Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    109-307

======================================================================

 
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENTS OF TRANSPORTATION, TREASURY, 
AND HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, THE JUDICIARY, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 
AND INDEPENDENT AGENCIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2006, 
                         AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

   November 18 (legislative day, November 17), 2005.--Ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Knollenberg, from the committee of conference, submitted the 
                               following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 3058]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
3058) ``making appropriations for the Departments of 
Transportation, Treasury, and Housing and Urban Development, 
the Judiciary, District of Columbia, and independent agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other 
purposes'', having met, after full and free conference, have 
agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses 
as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with an 
amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment, insert:

 DIVISION A--TRANSPORTATION, TREASURY, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, 
    THE JUDICIARY, AND INDEPENDENT AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2006

That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of 
Transportation, Treasury, Housing and Urban Development, the 
Judiciary, and independent agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2006, and for other purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Office of the Secretary

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of the Secretary, 
$84,900,000, of which not to exceed $2,198,000 shall be 
available for the immediate Office of the Secretary; not to 
exceed $698,000 shall be available for the immediate Office of 
the Deputy Secretary; not to exceed $15,183,000 shall be 
available for the Office of the General Counsel; not to exceed 
$11,650,000 shall be available for the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Transportation for Policy; not to exceed 
$8,485,000 shall be available for the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary for Budget and Programs; not to exceed $2,293,000 
shall be available for the Office of the Assistant Secretary 
for Governmental Affairs; not to exceed $22,031,000 shall be 
available for the Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Administration; not to exceed $1,910,000 shall be available for 
the Office of Public Affairs; not to exceed $1,442,000 shall be 
available for the Office of the Executive Secretariat; not to 
exceed $697,000 shall be available for the Board of Contract 
Appeals; not to exceed $1,265,000 shall be available for the 
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization; not to 
exceed $2,033,000 for the Office of Intelligence and Security; 
not to exceed $11,895,000 shall be available for the Office of 
the Chief Information Officer; and not to exceed $3,120,000 
shall be available for the Office of Emergency Transportation: 
Provided, That the Secretary of Transportation is authorized to 
transfer funds appropriated for any office of the Office of the 
Secretary to any other office of the Office of the Secretary: 
Provided further, That no appropriation for any office shall be 
increased or decreased by more than 5 percent by all such 
transfers: Provided further, That notice of any change in 
funding greater than 5 percent shall be submitted for approval 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations: Provided 
further, That not to exceed $60,000 shall be for allocation 
within the Department for official reception and representation 
expenses as the Secretary maydetermine: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, excluding fees authorized 
in Public Law 107-71, there may be credited to this appropriation up to 
$2,500,000 in funds received in user fees: Provided further, That none 
of the funds provided in this Act shall be available for the position 
of Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs.

                         OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Civil Rights, 
$8,550,000.

           TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, RESEARCH, AND DEVELOPMENT

    For necessary expenses for conducting transportation 
planning, research, systems development, development 
activities, and making grants, to remain available until 
expended, $15,000,000.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    Necessary expenses for operating costs and capital outlays 
of the Working Capital Fund, not to exceed $118,014,000, shall 
be paid from appropriations made available to the Department of 
Transportation: Provided, That such services shall be provided 
on a competitive basis to entities within the Department of 
Transportation: Provided further, That the above limitation on 
operating expenses shall not apply to non-DOT entities: 
Provided further, That no funds appropriated in this Act to an 
agency of the Department shall be transferred to the Working 
Capital Fund without the approval of the agency modal 
administrator: Provided further, That no assessments may be 
levied against any program, budget activity, subactivity or 
project funded by this Act unless notice of such assessments 
and the basis therefor are presented to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations and are approved by such 
Committees.

               MINORITY BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM

    For the cost of guaranteed loans, $500,000, as authorized 
by 49 U.S.C. 332: Provided, That such costs, including the cost 
of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974: Provided further, That 
these funds are available to subsidize total loan principal, 
any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$18,367,000. In addition, for administrative expenses to carry 
out the guaranteed loan program, $400,000.

                       MINORITY BUSINESS OUTREACH

    For necessary expenses of Minority Business Resource Center 
outreach activities, $3,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2007: Provided, That notwithstanding 49 U.S.C. 
332, these funds may be used for business opportunities related 
to any mode of transportation.

                        PAYMENTS TO AIR CARRIERS

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    In addition to funds made available from any other source 
to carry out the essential air service program under 49 U.S.C. 
41731 through 41742, $60,000,000, to be derived from the 
Airport and Airway Trust Fund, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That, in determining between or among 
carriers competing to provide service to a community, the 
Secretary may consider the relative subsidy requirements of the 
carriers: Provided further, That, if the funds under this 
heading are insufficient to meet the costs of the essential air 
service program in the current fiscal year, the Secretary shall 
transfer such sums as may be necessary to carry out the 
essential air service program from any available amounts 
appropriated to or directly administered by the Office of the 
Secretary for such fiscal year.

                       NEW HEADQUARTERS BUILDING

    For necessary expenses of the Department of 
Transportation's new headquarters building and related 
services, $50,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                               OPERATIONS

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Aviation 
Administration, not otherwise provided for, including 
operations and research activities related to commercial space 
transportation, administrative expenses for research and 
development, establishment of air navigation facilities, the 
operation (including leasing) and maintenance of aircraft, 
subsidizing the cost of aeronautical charts and maps sold to 
the public, lease or purchase of passenger motor vehicles for 
replacement only, in addition to amounts made available by 
Public Law 108-176, $8,036,000,000, of which $5,541,000,000 
shall be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, of 
which not to exceed $6,629,000,000 shall be available for air 
traffic organization activities; not to exceed $958,542,000 
shall be available for aviation regulation and certification 
activities; not to exceed $11,759,000 shall be available for 
commercial space transportation activities; not to exceed 
$50,983,000 shall be available for financial services 
activities; not to exceed $69,943,000 shall be available for 
human resources program activities; not to exceed $150,744,000 
shall be available for region and center operations and 
regional coordination activities; not to exceed $142,000,000 
shall be available for staff offices; and not to exceed 
$36,112,000 shall be available for information services: 
Provided, That not to exceed 2 percent of any budget activity, 
except for aviation regulation and certification budget 
activity, may be transferred to any budget activity under this 
heading: Provided further, That no transfer may increase 
ordecrease any appropriation by more than 2 percent: Provided further, 
That any transfer in excess of 2 percent shall be treated as a 
reprogramming of funds under section 710 of this Act and shall not be 
available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the 
procedures set forth in that section: Provided further, That none of 
the funds in this Act shall be available for the Federal Aviation 
Administration to finalize or implement any regulation that would 
promulgate new aviation user fees not specifically authorized by law 
after the date of the enactment of this Act: Provided further, That 
there may be credited to this appropriation funds received from States, 
counties, municipalities, foreign authorities, other public 
authorities, and private sources, for expenses incurred in the 
provision of agency services, including receipts for the maintenance 
and operation of air navigation facilities, and for issuance, renewal 
or modification of certificates, including airman, aircraft, and repair 
station certificates, or for tests related thereto, or for processing 
major repair or alteration forms: Provided further, That of the funds 
appropriated under this heading, not less than $7,500,000 shall be for 
the contract tower cost-sharing program: Provided further, That funds 
may be used to enter into a grant agreement with a nonprofit standard-
setting organization to assist in the development of aviation safety 
standards: Provided further, That none of the funds in this Act shall 
be available for new applicants for the second career training program: 
Provided further, That none of the funds in this Act shall be available 
for paying premium pay under 5 U.S.C. 5546(a) to any Federal Aviation 
Administration employee unless such employee actually performed work 
during the time corresponding to such premium pay: Provided further, 
That none of the funds in this Act may be obligated or expended to 
operate a manned auxiliary flight service station in the contiguous 
United States: Provided further, That none of the funds in this Act for 
aeronautical charting and cartography are available for activities 
conducted by, or coordinated through, the Working Capital Fund: 
Provided further, That none of the funds in this Act may be obligated 
or expended for an employee of the Federal Aviation Administration to 
purchase a store gift card or gift certificate through use of a 
Government-issued credit card. In addition, $150,000,000 is for costs 
associated with the flight service station transition.

                        FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
acquisition, establishment, technical support services, 
improvement by contract or purchase, and hire of air navigation 
and experimental facilities and equipment, as authorized under 
part A of subtitle VII of title 49, United States Code, 
including initial acquisition of necessary sites by lease or 
grant; engineering and service testing, including construction 
of test facilities and acquisition of necessary sites by lease 
or grant; construction and furnishing of quarters and related 
accommodations for officers and employees of the Federal 
Aviation Administration stationed at remote localities where 
such accommodations are not available; and the purchase, lease, 
or transfer of aircraft from funds available under this 
heading; to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund, 
$2,540,000,000, of which $2,110,789,500 shall remain available 
until September 30, 2008, and of which $429,210,500 shall 
remain available until September 30, 2006: Provided, That there 
may be credited to this appropriation funds received from 
States, counties, municipalities, other public authorities, and 
private sources, for expenses incurred in the establishment and 
modernization of air navigation facilities: Provided further, 
That upon initial submission to the Congress of the fiscal year 
2007 President's budget, the Secretary of Transportation shall 
transmit to the Congress a comprehensive capital investment 
plan for the Federal Aviation Administration which includes 
funding for each budget line item for fiscal years 2007 through 
2011, with total funding for each year of the plan constrained 
to the funding targets for those years as estimated and 
approved by the Office of Management and Budget.

                 RESEARCH, ENGINEERING, AND DEVELOPMENT

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
research, engineering, and development, as authorized under 
part A of subtitle VII of title 49, United States Code, 
including construction of experimental facilities and 
acquisition of necessary sites by lease or grant, $138,000,000, 
to be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund and to 
remain available until September 30, 2008: Provided, That there 
may be credited to this appropriation funds received from 
States, counties, municipalities, other public authorities, and 
private sources, for expenses incurred for research, 
engineering, and development.

                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

    For liquidation of obligations incurred for grants-in-aid 
for airport planning and development, and noise compatibility 
planning and programs as authorized under subchapter I of 
chapter 471 and subchapter I of chapter 475 of title 49, United 
States Code, and under other law authorizing such obligations; 
for procurement, installation,and commissioning of runway 
incursion prevention devices and systems at airports of such title; for 
grants authorized under section 41743 of title 49, United States Code; 
and for inspection activities and administration of airport safety 
programs, including those related to airport operating certificates 
under section 44706 of title 49, United States Code, $3,399,000,000 to 
be derived from the Airport and Airway Trust Fund and to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That none of the funds under this 
heading shall be available for the planning or execution of programs 
the obligations for which are in excess of $3,550,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2006, notwithstanding section 47117(g) of title 49, United States 
Code: Provided further, That none of the funds under this heading shall 
be available for the replacement of baggage conveyor systems, 
reconfiguration of terminal baggage areas, or other airport 
improvements that are necessary to install bulk explosive detection 
systems: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, of funds limited under this heading, not more than $71,096,000 
shall be obligated for administration, not less than $10,000,000 shall 
be available for the airport cooperative research program, and not less 
than $10,000,000 shall be available to carry out the Small Community 
Air Service Development Program, to remain available until expended: 
Provided further, That not later than December 31, 2015, the owner or 
operator of an airport certificated under 49 U.S.C. 44706 shall improve 
the airport's runway safety areas to comply with the Federal Aviation 
Administration design standards required by 14 CFR part 139: Provided 
further, That the Federal Aviation Administration shall report annually 
to the Congress on the agency's progress toward improving the runway 
safety areas at 49 U.S.C. 44706 airports.

                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

                 (RESCISSION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

    Of the amounts authorized for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2006 and prior years under sections 48103 and 
48112 of title 49, United States Code, $1,032,000,000 are 
rescinded.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 101. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
airports may transfer without consideration to the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) instrument landing systems (along 
with associated approach lighting equipment and runway visual 
range equipment) which conform to FAA design and performance 
specifications, the purchase of which was assisted by a Federal 
airport-aid program, airport development aid program or airport 
improvement program grant: Provided, That the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall accept such equipment, which shall 
thereafter be operated and maintained by FAA in accordance with 
agency criteria.
    Sec. 102. None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
compensate in excess of 375 technical staff-years under the 
federally funded research and development center contract 
between the Federal Aviation Administration and the Center for 
Advanced Aviation Systems Development during fiscal year 2006.
    Sec. 103. None of the funds in this Act shall be used to 
pursue or adopt guidelines or regulations requiring airport 
sponsors to provide to the Federal Aviation Administration 
without cost building construction, maintenance, utilities and 
expenses, or space in airport sponsor-owned buildings for 
services relating to air traffic control, air navigation, or 
weather reporting: Provided, That the prohibition of funds in 
this section does not apply to negotiations between the agency 
and airport sponsors to achieve agreement on ``below-market'' 
rates for these items or to grant assurances that require 
airport sponsors to provide land without cost to the FAA for 
air traffic control facilities.
    Sec. 104. The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration may reimburse amounts made available to satisfy 
49 U.S.C. 41742(a)(1) from fees credited under 49 U.S.C. 45303: 
Provided, That during fiscal year 2006, 49 U.S.C. 41742(b) 
shall not apply, and any amount remaining in such account at 
the close of that fiscal year may be made available to satisfy 
section 41742(a)(1) for the subsequent fiscal year.
    Sec. 105. Amounts collected under section 40113(e) of title 
49, United States Code, shall be credited to the appropriation 
current at the time of collection, to be merged with and 
available for the same purposes of such appropriation.
    Sec. 106. None of the funds appropriated or limited by this 
Act may be used to change weight restrictions or prior 
permission rules at Teterboro Airport in Teterboro, New Jersey.
    Sec. 107. None of the funds made available in this Act 
shall be used for engineering work related to an additional 
runway at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport.
    Sec. 108. (a) Section 44302(f)(1) of title 49, United 
States Code, is amended by striking ``2005,'' each place it 
appears and inserting ``2006,''.
    (b) Section 44303(b) of such title is amended by striking 
``2005,'' and inserting ``2006,''.
    Sec. 109. Section 47114(c)(1) of title 49, United States 
Code, is amended by adding the following new paragraph at the 
end:
                    ``(G) Special rule for fiscal year 2006.--
                Notwithstanding subparagraph (A) and the 
                absence of scheduled passenger aircraft service 
                at an airport, the Secretary may apportion in 
                fiscal year 2006 to the sponsor of the airport 
                an amount equal to $500,000, if the Secretary 
                finds that--
                            ``(i) the passenger boardings at 
                        the airport were below 10,000 in 
                        calendar year 2004;
                            ``(ii) the airport had at least 
                        10,000 passenger boardings and 
                        scheduled passenger aircraft service in 
                        either calendar year 2000 or 2001; and
                            ``(iii) the reason that passenger 
                        boardings described in clause (i) were 
                        below 10,000 was the decrease in 
                        passengers following the terrorist 
                        attacks of September 11, 2001.''.

                     Federal Highway Administration

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    Necessary expenses for administration and operation of the 
Federal Highway Administration, not to exceed $364,638,000, 
shall be paid in accordance with law from appropriations made 
available by this Act to the Federal Highway Administration 
together with advances and reimbursements received by the 
Federal Highway Administration.

                          FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    None of the funds in this Act shall be available for the 
implementation or execution of programs, the obligations for 
which are in excess of $36,032,343,903 for Federal-aid highways 
and highway safety construction programs for fiscal year 2006: 
Provided, That within the $36,032,343,903 obligation limitation 
on Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction 
programs, not more than $429,800,000 shall be available for the 
implementation or execution of programs for transportation 
research (chapter 5 of title 23, United States Code; sections 
111, 5505, and 5506 of title 49, United States Code; and title 
5 of Public Law 109-59) for fiscal year 2006: Provided further, 
That this limitation on transportation research programs shall 
not apply to any authority previously made available for 
obligation: Provided further, That the Secretary may, as 
authorized by section 605(b) of title 23, United States Code, 
collect and spend fees to cover the costs of services of expert 
firms, including counsel, in the field of municipal and project 
finance to assist in the underwriting and servicing of Federal 
credit instruments and all or a portion of the costs to the 
Federal government of servicing such credit instruments: 
Provided further, That such fees are available until expended 
to pay for such costs: Provided further, That such amounts are 
in addition to administrative expenses that are also available 
for such purpose, and are not subject to any obligation 
limitation or the limitation on administrative expenses under 
section 608 of title 23, United States Code.

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for carrying 
out the provisions of title 23, United States Code, that are 
attributable to Federal-aid highways, not otherwise provided, 
including reimbursement for sums expended pursuant to the 
provisions of 23 U.S.C. 308, $36,032,343,903 or so much thereof 
as may be available in and derived from the Highway Trust Fund 
(other than the Mass Transit Account), to remain available 
until expended.

                              (RESCISSION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    Of the unobligated balances of funds apportioned to each 
State under chapter 1 of title 23, United States Code, 
$1,999,999,000 are rescinded: Provided, That such rescission 
shall not apply to the funds distributed in accordance with 23 
U.S.C. 130(f), 23 U.S.C. 133(d)(1) as in effect prior to the 
date of enactment of Public Law 109-59, the first sentence of 
23 U.S.C. 133(d)(3)(A), 23 U.S.C. 104(b)(5), or 23 U.S.C. 163 
as in effect prior to the enactment of Public Law 109-59.

                 APPALACHIAN DEVELOPMENT HIGHWAY SYSTEM

    For necessary expenses for the Appalachian Development 
Highway System as authorized under section 1069(y) of Public 
Law 102-240, as amended, $20,000,000, to remain available until 
expended.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 110. (a) For fiscal year 2006, the Secretary of 
Transportation shall--
            (1) not distribute from the obligation limitation 
        for Federal-aid highways amounts authorized for 
        administrative expenses and programs by section 104(a) 
        of title 23, United States Code; programs funded from 
        the administrative takedown authorized by section 
        104(a)(1) of title 23, United States Code (as in effect 
        on the date before the date of enactment of the Safe, 
        Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity 
        Act: A Legacy for Users); the highway use tax evasion 
        program; the Bureau of Transportation Statistics; the 
        programs, projects, and activities funded from the 
        takedown authorized by section 112 of this Act; and the 
        unobligated balances of funds made available for 
        programs, projects, and activities funded from the 
        takedown authorized by section 117 of title I of 
        division H of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005 
        (Public Law 108-447) for which no obligation limitation 
        has previously been made available;
            (2) not distribute an amount from the obligation 
        limitation for Federal-aid highways that is equal to 
        the unobligated balance of amounts made available from 
        the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit 
        Account) for Federal-aid highways and highway safety 
        programs for previous fiscal years the funds for which 
        are allocated by the Secretary;
            (3) determine the ratio that--
                    (A) the obligation limitation for Federal-
                aid highways, less the aggregate of amounts not 
                distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2), bears 
                to
                    (B) the total of the sums authorized to be 
                appropriated for Federal-aid highways and 
                highway safety construction programs (other 
                than sums authorized to be appropriated for 
                provisions of law described in paragraphs (1) 
                through (9) of subsection (b) and sums 
                authorized to be appropriated for section 105 
                of title 23, United States Code, equal to the 
                amount referred to in subsection (b)(10) for 
                such fiscal year), less the aggregate of the 
                amounts not distributed under paragraphs (1) 
                and (2) of this subsection;
            (4)(A) distribute the obligation limitation for 
        Federal-aid highways, less the aggregate amounts not 
        distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2), for sections 
        1301, 1302, and 1934 of the Safe, Accountable, 
        Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy 
        for Users; sections 117 (but individually for each 
        project numbered 1 through 3676 listed in the table 
        contained in section 1702 of the Safe, Accountable, 
        Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy 
        for Users) and 144(g) of title 23, United States Code; 
        and section 14501 of title 40,United States Code, so 
that the amount of obligation authority available for each of such 
sections is equal to the amount determined by multiplying the ratio 
determined under paragraph (3) by the sums authorized to be 
appropriated for that section for the fiscal year; and
            (B) distribute $2,000,000,000 for section 105 of 
        title 23, United States Code;
            (5) distribute the obligation limitation provided 
        for Federal-aid highways, less the aggregate amounts 
        not distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) and 
        amounts distributed under paragraph (4), for each of 
        the programs that are allocated by the Secretary under 
        the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
        Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users and title 
        23, United States Code (other than to programs to which 
        paragraphs (1) and (4) apply), by multiplying the ratio 
        determined under paragraph (3) by the amounts 
        authorized to be appropriated for each such program for 
        such fiscal year; and
            (6) distribute the obligation limitation provided 
        for Federal-aid highways, less the aggregate amounts 
        not distributed under paragraphs (1) and (2) and 
        amounts distributed under paragraphs (4) and (5), for 
        Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction 
        programs (other than the amounts apportioned for the 
        equity bonus program, but only to the extent that the 
        amounts apportioned for the equity bonus program for 
        the fiscal year are greater than $2,639,000,000, and 
        the Appalachian development highway system program) 
        that are apportioned by the Secretary under the Safe, 
        Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity 
        Act: A Legacy for Users and title 23, United States 
        Code, in the ratio that--
                    (A) amounts authorized to be appropriated 
                for such programs that are apportioned to each 
                State for such fiscal year, bear to
                    (B) the total of the amounts authorized to 
                be appropriated for such programs that are 
                apportioned to all States for such fiscal year.
    (b) Exceptions From Obligation Limitation.--The obligation 
limitation for Federal-aid highways shall not apply to 
obligations: (1) under section 125 of title 23, United States 
Code; (2) under section 147 of the Surface Transportation 
Assistance Act of 1978; (3) under section 9 of the Federal-Aid 
Highway Act of 1981; (4) under subsections (b) and (j) of 
section 131 of the Surface Transportation Assistance Act of 
1982; (5) under subsections (b) and (c) of section 149 of the 
Surface Transportation and Uniform Relocation Assistance Act of 
1987; (6) under sections 1103 through 1108 of the Intermodal 
Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991; (7) under 
section 157 of title 23, United States Code, as in effect on 
the day before the date of the enactment of the Transportation 
Equity Act for the 21st Century; (8) under section 105 of title 
23, United States Code, as in effect for fiscal years 1998 
through 2004, but only in an amount equal to $639,000,000 for 
each of those fiscal years; (9) for Federal-aid highway 
programs for which obligation authority was made available 
under the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century or 
subsequent public laws for multiple years or to remain 
available until used, but only to the extent that the 
obligation authority has not lapsed or been used; (10) under 
section 105 of title 23, United States Code, but only in an 
amount equal to $639,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2005 and 
2006; and (11) under section 1603 of the Safe, Accountable, 
Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for 
Users, to the extent that funds obligated in accordance with 
that section were not subject to a limitation on obligations at 
the time at which the funds were initially made available for 
obligation.
    (c) Redistribution of Unused Obligation Authority.--
Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Secretary shall, after 
August 1 of such fiscal year, revise a distribution of the 
obligation limitation made available under subsection (a) if 
the amount distributed cannot be obligated during that fiscal 
year and redistribute sufficient amounts to those States able 
to obligate amounts in addition to those previously distributed 
during that fiscal year, giving priority to those States having 
large unobligated balances of funds apportioned under sections 
104 and 144 of title 23, United States Code.
    (d) Applicability of Obligation Limitations to 
Transportation Research Programs.--The obligation limitation 
shall apply to transportation research programs carried out 
under chapter 5 of title 23, United States Code, and title V 
(research title) of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users, except that 
obligation authority made available for such programs under 
such limitation shall remain available for a period of 3 fiscal 
years and shall be in addition to the amount of any limitation 
imposed on obligations for Federal-aid highway and highway 
safety construction programs for future fiscal years.
    (e) Redistribution of Certain Authorized Funds.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than 30 days after the 
        date of the distribution of obligation limitationunder 
subsection (a), the Secretary shall distribute to the States any funds 
that--
                    (A) are authorized to be appropriated for 
                such fiscal year for Federal-aid highways 
                programs; and
                    (B) the Secretary determines will not be 
                allocated to the States, and will not be 
                available for obligation, in such fiscal year 
                due to the imposition of any obligation 
                limitation for such fiscal year.
            (2) Ratio.--Funds shall be distributed under 
        paragraph (1) in the same ratio as the distribution of 
        obligation authority under subsection (a)(6).
            (3) Availability.--Funds distributed under 
        paragraph (1) shall be available for any purposes 
        described in section 133(b) of title 23, United States 
        Code.
      (f) Special Limitation Characteristics.--Obligation 
limitation distributed for a fiscal year under subsection 
(a)(4) for the provision specified in subsection (a)(4) shall--
      (a)(1) for programs, projects, and activities funded from 
the takedown authorized by section 117 of title I of division H 
of Public Law 108-447 and under subsection
            (1) remain available until used for obligation of 
        funds for that provision; and
            (2) be in addition to the amount of any limitation 
        imposed on obligations for Federal-aid highway and 
        highway safety construction programs for future fiscal 
        years.
      (g)High Priority Project Flexibility.--
            (1) In general.--Subject to paragraph (2), 
        obligation authority distributed for such fiscal year 
        under subsection (a)(4) for each project numbered 1 
        through 3676 listed in the table contained in section 
        1702 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
        Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users may be 
        obligated for any other project in such section in the 
        same State.
            (2) Restoration.--Obligation authority used as 
        described in paragraph (1) shall be restored to the 
        original purpose on the date on which obligation 
        authority is distributed under this section for the 
        next fiscal year following obligation under paragraph 
        (1).
      (h) Limitation on Statutory Construction.--Nothing in 
this section shall be construed to limit the distribution of 
obligation authority under subsection (a)(4)(A) for each of the 
individual projects numbered greater than 3676 listed in the 
table contained in section 1702 of the Safe, Accountable, 
Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for 
Users.
    Sec. 111. Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, funds received by 
the Bureau of Transportation Statistics from the sale of data 
products, for necessary expenses incurred pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
111 may be credited to the Federal-aid highways account for the 
purpose of reimbursing the Bureau for such expenses: Provided, 
That such funds shall be subject to the obligation limitation 
for Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction.
    Sec. 112. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
whenever an allocation is made of the sums authorized to be 
appropriated for expenditure on the Federal lands highway 
program, and whenever an apportionment is made of the sums 
authorized to be appropriated for the surface transportation 
program, the congestion mitigation and air quality improvement 
program, the National Highway System, the Interstate 
maintenance program, the bridge program, the Appalachian 
development highway system, and the equity bonus program, the 
Secretary of Transportation shall deduct a sum in such amount 
not to exceed 2.75 percent of all sums so authorized: Provided, 
That of the amount so deducted in accordance with this section, 
$600,000,000 shall be made available for surface transportation 
projects and $25,000,000 shall be made available for highway 
priority projects as identified under this section in the 
statement of the managers accompanying this Act: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law and 
the preceding clauses of this provision, the Secretary of 
Transportation may use amounts made available by this section 
to make grants for any surface transportation project otherwise 
eligible for funding under title 23 or title 49, United States 
Code: Provided further, That funds made available under this 
section, at the request of a State, shall be transferred bythe 
Secretary to another Federal agency: Provided further, That the Federal 
share payable on account of any program, project, or activity carried 
out with funds made available under this section shall be 100 percent: 
Provided further, That the sum deducted in accordance with this section 
shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That all funds 
made available under this section shall be subject to any limitation on 
obligations for Federal-aid highways and highway safety construction 
programs set forth in this Act or any other Act: Provided further, That 
the obligation limitation made available for the programs, projects, 
and activities for which funds are made available under this section 
shall remain available until used and shall be in addition to the 
amount of any limitation imposed on obligations for Federal-aid highway 
and highway safety construction programs for future fiscal years.
    Sec. 113. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
projects and activities described in the statement of managers 
accompanying this Act under the headings ``Federal-Aid 
Highways'' and ``Federal Transit Administration'' shall be 
eligible for fiscal year 2006 funds made available for the 
project for which each project or activity is so designated: 
Provided, That the Federal share payable on account of any such 
projects and activities subject to this section shall be the 
same as the share required by the Federal program under which 
each project or activity is designated unless otherwise 
provided in this Act.
    Sec. 114. Bypass Bridge at Hoover Dam. (a) In General.--
Subject to subsection (b), the Secretary of Transportation may 
expend from any funds appropriated for expenditure in 
accordance with title 23, United States Code, for payment of 
debt service by the States of Arizona and Nevada on notes 
issued for the bypass bridge project at Hoover Dam, pending 
appropriation or replenishment for that project.
    (b) Reimbursement.--Funds expended under subsection (a) 
shall be reimbursed from the funds made available to the States 
of Arizona and Nevada for payment of debt service on notes 
issued for the bypass bridge project at Hoover Dam.
    Sec. 115. Section 1023(h) of the Intermodal Surface 
Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (23 U.S.C. 127 note; 105 
Stat. 1951) is amended by striking paragraphs (2) and (3) and 
inserting the following:
            ``(2) State action.--
                    ``(A) Weight limitations.--For the period 
                beginning on the date of enactment of this 
                subparagraph and ending on September 30, 2009, 
                a covered State, including any political 
                subdivision of such State, may not enforce a 
                single axle weight limitation of less than 
                24,000 pounds, including enforcement 
                tolerances, on any vehicle referred to in 
                paragraph (1) in any case in which the vehicle 
                is using the Interstate System.
                    ``(B) Covered state defined.--In this 
                paragraph, the term `covered State' means a 
                State that has enforced, in the period 
                beginning on October 6, 1992, and ending on the 
                date of enactment of this subparagraph, a 
                single axle weight limitation of 20,000 pounds 
                or greater but less than 24,000 pounds, 
                including enforcement tolerances, on any 
                vehicle referred to in paragraph (1) in any 
                case in which the vehicle is using the 
                Interstate System.''.
      Sec. 116. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
access to the I-5 ``Transit Only'' ramps at NE 163rd in 
Shoreline, Washington, shall be expanded to include King County 
Solid Waste Division transfer vehicles upon the determination 
of the Federal Highway Administrator that necessary safety 
improvements have been completed.
    Sec. 117. Designation of Max M. Fisher Memorial Highway. 
(a) Designation.--The portion of highway US-24 in the State of 
Michigan, beginning at Interstate 96 and extending north to 
Interstate 75 at exit 93 west of Clarkston, shall be known and 
designated as the ``Max M. Fisher Memorial Highway''.
    (b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, 
document, paper, or other record of the United States to the 
highway portion referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed 
to be a reference to the ``Max M. Fisher Memorial Highway''.
    Sec. 118. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
provided in Public Law 108-7 under the heading ``Federal-aid 
Highways'' for intelligent transportation system projects and 
designated for Gettysburg Borough Signal Coordination and 
Upgrade-Signalization; Adams County, Pennsylvania shall be 
available for Gettysburg Borough and Surrounding Municipalities 
Signal Coordination and Upgrade-Signalization; Adams County, 
Pennsylvania.

              Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

              MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY OPERATIONS AND PROGRAMS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    For payment of obligations incurred for administration of 
motor carrier safety operations and programs pursuant to 
section 31104(i) of title 49, United States Code,and sections 
4127 and 4134 of Public Law 109-59, $213,000,000, to be derived from 
the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account), together 
with advances and reimbursements received by the Federal Motor Carrier 
Safety Administration, the sum of which shall remain available until 
expended: Provided, That none of the funds derived from the Highway 
Trust Fund in this Act shall be available for the implementation, 
execution or administration of programs, the obligations for which are 
in excess of $213,000,000, for ``Motor Carrier Safety Operations and 
Programs'', of which $10,084,000, to remain available for obligation 
until September 30, 2008, is for the research and technology program 
and $1,000,000 shall be available for commercial motor vehicle 
operator's grants to carry out section 4134 of Public Law 109-59: 
Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
of the funds under this heading for outreach and education shall be 
available for transfer.

                      MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    For payment of obligations incurred in carrying out 
sections 31102, 31104, 31106, 31107, 31109, 31309, 31313 of 
title 49, United States Code, and sections 4126 and 4128 of 
Public Law 109-59, $282,000,000, to be derived from the Highway 
Trust Fund (other than the Mass Transit Account) and to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That none of the funds in 
this Act shall be available for the implementation or execution 
of programs, the obligations for which are in excess of 
$282,000,000, for ``Motor Carrier Safety Grants''; of which 
$188,000,000 shall be available for the motor carrier safety 
assistance program to carry out sections 31102 and 31104 of 
title 49, United States Code; $25,000,000 shall be available 
for the commercial driver's license improvements program to 
carry out section 31313 of title 49, United States Code; 
$32,000,000 shall be available for the border enforcement 
grants program to carry out section 31107 of title 49, United 
States Code; $5,000,000 shall be available for the performance 
and registration information system management program to carry 
out sections 31106 and 31109 of title 49, United States Code; 
$25,000,000 shall be available for the commercial vehicle 
information systems and networks deployment program to carry 
out section 4126 of Public Law 109-59; $2,000,000 shall be 
available for the safety data improvement program to carry out 
section 4128 of Public Law 109-59; and $5,000,000 shall be 
available for the commercial driver's license information 
system modernization program to carry out section 31309 of 
title 49, United States Code: Provided further, That of the 
funds made available for the motor carrier safety assistance 
program, $29,000,000 shall be available for audits of new 
entrant motor carriers.

 ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 120. Funds appropriated or limited in this Act shall 
be subject to the terms and conditions stipulated in section 
350 of Public Law 107-87, including that the Secretary submit a 
report to the House and Senate Appropriations Committees 
annually on the safety and security of transportation into the 
United States by Mexico-domiciled motor carriers.

             National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

                        OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For expenses necessary to discharge the functions of the 
Secretary, with respect to traffic and highway safety under 
chapter 301 of title 49, United States Code, and part C of 
subtitle VI of title 49, United States Code, $122,457,000, to 
be derived from the sum authorized to be deducted under section 
112 of this Act and transferred to the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration upon enactment of this Act, of which 
$96,301,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2006 and 
$26,156,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2008: 
Provided, That such funds shall be transferred to and 
administered by the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration: Provided further, That none of the funds 
appropriated by this Act may be obligated or expended to plan, 
finalize, or implement any rulemaking to add to section 575.104 
of title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations any requirement 
pertaining to a grading standard that is different from the 
three grading standards (treadwear, traction, and temperature 
resistance) already in effect: Provided further, That all funds 
made available under this heading shall be subject to any 
limitation on obligations for Federal-aid highways and highway 
safety construction programs set forth in this Act or any other 
Act: Provided further, That the obligation limitation made 
available for the programs, projects, and activities for which 
funds are made available under this heading shall remain 
available as specified and shall be in addition to the amount 
of any limitation imposed on obligations for Federal-aid 
highway and highway safety construction programs for future 
fiscal years.

                        OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    For payment of obligations incurred in carrying out the 
provisions of 23 U.S.C. 403, to remain available until 
expended, $110,000,000, to be derived from the Highway Trust 
Fund: Provided, That none of the funds in this Act shall be 
available for the planning or execution of programs the total 
obligations for which, in fiscal year 2006, are in excess of 
$110,000,000 for programs authorized under 23 U.S.C. 403.

                        NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    For payment of obligations incurred in carrying out chapter 
303 of title 49, United States Code, $4,000,000, to be derived 
from the Highway Trust Fund and remain available until 
September 30, 2007: Provided, That none of the funds in this 
Act shall be available for the implementation or execution of 
programs the obligations for which are in excess of $4,000,000 
for the National Driver Register authorized under chapter 303 
of title 49, United States Code.

                     HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

    For payment of obligations incurred in carrying out the 
provisions of 23 U.S.C. 402, 405, 406, 408, and 410 and 
sections 2001(a)(11), 2009, 2010, and 2011 of Public Law 109-
59, to remain available until expended, $578,176,000 to be 
derived from the Highway Trust Fund (other than the Mass 
Transit Account): Provided, That none of the funds in this Act 
shall be available for the planning or execution of programs 
the total obligations for which, in fiscal year 2006, are in 
excess of $578,176,000 for programs authorized under 23 U.S.C. 
402, 405, 406, 408, and 410 and sections 2001(a)(11), 2009, 
2010, and 2011 of Public Law 109-59, of which $217,000,000 
shall be for ``Highway Safety Programs'' under 23 U.S.C. 402, 
$25,000,000 shall be for ``Occupant Protection Incentive 
Grants'' under 23 U.S.C. 405, $124,500,000 shall be for 
``Safety Belt Performance Grants'' under 23 U.S.C. 406, 
$34,500,000 shall be for ``State Traffic Safety Information 
System Improvements'' under 23 U.S.C. 408, $120,000,000 shall 
be for ``Alcohol-Impaired Driving Countermeasures Incentive 
Grant Program'' under 23 U.S.C. 410, $16,176,000 shall be for 
``Administrative Expenses'' under section 2001(a)(11) of Public 
Law 109-59, $29,000,000 shall be for ``High Visibility 
Enforcement Program'' under section 2009 of Public Law 109-59, 
$6,000,000 shall be for ``Motorcyclist Safety'' under section 
2010 of Public Law 109-59, and $6,000,000 shall be for ``Child 
Safety and Child Booster Seat Safety Incentive Grants'' under 
section 2011 of Public Law 109-59: Provided further, That none 
of these funds shall be used for construction, rehabilitation, 
or remodeling costs, or for office furnishings and fixtures for 
State, local or private buildings or structures: Provided 
further, That not to exceed $500,000 of the funds made 
available for section 410 ``Alcohol-Impaired Driving 
Countermeasures Grants'' shall be available for technical 
assistance to the States: Provided further, That not to exceed 
$750,000 of the funds made available for the ``High Visibility 
Enforcement Program'' shall be available for the evaluation 
required under section 2009(f) of Public Law 109-59.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
                             ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 125. Notwithstanding any other provision of law or 
limitation on the use of funds made available under section 403 
of title 23, United States Code, an additional $130,000 shall 
be made available to the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration, out of the amount limited for section 402 of 
title 23, United States Code, to pay for travel and related 
expenses for State management reviews and to pay for core 
competency development training and related expenses for 
highway safety staff.

                    Federal Railroad Administration

                         SAFETY AND OPERATIONS

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Railroad 
Administration, not otherwise provided for, $145,949,000, of 
which $13,856,000 shall remain available until expended.

                   RAILROAD RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    For necessary expenses for railroad research and 
development, $55,075,000, to remain available until expended, 
of which $6,500,000 shall be available for positive train 
control projects and $7,190,000 shall be available for grants 
for rail corridor planning, development and improvement and 
Federal share payable under such grants shall be 50 percent.

            RAILROAD REHABILITATION AND IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

    The Secretary of Transportation is authorized to issue to 
the Secretary of the Treasury notes or other obligations 
pursuant to section 512 of the Railroad Revitalization and 
Regulatory Reform Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-210), as amended, 
in such amounts and at such times as may be necessary to pay 
any amounts required pursuant to the guarantee of the principal 
amount of obligations under sections 511 through 513 of such 
Act, such authority to exist as long as any such guaranteed 
obligation isoutstanding: Provided, That pursuant to section 
502 of such Act, as amended, no new direct loans or loan guarantee 
commitments shall be made using Federal funds for the credit risk 
premium during fiscal year 2006.

                     ALASKA RAILROAD REHABILITATION

    To enable the Secretary of Transportation to make grants to 
the Alaska Railroad, $10,000,000, for capital rehabilitation 
and improvements benefiting its passenger operations, to remain 
available until expended.

OPERATING SUBSIDY GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION

    To enable the Secretary of Transportation to make quarterly 
grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation for 
operation of intercity passenger rail, $495,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That the Secretary of 
Transportation shall approve funding to cover operating losses 
for the National Railroad Passenger Corporation only after 
receiving and reviewing a grant request for each specific train 
route: Provided further, That each such grant request shall be 
accompanied by a detailed financial analysis, revenue 
projection, and capital expenditure projection justifying the 
Federal support to the Secretary's satisfaction: Provided 
further, That the Secretary of Transportation shall reserve 
$60,000,000 of the funds provided under this heading and is 
authorized to transfer such sums to the Surface Transportation 
Board, upon request from said Board, to carry out directed 
service orders issued pursuant to section 11123 of title 49, 
United States Code, to respond to the cessation of commuter 
rail operations by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation: 
Provided further, That the Secretary of Transportation shall 
make the reserved funds available to the National Railroad 
Passenger Corporation through an appropriate grant instrument 
not earlier than September 1, 2006 to the extent that no 
directed service orders have been issued by the Surface 
Transportation Board as of the date of transfer or there is a 
balance of reserved funds not needed by the Board to pay for 
any directed service order issued through September 30, 2006: 
Provided further, That the Corporation is directed to achieve 
savings through operating efficiencies including, but not 
limited to, modifications to food and beverage service and 
first class service: Provided further, That the Inspector 
General of the Department of Transportation shall report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations beginning on 
January 3, 2006 and quarterly thereafter with estimates of the 
savings accrued as a result of all operational reforms 
instituted by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation: 
Provided further, That if the Inspector General cannot certify 
that the Corporation has achieved operational savings by July 
1, 2006, none of the funds in this Act may be used after July 
1, 2006, to subsidize the net losses of food and beverage 
service and sleeper car service on any Amtrak route: Provided 
further, That of the funds provided under this section, not 
less than $5,000,000 shall be expended for the development and 
implementation of a managerial cost accounting system, which 
includes average and marginal unit cost capability: Provided 
further, That within 30 days of development of the managerial 
cost accounting system, the Department of Transportation 
Inspector General shall review and comment to the Secretary of 
Transportation and the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations upon the strengths and weaknesses of the system 
and how it best can be implemented to improve decision making 
by the Board of Directors and management of the Corporation: 
Provided further, That not later than 60 days after enactment 
of this Act, Amtrak shall transmit, in electronic format, to 
the Secretary of Transportation, the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation a comprehensive business 
plan approved by the Board of Directors for fiscal year 2006 
under section 24104(a) of title 49, United States Code: 
Provided further, That the business plan shall include, as 
applicable, targets for ridership, revenues, and capital and 
operating expenses: Provided further, That the plan shall also 
include a separate accounting of such targets for the Northeast 
Corridor; commuter service; long-distance Amtrak service; 
State-supported service; each intercity train route, including 
Autotrain; and commercial activities including contract 
operations: Provided further, That the business plan shall 
include a description of the work to be funded, along with cost 
estimates and an estimated timetable for completion of the 
projects covered by this business plan: Provided further, That 
the Corporation shall continue to provide monthly reports in 
electronic format regarding the pending business plan, which 
shall describe the work completed to date, any changes to the 
business plan, and the reasons for such changes, and shall 
identify all sole source contract awards which shall be 
accompanied by a justification as to why said contract was 
awarded on a sole source basis: Provided further, That none of 
the funds in this Act may be used for operating expenses, 
including advance purchase orders, not approved by the 
Secretary of Transportation or on the National Railroad 
Passenger Corporation's fiscal year 2006 business plan: 
Provided further, That Amtrak shall display the business plan 
and all subsequent supplemental plans on the Corporation's 
website within a reasonable timeframe following their 
submissionto the appropriate entities: Provided further, That 
none of the funds under this heading may be obligated or expended until 
the National Railroad Passenger Corporation agrees to continue abiding 
by the provisions of paragraphs 1, 2, 3, 5, 9, and 11 of the summary of 
conditions for the direct loan agreement of June 28, 2002, in the same 
manner as in effect on the date of enactment of this Act: Provided 
further, That none of the funds provided in this Act may be used after 
March 1, 2006, to support any route on which Amtrak offers a discounted 
fare of more than 50 percent off the normal, peak fare.

  CAPITAL AND DEBT SERVICE GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER 
                              CORPORATION

    To enable the Secretary of Transportation to make quarterly 
grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation for the 
maintenance and repair of capital infrastructure owned by the 
National Railroad Passenger Corporation, including railroad 
equipment, rolling stock, legal mandates and other services, 
$780,000,000, to remain available until expended, of which not 
to exceed $280,000,000 shall be for debt service obligations: 
Provided, That the Secretary of Transportation shall approve 
funding for capital expenditures, including advance purchase 
orders, for the National Railroad Passenger Corporation only 
after receiving and reviewing a grant request for each specific 
capital grant justifying the Federal support to the Secretary's 
satisfaction: Provided further, That none of the funds under 
this heading may be used to subsidize operating losses of the 
National Railroad Passenger Corporation: Provided further, That 
none of the funds under this heading may be used for capital 
projects not approved by the Secretary of Transportation or on 
the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's fiscal year 2006 
business plan: Provided further, That the Secretary shall 
determine the cost to the Corporation for the annual Northeast 
Corridor capital and maintenance costs attributable to commuter 
rail operations over said Corridor: Provided further, That 
these costs shall be calculated by the Secretary based on the 
train mile usage of each commuter rail authority as a 
percentage of the total number of annual train miles used by 
all users of the Northeast Corridor or by whatever measure the 
Secretary believes to be most appropriate: Provided further, 
That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary 
shall assess fees to each commuter rail authority for any 
direct capital or maintenance costs associated with that rail 
authority's usage of the corridor: Provided further, That such 
assessments shall account fully for whatever direct annual 
contributions are already being made by each commuter authority 
for such Northeast Corridor capital and maintenance expenses in 
that fiscal year: Provided further, That the revenues from such 
fees shall be merged with this appropriation and be available 
for obligation and expenditure consistent with the terms and 
conditions of this paragraph: Provided further, That the 
Secretary shall transmit to Congress a monthly accounting of 
charges levied in accordance with the preceding proviso.

    EFFICIENCY INCENTIVE GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER 
                              CORPORATION

    For an additional amount to be made available to the 
Secretary for efficiency incentive grants to the National 
Railroad Passenger Corporation, $40,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That the Secretary may make 
grants to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation for an 
additional sum for operating subsidies at any time during the 
fiscal year for the purpose of maintaining the operation of 
existing Amtrak routes: Provided further, That nothing in the 
previous proviso should be interpreted either to encourage or 
discourage the Corporation with respect to adjusting existing 
routes or frequencies: Provided further, That the Secretary may 
make grants for operating subsidies at any time during the 
fiscal year in order to avert the Corporation's entry into 
bankruptcy proceedings: Provided further, That prior to 
awarding additional operating grants for the purpose of the 
preceding proviso, the Secretary and the Inspector General of 
the Department of Transportation shall certify to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate that such grants are necessary to prevent the 
Corporation from entering bankruptcy: Provided further, That if 
the Secretary and the Inspector General deem that sufficient 
operating funds are available to continue operations through 
the end of fiscal year 2006, then, as of September 1, 2006, the 
Secretary may make grants to the National Railroad Passenger 
Corporation at such times and in such amounts for capital 
improvements that have a direct and measurable short-term 
impact on reducing operating losses of the National Railroad 
Passenger Corporation.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 130. The Secretary may purchase promotional items of 
nominal value for use in public outreach activities to 
accomplish the purposes of 49 U.S.C. 20134: Provided, That the 
Secretary shall prescribe guidelines for the administration of 
such purchases and use.
    Sec. 131. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, from 
funds made available to the Federal Railroad Administration 
under the heading ``Next Generation High-Speed Rail'' in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2005 (Public Law 108-447), 
the Secretary of Transportation shall award a grant in the 
amount of $500,000to the Maine Department of Transportation for 
Safety and Mitigation Rail Relocation in Auburn, Maine.
    Sec. 132. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
made available to the Federal Railroad Administration for the 
Illinois statewide highway-rail crossing safety program on page 
1420 of the Joint Explanatory Statement of the Committee of 
Conference for Public Law 108-447 (House Report 108-792) shall 
be made available to the Illinois Commerce Commission for the 
Public Education and Enforcement Research (PEERS) program to 
improve rail-grade crossing safety through education and 
enforcement initiatives.
    Sec. 133. Notwithstanding any existing Federal legislation, 
from funds available to the Federal Railroad Administration 
under the heading of ``Next Generation High-Speed Rail'' in the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2004, Public Law 108-199; 
the Secretary of Transportation may award a grant of $1,000,000 
to the New Orleans Regional Planning Commission, New Orleans, 
Louisiana for site planning and an update of the Master Plan 
for the Union Passenger Terminal, located at New Orleans, 
Louisiana.
    Sec. 134. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
made available to the Federal Railroad Administration for the 
Spokane Region High Speed Rail Corridor Study on page 1420 of 
the Joint Explanatory Statement of the Committee of Conference 
for Public Law 108-447 (House Report 108-792) shall be made 
available to the Washington State Department of Transportation 
for grade crossing and related improvements under the Bridging 
the Valley project between Spokane County, Washington and 
Kootenai County, Idaho.
    Sec. 135. Of the $40,000,000 provided under the heading 
``Efficiency Incentive Grants to the National Railroad 
Passenger Corporation'', and notwithstanding limitation 
language contained therein, $8,300,000 shall be made available 
immediately upon enactment of this Act only for a revenue 
service demonstration of not less than 5,500 carload shipments 
of premium temperature-controlled express.

                     Federal Transit Administration

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    For necessary administrative expenses of the Federal 
Transit Administration's programs authorized by chapter 53 of 
title 49, United States Code, $80,000,000: Provided, That of 
the funds available under this heading, not to exceed $925,000 
shall be available for the Office of the Administrator; not to 
exceed $7,325,000 shall be available for the Office of 
Administration; not to exceed $4,058,200 shall be available for 
the Office of the Chief Counsel; not to exceed $1,359,300 shall 
be available for the Office of Communication and Congressional 
Affairs; not to exceed $7,985,900 shall be available for the 
Office of Program Management; not to exceed $8,732,500 shall be 
available for the Office of Budget and Policy; not to exceed 
$4,763,900 shall be available for the Office of Demonstration 
and Innovation; not to exceed $3,153,100 shall be available for 
the Office of Civil Rights; not to exceed $4,127,300 shall be 
available for the Office of Planning; not to exceed $20,754,000 
shall be available for regional offices; and not to exceed 
$16,815,800 shall be available for the central account: 
Provided further, That the Administrator is authorized to 
transfer funds appropriated for an office of the Federal 
Transit Administration: Provided further, That no appropriation 
for an office shall be increased or decreased by more than a 
total of 5 percent during the fiscal year by all such 
transfers: Provided further, That any change in funding greater 
than 5 percent shall be submitted for approval to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, That any 
funding transferred from the central account shall be submitted 
for approval to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations: Provided further, That none of the funds 
provided or limited in this Act may be used to create a 
permanent office of transit security under this heading: 
Provided further, That of the funds in this Act available for 
the execution of contracts under section 5327(c) of title 49, 
United States Code, $2,000,000 shall be reimbursed to the 
Department of Transportation's Office of Inspector General for 
costs associated with audits and investigations of transit-
related issues, including reviews of new fixed guideway 
systems: Provided further, That upon submission to the Congress 
of the fiscal year 2007 President's budget, the Secretary of 
Transportation shall transmit to Congress the annual report on 
new starts, including proposed allocations of funds for fiscal 
year 2007.

                         FORMULA AND BUS GRANTS

                  (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORITY)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For payment of obligations incurred in carrying out the 
provisions of 49 U.S.C. 5305, 5307, 5308, 5309, 5310, 5311, 
5317, 5320, 5335, 5339, and 5340 and section 3038 of Public Law 
105-178, as amended, $1,500,000,000, to be derived from the 
Mass Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund and to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That funds available for 
the implementation or execution of programs authorized under 49 
U.S.C. 5305, 5307, 5308, 5309, 5310, 5311, 5317, 5320, 5335, 
5339, and 5340 and section 3038 of Public Law 105-178, as 
amended, shall not exceed total obligationsof $6,979,931,000 in 
fiscal year 2006: Provided further, That of the funds made available to 
carry out capital projects to modernize fixed guideway systems 
authorized under 49 U.S.C. 5309(b)(2), $47,766,000 shall be transferred 
to the Capital Investment Grants account and made available to carry 
out new fixed guideway capital projects identified in this Act and in 
accordance with the applicable provisions of 49 U.S.C. 5309: Provided 
further, That except as provided in section 3044(b)(1) of Public Law 
109-59, funds made available to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5308 shall instead 
be available to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5309(b)(3).

                RESEARCH AND UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CENTERS

    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5306, 5312-
5315, 5322, and 5506, $75,200,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That $9,000,000 is available to carry out 
the transit cooperative research program under section 5313 of 
title 49, United States Code, $4,300,000 is available for the 
National Transit Institute under section 5315 of title 49, 
United States Code, $7,000,000 is available for university 
transportation centers program under section 5506 of title 49, 
United States Code: Provided further, That $54,200,000 is 
available to carry out national research programs under 
sections 5312, 5313, 5314, and 5322 of title 49, United States 
Code.

                       CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANTS

    For necessary expenses to carry out section 5309 of title 
49, United States Code, $1,455,234,000, to remain available 
until expended as follows:
      ACE Gap Closure San Joaquin County, California, 
$5,000,000;
      Alaska and Hawaii ferry projects, $15,000,000;
      Ann Arbor/Detroit Commuter Rail, Michigan, $5,000,000;
      Atlanta Beltline/C-Loop, Georgia, $1,000,000;
      Baltimore Central Light Rail Double Track Project, 
Maryland, $12,420,000;
      Baltimore Red Line and Green Line, Maryland, $2,000,000;
      Boston/Fitchburg, Massachusetts Rail Corridor, 
$2,000,000;
      Central Corridor/St. Paul-Minneapolis, Minnesota, 
$2,000,000;
      Central Florida Commuter Rail, $11,000,000;
      Central Phoenix/East Valley LRT, Arizona, $90,000,000;
      Charlotte South Corridor Light Rail Project, North 
Carolina, $55,000,000;
      City of Miami Streetcar, Florida, $2,000,000;
      City of Rock Hill Trolley Study, South Carolina, 
$400,000;
      Commuter Rail, Albuquerque to Santa Fe, New Mexico, 
$500,000;
      Commuter Rail, Utah, $9,000,000;
      CORRIDORone Regional Rail Project, Pennsylvania, 
$1,500,000;
      CTA Douglas Blue Line, Illinois, $45,150,000;
      CTA Ravenswood Brown Line, Illinois, $40,000,000;
      CTA Yellow Line, Illinois, $1,000,000;
      Dallas Northwest/Southeast Light Rail MOS, Texas, 
$12,000,000;
      Denali Commission, Alaska, $5,000,000;
      Detroit Center City Loop, Michigan, $4,000,000;
      Dulles Corridor Rapid Transit Project, Virginia, 
$26,000,000;
      East Corridor Commuter Rail, Nashville, Tennessee, 
$6,000,000;
      East Side Access Project, New York, $340,000,000;
      Euclid Corridor Transportation Project, Ohio, 
$24,770,000;
      Fort Lauderdale Downtown Rail Link, Florida, $1,000,000;
      Gainesville-Haymarket VRE Service Extension, Virginia, 
$1,450,000;
      Hartford-New Britain Busway, Connecticut, $6,000,000;
      Houston METRO, Texas, $12,000,000;
      Hudson-Bergen Light Rail MOS 2, New Jersey, $100,000,000;
      Kansas City, Missouri, Southtown BRT, $12,300,000;
      Metra, Illinois, $42,180,000;
      Metro Gold Line Eastside Light Rail Extension, 
California, $80,000,000;
      Miami Dade County Metrorail Extension, Florida, 
$10,000,000;
      Mid-Coast Light Rail Transit Extension, California, 
$7,160,000;
      Mid-Jordan Light Rail Transit Line, Utah, $500,000;
      Mission Valley East, California, $7,700,000;
      N. Indiana Commuter Transit District Recapitalization, 
$5,000,000;
      New Jersey Trans-Hudson Midtown Corridor, New Jersey, 
$12,315,000;
      North Corridor Interstate MAX Light Rail Project, Oregon, 
$18,110,000;
      North Shore Connector, Pennsylvania, $55,000,000;
      North Shore Corridor and Blue Line Extension, 
Massachusetts, $2,000,000;
      Northeast Corridor Commuter Rail Project, Delaware, 
$1,425,000;
      Northern Branch Bergen County, New Jersey, $2,500,000;
      Northstar Corridor Commuter Rail Project, Minnesota, 
$2,000,000;
      Northwest New Jersey--Northeast Pennsylvania Passenger 
Rail, $10,000,000;
      Oceanside Escondido Rail Project, California, 
$12,210,000;
      Odgen Avenue Transit Corridor/Circle Line, Illinois, 
$1,000,000;
      Regional Fixed Guideway Project, Nevada, $3,000,000;
      Rhode Island Integrated Commuter Rail Project, Rhode 
Island, $6,000,000;
      San Francisco BART Extension to San Francisco 
International Airport, California, $81,860,000;
      San Francisco Muni Third Street Light Rail Project, 
California, $25,000,000;
      San Juan Tren Urbano, Puerto Rico, $8,045,487;
      Santa Barbara Coast Rail Track Improvement Project, 
California, $1,000,000;
      Schuylkill Valley Metro, Pennsylvania, $2,000,000;
      Seattle Sound Transit, Washington, $80,000,000;
      Second Avenue Subway, New York, $25,000,000;
      Silicon Valley Rapid Transit Corridor Project, Santa 
Clara County, California, $6,500,000;
      Silver Line Phase III, Massachusetts, $4,000,000;
      Sounder Commuter Rail, Washington, $5,000,000;
      Southeast Corridor Multi-Modal Project (T-REX), Colorado, 
$80,000,000;
      Stamford Urban Transitway, Connecticut, $10,000,000;
      Triangle Transit Authority Regional Rail System (Raleigh-
Durham), North Carolina, $20,000,000;
      Washington County Commuter Rail Project, Oregon, 
$15,000,000;
      West Corridor Light Rail, Colorado, $5,000,000.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 140. The limitations on obligations for the programs 
of the Federal Transit Administration shall not apply to any 
authority under 49 U.S.C. 5338, previously made available for 
obligation, or to any other authority previously made available 
for obligation.
    Sec. 141. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, and 
except for fixed guideway modernization projects, funds made 
available by this Act under ``Federal Transit Administration, 
Capital investment grants'' for projects specified in this Act 
or identified in reports accompanying this Act not obligated by 
September 30, 2008, and other recoveries, shall be made 
available for other projects under 49 U.S.C. 5309.
    Sec. 142. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
funds appropriated before October 1, 2005, under any section of 
chapter 53 of title 49, United States Code, that remain 
available for expenditure may be transferred to and 
administered under the most recent appropriation heading for 
any such section.
    Sec. 143. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
unobligated funds made available for a new fixed guideway 
systems project under the heading ``Federal Transit 
Administration, Capital Investment Grants'' in any 
appropriations Act prior to this Act may be used during this 
fiscal year to satisfy expenses incurred for such projects.
    Sec. 144. Funds made available for Alaska or Hawaii ferry 
boats or ferry terminal facilities pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 
5309(m)(2)(B) may be used to construct new vessels and 
facilities, or to improve existing vessels and facilities, 
including both the passenger and vehicle-related elements of 
such vessels and facilities, and for repair facilities: 
Provided, That not more than $3,000,000 of the funds made 
available pursuant to 49 U.S.C. 5309(m)(2)(B) may be used by 
the State of Hawaii to initiate and operate a passenger 
ferryboat services demonstration project to test the viability 
of different intra-island and inter-island ferry boat routes 
and technology: Provided further, That notwithstanding 49 
U.S.C. 5302(a)(7), funds made available for Alaska or Hawaii 
ferry boats may be used to acquire passenger ferry boats and to 
provide passenger ferry transportation services within areas of 
the State of Hawaii under the control or use of the National 
Park Service.
    Sec. 145. Amounts made available from the bus category of 
the Capital Investment Grants Account or Discretionary Grants 
Account in this or any other previous Appropriations Act that 
remain unobligated or unexpended in a grant for a multimodal 
transportation facility in Burlington, Vermont, may be used for 
site-preparation and design purposes of a multimodal 
transportation facility in a different location within 
Burlington, Vermont, than originally intended notwithstanding 
previous expenditures incurred such purposes at the original 
location.
    Sec. 146. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
designated in the conference report accompanying Public Law 
108-447 and Public Law 108-199 for the King County Metro Park 
and Ride on First Hill, Seattle, Washington, shall be available 
to the Swedish Hospital parking garage, Seattle, Washington, 
subject to the same conditions and requirements of section 125 
of division H of Public Law 108-447.
    Sec. 147. Funds in this Act that are apportioned to the 
Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority to carry out 
section 5307 of title 49, United States Code, may be used to 
acquire land, equipment, or facilities used in public 
transportation from another governmental authority in the same 
geographic area: Provided, That the non-Federal share under 
section 5307 may include revenues from the sale of advertising 
and concessions.
    Sec. 148. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
unobligated funds designated to the Jacksonville Transportation 
Authority, Community Transportation Coordinator Program under 
the heading ``Job Access and Reverse Commute Grants'' in the 
statement of the managers accompanying Public Law 108-199 may 
be made available to the Jacksonville Transportation Authority 
for any purpose authorized under the Job Access and Reverse 
Commute program.
    Sec. 149. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
funds made available to the South Shore Commuter Rail, Indiana, 
project under the Federal Transit Administration Capital 
Investment Grants Account in Division H of Public Law 108-447 
that remain available may be used for remodernization of the 
South Shore Commuter Rail system.

             Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation

    The Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation is hereby 
authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
funds and borrowing authority available to the Corporation, and 
in accord with law, and to make such contracts and commitments 
without regard to fiscal year limitations as provided by 
section 104 of the Government Corporation Control Act, as 
amended, as may be necessary in carrying out the programs set 
forth in the Corporation's budget for the current fiscal year.

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

                    (HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND)

    For necessary expenses for operations and maintenance of 
those portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway operated and 
maintained by the Saint Lawrence Seaway Development 
Corporation, $16,284,000, to be derived from the Harbor 
Maintenance Trust Fund, pursuant to Public Law 99-662.

                        Maritime Administration

                       MARITIME SECURITY PROGRAM

    For necessary expenses to maintain and preserve a U.S.-flag 
merchant fleet to serve the national security needs of the 
United States, $156,000,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                        OPERATIONS AND TRAINING

    For necessary expenses of operations and training 
activities authorized by law, $122,249,000 of which $23,750,000 
shall remain available until September 30, 2006, for salaries 
and benefits of employees of the United States Merchant Marine 
Academy; of which $15,000,000 shall remain available until 
expended for capital improvements at the United States Merchant 
Marine Academy; and of which $8,211,000 shall remain available 
until expended for the State Maritime Schools Schoolship 
Maintenance and Repair.

                             SHIP DISPOSAL

    For necessary expenses related to the disposal of obsolete 
vessels in the National Defense Reserve Fleet of the Maritime 
Administration, $21,000,000, to remain available until 
expended.

          MARITIME GUARANTEED LOAN (TITLE XI) PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For administrative expenses to carry out the guaranteed 
loan program, not to exceed $4,126,000, which shall be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for Operations 
and Training.

                           SHIP CONSTRUCTION

                              (RESCISSION)

    Of the unobligated balances available under this heading, 
$2,071,280 are rescinded.

           ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION

    Sec. 150. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, 
the Maritime Administration is authorized to furnish utilities 
and services and make necessary repairs in connection with any 
lease, contract, or occupancy involving Government property 
under control of the Maritime Administration, and payments 
received therefore shall be credited to the appropriation 
charged with the cost thereof: Provided, That rental payments 
under any such lease, contract, or occupancy for items other 
than such utilities, services, or repairs shall be covered into 
the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.
    Sec. 151. No obligations shall be incurred during the 
current fiscal year from the construction fund established by 
the Merchant Marine Act, 1936 (46 App. U.S.C. 1101 et seq.), or 
otherwise, in excess of the appropriations and limitations 
contained in this Act or in any prior appropriations Act.

         Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    For necessary administrative expenses of the Pipeline and 
Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, $16,877,000, of 
which $645,000 shall be derived from the Pipeline Safety Fund.

                       HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY

    For expenses necessary to discharge the hazardous materials 
safety functions of the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration, $26,138,000, of which $1,847,000 shall remain 
available until September 30, 2008: Provided, That up to 
$1,200,000 in fees collected under 49 U.S.C. 5108(g) shall be 
deposited in the general fund of the Treasury as offsetting 
receipts: Provided further, That there may be credited to this 
appropriation, to be available until expended, funds received 
from States, counties, municipalities, other public 
authorities, and private sources for expenses incurred for 
training, for reports publication and dissemination, and for 
travel expenses incurred in performance of hazardous materials 
exemptions and approvals functions.

                            PIPELINE SAFETY

                         (PIPELINE SAFETY FUND)

                    (OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND)

    For expenses necessary to conduct the functions of the 
pipeline safety program, for grants-in-aid to carry out a 
pipeline safety program, as authorized by 49 U.S.C. 60107, and 
to discharge the pipeline program responsibilities of the Oil 
Pollution Act of 1990, $73,010,000, of which $15,000,000 shall 
be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and shall 
remain available until September 30, 2008; of which $58,010,000 
shall be derived from the Pipeline Safety Fund, of which 
$24,000,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2008: 
Provided, That not less than $1,000,000 of the funds provided 
under this heading shall be for the one-call State grant 
program.

                     EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS GRANTS

                     (EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FUND)

    For necessary expenses to carry out 49 U.S.C. 5127(c), 
$200,000, to be derived from the Emergency Preparedness Fund, 
to remain available until September 30, 2007: Provided, That 
not more than $14,300,000 shallbe made available for obligation 
in fiscal year 2006 from amounts made available by 49 U.S.C. 5116(i) 
and 5127(d): Provided further, That none of the funds made available by 
49 U.S.C. 5116(i), 5127(c), and 5127(d) shall be made available for 
obligation by individuals other than the Secretary of Transportation, 
or his designee.

           Research and Innovative Technology Administration

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    For necessary expenses of the Research and Innovative 
Technology Administration, $5,774,000, of which $1,121,000 
shall remain available until September 30, 2008: Provided, That 
there may be credited to this appropriation, to be available 
until expended, funds received from States, counties, 
municipalities, other public authorities, and private sources 
for expenses incurred for training.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
to carry out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $62,499,000: Provided, That the Inspector 
General shall have all necessary authority, in carrying out the 
duties specified in the Inspector General Act, as amended (5 
U.S.C. App. 3), to investigate allegations of fraud, including 
false statements to the government (18 U.S.C. 1001), by any 
person or entity that is subject to regulation by the 
Department: Provided further, That the funds made available 
under this heading shall be used to investigate, pursuant to 
section 41712 of title 49, United States Code: (1) unfair or 
deceptive practices and unfair methods of competition by 
domestic and foreign air carriers and ticket agents; and (2) 
the compliance of domestic and foreign air carriers with 
respect to item (1) of this proviso.

                      Surface Transportation Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Surface Transportation Board, 
including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $26,450,000: 
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, not 
to exceed $1,250,000 from fees established by the Chairman of 
the Surface Transportation Board shall be credited to this 
appropriation as offsetting collections and used for necessary 
and authorized expenses under this heading: Provided further, 
That the sum herein appropriated from the general fund shall be 
reduced on a dollar-for-dollar basis as such offsetting 
collections are received during fiscal year 2006, to result in 
a final appropriation from the general fund estimated at no 
more than $25,200,000.

        Administrative Provisions--Department of Transportation

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 160. During the current fiscal year applicable 
appropriations to the Department of Transportation shall be 
available for maintenance and operation of aircraft; hire of 
passenger motor vehicles and aircraft; purchase of liability 
insurance for motor vehicles operating in foreign countries on 
official department business; and uniforms or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901-5902).
    Sec. 161. Appropriations contained in this Act for the 
Department of Transportation shall be available for services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not 
to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the rate for an 
Executive Level IV.
    Sec. 162. None of the funds in this Act shall be available 
for salaries and expenses of more than 108 political and 
Presidential appointees in the Department of Transportation: 
Provided, That none of the personnel covered by this provision 
may be assigned on temporary detail outside the Department of 
Transportation.
    Sec. 163. None of the funds in this Act shall be used to 
implement section 404 of title 23, United States Code.
    Sec. 164. (a) No recipient of funds made available in this 
Act shall disseminate personal information (as defined in 18 
U.S.C. 2725(3)) obtained by a State department of motor 
vehicles in connection with a motor vehicle record as defined 
in 18 U.S.C. 2725(1), except as provided in 18 U.S.C. 2721 for 
a use permitted under 18 U.S.C. 2721.
    (b) Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Secretary shall not 
withhold funds provided in this Act for any grantee if a State 
is in noncompliance with this provision.
    Sec. 165. Funds received by the Federal Highway 
Administration, Federal Transit Administration, and Federal 
Railroad Administration from States, counties, municipalities, 
other public authorities, and private sources for expenses 
incurred for training may be credited respectively to the 
Federal Highway Administration's ``Federal-Aid Highways'' 
account, the Federal Transit Administration's ``Transit 
Planning and Research'' account, and to the Federal Railroad 
Administration's ``Safety and Operations'' account, except for 
State rail safety inspectors participating in training pursuant 
to 49 U.S.C. 20105.
    Sec. 166. Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, rule 
or regulation, the Secretary of Transportation is authorized to 
allow the issuer of any preferred stock heretofore sold to the 
Department to redeem orrepurchase such stock upon the payment 
to the Department of an amount determined by the Secretary.
    Sec. 167. None of the funds in this Act to the Department 
of Transportation may be used to make a grant unless the 
Secretary of Transportation notifies the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations not less than 3 full business days 
before any discretionary grant award, letter of intent, or full 
funding grant agreement totaling $1,000,000 or more is 
announced by the department or its modal administrations from: 
(1) any discretionary grant program of the Federal Highway 
Administration other than the emergency relief program; (2) the 
airport improvement program of the Federal Aviation 
Administration; or (3) any program of the Federal Transit 
Administration other than the formula grants and fixed guideway 
modernization programs: Provided, That no notification shall 
involve funds that are not available for obligation.
    Sec. 168. Rebates, refunds, incentive payments, minor fees 
and other funds received by the Department of Transportation 
from travel management centers, charge card programs, the 
subleasing of building space, and miscellaneous sources are to 
be credited to appropriations of the Department of 
Transportation and allocated to elements of the Department of 
Transportation using fair and equitable criteria and such funds 
shall be available until expended.
    Sec. 169. Amounts made available in this or any other Act 
that the Secretary determines represent improper payments by 
the Department of Transportation to a third party contractor 
under a financial assistance award, which are recovered 
pursuant to law, shall be available--
            (1) to reimburse the actual expenses incurred by 
        the Department of Transportation in recovering improper 
        payments; and
            (2) to pay contractors for services provided in 
        recovering improper payments: Provided, That amounts in 
        excess of that required for paragraphs (1) and (2)--
                    (A) shall be credited to and merged with 
                the appropriation from which the improper 
                payments were made, and shall be available for 
                the purposes and period for which such 
                appropriations are available; or
                    (B) if no such appropriation remains 
                available, shall be deposited in the Treasury 
                as miscellaneous receipts: Provided, That prior 
                to the transfer of any such recovery to an 
                appropriations account, the Secretary shall 
                notify the House and Senate Committees on 
                Appropriations of the amount and reasons for 
                such transfer: Provided further, That for 
                purposes of this section, the term ``improper 
                payments'', has the same meaning as that 
                provided in section 2(d)(2) of Public Law 107-
                300.
    Sec. 170. The Secretary of Transportation is authorized to 
transfer the unexpended balances available for the bonding 
assistance program from ``Office of the Secretary, Salaries and 
expenses'' to ``Minority Business Outreach''.
    Sec. 171. None of the funds made available in this Act to 
the Department of Transportation may be obligated for the 
Office of the Secretary of Transportation to approve 
assessments or reimbursable agreements pertaining to funds 
appropriated to the modal administrations in this Act, except 
for activities underway on the date of enactment of this Act, 
unless such assessments or agreements have completed the normal 
reprogramming process for Congressional notification.
    Sec. 172. None of the funds made available under this Act 
may be obligated or expended to establish or implement a pilot 
program under which not more than 10 designated essential air 
service communities located in proximity to hub airports are 
required to assume 10 percent of their essential air subsidy 
costs for a 4-year period commonly referred to as the EAS local 
participation program.
    Sec. 173. (a) Section 14710(a) of title 49, United States 
Code, is amended--
            (1) by striking ``a State authority may'' and 
        inserting ``a State authority other than the attorney 
        general of the state may, as parens patriae,''; and
            (2) by inserting the following after the first 
        sentence: ``Any civil action for injunctive relief to 
        enjoin such delivery or transportation or to compel a 
        person to pay a fine or penalty assessed under chapter 
        149 shall be brought in an appropriate district court 
        of the United States.''.
    (b) Section 14710(b) of title 49, United States Code, is 
amended to read as follows:
    ``(b) Exercise of Enforcement Authority.--The authority of 
this section shall be exercised subject to the requirements of 
sections 14711(b)-(f) of this title.''.
    (c) Section 14711(b)(1) of title 49, United States Code, is 
amended by inserting the following at the end:
            ``The State may initiate a civil action under 
        subsection (a) if it is reviewable under subsectin 
        (b)(2).''.
      (d) Section 14711(b)(4) of title 49, United States Code, 
is amended by inserting ``that is subject to review under 
subsection (b)(2)'' before ``if the Secretary''.
      (e) The amendments made by this section shall cease to be 
in effect after September 30, 2006.
    Sec. 174. Section 112(b)(2) of title 23, United States 
Code, is amended--
            (1) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``title 40'' 
        and all that follows through the period and inserting 
        ``title 40.'';
            (2) by striking subparagraph (B);
            (3) by redesignating subparagraphs (C) through (G) 
        as subparagraphs (B) through (F), respectively;
            (4) in subparagraph (E) (as redesignated by 
        paragraph (3)), in the first sentence, by 
striking``subparagraph (E)'' and inserting ``subparagraph (D)''; and
            (5) in subparagraph (F) (as redesignated by 
        paragraph (3)), by striking ``State Option'' and all 
        that follows through the period and inserting ``(F) 
        Subparagraphs (B), (C), (D) and (E) herein shall not 
        apply to the States of West Virginia or Minnesota.''.
    Sec. 175. Notwithstanding any provision of law, the 
Secretary of Transportation is authorized and directed to make 
project grants under chapter 471 of title 49, United States 
Code, from funds available for fiscal year 2006 and thereafter 
under 49 U.S.C. 48103, for the cost of acquisition of land, or 
reimbursement of the cost of land if purchased prior to 
enactment of this provision and prior to a grant agreement, for 
non-exclusive use aeronautical purposes on an airport layout 
plan that has been approved by the Secretary on January 23, 
2004, pursuant to section 49 U.S.C. 47107(a)(16), for any small 
hub airport as defined in 49 U.S.C. 47102, and had scheduled or 
chartered direct international flights totaling at least 200 
million pounds gross aircraft landed weight for calendar year 
2002.
    Sec. 176. (a) Section 47108 of title 49, United States 
Code, is amended in subsection (e) by adding the following new 
paragraph at the end:
            ``(3) Changes to nonhub primary status.--If the 
        status of a nonhub primary airport changes to a small 
        hub primary airport at a time when the airport has 
        received discretionary funds under this chapter for a 
        terminal development project in accordance with section 
        47110(d)(2), and the project is not yet completed, the 
        project shall remain eligible for funding from the 
        discretionary fund and the small airport fund to pay 
        costs allowable under section 47110(d). Such project 
        shall remain eligible for such funds for three fiscal 
        years after the start of construction of the project, 
        or if the Secretary determines that a further extension 
        of eligibility is justified, until the project is 
        completed.''.
    (b) Conforming Amendment.--Section 47110(d)(2)(A) is 
amended by striking ``(A) the'' and inserting ``(A) except as 
provided in section 47108(e)(3), the''.
    Sec. 177. Section 40128(e) of title 49, United States Code, 
is amended by adding at the end the following: ``For purposes 
of this subsection, an air tour operator flying over the Hoover 
Dam in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area en route to the 
Grand Canyon National Park shall be deemed to be flying solely 
as a transportation route.''. Nothing in this provision shall 
allow exemption from overflight rules for the Grand Canyon.
    Sec. 178. Section 145(c) of the Aviation and Transportation 
Security Act (49 U.S.C. 40101 note) is amended by striking 
``November 19, 2005.'' and inserting ``November 30, 2006.''.
    Sec. 179. (a)(1) This section shall apply to a former 
employee of the Federal Aviation Administration, who--
            (A) was involuntarily separated as a result of the 
        reorganization of the Flight Services Unit following 
        the outsourcing of flight service duties to a 
        contractor;
            (B) was not eligible by October 3, 2005 for an 
        immediate annuity under a Federal retirement system; 
        and
            (C) assuming continued Federal employment, would 
        attain eligibility for an immediate annuity under 
        section 8336(d) or 8414(b) of title 5, United States 
        Code, not later than October 4, 2007.
    (2) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, during the 
period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act and 
ending October 4, 2007, an employee described under paragraph 
(1) may, with the approval of the Administrator of the Federal 
Aviation Administration or the designee of the Administrator, 
accept an assignment to such contractor within 14 days after 
the date of enactment of this section.
    (3) Except as provided in subsection (c), an employee 
appointed under paragraph (1)--
            (A) shall be a temporary Federal employee for the 
        duration of the assignment;
            (B) notwithstanding such temporary status, shall 
        retain previous enrollment or participation in Federal 
        employee benefits programs under chapters 83, 84, 87, 
        and 89 of title 5, United States Code; and
            (C) shall be considered to have not had a break in 
        service for purposes of chapters 83, 84, and sections 
        8706(b) and 8905(b) of title 5, United States Code, 
        except no service credit or benefits shall be extended 
        retroactively.
    (4) An assignment and temporary appointment under this 
section shall terminate on the earlier of--
            (A) October 4, 2007; or
            (B) the date on which the employee first becomes 
        eligibility for an immediate annuity under section 
        8336(d) or 8414(b) of title 5, United States Code.
    (5) Such funds as may be necessary are authorized for the 
Federal Aviation Administration to pay the salary and benefits 
of an employee assigned under this section, but no funds are 
authorized to reimburse the employing contractor for the salary 
and benefits of an employee so assigned.
    (b) An employee who was involuntarily separated as a result 
of the reorganization of the Flight Services Unit following the 
outsourcing of flight service duties to a contractor, and was 
eligible to use annual leave under the conditions of section 
6302(g) of title 5, United States Code, may use such leave to--
            (1) qualify for an immediate annuity or to meet the 
        age or service requirements for an enhanced annuity 
        that the employee could qualify for under sections 
        8336, 8412, or 8414; or
            (2) to meet the requirements under section 8905(b) 
        of title 5, United States Code, to qualify to continue 
        health benefits coverage after retirement from service.
    (c)(1) Nothing in this section shall--
            (A) affect the validity or legality of the 
        reduction-in-force actions of the Federal Aviation 
        Administration effective October 3, 2005; or
            (B) create any individual rights of actions 
        regarding such reduction-in-force or any other actions 
        related to or arising under the competitive sourcing of 
        flight services.
    (2) An employee subject to this section shall not be--
            (A) covered by chapter 71 of title 5, United States 
        Code, while on the assignment authorized by this 
        section; or
            (B) subject to section 208 of title 18, United 
        States Code.
    (3) Temporary employees assigned under this section shall 
not be Federal employees for purposes of chapter 171 of title 
28, United States Code (commonly referred to as the Federal 
Tort Claims Act). Chapter 171 of title 28, United States Code 
(commonly referred to as the Federal Tort Claims Act) and any 
other Federal tort liability statute shall not apply to an 
employee who is assigned to a contractor under subsection (a).
    Sec. 180. (a) In this section:
            (1) The term ``Conservation Area'' means the Sloan 
        Canyon National Conservation Area established by 
        section 604(a) of the Clark County Conservation of 
        Public Land and Natural Resources Act of 2002 (116 
        Stat. 2010).
            (2) The term ``County'' means Clark County, Nevada.
            (3)(A) The term ``helicopter tour'' means a 
        commercial helicopter tour operated for profit.
            (B) The term ``helicopter tour'' does not include a 
        helicopter tour that is carried out to assist a 
        Federal, State, or local agency.
            (4) The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of 
        the Interior.
            (5) The term ``Wilderness'' means the North 
        McCullough Mountains Wilderness established by section 
        202(a)(13) of the Clark County Conservation of Public 
        Land and Natural Resources Act of 2002 (116 Stat. 
        2000).
    (b) As soon as practicable after the date of enactment of 
this Act, the Secretary shall convey to the County, subject to 
valid existing rights, for no consideration, all right, title, 
and interest of the United States in and to the parcel of land 
described in subsection (c).
    (c) The parcel of land to be conveyed under subsection (b) 
is the parcel of approximately 229 acres of land depicted as 
tract A on the map entitled ``Clark County Public Heliport 
Facility'' and dated May 3, 2004.
    (d)(1) The parcel of land conveyed under subsection (b)--
            (A) shall be used by the County for the operation 
        of a heliport facility under the conditions stated in 
        paragraphs (2), (3), and (4); and
            (B) shall not be disposed of by the County.
    (2)(A) Any operator of a helicopter tour originating from 
or concluding at the parcel of land described in subsection (c) 
shall pay to the Clark County Department of Aviation a $3 
conservation fee for each passenger on the helicopter tour if 
any portion of the helicopter tour occurs over the Conservation 
Area.
    (B)(i) Not earlier than 10 years after the date of 
enactment of this Act and every 10 years thereafter, the 
Secretary shall conduct a review to determine whether to raise 
the amount of the conservation fee.
    (ii) After conducting a review under clause (i) and 
providing an opportunity for public comment, the Secretary may 
raise the amount of the conservation fee in an amount 
determined to be appropriate by the Secretary, but by not more 
than 50 percent of the amount of the conservation fee in effect 
on the day before the date of the increase.
    (3)(A) The amounts collected under paragraph (2) shall be 
deposited in a special account in the Treasury of the United 
States.
      (B) Of the amounts deposited under subparagraph (A)--
            (i) \2/3\ of the amounts shall be available to the 
        Secretary, without further appropriation, for the 
        management of cultural, wildlife, and wilderness 
        resources on public land in the State of Nevada; and
            (ii) \1/3\ of the amounts shall be available to the 
        Director of the Bureau of Land Management, without 
        further appropriation, for the conduct of Bureau of 
        Land Management operations for the Conservation Area 
        and the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.
    (4)(A) Except for safety reasons, any helicopter tour 
originating or concluding at the parcel of land described in 
subsection (c) that flies over the Conservation Area shall not 
fly--
            (i) over any area in the Conservation Area except 
        the area that is between 3 and 5 miles north of the 
        latitude of the southernmost boundary of the 
        Conservation Area;
            (ii) lower than 1,000 feet over the eastern 
        segments of the boundary of the Conservation Area; or
            (iii) lower than 500 feet over the western segments 
        of the boundary of the Conservation Area.
    (B) The Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration shall establish a special flight rules area and 
any operating procedures that the Administrator determines to 
be necessary to implement subparagraph (A).
    (5) If the County ceases to use any of the land described 
in subsection (c) for the purpose described in paragraph (1)(A) 
and under the conditions stated in paragraph (2)--
                    (A) title to the parcel shall revert to the 
                United States, at the option of the United 
                States; and
                    (B) the County shall be responsible for any 
                reclamation necessary to revert the parcel to 
                the United States.
    (e) The Secretary shall require, as a condition of the 
conveyance under subsection (b), that the County pay the 
administrative costs of the conveyance, including survey costs 
and any other costs associated with the transfer of title.
    Sec. 181. The first sentence of section 29(c) of the 
International Air Transportation Competition Act of 1979 
(Public Law 96-192; 94 Stat. 48) is amended by inserting 
``Missouri,'' before ``and Texas''.
    Sec. 182. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
of the funds provided in or limited by this Act may be 
obligated or expended to provide a budget justification for 
fiscal year 2007 concurrently with the President's annual 
budget submission to Congress under section 1105(a) of title 
31, United States Code, to any congressional committee other 
than the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to 
May 31, 2006.
      Sec. 183. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, if 
any funds provided in or limited by this Act are subject to a 
reprogramming action that requires notice to be provided to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, said 
reprogramming action shall be approved or denied solely by the 
Committees on Appropriations: Provided, That the Secretary may 
provide notice to other congressional committees of the action 
of the Committees on Appropriations on such reprogramming but 
not sooner than 30 days following the date on which the 
reprogramming action has been approved or denied by the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 184. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
projects numbered 5094 and 5096 in the table contained in 
section 1702 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (Public Law 109-
59; 119 Stat. 1144) shall be subject to section 120(c) of title 
23, United States Code.
    Sec. 185. For necessary expenses, including an independent 
verification regime, to reimburse fixed-based general aviation 
operators and the providers of general aviation ground support 
services at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport; College 
Park Airport in College Park, Maryland; Potomac Airpark in Fort 
Washington, Maryland; Washington Executive/Hyde Field in 
Clinton, Maryland; and Washington South Capitol Street Heliport 
in Washington, DC; for direct and incremental financial losses 
incurred while such airports were closed to general aviation 
operations, or as of the date of enactment of this provision in 
the case of airports that have not reopened to such operations, 
by these operators and service providers solely due to the 
actions of the Federal government following the terrorist 
attacks on the United States that occurred on September 11, 
2001, not to exceed $17,000,000, to be available until 
expended: Provided,That of this amount not to exceed $5,000,000 
shall be available on a pro-rata basis, if necessary, to fixed-based 
general aviation operators and the providers of general aviation ground 
support services located at College Park Airport in College Park, 
Maryland; Potomac Airpark in Fort Washington, Maryland; and Washington 
Executive/Hyde Field in Clinton, Maryland: Provided further, That no 
funds shall be obligated or distributed to fixed-based general aviation 
operators and providers of general aviation ground support services 
until an independent audit is completed:
    Provided further, That losses incurred as a result of 
violations of law, or through fault or negligence, of such 
operators and service providers or of third parties (including 
airports) are not eligible for reimbursement: Provided further, 
That obligation and expenditure of funds are conditional upon 
full release of the United States Government for all claims for 
financial losses resulting from such actions.
    Sec. 186. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
amounts made available pursuant to Public Law 109-59 for the 
Gravina Island bridge and the Knik Arm bridge shall be made 
available to the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public 
Facilities for any purpose eligible under section 133(b) of 
title 23, United States Code: Provided, That in allocating 
funds for the equity bonus program under section 105 of such 
title, the Secretary shall make the calculations required under 
that section as if this section had not been enacted: Provided 
further, That the descriptions for High Priority Projects #406, 
the Gravina Island bridge, and #2465, the Knik Arm bridge, in 
section 1702 of Public Law 109-59 are hereby deleted and in 
their place is inserted ``the Alaska Department of 
Transportation and Public Facilities''.
    Sec. 187. (a) In addition to amounts available to carry out 
section 10204 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (Public Law 109-
59) as of the date of enactment of this Act, of the amounts 
made available by section 112 of this Act, $1,000,000 shall be 
used by the Secretary of Transportation and the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to jointly--
            (1) complete the review and assessment of 
        catastrophic hurricane evacuation plans under that 
        section; and
            (2) submit to Congress, not later than June 1, 
        2006, the report described in subsection (d) of that 
        section.
    (b) Section 10204 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, 
Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (Public 
Law 109-59) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)--
                    (A) by inserting after ``evacuation plans'' 
                the following: ``(including the costs of the 
                plans)''; and
                    (B) by inserting ``and other catastrophic 
                events'' before ``impacting'';
            (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``and local'' 
        and inserting ``parish, county, and municipal''; and
            (3) in subsection (c)--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``safe 
                and'' before ``practical'';
                    (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting after 
                ``States'' the following: ``and adjoining 
                jurisdictions'';
                    (C) in paragraph (3), by striking ``and'' 
                after the semicolon at the end;
                    (D) in paragraph (4), by striking the 
                period at the end and inserting a semicolon; 
                and
                    (E) by adding at the end the following:
            ``(5) the availability of food, water, restrooms, 
        fueling stations, and shelter opportunities along the 
        evacuation routes;
            ``(6) the time required to evacuate under the plan; 
        and
            ``(7) the physical and mental strains associated 
        with the evacuation.''.
    This title may be cited as the ``Department of 
Transportation Appropriations Act, 2006''.

