Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-463

======================================================================



 
   AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2007

                                _______
                                

  May 12, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Bonilla, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5384]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and 
Drug Administration, and Related Agencies for fiscal year 2007.

                     TITLE I--AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS

                 Production, Processing, and Marketing

                        Office of the Secretary




2006 appropriation....................................        $5,076,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        11,540,000
Provided in the bill..................................         5,499,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +423,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -6,041,000



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Secretary, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $5,499,000, an increase of $423,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$6,041,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee provides $1,977,000 for cross-cutting trade 
negotiations and biotechnology resources, of which $350,000 
shall be for the purpose of trade capacity building for the 
specific purpose of providing technical assistance on trade 
related activities to low income emerging market countries.
    The Committee does not include funding for provisional 
reconstruction team as requested.
    The Committee does not include funding for foreign service 
performance pay as requested.
    Explanatory Notes.--The Committee appreciates receiving the 
detailed information provided in the Explanatory Notes prepared 
by the Department and relies heavily on this information when 
considering budget proposals. These materials have 
traditionally been prepared for the sole use of the 
Appropriations Committee in a format consistent with the 
organization and operation of the programs and the structure of 
the Appropriations Act. At the direction of the Office of 
Management and Budget, the Department has changed the format 
and content of these materials to focus on broader goals and 
objectives rather than the major program structure followed in 
the Act and in the actual conduct of the programs. For fiscal 
year 2008 and future years, the Department is directed to 
present Explanatory Notes in a format consistent with the 
presentation used for the fiscal year 2003 Budget. Any 
deviations from that format are to be approved in advance by 
the Committee.
    State Office Collocation.--The Committee continues to 
direct that any reallocation of resources related to the 
collocation of state offices scheduled for 2007 and subsequent 
years is subject to the Committee's reprogramming procedures. 
The Committee notes that no such reprogramming requests have 
been received to date.
    Ralstonia.--The Committee notes that the Secretary of 
Agriculture initiated emergency actions during FY 2005 to 
ensure the eradication of the disease Ralstonia solanacearum, 
Race 3, Biovar 2, which is of great concern to U.S. 
agriculture, including ornamentals growers, the potato 
industry, and others. The Committee strongly urges the 
Secretary of Agriculture to continue to use existing authority 
including that provided under CCC, to fund this initiative, and 
to establish a compensation program for persons suffering from 
losses as a result of the eradication and control efforts 
related to this disease. The Secretary shall submit to the 
Committee on Appropriations a report regarding the feasibility 
of establishing additional research and forward control 
programs in countries and/or regions that had been the point of 
origin for infected product.
    Administrative Provision.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary to advise the Committees on Appropriations in writing 
of the status of all reports requested of the Department in 
this bill, at the time of submission of the FY 2008 budget and 
quarterly thereafter.
    The Committee is concerned with reports that the 2006 north 
American cranberry crop, projected at nearly 7.5 million 
barrels, is expected to be significantly higher than 2005 and 
that this could result in a significant reduction in prices 
paid to producers. The Committee is also aware that USDA has 
used its purchasing authorities in past years to help maintain 
prices to cranberry producers. As such, the Committee urges 
USDA to ensure that federal cranberry purchases in FY07 remain 
at least at current levels.
    The Committee is concerned with reports that USDA's 
management of its inventory of surplus nonfat dry milk (NFDM) 
is threatening the development of the fledgling casein/milk 
protein concentrate manufacturing industry and may be causing 
additional and unnecessary costs to taxpayers. This industry 
depends upon the availability of federal stocks of NFDM but 
USDA appears to be throwing obstacles in the way of development 
of the industry by denying manufacturers the opportunity to bid 
on surplus stocks and in some cases rejecting bids even when 
there is only one bidder, all the while continuing to make 
surplus NFDM available to the Department of Defense and 
charitable institutions. While there are no doubt good 
justifications for these programs, the Committee believes that 
it is also vitally important that the U.S. develops a domestic 
casein/MPC manufacturing industry to compete effectively with 
imported products. As such, the Committee expects USDA to make 
greater efforts to meet the demands of the fledgling casein/MPC 
industry including fully utilizing new stocks of surplus 
product for this purpose as well as any existing stocks that 
may be available.
    The Committee encourages USDA to establish a U.S. 
viticulture international market development program that 
includes a student exchange and internship program involving 
the Virginia and California wine industries with the goal of 
improving U.S. wine production and promoting the exportation of 
U.S. wines.

