of Mr. Gordon follows:]

    Opening Statement of Representative Bart Gordon, Ranking Member

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman for scheduling this meeting on House 
Resolution 515. Anyone who has spent time with you on the Science 
Committee knows you have a sincere interest in the issue of climate 
change. You have always addressed this issue in a thoughtful, serious, 
bipartisan fashion.
    In general, our Committee has demonstrated bipartisan support for a 
wide variety of climate science and energy research programs at many of 
the agencies in our jurisdiction. Like you, I believe we need strong 
science programs and solid analysis to assess the magnitude and 
possible impacts of a shift in the earth's climate. Good information is 
an essential ingredient in the development of good policy. I believe 
you would agree, it is not enough to fund strong science programs. It 
is not enough to produce scientific results and analyses.
    To stimulate debate and craft good policy, information must be made 
public. Unfortunately, this Administration--at times--has not regarded 
the Congress and the public as true partners in crafting the policy 
directions for this country. Let's face it--sharing information with 
Congress and the public has not been this Administration's strong suit. 
Individual Members' and Committees' requests for information have not 
received the serious attention and responses that we must have to 
fulfill our responsibility to oversee the programs and policies we 
authorize.
    As a result, some Members are resorting to introducing Resolutions 
of Inquiry to send a message to the Administration. The message is 
simply this. Respond to our requests and provide the Congress with the 
information and analyses we require to serve our constituents. We want 
solid, unbiased factual information, not selective information that has 
been manipulated to serve a narrow political interest. Whether we are 
talking about climate change or the cost of a Medicare prescription 
drug plan, Congress must have good information.
    Mr. Chairman, we all know this Resolution will not go any further 
than this Committee meeting today. However, I am supporting the 
Resolution to send a message to the Administration. I do not want to 
dwell on past mistakes, but I think we should learn from them. I hope 
the Administration will, in the future, cooperate with the Congress and 
provide information in a timely fashion. We must work together to face 
our nation's challenges and develop clear policies to address them. I 
want to work with you and the Administration to ensure we give the 
American people the good public policy they deserve.

    [Statement of Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson follows:]

           Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member.
    As the Science Committee marks up H. Res. 515 today, I would like 
to voice my support of this bill. This resolution of inquiry requests 
the President to provide to the House of Representatives certain 
documents in his possession relating to the anticipated effects of 
climate change on the coastal regions of the United States.
    In my District of Dallas, Texas, climate change and global warming 
are very important issues. Texas is known for its hot summers and also 
for its poor air quality. On top of that, Texas has some of the highest 
rates of uninsured individuals in the nation. Poor quality and poor 
access to health care are a dangerous combination. Americans everywhere 
deserve to know how climate change will affect their health and daily 
lives.
    This resolution sends a strong message to the Administration to 
come clean to the American people about what it knows about climate 
change.
    I join 149 of my colleagues in supporting this H. Res. 515.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back.

    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you very much. And as usual, the 
very distinguished gentleman from Tennessee and I find 
ourselves in basic agreement. We need information in order to 
have informed decision making. I can speak on a lot of subjects 
but the subject of the moment, I have had no difficulty in 
getting information from the Administration. The only 
difficulty I have encountered is that that information leads me 
to a somewhat different approach in dealing with a subject but 
no difficulty.
    I have had no difficulty talking directly to the President 
of the United States on this subject to the point where I was 
in a meeting with him on a very sensitive issue, CAFTA, in 
which we were all lobbied and lobbied right up to the 11th hour 
and 59th minute, and in the Oval Office, we were talking about 
CAFTA, and he paused and the President looked at me and he 
said, ``Did you read my speech to the G-8 on global warming,'' 
and I said ``Well, I have to confess, Mr. President, I don't 
read all your speeches. I read reports of it.'' He said, 
``Well, you ought to read it. It will be interesting.'' So I 
got the speech and read it and quite frankly, it was an 
interesting speech. But you all know that on some of these 
environmental issues, the Administration and I don't always 
march down the same path but I have had no difficulty in 
getting information from the Administration and I would think 
that this committee can point with pride to a record, when we 
have requested information, we have received it--bipartisan 
requests. It hasn't always been as timely as we would like but 
I understand that.
    Quite frankly, the Administration just doesn't stop 
everything when they get a request from Boehlert or the Science 
Committee and say well, we have got to accommodate him. I 
understand that.
    But well, that is enough said. Let us proceed with the 
markup, and here is where we are. We will now consider H. Res. 
515, of inquiry requesting the President of the United States 
to provide to the House of Representatives certain documents in 
his possession related to the anticipated effects of climate 
change on the coastal regions of the United States. I ask 
unanimous consent that the resolution is considered as read and 
open to amendment at any point, and without objection, it is so 
ordered.
    [H. Res. 515 follows:]