                                TITLE II

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

                          Departmental Offices

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses of the Departmental Offices 
including operation and maintenance of the Treasury Building 
and Annex; hire of passenger motor vehicles; maintenance, 
repairs, and improvements of, and purchase of commercial 
insurance policies for, real properties leased or owned 
overseas, when necessary for the performance of official 
business, not to exceed $3,000,000 for official travel 
expenses; $196,592,000, of which not to exceed $8,642,000 is 
for executive direction program activities; not to exceed 
$7,852,000 is for general counsel program activities; not to 
exceed $32,011,000 is for economic policies and programs 
activities; not to exceed $26,574,000 is for financial policies 
and programs activities; pursuant to section 3004(b) of the 
Exchange Rates and International Economic Policy Coordination 
Act of 1988 (22 U.S.C. 5304(b)), not to exceed $1,000,000, to 
remain available until expended, is for the Secretary of the 
Treasury, in conjunction with the President, to implement said 
subsection as it pertains to governments and trade violations 
involving currency manipulation and other trade violations; not 
to exceed $39,939,000 is for financial crimes policies and 
programs activities; not to exceed $16,843,000 is for Treasury-
wide management policies and programs activities; and not to 
exceed $63,731,000 is for administration programs activities: 
Provided, That of the amount appropriated for financial crimes 
policies and programs activities, $22,032,016 is for the Office 
of Foreign Assets Control and shall support no less than 125 
full time equivalent positions: Provided further, That the 
Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to transfer funds 
appropriated for any program activity of the Departmental 
Offices to any other program activity of the Departmental 
Offices upon notification to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations: Provided further, That no appropriation for any 
program activity shall be increased or decreased by more than 
two percent by all such transfers: Provided further, That any 
change in funding greater than two percent shall be submitted 
for approval to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations: Provided further, That of the amount 
appropriated under this heading, not to exceed $3,000,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2007, for information 
technology modernization requirements; not to exceed $100,000 
for official reception and representation expenses; and not to 
exceed $258,000 for unforeseen emergencies of a confidential 
nature, to be allocated and expended under the direction of the 
Secretary of the Treasury and to be accounted for solely on his 
certificate: Provided further, That of the amount appropriated 
under this heading, $5,173,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2007, is for the Treasury-wide Financial 
Statement Audit Program, of which such amounts as may be 
necessary may be transferred to accounts of the Department's 
offices and bureaus to conduct audits: Provided further, That 
this transfer authority shall be in addition to any other 
provided in this Act.

        DEPARTMENT-WIDE SYSTEMS AND CAPITAL INVESTMENTS PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For development and acquisition of automatic data 
processing equipment, software, and services for the Department 
of the Treasury, $24,412,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2008: Provided, That these funds shall be 
transferred to accounts and in amounts as necessary to satisfy 
the requirements of the Department's offices, bureaus, and 
other organizations: Provided further, That this transfer 
authority shall be in addition to any other transfer authority 
provided in this Act: Provided further, That none of the funds 
appropriated shall be used to support or supplement ``Internal 
Revenue Service, Information Systems'' or ``Internal Revenue 
Service, Business Systems Modernization''.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, not to exceed $2,000,000 for official travel 
expenses, including hire of passenger motor vehicles; and not 
to exceed $100,000 for unforeseen emergencies of a confidential 
nature, to be allocated and expended under the direction of the 
Inspector General of the Treasury, $17,000,000, of which not to 
exceed $2,500 shall be available for official reception and 
representation expenses.

           TREASURY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR TAX ADMINISTRATION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Treasury Inspector General 
for Tax Administration in carrying out the Inspector General 
Act of 1978, as amended, including purchase (not to exceed 150 
for replacement only for police-type use) and hire of passenger 
motor vehicles (31 U.S.C. 1343(b)); services authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109, at such rates as may be determined by the 
Inspector General for Tax Administration; not to exceed 
$6,000,000 for official travel expenses; and not to exceed 
$500,000 for unforeseen emergencies of a confidential nature, 
to be allocated and expended under the direction of the 
Inspector General for Tax Administration, $133,286,000; and of 
which not to exceed $1,500 shall be available for official 
reception and representation expenses.

            AIR TRANSPORTATION STABILIZATION PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    For necessary expenses to administer the Air Transportation 
Stabilization Board established by section 102 of the Air 
Transportation Safety and System Stabilization Act (Public Law 
107-42), $2,750,000, to remain available until expended.

           TREASURY BUILDING AND ANNEX REPAIR AND RESTORATION

    For the repair, alteration, and improvement of the Treasury 
Building and Annex, $10,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2008.

                  Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Financial Crimes Enforcement 
Network, including hire of passenger motor vehicles; travel 
expenses of non-Federal law enforcement personnel to attend 
meetings concerned with financial intelligence activities, law 
enforcement, and financial regulation; not to exceed $14,000 
for official reception and representation expenses; and for 
assistance to Federal law enforcement agencies, with or without 
reimbursement, $73,630,000 of which not to exceed $6,944,000 
shall remain available until September 30, 2008; and of which 
$8,521,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2007: 
Provided, That funds appropriated in this account may be used 
to procure personal services contracts.

                      Financial Management Service

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Financial Management Service, 
$236,243,000, of which not to exceed $9,220,000 shall remain 
available until September 30, 2008, for information systems 
modernization initiatives; and of which not to exceed $2,500 
shall be available for official reception and representation 
expenses.

                Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of carrying out section 1111 of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, including hire of passenger 
motor vehicles, $91,126,000; of which not to exceed $6,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses; not to exceed 
$50,000 for cooperative research and development programs for 
laboratory services; and provision of laboratory assistance to 
State and local agencies with or without reimbursement.

                           United States Mint

               UNITED STATES MINT PUBLIC ENTERPRISE FUND

    Pursuant to section 5136 of title 31, United States Code, 
the United States Mint is provided funding through the United 
States Mint Public Enterprise Fund for costs associated with 
the production of circulating coins, numismatic coins, and 
protective services, including both operating expenses and 
capital investments. The aggregate amount of new liabilities 
and obligations incurred during fiscal year 2006 under such 
section 5136 for circulating coinage and protective service 
capital investments of the United States Mint shall not exceed 
$26,768,000.

                       Bureau of the Public Debt

                     ADMINISTERING THE PUBLIC DEBT

    For necessary expenses connected with any public-debt 
issues of the United States, $179,923,000, of which not to 
exceed $2,500 shall be available for official reception and 
representation expenses, and of which not to exceed $2,000,000 
shall remain available until expended for systems 
modernization: Provided, That the sum appropriated herein from 
the General Fund for fiscal year 2006 shall be reduced by not 
more than $3,000,000 as definitive security issue fees and 
Treasury Direct Investor Account Maintenance fees are 
collected, so as to result in a final fiscal year 2006 
appropriation from the General Fundestimated at $176,923,000. 
In addition, $70,000 to be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust 
Fund to reimburse the Bureau for administrative and personnel expenses 
for financial management of the Fund, as authorized by section 1012 of 
Public Law 101-380.

           Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

   COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    To carry out the Community Development Banking and 
Financial Institutions Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-325), 
including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates 
for individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to 
the rate for ES-3, $55,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2007, of which $4,000,000 shall be for financial 
assistance, technical assistance, training and outreach 
programs designed to benefit Native American, Native Hawaiian, 
and Alaskan Native communities and provided primarily through 
qualified community development lender organizations with 
experience and expertise in community development banking and 
lending in Indian country, Native American organizations, 
tribes and tribal organizations and other suitable providers, 
and up to $13,500,000 may be used for administrative expenses, 
including administration of the New Markets Tax Credit, up to 
$6,000,000 may be used for the cost of direct loans, and up to 
$250,000 may be used for administrative expenses to carry out 
the direct loan program: Provided, That the cost of direct 
loans, including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as 
defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 
as amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of direct 
loans not to exceed $11,000,000.

                        Internal Revenue Service

                 PROCESSING, ASSISTANCE, AND MANAGEMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses of the Internal Revenue Service for 
pre-filing taxpayer assistance and education, filing and 
account services, shared services support, general management 
and administration; and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109, at such rates as may be determined by the Commissioner, 
$4,136,578,000, of which up to $4,100,000 shall be for the Tax 
Counseling for the Elderly Program, of which $8,000,000 shall 
be available for low-income taxpayer clinic grants, of which 
$1,500,000 shall be for the Internal Revenue Service Oversight 
Board; and of which not to exceed $25,000 shall be for official 
reception and representation expenses: Provided, That of 
unobligated amounts available under this heading from previous 
appropriations acts, $20,000,000 shall be rescinded.

                          TAX LAW ENFORCEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses of the Internal Revenue Service for 
determining and establishing tax liabilities; providing 
litigation support; conducting criminal investigation and 
enforcement activities; securing unfiled tax returns; 
collecting unpaid accounts; conducting a document matching 
program; resolving taxpayer problems through prompt 
identification, referral and settlement; expanded customer 
service and public outreach programs, strengthened enforcement 
activities, and enhanced research efforts to reduce erroneous 
filings associated with the earned income tax credit; compiling 
statistics of income and conducting compliance research; 
purchase (for police-type use, not to exceed 850) and hire of 
passenger motor vehicles (31 U.S.C. 1343(b)); and services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, at such rates as may be determined 
by the Commissioner, $4,725,756,000, of which not to exceed 
$1,000,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2008, for 
research; and of which $55,584,000 shall be for the Interagency 
Crime and Drug Enforcement program: Provided, That up to 
$10,000,000 may be transferred as necessary from this account 
to the IRS Processing, Assistance, and Management appropriation 
or the IRS Information Systems appropriation solely for the 
purposes of management of the Interagency Crime and Drug 
Enforcement Program: Provided further, That up to $10,000,000 
may be transferred as necessary from this account to the IRS 
Processing, Assistance, and Management appropriation or the IRS 
Information Systems appropriation solely for the purposes of 
management of the Earned Income Tax Credit compliance program 
and to reimburse the Social Security Administration for the 
cost of implementing section 1090 of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 
1997 (Public Law 105-33): Provided further, That this transfer 
authority shall be in addition to any other transfer authority 
provided in this Act.

                          INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    For necessary expenses of the Internal Revenue Service for 
information systems and telecommunications support, including 
developmental information systems and operational information 
systems; the hire of passenger motor vehicles (31 U.S.C. 
1343(b)); and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, at such 
rates as may be determined by the Commissioner, $1,598,967,000, 
of which $75,000,000 shall remain available until September 30, 
2007.

                     BUSINESS SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION

    For necessary expenses of the Internal Revenue Service, 
$199,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2008, for 
the capital asset acquisition of information technology 
systems, including management and relatedcontractual costs of 
said acquisitions, including contractual costs associated with 
operations authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109: Provided, That none of these 
funds may be obligated until the Internal Revenue Service submits to 
the Committees on Appropriations, and such Committees approve, a plan 
for expenditure that: (1) meets the capital planning and investment 
control review requirements established by the Office of Management and 
Budget, including Circular A-11; (2) complies with the Internal Revenue 
Service's enterprise architecture, including the modernization 
blueprint; (3) conforms with the Internal Revenue Service's enterprise 
life cycle methodology; (4) is approved by the Internal Revenue 
Service, the Department of the Treasury, and the Office of Management 
and Budget; (5) has been reviewed by the Government Accountability 
Office; and (6) complies with the acquisition rules, requirements, 
guidelines, and systems acquisition management practices of the Federal 
Government.

               HEALTH INSURANCE TAX CREDIT ADMINISTRATION

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

    For expenses necessary to implement the health insurance 
tax credit included in the Trade Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-
210), $20,210,000: Provided, That of unobligated amounts 
available under this heading from previous appropriations acts, 
$9,000,000 shall be rescinded.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 201. Not to exceed 5 percent of any appropriation made 
available in this Act to the Internal Revenue Service or not to 
exceed 3 percent of appropriations under the heading ``Tax Law 
Enforcement'' may be transferred to any other Internal Revenue 
Service appropriation upon the advance approval of the 
Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 202. The Internal Revenue Service shall maintain a 
training program to ensure that Internal Revenue Service 
employees are trained in taxpayers' rights, in dealing 
courteously with taxpayers, and in cross-cultural relations.
    Sec. 203. The Internal Revenue Service shall institute and 
enforce policies and procedures that will safeguard the 
confidentiality of taxpayer information.
    Sec. 204. Funds made available by this or any other Act to 
the Internal Revenue Service shall be available for improved 
facilities and increased manpower to provide sufficient and 
effective 1-800 help line service for taxpayers. The 
Commissioner shall continue to make the improvement of the 
Internal Revenue Service 1-800 help line service a priority and 
allocate resources necessary to increase phone lines and staff 
to improve the Internal Revenue Service 1-800 help line 
service.
    Sec. 205. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available in this or any other Act or source to the Internal 
Revenue Service may be used to reduce taxpayer services as 
proposed in fiscal year 2006 until the Treasury Inspector 
General for Tax Administration completes a study detailing the 
impact of such proposed reductions on taxpayer compliance and 
taxpayer services, and the Internal Revenue Service's plans for 
providing adequate alternative services, and submits such study 
and plans to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate for approval: Provided, That no 
funds shall be obligated by the Internal Revenue Service for 
such purposes for 60 days after receipt of such study: Provided 
further, That the Internal Revenue Service shall consult with 
stakeholder organizations, including but not limited to, the 
National Taxpayer Advocate, the Internal Revenue Service 
Oversight Board, the Treasury Inspector General for Tax 
Administration, and Internal Revenue Service employees with 
respect to any proposed or planned efforts by the Internal 
Revenue Service to terminate or reduce significantly any 
taxpayer service activity.
    Sec. 206. Of the funds made available by this Act to the 
Internal Revenue Service, not less than $6,447,000,000 shall be 
available only for tax enforcement. In addition, of the funds 
made available by this Act to the Internal Revenue Service, and 
subject to the same terms and conditions, $446,000,000 shall be 
available for enhanced tax enforcement.
    Sec. 207. Of the funds made available by this Act to the 
Internal Revenue Service, not less than $166,249,000 shall be 
available for operating expenses of the Taxpayer Advocate 
Service, of which not less than $141,311,650 shall be made 
available from the ``Tax Law Enforcement'' account.
    Sec. 208. The Internal Revenue Service shall submit its 
fiscal year 2007 congressional budget justifications to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate using the identical structure provided under 
this Act and only in accordance with the direction specified in 
the report accompanying this Act.
    Sec. 209. Section 3 under the heading ``Administrative 
Provisions--Internal Revenue Service'' of title I of Public Law 
103-329 is amended by striking the last proviso.

         Administrative Provisions--Department of the Treasury

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 210. Appropriations to the Department of the Treasury 
in this Act shall be available for uniforms or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901), including 
maintenance, repairs, and cleaning; purchase of insurance for 
official motor vehicles operated in foreign countries; purchase 
of motor vehicles without regard to the general purchase price 
limitations for vehicles purchased and used overseas for the 
current fiscal year; entering into contracts with the 
Department of State for the furnishing of health and medical 
services to employees and their dependents serving in foreign 
countries; and services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
    Sec. 211. Not to exceed 2 percent of any appropriations in 
this Act made available to the Departmental Offices--Salaries 
and Expenses, Office of Inspector General, Financial Management 
Service, Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, Financial 
Crimes Enforcement Network, and Bureau of the Public Debt, may 
be transferred between such appropriations upon the advance 
approval of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided, That no 
transfer may increase or decrease any such appropriation by 
more than 2 percent.
    Sec. 212. Not to exceed 2 percent of any appropriation made 
available in this Act to the Internal Revenue Service may be 
transferred to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax 
Administration's appropriation upon the advance approval of the 
Committees on Appropriations: Provided, That no transfer may 
increase or decrease any such appropriation by more than 2 
percent.
    Sec. 213. Of the funds available for the purchase of law 
enforcement vehicles, no funds may be obligated until the 
Secretary of the Treasury certifies that the purchase by the 
respective Treasury bureau is consistent with Departmental 
vehicle management principles: Provided, That the Secretary may 
delegate this authority to the Assistant Secretary for 
Management.
    Sec. 214. None of the funds appropriated in this Act or 
otherwise available to the Department of the Treasury or the 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing may be used to redesign the $1 
Federal Reserve note.
    Sec. 215. The Secretary of the Treasury may transfer funds 
from Financial Management Services, Salaries and Expenses to 
Debt Collection Fund as necessary to cover the costs of debt 
collection: Provided, That such amounts shall be reimbursed to 
such salaries and expenses account from debt collections 
received in the Debt Collection Fund.
    Sec. 216. Section 122(g)(1) of Public Law 105-119 (5 U.S.C. 
3104 note), is further amended by striking ``7 years'' and 
inserting ``8 years''.
    Sec. 217. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this or any other Act may be used by the United 
States Mint to construct or operate any museum without the 
explicit approval of the House Committee on Financial Services 
and the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban 
Affairs.
    Sec. 218. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this or any other Act or source to the Department 
of the Treasury, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing, and the 
United States Mint, individually or collectively, may be used 
to consolidate any or all functions of the Bureau of Engraving 
and Printing and the United States Mint without the explicit 
approval of the House Committee on Financial Services; the 
Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs; the 
House Committee on Appropriations; and the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 219. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this or any other Act or source to the Secretary 
of the Treasury may be expended to develop, study, or implement 
any plan to reallocate the resources of, or merge the Financial 
Crimes Enforcement Network into the Departmental Offices--
Salaries and Expenses, or any other office within the 
Department of the Treasury.
    This title may be cited as the ``Department of the Treasury 
Appropriations Act, 2006''.

                               TITLE III

              DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                       Public and Indian Housing

                     TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For activities and assistance for the provision of tenant-
based rental assistance authorized under the United States 
Housing Act of 1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1437 et seq.) (``the 
Act'' herein), not otherwise provided for, $15,573,655,725, to 
remain available until expended, of which $11,373,656,000 shall 
be available on October 1, 2005, and $4,200,000,000 shall be 
available on October 1, 2006: Provided, That the amounts made 
available under this heading are provided as follows:
            (1) $14,089,755,725 for renewals of expiring 
        section 8 tenant-based annual contributions contracts 
        (including renewals of enhanced vouchers under any 
        provision of law authorizing such assistance under 
        section 8(t) of the Act): Provided, That 
        notwithstanding any other provision of law, fromamounts 
provided under this paragraph, the Secretary for the calendar year 2006 
funding cycle shall provide renewal funding for each public housing 
agency based on each public housing agency's 2005 annual budget for 
renewal funding as calculated by HUD, prior to prorations, and by 
applying the 2006 Annual Adjustment Factor as established by the 
Secretary, and by making any necessary adjustments for the costs 
associated with the first-time renewal of tenant protection or HOPE VI 
vouchers or vouchers that were not in use during the 12-month period in 
order to be available to meet a commitment pursuant to section 8(o)(13) 
of the Act: Provided further, That the Secretary shall, to the extent 
necessary to stay within the amount provided under this paragraph, pro 
rate each public housing agency's allocation otherwise established 
pursuant to this paragraph: Provided further, That except as provided 
in the following proviso, the entire amount provided under this 
paragraph shall be obligated to the public housing agencies based on 
the allocation and pro rata method described above: Provided further, 
That public housing agencies participating in the Moving to Work 
demonstration shall be funded pursuant to their Moving to Work 
agreements and shall be subject to the same pro rata adjustments under 
the previous proviso: Provided further, That up to $45,000,000 shall be 
available only: (1) to adjust the allocations for public housing 
agencies, after application for an adjustment by a public housing 
agency and verification by HUD, whose allocations under this heading 
for contract renewals for the calendar year 2005 funding cycle were 
based on verified VMS leasing and cost data averaged for the months of 
May, June, and July of 2004 and solely because of temporarily low 
leasing levels during such 3-month period did not accurately reflect 
leasing levels and costs for the 2004 fiscal year of the agencies; and 
(2) for adjustments for public housing agencies that experienced a 
significant increase, as determined by the Secretary, in renewal costs 
resulting from unforeseen circumstances or from the portability under 
section 8(r) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 of tenant-based 
rental assistance: Provided further, That none of the funds provided in 
this paragraph may be used to support a total number of unit months 
under lease which exceeds a public housing agency's authorized level of 
units under contract;
            (2) $180,000,000 for section 8 rental assistance 
        for relocation and replacement of housing units that 
        are demolished or disposed of pursuant to the Omnibus 
        Consolidated Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996 
        (Public Law 104-134), conversion of section 23 projects 
        to assistance under section 8, the family unification 
        program under section 8(x) of the Act, relocation of 
        witnesses in connection with efforts to combat crime in 
        public and assisted housing pursuant to a request from 
        a law enforcement or prosecution agency, enhanced 
        vouchers under any provision of law authorizing such 
        assistance under section 8(t) of the Act, HOPE VI 
        vouchers, mandatory and voluntary conversions, and 
        tenant protection assistance including replacement and 
        relocation assistance: Provided, That no more than 
        $12,000,000 can be used for section 8 assistance to 
        cover the cost of judgments and settlement agreements;
            (3) $48,000,000 for family self-sufficiency 
        coordinators under section 23 of the Act;
            (4) $5,900,000 shall be transferred to the Working 
        Capital Fund; and
            (5) $1,250,000,000 for administrative and other 
        expenses of public housing agencies in administering 
        the section 8 tenant-based rental assistance program, 
        of which up to $10,000,000 shall be available to the 
        Secretary to allocate to public housing agencies that 
        need additional funds to administer their section 8 
        programs: Provided, That $1,240,000,000 of the amount 
        provided in this paragraph shall be allocated for the 
        calendar year 2006 funding cycle on a pro rata basis to 
        public housing agencies based on the amount public 
        housing agencies were eligible to receive in calendar 
        year 2005: Provided further, That all amounts provided 
        under this paragraph shall be only for activities 
        related to the provision of tenant-based rental 
        assistance authorized under section 8, including 
        related development activities.

                        HOUSING CERTIFICATE FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

    Of the unobligated balances, including recaptures and 
carryover, remaining from funds appropriated to the Department 
of Housing and Urban Development under this heading, the 
heading ``Annual contributions for assisted housing'', the 
heading ``Tenant-based rental assistance'', and the heading 
``Project-based rental assistance'', for fiscal year 2005 and 
prior years, $2,050,000,000 is rescinded, to be effected by the 
Secretary no later than September 30, 2006: Provided, That, if 
insufficient funds exist under these headings, the remaining 
balance may be derived from any other heading under this title: 
Provided further, That the Secretary shall notify the 
Committees on Appropriations 30 days in advance of 
therescission of any funds derived from the headings specified above: 
Provided further, That any such balances governed by reallocation 
provisions under the statute authorizing the program for which the 
funds were originally appropriated shall be available for the 
rescission: Provided further, That any obligated balances of contract 
authority from fiscal year 1974 and prior that have been terminated 
shall be cancelled: Provided further, That no amounts recaptured from 
amounts appropriated in prior years under this heading or the heading 
``Annual contributions for assisted housing'' and no carryover of such 
appropriated amounts for project-based assistance shall be available 
for the calendar year 2006 funding cycle for activities provided for 
under the heading ``Tenant-based rental assistance''.

                    PROJECT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For activities and assistance for the provision of project-
based subsidy contracts under the United States Housing Act of 
1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1437 et seq.) (``the Act'' herein), 
not otherwise provided for, $5,088,300,000, to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That the amounts made available under 
this heading are provided as follows:
            (1) $4,939,700,000 for expiring or terminating 
        section 8 project-based subsidy contracts (including 
        section 8 moderate rehabilitation contracts), for 
        amendments to section 8 project-based subsidy contracts 
        (including section 8 moderate rehabilitation 
        contracts), for contracts entered into pursuant to 
        section 441 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance 
        Act, for renewal of section 8 contracts for units in 
        projects that are subject to approved plans of action 
        under the Emergency Low Income Housing Preservation Act 
        of 1987 or the Low-Income Housing Preservation and 
        Resident Homeownership Act of 1990, and for 
        administrative and other expenses associated with 
        project-based activities and assistance funded under 
        this paragraph.
            (2) $147,200,000 for performance-based contract 
        administrators for section 8 project-based assistance: 
        Provided, That the Secretary may also use such amounts 
        for performance-based contract administrators for: 
        interest reduction payments pursuant to section 236(a) 
        of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-1(a)); 
        rent supplement payments pursuant to section 101 of the 
        Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965 (12 U.S.C. 
        1701s); Section 236(f)(2) rental assistance payments 
        (12 U.S.C. 1715z-1(f)(2)); project rental assistance 
        contracts for the elderly under section 202(c)(2) of 
        the Housing Act of 1959, as amended (12 U.S.C. 1701q, 
        1701q-1); project rental assistance contracts for 
        supportive housing for persons with disabilities under 
        section 811(d)(2) of the Cranston-Gonzalez National 
        Affordable Housing Act; project assistance contracts 
        pursuant to section 202(h) of the Housing Act of 1959 
        (Public Law 86-372; 73 Stat. 667); and loans under 
        section 202 of the Housing Act of 1959 (Public Law 86-
        372; 73 Stat. 667).
            (3) $1,400,000 shall be transferred to the Working 
        Capital Fund: Provided further, That amounts recaptured 
        under this heading, the heading, `Annual Contributions 
        for Assisted Housing,' or the heading, `Housing 
        Certificate Fund,' for project-based section 8 
        activities may be used for renewals of or amendments to 
        section 8 project-based subsidy contracts or for 
        performance-based contract administrators, 
        notwithstanding the purposes for which such amounts 
        were appropriated.
            (4) amounts recaptured under this heading, the 
        heading ``Annual Contributions for Assisted Housing'', 
        or the heading ``Housing Certificate Fund'' may be used 
        for renewals of or amendments to section 8 project-
        based contracts, notwithstanding the purposes for which 
        such amounts were appropriated.

                      PUBLIC HOUSING CAPITAL FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the Public Housing Capital Fund Program to carry out 
capital and management activities for public housing agencies, 
as authorized under section 9 of the United States Housing Act 
of 1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1437g) (the ``Act'') 
$2,463,600,000, to remain available until September 30, 2009: 
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law or 
regulation, during fiscal year 2006, the Secretary may not 
delegate to any Department official other than the Deputy 
Secretary and the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian 
Housing any authority under paragraph (2) of section 9(j) 
regarding the extension of the time periods under such section: 
Provided further, That for purposes of such section 9(j), the 
term ``obligate'' means, with respect to amounts, that the 
amounts are subject to a binding agreement that will result in 
outlays, immediately or in the future: Provided further, That 
of the total amount provided under this heading, up to 
$11,000,000 shall be for carrying out activities under section 
9(h) of such Act: Provided further, That $11,000,000 shall be 
transferred to the Working Capital Fund: Provided further, That 
no funds may be used under this heading for the purposes 
specified in section 9(k) of the United States Housing Act of 
1937, as amended: Provided further, That of the total 
amountprovided under this heading, up to $17,000,000 shall be available 
for the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development to make grants, 
notwithstanding section 305 of this Act, to public housing agencies for 
emergency capital needs resulting from unforeseen or unpreventable 
emergencies and natural disasters occurring in fiscal year 2006: 
Provided further, That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
$38,000,000 shall be for supportive services, service coordinators and 
congregate services as authorized by section 34 of the Act and the 
Native American Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996: 
Provided further, That of the total amount provided under this heading 
up to $8,820,000 is to support the costs of administrative and judicial 
receiverships: Provided further, That of the total amount provided 
under this heading, $7,500,000 shall be for Neighborhood Networks 
grants for activities authorized in section 9(d)(1)(E) of the United 
States Housing Act of 1937, as amended: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, amounts made available in 
the previous proviso shall be awarded to public housing agencies on a 
competitive basis: Provided further, That notwithstanding section 
9(d)(1)(E) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, any Neighborhood 
Networks computer center established with funding made available under 
this heading in this or any other Act, shall be available for use by 
residents of public housing and residents of other housing assisted 
with funding made available under this title in this Act or any other 
Act.

                     PUBLIC HOUSING OPERATING FUND

    For 2006 payments to public housing agencies for the 
operation and management of public housing, as authorized by 
section 9(e) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as 
amended (42 U.S.C. 1437g(e)), $3,600,000,000: Provided, That, 
in fiscal year 2006 and all fiscal years hereafter, no amounts 
under this heading in any appropriations Act may be used for 
payments to public housing agencies for the costs of operation 
and management of public housing for any year prior to the 
current year of such Act: Provided further, That no funds may 
be used under this heading for the purposes specified in 
section 9(k) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as 
amended.

     REVITALIZATION OF SEVERELY DISTRESSED PUBLIC HOUSING (HOPE VI)

    For grants to public housing agencies for demolition, site 
revitalization, replacement housing, and tenant-based 
assistance grants to projects as authorized by section 24 of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended, 
$100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2007, of 
which the Secretary may use up to $2,000,000 for technical 
assistance and contract expertise, to be provided directly or 
indirectly by grants, contracts or cooperative agreements, 
including training and cost of necessary travel for 
participants in such training, by or to officials and employees 
of the department and of public housing agencies and to 
residents: Provided, That none of such funds shall be used 
directly or indirectly by granting competitive advantage in 
awards to settle litigation or pay judgments, unless expressly 
permitted herein.

                  NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the Native American Housing Block Grants program, as 
authorized under title I of the Native American Housing 
Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) (25 
U.S.C. 4111 et seq.), $630,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That, notwithstanding the Native American 
Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996, to 
determine the amount of the allocation under title I of such 
Act for each Indian tribe, the Secretary shall apply the 
formula under section 302 of such Act with the need component 
based on single-race Census data and with the need component 
based on multi-race Census data, and the amount of the 
allocation for each Indian tribe shall be the greater of the 
two resulting allocation amounts: Provided further, That of the 
amounts made available under this heading, $1,000,000 shall be 
contracted through the Secretary as technical assistance and 
capacity building to be used by the National American Indian 
Housing Council in support of the implementation of NAHASDA; 
$4,500,000 shall be to support the inspection of Indian housing 
units, contract expertise, training, and technical assistance 
in the training, oversight, and management of Indian housing 
and tenant-based assistance, including up to $300,000 for 
related travel; up to $4,000,000 may be used for emergencies 
that constitute imminent threats to health and safety, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law (including section 
305 of this Act): Provided further, That of the amount provided 
under this heading, $2,000,000 shall be made available for the 
cost of guaranteed notes and other obligations, as authorized 
by title VI of NAHASDA: Provided further, That such costs, 
including the costs of modifying such notes and other 
obligations, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize the total principal 
amount of any notes and other obligations, any part of which is 
to be guaranteed, not to exceed $17,926,000: Provided further, 
That for administrative expenses to carry out the guaranteed 
loan program, up to $150,000 from amounts in the third proviso, 
which shall be transferred to and merged with the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and Expenses''.

                  NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT

    For the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program, as 
authorized under title VIII of the Native American Housing 
Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (25 U.S.C. 4111 
et seq.), $8,815,000, to remain available until expended, of 
which $352,606 shall be for training and technical assistance 
activities.

           INDIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by section 
184 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (12 
U.S.C. 1715z-13a), $4,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That such costs, including the costs of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$116,276,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan program, up to $250,000 from amounts in the 
first paragraph which shall be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``Salaries and Expenses''.

      NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by section 
184A of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (12 
U.S.C. 1715z-13b), $900,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That such costs, including the costs of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$35,714,290.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan program, up to $35,000 from amounts in the 
first paragraph which shall be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``Salaries and Expenses''.

                   Community Planning and Development

              HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS

    For carrying out the Housing Opportunities for Persons with 
AIDS program, as authorized by the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act 
(42 U.S.C. 12901 et seq.), $289,000,000, to remain available 
until September 30, 2007, except that amounts allocated 
pursuant to section 854(c)(3) of such Act shall remain 
available until September 30, 2008: Provided, That the 
Secretary shall renew all expiring contracts for permanent 
supportive housing that were funded under section 854(c)(3) of 
such Act that meet all program requirements before awarding 
funds for new contracts and activities authorized under this 
section: Provided further, That the Secretary may use up to 
$1,500,000 of the funds under this heading for training, 
oversight, and technical assistance activities.

                 RURAL HOUSING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    For the Office of Rural Housing and Economic Development in 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development, $17,000,000, 
to remain available until expended, which amount shall be 
competitively awarded by September 1, 2006, to Indian tribes, 
State housing finance agencies, State community and/or economic 
development agencies, local rural nonprofits and community 
development corporations to support innovative housing and 
economic development activities in rural areas.

                       COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For assistance to units of State and local government, and 
to other entities, for economic and community development 
activities, and for other purposes, $4,220,000,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2008, unless otherwise specified: 
Provided, That of the amount provided, $3,748,400,000 is for 
carrying out the community development block grant program 
under title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
1974, as amended (the ``Act'' herein) (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.): 
Provided further, That unless explicitly provided for under 
this heading (except for planning grants provided in the second 
paragraph and amounts made available under the third 
paragraph), not to exceed 20 percent of any grant made with 
funds appropriated under this heading shall be expended for 
planning and management development and administration: 
Provided further, That $1,600,000 shall be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund: Provided further, That $60,000,000 shall 
be for grants to Indian tribes notwithstanding section 
106(a)(1) of such Act, of which, notwithstanding any other 
provision of law (including section 305 of this Act), up to 
$4,000,000 may be used for emergencies that constitute imminent 
threats to health and safety; $50,000,000 shall be available 
for YouthBuild program activities authorized by subtitle D of 
title IV of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing 
Act, as amended, and such activities shall be an eligible 
activity with respect to any funds made available under this 
heading: Provided, That local YouthBuild programs that 
demonstrate an ability to leverage private and nonprofit 
funding shall be given a priority for YouthBuild funding: 
Provided further, That no morethan eight percent of any grant 
award under the YouthBuild program may be used for administrative 
costs: Provided further, That of the amount made available for 
YouthBuild not less than $4,000,000 is for grants to establish 
YouthBuild programs in underserved and rural areas and $1,000,000 is to 
be made available for a grant to YouthBuild USA for capacity building 
for community development and affordable housing activities as 
specified in section 4 of the HUD Demonstration Act of 1993, as 
amended.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$310,000,000 shall be available for grants for the Economic 
Development Initiative (EDI) to finance a variety of targeted 
economic investments in accordance with the terms and 
conditions specified in the statement of managers accompanying 
this Act: Provided, That none of the funds provided under this 
paragraph may be used for program operations: Provided further, 
That, for fiscal years 2004, 2005 and 2006, no unobligated 
funds for EDI grants may be used for any purpose except 
acquisition, planning, design, purchase of equipment, 
revitalization, redevelopment or construction.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$50,000,000 shall be available for neighborhood initiatives 
that are utilized to improve the conditions of distressed and 
blighted areas and neighborhoods, to stimulate investment, 
economic diversification, and community revitalization in areas 
with population outmigration or a stagnating or declining 
economic base, or to determine whether housing benefits can be 
integrated more effectively with welfare reform initiatives: 
Provided, That amounts made available under this paragraph 
shall be provided in accordance with the terms and conditions 
specified in the statement of managers accompanying this Act.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of division G of 
Public Law 108-199 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
number 181 striking ``Volusia County'' and inserting ``Lively 
Arts Center in Volusia County''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of division G of 
Public Law 108-199 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
number 216 by striking ``for construction'' and inserting ``for 
planning, design, and engineering''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 369 by striking ``for the construction of HomeAid 
America temporary homeless shelters in Costa Mesa, California'' 
and inserting ``for the construction of shelters for the 
temporarily homeless in New York City, New York''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 502 by striking ``for acquisition of'' and 
inserting ``for renovations of''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 405 by striking ``Willington Senior Center'' and 
inserting ``buildings and facilities associated with the 
Willington Senior Housing Center''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 674 by striking ``City of Big Island, Virginia for 
the Sedalia Center restoration'' and inserting ``to restore the 
Sedalia Center in Bedford County, Virginia''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 469 by striking ``to the City of Havana, Illinois'' 
and inserting ``Havana, Illinois, Rural Fire District''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 554 by striking ``$250,000 to the Town of Monroe, 
New York for construction of the Monroe Free Library'' and 
inserting ``$150,000 for the Town of Lewisboro, New York for 
infrastructure improvements for the Onatru Farm Community 
Center and $100,000 for the Town of Poughkeepsie, New York for 
streetscape and related improvements in the Arlington Business 
District''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 445 by striking ``City of St. Petersburg, Florida'' 
and inserting ``Catholic Charities, Diocese of St. Petersburg, 
Florida''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-199 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 103 for the Mission Preservation Foundation in San 
Juan Capistrano, California by striking ``for the Great Stone 
Church restoration project'' and inserting ``to construct and 
install environment controls and security measures''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Division A of the Emergency AppropriationsAct for Defense, 
Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005 (Public Law 109-13) is 
amended--
            (1) in section 6070 (119 Stat. 299), by striking 
        paragraph (1); and
            (2) in section 6071 (119 Stat. 299), by striking 
        paragraph (1).
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of division I of 
Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
number 83 by striking ``construction'' and inserting 
``planning, design, engineering, and construction''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of division G of 
Public Law 108-199 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
number 216 by striking ``for construction'' and inserting ``for 
planning, design, and engineering''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of division I of 
Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
9 by striking ``for costs associated with the construction'' 
and inserting ``to be used for the planning and design''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of Division I of 
Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
260 by adding before the period ``including $120,000 for 
property renovation at 754 Broad Street for the Family Center 
emergency shelter for families and children''.
    The referenced statement of the managers accompanying 
Public Law 106-74 is deemed to be amended by inserting on page 
113 ``, of which $47,500 may be used for physical improvements 
at the South Providence Development Corporation business 
incubator facility or CleanScape, including associated project 
management costs'' after ``$100,000 for the South Providence 
Development Corporation in Providence, Rhode Island for a child 
care facility''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of Division I of 
Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
number 30 by striking ``City of San Francisco'' and inserting 
``San Francisco Museum and Historical Society''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under the heading 
``Community Development Fund'' in title II of Division G of 
Public Law 108-199 is deemed to be amended with respect to item 
number 122 by striking ``City of San Francisco'' and inserting 
``San Francisco Museum and Historical Society''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-199 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 855 by striking ``the Skagit County Children's 
Museum in Mount Vernon, Washington for facilities improvements 
and renovation'' and inserting ``the Children's Museum of 
Skagit County in Mount Vernon, Washington to purchase and 
renovate a building''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 1027 by striking ``planning and design'' and 
inserting ``planning, design, construction and buildout''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 946 by striking ``capital'' and inserting 
``planning, design, engineering, and construction''.
    The referenced statement of the managers under this heading 
in Public Law 108-447 is deemed to be amended with respect to 
item number 731 by striking ``rehabilitation and buildout'' and 
inserting ``planning, evaluation, design, engineering and 
construction''.

         COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LOAN GUARANTEES PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the cost of guaranteed loans, $3,000,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2007, as authorized by section 
108 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided, That such costs, including the cost of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$137,500,000, notwithstanding any aggregate limitation on 
outstanding obligations guaranteed in section 108(k) of the 
Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan program, $750,000 shall be transferred to and 
merged with the appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses''.

                       BROWNFIELDS REDEVELOPMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

    For competitive economic development grants, as authorized 
by section 108(q) of the Housing and Community Development Act 
of 1974, as amended, for Brownfieldsredevelopment projects, 
$10,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2007: Provided, 
That $10,000,000 shall be rescinded from unobligated balances from 
prior years appropriations under this heading and, to the extent there 
are insufficient balances, any additional rescission amounts shall be 
rescinded from funds appropriated under this heading for fiscal year 
2006.

                  HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the HOME investment partnerships program, as authorized 
under title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable 
Housing Act, as amended, $1,750,000,000, to remain available 
until September 30, 2008: Provided, That of the total amount 
provided in this paragraph, up to $42,000,000 shall be 
available for housing counseling under section 106 of the 
Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, and $1,000,000 shall 
be transferred to the Working Capital Fund.
    In addition to amounts otherwise made available under this 
heading, $25,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 
2008, for assistance to homebuyers as authorized under title I 
of the American Dream Downpayment Act.

        SELF-HELP AND ASSISTED HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM

    For the Self-Help and Assisted Homeownership Opportunity 
Program, $61,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 
2008: Provided, That of the total amount provided in this 
heading $20,000,000 shall be made available to the Self Help 
Homeownership Opportunity Program as authorized under section 
11 of the Housing Opportunity Program Extension Act of 1996 as 
amended: Provided further, That $30,000,000 shall be made 
available for capacity building, of which $26,500,000 shall be 
for capacity building for Community Development and affordable 
Housing for LISC and the Enterprise Foundation for activities 
authorized by Section 4 of the HUD Demonstration Act of 1993 
(42 U.S.C 9816 note), as in effect immediately before June 12, 
1997 and $3,500,000 shall be made available for capacity 
building activities administered by Habitat for Humanity 
International: Provided further, That $3,000,000 shall be made 
available to the Housing Assistance Council; $1,000,000 shall 
be made available to the National American Indian Housing 
Council; $4,000,000 shall be available as a grant to the Raza 
Development Fund of La Raza for the HOPE Fund, of which 
$500,000 is for technical assistance and fund management, and 
$3,500,000 is for investments in the HOPE Fund and financing to 
affiliated organizations; $2,000,000 shall be available as a 
grant to the National Housing Development Corporation for 
operating expenses and a program of affordable housing 
acquisition and rehabilitation; and $1,000,000 shall be made 
available to the Special Olympics National Organizing Committee 
for planning, equipment and operational expenses associated 
with the 2006 games in Ames, Iowa.

                       HOMELESS ASSISTANCE GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the emergency shelter grants program as authorized 
under subtitle B of title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless 
Assistance Act, as amended; the supportive housing program as 
authorized under subtitle C of title IV of such Act; the 
section 8 moderate rehabilitation single room occupancy program 
as authorized under the United States Housing Act of 1937, as 
amended, to assist homeless individuals pursuant to section 441 
of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act; and the shelter 
plus care program as authorized under subtitle F of title IV of 
such Act, $1,340,000,000, of which $1,320,000,000 shall remain 
available until September 30, 2008, and of which $20,000,000 
shall remain available until expended: Provided, That not less 
than 30 percent of funds made available, excluding amounts 
provided for renewals under the shelter plus care program, 
shall be used for permanent housing: Provided further, That all 
funds awarded for services shall be matched by 25 percent in 
funding by each grantee: Provided further, That the Secretary 
shall renew on an annual basis expiring contracts or amendments 
to contracts funded under the shelter plus care program if the 
program is determined to be needed under the applicable 
continuum of care and meets appropriate program requirements 
and financial standards, as determined by the Secretary: 
Provided further, That all awards of assistance under this 
heading shall be required to coordinate and integrate homeless 
programs with other mainstream health, social services, and 
employment programs for which homeless populations may be 
eligible, including Medicaid, State Children's Health Insurance 
Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Food Stamps, 
and services funding through the Mental Health and Substance 
Abuse Block Grant, Workforce Investment Act, and the Welfare-
to-Work grant program: Provided further, That up to $11,674,000 
of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be available 
for the national homeless data analysis project and technical 
assistance: Provided further, That $1,000,000 of the funds 
appropriated under this heading shall be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund: Provided further, That all balances for 
Shelter Plus Care renewals previously funded from the Shelter 
Plus Care Renewal account and transferred to this account shall 
be available, if recaptured, for Shelter Plus Care renewals in 
fiscal year 2006.

                            Housing Programs

                        HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For capital advances, including amendments to capital 
advance contracts, for housing for the elderly, as authorized 
by section 202 of the Housing Act of 1959, as amended, and for 
project rental assistance for the elderly under section 
202(c)(2) of such Act, including amendments to contracts for 
such assistance and renewal of expiring contracts for such 
assistance for up to a 1-year term, and for supportive services 
associated with the housing, $742,000,000, to remain available 
until September 30, 2009, of which amount $51,600,000 shall be 
for service coordinators and the continuation of existing 
congregate service grants for residents of assisted housing 
projects, and of which amount up to $24,800,000 shall be for 
grants under section 202b of the Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 
1701q-2) for conversion of eligible projects under such section 
to assisted living or related use and for emergency capital 
repairs as determined by the Secretary: Provided, That of the 
amount made available under this heading, $4,000,000 shall be 
made available to carry out section 203 of Public Law 108-186: 
Provided further, That of the amount made available under this 
heading, $20,000,000 shall be available to the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development only for making competitive 
grants to private nonprofit organizations and consumer 
cooperatives for covering costs of architectural and 
engineering work, site control, and other planning relating to 
the development of supportive housing for the elderly that is 
eligible for assistance under section 202 of the Housing Act of 
1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q): Provided further, That amounts under 
this heading shall be available for Real Estate Assessment 
Center inspections and inspection-related activities associated 
with section 202 capital advance projects: Provided further, 
That $400,000 of the total amount made available under this 
heading shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund: 
Provided further, That the Secretary may waive the provisions 
of section 202 governing the terms and conditions of project 
rental assistance, except that the initial contract term for 
such assistance shall not exceed 5 years in duration.

                 HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For capital advance contracts, including amendments to 
capital advance contracts, for supportive housing for persons 
with disabilities, as authorized by section 811 of the 
Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, for project 
rental assistance for supportive housing for persons with 
disabilities under section 811(d)(2) of such Act, including 
amendments to contracts for such assistance and renewal of 
expiring contracts for such assistance for up to a 1-year term, 
and for supportive services associated with the housing for 
persons with disabilities as authorized by section 811(b)(1) of 
such Act, and for tenant-based rental assistance contracts 
entered into pursuant tosection 811 of such Act, $239,000,000 
to remain available until September 30, 2009: Provided, That $400,000 
shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund: Provided further, 
That, of the amount provided under this heading $78,300,000 shall be 
for amendments or renewal of tenant-based assistance contracts entered 
into prior to fiscal year 2005 (only one amendment authorized for any 
such contract): Provided further, That of the amount provided under 
this heading, the Secretary may make available up to $5,000,000 for 
incremental tenant-based rental assistance, as authorized by section 
811 of such Act (which assistance is 5 years in duration): Provided 
further, That all tenant-based assistance made available under this 
heading shall continue to remain available only to persons with 
disabilities: Provided further, That the Secretary may waive the 
provisions of section 811 governing the terms and conditions of project 
rental assistance and tenant-based assistance, except that the initial 
contract term for such assistance shall not exceed 5 years in duration: 
Provided further, That amounts made available under this heading shall 
be available for Real Estate Assessment Center Inspections and 
inspection-related activities associated with Section 811 Capital 
Advance Projects.

                    OTHER ASSISTED HOUSING PROGRAMS

                       RENTAL HOUSING ASSISTANCE

    For amendments to contracts under section 101 of the 
Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965 (12 U.S.C. 1701s) and 
section 236(f)(2) of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-
1) in State-aided, non-insured rental housing projects, 
$26,400,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
amendments to such contracts hereafter may be for a period less 
than the term of the respective contracts.

                         FLEXIBLE SUBSIDY FUND

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    From the Rental Housing Assistance Fund, all uncommitted 
balances of excess rental charges as of September 30, 2005, and 
any collections made during fiscal year 2006 and all subsequent 
fiscal years, shall be transferred to the Flexible Subsidy 
Fund, as authorized by section 236(g) of the National Housing 
Act, as amended.

                  MANUFACTURED HOUSING FEES TRUST FUND

    For necessary expenses as authorized by the National 
Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards Act of 
1974, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5401 et seq.), up to $13,000,000, 
to remain available until expended, to be derived from the 
Manufactured Housing Fees Trust Fund: Provided, That not to 
exceed the total amount appropriated under this heading shall 
be available from the general fund of the Treasury to the 
extent necessary to incur obligations and make expenditures 
pending the receipt of collections to the Fund pursuant to 
section 620 of such Act: Provided further, That the amount made 
available under this heading from the general fund shall be 
reduced as such collections are received during fiscal year 
2006 so as to result in a final fiscal year 2006 appropriation 
from the general fund estimated at not more than $0 and fees 
pursuant to such section 620 shall be modified as necessary to 
ensure such a final fiscal year 2006 appropriation.

                     Federal Housing Administration

               MUTUAL MORTGAGE INSURANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    During fiscal year 2006, commitments to guarantee loans to 
carry out the purposes of section 203(b) of the National 
Housing Act, as amended, shall not exceed a loan principal of 
$185,000,000,000.
    During fiscal year 2006, obligations to make direct loans 
to carry out the purposes of section 204(g) of the National 
Housing Act, as amended, shall not exceed $50,000,000: 
Provided, That the foregoing amount shall be for loans to 
nonprofit and governmental entities in connection with sales of 
single family real properties owned by the Secretary and 
formerly insured under the Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.
    For administrative expenses necessary to carry out the 
guaranteed and direct loan program, $355,000,000, of which not 
to exceed $351,000,000 shall be transferred to the 
appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses''; and not to exceed 
$4,000,000 shall be transferred to the appropriation for 
``Office of Inspector General''. In addition, for 
administrative contract expenses, $62,600,000, of which 
$18,281,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund: 
Provided, That to the extent guaranteed loan commitments exceed 
$65,500,000,000 on or before April 1, 2006, an additional 
$1,400 for administrative contract expenses shall be available 
for each $1,000,000 in additional guaranteed loan commitments 
(including a pro rata amount for any amount below $1,000,000), 
but in no case shall funds made available by this proviso 
exceed $30,000,000.

                GENERAL AND SPECIAL RISK PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by sections 
238 and 519 of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-3 and 
1735c), including the cost of loan guarantee modifications, as 
that term is defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, as amended, $8,800,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That commitments to guarantee loans shall 
not exceed $35,000,000,000 in total loan principal, any part of 
which is to be guaranteed.
    Gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans, 
as authorized by sections 204(g), 207(l), 238, and 519(a) of 
the National Housing Act, shall not exceed $50,000,000, of 
which not to exceed $30,000,000 shall be for bridge financing 
in connection with the sale of multifamily real properties 
owned by the Secretary and formerly insured under such Act; and 
of which not to exceed $20,000,000 shall be for loans to 
nonprofit and governmental entities in connection with the sale 
of single-family real properties owned by the Secretary and 
formerly insured under such Act.
    In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to carry 
out the guaranteed and direct loan programs, $231,400,000, of 
which $211,400,000 shall be transferred to the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and Expenses''; and of which $20,000,000 shall 
be transferred to the appropriation for ``Office of Inspector 
General''.
    In addition, for administrative contract expenses necessary 
to carry out the guaranteed and direct loan programs, 
$71,900,000, of which $10,800,000 shall be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund: Provided, That to the extent guaranteed 
loan commitments exceed$8,426,000,000 on or before April 1, 
2006, an additional $1,980 for administrative contract expenses shall 
be available for each $1,000,000 in additional guaranteed loan 
commitments over $8,426,000,000 (including a pro rata amount for any 
increment below $1,000,000), but in no case shall funds made available 
by this proviso exceed $14,400,000.

                Government National Mortgage Association

GUARANTEES OF MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    New commitments to issue guarantees to carry out the 
purposes of section 306 of the National Housing Act, as amended 
(12 U.S.C. 1721(g)), shall not exceed $200,000,000,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2007.
    For administrative expenses necessary to carry out the 
guaranteed mortgage-backed securities program, $10,700,000, to 
be derived from the GNMA guarantees of mortgage-backed 
securities guaranteed loan receipt account, of which not to 
exceed $10,700,000, shall be transferred to the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and Expenses''.

                    Policy Development and Research

                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

    For contracts, grants, and necessary expenses of programs 
of research and studies relating to housing and urban problems, 
not otherwise provided for, as authorized by title V of the 
Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970, as amended (12 
U.S.C. 1701z-1 et seq.), including carrying out the functions 
of the Secretary under section 1(a)(1)(i) of Reorganization 
Plan No. 2 of 1968, $56,350,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2007: Provided, That of the total amount provided 
under this heading, $5,000,000 shall be for the Partnership for 
Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) Initiative: Provided 
further, That of the amounts made available for PATH under this 
heading, $2,500,000 shall not be subject to the requirements of 
section 305 of this title: Provided further, That the Office of 
Housing shall administer PATH: Provided further, That of funds 
made available under this heading, $750,000 shall be 
transferred to the National Research Council for a study in 
accordance with the statement of the managers accompanying this 
Act: Provided further, That of the funds made available under 
this heading, $20,600,000 is for grants pursuant to section 107 
of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended, as follows: $3,000,000 to support Alaska Native 
serving institutions and Native Hawaiian serving institutions 
as defined under the Higher Education Act, as amended; 
$2,600,000 for tribal colleges and universities to build, 
expand, renovate, and equip their facilities and to expand the 
role of the colleges into the community through the provision 
of needed services such as health programs, job training and 
economic development activities; $9,000,000 for the 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities program, of which 
up to $2,000,000 may be used for technical assistance; and 
$6,000,000 for the Hispanic Serving Institutions Program.

                   Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

                        FAIR HOUSING ACTIVITIES

    For contracts, grants, and other assistance, not otherwise 
provided for, as authorized by title VIII of the Civil Rights 
Act of 1968, as amended by the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 
1988, and section 561 of the Housing and Community Development 
Act of 1987, as amended, $46,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2007, of which $20,000,000 shall be to carry out 
activities pursuant to such section 561: Provided, That no 
funds made available under this heading shall be used to lobby 
the executive or legislative branches of the Federal Government 
in connection with a specific contract, grant or loan.

                     Office of Lead Hazard Control

                         LEAD HAZARD REDUCTION

    For the Lead Hazard Reduction Program, as authorized by 
section 1011 of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard 
Reduction Act of 1992, $152,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2007, of which $9,500,000 shall be for the 
Healthy Homes Initiative, pursuant to sections 501 and 502 of 
the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970 that shall 
include research, studies, testing, and demonstration efforts, 
including education and outreach concerning lead-based paint 
poisoning and other housing-related diseases and hazards: 
Provided, That for purposes of environmental review, pursuant 
to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 
4321 et seq.) and other provisions of law that further the 
purposes of such Act, a grant under the Healthy Homes 
Initiative, Operation Lead Elimination Action Plan (LEAP), or 
the Lead Technical Studies program under this heading or under 
prior appropriations Acts for such purposes under this heading, 
shall be considered to be funds for a special project for 
purposes of section 305(c) of the Multifamily Housing Property 
Disposition Reform Act of 1994: Provided further, That of the 
total amount made available under this heading, $48,000,000 
shall be made available on a competitive basis for areas with 
the highest lead paint abatement needs, as identified by the 
Secretary as having: (1) the highest number of occupied pre-
1940 units of rental housing; and (2) a disproportionately high 
number of documented cases of lead-poisoned children:Provided 
further, That each grantee receiving funds under the previous proviso 
shall target those privately owned units and multifamily buildings that 
are occupied by low-income families as defined under section 3(b)(2) of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937: Provided further, That not less 
than 90 percent of the funds made available under this paragraph shall 
be used exclusively for abatement, inspections, risk assessments, 
temporary relocations and interim control of lead-based hazards as 
defined by 42 U.S.C. 4851: Provided further, That each recipient of 
funds provided under the first proviso shall make a matching 
contribution in an amount not less than 25 percent: Provided further, 
That each applicant shall submit a detailed plan and strategy that 
demonstrates adequate capacity that is acceptable to the Secretary to 
carry out the proposed use of funds pursuant to a Notice of Funding 
Availability.

                     Management and Administration

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary administrative and non-administrative 
expenses of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
not otherwise provided for, including purchase of uniforms, or 
allowances therefore, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; hire 
of passenger motor vehicles; services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109; and not to exceed $25,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses, $1,153,285,000, of which $562,400,000 
shall be provided from the various funds of the Federal Housing 
Administration, $10,700,000 shall be provided from funds of the 
Government National Mortgage Association, $750,000 shall be 
from the ``Community development loan guarantee program'' 
account, $150,000 shall be provided by transfer from the 
``Native American housing block grants'' account, $250,000 
shall be provided by transfer from the ``Indian housing loan 
guarantee fund program'' account and $35,000 shall be 
transferred from the ``Native Hawaiian housing loan guarantee 
fund'' account: Provided, That funds made available under this 
heading shall only be allocated in the manner specified in the 
statement of the managers accompanying this Act unless the 
Committees on Appropriations of both the House of 
Representatives and the Senate are notified of any changes in 
an operating plan or reprogramming: Provided further, That no 
official or employee of the Department shall be designated as 
an allotment holder unless the Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer (OCFO) has determined that such allotment holder has 
implemented an adequate system of funds control and has 
received training in funds control procedures and directives: 
Provided further, That the Chief Financial Officer shall 
establish positive control of and maintain adequate systems of 
accounting for appropriations and other available funds as 
required by 31 U.S.C. 1514: Provided further, That for purposes 
of funds control and determining whether a violation exists 
under the Anti-Deficiency Act (31 U.S.C. 1341 et seq.), the 
point of obligation shall be the executed agreement or 
contract, except with respect to insurance and guarantee 
programs, certain types of salaries and expenses funding, and 
incremental funding that is authorized under an executed 
agreement or contract, and shall be designated in the approved 
funds control plan: Provided further, That the Chief Financial 
Officer shall: (1) appoint qualified personnel to conduct 
investigations of potential or actual violations; (2) establish 
minimum training requirements and other qualifications for 
personnel that may be appointed to conduct investigations; (3) 
establish guidelines and timeframes for the conduct and 
completion of investigations; (4) prescribe the content, format 
and other requirements for the submission of final reports on 
violations; and (5) prescribe such additional policies and 
procedures as may be required for conducting investigations of, 
and administering, processing, and reporting on, potential and 
actual violations of the Anti-Deficiency Act and all other 
statutes and regulations governing the obligation and 
expenditure of funds made available in this or any other Act: 
Provided further, That up to $15,000,000 may be transferred to 
the Working Capital Fund: Provided further, That the Secretary 
shall fill 7 out of 10 vacancies at the GS-14 and GS-15 levels 
until the total number of GS-14 and GS-15 positions in the 
Department has been reduced from the number of GS-14 and GS-15 
positions on the date of enactment of Public Law 106-377 by 
2\1/2\ percent.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

    For additional capital for the Working Capital Fund (42 
U.S.C. 3535) for the development of, modifications to, and 
infrastructure for Department-wide information technology 
systems, for the continuing operation of both Department-wide 
and program-specific information systems, and for program-
related development activities, $197,000,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2007: Provided, That any amounts 
transferred to this Fund under this Act shall remain available 
until expended: Provided further, That any amounts transferred 
to this Fund from amounts appropriated by previously enacted 
appropriations Acts or from within this Act may be used only 
for the purposes specified under this Fund, in addition to the 
purposes for which such amounts were appropriated.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$106,000,000, of which $24,000,000 shall be provided from the 
various funds of the Federal Housing Administration: Provided, 
That the Inspector General shall have independent authority 
over all personnel issues within this office.

             Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For carrying out the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial 
Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, including not to exceed $500 
for official reception and representation expenses, 
$60,000,000, to remain available until expended, to be derived 
from the Federal Housing Enterprises Oversight Fund: Provided, 
That the Director shall submit a spending plan for the amounts 
provided under this heading no later than January 15, 2006: 
Provided further, That not less than 80 percent of the total 
amount made available under this heading shall be used only for 
examination, supervision, and capital oversight of the 
enterprises (as such term is defined in section 1303 of the 
Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act 
of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 4502)) to ensure that the enterprises are 
operating in a financially safe and sound manner and complying 
with the capital requirements under Subtitle B of such Act: 
Provided further, That not to exceed the amount provided herein 
shall be available from the general fund of the Treasury to the 
extent necessary to incur obligations and make expenditures 
pending the receipt of collections to the Fund: Provided 
further, That the general fund amount shall be reduced as 
collections are received during the fiscal year so as to result 
in a final appropriation from the general fund estimated at not 
more than $0.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 301. Fifty percent of the amounts of budget authority, 
or in lieu thereof 50 percent of the cash amounts associated 
with such budget authority, that are recaptured from projects 
described in section 1012(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney 
Homeless Assistance Amendments Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1437 
note) shall be rescinded, or in the case of cash, shall be 
remitted to the Treasury, and such amounts of budget authority 
or cash recaptured and not rescinded or remitted to the 
Treasury shall be used by State housing finance agencies or 
local governments or local housing agencies with projects 
approved by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development for 
which settlement occurred after January 1, 1992, in accordance 
with such section. Notwithstanding the previous sentence, the 
Secretary may award up to 15 percent of the budget authority or 
cash recaptured and not rescinded or remitted to the Treasury 
to provide project owners with incentives to refinance their 
project at a lower interest rate.
    Sec. 302. None of the amounts made available under this Act 
may be used during fiscal year 2006 to investigate or prosecute 
under the Fair Housing Act any otherwise lawful activity 
engaged in by one or more persons, including the filing or 
maintaining of a non-frivolous legal action, that is engaged in 
solely for the purpose of achieving or preventing action by a 
Government official or entity, or a court of competent 
jurisdiction.
    Sec. 303. (a) Notwithstanding section 854(c)(1)(A) of the 
AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)(1)(A)), from 
any amounts made available under this title for fiscal year 
2006 that are allocated under such section, the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development shall allocate and make a grant, 
in the amount determined under subsection (b), for any State 
that--
            (1) received an allocation in a prior fiscal year 
        under clause (ii) of such section; and
            (2) is not otherwise eligible for an allocation for 
        fiscal year 2006 under such clause (ii) because the 
        areas in the State outside of the metropolitan 
        statistical areas that qualify under clause (i) in 
        fiscal year 2006 do not have the number of cases of 
        acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) required 
        under such clause.
    (b) The amount of the allocation and grant for any State 
described in subsection (a) shall be an amount based on the 
cumulative number of AIDS cases in the areas of that State that 
are outside of metropolitan statistical areas that qualify 
under clause (i) of such section 854(c)(1)(A) in fiscal year 
2006, in proportion to AIDS cases among cities and States that 
qualify under clauses (i) and (ii) of such section and States 
deemed eligible under subsection (a).
    (c) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the amount 
allocated for fiscal year 2006 under section 854(c) of the AIDS 
Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)), to the City of 
New York, New York, on behalf of the New York-Wayne-White 
Plains, New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Division (hereafter 
``metropolitan division'') of the New York-Newark-Edison, NY-
NJ-PA Metropolitan Statistical Area, shall be adjusted by the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development by: (1) allocating 
to the City of Jersey City, New Jersey, theproportion of the 
metropolitan area's or division's amount that is based on the number of 
cases of AIDS reported in the portion of the metropolitan area or 
division that is located in Hudson County, New Jersey, and adjusting 
for the proportion of the metropolitan division's high incidence bonus 
if this area in New Jersey also has a higher than average per capita 
incidence of AIDS; and (2) allocating to the City of Paterson, New 
Jersey, the proportion of the metropolitan area's or division's amount 
that is based on the number of cases of AIDS reported in the portion of 
the metropolitan area or division that is located in Bergen County and 
Passaic County, New Jersey, and adjusting for the proportion of the 
metropolitan division's high incidence bonus if this area in New Jersey 
also has a higher than average per capita incidence of AIDS. The 
recipient cities shall use amounts allocated under this subsection to 
carry out eligible activities under section 855 of the AIDS Housing 
Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12904) in their respective portions of the 
metropolitan division that is located in New Jersey.
    (d) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the amount 
allocated for fiscal year 2006 under section 854(c) of the AIDS 
Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)) to areas with a 
higher than average per capita incidence of AIDS, shall be 
adjusted by the Secretary on the basis of area incidence 
reported over a three year period.
    Sec. 304. (a) During fiscal year 2006, in the provision of 
rental assistance under section 8(o) of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f(o)) in connection with a 
program to demonstrate the economy and effectiveness of 
providing such assistance for use in assisted living facilities 
that is carried out in the counties of the State of Michigan 
notwithstanding paragraphs (3) and (18)(B)(iii) of such section 
8(o), a family residing in an assisted living facility in any 
such county, on behalf of which a public housing agency 
provides assistance pursuant to section 8(o)(18) of such Act, 
may be required, at the time the family initially receives such 
assistance, to pay rent in an amount exceeding 40 percent of 
the monthly adjusted income of the family by such a percentage 
or amount as the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
determines to be appropriate.
    Sec. 305. Except as explicitly provided in law, any grant, 
cooperative agreement or other assistance made pursuant to 
title III of this Act shall be made on a competitive basis and 
in accordance with section 102 of the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development Reform Act of 1989.
    Sec. 306. Funds of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development subject to the Government Corporation Control Act 
or section 402 of the Housing Act of 1950 shall be available, 
without regard to the limitations on administrative expenses, 
for legal services on a contract or fee basis, and for 
utilizing and making payment for services and facilities of the 
Federal National Mortgage Association, Government National 
Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 
Federal Financing Bank, Federal Reserve banks or any member 
thereof, Federal Home Loan banks, and any insured bank within 
the meaning of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Act, 
as amended (12 U.S.C. 1811-1831).
    Sec. 307. Unless otherwise provided for in this Act or 
through a reprogramming of funds, no part of any appropriation 
for the Department of Housing and Urban Development shall be 
available for any program, project or activity in excess of 
amounts set forth in the budget estimates submitted to 
Congress.
    Sec. 308. Corporations and agencies of the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development which are subject to the 
Government Corporation Control Act, as amended, are hereby 
authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
funds and borrowing authority available to each such 
corporation or agency and in accordance with law, and to make 
such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year 
limitations as provided by section 104 of such Act as may be 
necessary in carrying out the programs set forth in the budget 
for 2006 for such corporation or agency except as hereinafter 
provided: Provided, That collections of these corporations and 
agencies may be used for new loan or mortgage purchase 
commitments only to the extent expressly provided for in this 
Act (unless such loans are in support of other forms of 
assistance provided for in this or prior appropriations Acts), 
except that this proviso shall not apply to the mortgage 
insurance or guaranty operations of these corporations, or 
where loans or mortgage purchases are necessary to protect the 
financial interest of the United States Government.
    Sec. 309. None of the funds provided in this title for 
technical assistance, training, or management improvements may 
be obligated or expended unless HUD provides to the Committees 
on Appropriations a description of each proposed activity and a 
detailed budget estimate of the costs associated with each 
program, project or activity as part of the Budget 
Justifications. For fiscal year 2006, HUD shall transmit this 
information to the Committees by March 15, 2006 for 30 days of 
review.
    Sec. 310. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
shall provide quarterly reports to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations regarding all uncommitted, 
unobligated, recaptured and excess funds ineach program and 
activity within the jurisdiction of the Department and shall submit 
additional, updated budget information to these Committees upon 
request.
    Sec. 311. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in 
fiscal year 2006, in managing and disposing of any multifamily 
property that is owned or held by the Secretary of Housing and 
Urban Development, the Secretary shall maintain any rental 
assistance payments under section 8 of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937 that are attached to any dwelling units in 
the property. To the extent the Secretary determines that such 
a multifamily property owned or held by the Secretary is not 
feasible for continued rental assistance payments under such 
section 8, based on consideration of the costs of maintaining 
such payments for that property or other factors, the Secretary 
may, in consultation with the tenants of that property, 
contract for project-based rental assistance payments with an 
owner or owners of other existing housing properties, or 
provide other rental assistance.
    Sec. 312. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
the amount allocated for fiscal year 2006 under section 854(c) 
of the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)), to 
the City of Wilmington, Delaware, on behalf of the Wilmington, 
Delaware-Maryland-New Jersey Metropolitan Division (hereafter 
``metropolitan division''), shall be adjusted by the Secretary 
of Housing and Urban Development by allocating to the State of 
New Jersey the proportion of the metropolitan division's amount 
that is based on the number of cases of AIDS reported in the 
portion of the metropolitan division that is located in New 
Jersey, and adjusting for the proportion of the metropolitan 
division's high incidence bonus if this area in New Jersey also 
has a higher than average per capita incidence of AIDS. The 
State of New Jersey shall use amounts allocated to the State 
under this subsection to carry out eligible activities under 
section 855 of the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 
12904) in the portion of the metropolitan division that is 
located in New Jersey.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall allocate to 
Wake County, North Carolina, the amounts that otherwise would 
be allocated for fiscal year 2006 under section 854(c) of the 
AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)) to the City 
of Raleigh, North Carolina, on behalf of the Raleigh-Cary, 
North Carolina Metropolitan Statistical Area. Any amounts 
allocated to Wake County shall be used to carry out eligible 
activities under section 855 of such Act (42 U.S.C. 12904) 
within such metropolitan statistical area.
    (c) Notwithstanding section 854(c) of the AIDS Housing 
Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)), the Secretary of Housing 
and Urban Development may adjust the allocation of the amounts 
that otherwise would be allocated for fiscal year 2006 under 
section 854(c) of such Act, upon the written request of an 
applicant, in conjunction with the State(s), for a formula 
allocation on behalf of a metropolitan statistical area, to 
designate the State or States in which the metropolitan 
statistical area is located as the eligible grantee(s) of the 
allocation. In the case that a metropolitan statistical area 
involves more than one State, such amounts allocated to each 
State shall be in proportion to the number of cases of AIDS 
reported in the portion of the metropolitan statistical area 
located in that State. Any amounts allocated to a State under 
this section shall be used to carry out eligible activities 
within the portion of the metropolitan statistical area located 
in that State.
    Sec. 313. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for 
this fiscal year and every fiscal year thereafter, funds 
appropriated for housing for the elderly, as authorized by 
section 202 of the Housing Act of 1959, as amended, and for 
supportive housing for persons with disabilities, as authorized 
by section 811 of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable 
Housing Act, shall be available for the cost of maintaining and 
disposing of such properties that are acquired or otherwise 
become the responsibility of the Department.
    Sec. 314. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
shall submit an annual report no later than August 30, 2006 and 
annually thereafter to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations regarding the number of Federally assisted units 
under lease and the per unit cost of these units to the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    Sec. 315. The Department of Housing and Urban Development 
shall submit the Department's fiscal year 2007 congressional 
budget justifications to the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House of Representatives and the Senate using the identical 
structure provided under this Act and only in accordance with 
the direction specified in the report accompanying this Act.
    Sec. 316. That incremental vouchers previously made 
available under the heading ``Housing Certificate Fund'' or 
renewed under the heading, ``Tenant-Based Rental Assistance,'' 
for non-elderly disabled families shall, to the extent 
practicable, continue to be provided to non-elderly disabled 
families upon turnover.
    Sec. 317. A public housing agency or such other entity that 
administers Federal housing assistance in theStates of Alaska, 
Iowa, and Mississippi shall not be required to include a resident of 
public housing or a recipient of assistance provided under section 8 of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937 on the board of directors or a 
similar governing board of such agency or entity as required under 
section (2)(b) of such Act. Each public housing agency or other entity 
that administers Federal housing assistance under section 8 in the 
States of Alaska, Iowa and Mississippi shall establish an advisory 
board of not less than 6 residents of public housing or recipients of 
section 8 assistance to provide advice and comment to the public 
housing agency or other administering entity on issues related to 
public housing and section 8. Such advisory board shall meet not less 
than quarterly.
    Sec. 318. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
subject to the conditions listed in subsection (b), for fiscal 
years 2006 and 2007, the Secretary may authorize the transfer 
of project-based assistance, debt and statutorily required low-
income and very low-income use restrictions, associated with 
one multifamily housing project to another multifamily housing 
project.
    (b) The transfer authorized in subsection (a) is subject to 
the following conditions:
            (1) the number of low-income and very low-income 
        units and the net dollar amount of Federal assistance 
        provided by the transferring project shall remain the 
        same in the receiving project;
            (2) the transferring project shall, as determined 
        by the Secretary, be either physically obsolete or 
        economically non-viable;
            (3) the receiving project shall meet or exceed 
        applicable physical standards established by the 
        Secretary;
            (4) the owner or mortgagor of the transferring 
        project shall notify and consult with the tenants 
        residing in the transferring project and provide a 
        certification of approval by all appropriate local 
        governmental officials;
            (5) the tenants of the transferring project who 
        remain eligible for assistance to be provided by the 
        receiving project shall not be required to vacate their 
        units in the transferring project until new units in 
        the receiving project are available for occupancy;
            (6) the Secretary determines that this transfer is 
        in the best interest of the tenants;
            (7) if either the transferring project or the 
        receiving project meets the condition specified in 
        subsection (c)(2)(A), any lien on the receiving project 
        resulting from additional financing obtained by the 
        owner shall be subordinate to any FHA-insured mortgage 
        lien transferred to, or placed on, such project by the 
        Secretary;
            (8) if the transferring project meets the 
        requirements of subsection (c)(2)(E), the owner or 
        mortgagor of the receiving project shall execute and 
        record either a continuation of the existing use 
        agreement or a new use agreement for the project where, 
        in either case, any use restrictions in such agreement 
        are of no lesser duration than the existing use 
        restrictions;
            (9) any financial risk to the FHA General and 
        Special Risk Insurance Fund, as determined by the 
        Secretary, would be reduced as a result of a transfer 
        completed under this section; and
            (10) the Secretary determines that Federal 
        liability with regard to this project will not be 
        increased.
    (c) For purposes of this section--
            (1) the terms ``low-income'' and ``very low-
        income'' shall have the meanings provided by the 
        statute and/or regulations governing the program under 
        which the project is insured or assisted;
            (2) the term ``multifamily housing project'' means 
        housing that meets one of the following conditions--
                    (A) housing that is subject to a mortgage 
                insured under the National Housing Act,
                    (B) housing that has project-based 
                assistance attached to the structure,
                    (C) housing that is assisted under section 
                202 of the Housing Act of 1959 as amended by 
                section 801 of the Cranston-Gonzales National 
                Affordable Housing Act,
                    (D) housing that is assisted under section 
                202 of the Housing Act of 1959, as such section 
                existed before the enactment of the Cranston-
                Gonzales National Affordable Housing Act, or,
                    (E) housing or vacant land that is subject 
                to a use agreement;
            (3) the term ``project-based assistance'' means--
                    (A) assistance provided under section 8(b) 
                of the United States Housing Act of 1937;
                    (B) assistance for housing constructed or 
                substantially rehabilitated pursuant to 
                assistance provided under section 8(b)(2) of 
                such Act (as such section existed immediately 
                before October 1, 1983);
            (C) rent supplement payments under section 101 of 
        the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1965;
            (D) additional assistance payments under section 
        236(f)(2) of the National Housing Act; and,
            (E) assistance payments made under section 
        202(c)(2) of the Housing Act of 1959;
            (4) the term ``receiving project'' means the 
        multifamily housing project to which the project-based 
        assistance, debt, and statutorily required use low-
        income and very low-income restrictions are to be 
        transferred;
            (5) the term ``transferring project'' means the 
        multifamily housing project which is transferring the 
        project-based assistance, debt and the statutorily 
        required low-income and very low-income use 
        restrictions to the receiving project; and,
            (6) the term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of 
        Housing and Urban Development.
    Sec. 319. The funds made available for Native Alaskans 
under the heading ``Native American Housing Block Grants'' in 
title III of this Act shall be allocated to the same Native 
Alaskan housing block grant recipients that received funds in 
fiscal year 2005.
    Sec. 320. (a) Extension.--The Secretary of Housing and 
Urban Development shall extend the term of the Moving to Work 
Demonstration Agreement entered into between a public housing 
agency and the Secretary under section 204, title V, of the 
Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996 
(Public Law 104-134, April 26, 1996) if--
            (1) the public housing agency requests such 
        extension in writing;
            (2) the public housing agency is not at the time of 
        such request for extension in default under its Moving 
        to Work Demonstration Agreement; and
            (3) the Moving to Work Demonstration Agreement to 
        be extended would otherwise expire on or before 
        September 30, 2006.
    (b) Terms.--Unless the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development and the public housing agency otherwise agree, the 
extension under subsection (a) shall be upon the identical 
terms and conditions set forth in the extending agency's 
existing Moving to Work Demonstration Agreement, except that 
for each public housing agency that has been or will be granted 
an extension to its original Moving to Work Agreement, the 
Secretary shall require that data be collected so that the 
effect of Moving to Work policy changes on residents can be 
measured.
    (c) Extension Period.--The extension under subsection (a) 
shall be for such period as is requested by the public housing 
agency, not to exceed 3 years from the date of expiration of 
the extending agency's existing Moving to Work Demonstration 
Agreement.
    (d) Breach of Agreement.--Nothing contained in this section 
shall limit the authority of the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development to terminate any Moving to Work Demonstration 
Agreement of a public housing agency if the public housing 
agency is in breach of the provisions of such agreement.
    Sec. 321. No funds provided under this title may be used 
for an audit of the Government National Mortgage Association 
that makes applicable requirements under the Federal Credit 
Reform Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 661 et seq.).
    Sec. 322. Incremental vouchers previously made available 
under the heading, ``Housing Certificate Fund'' or renewed 
under the heading, ``Tenant-Based Rental Assistance'', for 
family unification shall, to the extent practicable, continue 
to be provided for family unification.
    Sec. 323. Section 223(f)(1) of the National Housing Act is 
amended by inserting ``purchase or'' immediately before 
``refinancing of existing debt''.
    Sec. 324. Section 421 of the Housing and Community 
Development Act of 1987 (12 U.S.C. Sec. 1715z-4a) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)(1)(A), by inserting after 
        ``is'' the following: ``or, at the time of the 
        violations, was''; and
            (2) in subsection (a)(1)(C), by inserting after 
        ``held'' the following: ``or, at the time of the 
        violations, was insured or held''.
    Sec. 325. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for 
fiscal year 2006 and thereafter, all mortgagees receiving 
interest reduction payments under section 236 of the National 
Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-1) shall submit only electronic 
invoices to the Department of Housing and Development in order 
to receive such payments. The mortgagees shall comply with this 
requirement no later than 90 days from the date of enactment of 
this provision.
    Sec. 326. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
recipient of a grant under section 202b of the Housing Act of 
1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q-2) after December 26, 2000, in accordance 
with the unnumbered paragraph at the end of section 202b(b) of 
such Act, may, at its option, establish a single-asset 
nonprofit entity to own the project and may lend the grant 
funds to such entity,which may be a private nonprofit 
organization described in section 831 of the American Homeownership and 
Economic Opportunity Act of 2000.
    Sec. 327. (a) No assistance shall be provided under section 
8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f) to 
any individual who--
            (1) is enrolled as a student at an institution of 
        higher education (as defined under section 102 of the 
        Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1002));
            (2) is under 24 years of age;
            (3) is not a veteran;
            (4) is unmarried;
            (5) does not have a dependent child; and
            (6) is not otherwise individually eligible, or has 
        parents who, individually or jointly, are not eligible, 
        to receive assistance under section 8 of the United 
        States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f).
    (b) For purposes of determining the eligibility of a person 
to receive assistance under section 8 of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f), any financial assistance 
(in excess of amounts received for tuition) that an individual 
receives under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001 
et seq.), from private sources, or an institution of higher 
education (as defined under the Higher Education Act of 1965 
(20 U.S.C. 1002)), shall be considered income to that 
individual, except for a person over the age of 23 with 
dependent children.
    (c) Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall 
issue final regulations to carry out the provisions of this 
section.
    Sec. 328. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
shall give priority consideration to applications from the 
housing authorities of the Counties of San Bernardino and Santa 
Clara and the City of San Jose, California to participate in 
the Moving to Work Demonstration Agreement under Section 204, 
Title V, of the Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions and 
Appropriations Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-134, April 26, 
1996): Provided, That upon turnover, existing requirements on 
the re-issuance of Section 8 vouchers shall be maintained to 
ensure that not less than 75 percent of all vouchers shall be 
made available to extremely low-income families.
    This title may be cited as the ``Department of Housing and 
Urban Development Appropriations Act, 2006''.