                          Executive Operations


                            CHIEF ECONOMIST




2006 appropriation....................................       $10,434,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        11,226,000
Provided in the bill..................................        11,226,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +792,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Chief Economist, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $11,226,000, an increase of $792,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount as 
the budget request.

                       NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION




2006 appropriation....................................       $14,379,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        14,795,000
Provided in the bill..................................        14,795,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +416,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the National Appeals Division, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $14,795,000, an increase of $416,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount 
as the budget request.

                 OFFICE OF BUDGET AND PROGRAM ANALYSIS




2006 appropriation....................................        $8,216,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         8,479,000
Provided in the bill..................................         8,479,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +264,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Budget and Program Analysis, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $8,479,000, an increase 
of $264,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
the same as the budget request.

                        HOMELAND SECURITY STAFF




2006 appropriation....................................          $925,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         1,114,000
Provided in the bill..................................           954,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +29,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................          -160,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Homeland Security Staff, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $954,000, an increase of $29,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$160,000 below the budget request.

                Office of the Chief Information Officer





2006 appropriation....................................       $16,297,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        16,936,000
Provided in the bill..................................        16,936,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +639,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Chief Information Officer, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $16,936,000, an increase 
of $639,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
the same amount as the budget request.

                      Common Computing Environment





2006 appropriation....................................      $108,971,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       108,900,000
Provided in the bill..................................        68,971,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -40,000,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -39,929,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Common Computing Environment, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $68,971,000, a decrease of 
$40,000,000 below the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $39,929,000 below the budget request.
    Since fiscal year 2001, Congress has appropriated over 
$600,000,000 for the modernization and integration of 
information systems in USDA's county field offices. The 
Committee has fully supported this effort, but will expect to 
see reduced or level funding levels for this account in future 
budget submissions as a result of anticipated efficiencies and 
economies of scale.
    The following table reflects the Committee's 
recommendation:

CCE base infrastructure  ....................................$15,885,000
FSA specific..................................................43,336,000
NRCS specific................................................. 8,121,000
RD specific................................................... 1,090,000
Interagency e-Gov.............................................   539,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

                                                             $68,971,000

    The Committee directs the Department to continue reporting 
to the Committee on Appropriations on a quarterly basis on the 
implementation of the Common Computing Environment.
    The Committee is aware that the acquisition of geospatial 
data and Geographic Information System technologies is critical 
to the Department of Agriculture's plans to modernize its 
County Service Centers and install a common computing 
environment that optimizes information sharing, customer 
service, and staff efficiencies, and improves the Department's 
ability to track and react to natural and/or man-made 
disasters. Within the funds provided in this Act, the Committee 
encourages the Department to provide the appropriate level of 
support for the acquisition of geospatial data and Geographic 
Information System technologies.