    
    
    Chairman Boehlert. Are there any amendments? Hearing none, 
the vote then is on the resolution. H. Res. 515, of inquiry 
requesting the President of the United States to provide to the 
House of Representatives certain documents in his possession 
related to the anticipated effects of climate change on the 
coastal regions of the United States. All those in favor, say 
aye. All those opposed will say no. In the opinion of the 
Chairs, the no's have it.
    Mr. Gordon. Mr. Chairman, we would request a recorded vote.
    Chairman Boehlert. The gentleman requests a recorded vote. 
The Clerk will call the roll.
    The Clerk. Mr. Boehlert.
    Chairman Boehlert. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Boehlert votes no. Mr. Hall.
    Mr. Hall. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Hall votes no. Mr. Smith.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Weldon.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Rohrabacher.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Rohrabacher votes no. Mr. Calvert.
    Mr. Calvert. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Calvert votes no. Mr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Bartlett votes no. Mr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Ehlers votes no. Mr. Gutknecht.
    Mr. Gutknecht. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Gutknecht votes no. Mr. Lucas.
    Mr. Lucas. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Lucas votes no. Mrs. Biggert.
    Mrs. Biggert. No.
    The Clerk. Mrs. Biggert votes no. Mr. Gilchrest.
    Mr. Gilchrest. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Gilchrest votes no. Mr. Akin.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Johnson.
    Mr. Johnson. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Johnson votes no. Mr. Forbes.
    Mr. Forbes. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Forbes votes no. Mr. Bonner.
    Mr. Bonner. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Bonner votes no. Mr. Feeney.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Inglis.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Reichert.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Sodrel.
    Mr. Sodrel. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Sodrel votes no. Mr. Schwarz.
    Mr. Schwarz. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Schwarz votes no. Mr. McCaul.
    Mr. McCaul. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. McCaul votes no. Mr. Gordon.
    Mr. Gordon. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Gordon votes yes. Mr. Costello.
    Mr. Costello. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Costello votes yes. Ms. Johnson.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Ms. Woolsey.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Ms. Hooley.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Udall.
    Mr. Udall. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Udall votes yes. Mr. Wu.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Honda.
    Mr. Honda. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Honda votes yes. Mr. Miller.
    Mr. Miller. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Miller votes yes. Mr. Davis.
    Mr. Davis. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Davis votes yes. Mr. Carnahan.
    Mr. Carnahan. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Carnahan votes yes. Mr. Lipinski.
    Mr. Lipinski. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Lipinski votes yes. Ms. Jackson Lee.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Sherman.
    Mr. Sherman. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Sherman votes yes. Mr. Baird.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Matheson.
    Mr. Matheson. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Matheson votes yes. Mr. Costa.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Green.
    Mr. Green. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Green votes yes. Mr. Melancon.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Moore.
    [No response.]
    Chairman Boehlert. The clerk will report.
    The Clerk. Mr. Chairman, yes, 11, no, 16.
    
    
    Chairman Boehlert. The motion is defeated. I recognize Dr. 
Ehlers to offer a motion.
    Mr. Ehlers. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee 
adversely report H. Res. 515 to the House with a recommendation 
that the resolution not be agreed to. Furthermore, I move that 
staff be instructed to prepare the legislative report and make 
necessary technical and conforming changes.
    Chairman Boehlert. The question is on the motion to report 
the resolution adversely. Those in favor of the motion will 
signify by saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the 
resolution is adversely reported. Without objection, the motion 
to reconsider is laid upon the table. Before moving on, I ask 
unanimous consent that Mr. Rohrabacher be permitted to have an 
article he wants inserted into the record.
    [The article follows:]
    
    
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Mr. Chairman, the article is an interview 
with America's premiere meteorologist, William Gray, dealing 
with the issue of global warming suggesting that people did not 
get contracts for a number of years who disagreed with the 
global warming theory. This man himself debunks that theory. I 
would suggest all of us take a look at it if we are open minded 
on the issue and insert it in the record, please.
    Chairman Boehlert. We will be glad to consider the minority 
scientific view. I move that members have two subsequent 
calendar days in which to submit supplemental minority or 
additional views on the measure. Without objection, so ordered. 
I want to thank the members for their attendance. This 
concludes the committee markup.
    [Whereupon, at 10:27 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]