                                TITLE IV

                             THE JUDICIARY

                   Supreme Court of the United States

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For expenses necessary for the operation of the Supreme 
Court, as required by law, excluding care of the building and 
grounds, including purchase or hire, driving, maintenance, and 
operation of an automobile for the Chief Justice, not to exceed 
$10,000 for the purpose of transporting Associate Justices, and 
hire of passenger motor vehicles as authorized by 31 U.S.C. 
1343 and 1344; not to exceed $10,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses; and for miscellaneous expenses, to be 
expended as the Chief Justice may approve, $60,730,000, of 
which $2,000,000 shall remain available until expended.

                    CARE OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS

    For such expenditures as may be necessary to enable the 
Architect of the Capitol to carry out the duties imposed upon 
the Architect by the Act approved May 7, 1934 (40 U.S.C. 13a-
13b), $5,624,000, which shall remain available until expended.

         United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For salaries of the chief judge, judges, and other officers 
and employees, and for necessary expenses of the court, as 
authorized by law, $24,000,000.

               United States Court of International Trade

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For salaries of the chief judge and eight judges, salaries 
of the officers and employees of the court, services, and 
necessary expenses of the court, as authorized by law, 
$15,480,000.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For the salaries of circuit and district judges (including 
judges of the territorial courts of the United States), 
justices and judges retired from office or from regular active 
service, judges of the United States Court of Federal Claims, 
bankruptcy judges, magistrate judges, and all other officers 
and employees of the Federal Judiciary not otherwise 
specifically provided for, and necessary expenses of the 
courts, as authorized by law, $4,348,780,000 (including the 
purchase of firearms and ammunition); of which not to exceed 
$27,817,000 shall remain availableuntil expended for space 
alteration projects and for furniture and furnishings related to new 
space alteration and construction projects.
    In addition, for expenses of the United States Court of 
Federal Claims associated with processing cases under the 
National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-
660), not to exceed $3,833,000, to be appropriated from the 
Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.

                           DEFENDER SERVICES

    For the operation of Federal Defender organizations; the 
compensation and reimbursement of expenses of attorneys 
appointed to represent persons under the Criminal Justice Act 
of 1964, as amended (18 U.S.C. 3006A); the compensation and 
reimbursement of expenses of persons furnishing investigative, 
expert and other services under the Criminal Justice Act of 
1964 (18 U.S.C. 3006A(e)); the compensation (in accordance with 
Criminal Justice Act maximums) and reimbursement of expenses of 
attorneys appointed to assist the court in criminal cases where 
the defendant has waived representation by counsel; the 
compensation and reimbursement of travel expenses of guardians 
ad litem acting on behalf of financially eligible minor or 
incompetent offenders in connection with transfers from the 
United States to foreign countries with which the United States 
has a treaty for the execution of penal sentences; the 
compensation of attorneys appointed to represent jurors in 
civil actions for the protection of their employment, as 
authorized by 28 U.S.C. 1875(d); and for necessary training and 
general administrative expenses, $717,000,000, to remain 
available until expended.

                    FEES OF JURORS AND COMMISSIONERS

    For fees and expenses of jurors as authorized by 28 U.S.C. 
1871 and 1876; compensation of jury commissioners as authorized 
by 28 U.S.C. 1863; and compensation of commissioners appointed 
in condemnation cases pursuant to rule 71A(h) of the Federal 
Rules of Civil Procedure (28 U.S.C. Appendix Rule 71A(h)), 
$61,318,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
the compensation of land commissioners shall not exceed the 
daily equivalent of the highest rate payable under section 5332 
of title 5, United States Code.

                             COURT SECURITY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, 
incident to the provision of protective guard services for 
United States courthouses and other facilities housing Federal 
court operations, and the procurement, installation, and 
maintenance of security systems and equipment for United States 
courthouses and other facilities housing Federal court 
operations, including building ingress-egress control, 
inspection of mail and packages, directed security patrols, 
perimeter security, basic security services provided by the 
Federal Protective Service, and other similar activities as 
authorized by section 1010 of the Judicial Improvement and 
Access to Justice Act (Public Law 100-702), $372,000,000, of 
which not to exceed $15,000,000 shall remain available until 
expended, to be expended directly or transferred to the United 
States Marshals Service, which shall be responsible for 
administering the Judicial Facility Security Program consistent 
with standards or guidelines agreed to by the Director of the 
Administrative Office of the United States Courts and the 
Attorney General, and of which not to exceed $65,500,000 shall 
remain available until expended, to be expended directly or 
transferred to the United States Federal Protective Service for 
costs associated with building security.

           Administrative Office of the United States Courts

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Administrative Office of the 
United States Courts as authorized by law, including travel as 
authorized by 31 U.S.C. 1345, hire of a passenger motor vehicle 
as authorized by 31 U.S.C. 1343(b), advertising and rent in the 
District of Columbia and elsewhere, $70,262,000, of which not 
to exceed $8,500 is authorized for official reception and 
representation expenses and of which up to $1,000,000 shall be 
made available to the National Academy of Public Administration 
for a review of the financial and management procedures of the 
Federal Judiciary.

                        Federal Judicial Center

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Judicial Center, as 
authorized by Public Law 90-219, $22,350,000; of which 
$1,800,000 shall remain available through September 30, 2007, 
to provide education and training to Federal court personnel; 
and of which not to exceed $1,500 is authorized for official 
reception and representation expenses.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds

                    PAYMENT TO JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS

    For payment to the Judicial Officers' Retirement Fund, as 
authorized by 28 U.S.C. 377(o), $36,800,000; to the Judicial 
Survivors' Annuities Fund, as authorized by 28 U.S.C. 376(c), 
$600,000; and to the United States Court of Federal Claims 
Judges' Retirement Fund, as authorized by 28 U.S.C. 178(l), 
$3,200,000.

                  United States Sentencing Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For the salaries and expenses necessary to carry out the 
provisions of chapter 58 of title 28, United States Code, 
$14,400,000, of which not to exceed $1,000 is authorized for 
official reception and representation expenses.

                Administrative Provisions--The Judiciary

    Sec. 401. Appropriations and authorizations made in this 
title which are available for salaries and expenses shall be 
available for services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
    Sec. 402. Not to exceed 5 percent of any appropriation made 
available for the current fiscal year for the Judiciary in this 
Act may be transferred between such appropriations, but no such 
appropriation, except ``Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and 
Other Judicial Services, Defender Services'' and ``Courts of 
Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services, Fees of 
Jurors and Commissioners'', shall be increased by more than 10 
percent by any such transfers: Provided, That any transfer 
pursuant to this section shall be treated as a reprogramming of 
funds under sections 705 and 710 of this Act and shall not be 
available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance 
with the procedures set forth in that section.
    Sec. 403. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
salaries and expenses appropriation for Courts of Appeals, 
District Courts, and Other Judicial Services shall be available 
for official reception and representation expenses of the 
Judicial Conference of the United States: Provided, That such 
available funds shall not exceed $11,000 and shall be 
administered by the Director of the Administrative Office of 
the United States Courts in the capacity as Secretary of the 
Judicial Conference.
    Sec. 404. Within 90 days of enactment of this Act, the 
Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts shall submit to the 
Committees on Appropriations a comprehensive financial plan for 
the Judiciary allocating all sources of available funds 
including appropriations, fee collections, and carryover 
balances, to include a separate and detailed plan for the 
Judiciary Information Technology fund.
    Sec. 405. Pursuant to section 140 of Public Law 97-92, and 
from funds appropriated in this Act, Justices and judges of the 
United States are authorized during fiscal year 2006, to 
receive a salary adjustment in accordance with 28 U.S.C. 461.
    Sec. 406. The existing judgeship for the eastern district 
of Missouri authorized by section 203(c) of the Judicial 
Improvements Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-650, 104 Stat. 5089) 
as amended by Public Law 105-53, as of the effective date of 
this Act, shall be extended. The first vacancy in the office of 
district judge in this district occurring 20 years or more 
after the confirmation date of the judge named to fill the 
temporary judgeship created by section 203(c) shall not be 
filled.
    Sec. 407. (a) Section 604 of title 28, United States Code, 
is amended by adding section (4) at the end of section ``(g)'':
            ``(4) The Director is hereby authorized:
                    ``(A) to enter into contracts for the 
                acquisition of severable services for a period 
                that begins in one fiscal year and ends in the 
                next fiscal year to the same extent as the head 
                of an executive agency under the authority of 
                section 253l of 41 U.S.C.;
                    ``(B) to enter into contracts for multiple 
                years for the acquisition of property and 
                services to the same extent as executive 
                agencies under the authority of section 254c of 
                41 U.S.C.; and
                    ``(C) to make advance, partial, progress or 
                other payments under contracts for property or 
                services to the same extent as executive 
                agencies under the authority of section 255 of 
                41 U.S.C.''
    (b) Section 612 of title 28, United States Code, is amended 
by striking the current language in section (e)(2)(B) and 
inserting ``such contract is in accordance with the Director's 
authority in section 604(g) of 28 U.S.C.; and,''.
    (c) The authorities granted in this section shall expire on 
September 30, 2010.
    Sec. 408. (a) The division of the court shall release to 
the Congress and to the public not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act all portions of the final report 
of the independent counsel of the investigation of Henry 
Cisneros made under section 594(h) of title 28, United States 
Code. The division of the court shall make such orders as are 
appropriate to protect the rights of any individual named in 
such report and to prevent undue interference with any pending 
prosecution. Upon the release of the final report, the final 
report shall be published pursuant to section 594(h)(3) of 
title 28, United States Code.
    (b)(1) After the release and publication of the final 
report referred to in subsection (a), the independent counsel 
shall continue his office only to the extent necessary and 
appropriate to perform the noninvestigative and 
nonprosecutorial tasks remaining of his statutory duties as 
required to conclude the functions of his office.
    (2) The duties referred to in paragraph (1) shall 
specifically include--
            (A) the evaluation of claims for attorney fees, 
        pursuant to section 593(l) of title 28, United States 
        Code;
            (B) the transfer of records to the Archivist of the 
        United States pursuant to section 594(k) of title 28, 
        United States Code;
            (C) compliance with oversight obligations pursuant 
        to section 595(a) of title 28, United States Code; and
            (D) preparation of statements of expenditures 
        pursuant to section 595(c) of title 28, United States 
        Code.
    (c)(1) The independent counsel shall have not more than 90 
days after the release and publication of the final report 
referred to in subsection (a) to complete his remaining 
statutory duties unless the division of the court determines 
that it is necessary for the independent counsel to have 
additional time to complete his remaining statutory duties.
    (2) If the division of the court finds that the independent 
counsel needs additional time under paragraph (1), the division 
of the court shall issue a public report stating the grounds 
for the extension and a proposed date for completion of all 
aspects of the investigation of Henry Cisneros and termination 
of the office of the independent counsel.
    This title may be cited as the ``Judiciary Appropriations 
Act, 2006''.

                                TITLE V

    EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT AND FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE 
                               PRESIDENT

                     Compensation of the President

    For compensation of the President, including an expense 
allowance at the rate of $50,000 per annum as authorized by 3 
U.S.C. 102, $450,000: Provided, That none of the funds made 
available for official expenses shall be expended for any other 
purpose and any unused amount shall revert to the Treasury 
pursuant to section 1552 of title 31, United States Code.

                           White House Office

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses for the White House as authorized by 
law, including not to exceed $3,850,000 for services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 and 3 U.S.C. 105; subsistence 
expenses as authorized by 3 U.S.C. 105, which shall be expended 
and accounted for as provided in that section; hire of 
passenger motor vehicles, newspapers, periodicals, teletype 
news service, and travel (not to exceed $100,000 to be expended 
and accounted for as provided by 3 U.S.C. 103); and not to 
exceed $19,000 for official entertainment expenses, to be 
available for allocation within the Executive Office of the 
President, $53,830,000: Provided, That of the funds 
appropriated under this heading, $1,500,000 shall be for the 
Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board.

                 Executive Residence at the White House

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    For the care, maintenance, repair and alteration, 
refurnishing, improvement, heating, and lighting, including 
electric power and fixtures, of the Executive Residence at the 
White House and official entertainment expenses of the 
President, $12,436,000, to be expended and accounted for as 
provided by 3 U.S.C. 105, 109, 110, and 112-114.

                         REIMBURSABLE EXPENSES

    For the reimbursable expenses of the Executive Residence at 
the White House, such sums as may be necessary: Provided, That 
all reimbursable operating expenses of the Executive Residence 
shall be made in accordance with the provisions of this 
paragraph: Provided further, That, notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, such amount for reimbursable operating 
expenses shall be the exclusive authority of the Executive 
Residence to incur obligations and to receive offsetting 
collections, for such expenses: Provided further, That the 
Executive Residence shall require each person sponsoring a 
reimbursable political event to pay in advance an amount equal 
to the estimated cost of the event, and all such advance 
payments shall be credited to this account and remain available 
until expended: Provided further, That the Executive Residence 
shall require the national committee of the political party of 
the President to maintain on deposit $25,000, to be separately 
accounted for and available for expenses relating to 
reimbursable political events sponsored by such committee 
during such fiscal year: Provided further, That the Executive 
Residence shall ensure that a written notice of any amount owed 
for a reimbursable operating expense under this paragraph is 
submitted to the person owing such amount within 60 days after 
such expense is incurred, and that such amount is collected 
within 30 days after the submission of such notice: Provided 
further, That the Executive Residence shall charge interest and 
assess penalties and other charges on any such amount that is 
not reimbursed within such 30 days, in accordance with the 
interest and penalty provisions applicable to an outstanding 
debt on a United States Government claim under section 3717 of 
title 31, United States Code: Provided further, That each such 
amount that is reimbursed, and any accompanying interest and 
charges, shall be deposited in the Treasury as miscellaneous 
receipts: Provided further, That the Executive Residence shall 
prepare and submitto the Committees on Appropriations, by not 
later than 90 days after the end of the fiscal year covered by this 
Act, a report setting forth the reimbursable operating expenses of the 
Executive Residence during the preceding fiscal year, including the 
total amount of such expenses, the amount of such total that consists 
of reimbursable official and ceremonial events, the amount of such 
total that consists of reimbursable political events, and the portion 
of each such amount that has been reimbursed as of the date of the 
report: Provided further, That the Executive Residence shall maintain a 
system for the tracking of expenses related to reimbursable events 
within the Executive Residence that includes a standard for the 
classification of any such expense as political or nonpolitical: 
Provided further, That no provision of this paragraph may be construed 
to exempt the Executive Residence from any other applicable requirement 
of subchapter I or II of chapter 37 of title 31, United States Code.

                   White House Repair and Restoration

    For the repair, alteration, and improvement of the 
Executive Residence at the White House, $1,700,000, to remain 
available until expended, for required maintenance, safety and 
health issues, and continued preventative maintenance.

                      Council of Economic Advisers

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Council of Economic Advisers 
in carrying out its functions under the Employment Act of 1946 
(15 U.S.C. 1021), $4,040,000.

                      Office of Policy Development

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Policy Development, 
including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 and 3 U.S.C. 
107, $3,500,000.

                       National Security Council

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the National Security Council, 
including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $8,705,000.

                        Office of Administration

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Administration, 
including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 and 3 U.S.C. 
107, and hire of passenger motor vehicles, $89,322,000, of 
which $11,768,000 shall remain available until expended for the 
Capital Investment Plan for continued modernization of the 
information technology infrastructure within the Executive 
Office of the President.

                    Office of Management and Budget

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Management and 
Budget, including hire of passenger motor vehicles and services 
as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 and to carry out the provisions 
of chapter 35 of title 44, United States Code, $76,930,000, of 
which not to exceed $3,000 shall be available for official 
representation expenses: Provided, That, as provided in 31 
U.S.C. 1301(a), appropriations shall be applied only to the 
objects for which appropriations were made and shall be 
allocated in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth 
in the accompanying statement of the managers except as 
otherwise provided by law: Provided further, That none of the 
funds appropriated in this Act for the Office of Management and 
Budget may be used for the purpose of reviewing any 
agricultural marketing orders or any activities or regulations 
under the provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Agreement 
Act of 1937 (7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.): Provided further, That none 
of the funds made available for the Office of Management and 
Budget by this Act may be expended for the altering of the 
transcript of actual testimony of witnesses, except for 
testimony of officials of the Office of Management and Budget, 
before the Committees on Appropriations or their subcommittees: 
Provided further, That the preceding shall not apply to printed 
hearings released by the Committees on Appropriations: Provided 
further, That none of the funds provided in this or prior Acts 
shall be used, directly or indirectly, by the Office of 
Management and Budget, for evaluating or determining if water 
resource project or study reports submitted by the Chief of 
Engineers acting through the Secretary of the Army are in 
compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and 
requirements relevant to the Civil Works water resource 
planning process: Provided further, That the Office of 
Management and Budget shall have not more than 60 days in which 
to perform budgetary policy reviews of water resource matters 
on which the Chief of Engineers has reported. The Director of 
the Office of Management and Budget shall notify the 
appropriate authorizing and Appropriations Committees when the 
60-day review is initiated. If water resource reports have not 
been transmitted to the appropriate authorizing and 
appropriating committees within 15 days of the end of the OMB 
review period based on the notification from the Director, 
Congress shall assume OMB concurrence with the report and act 
accordingly.

                 Office of National Drug Control Policy

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy; for research activities pursuant tothe Office 
of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998 (21 U.S.C. 
1701 et seq.); not to exceed $10,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses; and for participation in joint projects or in 
the provision of services on matters of mutual interest with nonprofit, 
research, or public organizations or agencies, with or without 
reimbursement, $26,908,000; of which $1,316,000 shall remain available 
until expended for policy research and evaluation: Provided, That the 
Office is authorized to accept, hold, administer, and utilize gifts, 
both real and personal, public and private, without fiscal year 
limitation, for the purpose of aiding or facilitating the work of the 
Office.

                COUNTERDRUG TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT CENTER

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses for the Counterdrug Technology 
Assessment Center for research activities pursuant to the 
Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 
1998 (21 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), $30,000,000, which shall remain 
available until expended, consisting of $14,000,000 for 
counternarcotics research and development projects, of which up 
to $1,000,000 is to be directed to supply reduction activities, 
and $16,000,000 for the continued operation of the technology 
transfer program: Provided, That the $14,000,000 for 
counternarcotics research and development projects shall be 
available for transfer to other Federal departments or 
agencies.

                     Federal Drug Control Programs

             HIGH INTENSITY DRUG TRAFFICKING AREAS PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses of the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy's High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Program, 
$227,000,000 for drug control activities consistent with the 
approved strategy for each of the designated High Intensity 
Drug Trafficking Areas, of which no less than 51 percent shall 
be transferred to State and local entities for drug control 
activities, which shall be obligated within 120 days of the 
date of the enactment of this Act: Provided, That up to 49 
percent, to remain available until September 30, 2007, may be 
transferred to Federal agencies and departments at a rate to be 
determined by the Director, of which not less than $2,000,000 
shall be used for auditing services and associated activities, 
and at least $500,000 of the $2,000,000 shall be used to 
develop and implement a data collection system to measure the 
performance of the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas 
Program: Provided further, That High Intensity Drug Trafficking 
Areas programs designated as of September 30, 2005, shall be 
funded at no less than the fiscal year 2005 initial allocation 
levels unless the Director submits to the Committees on 
Appropriations, and the Committees approve, justification for 
changes in those levels based on clearly articulated priorities 
for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas programs, as well 
as published Office of National Drug Control Policy performance 
measures of effectiveness: Provided further, That a request 
shall be submitted in compliance with the reprogramming 
guidelines to the Committees on Appropriations for approval 
prior to the obligation of funds of an amount in excess of the 
fiscal year 2005 budget request: Provided further, That none of 
the funds made available under this heading shall be available 
for the Consolidated Priority Organization Target program.

                  OTHER FEDERAL DRUG CONTROL PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For activities to support a national anti-drug campaign for 
youth, and for other purposes, authorized by the Office of 
National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 1998 (21 
U.S.C. 1701 et seq.), $194,900,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which the amounts are available as follows: 
$100,000,000 to support a national media campaign, as 
authorized by the Drug-Free Media Campaign Act of 1998: 
Provided, That the Office of National Drug Control Policy shall 
maintain funding for non-advertising services for the media 
campaign at no less than the fiscal year 2003 ratio of service 
funding to total funds and shall continue the corporate 
outreach program as it operated prior to its cancellation; 
$80,000,000 to continue a program of matching grants to drug-
free communities, of which $2,000,000 shall be a directed grant 
to the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America for the 
National Community Anti-Drug Coalition Institute, as authorized 
in chapter 2 of the National Narcotics Leadership Act of 1988, 
as amended; $1,000,000 for the National Drug Court Institute; 
$1,000,000 for the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws; 
$8,500,000 for the United States Anti-Doping Agency for anti-
doping activities; $2,900,000 for the United States membership 
dues to the World Anti-Doping Agency; and $1,500,000 for 
evaluations and research related to National Drug Control 
Program performance measures: Provided further, That such funds 
may be transferred to other Federal departments and agencies to 
carry out such activities: Provided further, That of the 
amounts appropriated for a national media campaign, not to 
exceed 10 percent shall be for administration, advertising 
production, research and testing, labor and related costs of 
the national media campaign.

                          Unanticipated Needs

    For expenses necessary to enable the President to meet 
unanticipated needs, in furtherance of the national interest, 
security, or defense which may arise at home orabroad during 
the current fiscal year, as authorized by 3 U.S.C. 108, $1,000,000.

                  Special Assistance to the President

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses to enable the Vice President to 
provide assistance to the President in connection with 
specially assigned functions; services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109 and 3 U.S.C. 106, including subsistence expenses as 
authorized by 3 U.S.C. 106, which shall be expended and 
accounted for as provided in that section; and hire of 
passenger motor vehicles, $4,455,000.

                Official Residence of the Vice President

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For the care, operation, refurnishing, improvement, and to 
the extent not otherwise provided for, heating and lighting, 
including electric power and fixtures, of the official 
residence of the Vice President; the hire of passenger motor 
vehicles; and not to exceed $90,000 for official entertainment 
expenses of the Vice President, to be accounted for solely on 
his certificate, $325,000: Provided, That advances or 
repayments or transfers from this appropriation may be made to 
any department or agency for expenses of carrying out such 
activities.
    This title may be cited as the ``Executive Office of the 
President Appropriations Act, 2006''.

                                TITLE VI

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

       Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For expenses necessary for the Architectural and 
Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, as authorized by 
section 502 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 
$5,941,000: Provided, That, notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, there may be credited to this appropriation funds 
received for publications and training expenses.

                   Consumer Product Safety Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission, including hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for 
individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the 
maximum rate payable under 5 U.S.C. 5376, purchase of nominal 
awards to recognize non-Federal officials' contributions to 
Commission activities, and not to exceed $500 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $63,000,000 of which up 
to $500,000 shall be used to coordinate with the Administrator 
of the Environmental Protection Agency in the Agency's study 
pursuant to H.R. 2361, as passed by the Senate in the first 
session of the 109th Congress, to assess safety risks to both 
persons and the environment with regard to small engines, as 
required in Public Law 108-199, including real-world scenarios 
involving, among other things, operator burn, fire due to 
contact with flammable items, and refueling.

                     Election Assistance Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses to carry out the Help America Vote 
Act of 2002, $14,200,000, of which $2,800,000 shall be 
transferred to the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology for election reform activities authorized under the 
Help America Vote Act of 2002.

                 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $31,000,000, to be derived from the Bank 
Insurance Fund, the Savings Association Insurance Fund, and the 
FSLIC Resolution Fund.

                      Federal Election Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of the 
Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971, as amended, $54,700,000, 
of which no less than $4,700,000 shall be available for 
internal automated data processing systems, and of which not to 
exceed $5,000 shall be available for reception and 
representation expenses.

                   Federal Labor Relations Authority

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses to carry out functions of the 
Federal Labor Relations Authority, pursuant to Reorganization 
Plan Numbered 2 of 1978, and the Civil Service Reform Act of 
1978, including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, and 
including hire of experts and consultants, hire of passenger 
motor vehicles, and rental of conference rooms in the District 
of Columbia and elsewhere, $25,468,000: Provided, That public 
members of the Federal Service Impasses Panel may be paid 
travel expenses and per diem in lieu of subsistence as 
authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5703) for persons employed 
intermittently in the Government service, and compensation as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, funds received from fees 
charged to non-Federal participants at labor-management 
relations conferences shall be credited to and merged with this 
account, to be available without further appropriation for the 
costs of carrying out these conferences.

                      Federal Maritime Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Maritime Commission 
as authorized by section 201(d) of the Merchant Marine Act, 
1936, as amended (46 U.S.C. App. 1111), including services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; hire of passenger motor vehicles 
as authorized by 31 U.S.C. 1343(b); and uniforms or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902, $20,499,000: 
Provided, That not to exceed $2,000 shall be available for 
official reception and representation expenses.

                    General Services Administration

                        REAL PROPERTY ACTIVITIES

                         FEDERAL BUILDINGS FUND

                 LIMITATIONS ON AVAILABILITY OF REVENUE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    To carry out the purposes of the Fund established pursuant 
to section 210(f) of the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 1949, as amended (40 U.S.C. 592), the revenues 
and collections deposited into the Fund shall be available for 
necessary expenses of real property management and related 
activities not otherwise provided for, including operation, 
maintenance, and protection of federally owned and leased 
buildings; rental of buildings in the District of Columbia; 
restoration of leased premises; moving governmental agencies 
(including space adjustments and telecommunications relocation 
expenses) in connection with the assignment, allocation and 
transfer of space; contractual services incident to cleaning or 
servicing buildings, and moving; repair and alteration of 
federally owned buildings including grounds, approaches and 
appurtenances; care and safeguarding of sites; maintenance, 
preservation, demolition, and equipment; acquisition of 
buildings and sites by purchase, condemnation, or as otherwise 
authorized by law; acquisition of options to purchase buildings 
and sites; conversion and extension of federally owned 
buildings; preliminary planning and design of projects by 
contract or otherwise; construction of new buildings (including 
equipment for such buildings); and payment of principal, 
interest, and any other obligations for public buildings 
acquired by installment purchase and purchase contract; in the 
aggregate amount of $7,752,745,000, of which: (1) $792,056,000 
shall remain available until expended for construction 
(including funds for sites and expenses and associated design 
and construction services) of additional projects at the 
following locations:
            New Construction:
                    Alabama:
                            Tuscaloosa, Federal Building, 
                        $34,500,000.
                    California:
                            San Diego, United States 
                        Courthouse, $230,803,000.
                    Colorado:
                            Lakewood, Denver Federal Center 
                        Infrastructure, $4,658,000.
                    District of Columbia:
                            Coast Guard Consolidation, 
                        $24,900,000.
                            St. Elizabeths West Campus 
                        Infrastructure, $13,095,000.
                            Southeast Federal Center Site 
                        Remediation, $15,000,000.
                    Illinois:
                            Rockford Federal Courthouse, 
                        $34,500,000.
                    Maine:
                            Calais, Border Station, 
                        $50,146,000.
                            Jackman, Border Station, 
                        $12,788,000.
                    Maryland:
                            Montgomery County, Food and Drug 
                        Administration Consolidation, 
                        $127,600,000.
                    Mississippi:
                            Jackson, United States Courthouse, 
                        $8,750,000.
                    Missouri:
                            Jefferson City, United States 
                        Courthouse, $5,200,000.
                    New York:
                            Champlain, Border Station, 
                        $52,510,000.
                            Massena, Border Station, 
                        $49,783,000.
                    Texas:
                            Austin, United States Courthouse, 
                        $3,000,000.
                    Washington:
                            Blaine, Peace Arch Border Station, 
                        $46,534,000.
            Material Price Increases for the following existing 
        projects: U.S. Mission to the United Nations, New York 
        City, New York; FBI Office, Houston, Texas; Border 
        Station, Del Rio, Texas; United States Courthouse, Cape 
        Girardeau, Missouri; United States Courthouse, El Paso, 
        Texas; Border Station, El Paso, Texas; and United 
        States Courthouse, Las Cruces, New Mexico, $66,789,000.
            Non-prospectus Construction, $9,500,000:
Provided, That each of the foregoing limits of costs on new 
construction projects may be exceeded to the extent that 
savings are effected in other such projects, but not to exceed 
10 percent of the amounts included in an approved prospectus, 
if required, unless advance approval is obtained from the 
Committees on Appropriations of a greater amount: Provided 
further, That all funds for direct construction projects shall 
expire on September 30, 2007 and remain in the Federal 
Buildings Fund except for funds for projects as to which funds 
for design or other funds have been obligated in whole or in 
part prior to such date; (2) $861,376,000 shall remain 
available until expended for repairs and alterations, which 
includes associated design and construction services:
            Repairs and Alterations:
                    Arizona:
                            Tucson, James A. Walsh United 
                        States Courthouse, $16,136,000.
                    District of Columbia:
                            For transfer to the Navy for 
                        certain permanent relocation expenses 
                        pursuant to section 1(e) of Public Law 
                        108-268, $2,000,000.
                            Eisenhower Executive Office 
                        Building, $33,417,000.
                            Federal Office Building 8, 
                        $47,769,000.
                            Heating, Operation, and 
                        Transmission District Repair, 
                        $18,783,000.
                            Herbert C. Hoover Building, 
                        $54,491,000.
                            Main Interior Federal Building, 
                        $41,399,000.
                    Georgia:
                            Atlanta, Martin Luther King, Jr., 
                        Federal Building, $30,129,000.
                    New York:
                            Brooklyn, Emanuel Celler 
                        Courthouse, $96,924,000.
                            New York City, James Watson Federal 
                        Building and United States Courthouse, 
                        $9,721,000.
            Special Emphasis Programs:
                    Chlorofluorocarbons Program, $10,000,000.
                    Energy Program, $28,000,000.
                    Glass Fragmentation Program, $15,700,000.
            Design Program, $21,915,000.
            Basic Repairs and Alterations, $434,992,000:
Provided further, That funds made available in this or any 
previous Act in the Federal Buildings Fund for Repairs and 
Alterations shall, for prospectus projects, be limited to the 
amount identified for each project, except each project in this 
or any previous Act may be increased by an amount not to exceed 
10 percent unless advance approval is obtained from the 
Committees on Appropriations of a greater amount: Provided 
further, That additional projects for which prospectuses have 
been fully approved may be funded under this category only if 
advance approval is obtained from the Committees on 
Appropriations: Provided further, That the amounts provided in 
this or any prior Act for ``Repairs and Alterations'' may be 
used to fund costs associated with implementing security 
improvements to buildings necessary to meet the minimum 
standards for security in accordance with current law and in 
compliance with the reprogramming guidelines of the appropriate 
Committees of the House and Senate: Provided further, That the 
difference between the funds appropriated and expended on any 
projects in this or any prior Act, under the heading ``Repairs 
and Alterations'', may be transferred to Basic Repairs and 
Alterations or used to fund authorized increases in prospectus 
projects: Provided further, That all funds for repairs and 
alterations prospectus projects shall expire on September 30, 
2007 and remain in the Federal Buildings Fund except funds for 
projects as to which funds for design or other funds have been 
obligated in whole or in part prior to such date: Provided 
further, That the amount provided in this or any prior Act for 
Basic Repairs and Alterations may be used to pay claims against 
the Government arising from any projects under the heading 
``Repairs and Alterations'' or used to fund authorized 
increases in prospectus projects; (3) $168,180,000 for 
installment acquisition payments including payments on purchase 
contracts which shall remain available until expended; (4) 
$4,046,031,000 for rental of space which shall remain available 
until expended; and (5) $1,885,102,000 for building operations 
which shall remain available until expended: Provided further, 
That funds available to the General Services Administration 
shall not be available for expenses of any construction, 
repair, alteration and acquisition project for which a 
prospectus, if required by the Public Buildings Act of 1959, as 
amended, has not been approved, except that necessary funds may 
be expended for each project for required expenses for the 
development of a proposed prospectus: Provided further, That 
funds available in the Federal Buildings Fund may be expended 
for emergency repairs when advance approval is obtained from 
the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, 
That,notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Administrator of 
the General Services Administration is authorized and directed to 
proceed with site, design, acquisition, and construction for a new 
courthouse in Jefferson City, Missouri, of which planning and design 
funding is provided in this Act: Provided further, That amounts 
necessary to provide reimbursable special services to other agencies 
under section 210(f)(6) of the Federal Property and Administrative 
Services Act of 1949, as amended (40 U.S.C. 592(b)(2)) and amounts to 
provide such reimbursable fencing, lighting, guard booths, and other 
facilities on private or other property not in Government ownership or 
control as may be appropriate to enable the United States Secret 
Service to perform its protective functions pursuant to 18 U.S.C. 3056, 
shall be available from such revenues and collections: Provided 
further, That revenues and collections and any other sums accruing to 
this Fund during fiscal year 2006, excluding reimbursements under 
section 210(f)(6) of the Federal Property and Administrative Services 
Act of 1949 (40 U.S.C. 592(b)(2)) in excess of the aggregate new 
obligational authority authorized for Real Property Activities of the 
Federal Buildings Fund in this Act shall remain in the Fund and shall 
not be available for expenditure except as authorized in appropriations 
Acts.

                           GENERAL ACTIVITIES

                         GOVERNMENT-WIDE POLICY

    For expenses authorized by law, not otherwise provided for, 
for Government-wide policy and evaluation activities associated 
with the management of real and personal property assets and 
certain administrative services; Government-wide policy support 
responsibilities relating to acquisition, telecommunications, 
information technology management, and related technology 
activities; and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
$52,796,000.

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    For expenses authorized by law, not otherwise provided for, 
for Government-wide activities associated with utilization and 
donation of surplus personal property; disposal of real 
property; providing Internet access to Federal information and 
services; agency-wide policy direction and management, and 
Board of Contract Appeals; accounting, records management, and 
other support services incident to adjudication of Indian 
Tribal Claims by the United States Court of Federal Claims; 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; and not to exceed 
$7,500 for official reception and representation expenses, 
$99,890,000.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
and service authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $43,410,000: Provided, 
That not to exceed $15,000 shall be available for payment for 
information and detection of fraud against the Government, 
including payment for recovery of stolen Government property: 
Provided further, That not to exceed $2,500 shall be available 
for awards to employees of other Federal agencies and private 
citizens in recognition of efforts and initiatives resulting in 
enhanced Office of Inspector General effectiveness.

                       ELECTRONIC GOVERNMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses in support of interagency projects 
that enable the Federal Government to expand its ability to 
conduct activities electronically, through the development and 
implementation of innovative uses of the Internet and other 
electronic methods, $3,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That these funds may be transferred to 
Federal agencies to carry out the purposes of the Fund: 
Provided further, That this transfer authority shall be in 
addition to any other transfer authority provided in this Act: 
Provided further, That such transfers may not be made until 10 
days after a proposed spending plan and justification for each 
project to be undertaken has been submitted to the Committees 
on Appropriations.

           ALLOWANCES AND OFFICE STAFF FOR FORMER PRESIDENTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For carrying out the provisions of the Act of August 25, 
1958, as amended (3 U.S.C. 102 note), and Public Law 95-138, 
$2,952,000: Provided, That the Administrator of General 
Services shall transfer to the Secretary of the Treasury such 
sums as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of such 
Acts.

                FEDERAL CITIZEN INFORMATION CENTER FUND

    For necessary expenses of the Federal Citizen Information 
Center, including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
$15,000,000, to be deposited into the Federal Citizen 
Information Center Fund: Provided, That the appropriations, 
revenues, and collections deposited into the Fund shall be 
available for necessary expenses of Federal Citizen Information 
Center activities in the aggregate amount not to exceed 
$32,000,000. Appropriations, revenues, and collections accruing 
to this Fund during fiscal year 2006 in excess of such amount 
shall remain in the Fund and shall not be available for 
expenditure except as authorized in appropriations Acts.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 601. The appropriate appropriation or fund available 
to the General Services Administration shall be credited with 
the cost of operation, protection, maintenance, upkeep, repair, 
and improvement, included as part of rentals received from 
Government corporations pursuant to law (40 U.S.C. 129).
    Sec. 602. Funds available to the General Services 
Administration shall be available for the hire of passenger 
motor vehicles.
    Sec. 603. Funds in the Federal Buildings Fund made 
available for fiscal year 2006 for Federal Buildings Fund 
activities may be transferred between such activities only to 
the extent necessary to meet program requirements: Provided, 
That any proposed transfers shall be approved in advance by the 
Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 604. Except as otherwise provided in this title, no 
funds made available by this Act shall be used to transmit a 
fiscal year 2007 request for United States Courthouse 
construction that: (1) does not meet the design guide standards 
for construction as established and approved by the General 
Services Administration, the Judicial Conference of the United 
States, and the Office of Management and Budget; and (2) does 
not reflect the priorities of the Judicial Conference of the 
United States as set out in its approved 5-year construction 
plan: Provided, That the fiscal year 2007 request must be 
accompanied by a standardized courtroom utilization study of 
each facility to be constructed, replaced, or expanded.
    Sec. 605. None of the funds provided in this Act may be 
used to increase the amount of occupiable square feet, provide 
cleaning services, security enhancements, or any other service 
usually provided through the Federal Buildings Fund, to any 
agency that does not pay the rate per square foot assessment 
for space and services as determined by the General Services 
Administration in compliance with the Public Buildings 
Amendments Act of 1972 (Public Law 92-313).
    Sec. 606. From funds made available under the heading 
``Federal Buildings Fund, Limitations on Availability of 
Revenue'', claims against the Government of less than $250,000 
arising from direct construction projects and acquisition of 
buildings may be liquidated from savings effected in other 
construction projects with prior notification to the Committees 
on Appropriations.
    Sec. 607. The General Services Administration shall conduct 
a program to promote the use of stairs in all Federal 
buildings.
    Sec. 608. No funds shall be used by the General Services 
Administration to reorganize its organizational structure 
without approval by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations through an operating plan change.
    Sec. 609. In the case of any General Services 
Administration (GSA) project subject to its published design 
criteria or specifications of any solicitations for offers 
issued for construction of a Federal building or courthouse and 
to the extent GSA utilizes, references or relies on any 
sustainable building rating systems that award credit for 
certified wood products, GSA shall ensure credit under its 
procedures and requirements to any project that uses wood or 
wood products certified by a credible third party sustainable 
forest certification program, including the Sustainable 
Forestry Initiative and the Forest Stewardship Council: 
Provided, That not later than 60 days after enactment of this 
Act, the Administrator shall report to the relevant 
congressional committees of jurisdiction on the progress and 
next steps toward recognition of other credible sustainable 
building rating systems within the GSA sustainable building 
procurement process.
    Sec. 610. For purposes of the eTravel system, no less than 
23 percent of all subcontracted dollars shall be allocated to 
small businesses.

                     Merit Systems Protection Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses to carry out functions of the Merit 
Systems Protection Board pursuant to Reorganization Plan 
Numbered 2 of 1978, the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, and 
the Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 (5 U.S.C. 5509 note), 
as amended, including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
rental of conference rooms in the District of Columbia and 
elsewhere, hire of passenger motor vehicles, direct procurement 
of survey printing, and not to exceed $2,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $35,600,000 together 
with not to exceed $2,605,000 for administrative expenses to 
adjudicate retirement appeals to be transferred from the Civil 
Service Retirement and Disability Fund in amounts determined by 
the Merit Systems Protection Board.

 Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental 
                           Policy Foundation

 MORRIS K. UDALL SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCELLENCE IN NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL 
                           POLICY TRUST FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For payment to the Morris K. Udall Scholarship and 
Excellence in National Environmental Policy Trust Fund, 
pursuant to the Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in 
National Environmental and Native AmericanPublic Policy Act of 
1992 (20 U.S.C. 5601 et seq.), $2,000,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which up to $50,000 shall be used to conduct financial 
audits pursuant to the Accountability of Tax Dollars Act of 2002 
(Public Law 107-289) notwithstanding sections 8 and 9 of Public Law 
102-259: Provided, That up to 60 percent of such funds may be 
transferred by the Morris K. Udall Scholarship and Excellence in 
National Environmental Policy Foundation for the necessary expenses of 
the Native Nations Institute.

                 ENVIRONMENTAL DISPUTE RESOLUTION FUND

    For payment to the Environmental Dispute Resolution Fund to 
carry out activities authorized in the Environmental Policy and 
Conflict Resolution Act of 1998, $1,900,000, to remain 
available until expended.

              National Archives and Records Administration

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses in connection with the 
administration of the National Archives and Records 
Administration (including the Information Security Oversight 
Office) and archived Federal records and related activities, as 
provided by law, and for expenses necessary for the review and 
declassification of documents, and for the hire of passenger 
motor vehicles, $283,045,000: Provided, That the Archivist of 
the United States is authorized to use any excess funds 
available from the amount borrowed for construction of the 
National Archives facility, for expenses necessary to provide 
adequate storage for holdings: Provided further, That of the 
funds provided in this paragraph, $2,000,000 shall be for 
initial move of records, staffing, and operations of the Nixon 
Library.

                      ELECTRONIC RECORDS ARCHIVES

    For necessary expenses in connection with the development 
of the electronic records archives, to include all direct 
project costs associated with research, analysis, design, 
development, and program management, $37,914,000, of which 
$22,000,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2008: 
Provided, That none of the multi-year funds may be obligated 
until the National Archives and Records Administration submits 
to the Committees on Appropriations, and such Committees 
approve, a plan for expenditure that: (1) meets the capital 
planning and investment control review requirements established 
by the Office of Management and Budget, including Circular A-
11; (2) complies with the National Archives and Records 
Administration's enterprise architecture; (3) conforms with the 
National Archives and Records Administration's enterprise life 
cycle methodology; (4) is approved by the National Archives and 
Records Administration and the Office of Management and Budget; 
(5) has been reviewed by the Government Accountability Office; 
and (6) complies with the acquisition rules, requirements, 
guidelines, and systems acquisition management practices of the 
Federal Government.

                        REPAIRS AND RESTORATION

    For the repair, alteration, and improvement of archives 
facilities, and to provide adequate storage for holdings, 
$9,682,000, to remain available until expended, of which 
$1,500,000 is to construct a new regional archives and records 
facility in Anchorage, Alaska, and of which $1,000,000 is for 
the repair and restoration of the plaza that surrounds the 
Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library that is under the 
joint control and custody of the University of Texas: Provided, 
That such funds may be transferred directly to the University 
and used, together with University funds, for repair and 
restoration of the plaza and remain available until expended 
for this purpose: Provided further, That such funds shall be 
spent in accordance with the construction plan submitted to the 
Committees on Appropriations on March 14, 2005: Provided 
further, That the Archivist shall be prohibited from entering 
into any agreement with the University or any other party that 
requires additional funding commitments on behalf of the 
Federal Government.

        NATIONAL HISTORICAL PUBLICATIONS AND RECORDS COMMISSION

                             GRANTS PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses for allocations and grants for 
historical publications and records as authorized by 44 U.S.C. 
2504, as amended, $7,500,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That of the funds provided in this 
paragraph, $2,000,000 shall be transferred to the operating 
expenses account for operating expenses of the National 
Historical Publications and Records Administration.

                  National Credit Union Administration

                       CENTRAL LIQUIDITY FACILITY

    During fiscal year 2006, gross obligations of the Central 
Liquidity Facility for the principal amount of new direct loans 
to member credit unions, as authorized by 12 U.S.C. 1795 et 
seq., shall not exceed $1,500,000,000: Provided, That 
administrative expenses of the Central Liquidity Facility in 
fiscal year 2006 shall not exceed $323,000.

               COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REVOLVING LOAN FUND

    For the Community Development Revolving Loan Fund program 
as authorized by 42 U.S.C. 9812, 9822 and 9910, $950,000 shall 
be available until September 30,2007 for technical assistance 
to low-income designated credit unions, and amounts of principal and 
interest on loans repaid shall be available until expended for low-
income designated credit unions.

                  National Transportation Safety Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the National Transportation 
Safety Board, including hire of passenger motor vehicles and 
aircraft; services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates 
for individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to 
the rate for a GS-15; uniforms, or allowances therefor, as 
authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901-5902) $76,700,000, of which 
not to exceed $2,000 may be used for official reception and 
representation expenses.

                              (RESCISSION)

    Of the available unobligated balances made available under 
Public Law 106-246, $1,000,000 are rescinded.

                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation

          PAYMENT TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD REINVESTMENT CORPORATION

    For payment to the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation 
for use in neighborhood reinvestment activities, as authorized 
by the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 
8101-8107), $118,000,000, of which $5,000,000 shall be for a 
multi-family rental housing program.

                      Office of Government Ethics

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses to carry out functions of the Office 
of Government Ethics pursuant to the Ethics in Government Act 
of 1978, as amended and the Ethics Reform Act of 1989, 
including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, rental of 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, 
hire of passenger motor vehicles, and not to exceed $1,500 for 
official reception and representation expenses, $11,148,000.

                     Office of Personnel Management

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                  (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF TRUST FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses to carry out functions of the Office 
of Personnel Management pursuant to Reorganization Plan 
Numbered 2 of 1978 and the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, 
including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; medical 
examinations performed for veterans by private physicians on a 
fee basis; rental of conference rooms in the District of 
Columbia and elsewhere; hire of passenger motor vehicles; not 
to exceed $2,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses; advances for reimbursements to applicable funds of 
the Office of Personnel Management and the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation for expenses incurred under Executive Order No. 
10422 of January 9, 1953, as amended; and payment of per diem 
and/or subsistence allowances to employees where Voting Rights 
Act activities require an employee to remain overnight at his 
or her post of duty, $122,521,000, of which $6,983,000 shall 
remain available until expended for the Enterprise Human 
Resources Integration project; $1,450,000 shall remain 
available until expended for the Human Resources Line of 
Business project; $500,000 shall remain available until 
expended for the E-Training project; and $1,412,000 shall 
remain available until expended until September 30, 2007 for 
the E-Payroll project; and in addition $100,017,000 for 
administrative expenses, to be transferred from the appropriate 
trust funds of the Office of Personnel Management without 
regard to other statutes, including direct procurement of 
printed materials, for the retirement and insurance programs: 
Provided, That the provisions of this appropriation shall not 
affect the authority to use applicable trust funds as provided 
by sections 8348(a)(1)(B), and 9004(f)(2)(A) of title 5, United 
States Code: Provided further, That no part of this 
appropriation shall be available for salaries and expenses of 
the Legal Examining Unit of the Office of Personnel Management 
established pursuant to Executive Order No. 9358 of July 1, 
1943, or any successor unit of like purpose: Provided further, 
That the President's Commission on White House Fellows, 
established by Executive Order No. 11183 of October 3, 1964, 
may, during fiscal year 2006, accept donations of money, 
property, and personal services: Provided further, That such 
donations, including those from prior years, may be used for 
the development of publicity materials to provide information 
about the White House Fellows, except that no such donations 
shall be accepted for travel or reimbursement of travel 
expenses, or for the salaries of employees of such Commission.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                  (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF TRUST FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act, as 
amended, including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
hire of passenger motor vehicles, $2,071,000, and in addition, 
not to exceed $16,329,000 for administrative expenses to audit, 
investigate, and provide other oversight of the Office of 
Personnel Management's retirement and insurance programs, to be 
transferred from the appropriate trust funds of the Office of 
Personnel Management, as determined by the Inspector General: 
Provided, That the Inspector General is authorized to rent 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia and elsewhere.

      GOVERNMENT PAYMENT FOR ANNUITANTS, EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS

    For payment of Government contributions with respect to 
retired employees, as authorized by chapter 89 of title 5, 
United States Code, and the Retired Federal Employees Health 
Benefits Act (74 Stat. 849), as amended, such sums as may be 
necessary.

       GOVERNMENT PAYMENT FOR ANNUITANTS, EMPLOYEE LIFE INSURANCE

    For payment of Government contributions with respect to 
employees retiring after December 31, 1989, as required by 
chapter 87 of title 5, United States Code, such sums as may be 
necessary.

        PAYMENT TO CIVIL SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

    For financing the unfunded liability of new and increased 
annuity benefits becoming effective on or after October 20, 
1969, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 8348, and annuities under 
special Acts to be credited to the Civil Service Retirement and 
Disability Fund, such sums as may be necessary: Provided, That 
annuities authorized by the Act of May 29, 1944, as amended, 
and the Act of August 19, 1950, as amended (33 U.S.C. 771-775), 
may hereafterbe paid out of the Civil Service Retirement and 
Disability Fund.

                       Office of Special Counsel

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses to carry out functions of the Office 
of Special Counsel pursuant to Reorganization Plan Numbered 2 
of 1978, the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (Public Law 95-
454), as amended, the Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 
(Public Law 101-12), as amended, Public Law 107-304, and the 
Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Act of 1994 
(Public Law 103-353), including services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109, payment of fees and expenses for witnesses, rental 
of conference rooms in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, 
and hire of passenger motor vehicles; $15,325,000.

                        Selective Service System

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses of the Selective Service System, 
including expenses of attendance at meetings and of training 
for uniformed personnel assigned to the Selective Service 
System, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 4101-4118 for civilian 
employees; purchase of uniforms, or allowances therefor, as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; hire of passenger motor 
vehicles; services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; and not to 
exceed $750 for official reception and representation expenses; 
$25,000,000: Provided, That during the current fiscal year, the 
President may exempt this appropriation from the provisions of 
31 U.S.C. 1341, whenever the President deems such action to be 
necessary in the interest of national defense: Provided 
further, That none of the funds appropriated by this Act may be 
expended for or in connection with the induction of any person 
into the Armed Forces of the United States.

           United States Interagency Council on Homelessness

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses (including payment of salaries, 
authorized travel, hire of passenger motor vehicles, the rental 
of conference rooms, and the employment of experts and 
consultants under section 3109 of title 5, United States Code) 
of the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness in 
carrying out the functions pursuant to title II of the 
McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, as amended, $1,800,000.
    Title II of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, as 
amended, is amended in section 209 by striking ``2005'' and 
inserting ``2006''.

                      United States Postal Service

                   PAYMENT TO THE POSTAL SERVICE FUND

    For payment to the Postal Service Fund for revenue forgone 
on free and reduced rate mail, pursuant to subsections (c) and 
(d) of section 2401 of title 39, United States Code, 
$116,350,000, of which $73,000,000 shall not be available for 
obligation until October 1, 2006: Provided, That mail for 
overseas voting and mail for the blind shall continue to be 
free: Provided further, That 6-day delivery and rural delivery 
of mail shall continue at not less than the 1983 level: 
Provided further, That none of the funds made available to the 
Postal Service by this Act shall be used to implement any rule, 
regulation, or policy of charging any officer or employee of 
any State or local child support enforcement agency, or any 
individual participating in a State or local program of child 
support enforcement, a fee for information requested or 
provided concerning an address of a postal customer: Provided 
further, That none of the funds provided in this Act shall be 
used to consolidate or close small rural and other small post 
offices in fiscal year 2006.

                        United States Tax Court

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    For necessary expenses, including contract reporting and 
other services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $47,998,000: 
Provided, That travel expenses of the judges shall be paid upon 
the written certificate of the judge.

                               TITLE VII

                      GENERAL PROVISIONS THIS ACT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 701. Such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 
2006 pay raises for programs funded in this Act shall be 
absorbed within the levels appropriated in this Act or previous 
appropriations Acts.
    Sec. 702. None of the funds in this Act shall be used for 
the planning or execution of any program to pay the expenses 
of, or otherwise compensate, non-Federal parties intervening in 
regulatory or adjudicatory proceedings funded in this Act.
    Sec. 703. None of the funds appropriated in this Act shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year, 
nor may any be transferred to other appropriations, unless 
expressly so provided herein.
    Sec. 704. The expenditure of any appropriation under this 
Act for any consulting service through procurement contract 
pursuant to section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, shall 
be limited to those contracts where such expenditures are a 
matter of public record and available for public inspection, 
except where otherwise providedunder existing law, or under 
existing Executive order issued pursuant to existing law.
    Sec. 705. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be transferred to any department, agency, or instrumentality of 
the United States Government, except pursuant to a transfer 
made by, or transfer authority provided in, this Act or any 
other appropriations Act.
    Sec. 706. None of the funds made available by this Act 
shall be available for any activity or for paying the salary of 
any Government employee where funding an activity or paying a 
salary to a Government employee would result in a decision, 
determination, rule, regulation, or policy that would prohibit 
the enforcement of section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 
U.S.C. 1307).
    Sec. 707. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall be available to pay the salary for any person filling 
a position, other than a temporary position, formerly held by 
an employee who has left to enter the Armed Forces of the 
United States and has satisfactorily completed his period of 
active military or naval service, and has within 90 days after 
his release from such service or from hospitalization 
continuing after discharge for a period of not more than 1 
year, made application for restoration to his former position 
and has been certified by the Office of Personnel Management as 
still qualified to perform the duties of his former position 
and has not been restored thereto.
    Sec. 708. No funds appropriated pursuant to this Act may be 
expended by an entity unless the entity agrees that in 
expending the assistance the entity will comply with sections 2 
through 4 of the Act of March 3, 1933 (41 U.S.C. 10a-10c, 
popularly known as the ``Buy American Act'').
    Sec. 709. No funds appropriated or otherwise made available 
under this Act shall be made available to any person or entity 
that has been convicted of violating the Buy American Act (41 
U.S.C. 10a-10c).
    Sec. 710. Except as otherwise provided in this Act, none of 
the funds provided in this Act, provided by previous 
appropriations Acts to the agencies or entities funded in this 
Act that remain available for obligation or expenditure in 
fiscal year 2006, or provided from any accounts in the Treasury 
derived by the collection of fees and available to the agencies 
funded by this Act, shall be available for obligation or 
expenditure through a reprogramming of funds that: (1) creates 
a new program; (2) eliminates a program, project, or activity; 
(3) increases funds or personnel for any program, project, or 
activity for which funds have been denied or restricted by the 
Congress; (4) proposes to use funds directed for a specific 
activity by either the House or Senate Committees on 
Appropriations for a different purpose; (5) augments existing 
programs, projects, or activities in excess of $5,000,000 or 10 
percent, whichever is less; (6) reduces existing programs, 
projects, or activities by $5,000,000 or 10 percent, whichever 
is less; or (7) creates, reorganizes, or restructures a branch, 
division, office, bureau, board, commission, agency, 
administration, or department different from the budget 
justifications submitted to the Committees on Appropriations or 
the table accompanying the statement of the managers 
accompanying this Act, whichever is more detailed, unless prior 
approval is received from the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations: Provided, That not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, each agency funded by this Act 
shall submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of 
the Senate and of the House of Representatives to establish the 
baseline for application of reprogramming and transfer 
authorities for the current fiscal year: Provided further, That 
the report shall include: (1) a table for each appropriation 
with a separate column to display the President's budget 
request, adjustments made by Congress, adjustments due to 
enacted rescissions, if appropriate, and the fiscal year 
enacted level; (2) a delineation in the table for each 
appropriation both by object class and program, project, and 
activity as detailed in the budget appendix for the respective 
appropriation; and (3) an identification of items of special 
congressional interest: Provided further, That the amount 
appropriated or limited for salaries and expenses for an agency 
shall be reduced by $100,000 per day for each day after the 
required date that the report has not been submitted to the 
Congress.
    Sec. 711. Except as otherwise specifically provided by law, 
not to exceed 50 percent of unobligated balances remaining 
available at the end of fiscal year 2006 from appropriations 
made available for salaries and expenses for fiscal year 2006 
in this Act, shall remain available through September 30, 2007, 
for each such account for the purposes authorized: Provided, 
That a request shall be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations for approval prior to the expenditure of such 
funds: Provided further, That these requests shall be made in 
compliance with reprogramming guidelines.
    Sec. 712. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used by the Executive Office of the President to request 
from the Federal Bureau of Investigation any official 
background investigation report on any individual, except 
when--
            (1) such individual has given his or her express 
        written consent for such request not more than 6months 
prior to the date of such request and during the same presidential 
administration; or
            (2) such request is required due to extraordinary 
        circumstances involving national security.
    Sec. 713. The cost accounting standards promulgated under 
section 26 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act 
(Public Law 93-400; 41 U.S.C. 422) shall not apply with respect 
to a contract under the Federal Employees Health Benefits 
Program established under chapter 89 of title 5, United States 
Code.
    Sec. 714. For the purpose of resolving litigation and 
implementing any settlement agreements regarding the nonforeign 
area cost-of-living allowance program, the Office of Personnel 
Management may accept and utilize (without regard to any 
restriction on unanticipated travel expenses imposed in an 
Appropriations Act) funds made available to the Office pursuant 
to court approval.
    Sec. 715. No funds appropriated by this Act shall be 
available to pay for an abortion, or the administrative 
expenses in connection with any health plan under the Federal 
employees health benefits program which provides any benefits 
or coverage for abortions.
    Sec. 716. The provision of section 715 shall not apply 
where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus 
were carried to term, or the pregnancy is the result of an act 
of rape or incest.
    Sec. 717. In order to promote Government access to 
commercial information technology, the restriction on 
purchasing nondomestic articles, materials, and supplies set 
forth in the Buy American Act (41 U.S.C. 10a et seq.), shall 
not apply to the acquisition by the Federal Government of 
information technology (as defined in section 11101 of title 
40, United States Code), that is a commercial item (as defined 
in section 4(12) of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy 
Act (41 U.S.C. 403(12)).
    Sec. 718. None of the funds made available in the Act may 
be used to finalize, implement, administer, or enforce--
            (1) the proposed rule relating to the determination 
        that real estate brokerage is an activity that is 
        financial in nature or incidental to a financial 
        activity published in the Federal Register on January 
        3, 2001 (66 Fed. Reg. 307 et seq.); or
            (2) the revision proposed in such rule to section 
        1501.2 of title 12 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
    Sec. 719. All Federal agencies and departments that are 
funded under this Act shall issue a report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on all sole source 
contracts by no later than July 31, 2006. Such report shall 
include the contractor, the amount of the contract and the 
rationale for using a sole source contract.
    Sec. 720. The Secretary of the Treasury may transfer funds 
from amounts appropriated under title II of this Act for any 
costs necessary to pay for both career and non-career senior 
Treasury officials and support staff in locations of economic 
strategic interest throughout the world. Such positions would 
be used to advocate positions of interest to the United States 
Government, including open and fair financial markets, 
consistent with the Secretary's obligation under the Gold 
Reserve Act of 1934 (48 Stat. 337) to promote orderly exchange 
arrangements and an orderly system of exchange rates. Any 
transfer shall not be made available until approved in an 
operating plan request by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 721. Section 640(c) of the Treasury and General 
Government Appropriations Act, 2000 (Public Law 106-58; 2 
U.S.C. 437g note), as amended by section 642 of the Treasury 
and General Government Appropriations Act, 2002 (Public Law 
107-67) and by section 639 of the Transportation, Treasury, and 
Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2004 (Public Law 108-
199), is amended by striking ``December 31, 2005'' and 
inserting ``December 31, 2008''.
    Sec. 722. The Secretary of the Treasury may make payments 
from the Treasury Forfeiture Fund to reimburse the United 
States Secret Service for costs of protecting the Secretary of 
the Treasury: Provided, That the United States Secret Service 
shall provide the Department of the Treasury with a detailed, 
itemized list of expenses associated with such protection: 
Provided further, That the Comptroller General shall review all 
expenditures related to such protection and shall determine if 
each expense is a reasonable and unavoidable cost of this 
protection: Provided further, That all such reimbursable 
expenses shall be subject to a memorandum of understanding 
between the Department of the Treasury and the United States 
Secret Service.
    Sec. 723. Section 101 of the Second Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act to Meet Immediate Needs Arising From the 
Consequences of Hurricane Katrina, 2005 (Public Law 109-62; 119 
Stat. 1992) is repealed.
    Sec. 724. (a) In General.--None of the funds appropriated 
or otherwise made available by this Act may be used for any 
Federal Government contract with any foreign incorporated 
entity which is treated as an inverted domestic corporation 
under section 835(b) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 
U.S.C. 395(b)) or any subsidiary of such an entity.
    (b) Waivers.--
            (1) In general.--Any Secretary shall waive 
        subsection (a) with respect to any Federal Government 
        contract under the authority of such Secretaryif the 
Secretary determines that the waiver is required in the interest of 
national security.
            (2) Report to congress.--Any Secretary issuing a 
        waiver under paragraph (1) shall report such issuance 
        to Congress.
    (c) Exception.--This section shall not apply to any Federal 
Government contract entered into before the date of the 
enactment of this Act, or to any task order issued pursuant to 
such contract.
    Sec. 725. From funds made available in this Act under the 
headings ``White House Office'', ``Executive Residence at the 
White House'', ``White House Repair and Restoration'', 
``Council of Economic Advisors'', ``National Security 
Council'', ``Office of Administration'', ``Office of Policy 
Development'', ``Special Assistance to the President'', and 
``Official Residence of the Vice President'', the Director of 
the Office of Management and Budget (or such other officer as 
the President may designate in writing), may, fifteen days 
after giving notice to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, transfer not to exceed 10 percent of any such 
appropriation to any other such appropriation, to be merged 
with and available for the same time and for the same purposes 
as the appropriation to which transferred: Provided, That the 
amount of an appropriation shall not be increased by more than 
50 percent by such transfers: Provided further, That no amount 
shall be transferred from ``Special Assistance to the 
President'' or ``Official Residence of the Vice President'' 
without the approval of the Vice President.
    Sec. 726. No funds in this Act may be used to support any 
Federal, State, or local projects that seek to use the power of 
eminent domain, unless eminent domain is employed only for a 
public use: Provided, That for purposes of this section, public 
use shall not be construed to include economic development that 
primarily benefits private entities: Provided further, That any 
use of funds for mass transit, railroad, airport, seaport or 
highway projects as well as utility projects which benefit or 
serve the general public (including energy-related, 
communication-related, water-related and wastewater-related 
infrastructure), other structures designated for use by the 
general public or which have other common-carrier or public-
utility functions that serve the general public and are subject 
to regulation and oversight by the government, and projects for 
the removal of an immediate threat to public health and safety 
or brownfields as defined in the Small Business Liability 
Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act (Public Law 107-118) 
shall be considered a public use for purposes of eminent 
domain: Provided further, That the Government Accountability 
Office, in consultation with the National Academy of Public 
Administration, organizations representing State and local 
governments, and property rights organizations, shall conduct a 
study to be submitted to the Congress within 12 months of the 
enactment of this Act on the nationwide use of eminent domain, 
including the procedures used and the results accomplished on a 
state-by-state basis as well as the impact on individual 
property owners and on the affected communities.