                 Office of the Chief Financial Officer





2006 appropriation....................................        $5,815,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        19,931,000
Provided in the bill..................................         5,991,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +176,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -13,940,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Chief Financial Officer, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $5,991,000, an increase 
of $176,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $13,940,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee, in fiscal year 2006, made permanent bill 
language that directs the Chief Financial Officer to actively 
market and expand the cross-servicing activities of the 
National Finance Center.
    The Committee includes authority in section 703 of the 
general provisions that allows for unobligated discretionary 
balances transferred to the Working Capital Fund to be used for 
the acquisition of plant and capital equipment for the delivery 
of the Financial Management Modernization Initiative.
    The Committee is aware that the National Finance Center's 
(NFC) proposal for e-payroll consolidation was rated the 
highest in the competition held by the Office of Management and 
Budget and the Office of Personnel Management. The Committee 
believes that the NFC's demonstrated ability to provide a high 
level of service while operating on a fee-for-service basis 
provides a significant opportunity to utilize a public/private 
partnership to provide private investment and share risk in the 
modernization of systems and infrastructure creation for e-
payroll. The Committee encourages the USDA to utilize the NFC 
to create a public/private partnership, such as the one that 
the State of Louisiana, private industry, and a consortium of 
academic institutions has developed, to help leverage scarce 
Federal resources to continue the modernization and development 
of Federal government wide e-payroll functions.
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a report 
concurrent with the Department's annual budget submission for 
the following fiscal year, updating the Committee on its 
contracting out policies, including agency budgets for 
contracting out, for fiscal year 2006. The Committee is 
continuing bill language requiring the submission of the report 
on contracting out policies and agency budgets, prior to use of 
any funds appropriated to the Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer for FAIR Act or Circular A-76 activities.
    The Committee directs the Secretary to provide quarterly 
reports, beginning July 31, 2006, on the status of continuity 
of operations of the NFC, remote mirror imaging, the 
reestablishment of payroll and cross-servicing operations and 
function in New Orleans, selection for a new alternate 
worksite, and plans for the new primary computing facility.

           Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights





2006 appropriation....................................          $813,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           836,000
Provided in the bill..................................           836,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +23,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 
the Committee provides an appropriation of $836,000, an 
increase of $23,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 
2006 and the same amount as the budget request.

                         Office of Civil Rights





2006 appropriation....................................       $19,908,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        22,650,000
Provided in the bill..................................        22,650,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +2,742,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Civil Rights, the Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $22,650,000, an increase of $2,742,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount 
as the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes $2,341,000, as 
requested, for the Civil Rights Enterprise System and 
compliance monitoring activities.

          Office of the Assistant Secretary for Administration





2006 appropriation....................................          $669,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           773,000
Provided in the bill..................................           736,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +67,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................           -37,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Assistant Secretary for 
Administration, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$736,000, an increase of $67,000 above the amount available for 
fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $37,000 below the budget 
request.

        Agriculture Buildings and Facilities and Rental Payments





2006 appropriation....................................      $185,857,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       209,814,000
Provided in the bill..................................       209,814,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +23,957,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Agriculture Buildings and Facilities and Rental 
Payments, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$209,814,000, an increase of $23,957,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget 
request.
    Included in this amount is $155,851,000 for payments to GSA 
for rent and the Department of Homeland Security for building 
security.
    The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$14,148,000 for building operations and maintenance for the 
South Building.
    The following table represents the Committee's specific 
recommendations for this account:

        Agriculture Buildings and Facilities and Rental Payments


                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                    2006     2007 budget     Committee
                                  estimate      request   recommendation

Rental Payments...............     $146,257     $155,851        $155,851
Building Operations...........       39,600       53,963          53,963
                               -----------------------------------------
      Total...................      185,857      209,814         209,814


                     Hazardous Materials Management





2006 appropriation....................................       $11,880,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        12,020,000
Provided in the bill..................................        12,020,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +140,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Hazardous Materials Management, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $12,020,000, an increase of $140,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount 
as the budget request.

                      Departmental Administration





2006 appropriation....................................       $22,872,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        28,302,000
Provided in the bill..................................        24,114,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +1,242,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -4,188,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Departmental Administration, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $24,114,000, an increase of $1,242,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$4,188,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$760,000, as requested, for providing support to policies, 
technical guidance, and operating environment of USDA's 
Continuity of Operations, Personnel and Document Security, and 
Physical Security Programs.

     Office of the Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations





2006 appropriation....................................        $3,783,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         3,940,000
Provided in the bill..................................         3,940,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +157,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Congressional 
Relations, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$3,940,000, an increase of $157,000 above the amount available 
for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount as the budget request.
    Within 30 days from the enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary shall notify the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations on the allocation of these funds by USDA agency, 
along with an explanation for the agency-by-agency distribution 
of the funds.

                        Office of Communications





2006 appropriation....................................        $9,414,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         9,695,000
Provided in the bill..................................         9,695,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +281,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Communications, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $9,695,000, an increase of $281,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount as 
the budget request.
    The Committee directs the Office of Communications to 
continue to provide them with copies of open source news 
material made available to USDA officials through the use of 
appropriated funds.

                      Office of Inspector General





2006 appropriation....................................       $79,533,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        82,493,000
Provided in the bill..................................        82,493,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +2,960,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of Inspector General, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $82,493,000, an increase of $2,960,000 
above the amount available for fiscal year 2006, and the same 
amount as the budget request.

                     Office of the General Counsel





2006 appropriation....................................       $38,957,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        40,647,000
Provided in the bill..................................        40,455,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +1,498,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................          -192,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the General Counsel, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $40,455,000, an increase of 
$1,498,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $192,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$707,000 of the amount requested, of which: $515,000 is for 
maintaining and supporting staff and $192,000 is for additional 
staff years for legal services.

  Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education and Economics





2006 appropriation....................................          $592,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           694,000
Provided in the bill..................................           651,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +59,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................           -43,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, 
Education, and Economics, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $651,000, an increase of $59,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $43,000 
below the budget request.

                       Economic Research Service





2006 appropriation....................................       $75,172,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        82,544,000
Provided in the bill..................................        80,963,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +5,791,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -1,581,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Economic Research Service, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $80,963,000, an increase of $5,791,000 
above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease 
of $1,581,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$5,000,000, as requested, to develop an Agricultural and Rural 
Development Information System, a comprehensive data collection 
and research program to monitor the changing economic health 
and well-being of farm and non-farm households in rural areas.
    The Committee provides $500,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 level, for the continuation of the organic data 
surveys, the compilation of non-survey data on organic 
production and marketing, the merger and reconciliation with 
any new survey information, analysis that reveals patterns, 
similarities and differences from comparisons among organic, 
other differentiated markets, and bulk or homogeneous product 
markets, and the development of policy-relevant findings from a 
full portfolio of data and information.

                National Agricultural Statistics Service





2006 appropriation....................................      $139,293,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       152,584,000
Provided in the bill..................................       148,719,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +9,426,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -3,865,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $148,719,000, an 
increase of $9,426,000 above the amount available for fiscal 
year 2006 and a decrease of $3,865,000 below the budget 
request.
    Included in this amount is $36,582,000 for the Census of 
Agriculture, an increase of $7,758,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount as the 
budget request. The Census of Agriculture collects and provides 
comprehensive data on all aspects of the agricultural economy. 
Also, included in this amount is $112,137,000 for the 
Agricultural Estimates, an increase of $1,668,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$3,865,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee notes the National Agricultural Statistics 
Service (NASS) has developed additional organic data surveys 
based on the 2002 Census of Agriculture and is expanding 
organic data collection in the 2007 Census of Agriculture. The 
Committee encourages the NASS to develop additional organic 
data surveys and to conduct a follow-up survey to the 2007 
Census of Agriculture in order to collect more in-depth 
information on acreage, yield/production, inventory, production 
practices, sales and expenses, marketing channels and 
demographics.
    The Committee provides $8,000,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 level, for the continuation of pesticide usage 
studies. These studies collect data from farmers pertaining to 
pesticides used, percent of crop covered, application rates and 
total amount of active ingredient applied.
    The Committee encourages the NASS to collect organic prices 
in the Prices Received data series.