                               TITLE VIII

                   GENERAL PROVISIONS GOVERNMENT-WIDE

                Departments, Agencies, and Corporations

    Sec. 801. Funds appropriated in this or any other Act may 
be used to pay travel to the United States for the immediate 
family of employees serving abroad in cases of death or life 
threatening illness of said employee.
    Sec. 802. No department, agency, or instrumentality of the 
United States receiving appropriated funds under this or any 
other Act for fiscal year 2006 shall obligate or expend any 
such funds, unless such department, agency, or instrumentality 
has in place, and will continue to administer in good faith, a 
written policy designed to ensure that all of its workplaces 
are free from the illegal use, possession, or distribution of 
controlled substances(as defined in the Controlled Substances 
Act (21 U.S.C. 802)) by the officers and employees of such department, 
agency, or instrumentality.
    Sec. 803. Unless otherwise specifically provided, the 
maximum amount allowable during the current fiscal year in 
accordance with section 16 of the Act of August 2, 1946 (60 
Stat. 810), for the purchase of any passenger motor vehicle 
(exclusive of buses, ambulances, law enforcement, and 
undercover surveillance vehicles), is hereby fixed at $8,100 
except station wagons for which the maximum shall be $9,100: 
Provided, That these limits may be exceeded by not to exceed 
$3,700 for police-type vehicles, and by not to exceed $4,000 
for special heavy-duty vehicles: Provided further, That the 
limits set forth in this section may not be exceeded by more 
than 5 percent for electric or hybrid vehicles purchased for 
demonstration under the provisions of the Electric and Hybrid 
Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1976: 
Provided further, That the limits set forth in this section may 
be exceeded by the incremental cost of clean alternative fuels 
vehicles acquired pursuant to Public Law 101-549 over the cost 
of comparable conventionally fueled vehicles.
    Sec. 804. Appropriations of the executive departments and 
independent establishments for the current fiscal year 
available for expenses of travel, or for the expenses of the 
activity concerned, are hereby made available for quarters 
allowances and cost-of-living allowances, in accordance with 5 
U.S.C. 5922-5924.
    Sec. 805. Unless otherwise specified during the current 
fiscal year, no part of any appropriation contained in this or 
any other Act shall be used to pay the compensation of any 
officer or employee of the Government of the United States 
(including any agency the majority of the stock of which is 
owned by the Government of the United States) whose post of 
duty is in the continental United States unless such person: 
(1) is a citizen of the United States; (2) is a person in the 
service of the United States on the date of the enactment of 
this Act who, being eligible for citizenship, has filed a 
declaration of intention to become a citizen of the United 
States prior to such date and is actually residing in the 
United States; (3) is a person who owes allegiance to the 
United States; (4) is an alien from Cuba, Poland, South 
Vietnam, the countries of the former Soviet Union, or the 
Baltic countries lawfully admitted to the United States for 
permanent residence; (5) is a South Vietnamese, Cambodian, or 
Laotian refugee paroled in the United States after January 1, 
1975; or (6) is a national of the People's Republic of China 
who qualifies for adjustment of status pursuant to the Chinese 
Student Protection Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-404): Provided, 
That for the purpose of this section, an affidavit signed by 
any such person shall be considered prima facie evidence that 
the requirements of this section with respect to his or her 
status have been complied with: Provided further, That any 
person making a false affidavit shall be guilty of a felony, 
and, upon conviction, shall be fined no more than $4,000 or 
imprisoned for not more than 1 year, or both: Provided further, 
That the above penal clause shall be in addition to, and not in 
substitution for, any other provisions of existing law: 
Provided further, That any payment made to any officer or 
employee contrary to the provisions of this section shall be 
recoverable in action by the Federal Government. This section 
shall not apply to citizens of Ireland, Israel, or the Republic 
of the Philippines, or to nationals of those countries allied 
with the United States in a current defense effort, or to 
international broadcasters employed by the United States 
Information Agency, or to temporary employment of translators, 
or to temporary employment in the field service (not to exceed 
60 days) as a result of emergencies.
    Sec. 806. Appropriations available to any department or 
agency during the current fiscal year for necessary expenses, 
including maintenance or operating expenses, shall also be 
available for payment to the General Services Administration 
for charges for space and services and those expenses of 
renovation and alteration of buildings and facilities which 
constitute public improvements performed in accordance with the 
Public Buildings Act of 1959 (73 Stat. 749), the Public 
Buildings Amendments of 1972 (87 Stat. 216), or other 
applicable law.
    Sec. 807. In addition to funds provided in this or any 
other Act, all Federal agencies are authorized to receive and 
use funds resulting from the sale of materials, including 
Federal records disposed of pursuant to a records schedule 
recovered through recycling or waste prevention programs. Such 
funds shall be available until expended for the following 
purposes:
            (1) Acquisition, waste reduction and prevention, 
        and recycling programs as described in Executive Order 
        No. 13101 (September 14, 1998), including any such 
        programs adopted prior to the effective date of the 
        Executive order.
            (2) Other Federal agency environmental management 
        programs, including, but not limited to, the 
        development and implementation of hazardous waste 
        management and pollution prevention programs.
            (3) Other employee programs as authorized by law or 
        as deemed appropriate by the head of the Federal 
        agency.
    Sec. 808. Funds made available by this or any other Act for 
administrative expenses in the current fiscal year of the 
corporations and agencies subject to chapter 91 of title 31, 
United States Code, shall be available, in addition to objects 
for which such funds are otherwise available, for rent in the 
District of Columbia; services in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 
3109; and the objects specified under this head, all the 
provisions of which shall be applicable to the expenditure of 
such funds unless otherwise specified in the Act by which they 
are made available: Provided, That in the event any functions 
budgeted as administrative expenses are subsequently 
transferred to or paid from other funds, the limitations on 
administrative expenses shall be correspondingly reduced.
    Sec. 809. No part of any appropriation for the current 
fiscal year contained in this or any other Act shall be paid to 
any person for the filling of any position for which he or she 
has been nominated after the Senate has voted not to approve 
the nomination of said person.
    Sec. 810. No part of any appropriation contained in this or 
any other Act shall be available for interagency financing of 
boards (except Federal Executive Boards), commissions, 
councils, committees, or similar groups (whether or not they 
are interagency entities) which do not have a prior and 
specific statutory approval to receive financial support from 
more than one agency or instrumentality.
    Sec. 811. Funds made available by this or any other Act to 
the Postal Service Fund (39 U.S.C. 2003) shall be available for 
employment of guards for all buildings and areas owned or 
occupied by the Postal Service or under the charge and control 
of the Postal Service. The Postal Service may give such guards, 
with respect to such property, any of the powers of special 
policemen provided under 40 U.S.C. 1315. The Postmaster 
General, or his designee, may take any action that the 
Secretary of Homeland Security may take under such section with 
respect to that property.
    Sec. 812. None of the funds made available pursuant to the 
provisions of this Act shall be used to implement, administer, 
or enforce any regulation which has been disapproved pursuant 
to a joint resolution duly adopted in accordance with the 
applicable law of the United States.
    Sec. 813. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
and except as otherwise provided in this section, no part of 
any of the funds appropriated for fiscal year 2006, by this or 
any other Act, may be used to pay any prevailing rate employee 
described in section 5342(a)(2)(A) of title 5, United States 
Code--
            (1) during the period from the date of expiration 
        of the limitation imposed by the comparable section for 
        previous fiscal years until the normal effective date 
        of the applicable wage survey adjustment that is to 
        take effect in fiscal year 2006, in an amount that 
        exceeds the rate payable for the applicable grade and 
        step of the applicable wage schedule in accordance with 
        such section; and
            (2) during the period consisting of the remainder 
        of fiscal year 2006, in an amount that exceeds, as a 
        result of a wage survey adjustment, the rate payable 
        under paragraph (1) by more than the sum of--
                    (A) the percentage adjustment taking effect 
                in fiscal year 2006 under section 5303 of title 
                5, United States Code, in the rates of pay 
                under the General Schedule; and
                    (B) the difference between the overall 
                average percentage of the locality-based 
                comparability payments taking effect in fiscal 
                year 2006 under section 5304 of such title 
                (whether by adjustment or otherwise), and the 
                overall average percentage of such payments 
                which was effective in the previous fiscal year 
                under such section.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no 
prevailing rate employee described in subparagraph (B) or (C) 
of section 5342(a)(2) of title 5, United States Code, and no 
employee covered by section 5348 of such title, may be paid 
during the periods for which subsection (a) is in effect at a 
rate that exceeds the rates that would be payable under 
subsection (a) were subsection (a) applicable to such employee.
    (c) For the purposes of this section, the rates payable to 
an employee who is covered by this section and who is paid from 
a schedule not in existence on September 30, 2005, shall be 
determined under regulations prescribed by the Office of 
Personnel Management.
    (d) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, rates of 
premium pay for employees subject to this section may not be 
changed from the rates in effect on September 30, 2005, except 
to the extent determined by the Office of Personnel Management 
to be consistent with the purpose of this section.
    (e) This section shall apply with respect to pay for 
service performed after September 30, 2005.
    (f) For the purpose of administering any provision of law 
(including any rule or regulation that provides premium pay, 
retirement, life insurance, or any other employee benefit) that 
requires any deduction or contribution, or that imposes any 
requirement or limitation on the basis of a rate of salary or 
basic pay, the rate of salary or basic pay payable after the 
application of this section shall be treated as the rate of 
salary or basic pay.
    (g) Nothing in this section shall be considered to permit 
or require the payment to any employee covered by this section 
at a rate in excess of the rate that would be payable were this 
section not in effect.
    (h) The Office of Personnel Management may provide for 
exceptions to the limitations imposed by this section if the 
Office determines that such exceptions are necessary to ensure 
the recruitment or retention of qualified employees.
    Sec. 814. During the period in which the head of any 
department or agency, or any other officer or civilian employee 
of the Government appointed by the President of the United 
States, holds office, no funds may be obligated or expended in 
excess of $5,000 to furnish or redecorate the office of such 
department head, agency head, officer, or employee, or to 
purchase furniture or make improvements for any such office, 
unless advance notice of such furnishing or redecoration is 
expressly approved by the Committees on Appropriations. For the 
purposes of this section, the term ``office'' shall include the 
entire suite of offices assigned to the individual, as well as 
any other space used primarily by the individual or the use of 
which is directly controlled by the individual.
    Sec. 815. Notwithstanding section 1346 of title 31, United 
States Code, or section 809 of this Act, funds made available 
for the current fiscal year by this or any other Act shall be 
available for the interagency funding of national security and 
emergency preparedness telecommunications initiatives which 
benefit multiple Federal departments, agencies, or entities, as 
provided by Executive Order No. 12472 (April 3, 1984).
    Sec. 816. (a) None of the funds appropriated by this or any 
other Act may be obligated or expended by any Federal 
department, agency, or other instrumentality for the salaries 
or expenses of any employee appointed to a position of a 
confidential or policy-determining character excepted from the 
competitive service pursuant to section 3302 of title 5, United 
States Code, without a certification to the Office of Personnel 
Management from the head of the Federal department, agency, or 
other instrumentality employing the Schedule C appointee that 
the Schedule C position was not created solely or primarily in 
order to detail the employee to the White House.
    (b) The provisions of this section shall not apply to 
Federal employees or members of the armed services detailed to 
or from--
            (1) the Central Intelligence Agency;
            (2) the National Security Agency;
            (3) the Defense Intelligence Agency;
            (4) the offices within the Department of Defense 
        for the collection of specialized national foreign 
        intelligence through reconnaissance programs;
            (5) the Bureau of Intelligence and Research of the 
        Department of State;
            (6) any agency, office, or unit of the Army, Navy, 
        Air Force, and Marine Corps, the Department of Homeland 
        Security, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the 
        Drug Enforcement Administration of the Department of 
        Justice, the Department of Transportation, the 
        Department of the Treasury, and the Department of 
        Energy performing intelligence functions; and
            (7) the Director of National Intelligence or the 
        Office of the Director of National Intelligence.
    Sec. 817. No department, agency, or instrumentality of the 
United States receiving appropriated funds under this or any 
other Act for the current fiscal year shall obligate or expend 
any such funds, unless such department, agency, or 
instrumentality has in place, and will continue to administer 
in good faith, a written policy designed to ensure that all of 
its workplaces are free from discrimination and sexual 
harassment and that all of its workplaces are not in violation 
of title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Public Law 88-
352, 78 Stat. 241), as amended, the Age Discrimination in 
Employment Act of 1967 (Public Law 90-202, 81 Stat. 602), and 
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Public Law 93-112, 87 Stat. 
355).
    Sec. 818. No part of any appropriation contained in this or 
any other Act shall be available for the payment of the salary 
of any officer or employee of the Federal Government, who--
            (1) prohibits or prevents, or attempts or threatens 
        to prohibit or prevent, any other officer or employee 
        of the Federal Government from having any direct oral 
        or written communication or contact with any Member, 
        committee, or subcommittee of the Congress in 
        connection with any matter pertaining to the employment 
        of such other officer or employee or pertaining to the 
        department or agency of such other officer or employee 
        in any way, irrespective of whether such communication 
        or contact is at the initiative of such other officer 
        or employee or in response to the request or inquiry of 
        such Member, committee, or subcommittee; or
            (2) removes, suspends from duty without pay, 
        demotes, reduces in rank, seniority, status, pay, or 
        performance of efficiency rating, denies promotion to, 
        relocates, reassigns, transfers, disciplines, or 
        discriminates in regard to any employment right, 
        entitlement, or benefit, or any term or condition of 
        employment of, any other officer or employee of the 
        Federal Government, or attempts or threatens to commit 
        any of the foregoing actions with respect to such other 
        officer or employee, by reason of any communication or 
        contact of such other officer or employee with any 
        Member, committee, or subcommittee of the Congress as 
        described in paragraph (1).
    Sec. 819. (a) None of the funds made available in this or 
any other Act may be obligated or expended for any employee 
training that--
            (1) does not meet identified needs for knowledge, 
        skills, and abilities bearing directly upon the 
        performance of official duties;
            (2) contains elements likely to induce high levels 
        of emotional response or psychological stress in some 
        participants;
            (3) does not require prior employee notification of 
        the content and methods to be used in the training and 
        written end of course evaluation;
            (4) contains any methods or content associated with 
        religious or quasi-religious belief systems or ``new 
        age'' belief systems as defined in Equal Employment 
        Opportunity Commission Notice N-915.022, dated 
        September 2, 1988; or
            (5) is offensive to, or designed to change, 
        participants' personal values or lifestyle outside the 
        workplace.
    (b) Nothing in this section shall prohibit, restrict, or 
otherwise preclude an agency from conducting training bearing 
directly upon the performance of official duties.
    Sec. 820. No funds appropriated in this or any other Act 
may be used to implement or enforce the agreements in Standard 
Forms 312 and 4414 of the Government or any other nondisclosure 
policy, form, or agreement if such policy, form, or agreement 
does not contain the following provisions: ``These restrictions 
are consistent with and do not supersede, conflict with, or 
otherwise alter the employee obligations, rights, or 
liabilities created by Executive Order No. 12958; section 7211 
of title 5, United States Code (governing disclosures to 
Congress); section 1034 of title 10, United States Code, as 
amended by the Military Whistleblower Protection Act (governing 
disclosure to Congress by members of the military); section 
2302(b)(8) of title 5, United States Code, as amended bythe 
Whistleblower Protection Act (governing disclosures of illegality, 
waste, fraud, abuse or public health or safety threats); the 
Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982 (50 U.S.C. 421 et seq.) 
(governing disclosures that could expose confidential Government 
agents); and the statutes which protect against disclosure that may 
compromise the national security, including sections 641, 793, 794, 
798, and 952 of title 18, United States Code, and section 4(b) of the 
Subversive Activities Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 783(b)). The definitions, 
requirements, obligations, rights, sanctions, and liabilities created 
by said Executive order and listed statutes are incorporated into this 
agreement and are controlling.'': Provided, That notwithstanding the 
preceding paragraph, a nondisclosure policy form or agreement that is 
to be executed by a person connected with the conduct of an 
intelligence or intelligence-related activity, other than an employee 
or officer of the United States Government, may contain provisions 
appropriate to the particular activity for which such document is to be 
used. Such form or agreement shall, at a minimum, require that the 
person will not disclose any classified information received in the 
course of such activity unless specifically authorized to do so by the 
United States Government. Such nondisclosure forms shall also make it 
clear that they do not bar disclosures to Congress or to an authorized 
official of an executive agency or the Department of Justice that are 
essential to reporting a substantial violation of law.
    Sec. 821. No part of any funds appropriated in this or any 
other Act shall be used by an agency of the executive branch, 
other than for normal and recognized executive-legislative 
relationships, for publicity or propaganda purposes, and for 
the preparation, distribution or use of any kit, pamphlet, 
booklet, publication, radio, television or film presentation 
designed to support or defeat legislation pending before the 
Congress, except in presentation to the Congress itself.
    Sec. 822. None of the funds appropriated by this or any 
other Act may be used by an agency to provide a Federal 
employee's home address to any labor organization except when 
the employee has authorized such disclosure or when such 
disclosure has been ordered by a court of competent 
jurisdiction.
    Sec. 823. None of the funds made available in this Act or 
any other Act may be used to provide any non-public information 
such as mailing or telephone lists to any person or any 
organization outside of the Federal Government without the 
approval of the Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 824. No part of any appropriation contained in this or 
any other Act shall be used directly or indirectly, including 
by private contractor, for publicity or propaganda purposes 
within the United States not heretofor authorized by the 
Congress.
    Sec. 825. (a) In this section the term ``agency''--
            (1) means an Executive agency as defined under 
        section 105 of title 5, United States Code;
            (2) includes a military department as defined under 
        section 102 of such title, the Postal Service, and the 
        Postal Rate Commission; and
            (3) shall not include the Government Accountability 
        Office.
    (b) Unless authorized in accordance with law or regulations 
to use such time for other purposes, an employee of an agency 
shall use official time in an honest effort to perform official 
duties. An employee not under a leave system, including a 
Presidential appointee exempted under section 6301(2) of title 
5, United States Code, has an obligation to expend an honest 
effort and a reasonable proportion of such employee's time in 
the performance of official duties.
    Sec. 826. Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 1346 and section 810 of 
this Act, funds made available for the current fiscal year by 
this or any other Act to any department or agency, which is a 
member of the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board 
(FASAB), shall be available to finance an appropriate share of 
FASAB administrative costs.
    Sec. 827. Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 1346 and section 910 of 
this Act, the head of each Executive department and agency is 
hereby authorized to transfer to or reimburse ``General 
Services Administration, Government-wide Policy'' with the 
approval of the Director of the Office of Management and 
Budget, funds made available for the current fiscal year by 
this or any other Act, including rebates from charge card and 
other contracts: Provided, That these funds shall be 
administered by the Administrator of General Services to 
support Government-wide financial, information technology, 
procurement, and other management innovations, initiatives, and 
activities, as approved by the Director of the Office of 
Management and Budget, in consultation with the appropriate 
interagency groups designated by the Director (including the 
Chief Financial Officers Council and the Joint Financial 
Management Improvement Program for financial management 
initiatives, the Chief Information Officers Council for 
information technology initiatives, the Chief Human Capital 
Officers Council for human capital initiatives, and the Federal 
Acquisition Council for procurement initiatives). The total 
funds transferred or reimbursed shall not exceed $10,000,000. 
Such transfers or reimbursements may onlybe made 15 days 
following notification of the Committees on Appropriations by the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget.
    Sec. 828. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a 
woman may breastfeed her child at any location in a Federal 
building or on Federal property, if the woman and her child are 
otherwise authorized to be present at the location.
    Sec. 829. Nothwithstanding section 1346 of title 31, United 
States Code, or section 810 of this Act, funds made available 
for the current fiscal year by this or any other Act shall be 
available for the interagency funding of specific projects, 
workshops, studies, and similar efforts to carry out the 
purposes of the National Science and Technology Council 
(authorized by Executive Order No. 12881), which benefit 
multiple Federal departments, agencies, or entities: Provided, 
That the Office of Management and Budget shall provide a report 
describing the budget of and resources connected with the 
National Science and Technology Council to the Committees on 
Appropriations, the House Committee on Science; and the Senate 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation 90 days 
after enactment of this Act.
    Sec. 830. Any request for proposals, solicitation, grant 
application, form, notification, press release, or other 
publications involving the distribution of Federal funds shall 
indicate the agency providing the funds, the Catalog of Federal 
Domestic Assistance Number, as applicable, and the amount 
provided: Provided, That this provision shall apply to direct 
payments, formula funds, and grants received by a State 
receiving Federal funds.
    Sec. 831. Subsection (f) of section 403 of Public Law 103-
356 (31 U.S.C. 501 note), as amended, is further amended by 
striking ``October 1, 2005'' and inserting ``October 1, 2006'': 
Provided, That this provision shall not apply to the Department 
of Homeland Security.
    Sec. 832. (a) Prohibition of Federal Agency Monitoring of 
Individuals' Internet Use.--None of the funds made available in 
this or any other Act may be used by any Federal agency--
            (1) to collect, review, or create any aggregation 
        of data, derived from any means, that includes any 
        personally identifiable information relating to an 
        individual's access to or use of any Federal Government 
        Internet site of the agency; or
            (2) to enter into any agreement with a third party 
        (including another government agency) to collect, 
        review, or obtain any aggregation of data, derived from 
        any means, that includes any personally identifiable 
        information relating to an individual's access to or 
        use of any nongovernmental Internet site.
    (b) Exceptions.--The limitations established in subsection 
(a) shall not apply to--
            (1) any record of aggregate data that does not 
        identify particular persons;
            (2) any voluntary submission of personally 
        identifiable information;
            (3) any action taken for law enforcement, 
        regulatory, or supervisory purposes, in accordance with 
        applicable law; or
            (4) any action described in subsection (a)(1) that 
        is a system security action taken by the operator of an 
        Internet site and is necessarily incident to providing 
        the Internet site services or to protecting the rights 
        or property of the provider of the Internet site.
    (c) Definitions.--For the purposes of this section:
            (1) The term ``regulatory'' means agency actions to 
        implement, interpret or enforce authorities provided in 
        law.
            (2) The term ``supervisory'' means examinations of 
        the agency's supervised institutions, including 
        assessing safety and soundness, overall financial 
        condition, management practices and policies and 
        compliance with applicable standards as provided in 
        law.
    Sec. 833. (a) None of the funds appropriated by this Act 
may be used to enter into or renew a contract which includes a 
provision providing prescription drug coverage, except where 
the contract also includes a provision for contraceptive 
coverage.
    (b) Nothing in this section shall apply to a contract 
with--
            (1) any of the following religious plans:
                    (A) Personal Care's HMO; and
                    (B) OSF HealthPlans, Inc.; and
            (2) any existing or future plan, if the carrier for 
        the plan objects to such coverage on the basis of 
        religious beliefs.
    (c) In implementing this section, any plan that enters into 
or renews a contract under this section may not subject any 
individual to discrimination on the basis that the individual 
refuses to prescribe or otherwise provide for contraceptives 
because such activities would be contrary to the individual's 
religious beliefs or moral convictions.
    (d) Nothing in this section shall be construed to require 
coverage of abortion or abortion-related services.
    Sec. 834. The Congress of the United States recognizes the 
United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) asthe official anti-
doping agency for Olympic, Pan American, and Paralympic sport in the 
United States.
    Sec. 835. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
appropriated for official travel by Federal departments and 
agencies may be used by such departments and agencies, if 
consistent with Office of Management and Budget Circular A-126 
regarding official travel for Government personnel, to 
participate in the fractional aircraft ownership pilot program.
    Sec. 836. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
of the funds appropriated or made available under this Act or 
any other appropriations Act may be used to implement or 
enforce restrictions or limitations on the Coast Guard 
Congressional Fellowship Program, or to implement the proposed 
regulations of the Office of Personnel Management to add 
sections 300.311 through 300.316 to part 300 of title 5 of the 
Code of Federal Regulations, published in the Federal Register, 
volume 68, number 174, on September 9, 2003 (relating to the 
detail of executive branch employees to the legislative 
branch).
    Sec. 837. (a) Not later than 180 days after the end of the 
fiscal year, the head of each Federal agency shall submit a 
report to Congress on the amount of the acquisitions made by 
the agency from entities that manufacture the articles, 
materials, or supplies outside of the United States in that 
fiscal year.
    (b) The report required by subsection (a) shall separately 
indicate--
            (1) the dollar value of any articles, materials, or 
        supplies purchased that were manufactured outside of 
        the United States;
            (2) an itemized list of all waivers granted with 
        respect to such articles, materials, or supplies under 
        the Buy American Act (41 U.S.C. 10a et seq.); and
            (3) a summary of the total procurement funds spent 
        on goods manufactured in the United States versus funds 
        spent on goods manufactured outside of the United 
        States.
    (c) The head of each Federal agency submitting a report 
under subsection (a) shall make the report publicly available 
to the maximum extent practicable.
    (d) This section shall not apply to acquisitions made by an 
agency, or component thereof, that is an element of the 
intelligence community as set forth in or designated under 
section 3(4) of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 
401a(4)).
    Sec. 838. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no 
executive branch agency shall purchase, construct, and/or lease 
any additional facilities, except within or contiguous to 
existing locations, to be used for the purpose of conducting 
Federal law enforcement training without the advance approval 
of the Committees on Appropriations, except that the Federal 
Law Enforcement Training Center is authorized to obtain the 
temporary use of additional facilities by lease, contract, or 
other agreement for training which cannot be accommodated in 
existing Center facilities.
    Sec. 839. Notwithstanding section 1346 of title 31, United 
States Code, and section 809 of this Act and any other 
provision of law, the head of each appropriate executive 
department and agency shall transfer to or reimburse the 
Federal Aviation Administration, upon the direction of the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget, funds made 
available by this or any other Act for the purposes described 
below, and shall submit budget requests for such purposes. 
These funds shall be administered by the Federal Aviation 
Administration, in consultation with the appropriate 
interagency groups designated by the Director and shall be used 
to ensure the uninterrupted, continuous operation of the Midway 
Atoll Airfield by the Federal Aviation Administration pursuant 
to an operational agreement with the Department of the Interior 
for the entirety of fiscal year 2006 and any period thereafter 
that precedes the enactment of the Transportation, Treasury, 
the Judiciary, Housing and Urban Development, and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 2007. The Director of the Office 
of Management and Budget shall mandate the necessary transfers 
after determining an equitable allocation between the 
appropriate executive departments and agencies of the 
responsibility for funding the continuous operation of the 
Midway Atoll Airfield based on, but not limited to, potential 
use, interest in maintaining aviation safety, and applicability 
to governmental operations and agency mission. The total funds 
transferred or reimbursed shall not exceed $6,000,000 for any 
twelve-month period. Such sums shall be sufficient to ensure 
continued operation of the airfield throughout the period cited 
above. Funds shall be available for operation of the airfield 
or airfield-related capital upgrades. The Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget shall notify the Committees on 
Appropriations of such transfers or reimbursements within 15 
days of this Act. Such transfers or reimbursements shall begin 
within 30 days of enactment of this Act.
    Sec. 840. Section 4(b) of the Federal Activities Inventory 
Reform Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-270) is amended by adding at 
the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(5) Executive agencies with fewer than 100 full-
        time employees as of the first day of the fiscal year. 
        However, such an agency shall be subject to section 2 
        to the extent it plans to conduct a public-private 
        competition for the performance of an activity that is 
        not inherently governmental.''.
    Sec. 841. (a) No funds shall be available for transfers or 
reimbursements to the E-Government Initiatives sponsored by the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) prior to 15 days 
following submission of a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations by the Director of the Office of Management and 
Budget and receipt of approval to transfer funds by the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    (b) The report in (a) shall detail--
            (1) the amount proposed for transfer for any 
        department and agency by program office, bureau, or 
        activity, as appropriate;
            (2) the specific use of funds;
            (3) the relevance of that use to that department or 
        agency and each bureau or office within, which is 
        contributing funds; and
            (4) a description on any such activities for which 
        funds were appropriated that will not be implemented or 
        partially implemented by the department or agency as a 
        result of the transfer.
    Sec. 842. (a) Requirement for Public-Private Competition.--
            (1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
        none of the funds appropriated by this or any other Act 
        shall be available to convert to contractor performance 
        an activity or function of an executive agency, that on 
        or after the date of enactment of this Act, is 
        performed by more than 10 Federal employees unless--
                    (A) the conversion is based on the result 
                of a public-private competition that includes a 
                most efficient and cost effective organization 
                plan developed by such activity or function; 
                and
                    (B) the Competitive Sourcing Official 
                determines that, over all performance periods 
                stated in the solicitation of offers for 
                performance of the activity or function, the 
                cost of performance of the activity or function 
                by a contractor would be less costly to the 
                executive agency by an amount that equals or 
                exceeds the lesser of--
                            (i) 10 percent of the most 
                        efficient organization's personnel-
                        related costs for performance of that 
                        activity or function by Federal 
                        employees; or
                            (ii) $10,000,000.
            (2) This paragraph shall not apply to--
                    (A) the Department of Defense;
                    (B) section 4492D of title 49, United 
                States Code;
                    (C) a commercial or industrial type 
                function that--
                            (i) is included on the procurement 
                        list established pursuant to section 2 
                        of the Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 
                        U.S.C. 47); or
                            (ii) is planned to be converted to 
                        performance by a qualified nonprofit 
                        agency for the blind or by a qualified 
                        nonprofit agency for other severely 
                        handicapped individuals in accordance 
                        with that Act;
                    (D) depot contracts or contracts for depot 
                maintenance as provided in sections 2469 and 
                2474 of title 10, United States Code; or
                    (E) activities that are the subject of an 
                ongoing competition that was publicly announced 
                prior to the date of enactment of this Act.
    (b) Use of Public-Private Competition.--Nothing in Office 
of Management and Budget Circular A-76 shall prevent the head 
of an executive agency from conducting a public-private 
competition to evaluate the benefits of converting work from 
contract performance to performance by Federal employees in 
appropriate instances. The Circular shall provide procedures 
and policies for these competitions that are similar to those 
applied to competitions that may result in the conversion of 
work from performance by Federal employees to performance by a 
contractor.
    Sec. 843. (a) The adjustment in rates of basic pay for 
employees under the statutory pay systems that takes effect in 
fiscal year 2006 under sections 5303 and 5304 of title 5, 
United States Code, shall be an increase of 3.1 percent, and 
this adjustment shall apply to civilian employees in the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security 
and such adjustments shall be effective as of the first day of 
the first applicable pay period beginning on or after January 
1, 2006.
    (b) Notwithstanding section 813 of this Act, the adjustment 
in rates of basic pay for the statutory pay systems that take 
place in fiscal year 2006 under sections 5344 and 5348 of title 
5, United States Code, shall be no less than the percentage in 
paragraph (a) as employeesin the same location whose rates of 
basic pay are adjusted pursuant to the statutory pay systems under 
section 5303 and 5304 of title 5, United States Code. Prevailing rate 
employees at locations where there are no employees whose pay is 
increased pursuant to sections 5303 and 5304 of title 5 and prevailing 
rate employees described in section 5343(a)(5) of title 5 shall be 
considered to be located in the pay locality designated as ``Rest of 
US'' pursuant to section 5304 of title 5 for purposes of this 
paragraph.
    (c) Funds used to carry out this section shall be paid from 
appropriations, which are made to each applicable department or 
agency for salaries and expenses for fiscal year 2006.
    Sec. 844. Unless otherwise authorized by existing law, none 
of the funds provided in this Act or any other Act may be used 
by an executive branch agency to produce any prepackaged news 
story intended for broadcast or distribution in the United 
States, unless the story includes a clear notification within 
the text or audio of the prepackaged news story that the 
prepackaged news story was prepared or funded by that executive 
branch agency.
    Sec. 845. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used in contravention of section 552a of title 5, United 
States Code (popularly known as the Privacy Act) or of section 
552.224 of title 48 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
    Sec. 846. Each Executive department and agency shall 
evaluate the creditworthiness of an individual before issuing 
the individual a government travel charge card. The department 
or agency may not issue a government travel charge card to an 
individual that either lacks a credit history or is found to 
have an unsatisfactory credit history as a result of this 
evaluation: Provided, That this restriction shall not preclude 
issuance of a restricted-use charge, debit, or stored value 
card made in accordance with agency procedures to: (1) an 
individual with an unsatisfactory credit history where such 
card is used to pay travel expenses and the agency determines 
there is no suitable alternative payment mechanism available 
before issuing the card; or (2) an individual who lacks a 
credit history. Each Executive department and agency shall 
establish guidelines and procedures for disciplinary actions to 
be taken against agency personnel for improper, fraudulent, or 
abusive use of government charge cards, which shall include 
appropriate disciplinary actions for use of charge cards for 
purposes, and at establishments, that are inconsistent with the 
official business of the Department or agency or with 
applicable standards of conduct.
    Sec. 847. Except as expressly provided otherwise, any 
reference to ``this Act'' contained in this division shall be 
treated as referring only to the provisions of this division.
    This division may be cited as the ``Transportation, 
Treasury, Housing and Urban Development, the Judiciary, and 
Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2006''.

       DIVISION B--DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2006

That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the District of 
Columbia and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2006, and for other purposes, namely:

                          DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

                             Federal Funds

              FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR RESIDENT TUITION SUPPORT

    For a Federal payment to the District of Columbia, to be 
deposited into a dedicated account, for a nationwide program to 
be administered by the Mayor, for District of Columbia resident 
tuition support, $33,200,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That such funds, including any interest 
accrued thereon, may be used on behalf of eligible District of 
Columbia residents to pay an amount based upon the difference 
between in-State and out-of-State tuition at public 
institutions of higher education, or to pay up to $2,500 each 
year at eligible private institutions of higher education: 
Provided further, That the awarding of such funds may be 
prioritized on the basis of a resident's academic merit, the 
income and need of eligible students and such other factors as 
may be authorized: Provided further, That the District of 
Columbia government shall maintain a dedicated account for the 
Resident Tuition Support Program that shall consist of the 
Federal funds appropriated to the Program in this Act and any 
subsequent appropriations, any unobligated balances from prior 
fiscal years, and any interest earned in this or any fiscal 
year: Provided further, That the account shall be under the 
control of the District of Columbia Chief Financial Officer, 
who shall use those funds solely for the purposes of carrying 
out the Resident Tuition Support Program: Provided further, 
That the Office of the Chief Financial Officer shall provide a 
quarterly financial report to the Committees on Appropriations 
of the House of Representatives and Senate for these funds 
showing, by object class, the expenditures made and the purpose 
therefor: Provided further, That not more than $1,200,000 of 
the total amount appropriated for this program may be used for 
administrative expenses.

   FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR EMERGENCY PLANNING AND SECURITY COSTS IN THE 
                          DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

    For necessary expenses, as determined by the Mayor of the 
District of Columbia in written consultation with the elected 
county or city officials of surrounding jurisdictions, 
$13,500,000, to remain available until expended, to reimburse 
the District of Columbia for the costs of providing public 
safety at events related to the presence of the national 
capital in the District of Columbia and forthe costs of 
providing support to respond to immediate and specific terrorist 
threats or attacks in the District of Columbia or surrounding 
jurisdictions: Provided, That any amount provided under this heading 
shall be available only after such amount has been apportioned pursuant 
to chapter 15 of title 31, United States Code.

           FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA COURTS

    For salaries and expenses for the District of Columbia 
Courts, $218,912,000, to be allocated as follows: for the 
District of Columbia Court of Appeals, $9,198,000, of which not 
to exceed $1,500 is for official reception and representation 
expenses; for the District of Columbia Superior Court, 
$87,342,000, of which not to exceed $1,500 is for official 
reception and representation expenses; for the District of 
Columbia Court System, $41,643,000, of which not to exceed 
$1,500 is for official reception and representation expenses; 
and $80,729,000, to remain available until September 30, 2007, 
for capital improvements for District of Columbia courthouse 
facilities: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, a single contract or related contracts for development 
and construction of facilities may be employed which 
collectively include the full scope of the project: Provided 
further, That the solicitation and contract shall contain the 
clause ``availability of Funds'' found at 48 CFR 52.232-18: 
Provided further, That funds made available for capital 
improvements shall be expended consistent with the General 
Services Administration master plan study and building 
evaluation report: Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
other provision of law, all amounts under this heading shall be 
apportioned quarterly by the Office of Management and Budget 
and obligated and expended in the same manner as funds 
appropriated for salaries and expenses of other Federal 
agencies, with payroll and financial services to be provided on 
a contractual basis with the General Services Administration 
(GSA), and such services shall include the preparation of 
monthly financial reports, copies of which shall be submitted 
directly by GSA to the President and to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate, the 
Committee on Government Reform of the House of Representatives, 
and the Committee on Governmental Affairs of the Senate: 
Provided further, That 30 days after providing written notice 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and Senate, the District of Columbia Courts may 
reallocate not more than $1,000,000 of the funds provided under 
this heading among the items and entities funded under this 
heading for operations, and not more than 4 percent of the 
funds provided under this heading for facilities.

            DEFENDER SERVICES IN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA COURTS

    For payments authorized under section 11-2604 and section 
11-2605, D.C. Official Code (relating to representation 
provided under the District of Columbia Criminal Justice Act), 
payments for counsel appointed in proceedings in the Family 
Court of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia under 
chapter 23 of title 16, D.C. Official Code, or pursuant to 
contractual agreements to provide guardian ad litem 
representation, training, technical assistance and such other 
services as are necessary to improve the quality of guardian ad 
litem representation, payments for counsel appointed in 
adoption proceedings under chapter 3 of title 16, D.C. Code, 
and payments for counsel authorized under section 21-2060, D.C. 
Official Code (relating to representation provided under the 
District of Columbia Guardianship, Protective Proceedings, and 
Durable Power of Attorney Act of 1986), $44,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That the funds provided in 
this Act under the heading ``Federal Payment to the District of 
Columbia Courts'' (other than the $80,729,000 provided under 
such heading for capital improvements for District of Columbia 
courthouse facilities) may also be used for payments under this 
heading: Provided further, That in addition to the funds 
provided under this heading, the Joint Committee on Judicial 
Administration in the District of Columbia may use funds 
provided in this Act under the heading ``Federal Payment to the 
District of Columbia Courts'' (other than the $80,729,000 
provided under such heading for capital improvements for 
District of Columbia courthouse facilities), to make payments 
described under this heading for obligations incurred during 
any fiscal year: Provided further, That funds provided under 
this heading shall be administered by the Joint Committee on 
Judicial Administration in the District of Columbia: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, this 
appropriation shall be apportioned quarterly by the Office of 
Management and Budget and obligated and expended in the same 
manner as funds appropriated for expenses of other Federal 
agencies, with payroll and financial services to be provided on 
a contractual basis with the General Services Administration 
(GSA), and such services shall include the preparation of 
monthly financial reports, copies of which shall be submitted 
directly by GSA to the President and to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate, the 
Committee on Government Reform of the House of Representatives, 
and the Committee on Governmental Affairs of the Senate.

 FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY 
                      FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For salaries and expenses, including the transfer and hire 
of motor vehicles, of the Court Services and Offender 
Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia and the Public 
Defender Service for the District of Columbia, as authorized by 
the National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government 
Improvement Act of 1997, $201,388,000, of which not to exceed 
$2,000 is for official receptions and representation expenses 
related to Community Supervision and Pretrial Services Agency 
programs; of which not to exceed $25,000 is for dues and 
assessments relating to the implementation of the Court 
Services and Offender Supervision Agency Interstate Supervision 
Act of 2002; of which $129,360,000 shall be for necessary 
expenses of Community Supervision and Sex Offender 
Registration, to include expenses relating to the supervision 
of adults subject to protection orders or the provision of 
services for or related to such persons; of which $42,195,000 
shall be available to the Pretrial Services Agency; and of 
which $29,833,000 shall be transferred to the Public Defender 
Service for the District of Columbia: Provided, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, all amounts under 
this heading shall be apportioned quarterly by the Office of 
Management and Budget and obligated and expended in the same 
manner as funds appropriated for salaries and expenses of other 
Federal agencies: Provided further, That the Director is 
authorized to accept and use gifts in the form of in-kind 
contributions of space and hospitality to support offender and 
defendant programs, and equipment and vocational training 
services to educate and train offenders and defendants: 
Provided further, That the Director shall keep accurate and 
detailed records of the acceptance and use of any gift or 
donation under the previous proviso, and shall make such 
records available for audit and public inspection: Provided 
further, That the Court Services and Offender Supervision 
Agency Director is authorized to accept and use reimbursement 
from the D.C. Government for space and services provided on a 
cost reimbursable basis: Provided further, That for this fiscal 
year and subsequent fiscal years, the Public Defender Service 
is authorized to charge fees to cover costs of materials 
distributed and training provided to attendees of educational 
events, including conferences, sponsored by the Public Defender 
Service, and notwithstanding section 3302 of title 31, United 
States Code, said fees shall be credited to the Public Defender 
Service account to be available for use without further 
appropriation.

 FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY

    For a Federal payment to the District of Columbia Water and 
Sewer Authority, $7,000,000, to remain available until 
expended, to continue implementation of the Combined Sewer 
Overflow Long-Term Plan: Provided, That the District of 
Columbia Water and Sewer Authority provides a 100 percent match 
for this payment.

        FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR THE ANACOSTIA WATERFRONT INITIATIVE

    For a Federal payment to the District of Columbia 
Department of Transportation, $3,000,000, to remain available 
until September 30, 2007, for design and construction of a 
continuous pedestrian and bicycle trail system from the Potomac 
River to the District's border with Maryland.

      FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE COORDINATING COUNCIL

    For a Federal payment to the Criminal Justice Coordinating 
Council, $1,300,000, to remain available until expended, to 
support initiatives related to the coordination of Federal and 
local criminal justice resources in the District of Columbia.

             FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE

    For a Federal payment to the District of Columbia 
Department of Transportation, $1,000,000, to operate a downtown 
circulator transit system.

    FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR FOSTER CARE IMPROVEMENTS IN THE DISTRICT OF 
                                COLUMBIA

    For the Federal payment to the District of Columbia for 
foster care improvements, $2,000,000 to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That $1,750,000 shall be for the Child and 
Family Services Agency, of which $1,000,000 shall be for a loan 
repayment program for social workers; of which $750,000 shall 
be for post-adoption services: Provided further, That $250,000 
shall be for the Washington Metropolitan Council of 
Governments, to continue a program in conjunction with the 
Foster and Adoptive Parents Advocacy Center, to provide respite 
care for and recruitment of foster parents: Provided further, 
That these Federal funds shall supplement and not supplant 
local funds for the purposes described under this heading.

  FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER OF THE 
                          DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

    For a Federal payment to the Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer of the District of Columbia, $29,200,000: Provided, 
That these funds shall be available for the projects and in the 
amounts specified in the Statement of the Managers on the 
conference report accompanyingthis Act: Provided further, That 
each entity that receives funding under this heading shall submit to 
the Office of the Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia 
(CFO) a report on the activities to be carried out with such funds no 
later than March 15, 2006, and the CFO shall submit a comprehensive 
report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate no later than June 1, 2006.

                 FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT

    For a Federal payment for a school improvement program in 
the District of Columbia, $40,000,000, to be allocated as 
follows: for the District of Columbia Public Schools, 
$13,000,000 to improve public school education in the District 
of Columbia; for the State Education Office, $13,000,000 to 
expand quality public charter schools in the District of 
Columbia, to remain available until September 30, 2007; for the 
Secretary of the Department of Education, $14,000,000 to 
provide opportunity scholarships for students in the District 
of Columbia in accordance with division C, title III of the 
District of Columbia Appropriations Act, 2004 (Public Law 108-
199; 118 Stat. 126), of which up to $1,000,000 may be used to 
administer and fund assessments.

       FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR BIOTERRORISM AND FORENSICS LABORATORY

    For a Federal payment to the District of Columbia, 
$5,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2007, for 
costs associated with the construction of a bioterrorism and 
forensics laboratory: Provided, That the District of Columbia 
shall provide an additional $1,500,000 with local funds as a 
condition of receiving this payment.

     FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR THE NATIONAL GUARD YOUTH CHALLENGE PROGRAM

    For a Federal payment for the District of Columbia National 
Guard Youth Challenge program, $500,000: Provided, That the 
amount appropriated by this heading shall be transferred to the 
Secretary of Defense and made available to the Commanding 
General of the District of Columbia National Guard for 
activities under the National Guard Youth Challenge Program 
under section 509 of title 32, United States Code, and shall be 
in addition to any matching funds otherwise required of the 
District of Columbia for that Program in fiscal year 2006 under 
subsection (d)(4) of such section.

        FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR MARRIAGE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT

    For a Federal payment for marriage development and 
improvement in the District of Columbia, $3,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That $1,500,000 shall be 
for the Capital Area Asset Building Corporation for the 
establishment of marriage development accounts in accordance 
with the requirements in the accompanying report, of which 
$400,000 shall be for program planning, marketing, evaluation, 
and account administration: Provided further, That $1,500,000 
shall be for mentoring, counseling, community outreach, and 
training and technical assistance, of which $850,000 shall be 
for the National Center for Fathering and $650,000 shall be for 
the East Capitol Center for Change to carry out these 
activities: Provided further, That within 30 days of enactment 
of this Act, the entities receiving funds under this title 
shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
and Senate, a detailed expenditure plan and program 
requirements that comport with the guidance in the accompanying 
report.

                       District of Columbia Funds

    The following amounts are appropriated for the District of 
Columbia for the current fiscal year out of the general fund of 
the District of Columbia, except as otherwise specifically 
provided: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, except as provided in section 450A of the District of 
Columbia Home Rule Act (D.C. Official Code, section 1-204.50a) 
and provisions of this Act, the total amount appropriated in 
this Act for operating expenses for the District of Columbia 
for fiscal year 2006 under this heading shall not exceed the 
lesser of the sum of the total revenues of the District of 
Columbia for such fiscal year or $8,700,158,000 (of which 
$5,007,344,000 shall be from local funds, $1,921,287,000 shall 
be from Federal grant funds, $1,754,399,000 shall be from other 
funds, and $17,129,000 shall be from private funds), in 
addition, $163,116,000 from funds previously appropriated in 
this Act as Federal payments: Provided further, That of the 
local funds, $466,894,000 shall be derived from the District's 
general fund balance: Provided further, That of these funds the 
District's intradistrict authority shall be $468,486,000: in 
addition for capital construction projects there is 
appropriated an increase of $2,820,637,000, of which 
$1,072,671,000 shall be from local funds, $49,551,000 from 
Highway Trust funds, $172,183,000 from the Local Street 
Maintenance fund, $378,000,000 from securitization of future 
revenue streams, $400,000,000 from Certificates of 
Participation financing, $534,800,000 from financing for 
construction of a baseball stadium, $213,432,000 from Federal 
grant funds, and a rescission of $295,032,000 from local funds 
appropriated under this heading in prior fiscal years, for a 
net amount of $2,525,605,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided further, That the amounts providedunder this 
heading are to be allocated and expended as proposed under ``Title II--
District of Columbia Funds'' of the Fiscal Year 2006 Proposed Budget 
and Financial Plan submitted to the Congress of the United States by 
the District of Columbia on June 6, 2005: Provided further,  That this 
amount may be increased by proceeds of one-time transactions, which are 
expended for emergency or unanticipated operating or capital needs: 
Provided further, That such increases shall be approved by enactment of 
local District law and shall comply with all reserve requirements 
contained in the District of Columbia Home Rule Act as amended by this 
Act: Provided further, That the Chief Financial Officer of the District 
of Columbia shall take such steps as are necessary to assure that the 
District of Columbia meets these requirements, including the 
apportioning by the Chief Financial Officer of the appropriations and 
funds made available to the District during fiscal year 2006, except 
that the Chief Financial Officer may not reprogram for operating 
expenses any funds derived from bonds, notes, or other obligations 
issued for capital projects.

                           General Provisions

    Sec. 101. Whenever in this Act, an amount is specified 
within an appropriation for particular purposes or objects of 
expenditure, such amount, unless otherwise specified, shall be 
considered as the maximum amount that may be expended for said 
purpose or object rather than an amount set apart exclusively 
therefor.
    Sec. 102. Appropriations in this Act shall be available for 
expenses of travel and for the payment of dues of organizations 
concerned with the work of the District of Columbia government, 
when authorized by the Mayor, or, in the case of the Council of 
the District of Columbia, funds may be expended with the 
authorization of the Chairman of the Council.
    Sec. 103. There are appropriated from the applicable funds 
of the District of Columbia such sums as may be necessary for 
making refunds and for the payment of legal settlements or 
judgments that have been entered against the District of 
Columbia government.
    Sec. 104. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b), no part 
of this appropriation shall be used for publicity or propaganda 
purposes or implementation of any policy including boycott 
designed to support or defeat legislation pending before 
Congress or any State legislature.
    (b) The District of Columbia may use local funds provided 
in this title to carry out lobbying activities on any matter 
other than--
            (1) the promotion or support of any boycott; or
            (2) statehood for the District of Columbia or 
        voting representation in Congress for the District of 
        Columbia.
    (c) Nothing in this section may be construed to prohibit 
any elected official from advocating with respect to any of the 
issues referred to in subsection (b).
    Sec. 105. (a) None of the funds provided under this title 
to the agencies funded by this title, both Federal and District 
government agencies, that remain available for obligation or 
expenditure in fiscal year 2006, or provided from any accounts 
in the Treasury of the United States derived by the collection 
of fees available to the agencies funded by this title, shall 
be available for obligation or expenditures for an agency 
through a reprogramming of funds which--
            (1) creates new programs;
            (2) eliminates a program, project, or 
        responsibility center;
            (3) establishes or changes allocations specifically 
        denied, limited or increased under this Act;
            (4) increases funds or personnel by any means for 
        any program, project, or responsibility center for 
        which funds have been denied or restricted;
            (5) reestablishes any program or project previously 
        deferred through reprogramming;
            (6) augments any existing program, project, or 
        responsibility center through a reprogramming of funds 
        in excess of $3,000,000 or 10 percent, whichever is 
        less; or
            (7) increases by 20 percent or more personnel 
        assigned to a specific program, project or 
        responsibility center, unless the Committees on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
        Senate are notified in writing 15 days in advance of 
        the reprogramming.
    (b) None the local funds contained in this Act may be 
available for obligation or expenditure for an agency through a 
transfer of any local funds in excess of $3,000,000 from one 
appropriation heading to another unless the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate are 
notified in writing 15 days in advance of the transfer, except 
that in no event may the amount of any funds transferred exceed 
4 percent of the local funds in the appropriations.
    Sec. 106. Consistent with the provisions of section 1301(a) 
of title 31, United States Code, appropriations under this Act 
shall be applied only to the objects for which the 
appropriations were made except as otherwise provided by law.
    Sec. 107. Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, the 
provisions of the District of Columbia Government Comprehensive 
Merit Personnel Act of 1978 (D.C. Law 2-139; D.C. Official 
Code, section 1-601.01 et seq.), enacted pursuant to section 
422(3) of the District of Columbia Home Rule Act (D.C. Official 
Code, section 1-204l.22(3)), shall apply with respect to the 
compensation of District of Columbia employees. For pay 
purposes, employees of the District of Columbia government 
shall not be subject to the provisions of title 5, United 
States Code.
    Sec. 108. No later than 30 days after the end of the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2006, the Mayor of the District of 
Columbia shall submit to the Council of the District of 
Columbia and the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and Senate the new fiscal year 2006 revenue 
estimates as of the end of such quarter. These estimates shall 
be used in the budget request for fiscal year 2007. The 
officially revised estimates at midyear shall be used for the 
midyear report.
    Sec. 109. No sole source contract with the District of 
Columbia government or any agency thereof may be renewed or 
extended without opening that contract to the competitive 
bidding process as set forth in section 303 of the District of 
Columbia Procurement Practices Act of 1985 (D.C. Law 6-85; D.C. 
Official Code, section 2-303.03), except that the District of 
Columbia government or any agency thereof may renew or extend 
sole source contracts for which competition is not feasible or 
practical, but only if the determination as to whether to 
invoke the competitive bidding process has been made in 
accordance with duly promulgated rules and procedures and has 
been reviewed and certified by the Chief Financial Officer of 
the District of Columbia.
    Sec. 110. None of the Federal funds provided in this Act 
may be used by the District of Columbia to provide for 
salaries, expenses, or other costs associated with the offices 
of United States Senator or United States Representative under 
section 4(d) of the District of Columbia Statehood 
Constitutional Convention Initiatives of 1979 (D.C. Law 3-171; 
D.C. Official Code, section 1-123).
    Sec. 111. None of the Federal funds made available in this 
Act may be used to implement or enforce the Health Care 
Benefits Expansion Act of 1992 (D.C. Law 9-114; D.C. Official 
Code, section 32-701 et seq.) or to otherwise implement or 
enforce any system of registration of unmarried, cohabiting 
couples, including but not limited to registration for the 
purpose of extending employment, health, or governmental 
benefits to such couples on the same basis that such benefits 
are extended to legally married couples.
    Sec. 112. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this 
Act, the Mayor, in consultation with the Chief Financial 
Officer of the District of Columbia may accept, obligate, and 
expend Federal, private, and other grants received by the 
District government that are not reflected in the amounts 
appropriated in this Act.
    (b)(1) No such Federal, private, or other grant may be 
obligated, or expended pursuant to subsection (a) until--
            (A) the Chief Financial Officer of the District of 
        Columbia submits to the Council a report setting forth 
        detailed information regarding such grant; and
            (B) the Council has reviewed and approved the 
        obligation, and expenditure of such grant.
    (2) For purposes of paragraph (1)(B), the Council shall be 
deemed to have reviewed and approved the obligation, and 
expenditure of a grant if--
            (A) no written notice of disapproval is filed with 
        the Secretary of the Council within 14 calendar days of 
        the receipt of the report from the Chief Financial 
        Officer under paragraph (1)(A); or
            (B) if such a notice of disapproval is filed within 
        such deadline, the Council does not by resolution 
        disapprove the obligation, or expenditure of the grant 
        within 30 calendar days of the initial receipt of the 
        report from the Chief Financial Officer under paragraph 
        (1)(A).
    (c) No amount may be obligated or expended from the general 
fund or other funds of the District of Columbia government in 
anticipation of the approval or receipt of a grant under 
subsection (b)(2) or in anticipation of the approval or receipt 
of a Federal, private, or other grant not subject to such 
subsection.
    (d) The Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia 
may adjust the budget for Federal, private, and other grants 
received by the District government reflected in the amounts 
appropriated in this title, or approved and received under 
subsection (b)(2) to reflect a change in the actual amount of 
the grant.
    (e) The Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia 
shall prepare a quarterly report setting forth detailed 
information regarding all Federal, private, and other grants 
subject to this section. Each such report shall be submitted to 
the Council of the District of Columbia and to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate 
not later than 15 days after the end of the quarter covered by 
the report.
    Sec. 113. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, 
none of the funds made available by this Act or by any other 
Act may be used to provide any officer oremployee of the 
District of Columbia with an official vehicle unless the officer or 
employee uses the vehicle only in the performance of the officer's or 
employee's official duties. For purposes of this paragraph, the term 
``official duties'' does not include travel between the officer's or 
employee's residence and workplace, except in the case of--
            (1) an officer or employee of the Metropolitan 
        Police Department who resides in the District of 
        Columbia or is otherwise designated by the Chief of the 
        Department;
            (2) at the discretion of the Fire Chief, an officer 
        or employee of the District of Columbia Fire and 
        Emergency Medical Services Department who resides in 
        the District of Columbia and is on call 24 hours a day 
        or is otherwise designated by the Fire Chief;
            (3) the Mayor of the District of Columbia; and
            (4) the Chairman of the Council of the District of 
        Columbia.
    (b) The Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia 
shall submit by March 1, 2006, an inventory, as of September 
30, 2005, of all vehicles owned, leased or operated by the 
District of Columbia government. The inventory shall include, 
but not be limited to, the department to which the vehicle is 
assigned; the year and make of the vehicle; the acquisition 
date and cost; the general condition of the vehicle; annual 
operating and maintenance costs; current mileage; and whether 
the vehicle is allowed to be taken home by a District officer 
or employee and if so, the officer or employee's title and 
resident location.
    Sec. 114. None of the funds contained in this Act may be 
used for purposes of the annual independent audit of the 
District of Columbia government for fiscal year 2006 unless--
            (1) the audit is conducted by the Inspector General 
        of the District of Columbia, in coordination with the 
        Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia, 
        pursuant to section 208(a)(4) of the District of 
        Columbia Procurement Practices Act of 1985 (D.C. 
        Official Code, section 2-302.8); and
            (2) the audit includes as a basic financial 
        statement a comparison of audited actual year-end 
        results with the revenues submitted in the budget 
        document for such year and the appropriations enacted 
        into law for such year using the format, terminology, 
        and classifications contained in the law making the 
        appropriations for the year and its legislative 
        history.
    Sec. 115. (a) None of the funds contained in this Act may 
be used by the District of Columbia Corporation Counsel or any 
other officer or entity of the District government to provide 
assistance for any petition drive or civil action which seeks 
to require Congress to provide for voting representation in 
Congress for the District of Columbia.
    (b) Nothing in this section bars the District of Columbia 
Corporation Counsel from reviewing or commenting on briefs in 
private lawsuits, or from consulting with officials of the 
District government regarding such lawsuits.
    Sec. 116. (a) None of the funds contained in this Act may 
be used for any program of distributing sterile needles or 
syringes for the hypodermic injection of any illegal drug.
    (b) Any individual or entity who receives any funds 
contained in this Act and who carries out any program described 
in subsection (a) shall account for all funds used for such 
program separately from any funds contained in this Act.
    Sec. 117. None of the funds contained in this Act may be 
used after the expiration of the 60-day period that begins on 
the date of the enactment of this Act to pay the salary of any 
chief financial officer of any office of the District of 
Columbia government (including any independent agency of the 
District of Columbia) who has not filed a certification with 
the Mayor and the Chief Financial Officer of the District of 
Columbia that the officer understands the duties and 
restrictions applicable to the officer and the officer's agency 
as a result of this Act (and the amendments made by this Act), 
including any duty to prepare a report requested either in the 
Act or in any of the reports accompanying the Act and the 
deadline by which each report must be submitted: Provided, That 
the Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia shall 
provide to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and Senate by April 1, 2006 and October 1, 
2006, a summary list showing each report, the due date, and the 
date submitted to the Committees.
    Sec. 118. Nothing in this Act may be construed to prevent 
the Council or Mayor of the District of Columbia from 
addressing the issue of the provision of contraceptive coverage 
by health insurance plans, but it is the intent of Congress 
that any legislation enacted on such issue should include a 
``conscience clause'' which provides exceptions for religious 
beliefs and moral convictions.
    Sec. 119. The Mayor of the District of Columbia shall 
submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and Senate, the Committee onGovernment Reform 
of the House of Representatives, and the Committee on Governmental 
Affairs of the Senate quarterly reports addressing--
            (1) crime, including the homicide rate, 
        implementation of community policing, the number of 
        police officers on local beats, and the closing down of 
        open-air drug markets;
            (2) access to substance and alcohol abuse 
        treatment, including the number of treatment slots, the 
        number of people served, the number of people on 
        waiting lists, and the effectiveness of treatment 
        programs;
            (3) management of parolees and pre-trial violent 
        offenders, including the number of halfway houses 
        escapes and steps taken to improve monitoring and 
        supervision of halfway house residents to reduce the 
        number of escapes to be provided in consultation with 
        the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency for 
        the District of Columbia;
            (4) education, including access to special 
        education services and student achievement to be 
        provided in consultation with the District of Columbia 
        Public Schools and the District of Columbia public 
        charter schools;
            (5) improvement in basic District services, 
        including rat control and abatement;
            (6) application for and management of Federal 
        grants, including the number and type of grants for 
        which the District was eligible but failed to apply and 
        the number and type of grants awarded to the District 
        but for which the District failed to spend the amounts 
        received; and
            (7) indicators of child well-being.
    Sec. 120. (a) No later than 30 calendar days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the Chief Financial Officer of 
the District of Columbia shall submit to the appropriate 
committees of Congress, the Mayor, and the Council of the 
District of Columbia a revised appropriated funds operating 
budget in the format of the budget that the District of 
Columbia government submitted pursuant to section 442 of the 
District of Columbia Home Rule Act (D.C. Official Code, section 
1-204.42), for all agencies of the District of Columbia 
government for fiscal year 2006 that is in the total amount of 
the approved appropriation and that realigns all budgeted data 
for personal services and other-than-personal-services, 
respectively, with anticipated actual expenditures.
    (b) This section shall apply only to an agency where the 
Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia certifies 
that a reallocation is required to address unanticipated 
changes in program requirements.
    Sec. 121. Notwithstanding any other law, in fiscal year 
2006 and in each subsequent fiscal year, the District of 
Columbia Courts shall transfer to the general treasury of the 
District of Columbia all fines levied and collected by the 
Courts under section 10(b)(1) and (2) of the District of 
Columbia Traffic Act (D.C. Official Code, section 50-
2201.05(b)(1) and (2)): Provided, that the transferred funds 
are hereby made available and shall remain available until 
expended and shall be used by the Office of the Attorney 
General of the District of Columbia for enforcement and 
prosecution of District traffic alcohol laws in accordance with 
section 10(b)(3) of the District of Columbia Traffic Act (D.C. 
Official Code, section 50-2201.05(b)(3)).
    Sec. 122. (a) None of the funds contained in this Act may 
be made available to pay--
            (1) the fees of an attorney who represents a party 
        in an action or an attorney who defends an action 
        brought against the District of Columbia Public Schools 
        under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
        (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.) in excess of $4,000 for that 
        action; or
            (2) the fees of an attorney or firm whom the Chief 
        Financial Officer of the District of Columbia 
        determines to have a pecuniary interest, either through 
        an attorney, officer, or employee of the firm, in any 
        special education diagnostic services, schools, or 
        other special education service providers.
    (b) In this section, the term ``action'' includes an 
administrative proceeding and any ensuing or related 
proceedings before a court of competent jurisdiction.
    Sec. 123. The Chief Financial Officer of the District of 
Columbia shall require attorneys in special education cases 
brought under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
(IDEA) in the District of Columbia to certify in writing that 
the attorney or representative rendered any and all services 
for which they receive awards, including those received under a 
settlement agreement or as part of an administrative 
proceeding, under the IDEA from the District of Columbia. As 
part of the certification, the Chief Financial Officer of the 
District of Columbia shall require all attorneys in IDEA cases 
to disclose any financial, corporate, legal, memberships on 
boards of directors, or other relationships with any special 
education diagnostic services, schools, or other special 
education service providers to which the attorneys have 
referred any clients as part of this certification. The Chief 
Financial Officer shall prepare and submit quarterly reports to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and Senate on the certification of and the 
amount paid by the government of the District of Columbia, 
including the District of Columbia Public Schools, to attorneys 
in cases brought under IDEA. The Inspector General of the 
District of Columbia may conduct investigations to determine 
the accuracy of the certifications.
    Sec. 124. The amount appropriated by this Act may be 
increased by no more than $42,000,000 from funds identified in 
the comprehensive annual financial report as the District's 
fiscal year 2005 unexpended general fund surplus. The District 
may obligate and expend these amounts only in accordance with 
the following conditions:
            (1) The Chief Financial Officer of the District of 
        Columbia shall certify that the use of any such amounts 
        is not anticipated to have a negative impact on the 
        District's long-term financial, fiscal, and economic 
        vitality.
            (2) The District of Columbia may only use these 
        funds for the following expenditures:
                    (A) One-time expenditures.
                    (B) Expenditures to avoid deficit spending.
                    (C) Debt Reduction.
                    (D) Program needs.
                    (E) Expenditures to avoid revenue 
                shortfalls.
            (3) The amounts shall be obligated and expended in 
        accordance with laws enacted by the Council in support 
        of each such obligation or expenditure.
            (4) The amounts may not be used to fund the 
        agencies of the District of Columbia government under 
        court ordered receivership.
            (5) The amounts may not be obligated or expended 
        unless the Mayor notifies the Committees on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
        Senate not fewer than 30 days in advance of the 
        obligation or expenditure.
    Sec. 125. (a) The fourth proviso in the item relating to 
``Federal Payment for School Improvement'' in the District of 
Columbia Appropriations Act, 2005 (Public Law 108-335; 118 
Stat. 1327) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$4,000,000'' and inserting 
        ``$4,000,000, to remain available until expended,''; 
        and
            (2) by striking ``$2,000,000 shall be for a new 
        incentive fund'' and inserting ``$2,000,000, to remain 
        available until expended, shall be for a new incentive 
        fund''.
    (b) The amendments made by subsection (a) shall take effect 
as if included in the enactment of the District of Columbia 
Appropriations Act, 2005.
    Sec. 126. (a) To account for an unanticipated growth of 
revenue collections, the amount appropriated as District of 
Columbia Funds pursuant to this Act may be increased--
            (1) by an aggregate amount of not more than 25 
        percent, in the case of amounts proposed to be 
        allocated as ``Other-Type Funds'' in the Fiscal Year 
        2006 Proposed Budget and Financial Plan submitted to 
        Congress by the District of Columbia on June 6, 2005; 
        and
            (2) by an aggregate amount of not more than 6 
        percent, in the case of any other amounts proposed to 
        be allocated in such Proposed Budget and Financial 
        Plan.
    (b) The District of Columbia may obligate and expend any 
increase in the amount of funds authorized under this section 
only in accordance with the following conditions:
            (1) The Chief Financial Officer of the District of 
        Columbia shall certify--
                    (A) the increase in revenue; and
                    (B) that the use of the amounts is not 
                anticipated to have a negative impact on the 
                long-term financial, fiscal, or economic health 
                of the District.
            (2) The amounts shall be obligated and expended in 
        accordance with laws enacted by the Council of the 
        District of Columbia in support of each such obligation 
        and expenditure, consistent with the requirements of 
        this Act.
            (3) The amounts may not be used to fund any 
        agencies of the District government operating under 
        court-ordered receivership.
            (4) The amounts may not be obligated or expended 
        unless the Mayor has notified the Committees on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
        Senate not fewer than 30 days in advance of the 
        obligation or expenditure.
    Sec. 127. The Chief Financial Officer for the District of 
Columbia may, for the purpose of cash flow management, conduct 
short-term borrowing from the emergency reserve fund and from 
the contingency reserve fund established under section 450A of 
the District of Columbia Home Rule Act (Public Law 98-198): 
Provided, That the amount borrowed shall not exceed 50 percent 
of the total amount of funds contained in both the emergency 
and contingency reserve funds at the time of borrowing: 
Provided further, That the borrowing shall not deplete either 
fund by more than 50 percent: Provided further, That 100 
percent of the funds borrowed shall be replenished within 9 
months of the time of the borrowing or by the end of the fiscal 
year, whichever occurs earlier: Provided further, That in the 
event that short-term borrowing has been conducted and the 
emergency or the contingency funds are later depleted below 50 
percent as a result of an emergency or contingency, an amount 
equal to the amount necessary to restore reserve levels to 50 
percent of the total amount of funds contained in both the 
emergency and contingency reserve fund must be replenished from 
the amount borrowed within 60 days.
    Sec. 128. (a) None of the funds contained in this Act may 
be used to enact or carry out any law, rule, or regulation to 
legalize or otherwise reduce penalties associated with the 
possession, use, or distribution of any schedule I substance 
under the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 802) or any 
tetrahydrocannabinols derivative.
    (b) The Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment 
Initiative of 1998, also known as Initiative 59, approved by 
the electors of the District of Columbia on November 3, 1998, 
shall not take effect.
    Sec. 129. None of the funds appropriated under this Act 
shall be expended for any abortion except where the life of the 
mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term or 
where the pregnancy is the result of an act of rape or incest.
    Sec. 130. Section 7 of the District of Columbia Stadium Act 
of 1957 (Public Law 85-300, 71 Stat. 619), as amended, is 
further amended by inserting after paragraph (d)(4) the 
following:
    ``(e)(1) Upon receipt of a written description from the 
District of Columbia of not more than 15 contiguous acres 
(hereinafter referred to as `the 15 acres'), within the area 
designated `D' on the revised map entitled `Map to Designate 
Transfer of Stadium and Lease of Parking Lots to the District' 
and bound by 21st Street, NE, Oklahoma Avenue, NE, Benning 
Road, NE, the Metro line, and C Street, NE, and execution of a 
long-term lease by the Mayor of the District of Columbia that 
is contingent upon the Secretary's conveyance of the 15 acres 
and for the purpose consistent with this paragraph, the 
Secretary shall convey the 15 acres described land to the 
District of Columbia for the purpose of siting, developing, and 
operating an educational institution for the public welfare, 
with first preference given to a pre-collegiate public boarding 
school.
    ``(2) Upon conveyance, the portion of the stadium lease 
that affects the 15 acres on the property and all the 
conditions associated therewith shall terminate, and the 15 
acres property shall be removed from the `Map to Designate 
Transfer of Stadium and Lease of Parking Lots to the District', 
and the long-term lease described in paragraph (1) shall take 
effect immediately. The Mayor of the District of Columbia shall 
execute and deliver a quitclaim deed to effectuate the 
District's responsibilities under this section.''.
    Sec. 131. The authority that the Chief Financial Officer of 
the District of Columbia exercised with respect to personnel 
and the preparation of fiscal impact statements during a 
control period (as defined in Public Law 104-8) shall remain in 
effect until September 30, 2006.
    Sec. 132. The entire process used by the Chief Financial 
Officer to acquire any and all kinds of goods, works and 
services by any contractual means, including but not limited to 
purchase, lease or rental, shall be exempt from all of the 
provisions of the District of Columbia's Procurement Practices 
Act: Provided, That provisions made by this subsection shall 
take effect as if enacted in D.C. Law 11-259 and shall remain 
in effect until September 30, 2006.
    Sec. 133. Section 4013 of the Uniform Per Student Funding 
Formula for Public Schools and Public Charter Schools Amendment 
Act of 2005, passed on first reading on May 10, 2005 (engrossed 
version of Bill 16-200), is hereby enacted into law.
    Sec. 134. The Chief Financial Officer of the District is 
hereby authorized to transfer $5,000,000 from the local funds 
appropriated for the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development to 
the Anacostia Waterfront Corporation and to reallocate the 
appropriation authority for such funds to a heading to be 
entitled ``Anacostia Waterfront Corporation'' in addition, an 
amount of $3,200,000 is hereby appropriated from the local 
funds made available to the Anacostia Waterfront Corporation in 
fiscal year 2005. Provided, That all of the funds made 
available herein to the Anacostia Waterfront Corporation shall 
remain available until expended.
    Sec. 135. Amounts appropriated in the Act for the 
Department of Health may be increased by $250,000 in local 
funds to remain available until expended to conduct a health 
study in Spring Valley.
    Sec. 136. Notwithstanding section 602(c)(1) of the District 
of Columbia Home Rule Act, amendments to the Ballpark Technical 
Amendments Act of 2005 and the Ballpark Fee Rebate Act of 2005 
shall take effect on the date of the enactment by the District 
of Columbia.
    Sec. 137. Except as expressly provided otherwise, any 
reference to ``this Act'' contained in this division shall be 
treated as referring only to the provisions of this division.
    This division may be cited as the ``District of Columbia 
Appropriations Act, 2006''.
    This Act (including divisions A and B) may be cited as the 
``Transportation, Treasury, Housing and Urban Development, the 
Judiciary, the District of Columbia, and Independent Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2006''.
    And the Senate agree to the same.

                                   Joe Knollenberg,
                                   Frank R. Wolf,
                                   Harold Rogers,
                                   Todd Tiahrt,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   Robert B. Aderholt,
                                   John E. Sweeney,
                                   John Abney Culberson,
                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   Jerry Lewis,
                                   John W. Olver,
                                   Steny H. Hoyer,
                                   Ed Pastor,
                                   Carolyn C. Kilpatrick,
                                   James E. Clyburn,
                                   Steven R. Rothman,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Christopher S. Bond,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Arlen Specter,
                                   R.F. Bennett,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Mike DeWine,
                                   Sam Brownback,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Wayne Allard,
                                   Thad Cochran,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Barbara Mikulski,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Richard J. Durbin
                                             (except for Cuba trade),
                                   Byron L. Dorgan
                                             (except for Cuba trade),
                                   Patrick J. Leahy
                                             (except for Cuba trade),
                                   Tom Harkin
                                             (except for Cuba trade),
                                   Mary L. Landrieu
                                             (except for Cuba trade),
                                   Daniel K. Inouye
                                             (except for Section 173),
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.
       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill 
(H.R. 3058), ``making appropriations for the Departments of 
Transportation, Treasury, and Housing and Urban Development, 
the Judiciary, District of Columbia, and independent agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other 
purposes'', submits the following joint statement to the House 
and the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action 
agreed upon by the conferees and recommended in the 
accompanying conference report.
      This legislation intent in the House and Senate versions 
in H.R. 3058 is set forth in the accompanying House report (H. 
Rept. 109-153) and the accompanying Senate report (S. Rept. 
109-109).
      The Senate amendment deleted the entire House bill after 
the enacting clause and inserted the Senate bill. The 
conference agreement includes a revised bill.
      The language and allocations set forth in the House and 
Senate reports should be complied with unless specifically 
addressed to the contrary in the conference report and the 
statement of the managers. Report language included by the 
House which is not changed by the report of the Senate or this 
statement of managers and Senate report language which is not 
changed by this statement of managers is approved by the 
committee of conference. The statement of the managers, while 
repeating some report language for emphasis, does not intend to 
negate the language referred to above unless expressly provided 
herein. In cases where the House or the Senate has directed the 
submission of a report, such report is to be submitted to both 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.

                 TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Office of the Secretary

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $84,900,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the office of the secretary instead of 
$67,824,000 as proposed by the House and $86,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. As proposed by both the House and the 
Senate, bill language is included that specifies funding by 
office. The conference agreement is as follows:

Immediate office of the Secretary.......................      $2,198,000
Immediate office of the Deputy Secretary................         698,000
Office of the General Counsel...........................      15,183,000
Office of the Under Secretary for Transportation Policy.      11,650,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Budget and 
    Programs............................................       8,485,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Governmental 
    Affairs.............................................       2,293,000
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration....      22,031,000
Office of Public Affairs................................       1,910,000
Office of the Executive Secretariat.....................       1,442,000
Board of Contract Appeals...............................         697,000
Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization..       1,265,000
Office of Intelligence and Security.....................       2,033,000
Office of the Chief Information Officer.................      11,895,000
Office of Emergency Transportation......................       3,120,000

      The conference agreement retains provisions proposed by 
both the House and the Senate limiting transfers among each 
office to no more than 5 percent and requiring that any 
transfer greater than 5 percent must be submitted for approval 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. Bill 
language is also included which allows the Department to spend 
up to $60,000 within the funds provided for official reception 
and representation expenses.
      The conference agreement retains bill language proposed 
by the House prohibiting funds from being used for the position 
of Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs. The conference 
agreement also retains bill language proposed by both the House 
and the Senate that allows up to $2,500,000 in user fees to be 
credited to salaries and expenses.
      The conferees direct the Department to notify the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations no less than three full 
business days before any grant totaling $1,000,000 is announced 
and further clarify that such notifications shall be based on 
the grants full-year funding level, not just the incremental 
amount being released.
      The conferees reiterate the need for better budget 
materials from the Department in general and direct the 
Department to provide additional details in the fiscal year 
2007 budget justification materials as instructed in both the 
House and Senate reports.
      The conferees direct the Secretary to submit an operating 
plan for fiscal year 2006 for the entire Department as 
described in the House report for approval by the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations within 60 days of enactment 
of this Act.
      Further, the Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs 
shall submit a report to both the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations at the beginning of each fiscal quarter on 
the status of all outstanding reports and reporting 
requirements, including the deadlines established by Congress 
for each report and an estimated date for delivery, as directed 
by the Senate. The Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs 
is also directed to submit a quarterly report detailing all 
funding transfers made between offices within the office of the 
secretary (OST) pursuant to transfer authority in OST salaries 
and expenses.
      The conferees direct the Secretary to immediately resume 
collecting, processing, and disseminating the motor carrier 
financial and operating statistics survey (Form M data), as was 
in effect in the Department prior to October 1, 2004, and to 
provide a report within 30 days of enactment of this Act to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations that identifies 
the agency responsible for the survey and the funds to be 
allocated to the survey in fiscal year 2006.
      The conferees direct that up to $500,000 of the funds 
provided to the Office of the Under Secretary of Transportation 
for Policy be used for an independent forensic audit of 
expenses and payments made under the essential air service 
(EAS) program, as directed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement does not provide funds for an EAS audit to be 
conducted by the National Academy of Public Administration, as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees deny the funding requested by the 
Department for contractor support for oversight of credit 
programs. Further, the conferees direct the Assistant Secretary 
for Budget and Programs to submit a report detailing 
initiatives to improve the management and reduce the risk of 
the Department's credit programs and to provide this report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations not later 
than March 1, 2006, as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees direct the Secretary, in consultation with 
the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the 
Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), to 
establish procedures not less than 60 days after the enactment 
of this Act to ensure that proper precautions are taken by 
airports and air carriers to recognize and prevent the spread 
of avian flu, as directed by the Senate.
      The provision relating to Love Field, Texas, that was 
proposed by the Senate is addressed in the Title I 
administrative provisions.
      The conferees once again urge the Department and the FAA 
to make it their highest priority to consider allocating 
permanent slots at LaGuardia Airport, as allowable under 49 
U.S.C. 41716(b), to allow the communities of Akron-Canton, 
Ohio, and Newport News-Williamsburg, Virginia, to each have 
permanent third roundtrips to LaGuardia with stage III aircraft 
with no less than 110 and no more than 125 seats.

                         OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS

      The conference agreement provides $8,550,000 for the 
office of civil rights as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.

           TRANSPORTATION PLANNING, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

      The conference agreement provides $15,000,000 for 
transportation planning, research and development as proposed 
by the Senate and instead of $9,030,000 as proposed by the 
House. Adjustments to the budget request are as follows:

Ballast Water Study--UWS................................        $500,000
Delaware State University Hydrogen Storage Research.....         250,000
DOT privacy assessment..................................         400,000
Missouri Transportation Institute, University of 
    Missouri--Rolla.....................................       1,000,000
Innovative Materials Research at Lawrence Tech 
    University, Southfield, MI..........................       1,175,000
Integrated Commercial Vehicle Safety Enforcement 
    Technology Initiative, MI...........................         900,000
Intermodal Transportation Research, Mississippi State 
    University..........................................         900,000
Maritime Domain Awareness Pilot Project, WA.............         425,000
Maritime Fire and Safety Association, WA................         425,000
National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, 
    MI..................................................       1,175,000
PVTA Hydrogen Bus or PVTA Electric Bus..................         750,000
Traffic Improvement Association of Oakland County, MI...         250,000
Transportation Laboratory at the Detroit Science Center, 
    Detroit, MI.........................................         400,000
TTI Pipeline Safety Research............................         500,000
UW Superior--STARTS.....................................         250,000
Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute 
    commercial shipping alternatives for inland 
    waterways...........................................         700,000

      The conference agreement does not provide funds to 
support the orderly discontinuation of Amtrak's mail and 
express service. The conference agreement also does not hold 
any funds within this account in reserve to carry out directed 
service should Amtrak cease operations.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

      The conference agreement includes a limitation of 
$118,014,000 for working capital fund activities instead of 
$120,014,000 as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

               MINORITY BUSINESS RESOURCE CENTER PROGRAM

      The conference agreement provides an appropriation of 
$900,000 for the administrative expenses of the minority 
business resource center program and limits loans made under 
the program to $18,367,000 as proposed by both the House and 
the Senate.

                       MINORITY BUSINESS OUTREACH

      The conference agreement provides $3,000,000 for minority 
business outreach as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                        PAYMENTS TO AIR CARRIERS

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $60,000,000 for 
payments to air carriers to be derived from the trust fund as 
proposed by the Senate, instead of $54,000,000 as proposed by 
the House. In addition to these funds, the program will receive 
$50,000,000 in mandatory spending pursuant to the Federal 
Aviation Authorization Act of 1996, resulting in a program 
budget of $110,000,000.
      The conference agreement includes bill language, as 
proposed by the House, which allows the secretary to take into 
consideration the subsidy requirements of carriers when 
selecting between carriers competing to provide service to a 
community.
      Should the total amount of overflight fees collected not 
be sufficient to meet all the funding needs of the program in 
the fiscal year, then the secretary is authorized to transfer 
funds from the available balances of any program appropriated 
to, or directly administered by the office of the secretary to 
the essential air service program. The conferees direct the 
office of the secretary to consult with the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations if such a transfer is necessary 
and identify the source of the funds of said transfer subject 
to normal reprogramming guidelines.
      The provisions relating to the transfer of funds to and 
from the FAA for the EAS program, as proposed by the House, are 
addressed in the FAA administrative provisions, as proposed by 
the Senate.

                       NEW HEADQUARTERS BUILDING

      The conference agreement provides $50,000,000 for 
continued construction and buildout of the new headquarters 
building as proposed by the Senate and instead of $55,000,000 
as proposed by the House.

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                               OPERATIONS

      The conference agreement includes $8,186,000,000 for 
operations of the Federal Aviation Administration instead of 
$8,396,920,000 as proposed by the House and $8,176,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Of the total amount provided, 
$5,541,000,000 is to be derived from the airport and airway 
trust fund instead of $4,986,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and $5,686,500,000 proposed by the Senate. Funds are 
distributed in the bill by budget activity, as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Contract tower cost-sharing.--The bill specifies 
$7,500,000 for continuation of the contract tower cost-sharing 
program as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Transfers between budget activities.--The conference 
agreement retains Senate language that allows transfers of no 
greater than two percent from any budget activity, excluding 
aviation regulation and certification, to any budget activity. 
Transfers of more than two percent are subject to reprogramming 
procedures contained in this Act.
      Flight service station transition costs.--The conference 
agreement provides an additional $150,000,000 for flight 
service station transition costs as proposed by the Senate, 
instead of $91,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The following table compares the conference agreement to 
the President's budget request and the levels proposed in the 
House and Senate bills by budget activity:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Conference
                                                               House bill        Senate bill        agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Air Traffic Organization..................................    $6,647,305,000    $6,647,305,000    $6,647,305,000
    Contract Tower base program...........................         3,200,000         2,710,000         3,200,000
    Contract tower cost-sharing program...................           395,000           395,000           395,000
    Restoration of ARA....................................      -222,171,000                 0                 0
    Management of MOUs and MOAs...........................          -500,000                 0          -500,000
    BTS Aviation Statistics...............................        -4,000,000        -4,000,000        -4,000,000
    Annualization Adjustment..............................                 0        -2,000,000        -2,000,000
    NAS Handoff...........................................                 0       -17,000,000       -17,000,000
    Alien Species Action Plan.............................                 0         1,600,000         1,600,000
    NY/NJ Airspace Redesign...............................                 0       (2,000,000)       (2,000,000)
Amount Recommended........................................     6,424,229,000     6,627,010,000     6,629,000,000
Flight Service Stations Transition........................        91,000,000       150,000,000       150,000,000
Amount Recommended........................................        91,000,000       150,000,000       150,000,000
Research and Acquisition..................................                 0                 0                 0
    Restoration of office funding.........................       222,171,000                 0                 0
Amount Recommended........................................       222,171,000                 0                 0
Aviation Regulation and Certification/Aviation Safety.....       941,742,000       941,742,000       941,742,000
    Flight Standards Safety inspectors....................         4,000,000         8,000,000         8,000,000
    Aircraft Certification Service........................         4,000,000         4,000,000         4,000,000
    Safety and Security Analytics.........................         1,000,000                 0         1,000,000
    Professional Aerial Application support system........            50,000  ................            50,000
    Certification of upset training program...............           250,000  ................           250,000
    Human Intervention and Motivation Study...............                 0           500,000           500,000
    Medallion Program.....................................                 0         2,000,000         2,000,000
    Charter air service safety program....................  ................  ................         1,000,000
Amount Recommended........................................       951,042,000       956,242,000       958,542,000
Commercial Space Transportation...........................        11,759,000        11,759,000        11,759,000
Amount recommended........................................        11,759,000        11,759,000        11,759,000
Financial Services........................................        50,983,000        50,983,000        50,983,000
    Personnel adjustments.................................          -400,000                 0                 0
Amount recommended........................................        50,583,000        50,983,000        50,983,000
Human Resource Management.................................        69,943,000        69,943,000        69,943,000
    Adjustments...........................................                 0                 0                 0
Amount recommended........................................        69,943,000        69,943,000        69,943,000
Region and Center Operations..............................       150,744,000       150,744,000       150,744,000
    Adjustments...........................................                 0                 0                 0
Amount recommended........................................       150,744,000       150,744,000       150,744,000
Staff Offices.............................................       141,909,000       141,909,000       141,909,000
    Personnel adjustments.................................        -1,572,000                 0            91,000
Amount Recommended........................................       140,337,000       141,909,000       142,000,000
Information Services......................................        36,112,000        36,612,000        36,612,000
    E-gov adjustment......................................                 0          -500,000          -500,000
Amount recommended........................................        36,612,000        36,112,000        36,112,000
  Account-wide Adjustments:
    Personnel compensation and benefits...................        -8,000,000                 0                 0
    Unfilled executive positions..........................        -5,000,000                 0                 0
    Working Capital Fund..................................        -1,500,000                 0                 0
    Undistributed reduction...............................                 0       -18,702,000       -13,083,000
Amount recommended........................................       -14,500,000       -18,702,000       -13,083,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total...............................................     8,133,920,000     8,176,500,000     8,186,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      National airspace redesign.--The conference agreement 
includes $2,000,000 and language proposed by the Senate 
regarding the use of funds for the national airspace redesign 
project in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area. The 
conferees agree to House language that no funds made available 
under this appropriation may be used to prepare the 
Environmental Impact Statement for the redesign of the New 
York/New Jersey/Philadelphia regional airspace, or to conduct 
any work as part of the review of the redesign project 
conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act and 
related laws, as long as the FAA fails to consider noise 
mitigation. Further, none of the funds made available for this 
purpose shall be reprogrammed by the FAA to other activities, 
including airspace redesign not directly related to New York, 
New Jersey, and Philadelphia airspace redesign.
      Safety inspectors.--The conferees provide a total of 
$683,845,000 for flight standards safety inspectors and 
$162,271,000 for aircraft certification services to address 
staffing reductions. This funding level represents an increase 
over the budget request of $8,000,000 for flight standards 
safety inspectors and $4,000,000 for aircraft certification 
services.
      The conference agreement modifies reporting requirements 
proposed by the House and Senate regarding safety inspector 
staffing in the offices of flight standards and aircraft 
certification, and directs FAA to submit semi-annual reports in 
fiscal year 2006 identifying baseline staffing levels, staffing 
goals, number of new hires on board, number of new hires in the 
pipeline, and the use of funds provided for these offices.
      Information services.--The conference agreement provides 
$36,112,000 for information services, as proposed by the 
Senate, and modifies Senate language directing that no funds be 
transferred to another agency in support of the e-gov 
initiative without prior notification of the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.
      On-airport mobile refuelers.--The conferees recommend 
that the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) work with the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish reasonable 
methods of compliance for the EPA's Spill Prevention Control 
and Countermeasure (SPCC) requirements as they relate to on-
airport mobile refuelers.
      On-airport mobile refueling vehicles already incorporate 
significant spill prevention protections. The design of 
refuelers is regulated by DOT and incorporates numerous safety 
systems, including emergency cut-off switches, interlock 
systems, and over-fill prevention devices for minimizing the 
potential for spills. In addition, the FAA extensively 
regulates the operations of mobile refuelers and other ground 
vehicles at airports to ensure safe operations. Moreover, 
mobile refueler operations at airports are subject to EPA 
regulations governing stormwater discharges, and airports have 
response plans in place to address potential spills. The 
conferees urge DOT and EPA to work together to ensure that the 
regulations do not impose unreasonable cost burdens on the 
operators of the refueling vehicles.
      Non-precision GPS approaches.--The conference agreement 
includes up to $5,000,000 for development of additional 
approaches and flight procedures at non-part 139 certified 
airports.
      Air charter safety management system.--The conference 
agreement provides $1,000,000 for the government and industry 
cooperative program to improve safety for America's Part 135 
on-demand air taxi industry. This program provides proactive 
tools for industry participants to prevent accidents and to 
improve and measure safety management by Part 135 on-demand air 
carriers.
      Department of Defense schools.--FAA organizations have 
traditionally staffed their overseas facilities with employees 
who have return rights to the U.S. mainland, making their 
dependents qualified to attend DOD schools. In 2004, FAA 
reviewed the eligibility of FAA employees in Puerto Rico and 
determined that many were ineligible to attend these schools. 
The majority of employees in Puerto Rico are local hires or 
employees that have stayed so long that they have forfeited 
their return rights.
      The FAA worked with DOD and its employees to allow the 
dependents of ineligible employees to enroll for one more year 
under a ``good cause'' continuation for the 2004-2005 school 
year. After FAA's determination in June 2004, another ``good 
cause'' extension was requested from DOD for the 2005-2006 
school year. The conferees understand that the second extension 
was granted to provide adequate time to plan for the 2007 
school year. FAA should continue to provide DOD school access 
for the dependents of eligible employees, consistent with its 
policies. Further, the conferees direct that the FAA provide a 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by 
March 15, 2006 detailing the justification for its 
determination, assistance it provided to employees determined 
as ineligible, and the tuition expenses that are provided for 
all FAA dependents living outside of the U.S.

                        FACILITIES AND EQUIPMENT

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement includes $2,540,000,000 instead 
of $3,053,000,000 as proposed by the House and $2,448,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate. Of the total amount available, 
$429,210,500 is available until September 30, 2006, and 
$2,110,789,500 is available until September 30, 2008. The 
conference agreement includes language proposed by both the 
House and Senate directing FAA to transmit a detailed five-year 
capital investment plan to Congress with its fiscal year 2007 
budget submission.
      The following table provides a breakdown of the House and 
Senate bills and the conference agreement by program:


      Advanced technology development and prototyping.--The 
conference agreement includes $68,210,000 for advanced 
technology development and prototyping instead of $41,460,000 
as proposed by the House and $75,960,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The following table compares the conference agreement 
to the House and Senate bills by budget activity:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Project                 House        Senate      Conference
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Runway Incursion..............    $7,100,000    $7,100,000    $7,100,000
Aviation System Capacity           6,500,000     6,500,000     6,500,000
 Improvement (ASCI)...........
Separation Standards..........     2,500,000     2,500,000     2,500,000
General Aviation and Vertical      1,500,000     1,500,000     1,500,000
 Flight Technology............
Operational Concept Validation     3,000,000     3,000,000     3,000,000
NAS Requirements..............       800,000       800,000       800,000
Safer Skies...................     3,400,000     3,400,000     3,400,000
NAS Safety Assessment.........     1,500,000     1,500,000     1,500,000
Wake Turbulence...............     2,000,000     4,000,000     4,000,000
Airspace Management Laboratory     7,000,000     7,000,000     7,000,000
Wind Profiling in Juneau, AK..     3,160,000     3,160,000     3,160,000
Airport Cooperative Research              --    10,000,000            --
 Program......................
GPS Anti-jam technologies.....     1,000,000            --     1,000,000
Fogeye........................            --            --       500,000
Lithium Technologies to reduce     1,000,000            --     1,000,000
 ASR..........................
Mobile Object Infrastructure              --     3,000,000     2,750,000
 Technology...................
Airport Technology Program....            --    17,500,000    17,500,000
Airfield Pavements Research...    $1,000,000     4,000,000     4,000,000
Runway Obstruction Warning                --     1,000,000     1,000,000
 System.......................
      Total...................    41,460,000    75,960,000    68,210,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Airport pavement research.--Of the funds provided, 
$4,000,000 is for the airfield improvement program authorized 
under section 905 of Public Law 106-181.
      Safe Flight 21.--The conference agreement includes 
$42,950,000 for Safe Flight 21, of which $10,000,000 is to 
augment ADS-B funding. The conferees direct the FAA to submit a 
spend plan to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
within 30 days of enactment.
      En route automation.--The conference agreement provides 
$333,550,000 for en route automation. FAA is given the 
discretion to allocate the reduction of $8,000,000 among 
projects within this program.
      Airport surface detection equipment--Model X (ASDE-X).--
The conference agreement provides $30,200,000 for ASDE--X, 
instead of $27,200,000 proposed by both the House and Senate. 
The conferees note that the ASDE-X deployment schedule has 
slipped by two years. Although the FAA recently announced 
deployment at 15 major airports, the conferees remain concerned 
about runway incursions and provide an additional $3,000,000 to 
expedite installation and deployment of ASDE-X equipment.
      Airport traffic control tower TRACON facilities.--The 
conferees provide $44,233,830, instead of $51,469,000 as 
proposed by the House and Senate. The reduction is due to the 
prohibition of ARAC consolidation into the Oklahoma City 
TRACON.
      Houston Area Air Traffic System (HAATS).--The conference 
agreement provides $10,200,000 for the HAATS.
      DOD/FAA facilities transfer.--The conference agreement 
includes $2,000,000 to continue the FAA contribution for 
operation of the airport radar approach control at Lawton/Fort 
Sill Regional Airport in Oklahoma.
      Integrated control and monitoring system (ICMS).--The 
conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for ICMS. Although the 
system has been operating successfully at six airports, the FAA 
is conducting an operational safety assessment of ICMS. The 
conferees concur with the FAA's decision to spend no more than 
$500,000 on this assessment, and the FAA used a portion of the 
fiscal year 2005 appropriation for this purpose. The conferees 
expect FAA to obligate the funding within three months of 
enactment of this Act.
      Terminal automation modernization replacement (TAMR).--
The conference agreement provides $20,000,000 for modernization 
of display systems replacement at two terminal radar approach 
control facilities and their associated air traffic control 
towers. The funding level is consistent with the budget 
request; however, the conference agreement provides funds under 
TAMR instead of the terminal automation program. The conferees 
note that on November 9, 2005, FAA requested interested 
companies with automation systems in the NAS for descriptions 
of their systems. The notice includes four critical sites: 
Chicago, Illinois; Denver, Colorado; St. Louis, Missouri; and 
Minneapolis--St. Paul, Minnesota, with an expected award date 
of January 2007. The sites were identified by the FAA as 
critical to upgrade. The conferees are concerned that the 
competition for the replacement of these four aging systems, 
which is only being offered to a limited number of vendors, is 
expected to take up to 15 months. The conferees encourage FAA 
to expedite consideration of proposals and make an award or 
awards, as the case may be, as soon as possible. In order to 
best address the emergency needs of each site in the most 
timely and efficient manner, the FAA is encouraged to 
independently evaluate bids based on the unique circumstances 
and situations at each location. Furthermore, the conferees 
note that if the FAA determines that air traffic control 
equipment at other facilities poses a critical safety risk, the 
conferees would consider and promptly respond to a request to 
reprogram funds to accommodate additional facilities if safety 
critical arise.
      Terminal automation program.--The conference agreement 
provides $24,300,000 for the terminal automation program 
instead of $64,300,000 as proposed by the House and $39,300,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement transferred 
$20,000,000 provided by both the House and Senate to TAMR to 
reflect that FAA will complete the display modernization. The 
funding level includes a total of $22,000,000 to continue to 
sustain software at the busiest facilities in the NAS.
      Terminal air traffic control facilities replacement.--The 
conference agreement provides $124,800,000 for this program. 
Funds shall be distributed as follows:

        Project                                     Conference agreement
Addison Field, Dallas, Texas............................      $1,500,000
Battle Creek, Michigan..................................       1,600,000
Billings, Montana.......................................       1,800,000
Boise, Idaho............................................       7,700,000
Broomfield, Colorado....................................       1,220,000
Champaign, Illinois.....................................       2,200,000
Cleveland, Ohio.........................................      18,225,000
Dayton, Ohio............................................       1,300,000
Deer Valley, Arizona....................................       2,300,000
Dulles International, Chantilly, Virginia...............       4,500,000
Fort Wayne, Indiana.....................................       1,300,000
Gulfport/Biloxi, Mississippi............................       5,000,000
Houston TRACON, Texas...................................       4,000,000
Huntsville, Alabama.....................................       2,216,000
Jeffco Airport, Colorado................................       4,000,000
Kona, Hawaii............................................       2,000,000
LaGuardia Int'l, New York...............................      10,000,000
Lihue, Hawaii...........................................       2,000,000
Manchester, New Hampshire...............................       1,300,000
McCarran International, Las Vegas, Nevada...............       3,000,000
Memphis, Tennessee......................................       2,300,000
Memphis, Tennessee......................................      16,100,000
Morristown, New Jersey..................................       8,339,000
Morristown, New Jersey..................................       1,150,000
Newport News, Virginia..................................       2,300,000
Palm Beach International Airport, Florida...............       2,000,000
Palm Springs International Airport, California..........       2,300,000
Phoenix, Arizona........................................       2,450,000
Reno, Nevada............................................       3,300,000
Spokane, Washington.....................................       3,000,000
St. Louis Downtown Airport, Illinois....................       2,880,000
Traverse City Air Traffic Control Tower, Michigan.......       1,520,000

      Spokane Tower.--The conferees include $3,000,000 for the 
demolition or relocation of seven buildings that are in the 
line-of-sight of the new air traffic control tower currently 
under construction. The conferees also understand that the need 
to build additional duct banks and other costs will require 
additional resources in fiscal year 2006 in order for the tower 
to be commissioned on August 27, 2007. The conferees direct the 
FAA to utilize unobligated balances within the tower program to 
fully cover these additional costs.
      Wide area augmentation system (WAAS).--The conferees 
provide $93,000,000 for WAAS, instead of $110,000,000 as 
proposed in the House and $98,500,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Of the funds provided, no less than $5,000,000 is for 
approaches at airports without an existing ILS. The conferees 
note that an additional $10,000,000 was provided for WAAS in a 
reprogramming letter dated September 20, 2005.
      Chicago O'Hare.--The conferees remain concerned that 
congestion and delays at major hubs impact the national airways 
system. Improving overall efficiency through investment in 
technology and procedures will increase capacity while long-
term solutions to airport congestion continue to be developed. 
The conferees support and encourage the FAA to make the 
following improvements to operations at O'Hare International 
Airport: (1) expeditiously install a multilateration system and 
accelerate deployment of the ASDE-X radar system to improve 
ground handling of aircraft and (2) redesign the descent 
corridor airspace and implement new RNAV arrivals and idle 
descents.
      Detroit Metro Airport, Michigan.--Detroit Metro Airport 
was identified as a candidate airport where FAA should consider 
installation of the precision runway monitor (PRM) system to 
improve airport capacity in inclement weather conditions. Since 
then, FAA has begun to limit PRM deployment in favor of 
multilateration technology. Since the need for capacity 
improvements at Detroit Metro remains valid and FAA is moving 
away from PRM deployments, the conferees provide $6,000,000 to 
develop and implement multilateration technology at this 
airport.
      Approach lighting system improvement program.--The 
conference agreement provides $9,000,000 for the approach 
lighting system improvement program. Of the amount provided, 
$3,000,000 is to continue the program of providing lighting 
systems at rural airfields throughout Alaska, and $1,000,000 is 
for a medium-intensity approach lighting system replacement 
(MALSR) for Lee Gilmer Airport in Gainesville, Georgia. The 
conferees do not include House language directing $5,000,000 to 
procure MALSR equipment, as a significant number of procured 
systems have not been installed. Further, the conference 
agreement includes language proposed by the Senate regarding 
issuing new MALSR specifications.
      Instrument landing system establishment.--The conference 
agreement provides $19,850,000 for the instrument landing 
system establishment. Funds shall be distributed as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, Florida.  Install previously       $1,800,000
                                      procured approach
                                      lighting system
                                      (runway 31).
Long Beach, California.............  Install previously        2,000,000
                                      procured approach
                                      lighting system
                                      (runway 25R).
Hartsfield-Jackson International,    Acquire and install         400,000
 Georgia.                             replacement LPDME.
Keokuk Municipal, Iowa.............  Install previously          550,000
                                      acquired glide scope.
Klawock, Alaska....................  Install previously        1,800,000
                                      acquired ILS.
McCook Municipal, Nebraska.........  Phase II installation       675,000
                                      of glide slope and
                                      PAPI system.
Western Nebraska (Scottsbuff)        Acquire and install       1,900,000
 Regional, Nebraska.                  glide slope and MALSR.
McAllen-Miller Airport, Texas......  Acquire and install       1,623,000
                                      ILS.
Somerset Airport, Kentucky.........  Installation of           1,525,000
                                      previously acquired
                                      ILS.
Leesburg Executive Airport,          Installation of           2,000,000
 Virginia.                            previously acquired
                                      ILS.
Ozark Regional Airport, Arkansas...  Final phase of ILS          577,000
                                      installation.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      In addition, the conference agreement includes $4,400,000 
for the cost sharing initiative and $600,000 for the FAA to 
conduct site surveys to determine costs and feasibility for 
installing instrument landing systems at the following 
airports: Reno/Tahoe International, Nevada; University Park, 
Pennsylvania; Aiken Municipal, South Carolina; Wendover, Utah; 
Menomonie Municipal--Score Field, Wisconsin; and Taylor County, 
Wisconsin.
      Frequency and spectrum engineering.--The conference 
agreement includes $8,600,000 for frequency and spectrum 
engineering, of which $2,500,000 is for the national airspace 
interference detection location and mitigation project.
      Center for advanced systems development (CAASD).--The 
conference agreement provides $77,800,000 for CAASD. The 
conferees encourage the use of funds in support of simulations 
and technical analysis to ensure implementation of constant 
descent arrivals using aircraft based spacing and merging.
      Transponder landing system.--The conference agreement 
does not provide funds for this program.