                     Agricultural Research Service





2006 appropriation....................................    $1,123,654,000
2007 budget estimate..................................     1,001,385,000
Provided in the bill..................................     1,057,603,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -66,051,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +56,218,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    Salaries and expenses.--For salaries and expenses of the 
Agricultural Research Service, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $1,057,603,000, a decrease of $66,051,000 
below the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase 
of $56,218,000 above the budget request.
    Acoustic and seismic technology.--New acoustic and seismic 
technologies open the path for improved and more efficient crop 
production practices. Use of these new technologies to 
characterize soils, detect hard pan levels, assess water 
content and other applications must be accelerated to reduce 
crop production costs and conserve energy, water, and soil. The 
Committee provides an increase of $100,000 in fiscal year 2007 
to the ARS National Sedimentation Laboratory at Oxford, 
Mississippi to accelerate research in this area.
    Animal vaccines.--There is a critical need to develop new 
technologies to mitigate the adverse impacts of diseases on 
cattle, poultry, and swine. The annual monetary loss resulting 
from diarrheal diseases in cattle and swine is estimated at 
$500,000,000 in the United States alone. Foodborne pathogens 
cause between 6.5 million and 33 million cases of human 
diseases and 9,000 deaths annually. The Committee provides an 
increase of $100,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
for expanded research on advanced animal vaccines and 
diagnostic applications currently carried out jointly by ARS, 
the University of Connecticut, and the University of Missouri.
    Appalachian horticulture research.--The Committee is aware 
that ornamental horticulture, floriculture and nursery crops, 
collectively constitute the third most important crop in the 
United States, surpassed only by corn and soybeans, with an 
average estimated value of more than $11,000,000,000 a year. 
Tennessee has a vibrant nursery industry and a growing 
floriculture industry. The Committee provides an increase of 
$100,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level for 
collaborative research with the University of Tennessee and 
Tennessee State University, including efforts to develop 
resistant genes in dogwoods and other woody ornamentals, new 
tissue culture techniques, and techniques to enable rapid 
deployment of new cultivars for the marketplace. This program 
is managed through the ARS Poplarville, Mississippi research 
station.
    Avian influenza and foot and mouth disease.--The Committee 
recognizes the ongoing efforts of ARS in developing diagnostic 
detection cababilities for Foot-and-Mouth Disease and Avian 
Influenza. The Committee provides an increase of $4,000,000 for 
expanded research in providing diagnostic detection tools, 
increasing its understanding of disease epidemiology and 
providing effective countermeasures for these exotic animal 
diseases.
    Biotechnology Research and Development Corporation 
(BRDC).--BRDC is a uniquely successful public/private 
partnership dedicated to promoting technology development and 
commercialization of agricultural technology. The Committee 
provides an increase of $100,000 in fiscal year 2007 for the 
BRDC.
    Chronic diseases of children.--The Committee has provided 
an additional $162,000 for the Children's Nutrition Research 
Center at Houston, TX for ongoing research with Baylor 
University on chronic diseases and the growing problem of 
overweight children.
    Coatings for microbial protection of food.--The Committee 
recognizes the importance of research and new technology 
developments to identify, control, and eliminate Listeria 
monocytogenes, E. Coli O157:H7, and Salmonella pathogens 
contamination in foods. The Committee provides an increase of 
$50,000 for expanded research on the development of 
capabilities for products for coating a wide variety of 
substrates.
    Coffee and cocoa research.--World supply of coffee and 
cocoa continues to be threatened by severe crop diseases. 
Disease resistance and alternative research program for coffee 
and cocoa has important economic benefits and implications for 
U.S. foreign policy in the coffee and cocoa producing nations 
of South Central America and West Africa. The Committee 
provides an increase of $150,000 over fiscal year 2006 for 
expanded research on disease resistance and alternative crop 
research development for coffee and cocoa.
    Corn germplasm.--Corn is a key resource in this country and 
throughout the world, providing food, industrial uses, 
livestock feed, and export. The Committee understands the 
importance of the germplasm base of corn hybrids grown by 
American farmers to promote genetic diversity and stability in 
corn production. The Committee provides an increase of $100,000 
in fiscal year 2007 to the ARS research laboratory at Ames, IA.
    Corn rootworm.--This pest continues to create economic and 
environmental problems in the Corn Belt region of the U.S. The 