                 RESEARCH, ENGINEERING AND DEVELOPMENT

      The conference agreement provides $138,000,000 for 
research, engineering, and development instead of $130,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $134,500,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The following table compares the conference agreement 
to the House and Senate bills by budget activity:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                    Conference
                             Program                                House bill      Senate bill      agreement
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Improve Aviation Safety:
    Fire research and safety....................................      $6,244,000      $6,244,000      $6,244,000
    Propulsion and fuel systems.................................       4,049,000       5,049,000       5,799,000
    Advanced material/structural safety.........................       2,613,000       3,213,000       5,941,000
    Atmospheric hazards/digital system safety...................       3,441,000       3,441,000       3,441,000
    Aging aircraft..............................................      19,007,000      20,007,000      20,007,000
    Aircraft catastrophic failure prevention research...........       3,340,000       3,340,000       3,340,000
    Flightdeck maintenance/system integration human factors.....       8,181,000       8,181,000       8,181,000
    Aviation safety risk analysis...............................       4,932,000       4,932,000       4,932,000
    Air traffic control airways facility human factors..........       9,654,000       9,654,000       9,654,000
    Aeromedical research........................................       6,889,000       8,889,000       8,889,000
    Weather program--safety.....................................      20,582,000      20,582,000      20,582,000
  Improve efficiency:
    Joint program and development office........................      18,100,000      17,000,000      18,100,000
    Wake Turbulence.............................................       2,296,000       2,296,000       2,296,000
Reduce Environment Impacts--Environment and Energy Mission            16,008,000       17,008000      16,000,000
 Support........................................................
    System Planning and Resource Management.....................       1,271,000       1,201,000       1,201,000
    William J. Hughes Technical Center Laboratory Facility......       3,393,000       3,393,000       3,393,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
          Total.................................................     130,000,000     134,500,000     138,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Propulsion and fuel systems.--Of the funds provided, 
$500,000 is to continue the evaluation of molecular markers for 
detecting the adulteration or dilution of jet fuel; $300,000 is 
for research into modifying general aviation piston engines to 
enable their safe operation usingunleaded aviation fuel; 
$500,000 is for research into aviation grade ethanol fuels at South 
Dakota State University; $400,000 for the Center of Excellence for 
General Aviation research; and $750,000 is for simulation of 
containment of airplane engine failure at the George Washington 
University in Virginia.
      Advanced materials/structural safety.--Of the funds 
provided, $4,000,000 is for research and equipment at the 
National Institute for Aviation Research at Wichita State 
University and $400,000 is for advanced materials research at 
the University of Washington.
      Aging Aircraft.--Of the funds provided, $1,000,000 is for 
the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability; $1,265,000 is for 
the Aging Aircraft Nondestructive Inspection Validation Center; 
$1,000,000 is for the National Institute for Aviation Research; 
$1,325,000 is for Center for Aviation Research and Aerospace 
Technology; and $100,000 is for the Center of Excellence for 
General Aviation Research.
      Flightdeck safety/systems integration.--Of the funds 
provided, $235,000 is to continue developing in-flight 
simulator training for commercial pilots at the Flight Research 
Training Center.
      Aeromedical research.--Of the funds provided, $2,000,000 
is to continue studies related to cabin air quality to be 
conducted by the Center of Excellence for Cabin Environment 
Research.

                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement includes a liquidating cash 
appropriation of $3,399,000,000 instead of $3,600,000,000 as 
proposed by the House, and $3,390,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Obligation limitation.--The conferees agree to an 
obligation limitation of $3,550,000,000 for the ``Grants-in-aid 
for airports'' program, instead of $3,600,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $3,500,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Administration.--The conference agreement includes a 
limitation on administrative expenses of $71,096,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Small community air service development program.--The 
bill includes $10,000,000 under the obligation limitation to 
continue the small community air service development program 
instead of $20,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House had 
no similar funding.
      Airport cooperative research program.--The bill includes 
$10,000,000 under the obligation limitation for the airport 
cooperative research program, as proposed by the House. The 
Senate provided funds under the facilities and equipment 
appropriation.
      High priority projects.-- Of the funds covered by the 
obligation limitation in this bill, the conferees direct FAA to 
provide not less than the following funding levels, out of 
available resources, for the following projects. The conferees 
agree that state apportionment funds may be construed as 
discretionary funds for the purposes of implementing this 
provision. To the maximum extent possible, the administrator 
should work to ensure that airport sponsors for these projects 
first use available entitlement funds to finance the projects. 
However, the FAA should not require sponsors to apply carryover 
entitlements to discretionary projects funded in the coming 
year, but only those entitlements applicable to the fiscal year 
2006 obligation limitation. The conferees further direct that 
the specific funding allocated below shall not diminish or 
prejudice the application of a specific airport or geographic 
region to receive other AIP discretionary grants or multiyear 
letters of intent.


                       GRANTS-IN-AID FOR AIRPORTS

                    (AIRPORT AND AIRWAY TRUST FUND)

                 (RESCISSION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

      The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
contract authority of $1,032,000,000 instead of $469,000,000 
proposed by the House and $1,174,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION

      Section 101 retains a provision authorizing airports to 
transfer instrument landing systems and other equipment 
purchased with federal airport grants to the FAA, subject to 
certain conditions, as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 102 allows 375 technical staff-years at the 
Center for Advanced Aviation Systems Development as proposed by 
the House and Senate.
      Section 103 prohibits funds for adopting guidelines or 
regulations requiring airport sponsors to provide FAA ``without 
cost'' building construction, maintenance, or space as proposed 
by the House and Senate.
      Section 104 retains a Senate provision that permits 
reimbursement for fees collected and credited under 49 U.S.C. 
45303. The House bill contained no similar provision.
      Section 105 retains a provision proposed in the Senate 
bill that allows reimbursement of funds for providing technical 
assistance to foreign aviation authorities to be credited to 
the Operations account. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.
      Section 106 retains a provision proposed by the House 
prohibiting funds to change weight restrictions or prior 
permission rules at Teterboro Airport in New Jersey. The Senate 
bill contained no similar provision.
      Section 107 retains a provision proposed by the House 
prohibiting funds for engineering work related to an additional 
runway at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport in 
Louisiana. The Senate bill contained no similar provision.
      Section 108 includes a provision as proposed by the House 
and modifies a Senate provision concerning the continuation and 
mandatory expansion of the war risk insurance program. The 
conference agreement extends the existing terms and conditions 
of the program for one year, until December 31, 2006. The 
conferees note that, under the provisions of section 106 of 
Public Law 108-176, the Secretary continues to have the 
authority to extend war risk insurance to aircraft 
manufacturers at his discretion. The Senate provision extending 
the virtual primary airport subsidies is addressed under 
section 109.
      Section 109 modifies a Senate provision regarding 
extending virtual primary airport subsidies for fiscal year 
2006. It is the conferees intent that this will be the last 
extension for such subsidies.

                     Federal Highway Administration

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

      The conference agreement limits administrative expenses 
of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to $364,638,000, 
as proposed by the Senate instead of $359,529,000 as proposed 
by the House. This amount assumes funding for six additional 
full-time equivalent staff years (FTES) to help oversee FHWA 
major projects, for an overall agency total of 2,430 FTES. The 
conferees recommend the following adjustment to the budget 
request by program and activity:

Administrative funding in support of oversight and 
    stewardship activities..............................     -$4,000,000

      The conferees direct FHWA to submit with the fiscal year 
2007 budget justification a report describing the cost, 
schedule, funding, and technical status of all major projects 
and an explanation of significant risks to costs, schedules, 
funding or technical issues.

                          FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement limits obligations for the 
federal-aid highways program to $36,032,343,903 instead of 
$36,287,100,000 as proposed by the House and $40,194,259,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language, as 
proposed by the House, which allows the Secretary to charge and 
collect fees from the applicant for a direct loan, guaranteed 
loan, or line of credit to cover the cost of the financial and 
legal analyses performed on behalf of the Department as 
authorized under section 605(b) of title 23, United States 
Code. The fees so collected are not subject to any obligation 
limitation or the limitation on administrative expenses set for 
the infrastructure finance program under section 608 of title 
23, United States Code.
      The conferees recognize the importance of permitting 
States to use transportation enhancement funds for historic 
preservation. The conferees direct the FHWA to continue 
approving the use of transportation enhancement funds for the 
preservation or restoration of historic courthouses when there 
is a linkage to transportation, consistent with past practices.

                 LIMITATION ON TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH

      The conference agreement includes a general limitation on 
transportation research of $429,800,000 instead of $485,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $408,491,420 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within this level, the conference agreement includes 
funding for the following activities:

Surface transportation research, development, deployment 
    program.............................................    $196,400,000
Training and education program..........................      26,700,000
Bureau of Transportation Statistics.....................      27,000,000
University transportation research......................      69,700,000
Intelligent transportation systems research.............     110,000,000

                  BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS

      Under the obligation limitation of the FHWA and within 
the sublimitation for transportation research, the conference 
agreement provides $27,000,000 for the Bureau of Transportation 
Statistics (BTS). Since the passage of the Norman Y. Mineta 
Research and Special Programs Improvement Act, Public Law 108-
426, on November 30, 2004, BTS is a part of the Research and 
Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) within the 
Department. Accordingly, additional information regarding BTS 
is included in the RITA section of this report.

               FERRY BOATS AND FERRY TERMINAL FACILITIES

      Within the funds available for ferry boats and ferry 
terminal facilities, funds are to be available for the 
following projects and activities:

        Project                                                   Amount
Beale Street Landing/Docking Facility, Memphis, TN......      $2,500,000
Bridgeport High Speed Ferry, CT.........................       2,750,000
Delaware Ferry Terminal NJ..............................       2,000,000
Ferry Boat New Construction, WA.........................       1,700,000
Ferryboat Vessel Acquisition, Erie, PA..................         500,000
Fire Island Ferry Terminal, Saltaire, NY................         400,000
Harbor Commission Car Ferry, Cassville, WI..............         400,000
Homer-Halibut Cove-Jakolof Bay-Seldovia Ferry, AK.......       1,000,000
Iowa-Illinois Regional Ferry Service, IA................         300,000
Kitsap Transit, purchase a low-wake passenger-only 
    ferry, WA...........................................       1,500,000
Kitsap Transit, Rich-Passage Wake Impact Study, 
    Bremerton, WA.......................................       2,300,000
LaGuardia Airport Ferry, NY.............................         600,000
Long Branch Ferry Pier, NJ..............................         900,000
Lorain Port Authority Black River Excursion Vessel, OH..         500,000
Manns Harbor Maintenance Facility, NC...................       3,000,000
Mayport Vessel Replacement, Jacksonville, FL............         700,000
Oklahoma City Water Transport System, OK................       1,250,000
Port Aransas Ferryboat, TX..............................         500,000
Replacement of Kennedy Class Ferries, NY................       1,000,000
San Francisco Bay Area Water Transit Ferry Boat Oyster 
    Point, CA...........................................         800,000
Savannah Water Ferry, GA................................       1,000,000
Sound Class Ferry, Ocracoke, NC.........................       2,750,000
Stamford High Speed Ferry, CT...........................       2,750,000
Staten Island Fast Ferry Purchase, NY...................       2,000,000
Thames Shipyard/Cross Sound Ferry Terminal, CT..........         500,000
Vashon Island Passenger Ferry, WA.......................       1,400,000

      TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNITY AND SYSTEM PRESERVATION PROGRAM

      Within the funds made available for the transportation 
and community and system preservation program, funds are to be 
distributed to the following projects and activities:


                             FEDERAL LANDS

      Within the funds available for the federal lands program, 
funds are to be available for the following projects and 
activities:

        Project                                                   Amount
14th Street Bridge Corridor Improvements, VA..................  $800,000
17-Mile Road Reconstruction, WY...............................   530,000
200 Line Road Project, Makah Indian Tribe, WA................. 1,500,000
A. Teague Parkway Extension, Red River Refuge, LA............. 1,250,000
Agua Caliente Cultural Museum Road Improvements, CA...........   750,000
Alaska Trails Initiative, AK.................................. 2,525,000
Battlefield Parkway Expansion from Kincaid Boulevard to Route 
    7, Leesburg, VA........................................... 3,000,000
Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge Access Road, UT..............   750,000
BIA Route 27 Reconstruction, SD............................... 1,000,000
Blackstone River Bikeway, RI.................................. 3,650,000
Bluff Street Corridor (SR-18), UT.............................   575,000
Boston Harbor Islands, Accessible Floats and Ramps, MA........ 1,000,000
Campobello International Park paving of main road and parking 
    area...................................................... 1,500,000
Chickasaw Museum and Cultural Center, Natchez Trace Parkway, 
    MS........................................................   450,000
City of Rocks Back Country Byway, ID.......................... 3,000,000
Craig Road Grade Separation, Las Vegas, NV.................... 5,000,000
Crow's Neck Environmental Education Center, Tishomingo County, 
    MS........................................................   150,000
Elm Street Garage Improvements, New Bedford, MA...............   300,000
FDA Access Road, Montgomery County, MD........................   500,000
FH-24, Banks to Lowman, ID.................................... 1,000,000
Forest Road 235 in Magdalena Ridge, NM........................ 1,165,000
Fort Campbell U.S. 41A Force Protection Barrier Project in 
    Fort Campbell, KY......................................... 1,600,000
Fort Peck Reservoir Fishing Access Roads, MT.................. 3,000,000
Ft. George Island Traffic Study, FL...........................   300,000
Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy Parks and Trails, CA...   600,000
HCRH Improvements, Cascade Locks, OR..........................   500,000
Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge, Arizona and Nevada.................. 1,000,000
Hoover Dam Bypass Bridge, AZ.................................. 6,000,000
Hopi/Navajo Route 60 in Navajo County, AZ..................... 1,000,000
Hwy 49-Hwy 7 Connector Road, Leflore County, MS............... 1,000,000
Hyde Park Information and Transportation Center, NY........... 1,500,000
Improvements to Turquoise Trail BIA Route 4, AZ...............   750,000
Interstate 580 Freeway Extension, NV.......................... 1,000,000
Jamestown 2007 Project, VA.................................... 1,625,000
LA Highway 117 Environmental Assessment, LA...................   500,000
Lake Mead Parkway Improvements, City of Henderson, NV......... 3,000,000
Lone Pine Dam, Navajo County, AZ.............................. 2,000,000
Lowell Canal Walkway-Red Cross River Reach, MA................ 1,000,000
Lower Elwha Tribe Access Road Project, WA..................... 1,000,000
Marine Corps Heritage Center Interchange, VA.................. 1,000,000
Navajo Route 13 Rehabilitation, NM............................ 1,540,000
Needles Highway, San Bernardino, County, CA................... 1,000,000
Northern Virginia Recreation Trail Connections, VA............   500,000
Ocean County Route 539 Crossing Resurfacing Upgrade, NJ.......   250,000
Pikes Peak Erosion and Sedimentation Control, CO.............. 1,200,000
Preston North and South in Richardson County, NE..............   200,000
Reconstruction of S-323, Alzada to Ekalaka, MT................   400,000
Repaving of Delta/Drummond Road, US Forest Highway 35, WI..... 2,300,000
Riverwalk construction, Lowell, Middlesex, MA................. 1,000,000
Road to the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe Reservation, WA.........   750,000
Salmon Falls Creek Bridge, ID.................................   200,000
San Juan County Road 442 in the Navajo Nation, UT.............   150,000
San Juan County Road 444 in the Navajo Nation, UT.............   330,000
San Juan County Road 470 in the Navajo Nation, UT.............   250,000
SD 40 Resurfacing from Hermosa, South Dakota to Shannon 
    County, Line, DS.......................................... 3,000,000
Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, OK.........................    60,000
SH 145 Dolores to Stoner, CO.................................. 4,800,000
Skaitook Lake Access Roads, OK................................   150,000
South Access to Golden Gate Bridge, CA........................ 1,250,000
South Dupree Road BIA Route 15, SD............................   500,000
Spirit Lake Reservation Tokio-Ephriam Road, ND................   400,000
SR 160 Blue Diamond Highway Widening, Valley View to Rainbow, 
    NV........................................................ 3,750,000
SR 4-Wagon Trail Realignment, CA..............................   750,000
SR 92/I-15 Interchange, Utah County, UT....................... 1,500,000
SR-92, I-15 Interchange to SR-146, UT.........................   500,000
Stones River National Battlefield Tour Route, TN..............   500,000
Summit Valley Road, San Bernardino County, CA................. 1,000,000
Sumpter Valley Railroad Restoration, Baker County, OR.........   500,000
Taholah School Access Road Project, Quinault Indian Nation, WA 2,500,000
Thomas Cole National Historic Site, NY........................   745,000
Tohono Oodham highway improvements, AZ........................   850,000
Trail Forever Golden Gate Conservancy, CA.....................   400,000
U.S. 26 Passing Lanes, Wasco County, OR.......................   500,000
US 93 Evaro to Polson Corridor, MT............................   600,000
Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM.......................... 1,475,000
West Vail Pass Vegetated Wildlife Overpass, CO................   500,000
Wilson Lake Cedar Creek Bridge Crossing, KS...................   130,000

                  INTERSTATE MAINTENANCE DISCRETIONARY

      Within the funds available for the interstate maintenance 
discretionary program, funds are to be available for the 
following projects and activities:


                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement provides a liquidating cash 
appropriation of $36,032,343,903 to pay the outstanding 
obligations of the various highway programs at levels provided 
in this Act and prior appropriations Acts, instead of 
$36,000,000,000 as proposed by the House and $40,194,259,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

                              (RESCISSION)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
$1,999,999,000 of the unobligated balances of funds apportioned 
to the States under chapter 1 of title 23, United States Code, 
excluding safety programs and funds set aside within the State 
for population areas. The conferees direct the FHWA to 
administer the rescission by allowing each State maximum 
flexibility in making adjustments among the apportioned highway 
programs.

                 APPALACHIAN DEVELOPMENT HIGHWAY SYSTEM

      The conference agreement provides $20,000,000 for the 
Appalachian Development Highway System to be allocated for West 
Virginia Corridor H.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

      Section 110 includes a provision similar to language 
proposed by the Senate that modifies the distribution of 
Federal-aid highway obligation limitation. The House did not 
include a similar provision.
      Section 111 retains the provision, as proposed by both 
the House and Senate, that allows funds received by the Bureau 
of Transportation Statistics from the sale of data products to 
be credited to the Federal-aid Highways account.
      Section 112 includes a new provision that establishes an 
administrative takedown and sets aside funding for activities 
of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The 
remaining amounts shall be distributed for the following 
purposes:

                    SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS

        Project                                                   Amount
12th Street Flood Prevention Project, Perry Township, OH        $750,000
200 West from Syracuse Road to Midland Drive, Davis and 
    Weber Counties, UT..................................       1,750,000
2nd Street/Andrews Avenue/3rd Street Enhancements, Ft. 
    Lauderdale, FL......................................         500,000
31st Street, Haksell Ave. to O'Connell Rd., Lawrence, KS         800,000
55th Street Bridge Replacement, Plain Township, OH......       1,100,000
56th Avenue/Quebec Improvements, Denver, CO.............       2,800,000
90A Widening, Stafford, TX..............................       1,650,000
90A Widening, Sugar Land, TX............................       1,475,000
A-B Street NW Corridor Connector, Auburn, WA............       1,700,000
Advanced Vehicle Research Center, NC....................         300,000
Airport Road Expansion, Phase II, Jasper, AL............       1,830,000
Airport Terminal Roadway Improvements, Broward County, 
    FL..................................................       1,000,000
Alameda Corridor-East, San Gabriel Valley, CA...........       4,200,000
Alief Community Park Rehabilitation Project, TX.........         300,000
Alliance for Transportation Research, University of New 
    Mexico, NM..........................................         200,000
Atlus Falcon Road Improvements, OK......................         750,000
American Discovery Trail, Coralville, IA................         200,000
Andrews Air Force Base Gateway Beautification, MD.......       1,250,000
Antelope Valley Transportation Improvements, NE.........         900,000
Arthur Avenue Retail Market, NY.........................         400,000
Ashburton Avenue Reconstruction, City of Yonkers, NY....         800,000
Ashland County, Town of Lapointe, reconstruct Rice 
    street with storm sewer, sidewalk and parking, WI...         450,000
Assembly Street Railroad Relocation, SC.................       1,300,000
Atlantic Avenue Extension, NY...........................         700,000
Austin Road Extension, Prospect, CT.....................         500,000
Austin-San Antonio Regional Commuter Rail Project, TX...       2,000,000
Baldwin County Highway 83 Evacuation Route Project, AL..         850,000
Baldwin Road, Oakland County, MI........................         700,000
Baltimore Area Transit System Expansion, MD.............         750,000
Barnhardt Road Extension, Umatilla County, OR...........       2,000,000
Bass River Park Gateway, Dennis, MA.....................       1,400,000
Back and Wixom Road/I-96 Interchange, MI................         600,000
Beckley Exhibition Coal Mine, WV........................         650,000
Belleville Road/Ecorse Road Intersection, MI............         400,000
Bird Springs Road/Bridge Rehabilitation, AZ.............       2,000,000
Bob Anthony Parkway, Barnett Res., MS...................       1,000,000
Bobby Jones/Palmetto Parkway, SC........................       1,000,000
Borough of Landsdale Street Improvements, PA............         500,000
Boston University Infrastructure Investment Research, MA         300,000
Boundary Street Construction, Marlborough, MA...........       1,600,000
Bourbon County Industrial Park Access Road, KY..........         600,000
Bridge at 132nd St. and US-69, Overland Park, KS........       1,000,000
Bridge Rehabilitation in Excelsior Springs, MO..........         450,000
Bridge Replacement, Werner Church Road Plain Township, 
    OH..................................................       1,000,000
Bridgeton Trail/Park, MO................................         800,000
Bristol Street Multi-Modal Corridor, CA.................         600,000
Brooklyn Children's Museum Pedestrian Enhancements, NY..         800,000
Brookwood Road Restoration, Halfmoon, NY................       1,330,000
Burbank/Sepulveda Boulevards Intersection Improvements, 
    CA..................................................         200,000
California University Pennsylvania (CUP) Urban MAG, PA..       2,000,000
Calmar Telematics ITS Project, Liverpool, NY............       1,250,000
Calumet City Street Resurfacing, IL.....................         400,000
Cape Cod Hyannis Memorial Statue Gateway/Walkway, MA....         100,000
Cedar Park RM 1431 Widening Project, TX.................         500,000
Center for Aquatic Life and Conservation, Baltimore, MD.         800,000
Center for Business and Education Park Access Road, VA..         600,000
Charleston International Airport Parking Garage, SC.....       1,000,000
Charlotte County Florida Evacuation Widening, FL........         250,000
Chatham Area Transit Job Access Reverse Commute, 
    Savannah, VA........................................       1,000,000
Chicago Department of Transportation Damen/Elston/
    Fullerton, IL.......................................         700,000
City of Ashland Industrial Park Road Construction, OH...         300,000
City of Ashland, Pedestrian Infrastructure Improvements, 
    WI..................................................         450,000
City of Baytown, Streetscape Project, TX................         700,000
City of Elkhart Grade Separation Project, Norfolk-
    Southern Railroad, IN...............................         200,000
City of Key West Job Access Program, FL.................         500,000
City of Lawndale Street Improvements, CA................         850,000
City of Leander Upgrade FM 2243, TX.....................         500,000
City of Omaha Widening/Improvements to Q Street from 
    157th Street to 204th Street, NE....................       1,000,000
City of Presque Isle Public Works Department Capital 
    Improvements, ME....................................         700,000
City of Santa Fe Springs, Los Angeles County, CA........         800,000
City of Santa Monica ITS Improvements, CA...............         350,000
City of Selma Water Avenue Streetscape Improvement, AL..         400,000
City of St. Petersburg bicycle master plan, FL..........         400,000
City of Thornton, Grade Separation Improvements, CO.....         500,000
Clark County, NV Beltway and Interchanges, NV...........         150,000
Clifton Corridor Transit and Transportation 
    Improvements, GA....................................       1,000,000
Coalfields Expressway, WV...............................      10,000,000
Cobblestone Landing Restoration, Memphis, TN............       2,000,000
College of Southern Idaho Student Safety Initiative, ID.         750,000
Colorado Boulevard Connector, CO........................       2,000,000
Columbus Bypass, MS.....................................       3,000,000
Columbus North Arterial Project, NE.....................         500,000
Connecting Road from Route 78 and Lathrop Street to East 
    2900th Street, Annawan, IL..........................       2,300,000
Construction of K-254, Northwest Bypass in Sedgwick, KS.       2,500,000
Construction of USH 8 and Industrial Parkway 
    intersection overpass, City of St. Croix Falls, WI..       1,250,000
County Road 19 Improvements, Cherokee County, AL........         500,000
Creager Island Bridge Replacement, Wayne County, NY.....         950,000
Creation of Pedestrian/bike paths on Route 190 Bridge, 
    Enfield, CT.........................................         750,000
Cromwell Industrial Park road construction in Cromwell, 
    CT..................................................         500,000
Crooks Road, from 14 Mile Road to Elmwood Road/Meijer 
    Drive, Clawson, MI..................................       2,200,000
Cross Valley Connector, Santa Clarita, CA...............       1,000,000
Crystal Lake Mitigation, Manchester, NH.................         300,000
CSAH 82 Victory Extension Project, Stage 3, MN..........         250,000
CTAA of America Nationwide Joblinks, MA.................       3,000,000
Culvert Replacement on Roads, AK........................         750,000
Curry College Area Road Improvements, MA................         500,000
Dakota Turkey Plant Access Road US 14 in Huron, SD......         500,000
Daytona Avenue Highway Improvements, Penfield, NY.......         100,000
Dedeaux Road, Gulfport, MS..............................       2,000,000
Delaware Welfare to Work Program, DE....................         275,000
Denton I-35E Bridge at Loop 288/U.S. 77, TX.............       2,000,000
Des Moines (Principal) Riverwalk, Des Moines, IA........         750,000
Design and construction of Union Street railroad 
    underpass, West Springfield, MA.....................         900,000
Development and construction of SR37/SR145, IN..........         500,000
Downtown Multimodal Parking System, Huntsville, AL......       1,000,000
Downtown Road Improvement, Indianapolis, IN.............         700,000
Dualization of MD 404, MD...............................       2,000,000
Dualization of US 113, MD...............................       2,000,000
Dublin Boulevard and Dougherty, City of Dublin, CA......         300,000
E. Genesee Avenue streetscape project, Saginaw, MI......       1,000,000
East Lake Sammamish Parkway, Sammamish, WA..............         750,000
Eastern Hills Corridor road construction, Clarence, Erie 
    County, NY..........................................         900,000
Edith Boulevard Improvements, Bernalillo County, NM.....       3,000,000
El Camino East/West Corridor, LA........................         400,000
Eleven Mile Road, Berkley, Oak Park, and Huntington 
    Woods, MI...........................................       1,000,000
Environmental Shield, Brooklyn Queens Expressway, NY....         650,000
Essential road improvements, Desert Hot Springs, CA.....       1,000,000
Evacuation Plan Funding, LA.............................       1,000,000
Evanston, IL: CTA viaducts reconstruction, IL...........         750,000
Evansville Indiana Downtown Traffic Study, IN...........         200,000
Expansion of access and parking adjacent to Post Office, 
    City of Jacksonville, AL............................         110,000
Expansion of Highway 431, Town of Roanoke, AL...........         150,000
Extend I-759 East to US Highway 278, Gadsden, AL........       2,800,000
FAST-TRAC SCATS signal installations, Oakland County, MI       1,000,000
Flamingo Road Reconstruction, Laguna Beach, CA..........       2,000,000
Fort Bragg Bike Path, CA................................         750,000
Fort Campbell Variable Message Board/Directional Signs 
    in Fort Campbell, KY................................       1,100,000
Fort Worth Flood Safety, TX.............................         800,000
Fort Worth Transportation Improvement Projects, TX......       2,000,000
Fortification Street Rehabilitation, Jackson, MS........       3,000,000
Fourth Street Bridge, San Francisco, CA.................       1,500,000
Fredericksburg Road-Medical Drive, San Antonio, TX......         500,000
Freight Rail Improvements, New Bedford, MA..............         500,000
Fresno State Route 41 Off ramp Improvements, CA.........       1,500,000
Galveston Rail Trolley Extension to Seawall Boulevard, 
    TX..................................................         750,000
GEARS Intelligent Transportation Systems, PA............         400,000
Geneva Road (SR-114) from Orem 1600 North to University, 
    Provo, UT...........................................         500,000
Going Street Overcrossing Project, OR...................       1,000,000
Grand Teton Pathways Project, WY........................       4,000,000
Great River Road, Renovating Old Fort Madison, IA.......          25,000
Great River Road, Scenic Byways, Montrose, IA...........          50,000
Greater Nanticoke (Luzerne Co, PA) Connector Road, PA...         750,000
Greenbridge Transportation Improvements, White Center, 
    WA..................................................       1,500,000
Greene Co. Demonstration Bridge, MO.....................         148,000
Greene County, Georgia Conversion of I-20 and Carey 
    Station, GA.........................................         200,000
Grenada Lake Bridge, Grenada, MS........................         200,000
Grenada Lake Bridge, MS.................................         500,000
Guaranteed Ride Home Prog. Santa Clara County, CA.......         300,000
Hapeville rail facilities and corridor, GA..............       3,000,000
Hartford Avenue Improvements to Aid Pocasset River 
    Drainage, RI........................................       1,000,000
Hattiesburg Intelligent Transportation System, MS.......         500,000
Highway 100 Trail Bridge and 26th Street Pedestrian 
    Bridge, St. Louis Park, MN..........................         800,000
Highway 149 Improvements, Richland, MS..................       1,700,000
Highway 21 extension, Talladega, AL.....................         500,000
Highway 25 to MS Highway 471 in Flowood, MS.............       1,750,000
Highway 278 Corridor, Beaufort County, SC...............         250,000
Highway 412 Mountain Home to Ash Flat, AR...............         700,000
Highway 44 Bridge, Marion County, MS....................         750,000
Highway 45 Bypass, Columbus, MS.........................         600,000
Highway 49 Widening from the University of North 
    Carolina to the Yadkin River Bridge, Charlotte, NC..       5,000,000
Highway 49/Highway 7 Connector Road, Greenwood, MS......       1,500,000
Highway 6 Bypass, TX....................................       2,250,000
Highway 6 from Batesville to Clarksdale, MS.............       3,250,000
Highway 63: Interstate 55-Jonesboro, AR.................       2,000,000
Highway 7 Improvements, Blue Springs, MO................       2,550,000
Highway 71: Texarkana--DeQueen, AR......................       2,000,000
Highway 77 Rail Grade Separation, Marion, AR............         350,000
Highway 82 Frontage Roads, Leland, MS...................         500,000
Highway-rail grade crossing bypass, Silver Spring, NY...         600,000
Hike and Bike Trails, Burleson, TX......................         250,000
Historic Court Square Improvements, Charlottesville, VA.         140,000
Hoboken Waterfront Walkway along North Sinatra Drive, NJ         400,000
Honolulu Ways to Work, HI...............................         250,000
Hoosier Heartland Highway, Cass/Carroll County, IN......       1,300,000
Hoosier Heartland Highway, IN...........................       1,500,000
Hoover Nature Trail, Ely, IA............................         100,000
Houston Flood Improvement Projects, TX..................       1,500,000
Houston Road Improvements, TX...........................         750,000
Howell, Shannon, Carter and Butler Counties, Route 60, 
    MO..................................................         500,000
Hudson River Waterfront Walkway, NJ.....................         750,000
HWY 133 from Valdosta to Moultrie to Albany, GA.........       1,000,000
I-15 Layton Interchange, Layton, UT.....................       1,500,000
I-15 North & Commuter Rail Coordination study; Davis 
    County, UT..........................................       1,500,000
I-15 (Falchion Rd)/SR 18 Interchange, CA................       1,000,000
I-20 Corridor Program, Lincoln Parish, LA...............         600,000
I-26/US 1 Airport Intermodal Connector, Lexington, SC...         750,000
I-275/M-5 corridor economic development study for 
    Oakland and Wayne Counties by the I-275/M-5 
    Transportation Alliance, Farmington Hills, MI.......         500,000
I-4 Crosstown Connector, FL.............................         850,000
I-4 Land Acquisition (Orlando Metropolitan Area), FL....       1,500,000
I-40/Arizona 95 Interconnect, Needles, CA...............       2,000,000
I-49 North, LA..........................................         500,000
I-5 Freeway/Highway 43 Freeway Ramp and Street Capacity 
    Improvements, OR....................................       2,000,000
I-5 Sorrento Valley/Genesee Avenue, San Diego, CA.......         600,000
I-69, Indianapolis to Evansville, IN....................       1,450,000
I-74 Northern Beltway, Eastern Section Extension, 
    Winston-Salem, NC...................................         500,000
I-76 Corridor Improvements from Ft. Morgan to Nebraska 
    state line, CO......................................       1,600,000
I-79 Parkway West ramp construction and widening, PA....         500,000
I-90 Burma Avenue Overpass, Gillette, WY................       1,000,000
I-94 Westbound Reconstruction, ND.......................       1,000,000
I-Go Carsharing Project, Chicago, IL....................         400,000
Illinois Trails, IL.....................................       2,000,000
Improve Millstonebrook Road Southampton, NY.............         500,000
Improvements to Alton Traffic Rotary, NH................         250,000
Improvements to Mill Bridge, Somers, CT.................       2,000,000
Improvements to Raffia Road in Enfield, CT..............         900,000
INAAP Re-use Authority Project, IN......................       1,500,000
Indian River Bridge Inlet Replacement, DE...............       3,000,000
Indianapolis Downtown Road Improvements, IN.............       1,000,000
Infrastructure Development and Highway/Street Access 
    Improvements, Rural Enterprises, OK.................         200,000
Integrate Traffic Light Coordination, Houston, TX.......         750,000
Intelligent Transportation System, Ventura County, CA...         700,000
Interchange construction on I-94 at 21 Mile Road, 
    Chesterfield Township, MI...........................         600,000
Intermodal Freight Facilities, Port of Walla Walla, WA..       1,500,000
Intermodal Infrastructure Enhancement Project, Port of 
    Olympia, Olympia, WA................................       1,000,000
Intersection at I-49 and Highway 190, St. Landry Parish, 
    LA..................................................       1,000,000
Intersection Improvements Route 9/Oak, Natick, MA.......       1,400,000
Interstate 40/Highways 25/64 Interchange, AR............         750,000
Interstate 5 Blaine Exit Interchange in Blaine, WA......         500,000
Interstate 5 Trade Corridor, OR.........................         800,000
Interstate 69, TN.......................................       1,900,000
Interstate 93 Water Quality Study, NY...................       1,250,000
Interstate-235 Reconstruction Project, IA...............         600,000
Isle of Wight Emergency Signals, VA.....................         300,000
Issac Middle School Pedestrian Bridge, AZ...............         700,000
ITS St. George Area, UT.................................         750,000
Jackson Road right-of-way and reconstruction, MI........         400,000
Jacksonville Transportation Authority, Soutel Road 
    Improvements, FL....................................       3,000,000
Jennie Barker Rd./Mary St./K-156 Intersection 
    Reconfiguration, Finney County, KS..................       1,250,000
Jersey City Signalization Improvements, Jersey City, NJ.         800,000
Johnson County, East/West Corridor, Phase I, IN.........       1,000,000
Joplin Downtown Streetscape Development, MO.............       1,000,000
Joplin West Bypass Study, MO............................         120,000
K-18 4-lane Improvement, Preliminary Engineering and 
    Design, Riley County, KS............................       1,250,000
Kalkberg Commerce Park, NY..............................         725,000
Kendall Square Transportation Improvements, MA..........       1,000,000
Keystone Drive Reconstruction and Upgrade, AK...........       1,000,000
KY1494 widening in Bullitt County, KY...................         150,000
LA 1 Replacement, LA....................................       1,500,000
LA Highway 28 from Ft. Polk to Alexandria, LA...........         750,000
La Velle Road Reconstruction, Alamogordo, NM............       1,000,000
Lagoon Pond Inlet Bridge, Martha's Vineyard, MA.........         800,000
Lake County Passage, IL.................................         975,000
Lake County Passage, Lake County, IL....................       1,300,000
Lake Falcon Improvements Project, TX....................         600,000
Lake Road Seaway Trail, Webster, NY.....................         450,000
Latson Road/I-96 Interchange, Brighton, MI..............         300,000
Leeville Bridge, LA.....................................         800,000
Lenexa Prairie Star Parkway, KS.........................         250,000
Lexington Connector, SC.................................         893,000
Liberty Street Reconstruction, McDonald, PA.............         100,000
Library Lane Project, NY................................         800,000
Lincoln Bypass, CA......................................         700,000
Lincoln South Beltway, NE...............................       2,000,000
Little Bay Bridges/Spaulding Turnpike, NH...............       2,500,000
Little Sugar Creek, Greenway, NC........................         500,000
Livernois Road, from South Boulevard to Avon Road, 
    Rochester Hills, MI.................................       1,300,000
Long Branch Village Center Access Improvements, Silver 
    Spring, MD..........................................         750,000
Longfellow Bridge Rehabilitation, Boston, MA............         700,000
Main Street Extension Realignment, Freemansburg, PA.....         800,000
Malden Industrial Park Improvement Programs, MO.........         800,000
Maple Road lane addition and road improvements between 
    Drake and Beck, MI..................................         500,000
Marin Novato Narrows Highway 101 Corridor Widening, CA..         850,000
Maryland 4 Suitland Parkway Exchange, MD................       2,000,000
Maryland 5 at Maryland 373, MD..........................       2,500,000
MD 246, MD235 to Saratoga Drive, MD.....................       1,000,000
MD45, Cavan to Ridgely Road, MD.........................         750,000
Mechanical Civil Aerospace Engineering Complex, Rolla, 
    MO..................................................       2,000,000
Medford Downtown Traffic and Pedestrian Redevelopment 
    Project, MA.........................................       1,000,000
Memorial Drive Improvements, Lancaster, OH..............         950,000
Meredith Village Improvement Project, NH................         800,000
Mexico Branch Line Improvements, MO.....................       2,000,000
Middle Reservation Road Improvements, Wyoming County, NY       1,000,000
Midlothian Road Widening and Signalization Project, IL..         450,000
Midtown Greenway, Minneapolis, MN.......................       1,500,000
Milwaukee Intermodal Terminal, WI.......................       2,000,000
Misericordia Job Program, IL............................         200,000
Missouri Avenue Reconstruction, Keokuk, IA..............         350,000
Monaville Road Bike Path Tunnel, IL.....................         800,000
Montana Automated Crash Notification Research, MT.......       1,000,000
Monterey Bay Sanctuary Scenic Trail, CA.................         500,000
Montour Trail completion project, PA....................         250,000
Morgan County Bridges Improvement Project in Morgan 
    County, KY..........................................       1,000,000
Morgan State University Transportation Center, MD.......         500,000
Mountain Avenue Duarte Road Realignment, Duarte, CA.....         500,000
MSU South Entrance Loop, MS.............................       1,000,000
Myrtle Avenue Streetscape Project, Monrovia, CA.........         100,000
N.A. Sandifer Highway, Lincoln County, MS...............       1,250,000
Navy Yard Reconstruction of Broad Street Quaywall, PA...         900,000
Nebraska Highway 35, NE.................................       5,000,000
New Hampshire Route 111A Intersection Safety 
    Improvements, NH....................................         750,000
New Haven Missouri River bore project, MO...............       1,000,000
New Mexico State University Bridge Research Center, NM..         200,000
Ninth Street Arterial Connector, Prineville, OR.........         500,000
Norris Viaduct Project, WY..............................         800,000
North Cass Parkway Corridor Improvement from U.S. 71 to 
    Mullen Road, Belton, MO.............................       2,000,000
North County 1-5 interchanges and Arch Sperry Road, San 
    Joaquin County, CA..................................       3,000,000
North Oak Corridor Improvement Project, MO..............       2,000,000
Northern Corridor Widening, St. George, UT..............         500,000
Northside Dr, Clinton, MS...............................       2,500,000
North-South Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL...................         350,000
Northwest Butler Transportation Improvement District, 
    Butler County, OH...................................       4,000,000
Northwestern Highway Extension, Oakland County, MI......       1,500,000
Ohio to Erie Trail/Camp Chase Segment, OH...............       2,000,000
Old Orchard Rd Overpass, MO.............................       3,000,000
Orange County SR50 Road Improvements, FL................         250,000
Orange County, FL.......................................         400,000
Overpass for SH146 at Wharton Wheems, La Porte, TX......       1,475,000
PA 901/PA61/PA54 Connector, Northumberland, PA..........       1,500,000
PA-10 widening, New Morgan Borough, PA..................       5,000,000
Paducah Waterfront Development Project in Paducah, KY...       2,300,000
Palmer Canyon Road Improvements, Los Angeles County, CA.         700,000
Park Boulevard drainage improvements, Pinellas Park, FL.       4,500,000
Park Street Streetscape Improvements, Alameda, CA.......         700,000
PATCO Fleet Upgrade, NJ.................................       3,000,000
Pecue Land Interchange and Realignment, LA..............         225,000
Pedestrian Walkway at SCSU and Claflin University, SC...       1,700,000
Pelzer Street Reconstruction, City of Winona, MN........         250,000
Penn and Smallman Street Gateways Project, PA...........         345,000
Pittsfield Downtown Streetscape Plan, MA................       1,850,000
Planning, preliminary engineering, land acquisition, and 
    construction to widen I-75 from Eight Mile Road to 
    M-59, MI............................................       2,000,000
Plough Boulevard Interchange at Winchester Road, 
    Memphis, TN.........................................       1,000,000
Port of Albany Operational Improvements, Albany, NY.....         650,000
Port of Siuslaw Infrastructure Improvements, OR.........         500,000
Port of Stockton, Daggett Road, Stockton, CA............         500,000
Portland & Western Rail Bridge Replacement Project, 
    Albany, OR..........................................         850,000
Ports to Plains, US 287 Corridor, CO....................       3,000,000
Powell County Bridge Replacement, MT....................         200,000
Prairie Star Parkway/K-7--Maize Blvd., Lenexa, KS.......         800,000
Priority Projects, South Dakota Department of 
    Transportation......................................         750,000
PVTA JARC, MA...........................................         400,000
Quakertown Rail Investment Study, PA....................         300,000
Queens Plaza Rebuilding Project, Queens, NY.............         800,000
Rail right-of-way purchase, City of Spooner, WI.........         155,000
Railroad Avenue Improvement, LA.........................         600,000
Ram Island Road Improvements, Shelter Isle, NY..........         300,000
Ranch Vista Boulevard widening project, Palmdale, CA....         545,000
Ranchero Road Grade Separation, Hesperia, CA............       3,000,000
Ravenswood Road Improvement Project, East Palo Alto, CA.         500,000
Re-alignment and Reconstruction of Somerset Street, ME..         100,000
Realignment, Widening and Reconstruction of Prospect 
    Street in Hartford, CT..............................       2,000,000
Reconstruct 3rd Street, City of Wausau, WI..............       1,500,000
Reconstruct Barnes Street/Eastern Avenue, Rhinelander, 
    WI..................................................         750,000
Reconstruction of Eleven Mile Road, MI..................         650,000
Reconstruction of Main Street in Tappan, NY.............         650,000
Reconstruction of Main Street, Stoneham, MA.............         450,000
Reconstruction of Old Highway 77, Geary County, KS......         400,000
Reconstruction of University Drive from the Crittenton 
    Hospital Medical Center east to Main Street (M-150) 
    in the City of Rochester, MI........................       2,000,000
Rehabilitate Route 1(a) Bridge, Hampton, NH.............         850,000
Renovations on Dixon Road, City of Cocoa, FL............         600,000
Renovations on Industry Road, City of Cocoa, FL.........         400,000
Repair of Route 9 Bridge and Vanderbilt Wall, NY........       1,100,000
Replace Ash Street/Pillsbury Road Bridge, Londonderry, 
    NH..................................................         500,000
Replace Milford Road Bridge, Anderson, SC...............         500,000
Replacement of Makakupaia Stream Bridge, Molokai, HI....         750,000
Reunion Parkway Environmental Assessment, Madison, MS...         500,000
Richmond Bypass, McHenry, IL............................         650,000
Rio Grande Bike Trail, Garfield County, CO..............       1,000,000
RITC Mass Country Roads, MA.............................         650,000
Road/Overpass Improvements at Adriaen's Landing and CT 
    Science Center, Hartford, CT........................       4,000,000
Roadway improvements to Old Laurens Road, Laurens, SC...         250,000
Rochelle Park and Paramus, Bergen County, NJ............       1,300,000
Route 10/202-Southwick, MA..............................       1,800,000
Route 112 Scenic Byway, MA..............................          75,000
Route 195 Corridor Study, Tolland, CT...................         300,000
Route 23 Hardyston Road Improvements, NJ................       1,700,000
Route 31 Ashby State Road, Fitchburg, MA................         750,000
Route 5 and Route 10 Bernardston, MA....................       1,000,000
Route 7 Leesburg Bypass Project, Leesburg, VA...........         500,000
Route 78 widening (Transit Road) from Genessee Street to 
    Main Street, Erie County, NY........................         900,000
Routes I-295 and 42 Missing Moves, Camden County, NJ....       2,000,000
Rural dock and waterfront development projects, AK......       2,000,000
S.R. 5 Corridor Improvements (W. 12 St.), PA............         800,000
Sacramento Buses and Bus Facilities, CA.................         250,000
Safer Roadside Barriers, NE.............................       1,000,000
Safety Improvements to Third Street, Suffield, CT.......         400,000
Sakonnet River Bride, RI................................       2,000,000
San Francisco 19th Avenue Improvements, CA..............       1,000,000
Saratoga RR Overpass, Simpson County, MS................       1,250,000
School Pedestrian Safety, Alameda County, CA............         650,000
SCRRA Highway/Rail Sealed Corridor Program, CA..........         500,000
SE Connector/Martin Luther King, Jr. Parkway East, Des 
    Moines, IA..........................................       3,000,000
Second Street Bridge Replacement project, MO............         864,000
Semmes Street Project, East Point, GA...................         500,000
Senior Transportation Project, OH.......................         800,000
SH71-FM20 to .25 m west of SH304 Bastrop City, TX.......         600,000
Sierra College Boulevard/I-80 Interchange, Rocklin, CA..         300,000
Siesta Gardens Alternative Access Road, VA..............         500,000
Sistrunk Boulevard Streetscape Improvements, Ft. 
    Lauderdale, FL......................................         750,000
Somerset Downtown Revitalization Project, KY............         800,000
South Boulevard Signal System, NC.......................         700,000
South Capitol Street Improvements, MD...................       2,250,000
South County Commuter Rail, RI..........................       4,000,000
South Frontage Road, Vicksburg, MS......................       2,000,000
South Lawrence Traffic Way, City of Lawrence and Douglas 
    County, KS..........................................       1,500,000
South Medford Interchange, OR...........................         350,000
South Road Mitigation, Londonderry, NH..................         250,000
South Valley Connector Project, ID......................       2,000,000
Southern California High Speed Rail Grade Crossing 
    Improvements, CA....................................       2,000,000
Special Services Transportation Agency, Chittenden 
    County, VT..........................................         300,000
Springfield Evening Bus Service, IL.....................         375,000
SR 146, Saint Rose Parkway (Phase 2) Reconstruction and 
    Widening, NV........................................       3,000,000
SR 171 at Rocky Comfort Creek, GA.......................       1,000,000
SR 247/SR1012 Valley View Business Park, Lackawanna 
    County, PA..........................................       2,500,000
SR 4 widening and bridge replacement, Brentwood, CA.....         200,000
SR 62 Lloyd Expressway Vanderburgh County, IN...........         750,000
SR 67 and SR 605 from I-110 to US 49, MS................         500,000
SR-56/I-5 Northbound Widening Project, San Diego, CA....         400,000
SR-91 Chokepoint Elimination in Corona, CA..............       1,000,000
St. Francois, Madison and Wayne Counties, Route 67, MO..         500,000
St. Georges Avenue Improvements, Roselle/Linden, NJ.....         500,000
St. Louis and Garden District Community Transportation 
    Improvement Initiative, MO..........................       3,000,000
St. Louis Science Center Streetscape Improvements, MO...         750,000
St. Louis Zoo Public Safety and Transportation 
    Improvements Project, MO............................       5,000,000
Star Landing Road Corridor, Desoto County, MS...........       1,500,000
State Road A1A S-Curve Improvement project, Deerfield 
    Beach, FL...........................................       2,000,000
State Route 79 Realignment, Riverside County, CA........         700,000
State Street Redesign, Madison, WI......................       1,000,000
Steger Street Improvements, IL..........................         400,000
STH 29/WSH 51, Marathon County, Wausau, WI..............       3,000,000
Subway Hub Access, Museum of Arts and Design, NY........          75,000
Sybiak Farm Mitigation, Derry, NH.......................         300,000
Tacoma Rail Mountain Division Rail-line Improvements 
    from Frederickson to Morton, WA.....................       1,500,000
Tanana River Bridge Replacement, AK.....................       3,000,000
TH 23 Paynesville Bypass, MN............................       1,000,000
Third Avenue resurfacing Project, Ranburne, AL..........          40,000
Tibbee Road Project, Clay County, MS....................         100,000
Toa Baja Recreational Trail Design and Construction, PR.       2,000,000
Toby Tubby Parkway Oxford, MS...........................         100,000
Tolt Bridge Replacement, King County, WA................         250,000
Tower Bridge Pedestrian/Bike Improvements, CA...........         500,000
Towpath Trail to Downtown Cleveland, OH.................         800,000
Traffic Calming Project in Plainsboro, NJ...............         700,000
Traffic congestion mitigation at I-210 and Highway 14, 
    Lake Charles, LA....................................       1,220,000
Traffic study for Mystic Seaport, Stonington, CT........         500,000
Trailways Station Revitalization and Visitors Center, GA         500,000
Transportation Access, Northlake, IL....................         500,000
Transportation and Engineering Research Facility, 
    Columbia, MO........................................       2,000,000
Transportation Grants for Evacuee Impacted Communities, 
    LA..................................................       1,500,000
Transportation Infrastructure Improvements and Expansion 
    for Green River, WY.................................         600,000
Trinity River Visions Neighborhood Linkage, TX..........         200,000
Truman Boulevard Feasibility Study, MO..................         600,000
Truman Boulevard Planning Improvements to I-670, MO.....         500,000
Trump Avenue/Georgetown Street Canton Township, OH......       1,100,000
Trunk Highway 610/10, MN................................       1,000,000
TTC-69 Environmental and Route Location Studies, TX.....         700,000
TTI Bryan-College Station ITS pilot for mid-size 
    studies, TX.........................................         400,000
Tucson Wash Crossings Improvements, AZ..................         100,000
Turnpike Improvements Project at I-95 and State Route 1, 
    DE..................................................       2,000,000
U.S. 12 Improvement Study, Saline, Washtenaw, MI........         600,000
U.S. 20 Toledo's Greenhouse Row, OH.....................         500,000
U.S. 26-287, Dubois to Moran Junction, WY...............       2,000,000
U.S. 35 Interchanges in Green County, OH................       3,000,000
U.S. Highway 11 in St. Tammany Parish, LA...............       2,000,000
U.S. Highway 67 Eastern Outer Road in Desloge, MO.......       1,750,000
U.S. Highway 87 Improvements, MT........................       1,400,000
U.S. Route 13 Corridor redevelopment, PA................        9,00,000
Uniontown to Brownsville--Mon Fayette Expressway, PA....       2,000,000
University District Improvements, Phases 2 and 3, 
    Spokane, WA.........................................       1,500,000
University of Arizona Science Center Bridge, AZ.........       3,500,000
University of South Alabama Transportation Technology 
    Center, AL..........................................      10,000,000
University Parkway Project, Evansville, IN..............       1,600,000
UNMC Relocation of Saddle Creek Road, NE................       1,000,000
UP/Sunset Avenue Grade Separation Banning, CA...........       1,000,000
Upgrade of Route 60 and Route 22/30 Interchange, 
    Allegheny County, PA................................         750,000
Upgrade Wells Highway/Sheep, Farm Road, Oconee, SC......         250,000
Upgrades to Maple Street Bridge, Mainstee, MI...........         345,000
Upgrades to U.S. Rt. 30, City of Wooster, OH............         750,000
US 167 Extension to LA 335, Vermillion Parish, LA.......         280,000
US 22 to I-79 Southern Beltway Project, Allegheny 
    County, PA..........................................       2,400,000
US 278 in Beaufort County, SC...........................       2,000,000
US 287 Corridor construction and repaving, CO...........       2,400,000
US 31, St. Joseph and Marshall Countries, IN............       2,700,000
US 35 Interchange W/I-64 Paving and Bridges, WV.........       2.350,000
US 6 Carbon County, UT..................................         500,000
US 61 Fort Madison Bypass, IA...........................       2,975,000
US 64/State Route 15, TN................................       4,500,000
US 67 Marfa Reliever Route, TX..........................         510,000
US 80/SR26 Bridge at Ogeechee River, GA.................         800,000
US 87 Feasibility Study, TX.............................         250,000
US Highway 51--Highway 43 Connector Road Canton, MS.....       4,000,000
US 14/18 and SD34 ``S'' Curve Underpass, Pierre, SD.....       2,000,000
US-34 Corridor Missouri River Bridges Pair, NE..........       1,500,000
US 401 Harnett and Cumberland Counties, NC..............         400,000
US-54 (Kellogg Rd.) from I-135 to K-96, Wichita, KS.....       1,000,000
US 59 at Grand Parkway overpass in Sugar Land, TX.......       1,850,000
US-95, Worley North, ID.................................       2,000,000
USH2 Improvements, Ashland County, City of Ashland, WI..       1,800,000
UW Superior/UM Duluth Maritime Research, WI.............       2,000,000
Village of Matteson Safety Upgrades, IL.................         750,000
Virgnia Tech Transportation Institute Vehicle and 
    Roadside Safety Product Development, VA.............       2,000,000
W. Smith Road Reconstruction, City of Medina, OH........         750,000
Wadsworth Interchange/State Highway 128, CO.............       1,500,000
Walden Point Road, AK...................................       1,000,000
Walnut Street Route 98 Oak Street, Genesee County, NY...         600,000
War Memorial Hospital Infrastructure, WV................         500,000
Washington St., Greenville, MS..........................       1,250,000
Washington State Produce Rail Car Program, WA...........       1,000,000
Water main, sewer and street improvements, City of 
    Barron, WI..........................................       2,100,000
Waterfront Parking Garage, Camden, NJ...................         800,000
Waterfront Redevelopment Project, Bellingham, WA........         500,000
Waterfront Walkway 12th Street to 10th Street along 
    North Sinatra Drive, Hoboken, NJ....................       1,000,000
Weathersfield US 422 Widening, Trumbull Co, OH..........         800,000
West Bypass Study City of Joplin, MO....................         120,000
West Vancouver Freight Access Project, Port of 
    Vancouver, WA.......................................       2,300,000
West Virginia Route 10, Logan County, WV................       5,000,000
Wickiup Junction Grade Separation, Deschutes County, OR.       1,000,000
Widen Route 50 from Route 2 to Poland Road, Fairfax, VA.       2,300,000
Widen Route 7 west of Tysons Corner, VA.................       1,400,000
Widen SR 86--Sells, AZ..................................         650,000
Widening of Gratiot Avenue from 24 Mile Road to 26 Mile 
    Road, Macomb County, MI.............................         400,000
Wikck's Lake bicycle and pedestrian trail, Farmville, VA         150,000
Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Nature Center & 
    Trail, MO...........................................       1,000,000
Williamsburg bridge plaza improvement, Brooklyn, NY.....         250,000
Wilson Street Bridge land acquisition and design, 
    Batavia, IL.........................................       1,000,000
WINR Donated Wheels Program Expansion, WI...............         100,000
Wisconsin Statewide JARC................................       1,000,000
Wyoming Statewide ITS...................................       1,700,000
Yakima Grade Separations, WA............................       2,500,000
Zora and Main Street Interchange, Joplin, MO............       5,880,000

      Transportation Assistance for Hurricane Impacted 
Communities in Louisiana.--The conference agreement provides 
$1,500,000 to be made available as a grant to the Louisiana 
Department of Transportation and Development to establish a 
program under which the Louisiana Department of Transportation 
and Development shall provide grants to parish and municipal 
governments in the State of Louisiana that experience a 
significant spike in population of at least 10 percent because 
of an unexpected influx of hurricane evacuees, as determined by 
the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, to 
quickly implement smart and innovative plans to alleviate 
traffic congestion and to address increased transportation 
demands in the affected communities.
      Illinois Trails.--The conference agreement provides 
$12,000,000 to the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) 
for various transportation enhancement projects throughout the 
State. The conferees expect IDOT to provide funding to the 
following projects: Springfield Interurban Trail, Urbana to 
Danville Trail, Galena River Trail, Camp Sacajawea Trail, and 
the Genoa Route 66 Prairie Trail.

                       HIGHWAY PRIORITY PROJECTS


      Section 113 includes a new provision that makes certain 
projects and activities eligible to receive fiscal year 2006 
grants.
      Section 114 retains the provision, as proposed by the 
Senate, that allows Nevada and Arizona to reimburse debt 
service payment on the Bypass Bridge at Hoover Dam project with 
future apportionments, in accordance with title 23, United 
States Code. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 115 includes a provision similar to language 
proposed by the Senate that exempts over-the-road bus and 
public transit vehicles from axle weight limitations.
      Section 116 retains the provision, as proposed by the 
Senate, that provides access for solid waste vehicles to a 
``transit only'' ramp in Washington State following the 
completion of necessary safety improvements to the ramp. The 
House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 117 includes a new provision that designates the 
name of a Michigan highway.
      Section 118 includes a new provision that modifies the 
designation of an intelligent transportation systems project in 
Public Law 108-7.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would have prohibited funding from being used 
for development or dissemination of any programmatic agreement 
making the Interstate eligible under the National Register of 
Historic Places.

              FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

              MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY OPERATIONS AND PROGRAMS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement includes a liquidation of 
contract authorization and a limitation on obligations of 
$213,000,000 for the operating expenses of and motor carrier 
safety research by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration (FMCSA), instead of $215,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $211,400,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conference agreement provides funding in the following manner:

                                                        Conference level
Operating expenses......................................    $144,475,000
Research and technology.................................      10,084,000
Information management..................................      42,092,000
Regulatory development..................................      10,414,000
Outreach and education..................................       4,000,000
PRISM operations........................................         935,000
Commercial motor vehicle operators grants...............       1,000,000

      Outreach and education.--The conference agreement provide 
a total of $4,000,000 for outreach and education. Of this 
amount, the conferees direct that no more than $100,000 shall 
be for the ``safety is good business'' program, no less than 
$1,000,000 shall be used to increase safety belt usage among 
commercial motor vehicle drivers, no less then $500,000 shall 
be for the share the road safely program, and no less than 
$1,000,000 shall be for household goods outreach. The conferees 
also provide within the funding for outreach and education 
$150,000 to continue the motorcoach transportation service 
selection program and $390,000 for the telephone hotline.
      The conference agreement also prohibits any funds 
relating to outreach and education from being transferred to 
another agency.
      The conference agreement retains language proposed by the 
Senate directing FMCSA to provide at least two updates to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations during fiscal 
year 2006 on the transition of the share the road safely 
program from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 
(NHTSA) to FMCSA, as well as the status of the two planned 
enforcement/media waves. The conferees also direct NHTSA to 
return to FMCSA the one FTE that had been detailed from FMCSA 
to help oversee the share the road safely program.
      Research and Technology.--The conference agreement 
includes $10,084,000 for research and technology and stipulates 
that the funds shall be available until September 30, 2008.
      Within the funds provided for operating expenses, the 
conference agreement includes funding for the following 
activities:

Salaries and benefits...................................     $91,746,000
Travel..................................................      14,087,000
Transportation..........................................         242,000
Communications, rent, and utilities.....................         515,000
GSA Rent................................................      10,887,000
Printing................................................         530,000
Other services..........................................      17,551,000
Supplies................................................       1,357,000
Equipment...............................................       3,687,000
Working capital fund....................................       3,873,000

      New entrant program.--The conference agreement provides a 
total of $2,000,000 for the new entrant program for oversight 
and other Federal responsibilities. This funding level 
issufficient to support the existing on-board staffing for fiscal year 
2006. An additional $29,000,000 is provided for state grants under the 
motor carrier safety assistance program.
      Commercial vehicle analysis reporting system (CVARS).--
Under the recently enacted reauthorization of motor carrier 
safety programs, no funding is provided within this limitation 
for CVARS. However, the conferees note that funding is 
available within motor carrier safety grants for the FMCSA to 
make grants to, or enter into contracts with, states, local 
government, or other persons for CVARS.

                      MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement provides a liquidating cash 
appropriation and a limitation on obligations of $282,000,000 
for motor carrier safety grants, instead of $286,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $278,620,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement provides funding for motor 
carrier safety grants as follows:

                                                                  Amount
Motor carrier safety assistance program.................    $188,000,000
Border enforcement grants...............................      32,000,000
Performance and registration information system 
    management grant program............................       5,000,000
Commercial driver's license (CDL) program improvement 
    grants..............................................      25,000,000
Commercial vehicle information systems and networks 
    deployment..........................................      25,000,000
CDL information system modernization....................       5,000,000
Safety data improvement grants..........................       2,000,000

      The conference agreement directs that $29,000,000 of the 
funds provided for the motor carrier safety assistance program 
shall be distributed as grants to States and local governments 
for new entrant motor carrier audits.

 ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION

      Section 120 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and the Senate that subjects funds appropriated in this 
Act to the terms and conditions of section 350 of Public Law 
107-87, including that the Secretary submit a report on Mexico-
domiciled motor carriers.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that prohibited using funds in this Act to implement 
or enforce any provision of the Final Rule issued on April 16, 
2003, as it applies to operators of utility service vehicles 
and motion picture and television production drivers working at 
a site within a 100 air mile radius of the reporting location.

             National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

      As noted in both the House and Senate reports, the lack 
of detail and specificity in NHTSA's fiscal year 2006 budget 
justification has put at risk the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees' ability to glean the information 
necessary to make informed decisions about the Nation's highway 
traffic safety programs. To ensure that the Committees have the 
information necessary to invest scarce Federal resources 
wisely, the conferees direct NHTSA to provide detailed 
information regarding requested increases and reductions to 
each program, project or activity outlined in the budget 
request. In particular, for each program, project or activity, 
the conferees direct NHTSA in its fiscal year 2007 budget 
justification to show the fiscal year 2006 enacted level, the 
requested level and to provide a narrative explaining the 
rationale for any increases or reductions to the current fiscal 
year enacted level.

                        OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides a total program level 
of $232,457,000 for highway and traffic safety activities, 
instead of $227,367,000 as proposed by the House and 
$232,688,000 as proposed by the Senate. The limited amounts for 
obligation include $122,457,000 to be transferred from the 
Federal Highway Administration for operations and research, and 
$110,000,000 for operations and research.
      The following table summarizes the conference agreement 
for operations and research by budget activity:

Salaries and benefits...................................     $72,002,000
Travel..................................................       1,336,000
Operating expenses......................................      22,963,000
Contract programs:
    Safety performance (rulemaking).....................      14,155,000
    Safety assurance (enforcement)......................      18,277,000
    Highway safety programs.............................      46,595,000
    Research and analysis...............................      72,632,000
    General administration..............................         673,000
    Grant administration reimbursements.................      16,176,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     232,457,000

                         SALARIES AND BENEFITS

      The conference agreement provides an increase of $150,000 
to support one additional FTE to work exclusively on 
enforcement against non-compliant tire imports in NHTSA's 
vehicle safety compliance office, as proposed by the Senate.

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $5,403,000 for NHTSA's 
contribution to the working capital fund and provides no 
funding for workforce planning and development, as proposed by 
the Senate.

                           SAFETY PERFORMANCE

      The conference agreement includes $10,500,000 for NCAP 
vehicle testing, instead of $7,859,000 as proposed by the House 
and $13,679,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $206,000 for 
harmonization of vehicle safety standards, as proposed by the 
Senate. The House provided no funding for this activity.

                        HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAMS

      The conference agreement provides the following amounts 
for highway safety programs:

Impaired Driving........................................     $12,800,000
    Judicial and prosecutorial awareness................     (1,100,000)
Pedestrian, Bicycle, and Pupil Transportation...........       2,065,000
    WPI Center for Human Impact Protection Systems......       (400,000)
Motorcycle safety.......................................         800,000
National Occupant Protection............................      11,774,000
Enforcement and Justice Services........................       2,217,000
Emergency Medical Services..............................       3,655,000
    NEMSIS implementation...............................     (1,000,000)
    University of South Alabama rural vehicular trauma 
      research..........................................       (350,000)
Traffic Records and Driver Licensing....................       2,660,000
Highway Safety Research.................................       7,690,000
    Bridgewater State College Remote Sensing and Spatial 
      Information Technologies, MA......................       (200,000)
Emerging Traffic Safety Issues..........................       1,178,000
NOPUS...................................................       1,656,000
International Activities in Behavioral Traffic Safety...         100,000

                         RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS

      The conference agreement provides the following amounts 
for research and analysis:

Safety Systems..........................................      $9,226,000
Biomechanics............................................      14,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Crashworthiness.........................      23,226,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Heavy Vehicles..........................................       4,515,000
    Commercial vehicle rollover prevention technology 
      demonstration.....................................       (900,000)
    Michigan Research Institute for research to reduce 
      vehicle weight....................................     (1,000,000)
    National Center for Manufacturing Sciences heavy 
      vehicle fuel economy research program.............       (500,000)
Driver/Vehicle Performance/Simulator....................       7,050,000
Pneumatic Tire Research.................................         621,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Crash Avoidance.........................      12,186,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Fatality Analysis Reporting System......................       7,063,000
National Automotive Sampling System.....................      12,230,000
Data Analysis Program...................................       2,000,000
State Data Program......................................       2,540,000
Special Crash Investigations............................       1,700,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, National Center for Statistics & 
      Analysis..........................................      25,533,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey...........       8,000,000
Vehicle Research and Test Center........................       1,012,000
FastFARS................................................       1,000,000
Crash Avoidance Initiative..............................         500,000
Plastic and composite automobiles.......................         250,000
Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Safety..         925,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................      11,687,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total, Research and Analysis....................      72,632,000

      Driver/Vehicle Performance/Simulator.--The conference 
agreement retains a provision in the Senate report directing 
that not less than $3,000,000 be provided for the National 
Advanced Driving Simulator.
      Driver Distraction.--The conferees direct NHTSA to 
undertake an effort to consolidate current knowledge on driver 
distraction for use by policy makers that would assist state 
and local governments to formulate effective policies, 
regulations and laws. Such an effort should also identify areas 
in which scientific evidence is weak or lacking, thus helping 
to focus the federal research effort in the most productive 
directions.

                        OPERATIONS AND RESEARCH

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement limits obligations for 
operations and research to $110,000,000, instead of $75,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $226,688,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                        NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement limits obligations for the 
national driver register to $4,000,000 as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

                     HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY GRANTS

                (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORIZATION)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                          (HIGHWAY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement limits obligations for highway 
traffic safety grants to $578,176,000, instead of $551,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $548,182,095 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees direct NHTSA to submit a High Visibility 
Enforcement grants spending plan to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations within 60 days of enactment.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
                             ADMINISTRATION

      Section 125 modifies a provision included by the Senate 
providing funding for travel and related expenses for state 
management reviews and highway safety core competency 
development training. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would provide funding for seat belt and 
impaired driving mobilizations.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would authorize innovative project allocations 
under section 157 seat belt grants.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that provides additional funding for NCAP. The 
conference agreement provides funding under ``Operations and 
Research.''

                    Federal Railroad Administration

                         SAFETY AND OPERATIONS

      The conference agreement provides $145,949,000 for Safety 
and Operations as proposed by the House instead of $146,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The conferees approve three new 
positions for FRA: two hazardous materials tank car facility 
inspectors and one R&D; program manager.

                   RAILROAD RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

      The conference agreement provides $55,075,000 for 
Railroad Research and Development, instead of no funding as 
proposed by the House and $41,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the amount provided, the conferees have provided 
$1,500,000 for the Foster Miller Advanced Freight Locomotive; 
$500,000 for DMU compliance and demonstration, NJ; $210,000 for 
the WVU constructed facility center; $1,500,000 for the 
Marshall University-University of Nebraska consortium for 
safety and research programs in rail equipment, human factors, 
and track and rail safety related issues; and $10,000,000 for 
NDGPS.
      Within the total, the conference agreement provides 
$6,500,000 for positive train control programs, including 
$3,000,000 for the North American Joint PTC program and 
$3,500,000 for a public-private partnership with a freight 
railroad to fund a project to assist the development of 
technology to deploy safety overlay technology designed to 
prevent train movement authority violations, over-speed 
violations, and train collision accidents caused by non-
compliance of authorities as well as provide additional 
protections to roadway workers and to protect against open 
switches in non-signal territories.
      The conference agreement includes $7,190,000 for rail 
corridor planning, to be distributed as follows: $500,000 for 
the Southeast HSR Corridor, NC; $500,000 for the Gulf Coast 
High Speed Corridor, near Carriere, MS; $2,500,000 to address 
critical corridor planning and highway-rail crossing safety 
needs within the Gulf Coast High Speed Rail Corridor; 
$1,540,000 for the Southeast High Speed Rail corridor between 
North Carolina and Virginia; $500,000 for grade crossing hazard 
elimination in Jemison, AL; $750,000 for highway-rail crossing 
improvements to the Pacific Northwest Corridor in Vancouver, 
Washington; $500,000 for the Public Education and Enforcement 
Research program for highway-rail grade crossing safety in 
Illinois; and, $400,000 for corridor improvements to the 
Midwest Regional Rail Initiative in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
      Rail-highway crossing hazard eliminations.--The 
conference agreement provides the following funding allocations 
for rail-highway grade crossing mitigation authorized under 
section 1103(f) of Public Law 109-59:

Grade crossing improvements, Deer Park, TX..............        $650,000
Conecuh Valley Railroad grade crossing at Henderson 
    Highway (CR-21), Troy, AL...........................         100,000
Streeter Avenue grade crossing, Riverside, CA...........         300,000
Grade crossing improvements, Fort Worth, TX.............         450,000
Grade crossing improvements, Palm Beach Gardens, FL.....         375,000
Upper Peninsula grade crossing improvements, MI.........         750,000
Los Angeles grade crossing improvements, CA.............         500,000
Pacific Northwest Corridor grade crossing improvements, 
    WA..................................................       1,250,000
Louisiana statewide grade crossing improvements.........       1,000,000
Gulf Coast grade crossing improvements, MS..............       1,000,000

                    NEXT GENERATION HIGH-SPEED RAIL

      The conference agreement provides no funding for Next 
Generation High-Speed Rail, instead of $10,165,000 as proposed 
by the House and $11,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                     ALASKA RAILROAD REHABILITATION

      The conference agreement provides $10,000,000 for the 
rehabilitation expenses of the Alaska Railroad instead of no 
funding as proposed by the House and $20,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION

                                (AMTRAK)

      The conference agreement provides a total of 
$1,315,000,000 for operations, capital improvements and debt 
service to the National Railroad Passenger Corporation 
(Amtrak). The conferees agree to provide these funds in a new 
account structure that provides better clarity as to the nature 
and extent of Amtrak's operations. The conferees further agree 
that reform is an essential element to bring escalating Amtrak 
costs under control in both the short and long term. As such, 
the conference agreement includes a number of reforms aimed at 
bringing about operational efficiency.

OPERATING SUBSIDY GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION

      The conference agreement provides $495,000,000 to the 
Secretary of Transportation to make quarterly operating subsidy 
grants to Amtrak, upon submittal of grant requests. Amtrak and 
the Secretary are reminded that the quarterly grants need not 
be of equal size, and that Amtrak should submit grant requests 
that align to seasonal operating needs.
      Earlier in the year, the Appropriations Committees 
received testimony from the Department of Transportation 
Inspector General (IG) indicating that Amtrak would require an 
appropriation between $1,400,000,000 and $1,500,000,000 in 
order to maintain all existing services through fiscal year 
2006. More recently, however, the conferees received a 
communication from the IG indicating that Amtrak carried over 
roughly $120,000,000 in available funds into fiscal year 2006--
some $90,000,000 more than was anticipated at the time of his 
initial testimony. The IG also noted that Amtrak failed to 
avail itself of multiple cost-saving opportunities, 
particularly in the areas of food and beverage and first class 
services.These findings prompted the IG to conclude that 
``Amtrak can function at a lower level of Federal funding--
$1,275,000,000 in FY 2006--without cutting routes.'' In total, the 
conference agreement provides $1,315,000,000 for Amtrak--$40,000,000 
more than the level cited by the Inspector General.
      The conference agreement includes bill language mandating 
that Amtrak achieve operational efficiencies, and directing the 
DOT Inspector General to submit quarterly reports to Congress 
tracking Amtrak's progress in this area. The conferees direct 
the Inspector General to develop an operating subsidy baseline 
by January 3, 2006 against which Amtrak's progress will be 
measured. The conference agreement includes bill language that 
prohibits federal subsidies for food and beverage and sleeper 
car service if the IG cannot certify by the July 1, 2006 
quarterly report that Amtrak has achieved operational savings. 
The conference agreement also includes a provision prohibiting 
Amtrak from discounting tickets at more than 50 percent off the 
normal, peak fare after March 1, 2006, consistent with Amtrak's 
recently announced plan for the Smart Pass program.
      The conferees are aware of a recent Government 
Accountability Office report that highlights serious weaknesses 
in Amtrak's procurement practices. The conferees expect that 
these concerns will be remedied, and direct Amtrak, as part of 
its monthly reporting requirements, to identify and justify all 
sole source contract awards.
      The conference agreement also provides $5,000,000 for 
development of a managerial cost accounting system, as proposed 
by the Senate. Finally, the conference agreement continues 
reporting and grant-making provisions contained in prior 
appropriations Acts, including the withholding of $60,000,000 
for directed service orders should it be needed.
      Subject to the terms and conditions set forth in this 
Act, the conferees encourage Amtrak to continue offering 
discounted tickets for veterans and, if financially feasible, 
to increase the veterans' discounts offered during off-peak 
periods when space remains available on trains. If discounts 
are offered, the conferees expect these discounts to be offered 
equally to members of all veterans service organizations.

  CAPITAL AND DEBT SERVICE GRANTS TO THE NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER 
                              CORPORATION

      The conference agreement includes $780,000,000 for 
capital and debt service payment grants to Amtrak. The 
conferees agree to language that provides not more than 
$280,000,000 for debt service payments. If Amtrak is able to 
refinance its debt and reduce the size of its payments, the 
conference agreement permits the savings to be used for the 
capital program. The conferees include language carried in 
previous appropriations Acts requiring the Secretary to approve 
capital expenditures in advance.
      The conference agreement also includes a provision 
directing the Secretary to determine the capital and 
maintenance cost to Amtrak associated with the use of Amtrak-
owned infrastructure on the Northeast Corridor by the commuter 
railroads that operate over that corridor. The provision 
requires the Secretary to determine and assess appropriate fees 
on the commuter railroads based on that use. The revenues from 
these fees will be merged with the capital appropriation and be 
used for the appropriate capital investments along the 
Northeast Corridor. In establishing the level of such fees, the 
Secretary will account fully for the contributions that 
commuter railroads currently make toward these costs. The 
conferees expect the Secretary to establish these fees 
expeditiously and through an open and transparent process that 
seeks, to the maximum extent possible, to yield a consensus on 
the part of all stakeholders as to the appropriate distribution 
of costs between said stakeholders. The conferees expect the 
Inspector General to include an assessment of the Department's 
efforts in assessing and collecting these fees as part of his 
quarterly reports on Amtrak's operating efficiencies beginning 
with the report due on July 1, 2006.

                      EFFICIENCY INCENTIVE GRANTS

      The conference agreement includes $40,000,000 for a new 
Efficiency Incentive Grant program. These funds are to be used 
at the discretion of the Secretary and may be used at any time 
during the fiscal year to make additional operating assistance 
available to Amtrak if the Secretary determines such assistance 
is necessary to maintain the operation of existing Amtrak 
routes. Funds may also be disbursed by the Secretary at any 
time during the fiscal year for operating assistance if such 
assistance is necessary for Amtrak to stay out of bankruptcy 
and the Secretary and IG have certified that an emergency 
situation exists. The conferees expect the Secretary to hold 
any funds not disbursed for operating assistance in reserve 
until September 1, 2006, and if such funds are not needed for 
additional operating assistance, the Secretary should then make 
capital grants to Amtrak for investments that will have a 
direct and measurable short-term impact on operating 
efficiencies.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION

      Section 130 retains a provision included by the House 
that permits FRA to purchase promotional items for Operation 
Lifesaver. The Senate did not include a similar provision.
      Section 131 retains a provision included by the Senate 
that clarifies the purpose of fiscal year 2005 funding in the 
State of Maine. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 132 retains a provision proposed by the Senate 
that clarifies the purpose of fiscal year 2005 funding in the 
State of Illinois. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Section 133 retains a provision proposed by the Senate 
that permits fiscal year 2004 funding to be used for site 
planning and improvements to Union Passenger Terminal in New 
Orleans. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 134 modifies a provision proposed by the Senate 
that permits fiscal year 2005 funding to be used for 
improvements in Spokane, WA. The House did not include a 
similar provision.
      Section 135 includes a new provision regarding a 
temperature-controlled express demonstration. The conferees 
direct Amtrak to report to both the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations on the status of this demonstration not later 
than April 14, 2006 and monthly thereafter.