Committee provides an increase of $100,000 at Ames, Iowa to 
fund priority research into the biology of controlling the corn 
rootworm which poses a significant economic threat to the corn 
industry.
    Cotton research.--The Committee understands that Fusarium 
oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV) is a particularly virulent 
plant pathogen that attacks cotton. In fact, it is so virulent 
that the industry refers to it as the cotton AIDS virus. FOV is 
becoming a bigger threat to California cotton, particularly 
since recent reports have shown the presence of FOV infected 
Pima plants in the absence of nematodes; a development that 
raises concerns because it raises questions about the 
effectiveness of crop rotation as a means to prevent infection. 
The Committee provides an increase of $80,000 in fiscal year 
2007 to the ARS research laboratory in Shafter, CA.
    Cropping systems research.--The Committee recognizes the 
need for regional research in the Mississippi River watershed 
to develop new varieties of soybean and cropping systems that 
will improve disease resistance, enhance value of the crop, and 
protect the region's natural resources. Crop management 
practices to limit erosion on the highly erodible soils of 
Tennessee and other southern states impact soybean diseases, 
both favorably and adversely. Research is needed to optimize 
disease control while maintaining these best crop management 
practices to protect soil and water quality. Molecular genetics 
technologies will be used to develop better soybeans and site-
specific systems will be developed for improving cropping 
systems in the region. The Committee provides an increase of 
$50,000 for an ARS cooperative research program with the 
University of Tennessee. The research will be conducted at the 
West Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station.
    Drought mitigation.--The Committee recognizes the need for 
a comprehensive water management strategy to respond to drought 
and other emerging climate extremes. An increase of $1,000,000 
is provided in fiscal year 2007 to develop technology and 
management systems to reduce the vulnerability of drought to 
agriculture.
    Emerging diseases.--The Committee provides an increase of 
$500,000 of which $200,000 shall be for Athens (GA), in fiscal 
year 2007 for the advancement of intervention strategies for 
emerging diseases of livestock and poultry.
    Food safety research.--The Committee provides an increase 
of $800,000 in fiscal year 2007 to develop food animal 
surveillance and epidemiology programs to assure early 
detection of epizootic pathogens and antibiotic resistance.
    Food safety and E. coli.--The Committee provides an 
increase of $100,000 in fiscal year 2007 for research on the 
control and E.coli O157:H7 in raw beef products; and other 
agents of importance that contaminate the U.S. food supply.
    Formosan subterranean termite.--The exotic Formosan 
Subterranean termite costs the U.S. one billion dollars each 
year. It is particularly damaging in the greater New Orleans 
area, along the Gulf Coast, and Hawaii. The Committee provides 
an increase of $100,000 in fiscal year 2007 for expanded 
research on Formosan termites.
    Greenhouse lettuce germplasm.--The Committee provides an 
increase of $75,000 in fiscal year 2007 for additional costs 
associated with the preservation, maintenance, and evaluation 
of greenhouse lettuce germplasm.
    Invasive aquatic weeds.--Recent introductions of exotic 
weeds including Eurasian, variable Milfoil, and Cabomba 
seriously threaten the health of Connecticut lakes. Traditional 
control methods focusing on whole lake treatments are 
prohibitively expensive. More effective and economical weed 
control methods focusing on localized spot treatments of weed 
beds in large bodies of water are needed. The Committee 
provides an increase of $100,000 in fiscal year 2007 for 
expanded research on invasive aquatic weeds carried out at Ft. 
Lauderdale, Florida.
    Mid-west/mid-south irrigation.--While irrigation is 
normally associated with the arid, western part of the U.S., 
the fastest growing irrigation states are found in the Mid-West 
and the Mid-South. The need for irrigation in these areas is 
critical in reducing production risks, increasing producer 
yields, promoting good land management practices, and reducing 
input costs. The Committee provides an increase of $100,000 in 
fiscal year 2007 to support cooperative research into 
irrigation methods and technologies with the Delta Center, 
University of Missouri at Portageville, Missouri.
    National grape and wine initiative.--The Committee 
understands the importance of the American grape and grape 
products industry to the U.S. economy. To successfully compete 
with a strong international competition, the industry must lead 
in the production of wine, juice, table grapes, and raisins 
that are of superior quality and value. The Committee is aware 
of the need to support the enhancement of public health through 
improved understanding of the nutritional benefits to be 
derived from grapes and grape products and provides an increase 
of $250,000 in fiscal year 2007 for this research to be carried 
out at the ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center in 
Davis, California.
    Northern Appalachian Experimental Watershed, Coshocton, 