                     Federal Transit Administration

      The House and Senate Committees on Appropriations both 
reported out of committee H.R. 3058, which provided 
appropriations for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA), 
prior to the August 10, 2005 enactment of Public Law 109-59, 
the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation 
Equity Act: A Legacy for Users or ``SAFETEA-LU.'' Both the 
House and the Senate structured the appropriations for FTA 
under the authorities contained in Public Law 105-178, the 
Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century or ``TEA-21'' 
and split funded the accounts between the General Fund and the 
Mass Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund. Besides various 
changes to the transit programs, SAFETEA-LU changed the funding 
mechanism for FTA such that accounts are funded completely from 
either the General Fund or the Mass Transit Account. The 
conference agreement follows the structure of SAFETEA-LU.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides a total of $80,000,000 
from the General Fund for the administrative expenses of the 
Federal Transit Administration. Of the amount provided, the 
conferees direct the funds for the following offices:

Administrator...........................................        $925,000
Administration..........................................       7,325,000
Chief Counsel...........................................       4,058,200
Communications and Congressional Affairs................       1,359,300
Program Management (includes public safety).............       7,985,900
Budget and Policy.......................................       8,732,500
Research, Demonstration, and Innovation.................       4,763,900
Civil Rights............................................       3,153,100
Planning................................................       4,127,300
Regional Offices........................................      20,754,000
Central Account.........................................      16,815,000

      The conference agreement retains provisions proposed by 
both the House and the Senate allowing for the transfer of up 
to five percent of funds between offices, directing FTA to 
submit for approval any proposal to transfer funds from the 
Central Account, prohibiting funds for a permanent office of 
transit security, directing FTA to reimburse up to $2,000,000 
to the Office of the Inspector General, and directing the 
submission of the annual new starts report. As proposed by the 
House, funds for the National Transit Database are included 
under the formula program.
      The conferees direct FTA to notify the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations prior to funding e-gov initiatives 
based in the Office of the Secretary. Activities in support of 
the Secretary's initiative should be reflected in either the 
OST account or in the FTA accounts.
      The conferees direct the FTA Administrator to comply with 
the Department's July 18, 2005 chief financial officer (CFO) 
policy requiring each operating agency chief financial officer 
to manage directly all financial and budget activities for both 
program and administrative funds. The conferees agree that the 
FTA CFO is to oversee the formulation and execution of all 
authorized and appropriated funds to the agency. The conferees 
direct the Administrator to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by January 30, 2006, detailing how 
FTA has aligned the agency's management and oversight of the 
financial and budget activities for both program and 
administrative funds consistent with the Department's CFO 
policy.
      Further, the conferees direct the Inspector General to 
conduct an audit of FTA's administrative expenses for fiscal 
year 2005 to validate that funds were spent consistent with the 
provisions of the appropriations Act and the directives that 
were included in the committee reports. The Inspector General 
should report the results of the audit to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by December 31, 2005.
      FTA is directed to submit its fiscal year 2007 
congressional budget justification for administrative funds 
itemized by office with material detailing salaries and 
expenses, staffing increases, and programmatic initiatives of 
each office. The initiatives for each should be clearly stated, 
and include a justification for each new position or full-time 
equivalent, should FTA request additional FTEs next year. In 
addition, the congressional budget justifications must identify 
the administrative costs for each new fixed guideway project 
included in the fiscal year 2007 request.
      The conferees reiterate the Senate directive to continue 
reporting monthly on the new starts program, including 
milestone schedules for projects within two years of reaching 
their full funding grant agreement.

                         FORMULA AND BUS GRANTS

                  (LIQUIDATION OF CONTRACT AUTHORITY)

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement limits obligations from the Mass 
Transit Account for the formula and bus grant program to 
$6,979,931,000. Of the amount available for the fixed guideway 
modernization program, $47,766,000 is to be transferred to the 
Capital Investment Grants account for activities under that 
program. The conferees expect FTA to distribute funds as 
directed by SAFETEA-LU.
      Of the funds provided for bus and bus facilities, the 
conferees direct funds to the following priorities:

10 new fixed-route buses, Cedar Rapids, IA..............         150,000
1st District Bus Replacement and Facilities, MI.........       2,000,000
2nd St/Andrews Ave/3rd St Enhancements, Fort Lauderdale, 
    FL..................................................         500,000
7th Avenue Transit Hub, FL..............................         400,000
7th District Buses and Bus Facilities, WI...............       1,050,000
95th Street Red Line Station, IL........................         800,000
Acquisition of MARTA Transit Buses, GA..................         500,000
ADA Paratransit Vehicles, San Diego, CA.................         500,000
Adams Co. Transit Authority purchase of buses, PA.......         500,000
Alabama Association of Area Agencies on Aging Bus and 
    Van Purchase........................................         200,000
Alabama State Docks Choctaw Point Terminal..............       2,160,000
Alaska Native Medical Center intermodal bus/parking 
    facility............................................         750,000
Alexandria Transit Service Improvements, VA.............       1,000,000
Allegan County Transportation Services, MI..............          89,000
Alternative fuel buses, Broward County, FL..............       1,000,000
Area Transit Authority, PA..............................       1,000,000
Arlington County Bus Transfer Facility, VA..............         400,000
Atlantic City Regional Medical Center Bus Project, NJ...         250,000
Automated Light study along Route 59, NY................         100,000
Automation Alley/BUSolutions, MI........................       2,000,000
Automotive-Based Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Program, DE.......       1,000,000
BARTA--Auto Vehicle Locator System, PA..................         800,000
BARTA--Franklin Street Station Intermodal, PA...........         500,000
Battle Creek Transit Bus Replacement, MI................       1,200,000
Bay City MTA New and Replacement Vehicles, MI...........         400,000
Bellows Falls Multimodal Facility, VT...................       1,000,000
Ben Franklin Transit, Maintenance and Operations 
    Facility, WA........................................         500,000
Bergen Intermodal Stations and Park N'Rides, NJ.........       2,000,000
Berrien County Public Transportation, MI................         150,000
Billings Public Bus and Transfer, MT....................       1,250,000
Blacksburg Transit Intermodal Facility, VA..............         200,000
Bloomfield Intermodal Facilities and Park-and-Ride, NJ..         500,000
Bloomington, Indiana University Campus Bus System, IN...         600,000
Bloomington Public Transportation Corporation, IN.......       1,200,000
Blue Line Trolley Shelter Improvements, CA..............         350,000
Boro Park JCC Bus Purchase, NY..........................         250,000
Boulder Highway Max Bus Rapid Transit System, NV........         450,000
Brazos Transit District Bus Replacement, TX.............         125,000
Brazos Transit District, Capital Cost Contracting, TX...       1,000,000
Bridgeport Intermodal Transport Center, CT..............       4,000,000
Brigham City Buses and Bus Facilities, UT...............         150,000
Brockton Area Transit Authority Replacement Buses, MA...       1,031,459
Broward County Alternative Fuel Buses, FL...............         115,000
Broward County Southwest Bus Facility, FL...............       1,000,000
Bucks County Intermodal Facility, PA....................         500,000
Burbank Airport Hybrid Shuttle Demonstration Project, CA         500,000
Burlington Transit Facilities, VT.......................       1,000,000
Bus Facility 65th Intermodal Station, NY................       1,000,000
Bus Purchase and Upgrades, Columbus, IN.................         500,000
Bus Purchase for Red Rose Transit Authority, Lancaster, 
    PA..................................................         750,000
Bus Rapid Transit in Western Slope Area, CO.............         400,000
Bus Replacement and Facilities, DE......................       1,000,000
Bus Replacement, TX.....................................       1,000,000
Bus Replacements, PA....................................         500,000
Bus Shelters, Dallas, TX................................         500,000
Bus Terminal and Support Facility, Lake Charles, LA.....       1,000,000
Bus/Vehicle Replacement, Lufkin, TX.....................         300,000
Buses and Bus Facilities, Danville, VA..................         300,000
Buses and Bus Facilities, Farmington, NM................         320,000
Buses and Bus Facilities, GA............................         500,000
Buses and Bus Facilities, Las Cruces, NM................       1,000,000
Bus and Bus Facilities, Clarkstown and White Plains, NY.         300,000
Cambria County Transit Authority, PA....................       1,000,000
Capital Area Transit (CAT), PA..........................         750,000
Capital Area Transportation Authority, Hybrid Public 
    Transportation Vehicles Purchase, Lansing, MI.......       2,000,000
Capital Metro Expansion and Improvement, TX.............       2,100,000
Capital Metro North Operating Facility, TX..............         500,000
Capital Metro Rapid Bus Project, TX.....................         750,000
Cass County Transit, MI.................................          80,000
Cedar Avenue Bus Rapid Transit, Dakota County, MN.......         750,000
Central New York Regional Transportation Authority......       1,500,000
Central NJ Intermodal Stations and Park & Rides.........         500,000
Central Ohio Transit Authority Paratransit Facility.....       1,500,000
Centre Area Transportation Intermodal Facility, PA......         500,000
CFRTA LYNX Bus Fleet Expansion, FL......................       1,350,000
Chatham Area Transit Authority bus and facility, GA.....         500,000
Cherry Street Joint Development Project, IN.............         250,000
Chestnut Hill Parking Foundation, Cheltenham, PA........         250,000
Church Street Transportation Center, PA.................         225,000
City of Albuquerque Transit Vehicles, NM................         225,000
City of Anderson Intermodal Center Project, IN..........         125,000
City of Brownsville Urban System, TX....................         500,000
City of Clinton, Missouri, Buses and Bus Facilities, MO.          50,000
City of Coralville Intermodal Facility, IA..............         575,000
City of El Paso Sun Metro Bus Replacement, TX...........       2,000,000
City of Lamar, Missouri, new transit vehicle............          20,000
City of Lubbock Citibus Improvement, TX.................         500,000
City of Marshfield, new transit vehicles, MO............          50,000
City of Midland Dial-A-Ride Section 5309, MI............         366,000
City of Modesto's Bus Maintenance Facility, CA..........         500,000
City of Moultrie, Georgia, Intermodal Facility..........         500,000
City of Northfield, MN Transit Station..................         280,000
City of Texarkana, AR...................................         400,000
City Utilities of Springfield bus facilities, MO........       1,650,000
Clallam Transit, WA.....................................         220,000
Clare County Transit Administration Facility, MI........         460,000
Coatesville Train Station, Coatesville, PA..............       1,000,000
Coconino County Bus Facilities, AZ......................       1,000,000
Colorado Transit Coalition, CO..........................       3,000,000
Communication Equipment and Bus, Belding, MI............          76,000
Commuter Rail Hub Planning and Renovation of the 
    Historic Brigham City Train Depot, UT...............          75,000
Complete intermodal transit facility, Lufkin, TX........         750,000
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Buses, TX..................       1,000,000
Construct bus shelters in Bellflower, CA................         250,000
Construction of Amesbury Bus Facility, MA...............       1,200,000
Corona Transit Center, CA...............................         500,000
Corpus Christi Bus and Bus Facilities, TX...............          80,000
County of Lebanon Transit (COLT), PA....................         300,000
Crawford Internmodal Transportation Facility, PA........         350,000
Cyride/Ames Iowa Bus Garaga facility....................       1,000,000
Deneka Maintenance Facility, MI.........................         500,000
Detroit Bus Leasing and Expansion, MI...................       2,000,000
Dowagiac Dial A Ride, MI................................          50,000
Downtown Akron Transportation Center, OH................         300,000
Downtown Nashville Transit Transfer Facility, TN........         800,000
East County Bus Maintenance Facility, CA................       1,000,000
East Valley Bus Maintenance Facility, AZ................       1,000,000
Easton Intermodal, PA...................................         400,000
Ed Roberts Campus, Berkeley, CA.........................         300,000
El Garces Intermodal Station, Needles, CA...............       2,000,000
Electric, Next-Generation Transit Buses, Broome County 
    Transit, NY.........................................         800,000
Endless Mountain Transportation Authority, Bradford 
    County, PA..........................................         300,000
Enhance Oklahoma Transit Association Public System......         500,000
Enhancements to Bus Terminal in McAllen, TX.............         500,000
Everett Transit, Bus and Paratransit Vehicle 
    Replacement, WA.....................................         825,000
Fairfield/Vacaville Intermodal Station, CA..............         500,000
Family Connection of Shelby County Trans Project, AL....          50,000
Fayette Area Coordinated Transportation, PA.............       1,500,000
Flagler County Buses and Bus Facilities, FL.............         300,000
Flint MTA New and Replacement Vehicles, MI..............         300,000
Foothill Transit, San Gabriel Valley, CA................       3,300,000
Foothills Community Action Partnership Foothills Express 
    Transit Expansion Project, KY.......................         350,000
Fort Bend Co, TX, Park & Ride...........................         500,000
Fort Wayne Citilink, IN.................................         125,000
Franklin County Transportation Council, MO..............         456,000
Franklin Multimodal Center, MA..........................       1,500,000
Fulton County Transit Authority, KY.....................         220,000
Gadsden State Community College Transit Project, AL.....         600,000
Gardner Maintenance Facility Construction, MA...........         800,000
Georgia GRTA Xpress Implementation Buses................       2,250,000
Gettysburg Bus and Bus Facilities, PA...................         250,000
Golden Empire Transit traffic signal priority project, 
    CA..................................................         250,000
Grant Transit, WA.......................................         225,000
Grays Harbor Transit, Transit Center Expansion, WA......         780,000
Grays Harbor Transit, WA................................          65,000
Greater Lapeer Transportation Authority, MI.............         500,000
Greater Lynchburg Transit Company Vehicle Replacement, 
    VA..................................................         400,000
Greater Minnesota Transit Capital.......................       1,000,000
Greater Minnesota Transit Capitol--5309 Buses and Bus 
    Facilities, Rock County.............................         500,000
Greater Ouachita Port intermodal facility, LA...........         400,000
Greater Richmond Transit Company Bus Operations and 
    Maintenance Facility, VA............................       2,000,000
Greater Sacramento Regional Bus Replacement/Bus Facility 
    Expansion, CA.......................................       1,000,000
Hampton Roads Southside Bus Facility, VA................       1,000,000
Hampton Roads Transit Bus Facilities, VA................       2,250,000
Handicap Buses Desoto County, MS........................         150,000
Harbor Transit, MI......................................         404,000
Harlan County Transit Center, KY........................         500,000
Hazleton Intermodal, PA.................................       1,500,000
Helena Transit Facility, MT.............................         250,000
Henderson Area Rapid Transit Authority, KY..............          44,000
High Point International Furniture Market Transportation 
    Terminal, NC........................................         850,000
Hill County Transit Administration Facility, TX.........         500,000
Hillsdale Dial-A-Ride, MI...............................         500,000
Holyoke Multimodal Center, MA...........................       1,750,000
Homestead East-West Bus Connector, FL...................         500,000
Honolulu Bus and Bus Facilities, HI.....................       6,000,000
Houston METRO Bus Transit Centers, TX...................       2,030,000
Hunt County Committee on Aging, TX......................         500,000
I-35W BRT 46th Street Station, Minneapolis, MN..........       1,000,000
Idaho Statewide ITS.....................................         100,000
Idaho Transit Coalition Bus Capital Investment..........       2,150,000
Idaho Transit Coalition Buses and Bus Facilities........         750,000
IL Statewide buses and facilities.......................       8,000,000
Inter-city Transit Companies, Meridian, MS..............         200,000
Inter-Modal Center, Middletown, CT......................         300,000
Intermodal Center, Scottsdale, AZ.......................         810,000
Intermodal Facility, Augusta, ME........................         700,000
Intermodal Facility, Ouachita Parish, LA................         500,000
Intermodal Park and Ride Facility at Discovery, CA......         300,000
Intermodal Station Improvements, Salem and Beverly, MA..       1,200,000
Intermodal Terminal Center, Jacksonville, FL............       1,000,000
Intermodal Transfer Facility at Duncan and Boyle, MO....         700,000
Intermodal Transit Center, Bell Gardens, CA.............         400,000
Intermodal transportation facility, Huntington Hospital, 
    NY..................................................         500,000
Interstate 15 managed lanes, San Diego, CA..............       1,000,000
Island Transit, WA......................................         480,000
ITS Security Equipment for Buses, TX....................         500,000
Ivy Tech Multi-Modal Facility, Indianapolis, IN.........         300,000
Ivy Tech State College Multi-Modal Facility, IN.........         175,000
Jacksonville Transportation Authority Bus and Bus 
    Facilities, FL......................................         340,000
Jamestown 2007 Natural Gas Bus purchase, VA.............         250,000
JARC Hartline, Hillsborough County, FL..................         250,000
JATRAN bus replacement, MS..............................         550,000
Jefferson City, Missouri, Buses and Bus Facilities......         350,000
Jefferson County Transit, WA............................         365,000
Johnson County Fleet Vehicle Replacement, KS............         350,000
Johnson County SEATS Para-Transit Facility Program, IA..         100,000
Kalamazoo Metro Transit, MI.............................       1,000,000
Kalispell Buses, MT.....................................         100,000
Kalkaska County Transportation Facility, MI.............         400,000
Kansas Statewide Bus and Bus Facilities, KS.............         700,000
Kapkowski Road Transportation Planning Area Project, NJ.         500,000
KCATA buses, MO.........................................       3,850,000
Key West Buses and Bus Facilities, FL...................         500,000
King County Airfield Transfer Area, WA..................       1,200,000
King County Metro Park and Ride on First Hill, WA.......       1,200,000
King County Metro, Bus Radio Replacement Program, WA....       2,000,000
Knoxville Electric Transit Intermodal Center, TN........       1,000,000
La Habra Shuttle Senior Transportation Program, CA......         157,000
LA Statewide buses and facilities.......................       4,000,000
Lafayette Bus Replacement, IN...........................         750,000
Lafayette Louisiana Multimodal Transportation Facility..         150,000
Lake County Bus Systems, IN.............................         500,000
Lake Erie Transit Hybrid Transit Buses, MI..............         700,000
Lake Erie Transit Maintenance Bay Expansion, Michigan...         500,000
Lakeland Area Citrus Connection Transit Systems.........         250,000
Lakeside Center Hub, Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York..         700,000
Lakewood Bus Stop Improvements, Lakewood, California....         400,000
Lancaster Intermodal, Pennsylvania......................       2,000,000
Lawson State Community College, Alabama.................         450,000
Lewistown Bus Facility, Montana.........................         300,000
Lincoln County Senior Citizen Bus, Kentucky.............         400,000
Link Transit Low Floor Coaches Chelan/Leavenworth, WA...         500,000
Livermoore Amador Valley Satellite Maintenance and 
    Operations Facility, California.....................       1,000,000
Long Beach Transit Bus Purchase, California.............         750,000
Los Angeles Valley College Bus Station Extension, 
    California..........................................         750,000
Lubbock/Citibus Low-Floor Buses, Paratransit Vans and 
    Facilities, and Passenger Amenities, TX.............          80,000
Ludington Mass Transportation Authority.................         320,000
Macatawa Area Express...................................         250,000
MART Advanced Vehicle Locator System (AVL), 
    Massachusetts.......................................         500,000
MART Maintenance Facility, Fitchburg, Massachusetts.....       1,200,000
MART Vehicle Replacement, Massachusetts.................       1,200,000
MARTA Atlanta Clean Fuel Buses..........................       1,000,000
MARTA Automated Smart Card Fare Collection Systems, 
    Georgia.............................................         375,000
Maryland Statewide Bus Program..........................         500,000
Mason County Transit, Washington........................         150,000
Memphis Airport Intermodal Facility, Tennessee..........       1,375,000
METRO St Louis Downtown Shuttle Trolley, Missouri.......         750,000
Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority acquisition 
    of clean buses, Georgia.............................       2,610,000
Mid Mon Valley Transit Authority, Pennsylvania..........       1,500,000
Midland Bus Facilities, TX..............................          50,000
Midland Bus Facilities, Texas...........................          80,000
Midland County Board of Commissioners Connection........         500,000
Minnesota Transit Cap.--5309 Buses and Bus Facilities--
    St. Peter...........................................         250,000
Miramar Town Center Transit Hub, Miramar, Florida.......         500,000
Mobile Waterfront Infrastructure Development, AL........         600,000
Monroe Township/Clarion University Transit..............         660,000
Monrovia, Los Angeles County, CA, Transit Village.......       1,500,000
Monterey Salinas Transit, Monterey, California..........         400,000
Montgomery Bus Stop, Shelters and Bus GPS Tracking 
    System, Alabama.....................................         200,000
Montgomery County Intermodal, Pennsylvania..............         500,000
Morristown Intermodal Historic Station, NJ..............       3,000,000
Mountain Line Bus, Montana..............................         875,000
MTA transit vehicles for disabled persons, Guam.........         300,000
Muncie Indiana Transit System...........................       1,200,000
N. Indiana Mental Health Trans. Partnership.............         250,000
Nassau County Hub and Centre, NY........................       1,000,000
Nassau County, New York Bus Replacement.................       1,000,000
National Center for Transportation Needs (TRANSPO), FL..         750,000
Nevada Statewide Bus and Bus Facilities, NV.............       3,000,000
New Bus Facility Capital Improvements, California (San 
    Joaquin)............................................       1,000,000
New Orleans Union Passenger Terminal Rehab, Louisiana...       1,000,000
Newark Penn Station Intermodal Improvements, New Jersey.       1,000,000
NFTA Hybrid Buses, Amherst, Erie County, New York.......         750,000
Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Buses, New 
    York................................................         500,000
NIMHTP, Madison Center, South Bend, IN..................         500,000
NJ Transit Jitney Bus Replacement, Atlantic City........         250,000
North Dakota Statewide Transit..........................       1,250,000
North Hempstead Green Bus Fleet, New York...............         600,000
North Leomister Parking Improvements, Massachusetts.....         720,000
Northern New Mexico Park and Ride.......................         450,000
Northumberland County Transportation, PA................         200,000
Northwest Busway, Minneapolis, Minnesota................       1,000,000
Northwestern Connecticut Central Transit Facility.......         300,000
Norwalk Pulse Point Joint Improvements, CT..............         250,000
NW NJ Multi-County Intermodal Transit Initiative........       1,000,000
OATS buses and bus facilities, Missouri.................       2,200,000
OCTA BRT................................................       1,500,000
Ogden Buses and Bus Facilities, UT......................         250,000
Ohio Statewide Buses and Bus Facilities.................       5,600,000
Ojai Multi-Agency Transportation Facility, CA...........         250,000
Oklahoma DOT Transit Program Division...................         500,000
Omni Trans Para Transit Vehicles........................         300,000
Pablo Bus Facility, Montana.............................         200,000
Pablo Buses, Montana....................................         150,000
PACE Bus Service to the College of DuPage, Glen Ellyn, 
    IL..................................................         200,000
Pace Suburban Bus Transit Signal Priority, Illinois.....         500,000
Pacific Station Multimodal Facility, Santa Cruz, 
    California..........................................         400,000
Paducah Area Transit System in Paducah, Kentucky........       1,100,000
Palm Springs Aerial Tramway Bus Project, CA.............         600,000
Palm Tran, Palm Beach County, FL........................         250,000
Paoli Transportation Center.............................       2,000,000
Paramount Easy Rider Clean-Air Buses, Paramount, 
    California..........................................         200,000
Park and Ride Facility, Ashland, OR.....................         250,000
Park-and-Ride Lot, Springfield, VA......................       1,000,000
Pasco County Transit Facilities Project, FL.............         250,000
Pasco County Public Transportation Bus Purchase, FL.....         500,000
Pasco County Transit Construction, FL...................         500,000
Pennyrile Allied Community Services.....................          93,000
Petersburg Multi-Modal Transit Center, VA...............         500,000
Petersburg Transit Intermodal Facility, VA..............         300,000
Phoenix/Avondale/Glendale Bus Expansion, Arizona........       1,500,000
Phoenix/Glendale West Valley Operating Facility, Arizona       1,000,000
Pine Ridge Transit System, South Dakota.................         600,000
Placerville Station II..................................       1,000,000
Poplar Transit Facility Renovation, Montana.............          80,000
Port Angeles International Gateway Project, Washington..         800,000
Port Authority of Allegheny County Bus Acquisition, 
    Pennsylvania........................................       3,100,000
Potomac and Rappahannock Transit Commission Buses for 
    service expansion, VA...............................       1,200,000
Prospect and East 21st Street Intermodal Transportation 
    Center, OH..........................................         875,000
Public Bus Transfer and Parking Facility, MT............       1,250,000
Public Transit for STCC College Students, Massachusetts.         700,000
Pullman Multi-Modal Transit Center, Pennsylvania........         500,000
Pullman Transit, Washington.............................          50,000
Purchase of Five Transit Buses, Pasco County, FL........         250,000
Purchase Transit Buses for Macon Transit Authority, 
    Georgia.............................................         500,000
Putnam County, FL Ride Solutions Buses..................         750,000
Puyallup Transit Center Park and Ride, Washington.......         780,000
Rapid Transit Handicap Accessibility, Newton, 
    Massachusetts.......................................       1,200,000
Ray County Transit Buses and Bus Equipment, Missouri....          50,000
Redondo Beach Coastal Shuttle Transit Vehicles, 
    California..........................................         700,000
Regional Bus and Bus Facilities: Intermodal Terminals, 
    UT, including Gateway TRAX station..................       1,500,000
Regional Intermodal Transportaiton, South Amboy, New 
    Jersey..............................................         500,000
Renaissance Square, NY..................................       5,000,000
Reno and Sparks Intermodal Transportation Terminals and 
    Related Development, NV.............................         500,000
RGRTA Hampton Corners Livingston County, NY.............       1,000,000
Rhode Island Public Transit Authority Elmwood Avenue 
    Maintenance Facility Improvements...................       1,240,000
Rhode Island Public Transit Authority Transit Security 
    Improvements........................................         200,000
Rhode Island Statewide Vehicle Replacement..............         500,000
Richmond Highway Public Transportation Initiative, VA...       2,400,000
Riverside Transit Center, CA............................         750,000
RiverSphere Multimodal Facility, Louisiana..............         200,000
Rolling Stock for HCTD Urban System, TX.................       1,500,000
Roscommon Transportation Authority Route Service........         200,000
Rosemary Children's Services' Transportation Program, 
    California..........................................          75,000
RTC Transit Maintenance Facility, NV....................         500,000
Rural Bus Program, HI...................................       4,000,000
Saint Peter's McGrinley Square Intermodal Facility, New 
    Jersey..............................................         800,000
SamTrans Revenue Collection System, California..........         300,000
San Antonio--New Buses, Bus Facility Improvements, and 
    Bus-Related Projects TX.............................         100,000
San Diego Bus Rapid Transportation Demonstration 
    Project, California.................................         700,000
San Francisco Muni Buses and Bus Facilities, California.       2,000,000
San Luis Rey Transit Center.............................         500,000
Sandy Transit Bus Facility, Oregon......................         375,000
Sanilac Co. Transit Authority, MI.......................         500,000
Santa Clara Valley Transit Authority Paratransit 
    Vehicle, California.................................         500,000
Seniors Transportation, Inc. Buses and Bus Facilities, 
    New York............................................         100,000
Shenango Valley Shuttle Service, Pennsylvania...........         250,000
Shuttle bus to transport seniors in Bell Gardens, 
    California..........................................         100,000
Silver Spring Transit Center, Maryland..................       3,000,000
Simi Valley Public Transit Radio Communications, CA.....         250,000
Skagit Transit Bus Acquisition, Washington..............         425,000
Skagit Transit Chuckanut Dr. Station in Burlington, 
    Washington..........................................         300,000
Skagway Intermodal facility, Alaska.....................       1,000,000
SMART Multi-Modal Transit Center and Bus Maintenance 
    Facility, Oregon....................................         500,000
Solana Beach Transit Center, Solana Beach, CA...........         500,000
Sound Transit, Eastgate Transit Access, Washington......       1,500,000
South East Missouri Transportation Service, Missouri....       1,100,000
South Norwalk Intermodal Facility, Norwalk, CT..........       1,000,000
Southeast Tennessee Human Resource Agency...............         500,000
Southern and Eastern Ky Bus and Bus Facilities..........         500,000
Southern Maryland Commuter Bus Initiative...............       2,000,000
Southern Missouri Buses and Bus Facilities..............       1,500,000
Space Coast Area Transit Bus Terminal, FL...............         200,000
Spencer Avenue Bus Transfer Center, Oroville, CA........         350,000
St Johns County, FL Council on Aging Buses..............         500,000
St. George Terminal, Staten Island, NY..................       1,000,000
St. Joseph County Transit...............................          80,000
Stamford Urban Transitway Phase II, CT..................       3,000,000
StarTran Farebox Technology Upgrades, Nebraska..........          65,000
State of Arkansas--Bus and Bus Facilities...............       4,000,000
Statewide Bus and Bus Facilities, NC....................       2,000,000
Statewide Bus and Bus Facilities, SD....................       4,000,000
Statewide Bus and Bus Facilities, Utah..................       1,700,000
Statewide Bus Replacement, Iowa.........................       1,400,000
Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation 
    (SMART), MI.........................................       5,000,000
Suffolk County Buses and Bus Facilities, New York.......         400,000
Sun Tran CNG Buses and Facilities.......................       2,000,000
Sun-Tran Operations and Maintenance Facility Expansion, 
    UT..................................................         250,000
SW King County-Highline CC Intermodal Transit Facility 
    and Parking Garage..................................         850,000
TALTRAN Bus Expansion Project, Florida..................       1,000,000
Taltran Bus Fleet Replacement...........................         500,000
TARC--purchase of 10 hybrid electric buses..............         500,000
Tech Town Transportation Center, OH.....................         750,000
Tennessee Department of Transportation Buses and Bus 
    Facilities..........................................         500,000
The District-Bryan/College Station Bus Replacement, 
    Texas...............................................         500,000
The UEL Bus Stop, University of Minnesota Twin Cities 
    Transitway, MN......................................          50,000
Third Bus Depot on Staten Island, NY--South Shore.......       2,000,000
TN DOT Job Access Reverse Commute.......................         500,000
TN Statewide Bus and Bus Facilities.....................       5,500,000
Torrance Transit System, California.....................         400,000
Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina Replacement Bus.....         750,000
Town of Normal Multimodal Transportation Center, IL.....       2,000,000
Transit Center 9400 South Sandy, Utah...................         500,000
Transit Vehicles for Albuquerque, NM....................         500,000
Treasure Coast Connector, St. Lucie County, FL..........         500,000
Triangle Transit Authority Replacement Buses, North 
    Carolina............................................         500,000
Trolley Plaza, AL.......................................         125,000
Trolley Shelter, West Palm Beach, Florida...............         250,000
Trolley System, Boynton Beach, FL.......................         250,000
Tucson SunTran Alternative Fuel Bus Replacement, AZ.....       1,500,000
Tucson SunTran Bus Storage and Maintenance Facility, AZ.       5,000,000
Twin Cities Dial A Ride.................................          89,000
Twin Transit, Washington................................         160,000
ULM Intermodal Facility, Monroe, LA.....................       1,000,000
UNI Multimodal Project, Cedar Falls, Iowa...............       1,575,000
Union Station Intermodal Trade and Transit Center, 
    Pennsylvania........................................       1,250,000
Union Station Intermodal Transportation Center, 
    Washington, D.C.....................................         700,000
Union/Snyder Transportation Authority Union County, PA..       1,000,000
University of Montana bus maintenance facility..........         250,000
University of Norther Iowa Multi........................         250,000
Upper Cumberland Human Resource Agency, Tennessee.......         350,000
Uptown Crossings Joint Development Transit Project, 
    Cincinnati, OH......................................       1,000,000
Utah Intermodal Transit Hubs, Utah......................         200,000
Vallejo Intermodal Station, California..................         850,000
Valley Hospital Bus Transportation, NJ..................          75,000
Valley Transit, Washington..............................         275,000
Vehicle Acquisition for Ionia Dial-A-Ride, MI...........         144,000
Vehicle Acquisition, SC.................................       1,600,000
Victor Valley Trans Operation/Maintenance Facility......         750,000
Virgin Island Transit VITRAN, Virgin Islands............         300,000
Visalia Bus Operations and Maintenance Facility.........         250,000
Visalia CNG Bus Conversion..............................         250,000
Warwick Para-Transit Vehicles, Rhode Island.............         135,000
West Side Transit Facility, Albuquerque, NM.............         825,000
West Valley City Intermodal Terminal, Utah..............         375,000
Westchester County Bee-Line Bus Replacement, New York...         250,000
Westminster College Intermodal Transportation Facilities 
    Expansion for Shuttle Buses, Utah...................       1,250,000
Westmoreland Transit Authority, Pennsylvania............         750,000
Wichita Transit Authority, KS...........................         800,000
Williamsport Trade and Transit Centre Expansion, 
    Pennsylvania........................................         675,000
Winston-Salem Union Station Intermodal Facility, NC.....         250,000
Winter Haven Transit Terminal/Buses.....................       1,000,000
Wisconsin Statewide Buses and Bus Facilities............       2,125,000
WMATA Bus Purchase......................................       1,500,000
Wyandotte County Unified Government Transit, KS.........         500,000
Yates Township Dial-A-Ride Transportation System, MI....         400,000
Yorba Linda Senior Mobility Program--TRAILS.............          41,000
York Co. Transit Auth. (PA) purchase of buses...........         500,000
Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System............         250,000
Zero Emission Bus Demonstration, Santa Clara, California         400,000

      The conferees provide $8,000,000 to the Illinois 
Department of Transportation (IDOT) for Section 5309 Bus and 
Bus Facilities grants. The conferees expect IDOT to provide at 
least $4,000,000 for Downstate Illinois replacement buses in 
Bloomington, Champaign-Urbana, Danville, Decatur, Peoria, 
Pekin, Quincy, River Valley, Rockford, Rock Island, 
Springfield, Madison County, Rides MTD, South Central MTD, and 
Macomb, including $375,000 for the Springfield MTD night 
service project. Further, the conferees expect IDOT to provide 
appropriate funds for bus facilities in Bloomington, Galesburg, 
Macomb, Peoria, and Rock Island, including $500,000 for the 
Champaign Day Care Center/Park-n-Ride and $500,000 for the 
Macomb maintenance facility.
      The conferees direct FTA to refrain from reallocating 
funds provided in fiscal year 2003 and prior year 
appropriations Acts for the Department of Transportation as 
follows:
GA--Macon Intermodal
NY--Middletown/Tompkins Consolidated Area Transit Center
NY--Tompkins County/Tompkins Consolidated Area Transit Center
SC--Sumter Intermodal
SC--Intermodal/Inland Port Terminal
PA--Wilkes-Barre intermodal
WV--Morgantown intermodal
AL--Jefferson County, Diesel Hybrid Electric Buses
MA--Attleboro Intermodal
NY--Jamaica Intermodal Facilities
KS--Lawrence Transit System Transfer Center
CT--Hartford-New Britain Busway Project
CT--Hollyhock Station/Intermodal Transportation Center, Norwich
IN--Indianapolis downtown transit facility
MA--Springfield Union Station intermodal facility
MA--Springfield Union Station Intermodal Redevelopment Project
NE--Metro Area Transit--Intermodal Facility
WA--Aurora Avenue Bus Rapid Transit
PA--Easton Intermodal Terminal
      SAFETEA-LU setasides of bus and bus facility funds.--The 
conferees note that the recently enacted surface transportation 
authorization bill, SAFETEA-LU, (Public Law 109-59) sets aside 
more than $442,000,000 of the formula funds made available in 
this Act for specific bus and bus related facility projects. 
These projects include eight high priority ferry boat system 
projects and 645 separate high priority bus projects. Included 
among those projects is annual funding of $5,000,000 for a 
Statewide grant for bus and bus related facilities in the State 
of West Virginia.
      The conferees are aware that hybrid buses offer reduced 
fuel consumption while utilizing existing infrastructure, a 
significant benefit particularly at a time when fuel 
conservation is paramount. Also, reduced maintenance for hybrid 
buses equates to significant life cycle cost benefits. 
Accordingly, the conferees believe that FTA should develop a 
program for encouraging and incentivizing a far greater number 
of transit systems to adopt this technology. The FTA is 
directed to develop such an initiative, which is to be 
submitted with the fiscal year 2007 budget submission.

                RESEARCH AND UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CENTERS

      The conference agreement provides $75,200,000 from the 
General Fund for research activities. Of the amounts provided, 
$4,300,000 is for the National Transit Institute, $9,000,000 is 
for transit cooperative research programs, $7,000,000 is for 
the university centers program. The conferees provided 
additional funds over and above the guaranteed level in order 
to preserve the core research program, which was inadvertently 
reduced under SAFETEA-LU.
      The conferees note that the recently enacted surface 
transportation authorization bill, SAFETEA-LU, (Public Law 109-
59) sets aside research funds made available in this Act for 
specific research and university projects. Of the remaining 
funds provided for the national planning and research program, 
the conference agreement directs funds for the following:

American Cities Transportation Institute, PA............        $500,000
CTAA of America Nationwide Joblinks.....................        $800,000
CALSTART/WESTART Advanced Transit Technology............      $2,000,000
Boston-Fitchburg, MA Rail Corridor......................        $640,000
Automation Alley BUSolution.............................      $1,500,000
Advanced Transportation Technology Institute, TN........      $1,000,000
Research Hybrid Fuel Technology Transit System, CA......        $250,000
Wichita State University: mass transit vehicle crash 
    protection..........................................        $250,000
University of Texas, Austin: Flywheel bus and truck 
    program.............................................      $1,000,000
Hennepin County Community Works.........................        $500,000
Advanced vehicle emission reduction sensor program, Ohio        $500,000
Biodiesel hybrid bus research, AL.......................      $1,000,000
CIMERC, PA..............................................      $1,000,000
City of Mount Vernon, WA--transit and development study.        $200,000
Low cost carbon fiber production technology, TN.........      $1,000,000
Center for Transportation and the Environment--Southern 
    Fuel Cell Coalition/Flywheel Development............      $1,660,000
Transport 2020, WI......................................      $1,000,000
Washington State ferries wireless over water project....      $1,000,000
WVU exhaust emission testing initiative, WV.............      $1,400,000

                       CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANTS

      The conference agreement provides $1,455,234,000 from the 
General Fund for capital investment grants.

ACE Gap Closure San Joaquin County, California..........       5,000,000
Alaska and Hawaii ferry projects........................      15,000,000
Ann Arbor/Detroit Commuter Rail, Michigan...............       5,000,000
Atlanta Beltline/C-Loop, Georgia........................       1,000,000
Baltimore Central Light Rail Double Track Project, 
    Maryland............................................      12,420,000
Baltimore Red Line and Green Line, Maryland.............       2,000,000
Boston/Fitchburg, Massachusetts Rail Corridor...........       2,000,000
Central Corridor/St. Paul-Minneapolis, Minnesota........       2,000,000
Central Florida Commuter Rail...........................      11,000,000
Central Phoenix/East Valley LRT, Arizona................      90,000,000
Charlotte South Corridor Light Rail Project, North 
    Carolina............................................      55,000,000
City of Miami Streetcar, Florida........................       2,000,000
City of Rock Hill Trolley Study, South Carolina.........         400,000
Commuter Rail, Albuquerque to Santa Fe, New Mexico......         500,000
Commuter Rail, Utah.....................................       9,000,000
CORRIDORone Regional Rail Project, Pennsylvania.........       1,500,000
CTA Douglas Blue Line, Illinois.........................      45,150,000
CTA Ravenswood Brown Line, Illinois.....................      40,000,000
CTA Yellow Line, Illinois...............................       1,000,000
Dallas Northwest/Southeast Light Rail MOS, Texas........      12,000,000
Detroit Center City Loop, Michigan......................       4,000,000
Dulles Corridor Rapid Transit Project, Virginia.........      30,000,000
East Corridor Commuter Rail, Nashville, Tennessee.......       6,000,000
East Side Access Project, New York......................     340,000,000
Euclid Corridor Transportation Project, Ohio............      24,774,513
Ft. Lauderdale Downtown Rail Link, Florida..............       1,000,000
Gainesville-Haymarket VRE Service Extension, Virginia...       1,450,000
Hartford-New Britain Busway, Connecticut................       6,000,000
Houston METRO, Texas....................................      12,000,000
Hudson-Bergen Light Rail MOS 2, New Jersey..............     100,000,000
Kansas City, MO, Southtown BRT..........................      12,300,000
Metra, Illinois.........................................      42,180,000
Metro Gold Line Eastside Light Rail Extension, 
    California..........................................      80,000,000
Miami Dade County Metrorail Extension, Florida..........      10,000,000
Mid-Coast Light Rail Transit Extension, California......       7,160,000
Mid-Jordan Light Rail Transit Line, Utah................         500,000
Mission Valley East, California.........................       7,700,000
N. Indiana Commuter Transit District Recapitalization...       5,000,000
New Jersey Trans-Hudson Midtown Corridor, New Jersey....      12,315,000
North Corridor Interstate MAX Light Rail Project, Oregon      18,110,000
North Shore Connector, Pennsylvania.....................      55,000,000
North Shore Corridor and Blue Line Extension, 
    Massachusetts.......................................       2,000,000
Northeast Corridor Commuter Rail Project, Delaware......       1,425,000
Northern Branch Bergen County, New Jersey...............       2,500,000
Northstar Corridor Commuter Rail Project, Minnesota.....       2,000,000
Northwest New Jersey-Northeast Pennsylvania Passenger 
    Rail................................................      10,000,000
Oceanside Escondido Rail Project, California............      12,210,000
Odgen Avenue Transit Corridor/Circle Line, Illinois.....       1,000,000
Regional Fixed Guideway Project, Nevada.................       3,000,000
Rhode Island Integrated Commuter Rail Project, Rhode 
    Island..............................................       6,000,000
San Francisco BART Extension to San Francisco 
    International Airport, California...................      81,860,000
San Francisco Muni Third Street Light Rail Project, 
    California..........................................      25,000,000
San Juan Tren Urbano, Puerto Rico.......................       8,045,487
Santa Barbara Coast Rail Track Improvement Project, 
    California..........................................       1,000,000
Schuykill Valley Metro, Pennsylvania....................       4,000,000
Seattle Sound Transit, Washington.......................      80,000,000
Second Avenue Subway, New York..........................      25,000,000
Silicon Valley Rapid Transit Corridor Project, Santa 
    Clara County, California............................       6,500,000
Silver Line Phase III, Massachusetts....................       4,000,000
Sounder Commuter Rail, Washington.......................       5,000,000
Southeast Corridor Multi-Modal Project (T-REX), Colorado      80,000,000
Stamford Urban Transitway, Connecticut..................      10,000,000
Triangle Transit Authority Regional Rail System 
    (Raleigh-Durham), North Carolina....................      20,000,000
Washington County Commuter Rail Project, Oregon.........      15,000,000
West Corridor Light Rail, Colorado......................       5,000,000
Denali Commission.......................................       5,000,000

      The conferees direct FTA to refrain from reallocating 
funds provided in fiscal year 2003 and prior year 
appropriations acts for the Department of Transportation as 
follows:
Minneapolis, MN Northstar Corridor
Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee Rail Extension Project
Washington Dulles Corridor Project
Bridgeport, Connecticut, Intermodal Transportation Center
Albuquerque/Greater Albuquerque, New Mexico Mass Transit and 
        Light Rail
Las Vegas, Nevada, Resort Corridor Fixed Guideway
Indianapolis Northeast-Downtown Corridor project
Maryland, [MARC] Commuter Rail Improvements
Wilmington, DE, Downtown Transit Corridor Project
Wilmington, DE, Train Station Improvements
      The conferees agree that FTA needed to change the new 
starts criteria, but reiterate the concern of the Senate in the 
way FTA implemented the new policy. The conferees direct FTA to 
report back to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations as directed by the Senate on how FTA will 
address similar changes in the future.
      The conferees direct FTA to refrain from signing any full 
funding grant agreement with a maximum Federal share higher 
than 60 percent.

       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION

      Section 140 exempts previously made transit obligations 
from limitations on obligations as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.
      Section 141 allows funds appropriated for capital 
investment grants not obligated by September 30, 2008, plus 
other recoveries, to be available for other projects under 49 
U.S.C. 5209 as proposed by the Senate. The House did not 
include a similar provision.
      Section 142 allows transit funds appropriated prior to 
October 1, 2005 that remain available for expenditure to be 
transferred to another eligible purpose as proposed by the 
House and the Senate.
      Section 143 allows prior year funds available for capital 
investment grants to be used in this fiscal year for such 
projects as proposed by the House. The Senate did not include a 
similar provision.
      Section 144 addresses transit funds available to Alaska 
and Hawaii for ferry boats as proposed by the Senate. The House 
did not include a similar provision.
      Section 145 makes technical changes to a grant made with 
prior year funds for Burlington, Vermont as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 146 makes technical changes to a grant made with 
prior year funds for Seattle, Washington as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 147 makes technical changes to funds made 
available to Charleston, South Carolina as proposed by the 
conferees.
      Section 148 makes technical changes to prior year funds 
available to Jacksonville, Florida as proposed by the 
conferees.
      Section 149 makes technical changes to prior year funds 
available to the South Shore Commuter Rail in Indiana as 
proposed by the conferees.

             Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

                    (HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement includes $16,284,000 for the 
Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation as proposed by 
the House and Senate.

                        Maritime Administration

                       MARITIME SECURITY PROGRAM

      The conference agreement includes $156,000,000 for the 
maritime security program as proposed by the House and Senate.

                        OPERATIONS AND TRAINING

      The conference agreement includes $122,249,000 for the 
Maritime Administration's operations and training account, 
instead of $112,336,000 as proposed by the House and 
$118,649,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement allocates the funds for operations and training as 
follows:

  U.S. Merchant Marine Academy:                        Conference Amount
    Salary and benefits.......................................   $23,750
    Midshipmen program........................................     7,032
    Instructional program.....................................     5,746
    Program direction and administration......................     2,945
    Maintenance, repair & operating requirements..............     7,381
    Capital improvements......................................    15,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Subtotal, USMMA.......................................   $61,854
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
  State Maritime Schools:
    Student incentive payments................................     1,200
    Direct schoolship payments................................     1,800
    Schoolship maintenance and repair.........................     8,211
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Subtotal, State Maritime Academies....................   $11,211
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
  MARAD Operations:
    Base operations...........................................    34,029
    Enterprise architecture & IT security upgrades............     4,963
    GSA space.................................................        93
    DOT Electronic Government.................................        99
    Marine Transportation System Advocate facility............    10,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Subtotal, MARAD Operations............................   $49,184
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
            Total, Operations and Training....................  $122,249

                             SHIP DISPOSAL

      The conference agreement includes $21,000,000 for the 
disposal of obsolete vessels of the National Defense Reserve 
Fleet as proposed by the House and Senate.

          MARITIME GUARANTEED LOAN (TITLE XI) PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement includes $4,126,000 for 
administrative expenses of the maritime guaranteed loan program 
(Title XI), instead of $3,526,000 as proposed by the House and 
$4,726,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement 
modifies a Senate proposed reporting requirement regarding 
companies in ``Credit Watch''. In order to protect proprietary 
and sensitive business information that may cause direct 
financial and/or competitive harm, the companies shall not be 
specifically identified in the report. The conferees direct 
MARAD to provide the report within 90 days of enactment of this 
Act.
      The conference agreement includes a new reporting 
requirement, due with the fiscal year 2007 budget submittal, 
that directs MARAD to detail funds provided or personnel 
detailed to the Office of the Secretary's credit council since 
its inception, by year.

                           SHIP CONSTRUCTION

                              (RESCISSION)

      The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
unobligated balances totaling $2,071,280 from the dormant ship 
construction account as proposed by the House and Senate.

           NATIONAL DEFENSE TANK VESSEL CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM

      The conference agreement does not include funds for the 
National Defense Tank Vessel Construction Program authorized 
under Public Law 108-136, as proposed by the House. The Senate 
proposed $25,000,000.

           ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION

      Section 150 retains a provision proposed by the House and 
Senate that authorizes MARAD to furnish utilities and services 
and make necessary repairs in connection with any lease, 
contract, or occupancy involving Government property under 
control of MARAD, and allow payments received to be credited to 
the Treasury, as proposed by both the House and Senate.
      Section 151 retains a provision proposed by the House and 
Senate that prohibits obligations incurred during the current 
year from construction funds in excess of appropriations 
contained in this or prior year appropriations Acts as proposed 
by both the House and Senate.

         Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $16,877,000 for 
necessary administrative expenses of the Pipeline and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $17,027,000 as proposed by the House. Of this 
amount, $645,000 is to be derived from the Pipeline Safety 
Fund.
      The conferees reduce the budget request by $150,000 to 
account for the transfer of an attorney to the office of 
general counsel for the office of emergency transportation 
litigation caseload.

                       HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY

      The conference agreement provides $26,138,000 to continue 
the agency's hazardous materials safety functions, as proposed 
by the Senate instead of $26,183,000 as proposed by the House.
      Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste 
shipments.--The conferees deny funding for four new positions 
for activities related to assuring the safety of shipments of 
spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste to Skull 
Valley, Utah, as was requested in the budget. The conferees 
note the fact that the Bureau of Land Management still has yet 
to approve the transportation route to the site, which raises 
significant doubts about the ability for the site to be opened 
during fiscal year 2006 and the need for the requested 
positions.
      Hazardous materials regulations compliance.--The 
conferees approve the three new positions to help ensure 
compliance with current hazmat regulations and the associated 
half-year funding.

                            PIPELINE SAFETY

                         (PIPELINE SAFETY FUND)

                    (OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND)

      The conference agreement provides $73,010,000 for the 
office of pipeline safety (OPS), instead of $72,860,000 as 
proposed by the House and $73,165,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conferees approve seven of the additional positions 
requested for OPS, instead of five as proposed by the House and 
eight as proposed by the Senate.
      Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund.--The conferees strongly 
agree with language contained in both the House and Senate 
reports expressing concern over the significant increases in 
the request of funds from the oil spill liability trust fund 
and the lack of justification for these increases in the budget 
documentation. The conferees once again direct the agency to 
include an itemization of how funds from the oil spill 
liability trust fund are being allocated within the OPS in the 
fiscal year 2007 budget justification.

                     EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS GRANTS

                     (EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FUND)

      The conference agreement provides a total of $14,500,000 
for Emergency Preparedness Grants, as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

           Research and Innovative Technology Administration

                        RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

      The conference agreement provides $5,774,000 to continue 
research and development activities in fiscal year 2006, 
instead of $4,326,000 as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate, and stipulates that $1,121,000 of the funds provided 
shall be available until September 30, 2008. The agreement 
supports a staffing level of 28 full-time equivalent staff 
years (FTE).
      The conferees reduce funding by $500,000 below the budget 
by denying the requested increase in hydrogen research.

                  BUREAU OF TRANSPORTATION STATISTICS

                      (LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

      Under the appropriation of the Federal Highway 
Administration, the conference agreement provides $27,000,000 
for the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS).
      As has been the practice in previous years, the conferees 
limit BTS staff to 122 FTE in fiscal year 2006 in order to 
curtail the significant growth in staffing that occurred 
previously within this agency.
      The language relating to the collection of the motor 
carrier financial and operating statistics survey is addressed 
in the office of the secretary section of this statement of the 
managers, as proposed by the House, instead of under BTS as 
proposed by the Senate.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $62,499,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General as proposed by the House and 
Senate.

                      Surface Transportation Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $26,450,000 for the 
Surface Transportation Board to fund salaries and expenses from 
a direct appropriation, instead of $26,622,000 as proposed by 
the House and $24,388,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conference agreement includes language that allows the Board to 
offset $1,250,000 of this appropriation from fees collected 
during the fiscal year, as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.

        Administrative Provisions--Department of Transportation

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Section 160 retains the provision as proposed by both the 
House and Senate that allows the Department of Transportation 
(DOT) to use funds for aircraft, motor vehicles, liability 
insurance, uniforms, or allowances, as authorized by law.
      Section 161 retains the provision that limits 
appropriations for services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 to the 
rate for an Executive Level IV, as proposed by the House and 
Senate.
      Section 162 retains the provision that prohibits funds to 
be used for salaries and expenses of more than 108 political 
and Presidential appointees in DOT, instead of 100 appointees 
as proposed by the House and 109 appointees as proposed by the 
Senate. The provision also requires that none of the personnel 
covered by this provision may be assigned on temporary detail 
outside DOT, as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 163 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and Senate that prohibits funds from being used to 
implement section 404 of title 23, United States Code.
      Section 164 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and Senate that prohibits recipients of funds made 
available in this Act from releasing certain personal 
information and photographs from a driver's license or motor 
vehicle record, without express consent of the person to whom 
such information pertains; and prohibits the withholding of 
funds provided in this Act for any grantee if a State is in 
noncompliance with this provision.
      Section 165 retains the provision that permits funds 
received by specified DOT agencies from States or other private 
or public sources for expenses incurred for training to be 
credited to certain specified agency accounts, as proposed by 
the House and Senate.
      Section 166 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and Senate that authorizes the Secretary of 
Transportation to allow issuers of any preferred stock sold to 
the Department to redeem or repurchase such stock upon the 
payment to the Department of an amount determined by the 
Secretary.
      Section 167 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and Senate that prohibits funds from being used to make a 
grant unless the Secretary of Transportation notifies the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations no less than three days 
in advance of any discretionary grant award, letter of intent, 
or full funding grant agreement totaling $1,000,000 or more.
      Section 168 retains the provision that allows funds 
received from rebates, refunds, and similar sources to be 
credited to appropriations of the DOT, as proposed by the House 
and Senate.
      Section 169 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and Senate that allows amounts from improper payments to 
a third party contractor that are lawfully recovered by the DOT 
to be available to cover expenses incurred in the recovery of 
such payments.
      Section 170 retains the provision that allows the 
Secretary of Transportation to transfer unexpended sums from 
``Office of the Secretary, Salaries and Expenses'' to 
``Minority Business Outreach'', as proposed by the House and 
Senate.
      Section 171 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House and Senate that prohibits the Office of the Secretary of 
Transportation from approving assessments or reimbursable 
agreements pertaining to funds appropriated to the modal 
administrations in this Act, unless such assessments or 
agreements have completed the normal reprogramming process for 
Congressional notification.
      Section 172 retains the provision as proposed by the 
House that prohibits the use of funds to implement an essential 
air service local cost share participation pilot program. The 
Senate included a similar provision in title VII.
      Section 173 includes a provision similar to what was 
proposed by the Senate that amends Section 14711(c) of title 49 
to allow DOT to be substituted for a State in civil actions to 
enforce certain consumer protection provisions. The House did 
not include a similar provision.
      Section 174 includes a provision similar to what was 
proposed by the Senate that modifies title 23 relating to 
contracting for engineering and design services to no longer 
permit such services to be awarded under State qualifications. 
The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 175 retains a Senate provision making eligible 
for the FAA's Airport Improvement Program a project meeting 
certain specified requirements. The House did not include a 
similar provision.
      Section 176 includes a Senate provision that allows a 
small hub to be eligible to receive terminal funding if the 
airport received a discretionary grant while the airport was 
designated as a non-primary airport. The House did not include 
a similar provision.
      Section 177 retains a Senate provision amending title 49 
to deem an air tour operator flying over the Hoover Dam to the 
Grand Canyon National Park as flying solely as a transportation 
route. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 178 retains a Senate provision extending a 
requirement for air carriers to honor tickets for suspended air 
passenger service. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Section 179 retains a Senate provision that allows former 
flight service station employees within two years of retirement 
to remain temporary FAA employees until they reach retirement 
eligibility. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 180 retains a Senate provision that authorizes 
conveyance of land to establish a heliport in Clark County, 
Nevada. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 181 retains a Senate provision amending section 
29(c) of the Public Law 96-192. The House did not include a 
similar provision.
      Section 182 includes a new provision that modifies a 
provision relating to the delivery of budget justifications.
      Section 183 includes a new provision that modifies a 
provision relating to processing of reprogrammings.
      Section 184 includes a new provision that modifies 
designations relating to certain highway projects in Vermont.
      Section 185 modifies House language to provide up to a 
total of $17,000,000 to reimburse fixed based general aviation 
operators and providers of general aviation ground support 
services at five facilities that incurred financial losses when 
the Federal government closed the facilities due to the 
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Each of the five 
facilities was closed to general aviation operations on 
September 11, 2001. Three airports in Maryland were reopened to 
such operations on March 2, 2002; the South Capitol Street 
Heliport was permanently closed to general aviation; and Ronald 
Reagan National Airport was reopened to general aviation 
operations on October 18, 2005.
      It is the conferees intent that reimbursement cover the 
unilateral closures of these facilities after September 11, 
2001. It is not the conferees intent to reimburse for closures 
resulting from a business operation or facility action or 
inaction. The conferees note without prejudice that DOT's 
September 2005 report estimated losses incurred through January 
23, 2004 at $10,443,936. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision.
      The language specifies that of the amount provided, up to 
$5,000,000 will be distributed, if necessary, to the fixed 
based operators and providers of general aviation ground 
support services at the three affected Maryland airports. 
Further, DOT is directed to verify direct and incremental 
financial losses through an independent audit no later than 
July 14, 2006 before any funds are provided. In addition, 
obligation and expenditure of funds are conditional upon full 
release of the government for all financial claims from the 
closing of these facilities.
      Section 186 includes a new provision that modifies 
designations relating to certain highway projects in Alaska.
      Section 187 includes a provision similar to what was 
proposed by the Senate that provides $1,000,000 from the 
amounts made available in Section 112 of this Act to conduct a 
study and issue a report relating to catastrophic hurricane 
evacuation plans. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would have reduced the fiscal year 2006 working 
capital fund limitation of DOT by $1,000,000.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would have designated the city of Norman, 
Oklahoma, to be considered part of the Oklahoma City 
Transportation urbanized area.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would have required the use of a sliding scale 
match ratio for certain transportation projects in the States 
of Idaho and Washington.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would have modified the designation relating to 
a certain project in the State of New York.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that would have modified the designation relating to 
a certain project in the State of New York.

                  TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

                          Departmental Offices

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $196,592,000 for 
departmental salaries and expenses instead of $157,452,000 as 
proposed by the House and $197,591,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Of the amount provided, not more than $3,000,000 is for 
travel expenses, not more than $3,000,000 is for information 
technology modernization, $258,000 is for emergencies or 
activities of a confidential nature, $5,173,000 is for 
Treasury-wide financial audits, and $100,000 is for reception 
and representation expenses.
      For the activities under this heading, the conferees 
recommend the following funding levels:

Executive Direction.....................................      $8,642,000
General Counsel.........................................       7,852,000
Economic Policies.......................................      32,011,000
Financial Policies......................................      26,574,000
Financial Crimes........................................      39,939,000
Treasury-wide Management................................      16,843,000
Administration..........................................      63,731,000

      Of the funds provided for the financial crimes activity, 
the conferees have agreed to include bill language providing 
$22,032,016 and not less than 125 full-time equivalent 
positions for the Office of Foreign Assets Control. The 
conferees direct that the Office of the Under Secretary for 
Terrorism and Financial Crimes shall be funded at no more than 
$1,998,000 to ensure that resources are directed to the 
operational offices. The conferees agree to the Senate 
provision, in lieu of the House provision, directing the 
Assistant Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis to report on 
the Office of Intelligence and Analysis within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act.
      The conference agreement includes a provision allowing 
the Department to transfer up to two percent of funds available 
between activities. In addition, the conferees direct the 
Department, including all bureaus and offices and the Internal 
Revenue Service, to submit an operating plan 60 days after 
enactment of this Act for fiscal year 2006 resources. The plan 
must include by office and by activity, a comparison of fiscal 
year 2005 actual expenditures, the fiscal year 2006 budget 
request, and the fiscal year 2006 resources including full-time 
equivalent positions and appropriated funds, and all 
initiatives underway at the Department.
      The conference agreement includes $1,000,000, available 
until expended, for combating trade violations, including 
currency manipulation as similarly proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement does not include an increase of 
$720,000 for the Treasury media room and $1,000,000 for the 
building fund. The conferees agree that the Department must 
budget for capital expenses of the building, but have instead 
provided funds for the completion of the building renovation 
under a different account. The conferees direct the Department 
to include in the fiscal year 2007 budget request a proposal to 
fund building operations and maintenance expenses.
      The conferees direct the Secretary to submit a report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations providing a 
legal basis for the application of section 1.148-1(c) of the 
United States Treasury Regulations (regarding arbitrage bond 
regulations) to the reserve funds held by the Clean Water and 
Safe Drinking Water State revolving funds which generally 
contain replacement proceeds but not bond proceeds. This report 
should be submitted by no later than 90 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
      Of the funds provided for Financial Policies, $1,500,000 
is for the e-Cavern partnership and $250,000 is for Treasury's 
public key infrastructure.

        DEPARTMENT-WIDE SYSTEMS AND CAPITAL INVESTMENTS PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $24,412,000 for systems 
and capital investments as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$21,412,000 as proposed by the House. The conferees direct the 
Department to provide detailed information on all systems, 
especially the TFIN project, in the operating plan as proposed 
by the House.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $17,000,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Office of Inspector General as 
proposed by the House instead of $16,722,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Of the amounts provided, up to $2,000,000 may be used 
for travel, $100,000 may be used for emergencies or activities 
of a confidential nature, and up to $2,500 may be used for 
reception and representation expenses.

           TREASURY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR TAX ADMINISTRATION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $133,286,000 for 
salaries and expenses as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. Of the amounts provided, $6,000,000 is for travel 
expenses, $500,000 is for emergencies, and $1,500 is for 
reception and representation expenses.

            AIR TRANSPORTATION STABILIZATION PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      The conference agreement provides $2,750,000, to remain 
available until expended, for the costs of the air 
transportation stabilization program instead of $2,942,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House did not include funds for 
this program.

           TREASURY BUILDING AND ANNEX REPAIR AND RESTORATION

      The conference agreement provides $10,000,000 for the 
repair and restoration of the Treasury building as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate.

                  Financial Crimes Enforcement Network

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $73,630,000 for 
salaries and expenses as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. Of the amounts provided, not more than $14,000 is for 
reception and representation expenses, $6,944,000 is available 
until September 30, 2008, and $8,521,000 is available until 
September 30, 2007.

                      Financial Management Service

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $236,243,000 for 
salaries and expenses as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. Of the amounts provided, $9,220,000 is available until 
September 30, 2008 and $2,500 is available for reception and 
representation expenses.

                Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $91,126,000 for 
salaries and expenses as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. Of the amounts provided, not more than $6,000 is for 
reception and representation expenses and $50,000 is for 
cooperative research.

                           United States Mint

               UNITED STATES MINT PUBLIC ENTERPRISE FUND

      The conference agreement limits the amounts available for 
salaries and expenses to not more than $26,768,000 instead of 
$36,900,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate, based on a 
revised estimate of costs.

                       Bureau of the Public Debt

                     ADMINISTERING THE PUBLIC DEBT

      The conference agreement provides $176,923,000 for costs 
associated with administering the public debt as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate. Of the amounts provided, not 
more than $2,500 is for reception and representation expenses 
and $2,000,000 is for systems modernization. The conference 
agreement includes $3,000,000 in user fees to offset the 
appropriated amounts and $70,000 from the Oil Spill Liability 
Trust Fund to reimburse the Bureau for various administrative 
expenses.

           Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

      COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      The conference agreement provides $55,000,000, available 
until September 30, 2007 as proposed by the Senate. The House 
proposed the same level of funding with one year availability. 
Of the amounts provided, up to $13,500,000 is for 
administrative costs, $6,000,000 is for direct loans, $250,000 
is for administrative expenses of the direct loan program, and 
$4,000,000 is for technical assistance and other purposes for 
Native American, Native Hawaiian, and Alaskan Native 
communities. The conference agreement includes language that 
limits loan obligations of up to $11,000,000, as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate.
      The conference agreement directs that the Bank Enterprise 
Award program be funded at no less than $11,000,000.

                        Internal Revenue Service

                 PROCESSING, ASSISTANCE, AND MANAGEMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement includes $4,136,578,000 for 
Processing, Assistance and Management as proposed by the 
Senate, instead of $4,181,520,000 as proposed by the House. The 
conferees direct IRS to consult with the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations prior to elimination, 
consolidation, or reorganization of the workforce and direct 
IRS not to proceed with any such activity unless explicitly 
approved by the Committees through the IRS operating plan.
      The conferees direct the IRS, the IRS Oversight Board and 
the National Taxpayer Advocate to develop a 5-year plan for 
taxpayer service activities and report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by April 14, 2006, as outlined in 
the Senate report. The plan should include long-term goals that 
are strategic and quantitative and that balance enforcement and 
service.
      The conferees direct the IRS, in consultation with the 
National Taxpayer Advocate, to report by June 30, 2006 on uses 
of the Debt Indicator Tool--and whether it facilitates the use 
of refund anticipation loans (RALs)--the debt collection offset 
practice, the use of RALs, and evaluations of RAL alternatives, 
and use of debit cards for refunds, including recommendations 
on how to deliver tax refunds more quickly.
      The conferees are aware that the IRS and the Free File 
Alliance have signed a new, four-year agreement under which IRS 
continues to agree not to enter the tax preparation market. The 
conferees direct IRS to abide by the terms and conditions of 
that agreement.
      The conference agreement rescinds $20,000,000 in 
unobligated prior year balances from the Processing, Assistance 
and Management account.

                          TAX LAW ENFORCEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $4,725,756,000 for Tax 
Law Enforcement as proposed by the Senate, instead of 
$4,580,216,000 as proposed by the House. Language providing 
$55,584,000 for the Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement 
(ICDE) program is included, as proposed by House. The 
conference agreement permits the transfer of up to $10,000,000 
for management of the ICDE program, as proposed by the House. 
In addition, the conference agreement allows for the transfer 
of up to $10,000,000 to the Social Security Administration as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate. The conference 
agreement includes language proposed by the Senate that 
designates $1,000,000 available until September 30, 2008, for 
research. The House did not include similar language.
      The conferees direct IRS to report back to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations on tax enforcement, 
including estimates for the entire program, enforcement 
spending, workload indicators, direct tax enforcement-related 
revenue and an explanation of the methodology and accuracy of 
the estimates provided. The report shall be submitted by no 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                          INFORMATION SYSTEMS

      The conference agreement provides $1,598,967,000 for 
information systems instead of $1,575,146,000 as proposed by 
the House and $1,597,717,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within 
the amount provided, the conferees provide $1,250,000 for a 
vulnerability management solution that continuously discovers 
network exposures through an appliance-based technology, 
running a hardened operating system.

                     BUSINESS SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION

      The conference agreement provides $199,000,000 for 
Business Systems Modernization as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate. Language is retained, proposed by both the 
House and the Senate, requiring a spend plan from the IRS prior 
to the release of these funds.

               health insurance tax credit administration

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $20,210,000 for 
administration of the Health Insurance Tax Credit program as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      The conference agreement rescinds $9,000,000 in 
unobligated prior year balances from the Health Insurance Tax 
Credit Administration account.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

      Section 201 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate that provides transfer authority.
      Section 202 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate that requires IRS to maintain training in 
taxpayer service.
      Section 203 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate that requires IRS to safeguard taxpayer 
information.
      Section 204 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate that permits funding for 1-800 help line 
services and directs the Commissioner to make improving phone 
service a priority.
      Section 205 amends a provision included by both the House 
and the Senate prohibiting funds to reduce taxpayer services 
until TIGTA completes a study on impacts to compliance.
      Section 206 retains a provision included by the Senate 
that specifies $6,447,000,000 for enhanced tax enforcement. The 
House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 207 amends a provision included by the Senate 
specifying $166,249,000 for operating expenses of the Taxpayer 
Advocate Service (TAS), of which $141,311,650 shall be made 
available from the Tax Law Enforcement account. The conferees 
direct the IRS to continue providing overhead support from 
accounts outside of TAS. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Section 208 includes a provision requiring the IRS to 
submit its fiscal year 2007 budget justification in the 
existing account structure.
      Section 209 retains a provision included by the Senate 
that repeals the limitation on user fees to supplement 
appropriations. The House did not include a similar provision.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision included by 
the Senate that requires a tax enforcement report.

         Administrative Provisions--Department of the Treasury

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Section 210 allows Treasury to purchase uniforms, lease 
vehicles, and engage in other activities pursuant to title 5 
U.S.C. 5901 as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Section 211 allows for the transfer of up to two percent 
of funds between Departmental Offices and the various Treasury 
bureaus, except the IRS as proposed by the Senate. The House 
did not include a similar provision.
      Section 212 allows for the transfer of up to two percent 
from the IRS accounts to TIGTA as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.
      Section 213 directs that the purchase of vehicles be 
consistent with vehicle management principles.
      Section 214 prohibits funds to be used to redesign the $1 
note as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Section 215 allows for the transfer of funds from 
``Financial management service, salaries and expenses'' to the 
Debt Collection Fund conditional on future reimbursement as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Section 216 extends the franchise fund for one year as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Section 217 prohibits funds to build a United States Mint 
museum without the approval of the authorizing committees of 
jurisdiction as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Section 218 prohibits funds for consolidating functions 
of the United States Mint and the Bureau of Engraving and 
Printing without the approval of the authorizing committees of 
jurisdiction as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Section 219 prohibits funds to reallocate the funds 
provided to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), 
or merge FinCEN into the departmental offices as proposed by 
the Senate. The House did not include a similar provision.

         TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

      The conferees reiterate that the Department must limit 
the reprogramming of funds between the programs, projects, and 
activities within each account to not more than $500,000 
without prior approval of the Committees on Appropriations. 
Unless otherwise identified in this Statement of Managers or 
Committee reports, the most detailed allocation of funds 
presented in the budget justifications is approved, with any 
deviation from such approved allocation subject to the normal 
reprogramming requirements. Further, it is the intent of the 
conferees that all carryover funds in the various accounts, 
including recaptures and de-obligations, are subject to the 
normal reprogramming requirements outlined above. Further, no 
changes may be made to any program, project, or activity if it 
is construed to be policy or a change in policy, without prior 
approval of the Committees on Appropriations. Finally, the 
conferees expect to be notified regarding reorganizations of 
offices, programs or activities prior to the planned 
implementation of such reorganizations, as well as be notified, 
on a monthly basis, of all ongoing litigation, including any 
negotiations or discussions, planned or ongoing, regarding a 
consent decree between the Department and any other entity, 
including the estimated costs of such decrees.

                       Public and Indian Housing

                     TENANT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The joint statement of the managers herein reflects the 
agreement of the conferees on tenant-based rental assistance. 
The conference agreement appropriates $15,573,655,725 for all 
tenant-based Section 8 (voucher) activities under the Tenant-
Based Rental Assistance Account. The House proposed 
$15,631,400,000 and the Senate proposed $15,636,064,000 for 
these activities. Language is included designating funds 
provided as follows:

                                                              Conference
        Activity                                               agreement
Voucher Renewals........................................ $14,089,755,725
Tenant Protection Vouchers..............................     180,000,000
Administative Costs.....................................   1,250,000,000
(Administrative Fees)................................... (1,240,000,000)
Family Self-Sufficiency Coordinators....................      48,000,000
Working Capital Fund....................................       5,900,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total, Tenant Based Rental Assistance...........  15,573,655,725

      Section 8 Voucher Renewals.--The conference agreement 
includes $14,089,755,725 instead of $14,089,756,000 as proposed 
by the Senate and $14,189,756,725 as proposed by the House. The 
conferees continue the 2005 allocation method as proposed by 
the House. The Senate had proposed to revise the allocation 
methodology.
      The conferees direct HUD not to use recaptures from any 
source or any project-based carryover to augment total 2006 
funding for this account. In addition, the conferees direct HUD 
to provide all public housing agencies (PHAs) with a fixed, 
annual budget within which each agency must manage its voucher 
programs for fiscal year 2006. The conferees expect that Moving 
To Work (MTW) agencies will be funded based on their agreements 
and are subject to the same adjustments made to all other PHA 
annual budgets based on funding availability. HUD may make any 
necessary adjustments for the costs associated with the first-
time renewals of tenant protection and HOPE VI vouchers in 
2005. The conferees further direct the Department to commit the 
entire amount of funds provided for voucher renewals to the 
public housing authorities at the time annual budgets of the 
public housing authorities are established.
      The conferees direct HUD to provide funds to PHAs based 
on the amounts PHAs would have received in fiscal year 2005 
before any pro rata reductions, and adjusted for the 2005 AAF 
and the 2006 AAF for each PHA, plus the estimated number of 
first time renewals of vouchers that will enter the Tenant 
Based Rental Assistance Account from other forms of assistance. 
The conferees direct HUD, to the extent necessary, to pro rate 
each public housing agency's budget to stay within the amount 
appropriated.
      The conference agreement includes up to $45,000,000 in 
funds to adjust the baseline amount for PHAs that for anomalous 
reasons, or unforeseen circumstances, were significantly under 
leased at the time the baseline was set. Examples include the 
timing of the PHAs fiscal year, portability or other unforeseen 
circumstances, including the assignment of a significant number 
of vouchers, which results in a sharp rise in costs. The 
Secretary has full discretion to determine the appropriate 
amount of adjustment. HUD is directed to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on requests made by PHAs for 
adjustments to allocations and the final decisions made by the 
Department.
      The conferees reiterate House report language that 
requires HUD to track and report on the extent to which subsidy 
changes are due to changes in rent costs and changes in tenant 
incomes.
      Tenant Protection.--The conference agreement includes 
$180,000,000 for rental subsidies for tenant protection 
activities instead of $165,700,000 as proposed by the House and 
$192,000,000 as proposed by the Senate, to replace project-
based Section 8 assistance with section 8 vouchers, for 
conversion of section 202 and section 23 projects to section 8 
assistance, and for the family reunification program and for 
the witness protection program.
      Administrative Fees.--The conference agreement includes 
$1,250,000,000 for public housing agencies' administrative 
costs and other expenses, instead of $1,225,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $1,295,408,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
Language is included making up to $10,000,000, as proposed by 
the Senate, available to the Secretary to allocate to public 
housing agencies that need additional funds to administer their 
programs. The House had provided $25,000,000. The conferees 
direct the Department to specify the activities eligible for 
this funding in the notice to be issued within sixty days of 
enactment of this Act. The Senate did not include similar 
language. The conferees did not adopt language included in the 
House bill that allowed the transfer of up to $200,000,000 in 
tenant-based funds to the project based account.
      Family Self Sufficiency Coordinators.--The conference 
agreement includes $48,000,000 for public housing agencies 
family self-sufficiency coordinator staff as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $45,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Working Capital Fund.--The conference agreement includes 
$5,900,000 for transfer to the Working Capital Fund as proposed 
by the House and Senate.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate that limits funds for litigation and settlements to 
$12,000,000. The House had more narrow language.

                        HOUSING CERTIFICATE FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

      The conference agreement includes a rescission of 
$2,050,000,000 from unobligated balances and recaptures from 
prior-year appropriations provided in the tenant-based rental 
assistance and the project-based rental assistance accounts or 
any other account within this title. This rescission is to be 
effected no later than September 30, 2006. The House proposed 
to rescind $2,500,000,000 and the Senate proposed to rescind 
$1,500,000,000.
      The conferees direct that the Department rescind funds 
provided to Section 8 programs in prior years to the maximum 
extent possible. The conference agreement does not include 
language proposed by the Senate to require that HUD and OMB 
salaries be reduced 10 percent if sufficient Section 8 funds 
are not available. Instead, language is included that directs 
HUD to notify the Committees on Appropriations 30 days in 
advance if unobligated balances in any other accounts will be 
required to implement the rescission.

                    PROJECT-BASED RENTAL ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $5,088,300,000 for 
project-based rental assistance activities as proposed by the 
House, instead of $5,072,100,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conference agreement provides funds as follows:
                                                              Conference
        Activity                                               agreement
Project-Based Contract Renewals.........................  $4,939,700,000
Contract Administrators.................................     147,200,000
Working Capital Fund....................................       1,400,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total, Project-Based Rental Assistance             5,088,300,000

      Language is included, similar to language proposed by the 
House and the Senate, designating $4,939,700,000 for renewals 
and amendment of section 8 project-based contracts, section 8 
moderate rehabilitation contracts (including associated PHA 
administrative expenses), Emergency Low-Income Housing 
Preservation Reform Act (ELIHPRA) and Low-Income Housing 
Preservation Reform Act (LIHPRA) contracts, and section 441 
single room occupancy contracts (including associated PHA 
administrative expenses).
      Language is included, as proposed by the Senate, 
designating $147,200,000 for performance-based contract 
administrators. The conference agreement also includes language 
proposed by the House that would allow these funds for the 
inspection and administration of units funded through elderly 
and disabled, section 236, rent supplement and rental 
assistance programs and the section 202 loan programs.
      The conference agreement assumes that project-based 
section 8 contract amendment funding requirements for fiscal 
year 2006 can also be met through the use of recaptures 
available in the Housing Certificate Fund, as proposed in the 
budget request. Language is included elsewhere in this title 
making funds available for such purpose.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the House that allowed up to $200,000,000 to be 
transferred from the tenant-based account to the project-based 
account.
      The conferees direct that the Department conduct a study 
and prepare a report that describes the progress, if any, in 
improving the living conditions of the tenants of the Evergreen 
I and Evergreen II housing complexes in Joliet, Illinois, by 
the owners of such complexes. An interim report is required 
within six months of enactment of this Act. A final report is 
required within 12 months of enactment of this Act, which shall 
detail findings and recommendations, if any.

                      PUBLIC HOUSING CAPITAL FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $2,463,600,000 for the 
Public Housing Capital Fund, instead of $2,600,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $2,327,200,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the total funding the conference agreement 
includes:
  --up to $8,820,000 to support the costs of existing 
        administrative and judicial receiverships in effect as 
        of the date of enactment of this Act, as proposed by 
        the House and Senate;
  --$11,000,000 for information technology systems instead of 
        $10,000,000 as proposed by the House and $13,200,000 as 
        proposed by the Senate; and
  --up to $17,000,000 for emergency capital needs resulting 
        from unforeseen emergencies or natural disasters in 
        fiscal year 2006 as proposed by both the House and 
        Senate. Additional language is included that was not in 
        either the House or Senate proposal to add the word 
        ``unpreventable'' to the definition of ``emergency''.
      The conference agreement includes $38,000,000 for the 
Resident Opportunity Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) program, instead 
of $24,000,000 as proposed by the House and $45,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $7,500,000 for 
Neighborhood Networks grants similar to language proposed by 
the Senate, but does not include $1,000,000 for technical 
assistance grants. The House did not include separate funding 
for this activity. The conferees direct the Department to 
report to the Committees on Appropriations no later than July 
15, 2006 on the effectiveness of this program in assisting low-
income households in developing skills related to computer 
technology.
      The conference agreement does not designate up to 
$20,000,000 for demolition, relocation and site remediation for 
obsolete and distressed public housing units as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include funds for this activity.

                     PUBLIC HOUSING OPERATING FUND

      The conference agreement appropriates $3,600,000,000 for 
the Public Housing Operating Fund as proposed by the House 
instead of $3,557,300,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
House requiring HUD to implement the negotiated rule as 
described in the ``Post 4th Session Rule'' since HUD has 
postponed the effective date of the rule and has instead issued 
a letter that establishes broad participation by PHAs in 
developing the technical guidance to implement the rule. The 
conferees direct HUD to provide quarterly updates to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations on the status of the 
implementing rule and directs that the Department include broad 
participation from impacted agencies.
      The conference agreement directs that up to $10,000,000 
be used for a program to provide bonus funding for PHAs that 
assist families in moving away from dependency on housing 
assistance programs, as proposed by the House. The Senate did 
not include a similar provision. The conferees expect the 
Department to allocate these funds through a Notice of Funding 
Availability that provides clear eligibility criteria for this 
program.
      The conference agreement includes language that restricts 
funding to operations in fiscal year 2006 and includes language 
proposed by the Senate that would make this annual requirement 
permanent law.
      The conferees note that HUD has yet to issue its guidance 
to implement section 151 of subtitle D of the Energy Policy Act 
of 2005, which extends the payback period for public housing 
authorities entering into energy performance contracts to 20 
years. HUD is directed to issue the guidance implementing this 
section, within 45 days of enactment of this Act.

     REVITALIZATION OF SEVERELY DISTRESSED PUBLIC HOUSING (HOPE VI)

      The conference agreement appropriates $100,000,000 for 
the Revitalization of Severely Distressed Public Housing 
program (HOPE VI), instead of $150,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate and $60,000,000 as proposed by the House. The conference 
agreement allows up to $2,000,000 may be used for technical 
assistance. Language is included making funds available for 
obligation until September 30, 2007.
      The conferees believe it is time to consider alternative 
approaches to the HOPE VI program that provide flexible 
authority for PHAs to address obsolete housing as well as new 
tools for PHAs to develop mixed income housing.

                  NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $630,000,000 
instead of $622,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
$600,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes $4,500,000 for 
inspections, training, and technical assistance and $1,000,000 
for the National American Indian Housing Council for technical 
assistance and capacity building. The House proposed $2,308,000 
and $1,200,000 respectively for these activities. The Senate 
proposed $4,500,000 and $2,200,000 for these activities 
respectively.
      The conference agreement requires that HUD distribute the 
needs portion of the formula distribution on the basis of 
either single race or multi race data whichever is the most 
advantageous to the grant recipient, as proposed by the House. 
Sufficient additional funds have been added to the base, along 
with uncommitted carryover from 2005, to ensure that no grantee 
is disadvantaged.
      The conference agreement includes $2,000,000 for 
guaranteed loans to subsidize a total guaranteed loan principal 
of up to $17,926,000 as proposed by both the House and Senate 
and includes modified language transferring $150,000 to the 
Department's Salaries and Expenses Account, as proposed by the 
House.
      The conference agreement includes no funds for transfer 
to the Working Capital Fund for information technology systems 
as proposed by the House instead of $2,600,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                  NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT

      The conference agreement provides $8,815,000 for the 
Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate. The Senate included the funds as part of 
the Community Development Fund.

           INDIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $4,000,000, to 
subsidize a loan limitation of up to $116,276,000 instead of 
$2,645,000 as proposed by the House and $5,000,000 as proposed 
by the Senate.

      NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $900,000 for 
guaranteed loans for Native Hawaiian housing, instead of 
$882,000 as proposed by the House and $1,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate, to subsidize a total guaranteed loan principal of 
up to $35,714,290.

                   Community Planning and Development

              HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS

      The conference agreement appropriates $289,000,000 for 
Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) instead of 
$290,000,000 as proposed by the House and $287,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Up to $1,500,000 is provided for 
technical assistance instead of $1,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $2,200,000 as proposed by the Senate. HUD is directed 
to distribute 90 percent of the funds through the formula and 
10 percent through a national competition.

                 RURAL HOUSING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

      The conference agreement appropriates $17,000,000 for 
rural housing and economic development instead of $10,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $24,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Language is included requiring funds to be awarded 
competitively by September 1, 2006 as proposed by both the 
House and Senate.

                       COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $4,220,000,000 for the 
Community Development Fund, compared to $4,243,000,000 as 
proposed by the House, and $4,323,610,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees agree to the following:

Formula distribution of funds...........................  $3,748,400,000
Economic Development Initiative Grants..................    $310,000,000
Transfer to the Working Capital Fund....................      $1,600,000
Indian Economic Block Grants............................     $60,000,000
Youthbuild..............................................     $50,000,000
Neighborhood Initiatives Program........................     $50,000,000

      The conference agreement includes modified language 
making technical corrections to certain targeted economic 
development initiative grants funded under this heading in 
prior appropriations Acts, similar to language proposed by the 
House and the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the House transferring up to $1,600,000 to the Working Capital 
Fund for development of and modifications to information 
technology systems. The Senate had proposed $3,000,000 for this 
transfer.
      The conference agreement includes $60,000,000 for the 
Indian Economic Block Grant program, of which up to $4,000,000 
is for emergencies. The House proposed $45,000,000 as part of 
the Native American Housing Block Grant program. The Senate 
proposed $69,000,000 for this grant program.
      The conference agreement provides $50,000,000 for the 
Youthbuild program instead of $55,000,000 proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include Youthbuild as a separate 
program.
      The conference agreement includes language limiting the 
use of funds provided under this heading for planning, 
management and administration to not more than 20 percent of 
the funds provided except for amounts provided for certain 
activities as proposed by the House and the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $310,000,000 for the 
Economic Development Initiative with specific requirements on 
how these funds can be used. The conference agreement directs 
HUD to implement the Economic Development Initiatives program 
as follows:
      1. $100,000 to the City of Anchorage, Alaska for 
facilities construction associated with the SAFE Center at 
Chester Creek;
      2. $400,000 for Bean's Cafe in Anchorage, Alaska for the 
expansion of its kitchen;
      3. $150,000 for the Alaska Botanical Garden in Anchorage, 
Alaska for expansion and renovation of its infrastructure;
      4. $750,000 for the Bering Straits Native Corporation in 
Nome, Alaska for Cape Nome Quarry upgrades;
      5. $950,000 for the Western Alaska Council, Boy Scouts of 
America in Anchorage, Alaska for construction of the Boy Scouts 
High Adventure Base Camp near Talkeetna, Alaska;
      6. $750,000 for the construction of the Tongass Coast 
Aquarium;
      7. $750,000 for Alaska Pacific University for the 
construction of a building;
      8. $250,000 for the construction of the Alyeska 
Roundhouse in Girdwood, Alaska;
      9. $500,000 for the People's Regional Learning Center in 
Bethel, Alaska to construct a vocational school and 
dormitories;
      10. $500,000 for the Dillingham City School District in 
Dillingham, Alaska, to repair the gymnasium in the Dillingham 
middle/high school;
      11. $250,000 National Children's Advocacy Center in 
Huntsville, Alabama for facilities planning and improvements to 
the advocacy center;
      12. $200,000 to Chambers County, Alabama for the 
development of the Chambers County industrial park;
      13. $400,000 to Clarke County, Alabama for an ongoing 
economic development project by the Clark Co. commission;
      14. $200,000 to the City of Ashland, Alabama for the 
purchase of land for Ashland industrial development;
      15. $300,000 to the City of Bear Creek, Alabama for 
industrial park expansion;
      16. $150,000 to the City of Bessemer, Alabama for 
facilities renovation of an existing building at Jefferson 
State Community College;
      17. $500,000 to the City of Decatur, Alabama for the 
Ingalls Harbor/Day Park Riverfront Renovation;
      18. $200,000 to the City of Fort Payne, Alabama for 
acquisition as part of the downtown revitalization project;
      19. $100,000 to the City of Guntersville, Alabama for 
renovations to the Whole Backstage Theater;
      20. $100,000 to the City of Huntsville, Alabama for land 
acquisition for downtown redevelopment;
      21. $250,000 to the City of Montevallo, Alabama for 
facilities renovation and expansion of the Ramsay Conference 
Center at the University of Montevallo in Alabama;
      22. $100,000 to the City of Montevallo, Alabama for 
sidewalks, street furniture, and facade improvements;
      23. $1,000,000 to the City of Opelika, Alabama for the 
Northeast Opelika Industrial Park;
      24. $150,000 to the City of Prattville, Alabama for the 
Prattville Waterfront Development Project to provide access to 
local waterways;
      25. $100,000 to the City of Robertsdale, Alabama for 
upgrades to the PZK Civic Center;
      26. $100,000 to the City of Shorter, Alabama for 
facilities construction and renovation of the Old Shorter 
School building to a community center;
      27. $150,000 to the City of Thomasville, Alabama to 
construct a worker training center at Alabama Southern 
Community Center;
      28. $275,000 to the City of Troy, Alabama for small 
business training at the Troy University Center for 
International Trade and Business Development;
      29. $100,000 to the Huntsville Museum of Art, Alabama for 
facility renovations;
      30. $75,000 to the Town of Mooresville, Alabama for 
rehabilitation, facility improvements, and buildout of three 
buildings;
      31. $400,000 for Construction and outfitting of the 
University of South Alabama's Mitchell School of Business 
Library in Mobile, Alabama;
      32. $400,000 for construction and outfitting of the New 
Centurions, Inc. New Life for Women Shelter in Etowah County, 
Alabama;
      33. $250,000 for the Greenville Family YMCA for child 
care facility acquisition, renovation, and construction in 
Greenville, Alabama;
      34. $300,000 for the City of Evergreen for expansion of 
the Evergreen Conecuh County Library in Evergreen, Alabama;
      35. $400,000 for the Fayette County Commission for the 
Fayette County Industrial Park in Fayette County, Alabama;
      36. $200,000 for the Hayneville/Lowndes County Library 
Foundation for construction of a new library in Hayneville, 
Alabama;
      37. $350,000 for the Jasper Area Family Services Center 
for construction of the Center in Jasper, Alabama;
      38. $300,000 for the City of Tuskegee for Downtown 
Revitalization in Tuskegee, Alabama;
      39. $400,000 for the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and 
Blind's Tuscaloosa Regional Center in Tuscaloosa, Alabama;
      40. $250,000 for the City of Montgomery to develop the 
Montgomery Riverwalk in Montgomery, Alabama;
      41. $250,000 for the Cleveland Avenue YMCA for facility 
expansion in Montgomery, Alabama;
      42. $200,000 for the Wilcox County Industrial Development 
Authority for planning and development of its Industrial/
Commercial Park;
      43. $300,000 for the City of Guin in Wilcox County, 
Alabama for planning and development of its Industrial/
Commercial Park;
      44. $150,000 to Grand Prairie Center for the Arts and 
Allied Health, Phillips County Community College in Stuttgart, 
Arkansas for facility construction;
      45. $150,000 to the City of Little Rock, Arkansas for 
facilities renovation and improvements to the community center 
at Granite Mountain;
      46. $150,000 to the El Dorado Public Schools in El 
Dorado, Arkansas for the expansion of a recreational field;
      47. $150,000 to the North Arkansas College, Harrison 
County, Arkansas for renovations to a Conference and Training 
facility;
      48. $250,000 to Vada Sheid Community Development Center, 
ASU in Mountain Home, Arkansas for the community development 
center auditorium;
      49. $800,000 for the Central Arkansas Resource 
Conservation and Development Council in Helena, Arkansas for 
the construction of the Phillips County Agricultural Storage 
Facility;
      50. $200,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Ouachita 
County, Arkansas for the construction of recreational 
facilities;
      51. $200,000 for the City of Conway, Arkansas for 
downtown revitalization;
      52. $200,000 for Audubon Arkansas for the development of 
the Audubon Nature Center at Gillam Park in Little Rock, 
Arkansas;
      53. $600,000 to Chicanos Por La Causa in Phoenix, Arizona 
for redevelopment of the Nuestro Barrio Community;
      54. $250,000 to Chicanos Por La Causa in Phoenix, Arizona 
for land acquisition and redevelopment of the East Washington 
Fluff site;
      55. $250,000 to Pinal County, Arizona for the renovation 
and repair of the Pinal County Courthouse;
      56. $350,000 to the City of Douglas, Arizona for 
facilities renovation of the Grand Theater;
      57. $500,000 to the City of Eloy, Arizona for 
construction of a community center;
      58. $250,000 to the City of Globe, Arizona for land 
acquisition and streetscape improvements;
      59. $180,000 to the City of Scottsdale, Arizona for the 
renovation of the Vista del Camino Community Center;
      60. $650,000 to the City of Sierra Vista, Arizona for 
construction of the Boys & Girls Club in Sierra Vista;
      61. $150,000 to the Dunbar Coalition in Tucson, Arizona 
for the Dunbar Project;
      62. $350,000 to Valley of the Sun YMCA in Phoenix, 
Arizona for facilities construction of a YMCA;
      63. $150,000 to Chualar, California for construction of a 
multipurpose cultural room on the Chualar Elementary School 
campus;
      64. $150,000 to Merced County, California for renovation 
of the George Washington Carver Community Center in Dos Palos, 
California;
      65. $150,000 to Mono County, California for the Library 
Authority Board of Education for construction of a building;
      66. $100,000 to San Bernardino County, CA for the 
development of the Santa Ana River Regional Park;
      67. $200,000 to Solano County, California for renovation 
of two structures used by local veterans groups;
      68. $150,000 to Taylor Yard Park in Los Angeles, 
California for recreational equipment and other park upgrades 
that will serve at-risk youth;
      69. $250,000 to the City of Alhambra, California for 
development and construction of a park;
      70. $1,000,000 to the City of Apple Valley, California 
for Civic Center Park development;
      71. $250,000 to the City of Banning, CA for city pool 
improvements;
      72. $350,000 to the City of Beaumont, CA for the 
construction of the Beaumont Sports Park;
      73. $200,000 to the City of Bell Gardens, California for 
renovation and update of facilities;
      74. $100,000 to the City of Bishop, California for 
improvements to City housing;
      75. $75,000 to the City of Chino, California for 
construction of a facility for the Hillview Acres Children's 
Home;
      76. $150,000 to the City of Chowchilla, California for 
reconstruction of an industrial park;
      77. $80,000 to the City of Colfax, California for an 
expansion of the Youth Center;
      78. $150,000 to the City of Colton, California for 
improvements to Veterans Park;
      79. $100,000 to the City of Corona, California for the 
renovation of the Old City Hall;
      80. $1,000,000 to the City of Crescenta Valley, 
California for the ongoing construction of a new library;
      81. $350,000 to the City of Davis, California; to 
complete the design and construction of Shafter Research and 
Extension Center at the University of California, Davis;
      82. $250,000 to the City of Diamond Bar, California for 
the renovation of the Diamond Bar High School and Community 
Sports Field;
      83. $150,000 to the City of East Palo Alto, California 
for the construction of facilities for community services;
      84. $350,000 to the City of El Monte, California for 
construction of a community gymnasium;
      85. $250,000 to the City of Encinitas, California for the 
construction of a visitor center in the San Elijo Lagoon Open 
Space Preserve;
      86. $250,000 to the City of Greenfield, California for 
construction of a multipurpose community facility;
      87. $100,000 to the City of Huntington Beach, California 
for the planning and design phase of a senior center;
      88. $200,000 to the City of Huntington Park, California 
for renovation of a recreation center building;
      89. $500,000 to the City of Idyllwild, California for 
building cabins and dining hall improvements at Ronald McDonald 
camp;
      90. $200,000 to the City of Inglewood, California for 
construction of a new senior center;
      91. $75,000 to the City of La Habra, California to 
rehabilitate the La Habra Vista Grande Park;
      92. $150,000 to the City of La Mirada, California for 
construction of an aquatic center;
      93. $250,000 to the City of Lake Morena, California for 
the design of a residential facility for homeless youth;
      94. $250,000 to the City of Lancaster, California for 
installations related to the baseball complex;
      95. $100,000 to the City of Lancaster, California for 
improvements to the Boys and Girls Club of Antelope Valley;
      96. $100,000 to the City of Lompoc, California to 
construct a new C.N.A. training center;
      97. $50,000 to the City of Lompoc, California to 
construct an elevator for a building that serves the disabled;
      98. $150,000 to the City of Long Beach, California to 
develop an exhibit to educate the public on the importance of 
ports;
      99. $125,000 to the City of Los Angeles, California for 
the Esperanza Community Maple-Mae Project;
      100. $400,000 to the City of Los Angeles, California for 
site acquisition and development;
      101. $100,000 to the City of Madera, California to 
construct a youth center for at risk youth;
      102. $200,000 to the City of Mariposa, California for 
preservation of the CA Mining and Mineral Museum;
      103. $150,000 to the City of Mendota, California for 
construction of the Rural Vocational Training Facility (RVTF);
      104. $50,000 to the City of Oak View, California for 
rehabilitation of the multi-purpose room and kitchen of the Oak 
View Park and Resource Center;
      105. $150,000 to the City of Oakland, California for 
renovation of historic Fruitvale Masonic Temple;
      106. $200,000 to the City of Oceanside, California for a 
Senior Center facility to serve seniors from Oceanside, Vista, 
Carlsbad and San Marcos;
      107. $100,000 to the City of Oroville, California for 
Vega Center renovations;
      108. $200,000 to the City of Pico Rivera, California for 
the expansion of the California senior center;
      109. $200,000 to the City of Placerville, California for 
Gold Bug Park Renovations;
      110. $250,000 to the City of Redding, California to 
develop the Stilwater business park;
      111. $100,000 to the City of Riverside, California for 
the development of a Technology Center within University 
Research Park;
      112. $100,000 to the City of Riverside, California for 
facility construction of the School for Nursing at Riverside 
Community College;
      113. $100,000 to the City of Riverside, California for 
construction of a pedestrian bridge in the California Citrus 
State Park;
      114. $400,000 to the City of Sacramento, California for 
construction of the Sacramento Food Bank;
      115. $100,000 to the City of San Bernardino, California 
for Renovations to National Orange Show stadium;
      116. $100,000 to the City of San Fernando, California for 
revitalization of downtown San Fernando;
      117. $300,000 to the City of San Jacinto, California for 
improvements to city museum/Estudillo property;
      118. $150,000 to the City of San Jose, California to the 
construction of a community center in a low and moderate-income 
area;
      119. $350,000 to the City of San Leandro, California for 
streetscape and pedestrian safety improvements;
      120. $150,000 to the City of San Pedro, California for 
streetscape and other improvements along Gaffey Street;
      121. $500,000 to the City of Santee, California for 
construction of a new Boys and Girls Club facility at East 
County;
      122. $100,000 to the City of Stockton, California for the 
Oasis of Hope Community Development Corporation education 
project;
      123. $125,000 to the City of Tehachapi, California for 
design and construction of a performing arts center;
      124. $100,000 to the City of Thousand Oaks, California to 
construct a community aquatics complex on the campus of 
California Lutheran University;
      125. $100,000 to the City of Tulare, California to expand 
educational activities with the College of Sequoias and the 
California Polytechnic University;
      126. $40,000 to the City of Tulare, California for 
modernization of the veterans hall;
      127. $250,000 to the City of Twentynine Palms, California 
for Development of a Visitors Center;
      128. $100,000 to the City of Visalia, California for 
construction of a new facility to provide shelter for homeless 
women and children;
      129. $100,000 to the City of Vista, California Solutions 
Family Intake/Access Center for homeless families and their 
children;
      130. $350,000 to the City of Yucaipa, California for 
development and construction of the Yucaipa/Crafton Hills 
College Recreational Facility;
      131. $350,000 to the City of Yucaipa, California for 
development of the Yucaipa Valley Regional Sports Complex;
      132. $150,000 to the Community Action partnership of 
Orange County in Garden Grove, California for acquisition, 
construction, or rehabilitation of a service facility;
      133. $200,000 to the Department of Economic Development 
in Rancho Cordova, California for Cordova Senior Center 
Expansion;
      134. $250,000 to the Earle Baum Center of the Blind, Inc. 
in Santa Rosa, California to build a center for the visually 
impaired;
      135. $250,000 to the Lake County Arts Council in 
Lakeport, California for renovation of the Lakeport Cinema to a 
Performing Arts Center;
      136. $500,000 to the Museum of Latin American Art in Long 
Beach, California to complete the renovation of the Museum;
      137. $150,000 to the San Diego Housing Commission in San 
Diego, California for the HOPE Village Project to construct a 
20-unit housing complex to house homeless individuals;
      138. $150,000 to the Santa Barbara County Food bank in 
Santa Barbara, California for expansion and upgrades to its 
facility;
      139. $550,000 to the Skirball Cultural Center in Los 
Angeles, California for development and construction of Noah's 
pArk;
      140. $250,000 to the Town of Yucca Valley, California for 
development and construction of the South Side Community 
Center;
      141. $200,000 to the Valley Alliance for the Arts in San 
Fernando Valley, California for construction of a performing 
arts center;
      142. $200,000 to the Youth Science Institute Center in 
San Jose, California for building renovations;
      143. $250,000 for the 10th and Mission Affordable Family 
Housing & Commercial Space Project, for the development of 
housing units and commercial space, Mercy Housing, San 
Francisco, California;
      144. $200,000 for the City of Inglewood, California to 
construct a Senior Center;
      145. $200,000 for the San Francisco Museum and Historical 
Society Old Mint Restoration Project for planning, design and 
construction, California;
      146. $150,000 for the Fresno County Economic 
Opportunities Commission, Fresno, CA, for construction of the 
Neighborhood Youth Center;
      147. $600,000 for the City of Oakland, CA for the Fox 
Theater Restoration;
      148. $200,000 for the City of Redding, CA for the 
Stillwater Business Park;
      149. $200,000 for the West Angeles Community Development 
Corporation, CA for the development of the West Angeles Plaza;
      150. $100,000 to the Housing Trust of Santa Clara County, 
CA, for the First Time Home Buyer Loan Program;
      151. $175,000 for the San Francisco Fine Arts Museums, 
CA, for M.H. de Young Memorial Museum construction;
      152. $175,000 for the Agua Caliente Cultural Museum, Palm 
Springs, CA for construction;
      153. $160,000 to the City of Montrose, Colorado for 
expansion of a research park for Mesa State University;
      154. $240,000 to the City of Pueblo, Colorado for 
redevelopment of recreation and park facilities;
      155. $250,000 to the City of Wellington, Colorado for 
construction and renovation of rehabilitation facilities;
      156. $150,000 to the Denver Rescue Mission in Denver, 
Colorado for acquisition and renovation of an emergency 
shelter;
      157. $300,000 for the City of Denver, Denver Rescue 
Mission for the Acquisition and Renovation of Emergency and 
Transitional Housing for Colorado's Homeless population;
      158. $150,000 to the City of Ansonia, Connecticut for 
construction of a new community space;
      159. $350,000 to the City of Bridgeport, Connecticut for 
relocation of the Music and Arts Center for the Humanities to a 
now-vacant department store;
      160. $100,000 to the City of Bridgeport, Connecticut for 
planning and implementation of a Neighborhood Revitalization 
Zone (NRZ);
      161. $100,000 to the City of Bridgeport, Connecticut to 
complete the renovation of the former CT state armory facility;
      162. $100,000 to the City of Ellington, Connecticut for 
construction of a new YMCA in an underserved area;
      163. $250,000 to the City of Farmington, Connecticut for 
Hill-Stead Museum Renovation and Security Improvements;
      164. $100,000 to the City of New Britain, Connecticut for 
the renovation of 85 Arch Street by the Friendship Service 
Center of New Britain;
      165. $100,000 to the City of Norwalk, Connecticut for the 
Human Services Council to redevelop facilities for affordable 
housing;
      166. $250,000 to the City of Stamford, Connecticut for 
renovations to the Palace Theatre;
      167. $100,000 to the City of Stamford, Connecticut for 
repairs to the Yerwood Community Center;
      168. $100,000 to the City of Waterbury, Connecticut for 
renovations to the Mattatuck Museum to create an exhibit on the 
history of Brass Valley;
      169. $450,000 to the Naugatuck YMCA in Naugatuck, 
Connecticut for upgrades and other facilities expansion;
      170. $100,000 to the Town of Sherman, Connecticut for 
reconstruction of the Sherman town library;
      171. $350,000 to the Town of Stonington, Connecticut for 
the construction of south pier at Stonington Town Dock Complex;
      172. $350,000 to the Town of Willington, Connecticut for 
the expansion of low-income senior housing;
      173. $300,000 to the University of Hartford in Hartford, 
Connecticut for facilities construction and renovation of the 
Hartt Performing Arts Center;
      174. $450,000 for the City of Hartford, Connecticut for 
the Hartford Homeownership Initiative;
      175. $200,000 for the City of Hartford, Connecticut for 
the renovation of the Mark Twain House Building;
      176. $300,000 for the City of Ansonia, Connecticut for 
the renovation of the Ansonia Armory;
      177. $250,000 for the City of West Haven, CT, for the 
redevelopment of residential housing;
      178. $250,000 for the City of Stamford, CT, for 
renovations to the Yerwood Community Center;
      179. $250,000 for the Town of Southbury, CT, for 
renovations to the Bent of the River Audubon Center;
      180. $200,000 for the City of Hartford, CT, for 
neighborhood restoration activities undertaken by the Southside 
Institutions Neighborhood Alliance;
      181. $250,000 to the African American Civil War Museum in 
Washington, DC for capital improvements to the facility and 
visitors center;
      182. $200,000 to New Castle County, Delaware for 
renovations to the Wilmington Senior Center;
      183. $250,000 to Sussex County, Delaware for the 
renovation of Beebe Medical Center;
      184. $250,000 for the Ministry of Caring, House of Joseph 
II, in Wilmington, DE for the renovation/operation of the 
facility;
      185. $200,000 to the St. Michaels School and Nursery, 
Wilmington, DE, for expansion of the school;
      186. $200,000 to the Wilmington Senior Center, 
Wilmington, DE, for the completion of the renovation of the 
Lafayette Court Senior Apartments project;
      187. $250,000 for Easter Seals Delaware & Maryland's 
Eastern Shore for the construction of the new Easter Seals 
Facility in Georgetown, Delaware;
      188. $200,000 for the Wilmington Music School for the 
Music School Expansion in Wilmington, Delaware;
      189. $200,000 to the City of Lewes for the Lewes 
Canalfront Park in Lewes, Delaware;
      190. $350,000 to Brevard County, Florida for construction 
of a marine and coastal research center at Hubbs/Sea World;
      191. $75,000 to Brevard County, Florida for the 
construction of Crosswinds youth center;
      192. $200,000 to Goodwill of North Florida, Inc. in 
Jacksonville, Florida for the expansion of its facility;
      193. $100,000 to Hillsborough County, FL for construction 
of an agricultural worker center;
      194. $200,000 to Lake County, FL for construction of a 
library;
      195. $500,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida for 
construction of a new building for the Centro Mater Foundation;
      196. $250,000 to Pinellas County, Florida for the 
renovation of Palm Harbor Public Library;
      197. $25,000 to the City of Alachua, Florida for the 
construction of the Veterans' Memorial at City Hall;
      198. $250,000 to the City of Bartow, Florida for the 
redevelopment of downtown Bartow;
      199. $250,000 to the City of Boca Raton, Florida for 
infrastructure improvements for Pearl City;
      200. $96,300 to the City of Coral Gables, Florida for the 
renovation of historic Biltmore Hotel;
      201. $100,000 to the City of DeBary, Florida for 
construction of a Gateway Center for the Arts;
      202. $500,000 to the City of Dunedin, FL for construction 
of a new community center;
      203. $250,000 to the City of Elfers, Florida to replace 
the Community Aging & Retirement Services, Inc building;
      204. $200,000 to the City of Ft. Myers, Florida for the 
redevelopment of Edison & Ford Estates;
      205. $250,000 to the City of Gainesville, Florida for the 
expansion of the Fine and Applied Arts Educational Building at 
Santa Fe Community College;
      206. $400,000 to the City of Gainesville, Florida for 
renovations and historic preservation of James Norman Hall at 
the University of Florida, Gainesville;
      207. $200,000 to the City of Gulfport, Florida for 
renovations to City of Gulfport Scout Hall;
      208. $200,000 to the City of Hollywood, Florida for the 
construction and development of the Young Circle Arts Park 
project;
      209. $150,000 to the City of Homestead, Florida for 
upgrades to the Dade County water and sewer infrastructure;
      210. $75,000 to the City of Marathon, Florida for the 
redevelopment of Boot Key Municipal Harbor;
      211. $250,000 to the City of Miami Gardens, Florida for 
revitalization of the business district;
      212. $100,000 to the City of Miami Springs, Florida for 
the construction of a hurricane shelter;
      213. $250,000 to the City of Miami, Florida for the 
elderly assistance program;
      214. $250,000 to the City of Naranja, Florida to 
construct a facility at Camillus House;
      215. $250,000 to the City of New Port Richey, Florida for 
the renovation of Good Samaritan Health Clinic of Pasco, Inc;
      216. $300,000 to the City of Ocala, Florida for 
improvements to the Fine Arts Center at Central Florida 
Community College;
      217. $250,000 to the City of Ocoee, Florida for 
construction of a senior citizens veterans service center;
      218. $100,000 to the City of Osceola County, Florida for 
the completion of Osceola County Homeless Shelter;
      219. $100,000 to the City of Osceola County, Florida for 
the construction of a senior citizen center;
      220. $100,000 to the City of Pensacola, Florida for 
construction of the YMCA of Greater Pensacola;
      221. $250,000 to the City of Pinellas County, Florida for 
construction of Joe's Creek Greenway Park;
      222. $300,000 to the City of Riviera Beach, Florida for 
site acquisition and improvements for commercial 
revitalization;
      223. $250,000 to the City of Sarasota, Florida for 
renovations to the Robert L. Taylor Community Center;
      224. $200,000 to the City of Seminole, Florida for the 
development of a Science and Nature Park at St. Petersburg 
College;
      225. $250,000 to the City of St. Petersburg Beach, 
Florida for construction of a new Community Center;
      226. $100,000 to the City of St. Petersburg, Florida for 
planning and design of Albert Whitted Waterfront Park;
      227. $125,000 to the City of Treasure Island, Florida for 
construction of beach walkovers;
      228. $250,000 to the City of Winter Haven, Florida for 
improvements to the downtown business district;
      229. $150,000 to the Tangerine Avenue Community 
Redevelopment Area in St. Petersburg, Florida for the 
redevelopment of the Tangerine Avenue Community Area;
      230. $400,000 to Wakulla County, Florida for construction 
of the multi-purpose community center;
      231. $500,000 for Orange County, FL for Central Receiving 
Center to renovate single occupancy rooms;
      232. $500,000 for the Lowry Park Zoological Society, 
Tampa, FL for business development initiative;
      233. $300,000 for the Central Florida YMCA to expand and 
renovate the Wayne Densch YMCA Family Center;
      234. $250,000 for Miami Dade College and the construction 
of a library at their Hialeah, Florida campus;
      235. $250,000 for Nova Southeastern University in Florida 
for the Center for Collaborative Bio-Medical Research;
      236. $600,000 for the City of Coral Gables, Florida for 
the Biltmore Complex Restoration Project;
      237. $400,000 for the City of Orlando, Florida for the 
Parramore Neighborhood Revitalization Project;
      238. $250,000 for Miami Dade County, Florida for the 
Miami Performing Arts Center;
      239. $250,000 for the American Beach Property Owners' 
Association, Fernandina Beach, Florida for the Historic Evans 
Rendezvous Cultural Center Restoration Project;
      240. $200,000 for the City of Gainesville, Florida for 
the Downtown Revitalization Project;
      241. $200,000 for the Florida Memorial University, Miami, 
Florida: West Augustine Initiative;
      242. $200,000 to Clarkston Community Center in Dekalb 
County, Georgia for renovation of Clarkston Community Center;
      243. $150,000 to Clayton County, Georgia for renovation 
of the Clayton Senior Center;
      244. $400,000 to Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, 
Georgia for land acquisition to revitalize its West End 
neighborhood;
      245. $250,000 to Paulding County, Georgia for site 
preparations;
      246. $175,000 to SOWEGA Council on Aging in Albany, 
Georgia for facility construction;
      247. $100,000 to the City of Atlanta, Georgia for 
development of land for Morehouse School of Medicine;
      248. $50,000 to the City of Atlanta, Georgia for 
development of land for Morehouse School of Medicine;
      249. $150,000 to the City of Augusta, Georgia for a Hope 
House facility for therapeutic childcare;
      250. $100,000 to the City of Covington, Georgia for 
renovation and construction of a resource center;
      251. $100,000 to the City of Marietta, Georgia for the 
city redevelopment of Marietta Growth Fund;
      252. $100,000 to the City of Powder Springs, Georgia to 
refurbish the Ford Center;
      253. $275,000 to the City of Savannah, Georgia for the 
renovation of a building annex to house a library and computer 
lab;
      254. $75,000 to the City of Savannah, Georgia for 
revitalization of the Central Georgia Railway for Coastal 
Heritage Society;
      255. $75,000 to the City of Tybee Island, Georgia for a 
new facility for the Georgia 4-H Foundation;
      256. $250,000 to the City of Warner Robins, Georgia for 
the construction of a WWII exhibit and depot flight line for 
the Museum of Aviation;
      257. $250,000 to the Community Service Board of Middle 
Georgia for construction of a girls crisis center;
      258. $225,000 to the Infantry Museum and Heritage Park in 
Columbus, Georgia for construction/development of National 
Infantry Museum and Heritage Park;
      259. $200,000 for Mercer University, Macon, Georgia for 
Critical Personnel Development Program (CPDP);
      260. $200,000 for the Atlanta, Georgia Intergenerational 
Resource Center for a senior housing project;
      261. $200,000 for the Warner Robins, Georgia Museum of 
Aviation for expansion of aviation flight and technology 
center;
      262. $200,000 City of Moutri, Georgia for a community and 
economic development initiative;
      263. $200,000 Morehouse School of Medicine for West End 
Community Development;
      264. $500,000 Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Georgia for the 
Atlanta Symphony Center expansion;
      265. $150,000 to the Children's Justice Center Foundation 
in Honolulu, Hawaii for renovation of a building to provide 
services to victims of child abuse and neglect;
      266. $150,000 to the County of Hawaii in Kailua-Kona, 
Hawaii for construction of a homeless shelter;
      267. $650,000 for the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii, 
Honolulu, HI, for planning, design and construction of the 
Nanakuli Boys & Girls Club;
      268. $300,000 for Pa'a Pono Miloli'I to construct a 
community and youth center;
      269. $300,000 for the Children's Justice Center 
Foundation to construct and renovate the child counseling 
center on Oahu;
      270. $300,000 for the Maui Economic Development Board to 
renovate the enterprise building;
      271. $300,000 for the Kauai YMCA to construct facilities;
      272. $200,000 for the Lanai Youth Center to acquire and 
construct activity facilities;
      273. $200,000 for the County of Hawaii for the renovation 
of a Caregiver and Senior Resource Center;
      274. $300,000 for Hale Mahaolu Ehiku to construct 
affordable rental housing for senior citizens;
      275. $450,000 to Iowa City, Iowa for the establishment of 
a service center for Systems Unlimited, Inc to aid 
disadvantaged families;
      276. $450,000 to the city of Cedar Rapids, Iowa for 
redevelopment of southern Cedar Rapids;
      277. $400,000 to the City of Des Moines, Iowa for land 
acquisition for a technology park;
      278. $750,000 for the City of Clinton, Iowa, for 
redevelopment of Liberty Square;
      279. $250,000 for the National Cattle Congress, Waterloo, 
Iowa, for renovation and construction of facilities;
      280. $400,000 for the City of Waterloo, Iowa, for the 
acquisition and rehabilitation of the Cedar Valley TechWorks 
facility;
      281. $300,000 for the City of Des Moines, Iowa, for the 
Riverpoint West development;
      282. $300,000 for the City of Fort Dodge, Iowa for the 
Lincoln Neighborhood housing initiative;
      283. $1,000,000 to the Iowa Department of Economic 
Development for the Main Street Iowa program for restoration of 
structures on main streets throughout the state;
      284. $750,000 to Polk County, Iowa for the purchase and 
rehabilitation of housing for low income people;
      285. $200,000 to the Heartland Hill Habitat for Humanity 
in Brehmer County, Iowa for the renovation of deteriorated 
housing for low income housing;
      286. $300,000 to the City of Council Bluffs, Iowa for 
downtown historic building renovation;
      287. $100,000 to Franklin County, Idaho for restoration 
of Oneida Stake Academy for historic renovations;
      288. $45,000 to the City of Franklin, Idaho for repairs 
to historic City Hall;
      289. $150,000 to the City of Lewiston, Idaho for 
completion of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Project Planning 
and Implementation;
      290. $100,000 to the City of Pocatello, Idaho for 
renovations to the Greater Pocatello Senior Center;
      291. $350,000 to the City of Rexburg, Idaho for 
construction of recreational facilities and handicap 
accessibility;
      292. $1,000,000 for Ada County, Idaho for development of 
the Family Justice Center and the Detox Center;
      293. $1,000,000 for the Clearwater Economic Development 
Association for the implementation of the Lewis and Clark 
Bicentennial Plan;
      294. $1,000,000 for Boise State University for 
construction of the Center for Environmental Science and 
Economic Development;
      295. $1,000,000 for the Idaho Migrant Council for 
planning, design, and construction of the Burley Community 
Center, Burley, Idaho;
      296. $250,000 to Western Illinois University Quad City 
Campus in Moline, Illinois for renovations of facilities;
      297. $250,000 to Coles County, Illinois for construction 
of Lifespan Center for seniors;
      298. $100,000 to Northeastern Illinois University in 
Chicago, Illinois for a feasibility study on planning and 
design analysis for a new education building;
      299. $200,000 to Pioneer Center Group Home in McHenry 
County, Illinois for upgrades at to a group home;
      300. $150,000 to Seguin Services in Cicero, Illinois for 
construction of a garden center;
      301. $200,000 to the Avalon Park School in Chicago, 
Illinois for construction of a child-parent center;
      302. $900,000 to the Chicago Academy High School in 
Chicago, Illinois for construction of a campus park;
      303. $150,000 to the Chicago Children's Advocacy Center 
in Chicago, Illinois for expansion of its facilities;
      304. $150,000 to the Chicago Park District in Chicago, 
Illinois for land acquisition and facilities improvements to 
expand a park;
      305. $200,000 to the Chicago Park District in Chicago, 
Illinois for land acquisition and facilities improvements for 
the expansion of a park;
      306. $80,000 to the City of Beardstown, Illinois for 
construction of the Grand Opera House Beardstown Historical 
Society;
      307. $200,000 to the City of Bloomingdale, Illinois for 
the renovation of Marklund Children's Home;
      308. $100,000 to the City of Collinsville, Illinois for 
completion of the Collins Home Project;
      309. $500,000 to the City of Downers Grove, Illinois for 
improvements to Ray Graham Association for People With 
Disabilities;
      310. $100,000 to the City of East Moline, Illinois for 
revitalization of downtown;
      311. $225,000 to the City of Harvey, Illinois for 
demolition and redevelopment of property to aid the community;
      312. $150,000 to the City of Hudson, Illinois for 
construction of Timber Pointe Outdoor Center;
      313. $250,000 to the City of Jacksonville, Illinois for 
renovation to Crampton Hall at Illinois College;
      314. $250,000 to the City of Joliet, Illinois for repairs 
to Rialto Square Theater;
      315. $100,000 to the City of Lincoln, Illinois for the 
restoration of the Earl C. Hargrove Auditorium at Lincoln 
Christian College;
      316. $200,000 to the City of Naperville, Illinois for the 
DuPage Children's Museum for building renovations;
      317. $75,000 to the City of Naperville, Illinois for Our 
Children's Homestead to construct new foster care homes;
      318. $250,000 to the City of Peoria, Illinois for design 
and construction of Central Illinois Regional Museum;
      319. $250,000 to the City of Peoria, Illinois for 
renovations to Bradley Hall at Bradley University;
      320. $250,000 to the City of Peoria, Illinois for design 
and construction of Africa exhibit at Glen Oak Zoo;
      321. $100,000 to the City of Peru, Illinois for 
construction of the Horizon House;
      322. $100,000 to the City of Quincy, Illinois for the 
design and construction of an Art and Sciences Center at Quincy 
University;
      323. $150,000 to the City of Rockford, Illinois for the 
expansion of laboratories and public viewing areas at Burpee/
Discovery Center Museum;
      324. $200,000 to the City of Shawneetown, Illinois for 
construction of a facility at Shawneetown Regional Port 
District;
      325. $150,000 to the City of Wheaton, Illinois for 
renovation of the County of DuPage's nursing facility to be 
used for nurses training center;
      326. $500,000 to the City of Yorkville, Illinois for the 
redevelopment of a Yorkville site;
      327. $75,000 to the City of Crest Hill, Illinois for 
redevelopment of Division Street;
      328. $75,000 to the Home of the Sparrow in Lake, Illinois 
for the renovation of a homeless shelter;
      329. $75,000 to the Inner Voice in Chicago, Illinois for 
upgrades to homeless shelters on the South Side of Chicago;
      330. $100,000 to the Village of Hazel Crest in Hazel 
Crest, Illinois for the redevelopment of the area around Hazel 
Crest Metra Station;
      331. $160,000 to the Village of Orion, Illinois for lead-
based paint removal;
      332. $75,000 to the Village of South Jacksonville, 
Illinois for construction of a playground and park for disabled 
children;
      333. $500,000 for the Looking for Lincoln Heritage 
Coalition in Springfield, IL, for the Looking for Lincoln 
economic development and tourism initiative;
      334. $800,000 for the Peace and Education Coalition in 
Chicago, IL, for construction of a new facility to serve San 
Miguel Schools in the City's Back of the Yards neighborhood;
      335. $300,000 to the Haymarket Center in Chicago, IL, for 
construction and establishment of the McDermott Addiction 
Center;
      336. $200,000 for the Quincy Public Library in Quincy, 
IL, for a newspaper digitization and community education 
project;
      337. $200,000 to the Community Foundation of Decatur/
Macon County, Illinois for construction and rehabilitation of 
housing facilities for the homeless and disabled;
      338. $200,000 to the Heartland Community Health Center in 
Illinois for equipment and facilities to expand services;
      339. $250,000 to the Chicago Historical Society in 
Illinois for construction of a new Chicago History Exhibition 
and redevelopment of current facilities;
      340. $200,000 for Home Sweet Home Ministries--Threshold 
program located in the City of Bloomington, IL for the 
construction of an additional housing facility;
      341. $250,000 for the Village of Northfield, IL for 
construction of pedestrian and bicycle paths as well as other 
infrastructure improvements to the Northfield Park District;
      342. $200,000 for the Township of North Hurricane, IL for 
construction of a multi-purpose building within Precinct 1 of 
the Township;
      343. $100,000 to Martin County, Indiana for improvements 
to the Crane Technology Park;
      344. $250,000 to the African American Achievers Youth 
Corporation in Gary, Indiana for renovations of the Glen 
Theater;
      345. $150,000 to the City of Fort Wayne, Indiana for the 
construction of a new building for Crossroad;
      346. $100,000 to the City of Fort Wayne, Indiana for 
construction of a new facility for Easter Seals Arc of 
Northeast Indiana;
      347. $500,000 to the City of Marion, Indiana for the 
renovation of Memorial Coliseum Redevelopment;
      348. $250,000 to the City of Muncie, Indiana for 
enhancements to Urban Park;
      349. $500,000 to the City of South Bend, Indiana for the 
South Bend Heritage Foundation for neighborhood economic 
development and revitalization;
      350. $250,000 to the City of South Bend, Indiana for the 
redevelopment of a brownfield site;
      351. $500,000 to the Town of Cedar Lake, Indiana for 
downtown streetscape improvements;
      352. $500,000 for the City of Muncie, Indiana to 
revitalize the downtown urban park;
      353. $250,000 for the Learning Collaborative to implement 
the Web Portal Technology Development Initiative in Daviess 
County, IN;
      354. $250,000 for the City of Anderson, Indiana to expand 
the Fiber Optic Network;
      355. $150,000 for the City of Indianapolis, IN for the 
Link Savoy Housing Development;
      356. $100,000 for the City of Evansville, IN for the 
Center City Industrial Park;
      357. $100,000 for the City of Fort Wayne, IN for the Fort 
Wayne Technology Center;
      358. $200,000 to SAFEHOME, Inc. in Overland Park, Kansas 
for building acquisition;
      359. $100,000 to the City of Atchison, Kansas for the 
redevelopment of a storm water system overflow;
      360. $200,000 to the City of Florence, Kansas for 
construction and upgrades of the World Impact Morning Star 
Ranch;
      361. $250,000 to the City of Fort Scott, Kansas for 
restoration of historic buildings and brick streets in the 
downtown area;
      362. $250,000 to the City of Independence, Kansas for 
renovations to historic Landon House and Booth Theater;
      363. $300,000 to the City of Wichita, Kansas for 
expansion of Lord's Diner of Wichita;
      364. $300,000 to the City of Wichita, Kansas for 
construction of food bank central distribution facility;
      365. $250,000 to the City of Wichita, Kansas for the 
downtown WaterWalk revitalization project;
      366. $150,000 to the YWCA of Greater Kansas City in 
Kansas City, Kansas for expansion of the facility;
      367. $1,000,000 for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater 
Kansas City for the construction of the Heathwood Community 
Center for Children and Families in Wyandotte County, KS;
      368. $500,000 for Sedgwick County, KS for the 
construction of a Technical Education and Training Center;
      369. $300,000 for the City of Fort Scott, KS for the 
redevelopment of underground infrastructure in the Central 
Business District;
      370. $200,000 for the City of Topeka, KS for renovating 
and updating Heartland Park Topeka;
      371. $500,000 for the City of Mission Kansas to ensure 
the future viability of business and residential districts near 
the Rock Creek Project;
      372. $500,000 for the City of Fairview, Kansas to ensure 
the future viability of business and residential districts near 
the Rock Creek Project;
      373. $75,000 to Crittenden County, Kentucky for expansion 
of the Crittenden County Day Care Center;
      374. $200,000 to Fleming County, Kentucky for the 
completion of a building by the Fleming County Industrial 
Authority;
      375. $150,000 to Hardin County, Kentucky for renovation 
of an historic state theater;
      376. $100,000 to LaRue County, Kentucky for construction 
of a facility for the Lincoln Bicentennial celebration in 2008;
      377. $150,000 to Powell County Fiscal Court in Powell 
County, Kentucky for the construction and development of a 
park;
      378. $350,000 to Pulaski County, Kentucky for 
construction of the Mill Springs Battlefield Visitors Center;
      379. $100,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for the 
renovation of First Gethsemane Center for Family Development;
      380. $350,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for 
construction of a community resource center for Day Spring 
Foundation;
      381. $350,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for the 
renovation of a facility for the Temple Community Development 
Corporation;
      382. $250,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for the 
construction of an entertainment facility for the Community 
Economic Empowerment Corporation;
      383. $100,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for 
renovation of a facility for the New Zion Community Foundation;
      384. $100,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for 
construction of a playground in Shawnee Park;
      385. $100,000 to the City of Louisville, Kentucky for 
construction of a playground in the Louisville Olmsted Parks 
Conservancy;
      386. $500,000 to the City of Lynch, Kentucky for historic 
preservation of the Portal 31 Exhibition Mine Site;
      387. $500,000 to the City of Manchester, KY for facility 
construction;
      388. $70,000 to the City of Tompkinsville, Kentucky for 
the completion of the Tompkinsville Senior Citizen Housing 
Complex;
      389. $600,000 for the Kentucky Commerce Cabinet to 
develop a visitor center at the Big Bone Lick State Park;
      390. $200,000 for McCracken County Fiscal Court in 
Kentucky to construct an Emergency Services Building
      391. $200,000 for Clinton County to develop and construct 
a Welcome Center, KY;
      392. $100,000 to Livingston Parish, Louisiana for 
construction of Livingston Parish Veterans' Memorial Plaza;
      393. $250,000 to Loyola University New Orleans, Louisiana 
for renovations and upgrades to a facility;
      394. $250,000 to the City of Grand Isle, Louisiana for 
construction of a multiplex center;
      395. $500,000 to the City of Opelousas, Louisiana for 
Phase I of recreation improvements;
      396. $250,000 to the City of Shreveport, Louisiana for 
renovations to a donated building in Shreveport;
      397. $180,000 to the City of St. Tammany, Louisiana for 
repairs to the Town Hall and Community Center;
      398. $225,000 to the City of St. Tammany, Louisiana to 
build a trailhead plaza;
      399. $250,000 for Alexandria Central Economic Development 
District, to develop the Alexandria Riverfront Development in 
Louisiana;
      400. $250,000 for Ascension Parish, to develop the Lamar 
Dixon Exposition Center in Louisiana;
      401. $500,000 for the Audubon Nature Institute for the 
Audubon Living Science Museum and Wetlands Center in New 
Orleans, Louisiana;
      402. $500,000 for Lafourche Parish for waterfront 
development along Bayou Lafourche in Ascension, Asumption and 
Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana;
      403. $300,000 to American International College in 
Springfield, Massachusetts for the renovation of Reed Mansion 
and Breck Hall;
      404. $600,000 to Banknorth building in Fitchburg, 
Massachusetts for renovation and construction;
      405. $200,000 to Boston Healthcare for the Homeless in 
Boston, Massachusetts for renovation of its facility;
      406. $300,000 to Edith Wharton Restoration, Inc. in 
Lenox, Massachusetts for facilities upgrade and buildout;
      407. $300,000 to Endicott College in Beverly, 
Massachusetts for construction of a research center;
      408. $100,000 to Greenfield Community College in 
Greenfield, Massachusetts for a feasibility study;
      409. $380,000 to Lawrence Community Works in Lawrence, 
Massachusetts for construction of a design and technology 
training center;
      410. $250,000 to Stetson Town Hall in Randolph, 
Massachusetts for improvements and renovations of its facility;
      411. $200,000 to the City of Holyoke, Massachusetts for 
renovations of facility for Solutions Development Corporation;
      412. $200,000 to the City of Lynn, Massachusetts for the 
renovation of the City Hall and Auditorium;
      413. $500,000 to the City of Medford, Massachusetts for 
construction and renovation of an outdoor facility;
      414. $300,000 to the City of Melrose, Massachusetts for 
improvements to the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall;
      415. $1,000,000 to the City of New Bedford, Massachusetts 
for design and construction of a community center;
      416. $100,000 to the City of Sommerville, Massachusetts 
for renovations and upgrades to its facility;
      417. $100,000 to the Community Art Center, Inc. in 
Cambridge, Massachusetts for renovation and capital 
improvements;
      418. $300,000 to the Mahaiwae Performing Arts Center, 
Inc. in Great Barrington, Massachusetts for facilities 
renovation and improvements;
      419. $400,000 to the Main South Community Development 
Corporation in Worcester, Massachusetts for revitalization of 
the Gardner-Kilby-Hammond neighborhood;
      420. $125,000 to the Mashpee Wampanoq Tribal Council, 
Inc. in Massachusetts for renovation of a facility;
      421. $200,000 to the Merrimack Repertory Theater in 
Lowell, Massachusetts for renovation of facilities;
      422. $100,000 to the Narrows Center in Fall River, 
Massachusetts for renovations and upgrades to facilities;
      423. $400,000 to the Springfield Day Nursery in 
Springfield, Massachusetts for renovations to the King Street 
Children's Center;
      424. $400,000 to Western Mass Enterprise Fund, Inc. in 
Greenfield, Massachusetts for capitalization of a loan fund;
      425. $200,000 to Whittier Street Community Center in 
Roxbury, Massachusetts for facilities renovation;
      426. $400,000 to Walpole, MA for improvements and 
renovations to town fields;
      427. $280,000 for the City of North Adams, MA for the 
renovation of the historic Mohawk Theater;
      428. $280,000 for the City of Holyoke, MA for renovations 
to the Picknelly Adult and Family Education Center;
      429. $200,000 for the City of Medford, MA for the 
redevelopment of Medford Square;
      430. $280,000 for the Main South Community Development 
Corporation, Worcester, MA for the redevelopment of the 
Gardner-Kilby-Hammond Neighborhood;
      431. $260,000 for the City of Lawrence, MA for the 
redevelopment of the Lawrence In-Town Mall site;
      432. $250,000 for the Bird Street Community Center, 
Boston, MA for facility renovations;
      433. $200,000 for Straight Ahead Ministries of Westboro, 
MA for the acquisition and renovation of facilities in 
Hubbardston, MA;
      434. $200,000 for Girls Incorporated of Lynn, MA for 
building renovations;
      435. $250,000 to Dawson Safe Haven for Children, Youth, 
and Families in Baltimore, Maryland for reconstruction of the 
Dawson Safe Haven facility;
      436. $225,000 to St. Mary's College, St. Mary's, Maryland 
for the renovation and purchasing of technology equipment for 
Goodpaster Hall;
      437. $150,000 to the City of Baltimore, Maryland for 
revitalization of the East Baltimore Development Project Area;
      438. $250,000 to the City of Hyattsville, Maryland for 
construction of the Renaissance Square Artists' Housing;
      439. $250,000 to the City of Takoma Park, Maryland for 
construction and build out of a community learning center;
      440. $500,000 to the Historic St. Mary's City Commission 
in St. Mary's City, Maryland for construction and renovation of 
a brick chapel;
      441. $275,000 to the Ministers Alliance of Charles County 
in Waldorf, Maryland for the acquisition, renovation, and 
construction of a business center;
      442. $100,000 to the Towson YMCA Day Care in Towson, 
Maryland for the renovation and expansion of the Day Care 
Facility;
      443. $300,000 for the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore for 
construction and equipping of new food distribution center;
      444. $500,000 for the Washington Archdiocese/Langley Park 
Health Clinic and Social Service Center, Maryland;
      445. $450,000 for the East Baltimore Development Project, 
Maryland;
      446. $500,000 for Patterson Park/Library Square 
Revitalization, Maryland;
      447. $400,000 for Goucher College, Community Service 
Center, Maryland;
      448. $200,000 for the American Visionary Arts Museum, 
Maryland;
      449. $200,000 for the Our Daily Bread Employment Center, 
Maryland;
      450. $100,000 to Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine for 
site planning and renovation of a building;
      451. $200,000 to the Town of Milo, Maine for the 
development of an industrial park;
      452. $325,000 for the City of Brewer Administrative 
Building Redevelopment, ME;
      453. $300,000 for the Maine Franco-American Heritage 
Center, Renovation Project;
      454. $325,000 for the Bangor Waterfront Park on the 
Penobscot River for the City of Bangor, Maine;
      455. $350,000 for the Town of Milo, Maine for the 
development of the Eastern Piscataquis Industrial Park;
      456. $350,000 for the Town of Van Buren for the Van Buren 
Regional Business Park, Maine;
      457. $350,000 for Western Maine Community Action for the 
Keeping Seniors Home program;
      458. $300,000 for the University of New England: George 
and Barbara Bush Cultural Center for construction and 
equipment;
      459. $200,000 for the City of Portland, Portland Public 
Library Renovation and Expansion Project, Maine;
      460. $100,000 for the Penobscot Marine Museum Maine-
Mawooshen for the One Country, Two Worlds Project, Maine;
      461. $300,000 for the Westbrook Housing Authority: 
Larrabee Village Supportive Services for construction and 
design of facilities for the elderly & disabled;
      462. $250,000 to Grand Traverse County, Michigan for a 
homeless shelter to serve five counties;
      463. $400,000 to Grand Valley State University in the 
Town of Allendale, Michigan for renovations to a research and 
education facility;
      464. $150,000 to Northern Michigan University in 
Marquette, Michigan for construction and facility expansion of 
the Olympic Village Project;
      465. $550,000 to the Arab Community Center for Economic 
and Social Services in Dearborn, Michigan for construction of a 
museum;
      466. $550,000 to the City of Detroit, Michigan for the 
demolition of unsafe buildings;
      467. $500,000 to the City of Detroit, Michigan for 
demolition of dangerous structures;
      468. $300,000 to the City of Detroit, Michigan for 
revitalization of Eastern Market;
      469. $350,000 to the City of East Lansing, Michigan for 
the construction of housing units for low-income families;
      470. $150,000 to the City of Farmington, Michigan for 
trail improvements to Shiawassee Park;
      471. $350,000 to the City of Farmington, Michigan for ADA 
compliance of the Municipal Riverfront Park;
      472. $400,000 to the City of Ferndale, Michigan for the 
expansion of the existing Kulick Community Center;
      473. $100,000 to the City of Frankfort, Michigan for 
mixed-use development;
      474. $250,000 to the City of Port Huron, Michigan for the 
renovation of areas in conjunction with the city revitalization 
plan;
      475. $350,000 to the City of Saginaw, Michigan for 
renovation of the YMCA of Saginaw;
      476. $100,000 to the Detroit Zoo for construction of the 
Ford Center for Environmental and Conservation Education;
      477. $200,000 to the Jewish Vocational Services in the 
City of Southfield, Michigan for the development of assisted 
housing;
      478. $300,000 to the Labor Museum and Learning Center of 
Michigan in Flint, Michigan for construction and buildout of a 
museum;
      479. $400,000 to the Lighthouse of Oakland County, 
Michigan for construction of new homes in Unity Park;
      480. $475,000 to the Michigan Jewish Institute in West 
Bloomfield, Michigan for improvements to campus buildings and 
classrooms;
      481. $200,000 to the MotorCities National Heritage Area 
in Detroit, Michigan for renovations to the historic Piquette 
Plant;
      482. $700,000 to the National Center for Manufacturing 
Sciences in the City of Ann Arbor, Michigan for the development 
of advanced technologies to the manufacturing base;
      483. $200,000 to The Oakland Livingston Human Service 
Agency in Pontiac, Michigan for the purchase of 196 Cesar 
Chavez Avenue;
      484. $250,000 to the Presbyterian Villages of Pontiac, 
Michigan for improvements to the senior wellness center;
      485. $350,000 to the Presbyterian Villages of Redwood, 
Michigan for construction of green housing;
      486. $200,000 to the Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic 
in the City of Troy, Michigan for material dissemination to 
homes and classrooms;
      487. $250,000 to the Samaritan Center in the City of 
Detroit, Michigan for renovation of a multipurpose facility;
      488. $250,000 to the Village of Clinton, Michigan for 
renovations to the Boysville Neighborhood Centers;
      489. $250,000 to Walsh College in the City of Troy, 
Michigan for a library expansion;
      490. $600,000 for The Enterprise Group of Jackson, MI for 
the Armory Arts redevelopment project;
      491. $600,000 to the Arab Community Center for Economic 
and Social Services (ACCESS) in Dearborn, MI for expansion of a 
museum;
      492. $600,000 to the City of Detroit, MI for 
redevelopment of the Far East Side neighborhood;
      493. $350,000 to the City of Saginaw, MI to provide for 
the revitalization of Northeast Saginaw;
      494. $300,000 for the State of Michigan for costs 
associated with the relocation of the A.E. Seaman Mineral 
Museum;
      495. $300,000 for Focus: Hope in Detroit, MI for the 
upgrades to the cogeneration micro-grid;
      496. $250,000 for the Goodwill Inn Homeless Shelter in 
Traverse City, MI for construction of a new shelter;
      497. $200,000 to the Harbor Habitat for Humanity in 
Benton Harbor, MI for costs associated with infrastructure in 
the construction of new homes;
      498. $150,000 to the City of St. Paul, Minnesota for 
rehabilitation needs at the Ames Lake Neighborhood/Phalen Place 
Apartments;
      499. $100,000 to the City of St. Paul, Minnesota for the 
development of supporting housing for homeless youth;
      500. $500,000 to the Minneapolis American Indian Center 
in Minneapolis, Minnesota for facilities renovation;
      501. $275,000 to the Northside Residents Redevelopment 
Council in Minneapolis, Minnesota for construction of mixed-use 
facilities;
      502. $550,000 to the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians in 
Red Lake, Minnesota for construction and buildout of a multi-
purpose complex;
      503. $200,000 for the Hmong American Mutual Assistance 
Association in Minneapolis, Minnesota to complete the HAMAA 
Community Center;
      504. $200,000 for the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians 
in Red Lake, Minnesota to construct criminal justice complex 
project;
      505. $200,000 for the Chicanos Latinos Unidos En Servicio 
(CLUES) in St. Paul, Minnesota for facility construction;
      506. $200,000 for Redwood County, Minnesota for the 
Material Recovery/Waste to Energy Facility at Lamberton, 
Minnesota;
      507. $300,000 to construct a community, activity center 
for low-income seniors in Mora, MN;
      508. $75,000 to the 3rd Ward Neighborhood Council in St. 
Louis, Missouri for renovation and preservation of a facility;
      509. $150,000 to the Better Family Life Cultural Center & 
Museum in St. Louis, Missouri for facility construction and 
renovation;
      510. $500,000 to the City of Cape Girardeau, Missouri for 
the construction of a new school for visual and performing arts 
at Southeast Missouri State University;
      511. $250,000 to the City of Cape Girardeau, Missouri for 
construction of a Discovery Research Institute;
      512. $250,000 to the City of Joplin, Missouri for the 
renovation of center downtown district;
      513. $150,000 to the City of Kansas City, Missouri for 
project planning and design, demolition, and redevelopment at 
the Columbus Park Redevelopment Project;
      514. $500,000 to the City of Springfield, Missouri for 
the renovation of Gillioz/Reagan Theater;
      515. $250,000 to the City of Springfield, Missouri for 
the construction of a multi-purpose community facility;
      516. $150,000 to the City of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri for 
streetscape improvements;
      517. $500,000 for the Liberty Memorial Association in 
Kansas City, MO for construction and renovation;
      518. $250,000 for the St. Louis Bosnian Chamber of 
Commerce for construction of a community center in St. Louis, 
MO;
      519. $250,000 for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater 
Kansas City, MO for RBI construction;
      520. $250,000 for the Winston Churchill Memorial in 
Fulton, MO for construction and renovation;
      521. $250,000 for Covenant House Missouri for 
construction of homeless youth center in St. Louis, MO;
      522. $250,000 for Truman State University for 
construction of Speech and Hearing Clinic in Kirksville, MO;
      523. $250,000 for City of Springfield, MO for renovation 
of the Springfield Commercial Club Building;
      524. $750,000 to the Family Support Services Center for 
Autistic Children for construction of a Center to serve 
families with autistic children in St. Charles County, 
Missouri;
      525. $500,000 to the University of Missouri for Hickman 
House preservation, renovation and improvements projects in 
Howard County, Missouri;
      526. $500,000 to the Salvation Army Northland Community 
Center, to construct a family center and community room Clay 
County, Missouri;
      527. $1,000,000 to the Kansas City Neighborhood Alliance 
for capital improvements in Kansas City, Missouri;
      528. $1,000,000 to Better Living Communities for capital 
improvements for Salisbury Park neighborhood housing 
development in St. Louis, Missouri;
      529. $500,000 to the St. Louis Housing Authority for 
neighborhood housing development of the Cochran Gardens Public 
Housing Site in St. Louis, Missouri;
      530. $620,000 to the City of Kansas City for Swope 
Community Builders for the Linwood Housing project, Kansas 
City, Missouri;
      531. $500,000 to the Missouri Soybean Association for 
test plots for the Life Sciences Research Development and 
Commercialization Project in Boone County, Missouri;
      532. $500,000 to the Mark Twain Neighborhood Association 
for capital improvements in St. Louis, Missouri;
      533. $750,000 to the Students in Free Enterprise World 
Headquarters for capital improvements [equipment] in Greene 
County, Missouri;
      534. $250,000 to the Advanced Technology Center for 
construction of Laser/photronics lab complex and classroom in 
Mexico, Missouri;
      535. $750,000 to the Youzeum for construction of youth 
health museum in Boone County, Missouri;
      536. $400,000 to City of Kennett for downtown 
revitalization in Kennett, Missouri;
      537. $550,000 City of Moorhead, Sunflower County, 
Mississippi for streetscape improvements;
      538. $300,000 to Panola County, Mississippi for the 
construction of a multi-purpose community facility;
      539. $200,000 to the City of Meridian, Mississippi for 
the construction of the Mississippi Arts and Entertainment 
Center;
      540. $100,000 to the City of Natchez, Mississippi for a 
long term master plan for community development;
      541. $750,000 to the City of Pontotoc, Mississippi for 
construction of the Pontotoc County Sportsplex;
      542. $50,000 to the City of Starkville, Mississippi for 
improvements to the Cornerstone Industrial Park;
      543. $250,000 to the Town of McLain, Mississippi for 
industrial park development;
      544. $500,000 in the City of Oxford, Mississippi for the 
Innovation and Outreach Center;
      545. $500,000 in the City of Madison, Mississippi, for 
the Historic Madison Gateway Project;
      546. $500,000 in the City of Tchula, Mississippi for the 
Tchula New Town Infrastructure Project;
      547. $1,500,000 for the Mississippi Museum of Art in 
Jackson, Mississippi, for renovations and improvements;
      548. $950,000 for the Education Building for the Jackson 
Zoo in Jackson, Mississippi, to construct an educational 
building;
      549. $850,000 for the Lafayette County Courthouse in 
Oxford, Mississippi, to restore and renovate their historic 
c.1872 courthouse;
      550. $800,000 for the Hinds Community College Performing 
Arts Center in Utica, Mississippi, to construct a performing 
arts, multi-purpose building;
      551. $500,000 for the Mississippi University for Women 
Facility Restoration in Columbus, Mississippi, for facility 
improvements and restoration;
      552. $500,000 for the Simpson County, Mississippi 
Courthouse for renovations and improvements;
      553. $500,000 for the Jackson Public School-Belhaven 
College H.T. Newell Field Complex Partnership for facility 
improvements and construction in Jackson, Mississippi;
      554. $600,000 for the City of Collins, Mississippi, to 
build a multi-purpose civic center;
      555. $500,000 for the renovation of the Robert O. Wilder 
Building at Tougaloo College in Jackson, Mississippi;
      556. $500,000 for the St. Ambrose Leadership College in 
Wesson, Mississippi, for restoration of a historic building for 
housing;
      557. $500,000 for Delta State University for economic 
development activities and campus and facility improvements;
      558. $500,000 for the Historical Preservation at Alcorn 
State University, Alcorn State, Mississippi, for the 
restoration project of existing historic buildings;
      559. $100,000 to the City of Billings, Montana for the 
renovation of the Child and Family Intervention Center;
      560. $100,000 to the City of Havre, Montana for 
improvements to the Montana State University Applied Technology 
Center;
      561. $40,000 to the City of Lolo, Montana for 
construction of a pedestrian bridge over Lolo Creek;
      562. $500,000 to the City of Missoula, Montana for 
expansion of the Montana Food Bank Network;
      563. $200,000 for the Liberty House Foundation, for 
construction expenses in Ft. Harrison, MT;
      564. $350,000 for the Rocky Mountain Development Council, 
to continue the PenKay Eagles Manor Renovation in Helena, MT;
      565. $250,000 for the Rocky Boy Reservation's utilization 
of Malmstrom Air Force Base's excess housing;
      566. $250,000 for the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation in 
Missoula, MT for the infrastructure needs of their new 
headquarters facility;
      567. $250,000 for the Center for St. Vincent Healthcare's 
Center for Healthy Aging in Billings, MT;
      568. $200,000 for the Child and Family Intervention 
Center to renovate the Garfield School Building in Billings, 
MT;
      569. $200,000 for the Yellowstone Boys and Girls Ranch's 
Education Facilities Expansion in Billings, MT;
      570. $200,000 for the Carter County Museum's Highway to 
Hell Creek project facilities expansion in Ekalaka, MT;
      571. $400,000 for the Big Sky Economic Development 
Corporation for acquisition and rehabilitation for low-income 
housing in Billings, MT;
      572. $200,000 for the Missoula Aging Services building 
renovation in Missoula, MT;
      573. $200,000 to the St. Vincent Center for Healthy Aging 
for construction in Billings, MT;
      574. $300,000 to the Daly Mansion Preservation Trust for 
the renovation of the Daly Mansion in Hamilton, MT;
      575. $250,000 to CommunityWorks for the construction of 
the ExplorationWorks Museum in Helena, MT;
      576. $200,000 to the Montana Technology Enterprise Center 
for the construction of lab facilities in Missoula, MT;
      577. $150,000 to Columbus County, North Carolina for 
construction of a center for the Southeast Community College;
      578. $250,000 to Davidson County, North Carolina for 
facility and equipment upgrades to the Davidson County 
Community College;
      579. $200,000 to DHIC, Inc. in Wake County, North 
Carolina for a revolving loan fund for low-income homebuyers;
      580. $200,000 to EmPOWERment, Inc. in Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina for a revolving loan fund for low-income homebuyers;
      581. $150,000 to Gaston County, North Carolina for 
technology park expansion;
      582. $50,000 to Madison County, North Carolina; for 
restoration of an old school building to be used as the Spring 
Creek Community Center;
      583. $100,000 to Northampton County, North Carolina for 
planning, design, and construction of a community center;
      584. $348,700 to the City of Asheville, North Carolina 
for the renovation of the Asheville Veterans Memorial Stadium;
      585. $250,000 to the City of Asheville, North Carolina; 
for construction of a new science and multi-media building;
      586. $50,000 to the City of Dobbins Heights, North 
Carolina for the redevelopment of downtown;
      587. $150,000 to the City of Durham, North Carolina for 
facilities construction/renovation and streetscape 
improvements;
      588. $150,000 to the City of Fayetteville and Cumberland 
County, North Carolina for the development of a business park;
      589. $250,000 to the City of Hatteras, North Carolina for 
the construction of the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum;
      590. $250,000 to the City of Laurinburg, North Carolina 
for the demolition of an old hospital;
      591. $250,000 to the City of Monroe, North Carolina for 
the renovation of Old Armory for neighborhood revitalization;
      592. $200,000 to the City of Raeford, North Carolina for 
improvements to the Raeford downtown streetscape;
      593. $250,000 to the City of Sparta, North Carolina for 
construction of the Sparta Teapot Museum;
      594. $250,000 to the City of Troy, North Carolina for the 
implementation of an affordable housing program;
      595. $150,000 to the City of Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina for renovation and expansion of the Central Library of 
Forsyth County;
      596. $250,000 to the Inter-Faith Council for Social 
Services in Chapel Hill, North Carolina for construction, 
renovation, and build out of facilities;
      597. $200,000 to the Piedmont Environmental Center in 
High Point, North Carolina for renovation and expansion of the 
Naturalist Education Center;
      598. $150,000 to the Town of Cullowhee, North Carolina 
for interior building renovations to the Center for Engineering 
Technologies at Western Carolina University;
      599. $150,000 to the Town of Zebulon, North Carolina for 
land acquisition;
      600. $200,000 to UDI Community Development Corporation in 
Durham, North Carolina for construction/renovation and build 
out of an industrial park facility;
      601. $400,000 for Renovations to the Core Sound Waterfowl 
Museum in Harkers Island, NC;
      602. $200,000 to the City of Kannapolis, NC for the 
rehabilitation of the Pillowtex Plant 1 site;
      603. $250,000 for New River Community Partners, Inc., in 
Sparta, NC for the Sparta Teapot Museum;
      604. $200,000 for Catawba Science Museum to renovate and 
expand exhibitions in Hickory, NC;
      605. $200,000 for Military Business Park Development in 
Fayetteville, NC;
      606. $250,000 for the City of Wilmington, NC, for the 
Downtown Park & Open Space Initiative;
      607. $250,000 for the City of Fayetteville, NC, for the 
Military Business Park;
      608. $250,000 for the City of Asheville, NC, for the 
Veterans Memorial Restoration;
      609. $350,000 to the Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch 
Residential Facilities in North Dakota for construction and 
renovation of its three facilities;
      610. $250,000 for the Northwest Ventures Communities, 
Minot, ND for the construction of the Northwest Career and 
Technology Center;
      611. $200,000 for the United Tribes Technical College in 
Bismarck, ND for the construction of family housing;
      612. $350,000 for the City of Killdeer, ND to construct a 
community activity center;
      613. $400,000 for the City of Rugby, ND to support 
construction and other projects within two North Dakota REAP 
Zones;
      614. $300,000 for the Dakota Boys and Girls Ranch, Minot, 
ND for facilities at their Minot location;
      615. $350,000 for the UND Center for Innovation 
Foundation in Grand Forks, ND for the Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur 
Center;
      616. $300,000 for the Bismarck-Mandan Development 
Association, Bismarck, ND for the construction of the National 
Energy Technology Training and Education Facility;
      617. $200,000 for the Minot Area Community Development 
Foundation, Minot, ND for the Prairie Community Development 
Center;
      618. $200,000 for the Turtle Mountain Community College, 
Belcourt, ND for the Turtle Mountain Community College 
Vocational Educational Center;
      619. $250,000 to the City of Boys Town, Nebraska for the 
national priorities of Girls and Boys Town USA;
      620. $200,000 to the City of Columbus, Nebraska for 
renovations to the Boys and Girls Home of Nebraska;
      621. $400,000 to the City of Lincoln, Nebraska for the 
revitalization of the Antelope Valley Neighborhood Project;
      622. $100,000 to the City of Lincoln, Nebraska for the 
expansion of rural business enterprise development;
      623. $100,000 to the City of Omaha, Nebraska for the 
restoration of Tech Auditorium;
      624. $150,000 to the City of Peru, Nebraska for 
construction of a new technology building at Peru State 
College;
      625. $100,000 to the City of Red Cloud, Nebraska for 
renovations to the historic Moon Block building;
      626. $200,000 to Thurston County, Nebraska for the 
renovation of the Thurston County Courthouse;
      627. $1,000,000 for Metro Community College's Health 
Careers and Science Building in the City of Omaha, NE;
      628. $200,000 for Thurston County Courthouse renovation 
in the City of Pender, NE;
      629. $200,000 for the Boys and Girls Home of Nebraska's 
Columbus Family Resources Center in the City of Columbus, NE;
      630. $200,000 for the Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial and 
Educational Foundation's Moon Block restoration project in the 
City of Red Cloud;
      631. $200,000 for Clarkson College's Central Student 
Service Center Facility in the City of Omaha, NE;
      632. $200,000 for University of Nebraska-Lincoln's 
Enterprise Development in Rural Nebraska in the City of 
Lincoln;
      633. $950,000 for a parking facility as part of the 
Joslyn Art Museum Master Plan, in Omaha, Nebraska;
      634. $100,000 to the City of Bethlehem, New Hampshire for 
the renovation of Main Street performing arts theater;
      635. $150,000 to the City of Concord, New Hampshire for 
site preparation for improvements to White Park;
      636. $100,000 to the City of Portsmouth, New Hampshire 
for construction of an environmentally responsible library;
      637. $225,000 to the Town of Temple, New Hampshire for 
restoration of Temple Town Hall;
      638. $100,000 to the Village of North Conway, New 
Hampshire for construction of an academic learning center at 
the New Hampshire Community Technical College;
      639. $450,000 for Families in Transition, Manchester, New 
Hampshire for the Mothers and Children: Staying Together 
Recovery Center;
      640. $350,000 for New Hampshire Community Technical 
College System, Conway, New Hampshire for the Consortium-Based 
Academic Center;
      641. $200,000 for Gibson Center, Madison, New Hampshire 
for the preservation of senior housing at Silver Lake Landing;
      642. $500,000 for the New Hampshire Community Loan Fund, 
manufactured housing park program;
      643. $200,000 for the Monadnock, NH, Township home owner 
initiative;
      644. $400,000 for the Derry, NH, Senior Center project;
      645. $600,000 for the Manchester, NH, YWCA project;
      646. $400,000 for the Nashua, NH, Downtown Riverfront 
Opportunity Program;
      647. $400,000 for the Student Conservation Association 
service center, New Hampshire;
      648. $400,000 to 2nd Floor Youth Helpline in Hazlet, New 
Jersey for construction and renovation of its space;
      649. $300,000 to Essex County, New Jersey for economic 
development;
      650. $250,000 to Eva's Kitchen and Sheltering Program in 
Paterson, New Jersey for renovation and construction of a 
homeless shelter;
      651. $150,000 to Hunterdon County, New Jersey for 
improvements to the Village of Oldwick;
      652. $300,000 to Morris County, New Jersey for economic 
development;
      653. $150,000 to Rutgers University in New Jersey for 
land acquisition for Early Childhood Research Learning Academy;
      654. $300,000 to Somerset County, New Jersey for economic 
development;
      655. $300,000 to Sussex County, New Jersey for economic 
development;
      656. $150,000 to the City of Atlantic City, New Jersey 
for the development of a manufacturers business park;
      657. $200,000 to the City of Barnegat Light, New Jersey 
for renovations to historic structures;
      658. $150,000 to the City of Bridgeton, New Jersey for 
the revitalization of Southeast Gateway Neighborhood;
      659. $90,000 to the City of Cape May, New Jersey for 
rehabilitation of a community arts center;
      660. $350,000 to the City of East Orange, New Jersey for 
upgrades and improvements to recreation fields;
      661. $100,000 to the City of Elmer, New Jersey for 
expansion of Appel Farms Arts and Music Center;
      662. $250,000 to the City of Lakewood, New Jersey for the 
construction of a new building for the School for Children with 
Hidden Intelligence;
      663. $600,000 to the City of Perth Amboy, New Jersey for 
rehabilitation and construction of the Jewish Renaissance 
Medical Center;
      664. $50,000 to the City of Trenton, New Jersey for the 
completion of the Martin House Transitional Housing Program;
      665. $350,000 to the City of West Milford, New Jersey for 
public commercial improvements;
      666. $100,000 to the City of Westfield, New Jersey for 
the renovation of the new East Board Street YMCA;
      667. $250,000 to the Monroe Township in Middlesex County, 
New Jersey for the development of recreation facilities;
      668. $100,000 to the Town of Montclair, New Jersey for 
construction of a facility at Montclair State University;
      669. $250,000 for the City of Pleasantville, NJ for the 
construction and renovation of the Pleasantville Marina;
      670. $200,000 for the City of Paterson, NJ for the design 
and renovation of the Silk City Senior Nutrition Center;
      671. $200,000 for the St. Joseph's School of the Blind in 
Jersey City, NJ for the construction of a new facility;
      672. $300,000 for the Rutgers-Camden Business Incubator, 
Camden NJ for the expansion of the business incubator;
      673. $20,000 to the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico for 
the East Central Ministries enterprises program;
      674. $500,000 to the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico for 
the construction of the YMCA of Albuquerque;
      675. $250,000 to the City of Belen, New Mexico for 
construction of a multipurpose community center;
      676. $150,000 to the City of Carlsbad, New Mexico for 
construction of the Carlsbad Battered Family Shelter;
      677. $350,000 to the City of Placitas, New Mexico for the 
construction of the Placitas Public Library;
      678. $200,000 to the Village of Angel Fire in New Mexico 
for construction and development of a town square;
      679. $1,130,000 for Presbyterian Medical Services for 
their Head Start Facility in Santa Fe, New Mexico;
      680. $750,000 for the Albuquerque Mental Health Housing 
Coalition, Inc. for the renovation of the Sunport Plaza 
Apartments in Albuquerque, New Mexico;
      681. $620,000 for Eastern New Mexico State University in 
Portales, New Mexico for scientific instructional equipment;
      682. $200,000 Otero County, NM, Veteran's Museum 
Construction;
      683. $350,000 City of Carlsbad, NM, Battered Family 
Shelter Construction;
      684. $250,000 Helping Hands Food Bank of Deming, NM, 
Construction;
      685. $350,000 City of Sunland Park, NM, Community Center 
Construction;
      686. $250,000 Sandoval County, NM, Community Health 
Alliance, Construction and Equipment;
      687. $200,000 City of Portales, NM, Rehabilitation of the 
Yam Movie Palace;
      688. $100,000 to the City of Carson, Nevada for expansion 
of Nevada's Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology;
      689. $500,000 to the City of Henderson, Nevada for 
improvements and building renovations;
      690. $350,000 to the City of Las Vegas, Nevada for 
improvements to WestCare;
      691. $150,000 to the City of North Las Vegas, Nevada for 
construction of a recreation center;
      692. $150,000 to the City of Tonapah, Nevada for the 
development of multifunctional recreational facilities;
      693. $300,000 for the Pahrump Senior Center, Pahrump NV, 
for senior transportation;
      694. $500,000 for the Nathan Adelson Hospice, Henderson, 
NV, for an adult day care center;
      695. $200,000 for the Ridge House, Reno, NV, for the 
purchase or acquisition of facilities for the Reentry Resource 
Center;
      696. $500,000 for the University of Nevada-Reno to 
provide a Small Business Development Center;
      697. $500,000 for the City of Las Vegas, Nevada for the 
renovation of the Old Post Office;
      698. $350,000 for the City of Reno, Nevada to provide 
Fourth St. Corridor Enhancements;
      699. $300,000 for the City of Pahrump/Nye County, Nevada 
Fairgrounds Project;
      700. $500,000 for Wadsworth, Nevada to provide a 
Community Center;
      701. $200,000 for the City of Sparks, Nevada for the Deer 
Park Facility Renovation Project;
      702. $250,000 for the City of Reno, Nevada to provide a 
Food Bank of Northern Nevada Regional Distribution Facility 
Project;
      703. $350,000 to Columbia County, New York for 
restoration of historic Great Stone Barn;
      704. $150,000 to Elmcor Youth and Adult Activities in 
Queens, New York for renovation of economic development 
facilities;
      705. $350,000 to Erie County, New York for the Suburban 
Solutions Center;
      706. $400,000 to Fordham University in Bronx, New York 
for the construction of a multipurpose center;
      707. $75,000 to Mamaroneck Village, New York for a 
pedestrian streetscape program;
      708. $150,000 to Monroe County, New York for the 
rehabilitation of historic Whiteside Barnett and Co. 
Agricultural Works property;
      709. $150,000 to Monroe County, New York for construction 
of education center classrooms;
      710. $150,000 to Monroe County, New York for construction 
of a research and education center at the State University of 
New York College, Brockport;
      711. $250,000 to Proctor's Theatre in Schenectady, New 
York for facility expansion;
      712. $250,000 to Prospect Park Alliance in Brooklyn, New 
York for construction of a visitor's center and upgrades to its 
facilities;
      713. $150,000 to Sunnyside Community Services in Queens, 
New York for construction of a senior center;
      714. $150,000 to the 39th Street Recreation Center, New 
York Department of Parks for the renovation of a recreation 
center;
      715. $250,000 to the Bardavon 1869 Opera House, Inc. in 
Poughkeepsie, New York for improvements to the Bardavon Opera 
House;
      716. $150,000 to the Beth Gavriel Bukharian Congregation 
in Queens, New York for planning, design, and construction of a 
building expansion to serve the Bukharian and Russian 
populations;
      717. $550,000 to the Boricua College in New York, New 
York for renovation of the Audubon Terrace Building;
      718. $250,000 to the Burchfield-Penney Art Center in 
Buffalo, New York for the construction of an art museum;
      719. $450,000 to the City College of New York for the 
planning, design, and construction of the Center for Public 
Service;
      720. $158,000 to the City of Alfred, New York for 
construction of the Sugar Hill Industrial Park;
      721. $200,000 to the City of Alfred, New York for 
construction of a facility at Alfred State College;
      722. $250,000 to the City of Babylon, New York for 
construction of 9/11 Education Center;
      723. $300,000 to the City of Brooklyn, New York for 
additions to Sephardic Community Center;
      724. $100,000 to the City of Brooklyn, New York for 
improvements to the 86th Street Business District;
      725. $250,000 to the City of Elmira, New York for the 
restoration of Cowles Hall on the Elmira College Campus;
      726. $100,000 to the City of Fort Ann, New York for 
construction of the Adirondack Golden Goal complex;
      727. $100,000 to the City of Geneva, New York for 
construction of community recreation center;
      728. $100,000 to the City of Glen Cove, New York for 
construction of children's center for the YMCA at Glen Cove;
      729. $250,000 to the City of Houghton, New York for the 
rehabilitation of Paine Science Center at Houghton College;
      730. $250,000 to the City of Hunter, New York for 
renovations of the Orpheum Theatre and renovations of the Sugar 
Maples Center for the Arts;
      731. $250,000 to the City of Lindenhurst, New York for 
construction of a center for Breast Cancer Help, Inc;
      732. $100,000 to the City of Plattsburgh, New York for 
the construction of Adirondack Champlain Fiber Network;
      733. $150,000 to the City of Rochester, New York for 
construction to the Northwest Family YMCA, Camp Northpoint;
      734. $100,000 to the City of Rome, New York for the 
construction of a community recreation center;
      735. $250,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for the 
continuation of the Neighborhood Initiative Program;
      736. $100,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for the 
Essential New York Initiative;
      737. $250,000 to the City of Utica, New York for the 
replacement of windows at the Utica Public Library;
      738. $100,000 to the City of Utica, New York for the 
construction and expansion of nursing laboratory;
      739. $100,000 to the City of Watertown, New York for 
renovations to North Country Children's Clinic;
      740. $200,000 to the Federation of Italian-American 
Organizations in Brooklyn, New York for facility upgrades;
      741. $150,000 to the Huntington Economic Development 
Corporation in Huntington, New York for planning and design of 
a public plaza;
      742. $550,000 to the Lutheran Medical Center in Brooklyn, 
New York for renovation and capital improvements;
      743. $200,000 to the Mary Mitchell Family and Youth 
Center in Bronx, New York for the construction of a 
multipurpose center;
      744. $150,000 to the Museum of the Moving Image in 
Queens, New York for facility expansion;
      745. $750,000 to the Old Fort Niagara Gateway to History 
in Porter, New York for rehabilitation of a visitor's center;
      746. $400,000 to the Orange County Community College in 
Middletown, New York for construction of a new building;
      747. $75,000 to the Pregones Theater in Bronx, New York 
for renovation of its facility;
      748. $75,000 to the Queens Borough Children's Discovery 
Center, New York City, New York for the construction of a 
children's discovery center;
      749. $200,000 to the Town of Brookhaven, Farmingville, 
New York for demolition and construction of a new Senior 
Citizens Wellness Center;
      750. $75,000 to the Town of Eastchester, New York for 
construction of a youth center;
      751. $100,000 to the Town of Lenox, New York for 
construction of WWI Memorial;
      752. $150,000 to the Town of North Hempstead, New York 
for construction and revitalization in New Cassel;
      753. $200,000 to the town of Old Forge, New York for the 
renovation of Arts Guild of Old Forge;
      754. $100,000 to the Town of Ripley, New York for land 
acquisition;
      755. $75,000 to the Village of Elmsford, New York for 
construction of a new senior center;
      756. $75,000 to the Village of Pleasantville, New York 
for a pedestrian streetscape program;
      757. $200,000 to the Village of Tuckahoe, New York for 
streetscape improvements in the Crestwood section;
      758. $250,000 to the Town of Volney, New York for the 
development of Riverview Business Park;
      759. $500,000 to Warren County, New York for facilities 
construction at North Creek Ski Bowl;
      760. $200,000 to the YWCA of Niagara, NY for the computer 
lab expansion;
      761. $250,000 to Alianza Dominicana of New York City, NY 
for expansion of the Triangle building;
      762. $200,000 to SUNY Plattsburgh, NY for the expansion 
of the Adirondack-Champlain Community Fiber Network;
      763. $250,000 to the El Museo del Barrio in New York 
City, NY for capital improvements;
      764. $200,000 to the Central New York Community Arts 
Council of Utica, NY for the expansion of the Stanley Theater;
      765. $200,000 to the City of Canandaigua, NY for the 
construction of a regional tourism center;
      766. $200,000 for the Graduate College of Union 
University, Schenectady, NY to establish a freestanding campus;
      767. $200,000 for the Robert H. Jackson Center, 
Jamestown, NY for auditorium restoration;
      768. $200,000 for the Griffiss Local Development 
Corporation, Rome, NY for development of a multi-tenant 
technology office complex;
      769. $200,000 for the Nassau County Museum of Art, Roslyn 
Harbor, NY for building restoration;
      770. $200,000 for the Veterans Outreach Center, 
Rochester, NY for renovation and expansion of employment and 
training facilities;
      771. $100,000 to Carroll County, Ohio for the development 
of a community center;
      772. $250,000 to Columbiana County, Ohio for construction 
of a new community services building;
      773. $200,000 to Connecting Point, Inc. in Toledo, Ohio 
for facility construction;
      774. $200,000 to Ross County, Ohio for development of an 
industrial park;
      775. $100,000 to the City of St. Clairsville, Ohio for 
the renovation of the Clarendon Hotel;
      776. $750,000 to the City of Canton, Ohio for 
construction of a Community Youth/Recreation Activity Center;
      777. $350,000 to the City of Cincinnati, Ohio for the 
construction of community education center on grounds of fire 
training facility;
      778. $100,000 to the City of Cincinnati, Ohio for the 
renovation of Covedale Center for Performing Arts;
      779. $650,000 to the City of Columbus, Ohio for the 
Campus Partners Neighborhood Initiative;
      780. $300,000 to the City of Columbus, Ohio for mixed-use 
commercial and residential facilities;
      781. $250,000 to the City of Dayton, Ohio for street 
infrastructure and parking facility improvements;
      782. $100,000 to the City of Dayton, Ohio for 
redevelopment of Brown and Stewart Street properties at the 
University of Dayton;
      783. $200,000 to the City of Delaware, Ohio for 
renovations to the Stand Theater;
      784. $200,000 to the City of Glouster, Ohio for 
renovations to the Ohio Department of Corrections Facility;
      785. $250,000 to the City of Green, Ohio for the purchase 
of Southgate Farm;
      786. $75,000 to the City of Lancaster, Ohio for the 
renovation of a building for the glass-blowing museum;
      787. $100,000 to the City of Lima, Ohio for improvements 
to riverwalk;
      788. $150,000 to the City of Lorain, Ohio for planning, 
design, demolition, and redevelopment of Broadway Avenue;
      789. $400,000 to the City of Navarre, Ohio for 
construction of a library for the Towpath Trail YMCA Community 
Center;
      790. $295,000 to the City of Peebles, Ohio for 
improvements to the Serpent Mound State Memorial Visitor 
Facility;
      791. $1,000,000 to the City of Springfield, Ohio for the 
expansion of Applied Research Technology Park (ARTP) in 
Springfield;
      792. $175,000 to the City of Springfield, Ohio for 
demolition of a property to be used for a new hospital;
      793. $200,000 to the City of St. Marys, Ohio for 
renovations to the historic Glass Block;
      794. $100,000 to the City of Toledo, Ohio for the 
construction of Ice-Skating Rinks in City Parks;
      795. $150,000 to the City of Urbana, Ohio for the 
revitalization of Champaign County heritage sites;
      796. $250,000 to the City of Van Wert, Ohio for 
renovations of a facility for The Marsh Foundation;
      797. $250,000 to the City of Van Wert, Ohio for the 
renovation of facilities for Starr Commonwealth;
      798. $200,000 to the Depression and Bipolar Support 
Alliance in Toledo, Ohio for facility construction;
      799. $150,000 to the Urban League of Greater Cleveland, 
Ohio for a multicultural business development center;
      800. $200,000 to the Youngstown, Ohio Associated 
Neighborhood Center in Youngstown, Ohio for upgrades to the 
McGuffey Center;
      801. $200,000 for the City of Canton, Ohio for the New 
Horizons Park land and site acquisition, demolition, or 
facilities construction;
      802. $200,000 for Wright Dunbar, Inc., Dayton, Ohio, to 
construct the Gateway to Paul Laurence Dunbar Memorial;
      803. $200,000 for Daybreak, Inc., Dayton, Ohio, for the 
Daybreak Opportunity House land and site acquisition, 
demolition, site preparation and facilities construction;
      804. $200,000 for Catholic Charities Services 
Corporation, Parma, Ohio, for Parmadale's land and site 
acquisition, demolition, site preparation and facilities 
construction;
      805. $100,000 for Cornerstone of Hope, Independence, OH, 
to build a facility;
      806. $300,000 for The Preston Fund for SMA Research, 
Beachwood, Ohio, for the construction and development of 
Preston's H.O.P.E.;
      807. $300,000 for the Defiance County Senior Service 
Center, Defiance, Ohio, for construction;
      808. $250,000 for the Ukrainian Museum-Archives, 
Cleveland, Ohio, for Phase II development and construction;
      809. $250,000 for The Scioto Society, Inc., Chillicothe, 
Ohio for the ``Tecumseh!'' Capital Improvement Project;
      810. $270,000 for the Lorain County Community College 
Great Lakes Business Growth and Development Center in Ohio;
      811. $200,000 for the City of Jackson's Day Care Center, 
Ohio;
      812. $260,000 for Wilberforce University, Ohio Private 
Historically Black University Residence Hall Project;
      813. $270,000 for the Solid Waste Authority of Central 
Ohio (SWACO) Pyramid Resource Center;
      814. $250,000 to the City of Durant, Oklahoma for an 
employer assisted housing initiative;
      815. $100,000 to the City of El Reno, Oklahoma for the 
construction of a facility for Youth and Family Services;
      816. $300,000 to the City of Pawnee, Oklahoma for the 
renovation of the Buffalo Theater;
      817. $100,000 to the City of Tulsa, Oklahoma for the 
renovation of a facility to establish a one-stop youth and 
family service center;
      818. $220,000 for the City of Ardmore, OK, to construct 
the Ardmore Community Resource Center;
      819. $220,000 for Norman Economic Development 
Corporation, Norman, OK, to construct an engineering incubator;
      820. $200,000 for the City of Ponca City, OK, to 
construct a museum building and information center for the 
statue of Ponca Chief Standing Bear;
      821. $220,000 for the United States-Mexico Cultural 
Education Foundation to establish the Center for North American 
Sustainable Economic Development at the University of Oklahoma, 
Norman, OK;
      822. $220,000 for the Native American Cultural Center and 
Museum, Oklahoma City, OK, for construction of the American 
Indian Cultural Center;
      823. $200,000 for the City of Midwest City, OK to 
construct a community outreach center;
      824. $150,000 to the Portland Center Stage Armory Theater 
in Portland, Oregon for renovations and upgrades to its 
facility;
      825. $150,000 to the Portland Development Commission in 
Portland, Oregon for urban revitalization of the South 
Waterfront District;
      826. $300,000 to the Richard E. Wildish Community Theater 
in Springfield, Oregon for the completion of construction of 
its facility;
      827. $200,000 to the Salem Urban Renewal Agency in Salem, 
Oregon for rehabilitation of downtown Salem;
      828. $200,000 for the City of Lakeview, Oregon to develop 
geothermal resources;
      829. $200,000 for Marion-Polk Food Share in Salem, Oregon 
to improve and renovate an emergency food distribution center;
      830. $200,000 for the City of Pendleton, Oregon to 
improve and renovate round-up facilities;
      831. $500,000 for construction of an education building 
at the Blue Mountain Community College's Northeastern Oregon 
Collaborative University Center, Hermiston, Oregon;
      832. $250,000 for construction of the Downtown/Riverfront 
Access Project by the City of The Dalles for the Port of The 
Dalles, Oregon;
      833. $200,000 for construction of a Teen Activity Center 
at the Santo Community Center in Medford, Oregon;
      834. $200,000 to Armstrong County, Pennsylvania for 
rebuilding the Belmont Complex;
      835. $200,000 to Berks County, Pennsylvania for a 
Competitive Greater Reading Initiative;
      836. $500,000 to Bradford County, Pennsylvania for the 
construction of two business parks;
      837. $200,000 to Bristol Township, Pennsylvania for the 
construction of a community center for Freedom Neighborhood;
      838. $150,000 to Carbon County, Pennsylvania for land 
acquisition, facilities renovation, and demolition;
      839. $200,000 to Greene County, Pennsylvania for 
revitalization of recreational facilities;
      840. $100,000 to Gwen's Girls, Inc. in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania for construction of a residential facility;
      841. $200,000 to Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania for 
construction of a new facility for the YMCA of Carbondale;
      842. $750,000 to Lower Makefield Township, Pennsylvania 
for construction of the Lower Makefield 9/11 Memorial Garden;
      843. $150,000 to North Central Triangle Revitalization in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for planning and design of the 
Triangle Revitalization project;
      844. $47,000 to Perry County, Pennsylvania for expansion 
of the community pool in Liverpool Township;
      845. $100,000 to Point Breeze Performing Arts Center in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for renovations and upgrades of its 
facility;
      846. $200,000 to the Borough of Mahonoy City, 
Pennsylvania for improvements to West Market Street;
      847. $100,000 to the Carroll Park Neighbors Advisory 
Council in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for facility renovations 
and upgrades;
      848. $15,000 to the City of Blaine, Pennsylvania for 
renovations to the baseball park in Toboyne Township;
      849. $100,000 to the City of Allentown, Pennsylvania for 
the construction of the Da Vinci Discovery Center of Science 
and Technology;
      850. $100,000 to the City of Allentown, Pennsylvania for 
expansion of the Allentown Art Museum;
      851. $100,000 to the City of Allentown, Pennsylvania for 
the construction of a center for LeHigh Valley Heritage;
      852. $100,000 to the City of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania for 
the renovation of KidsPeace Broadway Campus;
      853. $200,000 to the City of Bradford, Pennsylvania for 
construction of an aquatic area at Brookville YMCA;
      854. $60,000 to the City of Cambria, Pennsylvania for 
construction of a playground facility for Coal Country Hang-out 
Youth Center;
      855. $250,000 to the City of Carnegie, Pennsylvania for 
infrastructure improvements;
      856. $100,000 to the City of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 
for renovations to the Capitol Theater;
      857. $250,000 to the City of Chester, Pennsylvania for 
improving the YWCA of Chester;
      858. $200,000 to the City of Clarion, Pennsylvania for 
improvements to Sawmill Center for the Arts;
      859. $200,000 to the City of Clearfield, Pennsylvania for 
improvements to the Clearfield YMCA;
      860. $200,000 to the City of Corry, Pennsylvania for the 
redevelopment of the former Cooper Ajax facility;
      861. $200,000 to the City of Galeton, Pennsylvania for 
the expansion of the museum's visitor center;
      862. $100,000 to the City of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania for 
the renovation of Gettysburg Railway Station as a visitor's 
center;
      863. $150,000 to the City of Greenville, Pennsylvania for 
the reconstruction of streetscapes;
      864. $50,000 to the City of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania 
for the renovations to the YMCA in Hollidaysburg;
      865. $50,000 to the City of Homer, Pennsylvania for 
construction of a new athletic facility;
      866. $250,000 to the City of Jeannette, Pennsylvania for 
parking improvements to the business district;
      867. $400,000 to the City of Johnstown, Pennsylvania for 
construction and improvements to the convention center;
      868. $250,000 to the City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania for 
construction of the Columbia Clubhouse for the Boys and Girls 
Club of Lancaster;
      869. $10,000 to the City of Marysville, Pennsylvania for 
enhancements to a public playground;
      870. $100,000 to the City of Media, Pennsylvania for 
technology infrastructure at the Delaware County Community 
College;
      871. $25,000 to the City of Mifflintown, Pennsylvania for 
the development of a playground facility;
      872. $250,000 to the City of Monroeville, Pennsylvania 
for construction of a new center and park for Monroeville 
Community Center;
      873. $100,000 to the City of Oil City, Pennsylvania for 
upgrades to the Oil Creek Railway Historic Caboose;
      874. $300,000 to the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
for streetscape of the vendors mall;
      875. $200,000 to the City of Pine Forge, Pennsylvania for 
construction of an student center at Pine Forge Academy;
      876. $250,000 to the City of Radnor, Pennsylvania for 
expansion of a community center for Cabrini College;
      877. $250,000 to the City of Sunbury, Pennsylvania for 
construction of an amphitheater complex for the Susquehanna 
Riverfront;
      878. $200,000 to the City of Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania 
for construction of a community facility for autistic children;
      879. $150,000 to the City of York, Pennsylvania for 
improvements to streetscapes;
      880. $1,500,000 to the Indiana University, Indiana, 
Pennsylvania for the development and construction of a Regional 
Development Center;
      881. $1,500,000 to the Indiana University, Indiana, 
Pennsylvania for the construction of a multiuse training 
facility in Indiana, Pennsylvania;
      882. $150,000 to the Jewish Community Center of Greater 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for facilities construction and 
improvements;
      883. $200,000 to Waynesburg College Center, Greene 
County, Pennsylvania for a center for economic development;
      884. $200,000 for the City of Carbondale, Pennsylvania 
for the South Main Street Economic Development Initiative which 
is designed to reduce blight along the City's Main Street 
Corridor;
      885. $200,000 for the Redevelopment Authority of the City 
of Corry to acquire a brownfield site in downtown Corry, 
Pennsylvania;
      886. $200,000 for Weatherly Borough, Pennsylvania to 
acquire and redevelop the Lehigh Valley Railroad Shops and 
Weatherly Steel Plant complex in the heart of Weatherly, PA;
      887. $200,000 for Indiana County, Pennsylvania to acquire 
the Wayne Avenue Property in Indiana;
      888. $200,000 for Armstrong County, Pennsylvania for 
remediation and infrastructure development on a 14.2 acre of 
brownfield property in Apollo Borough;
      889. $200,000 for Perry County, Pennsylvania to develop 
an industrial park in New Bloomfield;
      890. $200,000 for People for People, Inc. for planning 
and project development efforts for the Triangle redevelopment 
project;
      891. $200,000 for the Southwestern Pennsylvania 
Commission, to develop the Alta Vista Business Park, a mixed-
use business park on a former strip mine site adjacent to I-70, 
in Washington County, Pennsylvania;
      892. $300,000 for the Allegheny County Airport Authority 
in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania for site preparation and 
construction of its North Field Development project;
      893. $200,000 for Gaudenzia, Inc. in Norristown, 
Pennsylvania to renovate and expand its residential facilities;
      894. $200,000 for Our City Reading in Reading, 
Pennsylvania to rehabilitate abandoned houses and provide down 
payment assistance to home buyers;
      895. $200,000 for the City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania for 
the revitalization and construction of Lancaster Square;
      896. $200,000 for the Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of 
Business and Industry in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania for 
acquisition, planning, and redevelopment of the historic Irem 
Temple;
      897. $200,000 for the Greene County Department of 
Planning and Economic Development in Greene County, 
Pennsylvania for construction and site development of a multi-
phased business park on the grounds of the Greene County 
Airport;
      898. $200,000 for Impact Services Corporation in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to renovate, redevelop, and convert 
an existing building into low-income housing units;
      899. $200,000 for the Shippensburg University Foundation 
in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania for construction of Phase III of 
the Shippensburg Regional Conference Center;
      900. $200,000 for the Partnership CDC in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania for acquisition, renovation and rehabilitation of 
affordable housing for moderate- and low-income families;
      901. $200,000 for the Allentown Art Museum in Allentown, 
Pennsylvania to expand and modernize its facilities;
      902. $200,000 for the Pittsburgh Zoo in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania for the planning, site development, and 
construction of Phase I of its expansion project;
      903. $200,000 for Universal Community Homes in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for conversion of parcels of land 
into housing units for low- and moderate-income families;
      904. $150,000 to the Municipality of Isabela, Puerto Rico 
for the construction of a youth center;
      905. $250,000 to the Village of Aguadilla, Puerto Rico 
for construction of a little league baseball park at Old Ramey 
Air Force Base;
      906. $200,000 to the City of Central Falls, Rhode Island 
for construction and renovation of parks facilities;
      907. $150,000 to the Providence YMCA in Providence, Rhode 
Island for the construction of a multipurpose center;
      908. $200,000 to the Town of North Smithfield, Rhode 
Island for economic development initiatives focused on 
technology improvements;
      909. $350,000 for the Cranston Public Library in 
Cranston, Rhode Island for building renovations;
      910. $250,000 for Jamiel Park in Warren, Rhode Island for 
facility improvements;
      911. $200,000 for the Town of West Warwick, Rhode Island 
for the development and construction of a river walk;
      912. $200,000 for Meeting Street School in Providence, 
Rhode Island for the construction of the Bright Futures Early 
Learning Center;
      913. $200,000 for Sexual Assault and Trauma Resource 
Center in Providence, Rhode Island for building acquisition and 
renovations;
      914. $200,000 for the Pastime Theatre in Bristol, Rhode 
Island for building improvements;
      915. $200,000 for Family Service of Rhode Island in 
Providence, Rhode Island for building purchase and renovations;
      916. $200,000 for St. Mary's Home for Children in North 
Providence, Rhode Island for building renovations;
      917. $200,000 for Stand Up for Animals in Westerly, Rhode 
Island for building construction;
      918. $300,000 for the acquisition and renovation of the 
Seniors Helping Others volunteer center in South Kingstown, RI;
      919. $300,000 for the expansion and renovation of the 
Pawtucket Day Child Development Center, Pawtucket, RI;
      920. $300,000 for the renovation and expansion of the 
John E. Fogarty Center to provide services and programs for 
children and adults with disabilities, North Providence, RI;
      921. $200,000 for the City of Woonsocket, RI for the 
redevelopment of the Hamlet Avenue Mill site;
      922. $200,000 to provide for equipment and construction 
of the Arlington Branch of the Cranston Public Library, 
Cranston, RI;
      923. $1,000,000 Engenuity South Carolina in the City of 
Columbia for the National Institute of Hydrogen 
Commercialization;
      924. $100,000 to Georgetown County, South Carolina for 
construction of the Choppee Regional Resource Center;
      925. $60,000 to Laurens County, South Carolina for the 
Hunter Industrial Park improvements;
      926. $250,000 to Lee County, South Carolina for 
construction of a county recreation center;
      927. $150,000 to Marion County, South Carolina for 
constructing of an outdoor wellness facility;
      928. $125,000 to the Bible Way Community Development 
Corporation, Columbia, South Carolina for construction of a 
multipurpose facility;
      929. $100,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of the Pee Dee 
in Florence, South Carolina for renovation and expansion of 
Florence and Sumter facilities;
      930. $400,000 to the City of Charleston, SC for completed 
construction of the Spirit of South Carolina;
      931. $500,000 to the City of Greenville, South Carolina 
for the development of Clemson University International Center 
for Automotive Research;
      932. $300,000 to the City of Lancaster, South Carolina 
for renovation of the ``Hope on the Hill'' adult education and 
afterschool center;
      933. $100,000 to the City of Spartanburg, South Carolina 
for the expansion of dormitories and classrooms at the South 
Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind;
      934. $300,000 to the City of Walterboro, South Carolina 
for construction of Great Swamp Sanctuary Discovery Center and 
associated streetscape;
      935. $200,000 to the National Council of Negro Women, 
Inc. in Bishopville, South Carolina for construction of the Dr. 
Mary McLeod Bethune Memorial Park;
      936. $200,000 to the Paxville Community Development 
Center in Paxville, South Carolina for the construction of a 
multipurpose center;
      937. $50,000 to the Progressive Club in John's Island, 
South Carolina for renovation of a multi-purpose building;
      938. $400,000 to the Town of Greenwood, South Carolina 
for the renovation of Old Federal Courthouse;
      939. $100,000 to the Town of St. Stephens, South Carolina 
for renovation of the Berkeley Senior Center;
      940. $75,000 to the Williamsburg County Boys and Girls 
Club in Hemingway, South Carolina for expansion and upgrading 
of facilities;
      941. $280,000 for the South Carolina School for the Deaf 
and Blind in Spartanburg, SC for dormitory renovation;
      942. $220,000 for Crisis Ministries Homeless Shelter in 
Charleston, SC for facilities renovation;
      943. $100,000 to the Children's Home Society of South 
Dakota in Sioux Falls, South Dakota for construction of 
facilities;
      944. $100,000 to the City of Aberdeen, South Dakota for 
renovations to the Aberdeen Recreation and Cultural Center;
      945. $150,000 to Wakpa Sica Reconciliation Place in Ft. 
Pierre, South Dakota for construction of the Wakpa Sica 
Reconciliation Place;
      946. $250,000 for the City of Aberdeen, South Dakota to 
construct a Recreation and Cultural Center;
      947. $250,000 for the Children's Home Society in Sioux 
Falls to expand its at-risk youth facility;
      948. $400,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Brookings, SD 
for Facilities Expansion;
      949. $200,000 to the Children's Home Society of Sioux 
Falls, SD for At-Risk Youth Facilities Expansion;
      950. $200,000 to the City of North Sioux City, SD for 
Community Library Expansion;
      951. $200,000 to the Mammoth Site of Hot Springs, SD for 
the Theater and Lecture Hall Project;
      952. $200,000 to the Wakpa Sica Historical Society of 
Fort Pierre, SD for the Wakpa Sica Reconciliation Place;
      953. $200,000 to the Rapid City Area Economic Development 
Partnership of Rapid City, SD for the Technology Transfer and 
Entrepreneur Center Project;
      954. $200,000 to Miner County Revitalization of Howard, 
SD for the Rural Learning Center Project;
      955. $100,000 to Bradley County, Tennessee for 
construction of a facility to house small business development;
      956. $100,000 to Clay County, Tennessee for renovation of 
the Clay County Senior Citizens Center;
      957. $150,000 to Hamilton County, Tennessee for 
technology improvements to the Hamilton County Center for 
Entrepreneurial Growth;
      958. $250,000 to Johnson City, Tennessee for construction 
materials for expansion of the Appalachia Service Project;
      959. $250,000 to Knox County, Tennessee for the 
construction of a senior center;
      960. $100,000 to Loudon County, Tennessee to complete 
construction of a senior center;
      961. $500,000 to Polk County, Tennessee for the 
construction of community projects;
      962. $100,000 to the City of Gallatin, Tennessee for 
construction of facilities;
      963. $50,000 to the City of Gray, Tennessee for 
renovations to the storage warehouse of Second Harvest Food 
Bank;
      964. $100,000 to the City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the 
nanoscience research initiative for Tech 2020;
      965. $100,000 to the City of Savannah, Tennessee for the 
expansion of the Tennessee River Museum;
      966. $200,000 to the Cumberland County Playhouse in 
Crossville, Tennessee for facility renovations;
      967. $150,000 to the Second Harvest Food Bank in Middle, 
Tennessee for facilities renovation and buildout;
      968. $150,000 to the Second Harvest Food Bank in 
Nashville, Tennessee for facilities renovation and equipment;
      969. $150,000 to the Southwest Tennessee Community 
College in Memphis, Tennessee for construction of a teaching 
facility;
      970. $750,000 for the City of Clinton, Tennessee to 
renovate the Green McAdoo Cultural Center;
      971. $400,000 for the Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle 
Tennessee in Nashville, Tennessee for the expansion of its 
distribution center;
      972. $300,000 for the Chattanooga African American 
Chamber of Commerce, Tennessee to construct the Martin Luther 
King Business Solutions Center;
      973. $600,000 for the Carroll County Watershed Authority 
in Carroll County, Tennessee for land acquisition;
      974. $200,000 for the Big South Fork Visitors Center in 
Cumberland County, Tennessee to develop new visitors 
facilities;
      975. $500,000 for Technology 2020 in Oak Ridge, Tennessee 
to support the East Tennessee Nanotechnology Initiative;
      976. $250,000 for Smith County, Tennessee for 
construction and infrastructure improvements to the Health, 
Senior, and Education complex;
      977. $320,000 to Cameron County, Texas for construction 
of a Boys and Girls Club in Santa Rosa, Texas;
      978. $150,000 to Harris County, Texas for the development 
of an economic development plan;
      979. $150,000 to Harris County, Texas for the 
construction of a senior education center;
      980. $150,000 to the Children's Museum of Houston, Texas 
for construction of an annex to a Children's Museum;
      981. $250,000 to the City of Abilene, Texas for 
construction of a new hangar at Abilene Regional Airport;
      982. $500,000 to the City of Arlington, Texas for 
construction of an entrepreneur center;
      983. $100,000 to the City of Austin, Texas for 
construction of International Center of Austin;
      984. $500,000 to the City of Cleburne, Texas for 
construction of a new East Cleburne Community Center;
      985. $150,000 to the City of Dallas, Texas for planning 
and design of an Afro-Centric cultural district;
      986. $650,000 to the City of Fort Worth, Texas for 
construction of the Trinity River Vision;
      987. $350,000 to the City of Fort Worth, Texas for the 
Central City Revitalization Initiative;
      988. $1,000,000 to the City of Houston, Texas for 
construction of a facility for the Bay Area Business and 
Technology Center at the University of Houston Clear Lake;
      989. $200,000 to the City of Leonard, Texas for 
streetscape improvements;
      990. $250,000 to the City of Livingston, Texas for 
facility improvements to the reservation of the Alabama-
Coushatta Tribe of Texas;
      991. $100,000 to the City of Madisonville, Texas for 
upgrades and improvements to its' community recreational 
fields;
      992. $250,000 to the City of Midland, Texas for the 
renovation of downtown Midland;
      993. $200,000 to the City of Nacogdoches, Texas for 
renovations to The Fredonia Hotel and Convention Center;
      994. $250,000 to the City of Odessa, Texas for the 
renovation of Historical Globe Theatre;
      995. $250,000 to the City of Rio Bravo, Texas for the 
construction of a community center;
      996. $150,000 to the City of Tilden, Texas for 
construction of a community center;
      997. $250,000 to the Food Bank of the Rio Grande Valley, 
Inc. in McAllen, Texas for purchase of a facility;
      998. $250,000 to the Foundation for Brownsville Sports in 
Brownsville, Texas for renovation of a site;
      999. $150,000 to the San Antonio Food Bank in San 
Antonio, Texas for construction of a distribution facility;
      1000. $400,000 for the Dallas Women's Museum in Dallas, 
Texas to conduct renovations;
      1001. $200,000 for the Houston Hispanic Forum of Houston, 
Texas to provide the historic preservation and renovation of 
the Houston Light Guard Armory into the Hispanic Cultural and 
Educational Center;
      1002. $200,000 for Polk County, Texas to restore the Polk 
County Annex;
      1003. $200,000 to the Arlington Chamber of Commerce in 
Arlington, Texas to establish the Arlington Entrepreneur 
Center;
      1004. $200,000 to the City of Fort Worth, Texas for the 
Central City revitalization initiative;
      1005. $200,000 to the World Congress on Information 
Technology in Austin, Texas for convention center renovations;
      1006. $200,000 to the City of Commerce, Texas for a new 
city hall facility;
      1007. $200,000 to the City of Hillsboro, Texas for the 
district warehouse development project;
      1008. $200,000 to the City of Dallas, Texas for the 
Dallas Fair Park Commercial District;
      1009. $300,000 to the City of Lufkin, Texas for the 
convention center initiative;
      1010. $200,000 for the Los Fresnos Texas Boys and Girls 
Club, Los Fresnos, TX for planning, design and facility 
construction;
      1011. $200,000 to Sandy City, Utah for streetscape 
improvements and revitalization efforts;
      1012. $250,000 to the City of Riverton, Utah for the 
construction of Nature Center;
      1013. $250,000 to the City of Riverton, Utah for the 
reconstruction of Old Dome Meeting Hall;
      1014. $150,000 to the College of Eastern Utah in 
Blanding, Utah for construction of a building on its campus;
      1015. $600,000 for the City of Provo, Utah to build the 
Provo Community Arts Center in the City of Provo;
      1016. $200,000 for the City of Hyrum, Utah to build the 
Hyrum Library and Museum Complex in the City of Hyrum;
      1017. $1,000,000 for Sandy City, Utah, for the 
revitalization of the city's original historic district;
      1018. $1,200,000 for the City of Blanding's College of 
Eastern Utah--San Juan Campus, for the construction of a 
library community multipurpose building;
      1019. $800,000 for Summit County, Utah, for improvements 
to the Utah Olympic Park facilities;
      1020. $100,000 to Bedford County, Virginia for 
construction of the National D-Day Memorial;
      1021. $50,000 to Chase City, Virginia for the 
construction of an African-American historic landmark memorial;
      1022. $100,000 to Fairfax County, Virginia for creation 
of the Housing Counseling Information and Technology Center;
      1023. $150,000 to Franklin County, Virginia for 
restoration of the Jubal A. Early homeplace;
      1024. $150,000 to Henrico County, Virginia for site 
preparation and construction of a war memorial and visitor's 
center;
      1025. $400,000 to Northampton County, Virginia for 
construction of a community center;
      1026. $250,000 to Northampton County, Virginia for the 
construction of a recreational facility;
      1027. $100,000 to Prince William County, Virginia for 
improvements to the Nokesville streetscape;
      1028. $200,000 to the Alexandria Redevelopment Housing 
Authority in Alexandria, Virginia for renovations of the Family 
Resource Learning Center;
      1029. $250,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Alexandria 
in Alexandria, Virginia for renovation and expansion of 
facilities;
      1030. $250,000 to the City of Berryville, Virginia for 
the restoration of Barns of Rose Hill;
      1031. $250,000 to the City of Chesapeake, Virginia for 
improvements to the Poindexter streetscape;
      1032. $50,000 to the City of Danville, Virginia for 
development of the American Armoured Foundation Tank Museum;
      1033. $100,000 to the City of Harrisonburg, Virginia for 
renovations to the Harrisonburg Children's Museum;
      1034. $300,000 to the City of Manassas, Virginia for 
construction of a technology building at the Northern Virginia 
Community College;
      1035. $100,000 to the City of Martinsville, Virginia for 
the expansion of the West Piedmont Business Development Center;
      1036. $250,000 to the City of Newport News, Virginia for 
the restoration of USS Monitor artifacts;
      1037. $300,000 to the City of Richmond, Virginia for the 
construction of the Virginia Performing Arts Foundation 
Education Center;
      1038. $200,000 to the City of Richmond, Virginia for 
construction and renovations to the Virginia Holocaust Museum;
      1039. $150,000 to the City of Richmond, Virginia for 
construction and renovations to the Virginia Historical 
Society;
      1040. $150,000 to the City of Richmond, Virginia for 
facility expansion of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts;
      1041. $250,000 to the City of Roanoke, Virginia for 
renovations to the Southwestern Virginia Food Bank;
      1042. $100,000 to the City of South Boston, Virginia for 
restoration of The Prizery for a community arts center;
      1043. $150,000 to the City of Staunton, Virginia for 
building renovations and improvements to downtown buildings;
      1044. $200,000 to the City of Vienna, Virginia for the 
Green Project;
      1045. $150,000 to the Dabney S. Lancaster Community 
College in Clifton Forge, Virginia for construction of the 
Virginia Packaging Applications Center;
      1046. $100,000 to the Falls Church Education Foundation 
in Falls Church, Virginia for planning and expansion of Mt. 
Daniel Elementary School;
      1047. $75,000 to the Town of Boydton, Virginia for 
revitalization projects in the central business district;
      1048. $50,000 to the Town of Charlotte, Virginia for the 
revitalization of the historic Charlotte Court House;
      1049. $450,000 to Warren County, Virginia for renovations 
to the county youth center;
      1050. $250,000 for the Woodrow Wilson Presidential 
Library in Staunton, Virginia to continue undertaking initial 
design of the Library;
      1051. $250,000 for the Radford University Business and 
Technology Park in Radford, Virginia to begin site preparation 
and schematic design of the Park;
      1052. $200,000 for the George L. Carter Home Regional 
Arts and Crafts Center in Hillville, Virginia to restore the 
historic home to serve as a regional Appalachian arts and 
crafts center;
      1053. $200,000 for the Suffolk Museum of African-American 
History in Suffolk, Virginia to renovate the former Phoenix 
Bank of Nansemond for the Museum of African-American History;
      1054. $500,000 for the Christopher Newport News 
University Real Estate Foundation for the Warwick Boulevard 
Commercial Corridor Redevelopment Project in Newport News, 
Virginia;
      1055. $200,000 for the Mariners' Museum for the USS 
Monitor Center in Newport News, Virginia;
      1056. $200,000 for the Total Action Against Poverty to 
restore and revitalize the Dumas Center for Artistic and 
Cultural Development in Roanoke, Virginia;
      1057. $200,000 for the Appalachia Service Project for its 
Home Repair Program in Jonesville, Virginia;
      1058. $200,000 to the Northeast Vermont Area Agency on 
Aging in Vermont for construction and rehabilitation of senior 
centers;
      1059. $750,000 for the Preservation Trust of Vermont, 
Burlington, VT for the Village Revilitization Initiative;
      1060. $750,000 for the Vermont Broadband Council, 
Waterbury, VT for high speed broadband deployment;
      1061. $450,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation 
Board, Montpelier, VT for development of affordable housing in 
Townsend, VT;
      1062. $300,000 for Project Independence, Bennington, VT 
for renovation of the Harwood Hill Farm Facility;
      1063. $250,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation 
Board to build low-income housing and reconstruct downtown 
Enosburg, VT;
      1064. $250,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation 
Board to construct senior housing in South Burlington, VT;
      1065. $250,000 for the Visiting Nurse Association of 
Chittenden and Grand Isle Counties, VT to construct a low-
income parent and child center in Burlington, VT;
      1066. $200,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation 
Board to rehabilitate and construct affordable rental housing 
in Bradford, VT;
      1067. $150,000 to Kitsap County, Washington for land 
acquisition for a community center and park/utility complex;
      1068. $200,000 to Skagit County, Washington for land 
acquisition to assist in the redevelopment of Hamilton, 
Washington;
      1069. $150,000 to Skamania County Wind River Public 
Development Authority in Washington for rehabilitation and 
upgrades to existing buildings;
      1070. $350,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of King County 
in Seattle, Washington for renovation of the Greenbridge 
Community Center;
      1071. $800,000 to the City of Bellevue, Washington for 
the purchase of an additional Safe House for short-term 
transitional shelter;
      1072. $250,000 to the City of Kent, Washington for 
renovations to the Springwood Community Center;
      1073. $300,000 to the City of Roslyn, Washington for 
rehabilitation of Roslyn City Hall;
      1074. $200,000 to the City of Yakima, Washington for 
restoring buildings and improving streetscapes;
      1075. $200,000 to the Foss Waterway Development Authority 
in Tacoma, Washington for redevelopment of its downtown urban 
core;
      1076. $550,000 to the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, 
Washington for construction of facilities;
      1077. $225,000 to the Northwest Maritime Center in Port 
Townsend, Washington for construction of its facility;
      1078. $300,000 for the City of Roslyn, WA, for the Old 
City Hall and Library Renovation Project;
      1079. $325,000 for the Wing Luke Asian Museum in Seattle, 
WA for an expansion project;
      1080. $500,000 for North Helpline in Seattle, WA for new 
facility site acquisition;
      1081. $500,000 for the Fremont Public Association in 
Seattle, WA for the Housing for the Homeless project;
      1082. $500,000 for the Asian Counseling and Referral 
Service in Seattle, WA for facility construction;
      1083. $325,000 for the Urban League in Seattle, WA for 
construction of the Northwest African American Museum;
      1084. $500,000 for the Seattle Art Museum in Seattle, WA 
for construction of the Olympic Sculpture Park;
      1085. $325,000 for the Seattle Aquarium Society in 
Seattle, WA for the renovation and expansion of the Seattle 
Aquarium;
      1086. $500,000 Northeast Community Center Association in 
Spokane, WA for a capital improvement project;
      1087. $400,000 for Easter Seals Washington in Seattle, WA 
for construction of a camp and respite lodging facility;
      1088. $500,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of King 
County, WA for renovations to the Greenbridge Community Center;
      1089. $325,000 for the Spokane Symphony in Spokane, WA 
for renovations to the Fox Theater;
      1090. $500,000 for Kitsap Community Resources in 
Bremerton, Washington, for the construction of the Bremerton 
Community Services Center;
      1091. $150,000 to Chippewa Valley Technical College in 
Eau Claire, Wisconsin for construction of an addition to the 
Gateway Manufacturing and Technology Center;
      1092. $200,000 to Manitowoc County, Wisconsin for 
reconstruction of the Manitowoc County Courthouse;
      1093. $150,000 to Monroe Senior Center in Monroe, 
Wisconsin for renovation of its facilities;
      1094. $100,000 to the City of Cedarburg, Wisconsin for 
demolition of a facility for future construction;
      1095. $300,000 to the City of Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin for 
the completion of the New Launch System at Sturgeon Bay 
Shipbuilding Cluster;
      1096. $100,000 to the Juneau County Economic Development 
Corporation in Wisconsin for renovation of a multipurpose 
facility;
      1097. $200,000 to the Milwaukee Public Schools for a 
demolition project;
      1098. $150,000 to the West End Development Corporation in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin for revitalization of the city's Near West 
Side;
      1099. $200,000 for the City of LaCrosse, WI to construct 
the Center for Manufacturing Excellence;
      1100. $300,000 for the City of Appleton, WI for 
construction of affordable housing units at the Appleton Wire 
Works factory site;
      1101. $270,000 for the Redevelopment Authority of the 
City of Racine, WI to redevelop brownfields space for the 
Racine Industrial Park;
      1102. $200,000 for the Redevelopment Authority of the 
City of Milwaukee, WI to redevelop a vacant school and provide 
for the Bronzeville Cultural Center;
      1103. $200,000 for the City of Kenosha, WI for 
construction related to the Columbus Neighborhood Affordable 
Housing Project;
      1104. $200,000 for West End Development Corporation in 
Milwaukee, WI to rehabilitation a commercial building as part 
of the North 27th Street Project;
      1105. $230,000 for the City of Green Bay, WI, for the 
Green Bay Waterfront construction and revitalization project;
      1106. $200,000 for the City of Milwaukee, WI for 
construction of the Menomonee Valley Partners Stormwater Park;
      1107. $200,000 for City of Necedah, WI to construct a 
facility for the Juneau County Business Incubator;
      1108. $250,000 for the City of Milwaukee, WI for 
rehabilitation associated with the 30th Street Industrial 
Corridor-Esser Paint site;
      1109. $25,000 Mineral County Historical Foundation for 
facilities construction;
      1110. $2,200,000 to Glenville State College in Glenville, 
West Virginia for facilities construction;
      1111. $550,000 to Greenbrier County, West Virginia for 
construction of the Greenbrier Valley Welcome and Interpretive 
Center;
      1112. $100,000 to Preston County Commission in West 
Virginia for construction and renovation;
      1113. $300,000 to the City of Montgomery, West Virginia 
for completion of a building for the West Virginia Technical 
College newspaper publishing program;
      1114. $450,000 to the City of South Charleston, West 
Virginia for a feasibility study for the Mid-Atlantic 
Technology, Research and Innovation Center;
      1115. $25,000 to the Friends of Preston Academy for 
facilities construction;
      1116. $50,000 to Wetzel County Commission for 
construction and renovation;
      1117. $1,000,000 for construction, related activities, 
and programs at the Scarborough Library at Shepherd University;
      1118. $1,000,000 for the Wheeling Park Commission for the 
development of training facilities at Oglebay Park;
      1119. $2,000,000 for West Virginia University for the 
development of a facility to house forensic science research 
and academic programs;
      1120. $1,000,000 for the Kanawha Institute for Social 
Research and Action, for renovations to the Empowerment Center 
in West Dunbar, which will house an array of self-sufficiency 
programs for low- to moderate-income individuals;
      1121. $150,000 to the City of Dubois, Wyoming for 
improvements to the Dubois Community area;
      1122. $350,000 to the City of Laramie, Wyoming for 
construction of a National Creative Arts Center facility;
      1123. $100,000 to the City of Laramie, Wyoming for 
improvements to the Wyoming Technology Business Center;
      1124. $900,000 for the Sustainable Agriculture Research & 
Extension Center (SAREC) in Goshen County, Wyoming for 
construction of a community center building;
      1125. $1,100,000 for the Wyoming Substance Abuse 
Treatment and Recovery Center (WYSTAR) in Sheridan, Wyoming to 
expand its substance abuse treatment facility for women with 
children;
      1126. $1,000,000 for the Central Wyoming College 
Foundation in Riverton, Wyoming to construct the Intertribal 
Education & Community Center;
      The conference agreement includes $50,000,000 for the 
Neighborhood Initiatives program and directs HUD to implement 
the program as follows:
      1. $1,000,000 to the City and County of San Francisco for 
rehabilitation of a facility for use as a homeless shelter;
      2. $1,000,000 to the City of Desert Hot Springs, 
California for construction of a civic center;
      3. $500,000 to the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, 
California for construction of a museum;
      4. $2,000,000 to the Nixon Foundation for capital 
improvements to the Richard Nixon Library and Birthplace;
      5. $1,000,000 to the San Francisco Conservatory of Music 
for relocation of its facility;
      6. $400,000 to the University of San Francisco for 
construction, renovation, and expansion of the Science Center;
      7. $750,000 for Barracks Row Main Street, Inc. for the 
redevelopment of the Eastern Market Metro Plaza;
      8. $600,000 for the National Children's Museum for 
facility construction;
      9. $100,000 for the National Council for Negro Women for 
facility construction;
      10. $1,250,000 to the Bucks County Community College in 
the County of Bucks, Pennsylvania, for facilities design and 
construction;
      11. $2,500,000 to ER One in Washington, DC for facilities 
construction;
      12. $700,000 to Southeastern University for facility 
renovation;
      13. $700,000 to The ARC in Washington, DC for 
construction of a community center;
      14. $1,325,000 to the DC Food Bank for facilities 
construction;
      15. $1,250,000 to the Center on Halsted in Chicago, 
Illinois for the construction of a new community center;
      16. $3,000,000 for the City of Paducah, Kentucky, to 
develop the Paducah Waterfront Development Project;
      17. $950,000 to Picknelly Adult & Family Education Center 
in Holyoke, Massachusetts for an adult literacy center;
      18. $800,000 to Pittsfield and Leeds Cooperative Housing 
in Pittsfield, MA for homeless veterans;
      19. $100,000 for the Technical Exploration Center (TEC) 
of Husson College: Expand the Service Capacity of TEC;
      20. $500,000 for the Detroit Science Center to create a 
Space Science Discovery Lab;
      21. $200,000 to Presbyterian Villages of Michigan for 
construction and building upgrades to its facilities;
      22. $5,000,000 for planning, development and acquisition 
for the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy, for the West Riverfront 
Redevelopment project, Detroit, Michigan;
      23. $200,000 for the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency in 
St. Paul, Minnesota to provide supportive housing for homeless 
youth;
      24. $5,000,000 for the Grace Hill Neighborhood Health 
Centers, Inc. shall be spent on primary prevention activities 
with no less than $4,000,000 spent on remediation and abatement 
activities of housing in St. Louis, Missouri.
      25. $150,000 for the Covenant House I Elderly 
Demonstration Program to preserve and expand affordable housing 
opportunities for the elderly in St. Louis, Missouri;
      26. $130,000 to the City of Kansas City for Swope 
Community Builders for the Linwood Housing project, Kansas 
City, Missouri;
      27. $500,000 for Mississippi State University costs for 
facility restoration and development;
      28. $300,000 for the Stennis Institute of Government 
capacity development initiative in Starkville, Mississippi, for 
the enhancement of economic development capabilities;
      29. $200,000 for the Housing Education and Economic 
Development Center in Jackson, Mississippi, for the enhancement 
of housing and economic development programs;
      30. $200,000 for the Mississippi Community College 
Foundation for the Montgomery Institute to provide 
entrepreneurship assistance and coordination in NI;
      31. $800,000 for Enochs Hall in Brookhaven, Mississippi 
for the construction of additional teaching facilities and 
operations of activities;
      32. $275,000 to Newark Downtown Corridor Revitalization 
in Newark, New Jersey for revitalization of the Newark Downtown 
Corridor;
      33. $275,000 to the Englewood Hospital in New Jersey for 
construction of its facility;
      34. $275,000 to the I-Port 440 International Trade and 
Logistics Center for construction and renovation of its 
facility;
      35. $275,000 to the Meadowlands Hospital Emergency 
Department in Secaucus, New Jersey for expansion and upgrades 
of the Emergency Department;
      36. $1,000,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
continuation of the Neighborhood Initiative Program;
      37. $5,000,000 to the Housing Partnership Network for 
capitalization of its affordable housing-related ventures;
      38. $575,000 to the Metropolitan Development Association 
in Syracuse, New York for the Essential New York Initiative;
      39. $220,000 for Rural Enterprises Institute of Oklahoma 
to continue the HUD Employer Assisted Housing Project;
      40. $200,000 for Union County, Oregon to support economic 
development and tourism activities for the Wallowa Union 
Railroad;
      41. $200,000 for Umatilla County, Oregon to support 
economic development and infrastructure improvements;
      42. $200,000 to the City of Scranton, Pennsylvania for 
the North Main Avenue redevelopment project;
      43. $200,000 for Oxford Mainstreet, Inc, Oxford, PA to 
revitalize the downtown commercial district.
      44. $200,000 to Camp Fire USA Lone Star Council in 
Dallas, Texas for their Texas public housing initiative;
      45. $200,000 for the City of Eagle Mountain, Utah for 
community development and park facilities improvements in the 
City of Eagle Mountain;
      46. $1,500,000 for the Washington State Farmworker 
Housing Trust in Seattle, WA for the Washington Farmerworker 
and Housing Homeownership;
      47. $500,000 for the Enterprise Foundation in Seattle, WA 
for the Washington Greenbuilding Initiative;
      48. $3,200,000 to the University of Wisconsin, Marathon 
for construction of a building;
      49. $1,600,000 to Vandalia Heritage Foundation, Inc. in 
West Virginia for land acquisition, facilities construction and 
renovation;
      50. $1,000,000 for construction, related activities, and 
programs at the Scarborough Library at Shepherd University.

         COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LOAN GUARANTEES PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $3,000,000 for 
costs associated with section 108 loan guarantees, including 
administrative costs, to subsidize a total loan principal of up 
to $137,500,000. The House had proposed no funding for this 
program and the Senate had proposed $6,000,000 for a loan limit 
of $275,000,000. The conference agreement transfers $750,000 to 
the Salaries and Expenses account instead of $1,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

                       BROWNFIELDS REDEVELOPMENT

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement includes $10,000,000 for 
Brownfields Redevelopment. The House proposed no funds and the 
Senate proposed $15,000,000. The agreement includes a 
rescission of $10,000,000 from unobligated funds from prior 
years appropriations and, to the extent funds are unavailable, 
from FY 2006 funds.

                  HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates a total of 
$1,775,000,000 for this account, instead of $1,900,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $1,750,000,000 for the 
HOME Investment Partnerships program, instead of $1,850,000,000 
as proposed by the House and the Senate. Within this account, 
funds are allocated as follows:

      --$42,000,000 is for housing counseling as proposed by 
the Senate. The House had proposed $41,700,000.
      --$1,000,000 is transferred to the Working Capital fund 
as proposed by the House. The Senate had proposed $2,000,000.
      The conference agreement directs that 15 percent of the 
formula is reserved for housing developed, sponsored or owned 
by Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDOs) as 
proposed by the House. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision. In addition, $10,000,000 is reserved for technical 
assistance as proposed by the Senate. The House had proposed 
$17,300,000 for technical assistance. Of amounts made available 
for technical assistance, $8,000,000 is for qualified non-
profit intermediaries to provide technical assistance to CHDOs 
as proposed by the House. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision.
      In addition to the $1,750,000,000 for the grant amount 
above, the conference agreement includes $25,000,000 to provide 
down-payment assistance to low-income families to help them 
achieve homeownership, instead of $50,000,000 as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate.

        SELF-HELP AND ASSISTED HOMEOWNERSHIP OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM

      The conference agreement provides funding for Section 4 
and other entities under a new account structure as proposed by 
the House. The account combines those specific organizations 
that engage in self-help or other forms of homeownership and 
assisted housing formerly funded under the Community 
Development Fund. The Senate proposed to retain these entities 
as set-asides within the CDBG program. A total of $61,000,000 
is provided under this structure, and the conferees direct that 
funds be distributed as follows:

LISC/Enterprise Foundation..............................     $30,000,000
La Raza.................................................       4,000,000
Housing Assistance Council..............................       3,000,000
National American Indian Housing Council................       1,000,000
Self Help and Opportunity Program.......................      20,000,000
Special Olympics........................................       1,000,000
National Housing Development Corporation................       2,000,000

      In addition, the conference agreement directs that, of 
the $30,000,000 made available to LISC and Enterprise 
Foundation, $3,500,000 shall be made available for Habitat for 
Humanity for technical assistance and capacity building.

                       HOMELESS ASSISTANCE GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $1,340,000,000 for 
Homeless Assistance Grants, as proposed by the House instead of 
$1,415,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds are available 
for two years except for $20,000,000, which is available until 
expended. As proposed by both the House and Senate, 
$238,000,000 is for renewal of Shelter Plus Care contracts. The 
conference agreement transfers $1,000,000 to the Working 
Capital Fund as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      Language is included designating up to $11,674,000 for 
the National Homeless Data Analysis project and for technical 
assistance as proposed by the House and the Senate. The 
conferees reiterate the three specific directives in the Senate 
report, which address homeless families and expect the 
Department to fund these directives from funds made available 
for the National Homeless Data Analysis project and technical 
assistance.
      Language is included as proposed by both the House and 
Senate requiring that 30 percent of the funds be for permanent 
shelter and requires a 25 percent match for service funds.

                            Housing Programs

                        HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $742,000,000 for 
the section 202 Housing for the Elderly program as proposed by 
the Senate, instead of $741,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement allocates funds as follows:
            --$641,200,000 for new capital and PRAC contracts, 
        amendments to contracts and for the renewal of 
        contracts for up to one year terms and for supportive 
        services;
            --$51,600,000 for service coordinators and the 
        continuation of congregate services grants. The House 
        had proposed $49,600,000 for service coordinators and 
        congregate services and the Senate had proposed 
        $53,600,000;
            --Up to $24,800,000 for assisted living conversion 
        grants and emergency capital repairs as proposed by the 
        House. The Senate proposed $30,000,000 for assisted 
        living conversion grants, emergency capital repairs, 
        and substantial rehabilitation;
            --$4,000,000 for a demonstration project to 
        determine the efficacy of implementing Section 203 of 
        Public Law 108-186;
            --$20,000,000 for competitive grants for planning, 
        design and development activities for section 202 
        projects as proposed by the Senate. The House did not 
        propose funds for these activities. These funds are to 
        be allocated for project planning, preliminary design, 
        site control activities and other development costs, 
        including gap financing if appropriate,directly related 
to section 202 projects in order to facilitate timely completion of 
such projects. The conferees do not intend for these funds to be used 
for technical assistance but instead expect such funds to be used for 
start-up costs associated with such projects; and
            --$400,000 for transfer to the Working Capital Fund 
        for information technology activities as proposed by 
        the House instead of $450,000 as proposed by the 
        Senate.

                 HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides a total program level 
of $239,000,000 for the Section 811 program instead of 
$238,100,000 as proposed by the House and $240,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language proposed 
by the House and Senate to ensure that housing assistance made 
available under this account remains available to persons with 
disabilities upon turnover.
      The conference agreement allocates funds as follows:
            --$155,700,000 for new capital grants and PRAC;
            --$78,300,000 for amendment and one-year renewal 
        costs of Section 811 rental assistance as proposed by 
        the House. The Senate had proposed funding renewals 
        under the Tenant-based Rental Assistance Account; and
            --Caps funds for incremental vouchers at $5,000,000 
        as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      The conferees reiterate language included in the House 
report directing HUD to issue program guidance for the Section 
811 mainstream program including guidance on (1) targeting 
rental assistance eligibility criteria; (2) maintaining 
vouchers exclusively for eligible persons; and (3) retaining a 
meaningful role for non-profit disability organizations. The 
conference agreement further reiterates Senate report language 
to ensure that all tenant-based assistance made available under 
this account is to remain available to persons with 
disabilities upon turnover.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
both the House and Senate that allows the use of funds by the 
Real Estate Assessment Center ( REAC) for inspection related 
activities.

                    OTHER ASSISTED HOUSING PROGRAMS

                       RENTAL HOUSING ASSISTANCE

      The conference agreement provides $26,400,000 for Section 
236 payments to State-aided, non-insured projects as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate. In addition, the conference 
agreement includes language, allowing HUD to amend contracts 
for a period of less than needed to fund the contracts to term. 
The House and Senate did not propose this language.

                         FLEXIBLE SUBSIDY FUND

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement includes language permanently 
transferring excess rental charges to the Flexible Subsidy Fund 
as proposed by the Senate. The House included similar language.

                  MANUFACTURED HOUSING FEES TRUST FUND

      The conference agreement appropriates up to $13,000,000 
for authorized activities from fees collected in the Fund as 
proposed by the Senate. The House proposed $12,896,000.

                     Federal Housing Administration

               MUTUAL MORTGAGE INSURANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement establishes an $185,000,000,000 
limitation on commitments to guarantee single-family loans 
during fiscal year 2006, as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement establishes a $50,000,000 
limitation on direct loans to nonprofits and governmental 
entities in connection with the sale of HUD-owned single-family 
properties, as proposed by the House and the Senate.
      As proposed by both the House and the Senate the 
conference agreement appropriates:
            --$355,000,000 for administrative expenses, of 
        which $351,000,000 is for transfer to the Salaries and 
        Expenses account and not to exceed $4,000,000 is for 
        transfer to the Office of Inspector General; and
            --$62,600,000 for administrative contract expenses, 
        of which $18,281,000 is for information technology 
        systems. Language is also included allowing up to an 
        additional $30,000,000 to be made available for such 
        expenses in certain circumstances.

                GENERAL AND SPECIAL RISK PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement, as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate:
            --Establishes a $35,000,000,000 limitation on 
        multifamily and specialized loan guarantees during 
        fiscal year 2006;
            --Appropriates $8,800,000 for subsidy costs to 
        support certain multifamily and special purpose loan 
        guarantee programs as proposed by both the House and 
        Senate;
            --Appropriates $231,400,000 for administrative 
        expenses, of which $211,400,000 is transferred to the 
        Salaries and Expenses Account and $20,000,000 is for 
        transfer to the Office of Inspector General; and
            --Appropriates $71,900,000 for administrative 
        contract expenses, of which $10,800,000 is for transfer 
        to the Working Capital Fund for information technology 
        systems.
      Language is also included allowing up to an additional 
$4,000,000 to be made available for such expenses in certain 
circumstances as proposed by both the House and Senate.

                Government National Mortgage Association

GUARANTEES OF MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement includes up to $200,000,000,000 
for new commitments to issue guarantees and appropriates 
$10,700,000 for administrative expenses to be transferred to 
the Salaries and Expenses account as proposed by the House 
instead of $11,360,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                    Policy Development and Research

                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

      The conference agreement provides for a new structure for 
this program, which includes both general contract funds for 
research and funds for Section 107 academic grants formerly 
funded under the Community Development Fund, and which have 
been historically administered by PD&R.;
      The conference agreement also includes language that 
directs that the implementation of $5,000,000 for the 
Partnership for the Advancing of Technology in Housing (PATH) 
be shifted to the Office of Housing. Both the House and the 
Senate proposed funding for PATH under the PD&R; account.
      In total the conference agreement appropriates 
$56,350,000 for research and technology instead of $60,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $46,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Of the amount provided the conference agreement directs 
that:
            --$750,000 be provided to the National Academy of 
        Sciences/National Research Council for a thorough 
        evaluation of HUD's current research plan and provide 
        HUD and the Congress with a set of options and 
        recommendations for Congress to consider about the 
        future course of research needed to address future 
        technology, engineering and social or economic issues; 
        and
            --$20,600,000 is provided for Section 107 grants to 
        academic institutions, and is to be distributed as 
        follows:

Section 107.............................................     $20,600,000
Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions..     (3,000,000)
Tribal Colleges and Universities........................     (2,600,000)
HBCUs...................................................     (9,000,000)
Hispanic Serving Institutions...........................     (6,000,000)

                   Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

                        FAIR HOUSING ACTIVITIES

      The conference agreement appropriates $46,000,000 for 
this program as proposed by the Senate instead of $46,500,000 
as proposed by the House. Of this amount, $26,000,000 is for 
the Fair Housing Assistance Program (FHAP) and $20,000,000 is 
for the Fair Housing Initiatives Program (FHIP), as proposed by 
the Senate. The House proposed $26,500,000 for FHAP and 
$20,000,000 for FHIP.

                     Office of Lead Hazard Control

                         LEAD HAZARD REDUCTION

      The conference agreement appropriates $152,000,000 for 
the Lead Hazard Reduction program instead of $166,656,000 as 
proposed by the House and $167,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement allocates funds as follows:
            --$76,900,000 for the lead-based paint hazard 
        control grant program to provide assistance to State 
        and local governments and Native American tribes for 
        lead-based paint abatement in private low-income 
        housing;
            --$8,800,000 for Operation LEAP;
            --$8,800,000 for technical assistance and support 
        to State and local agencies and private property 
        owners;
            --$9,500,000 for the Healthy Homes Initiative for 
        competitive grants for research, standards development, 
        and education and outreach activities to address lead-
        based paint poisoning and other housing-related 
        diseases and hazards; and
            --$48,000,000 for an initiative to target lead 
        abatement funds to areas with the highest lead paint 
        abatement needs.

                     Management and Administration

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $1,153,285,000 for the 
management and administration of HUD as proposed by the House. 
The Senate proposed $1,145,195,000 for these activities.
      Of the amount provided the conference agreement includes 
$579,000,000 from direct appropriations, of which up to 
$15,000,000 can be transferred to the working capital fund and 
$574,285,000 is to be derived from transfers from other 
accounts.
      Operating Plans/Reprogramming Requirements.--All 
Departments and agencies funded within the Subcommittee's 
jurisdiction are required to submit operating plans, 
reprogramming letters and reorganization proposals for 
committee approval. Unless otherwise specified in this Act or 
the accompanying statement of the managers, the approved level 
for any program, project, or activity is that amount detailed 
for that program, project, or activity in the Department's 
annual detailed budget justification document unless changed 
through an approved operating plan.
      Limitations on Conferences and associated expenditures.--
The conference agreement directs HUD to conduct an analysis of 
funds used by each office for conferences in fiscal year 2005. 
The analysis is to include conferences that are not 
specifically associated with the issuance of formal guidance, 
the implementation of new regulations or implementation of HUD 
directives to grantees pursuant to Congressional directives as 
well as conferences that are funded as part of technical 
assistance of any kind and HUD staff conferences for purposes 
of internal guidance or staff-related training. The types of 
costs to be included are travel, including the travel costs of 
employees and any other individuals paid for by HUD, the dollar 
value of FTE utilization to develop and support the conference, 
and contractual or grant costs associated with the development 
or conduct of the conferences.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

      The conference agreement appropriates $197,000,000 for 
the Working Capital Fund (WCF) instead of $265,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate and $62,000,000 as proposed by the 
House. The conferees direct that HUD reduce staffing in the WCF 
by 33 FTEs as the first part of a three-year phase out of 100 
FTEs due to the signing of the new long-term HITS contract, as 
proposed by the House. Within funds provided, the Department is 
directed to modernize its e-mail system and make it compatible 
with thesystems used by the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees to facilitate the electronic transfer of information and 
data.
      The conferees reiterate House report language that 
precludes the transfer of funds from the WCF for the ``e-gov'' 
initiative prior to submission of an operating plan; requires a 
report on the status of the four IT projects and directs HUD to 
submit an updated 5 year IT plan.
      In addition, the conference agreement includes language 
proposed by both the House and Senate that allows transfers 
from the following accounts to be used for the purposes of the 
fund and for which the funds were appropriated. Transfers 
include:

FHA, Mutual mortgage insurance fund.....................     $18,281,000
FHA, General and special risk insurance fund............      10,800,000
Community development fund..............................       1,600,000
HOME investment partnerships program....................       1,000,000
Homeless assistance.....................................       1,000,000
Public housing capital fund.............................      11,000,000
Tenant-based rental assistance..........................       5,900,000
Project-based rental assistance.........................       1,400,000
Housing for the elderly.................................         400,000
Housing for the disabled................................         400,000
Management and Administration...........................      15,000,000

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $106,000,000 for 
the Office of Inspector General as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $103,000,000 as proposed by the House. Of this 
amount, $24,000,000 is provided by transfer from the various 
funds of the Federal Housing Administration as proposed by the 
House and the Senate.
      The conferees reiterate the House language that prohibits 
the IG from requiring HUD to rescind funds from existing 
Section 236 contracts and requires that any proposal to require 
HUD to reduce obligations on existing long term contracts as 
part of an audit must be approved in the IG's operating plan. 
The Senate did not include a similar provision.
      As proposed in the House, the conference agreement 
includes language within Administrative Provisions that 
precludes HUD's IG from conducting an audit of GNMA under any 
circumstances other than those in effect for fiscal year 2005. 
The Senate did not include a similar provision.

             Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement appropriates $60,000,000 for the 
Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO) to be 
derived from collections available in the Federal Housing 
Enterprise Oversight Fund as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes an administrative 
amendment proposed by the House that continues prior year 
requirements on the use of funds. The Senate did not include a 
similar provision. A set aside for special investigations, as 
proposed by the House was not included.

                       Administrative Provisions

      Section 301 splits overpayments 50/50 between Treasury 
and State HFAs, as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 302 precludes the use of funds to prosecute or 
investigate legal activities under the Fair Housing Act, as 
proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 303 continues language to correct anomalies for 
HOPWA and specifies jurisdictions in New York and New Jersey 
and uses three year average as proposed by the House and 
Senate.
      Section 304 authorizes the Secretary to waive certain 
requirements on adjusted income for certain assisted living 
projects for counties in Michigan, and expands the 
demonstration to be statewide. The Senate proposed four 
counties.
      Section 305 requires that funds be subject to competition 
unless specified otherwise in statute as proposed by the House 
and Senate.
      Section 306 allows HUD to use funds for services or 
facilities of GNMA, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and certain banks 
as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 307 requires HUD to comport with the budget 
estimates except as otherwise provided in this Act or through 
an approved reprogramming, as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 308 provides authorization for HUD corporations 
to utilize funds under certain conditions and restrictions, as 
proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 309 requires that technical assistance and 
training funds be subject to an approved operating plan as 
proposed by the House and Senate due by March 15, 2006.
      Section 310 requires a report on unexpended balances each 
quarter as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 311 provides funding for continued project-based 
assistance for HUD-held or -owned projects subject to cost 
considerations and the physical condition of the properties. 
The House limited this program to units occupied by the elderly 
and disabled. HUD is directed to report quarterly to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the disposition of all HUD-held 
or -owned properties.
      Section 312 specifies the distribution of AIDs funds to 
New Jersey and North Carolina, as proposed by the House and 
Senate.
      Section 313 allows Section 202 and 811 funds to be used 
for disposition of properties. The Senate did not have a 
similar provision.
      Section 314 requires a report annually on number of 
leased units and average costs. The Senate did not have a 
similar provision.
      Section 315 requires that budget justifications shall be 
submitted in traditional format as proposed by the House and 
Senate.
      Section 316 requires that non-elderly disabled assistance 
shall continue for non-elderly disabled persons upon turnover 
to the extent practicable as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 317 exempts the residency requirement for PHA 
Boards in Alaska, Iowa and Mississippi as proposed by the House 
and Senate.
      Section 318 authorizes HUD to transfer debt and use 
agreements from an obsolete project to a viable project, 
provided that no additional costs are incurred, and other 
conditions are met. The House did not have a similar provision.
      Section 319 distributes fiscal year 2006 Indian block 
grant funds to the same Native Alaskan recipients as fiscal 
year 2005 as proposed by the House and Senate.
      Section 320 extends the MTW agreements (about to expire 
at the end of 2006) for up to three years. The House did not 
have a similar provision.
      Section 321 prohibits the IG from changing the basis on 
which the audit of GNMA is conducted. The Senate did not have a 
similar provision.
      Section 322 requires that the renewal of Family 
Unification vouchers upon turnover shall, to the extent 
practicable, go to family unification. The House did not have a 
similar provision.
      Section 323 clarifies section 223(f) of NHA to include 
purchase as well as refinancing of debt. The Senate did not 
have a similar provision.
      Section 324 makes a technical fix to allow HUD to pursue 
sanctions against owners of FHA multi-family housing who skim 
equity. Language is included that makes violations applicable 
retroactively. The House did not have a similar provision.
      Section 325 requires that Section 236 vouchers be 
submitted electronically, to avoid payment errors by HUD. The 
Senate did not have a similar provision.
      Section 326 includes an amendment that clarifies that 
unused or underutilized commercial properties selected by HUD 
for Section 202b assistance after December 26, 2000 are 
eligible to use the limited partnership ownership structure 
made possible by the new definition of non-profit 
organizations. The Senate did not have a similar provision.
      Section 327 requires that athletic scholarships for 
housing shall be considered part of adjusted income for 
purposes of eligibility for Section 8. The House did not have a 
similar provision.
      Section 328 requires priority consideration for Moving to 
Work Demonstration applications from Santa Clara/San Jose and 
San Bernardino.
      The conference agreement does not include a Senate 
provision that limits HUD conference expenses to $3,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2006. Instead the conferees direct HUD to conduct a 
study of funding for conferences including associated travel, 
staff time and related expenses elsewhere in this title. The 
House did not have a similar provision.

                        TITLE IV--THE JUDICIARY

                   Supreme Court of the United States

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $60,730,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Supreme Court, as proposed by the 
House and the Senate.

                    CARE OF THE BUILDING AND GROUNDS

      The conference agreement includes $5,624,000 for care of 
the Supreme Court building and grounds, as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

         United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $24,000,000 for the 
United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, instead 
of $24,613,000 as proposed by the House and $23,489,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conferees have provided sufficient 
funding to hire court security officers originally provided in 
fiscal year 2003, but deny funding for all program increases 
outlined in the court's fiscal year 2006 budget justification.

               United States Court of International Trade

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $15,480,000 for the 
U.S. Court of International Trade, as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $4,348,780,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Courts of Appeals, District 
Courts, and Other Judicial Services, as proposed by the House, 
instead of $4,374,959,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees are aware of substantial carry-over funding from 
fiscal year 2005 that is available to the Judiciary and expect 
that these funds will be used to supplement fiscal year 2006 
appropriations. Within the amount provided, the conferees 
encourage the Judiciary to make available $1,300,000 for the 
Edwin L. Nelson Local Initiatives Program, with $1,000,000 
reserved for local court grants. In addition, the conferees 
provide $672,000 for Electronic Probation Pretrial Services 
under the Judiciary Information Technology Fund (JITF). No 
funding is provided for other new JITF programs, nor is funding 
provided for additional court automation support personnel, as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees direct the Administrative Office of the 
U.S. Courts (AO) to report on all new trends in caseload 
changes, including those resulting from the recent Booker/
Fanfan decision, increased law enforcement activities along the 
borders, and the recently enacted bankruptcy reform 
legislation.
      As the formula for the distribution of fiscal year 2006 
funds is developed, the conferees encourage the Administrative 
Office to take into account district courts with extremely 
heavy caseloads along the international border.

                 VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION TRUST FUND

      The conference agreement includes $3,833,000 from the 
Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

                           DEFENDER SERVICES

      The conference agreement includes $717,000,000 for 
defender services instead of $721,919,000 as proposed by the 
House and $710,785,000, as proposed by the Senate. The 
conference agreement deletes language denying cost-of-living 
adjustments to panel attorneys, as proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees will revisit the need for panel attorney cost-of-
living adjustments in fiscal year 2007.

                    FEES OF JURORS AND COMMISSIONERS

      The conference agreement includes $61,318,000 for fees of 
jurors and commissioners, as proposed by the Senate, instead of 
$60,053,000 as proposed by the House.

                             COURT SECURITY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement includes $372,000,000 for court 
security, instead of $379,461,000 as proposed by the House and 
$372,426,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement includes language limiting payments to the Federal 
Protective Service (FPS) to not more than $65,500,000. The 
conferees remain concerned that FPS has yet to produce a full 
accounting of charges to the Judiciary. Furthermore, the 
conferees are concerned that security decisions made in the 
field without consultation with the AO have placed in jeopardy 
other important court activities.
      The conferees are aware that the AO and the U.S. Marshals 
Service cannot reach agreement over which entity will 
administer the annual maintenance of security systems for which 
$11,935,000 was provided inPublic Law 109-13, the fiscal year 
2005 Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global 
War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief. The conferees direct the AO to work 
with the U.S. Marshals Service to come to a resolution of this impasse 
prior to submission of the fiscal year 2007 President's budget request.

           Administrative Office of the United States Courts

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $70,262,000 for the 
Administrative Office of the United States Courts as proposed 
by the House, instead of $72,198,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                        Federal Judicial Center

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $22,350,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Federal Judicial Center as 
proposed by the Senate, instead of $22,249,000 as proposed by 
the House.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds

                    PAYMENT TO JUDICIARY TRUST FUNDS

      The conference agreement includes $40,600,000 for payment 
to various judicial retirement funds, as proposed by the House 
and Senate.

                  United States Sentencing Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $14,400,000 for the 
United States Sentencing Commission, instead of $14,046,000 as 
proposed by the House and $14,700,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                Administrative Provisions--The Judiciary

      Section 401 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate that allows appropriations to be used for 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
      Section 402 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate related to the transfer of funds.
      Section 403 retains a provision included by both the 
House and the Senate that allows up to $11,000 to be used for 
official representation expenses of the Judicial Conference of 
the United States.
      Section 404 retains a provision included by the Senate 
that requires a financial plan. The conferees intend that the 
financial plan should serve as the equivalent of operating 
plans required of other entities receiving funding under this 
Act. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 405 retains a provision proposed by the Senate 
that provides a cost-of-living adjustment to justices and 
judges. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Section 406 retains a provision proposed by the Senate 
that extends a temporary judgeship in Missouri. The House did 
not include a similar provision.
      Section 407 retains a provision included by the Senate 
that provides certain procurement authorities to the Judicial 
branch that are currently available to the Legislative and 
Executive branches. The House did not include a similar 
provision. The conferees direct the AO to provide a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations detailing a two-year history 
of the use of these authorities on or before May 1, 2008.
      Section 408 modifies a provision included by the Senate 
concerning the investigation of Henry Cisneros. The House did 
not include a similar provision.
      The conference agreement deletes a provision proposed by 
the Senate that requires a GAO report on the impacts of 
increased border/homeland security funding in the Judiciary.

 TITLE V--EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT AND FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO 
                             THE PRESIDENT

                     Compensation of the President

      The conference agreement provides $450,000 for 
compensation of the President as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.

                           White House Office

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $53,830,000 as proposed 
by the House instead of $58,081,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
The bill specifies that, of the total funding provided, 
$1,500,000 is for the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight 
Board, as proposed by the House and the Senate.

                 Executive Residence at the White House

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $12,436,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                   White House Repair and Restoration

      The conference agreement provides $1,700,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                      Council of Economic Advisers

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $4,040,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                      Office of Policy Development

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $3,500,000 as proposed 
by the House. The Senate proposed to consolidate OPD in the 
White House Salaries and Expenses.

                       National Security Council

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $8,705,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                        Office of Administration

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $89,322,000 as proposed 
by the House instead of $98,609,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
The conference agreement includes $11,768,000 for the capital 
investment plan. The conferees allocate funds by activity as 
proposed in budget request.

                    Office of Management and Budget

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $76,930,000 for the 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB) instead of $67,930,000 
proposed by the House and $68,411,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees did not agree to consolidate rent and 
health costs into the Enterprise Services activity. The 
conferees also allocate funds by object class, and limit 
reception and representation expenses to $3,000 as proposed by 
the House instead of $2,000 proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement reiterates language included in 
the general provisions precluding the use of funds for the ``e-
Gov'' initiative and for conducting PART studies prior to 
consultation with the Committees on Appropriations.
      The conference agreement continues prior year 
restrictions and requirements for congressional notification 
for agricultural marketing orders and on the review of water 
projects and other water resource matters, as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include restrictions and requirements 
relating to water resource projects.

                 Office of National Drug Control Policy

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conferees agree to provide $26,908,000 for salaries 
and expenses, as proposed by the House instead of $24,224,000 
proposed by the Senate. The conferees do not agree to transfer 
the rent and health costs to the Enterprise Services activity. 
Within this total, the conference agreement retains specific 
funding and staffing levels for ONDCP administrative offices as 
proposed in the House and Senate reports.
      The conferees are concerned with ONDCP's lack of 
attention and activity on Methamphetamine despite the 
increasing reports on the devastating impact Methamphetamine 
has on the Nation's communities. The conferees direct ONDCP to 
increase its focus, resources and activities targeted at 
combating Methamphetamine abuse.

                Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conferees agree to provide $30,000,000 for the 
Counterdrug Technology Assessment Center (CTAC), as proposed by 
the House and the Senate. Of this amount, the conferees agree 
to provide $16,000,000 for the operation of the technology 
transfer program, instead of $18,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate and $12,000,000 as proposed by the House. Also included 
in this amount is $14,000,000 for counter-narcotics research 
and development. Of this amount, up to $1,000,000 shall be 
provided for supply reduction and directed to marijuana 
eradication. The House proposed $18,000,000 for research and 
the Senate proposed $12,000,000. Fiscal year 2006 CTAC/HIDTA 
appropriated funds must be transferred within 90 days of 
enactment of this Act.
      The conferees direct that a spending plan be included in 
the ONDCP operating plan for fiscal year 2006. In addition, the 
conferees direct that a thorough review of the entire CTAC 
program be implemented to determine the future course of 
funding for the CTAC program. A report with options for the 
Committees to consider shall be included in the 
Administration's fiscal year 2007 budget justification for 
ONDCP.
      Further, the conferees direct the completion of existing 
imaging system instrumentation validation effects at qualified 
academic institutions and direct that ONDCP assess the 
reinstatement of the demand instrumentation infrastructure 
development program in the fiscal year 2007 budget.

                     Federal Drug Control Programs

             High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Program

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conferees agree to provide $227,000,000 for the HIDTA 
program, as proposed by the Senate. The House proposed 
$236,000,000. The conference agreement precludes the use of 
funds for the Consolidated Priority Organization Target (CPOT) 
list as proposed by the Senate. Of the funds provided, no less 
than $2,000,000 shall be for new counties; $2,000,000 is 
provided for audit activities, of which at least $500,000 is to 
develop performance measures. Language is included that HIDTAs 
designated as of September 30, 2005 shall be funded at no less 
than the fiscal year 2005 initial allocations, as proposed by 
the House. The Senate report contained a similar provision.
      The conferees encourage the use of performance measures 
that were developed by the HIDTA Directors Committee, as 
proposed by the House.

                  Other Federal Drug Control Programs

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conferees agree to provide $194,900,000 for Other 
Federal Drug Control Programs, instead of $238,292,000 as 
proposed by the House and $191,400,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the amount provided, the agreement provides the 
following allocations:

National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign.................    $100,000,000
Drug Free Communities Support Program...................     $80,000,000
National Community Anti-Drug Coalitions Institute.......     (2,000,000)
National Drug Court Institute...........................       1,000,000
National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws.............       1,000,000
U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.................................       8,500,000
World Anti-Doping Agency Membership Dues................       2,900,000
Research & Performance Measures.........................       1,500,000

      The conferees have reviewed ONDCP's pending performance 
measures for research and note that much of it reflects ongoing 
interest in defining the nature and extent of drug use and its 
damaging consequences in the United States. The conferees 
direct ONDCP to expand its research to include a study of the 
social costs of Methamphetamine use and production in the 
United States.
      The conferees direct ONDCP to maintain funding for non-
advertising services for the Media Campaign at no less than the 
fiscal year 2003 ratio of service funding to total funds and to 
re-institute the corporate outreach program as it operated 
prior to its cancellation as proposed by the House. The Senate 
had no similar provision.
      The conferees direct that USADA submit a report including 
a spending plan and performance measures for fiscal year 2006, 
specifying the use of funds that were provided above the 
request.

                          Unanticipated Needs

      The conference agreement provides $1,000,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                  Special Assistance to the President

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $4,455,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                Official Residence of the Vice President

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $325,000 as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate, and adopts the header as 
proposed by the Senate.

                     TITLE VI--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

       Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $5,941,000 as proposed 
by the House and Senate.

                   Consumer Product Safety Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $63,000,000 as proposed 
by the Senate.

                     Election Assistance Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $14,200,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Election Assistance Commission 
instead of $15,877,000 as proposed by the House and $13,888,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The conferees direct that funds 
provided above the fiscal year 2005 level are to be used only 
to conduct audits of state expenditures of Help America Vote 
Act grant funds, for which one additional position is 
authorized.
      The conference agreement transfers $2,800,000 to the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as 
proposed by the House, instead of $4,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. In addition, the conferees encourage the Commission to 
provide $250,000 for the Help America Vote College Program.

                 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      The conference agreement includes $31,000,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General, as proposed by the Senate instead 
of $29,965,000 as proposed by the House. Funds for this account 
are derived from the Bank Insurance Fund, the Savings and Loan 
Insurance Fund, and the FSLIC Resolution Fund and are therefore 
not reflected in either the budget authority or budget outlay 
totals.

                      Federal Election Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $54,700,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Commission as proposed by the 
House instead of $54,600,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                   Federal Labor Relations Authority

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $25,468,000 for the 
Federal Labor Relations Authority as proposed by the House and 
Senate.

                      Federal Maritime Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $20,499,000 as proposed 
by the House and Senate.

                    General Services Administration

                        Real Property Activities

                         FEDERAL BUILDINGS FUND

                 Limitation on Availability of Revenue

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides resources from the 
Federal Buildings Fund in the aggregate amount of 
$7,752,745,000 instead of $6,867,097,000 as proposed by the 
House and $7,889,745,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                      CONSTRUCTION AND ACQUISITION

      The conference agreement limits funds for construction to 
$792,056,000 instead of $630,817,000 as proposed by the House 
and $829,056,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement modifies the projects proposed by the House and 
Senate bills and provides funds for the following projects:

        Project                                                   Amount
San Diego, U.S. Courthouse..............................    $230,803,000
Lakewood, Denver Federal Center Infrastructure..........       4,658,000
Coast Guard Consolidation...............................      24,900,000
St. Elizabeths West Campus Infrastructure...............      13,095,000
Southeast Federal Center Site Remediation...............      15,000,000
Calais, Border Station..................................      50,146,000
Jackman, Border Station.................................      12,788,000
Montgomery County FDA Consolidation.....................     127,600,000
Champlain, Border Station...............................      52,510,000
Massena, Border Station.................................      49,783,000
Austin, U.S. Courthouse.................................       3,000,000
Blaine, Peace Arch Border Station.......................      46,534,000
Tuscaloosa Federal Building.............................      34,500,000
Rockford Federal Courthouse.............................      34,500,000
Jackson, U.S. Courthouse................................       8,750,000
Jefferson City U.S. Courthouse..........................       5,200,000
Material price increases for U.S. Mission to the United 
    Nations, New York; Houston, Texas FBI Office; Del 
    Rio, Texas Border Station; Cape Girardeau, Missouri 
    U.S. Courthouse; El Paso, Texas U.S. Courthouse; El 
    Paso, Texas Border Station; Las Cruces, New Mexico 
    U.S. Courthouse.....................................      66,789,000
Nonprospectus construction..............................       9,500,000

                        REPAIRS AND ALTERATIONS

      The conference agreement limits resources for repairs and 
alterations to $861,376,000 instead of $392,967,000 as proposed 
by the House, and $961,376,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
bill specifies certain projects and various programs as 
follows:

        Project                                                   Amount
Tucson, James A. Walsh Courthouse.......................     $16,136,000
Eisenhower Executive Office Building....................      33,417,000
Federal Office Building 8...............................      47,769,000
Heating, Operation, and Transmission repair.............      18,783,000
Herbert C. Hoover Building..............................      54,491,000
Main Interior Building..................................      41,399,000
Atlanta, Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Building.......      30,129,000
Brooklyn, Emanuel Celler Courthouse.....................      96,924,000
James Watson Federal Building and Courthouse, New York 
    City................................................       9,721,000
Transfers to Navy for permanent relocation expenses 
    pursuant to section 1(e) of PL 108-268..............       2,000,000
Special Emphasis Programs:
    Chlorofluorocarbons program.........................      10,000,000
    Energy Program......................................      28,000,000
    Glass Fragmentation Program.........................      15,700,000
Design Program..........................................      21,915,000
Basic Repairs and Alterations...........................     434,992,000

                    INSTALLMENT ACQUISITION PAYMENTS

      The conference agreement provides a limitation of 
$168,180,000 for installment acquisition payments as proposed 
by both the House and Senate.

                            RENTAL OF SPACE

      The conference agreement limits $4,046,031,000 for rental 
of space as proposed by the Senate instead of $4,033,531,000 as 
proposed by the