OH.--The mission of the North Appalachian Experimental 
Watershed (NAEW) is to conduct research on hydrology, surface 
runoff, groundwater quality, and erosion for agricultural and 
other purposes. Conservation tillage, filter strips, crop 
rotations, manure management, input of high runoff generating 
areas, reduced input management practices, and pasture 
management systems are evaluated using watersheds and monolith 
lysimeters. Quantification of runoff and water quality risks 
through analysis of data and precipitation and weather 
investigations are also a component of the research. A 67-year 
data base of measurements from rain gauges, watershed flumes 
and weirs, and automated data collecting lysimeters along with 
soil and climatology data provide a long-term frame of 
reference which is essential in the evaluation of current 
experimental data. Research is designed to develop knowledge of 
basic water sediment and chemical movement and to develop 
practical procedures and verify models describing their 
transport. Practical results of the research are to develop 
safe pesticide and nutrient management strategies while 
maintaining high agricultural productivity levels, and to 
develop practical management tools. The Committee provides an 
additional $100,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level for this 
research.
    Ogallala aquifer.--Surface water in the Central High Plains 
region of the U.S. is severely limited. The Ogallala Aquifer, 
which is a finite resource, has provided water resources in the 
development of a highly significant agricultural economy in 
this region. The Committee provides an increase of $400,000 in 
fiscal year 2007 for research into the complex nature of water 
availability, potential uses, and costs to determine future 
water policy in this region, which includes Texas, Kansas, and 
adjoining states.
    Organic minor crop research.--The Committee is aware of the 
Sustainable and Organic Agriculture Research (SOAR) program of 
the California Polytechnic State University whose mission is to 
advance sustainable food and agricultural systems and promote 
California's leadership in environmentally responsive 
agriculture. The Committee provides an increase of $200,000 in 
fiscal year 2007 to the ARS research station in Salinas, 
California for collaborative research on organic farming with 
California Polytechnic State University.
    Quantify basin water budget components in the southwest.--
The Committee acknowledges the need to expand efforts to 
accurately quantify components of a basin's water budget to 
support local and community based watershed management. The 
Committee provides an increase of $100,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 level for additional research at the Southwest 
Watershed Research Center at Tucson, Arizona and at the 
University of Arizona.
    Research in support of APHIS.--The Committee provides an 
increase of $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2007 for ARS to conduct 
research in support of APHIS under the Food and Agriculture 
Defense Initiative.
    Soybean and wheat stem rust.--The committee recognizes the 
importance of developing integrated disease management 
strategies for soybeans and grains. The Committee provides an 
increase of $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2007 for the development 
of resistant germplasm and more sustainable, environmentally 
friendly control strategies to provide practical solutions for 
U.S. producers.
    Vegetable and forage research.--The Committee recognizes 
the important research program carried out at Prosser, 
Washington Agriculture Research Station for vegetable and 
forage research. The Committee provides an increase of $320,000 
in fiscal year 2007 to enhance this important agriculture 
research program.
    Water use reduction.--Available water supplies are being 
stretched by rapidly growing demands for water by urban 
populations, irrigated agriculture, industry/energy sectors, 
and instream flow requirements. The dilemma for producers and 
local economies is finding solutions to reduce irrigation and 
natural resource consumption while at the same time maintaining 
and/or enhancing producer net returns. The Committee provides 
an increase of $25,000 in fiscal year 2007 to ARS for research 
to enhance, in a sustainable manner, irrigated agriculture and 
associated rural economies in Southwest Georgia.
    West Nile Virus.--The Committee recognizes the continuing 
threat of mosquito-borne West Nile Virus to humans and domestic 
animals in northern New England and other parts of the United 
States. The Committee provides an increase of $162,000 in 
fiscal year 2007 for expanded cooperative research with the 
Connecticut State Agricultural Experiment Station to develop 
methods of efficiently controlling mosquitoes, to evaluate 
available anti-viral drugs to cure infected humans and to 
determine if the virus is mutating to more virulent forms.
    Bioenergy research.--Soaring energy prices, instability of 
petroleum exporting countries and environmental concerns 
highlight the need to develop alternative domestic sources of 
energy from industrial feedstocks. A significant, sustained, 
and coordinated research and development effort is needed to 
produce and enhance feedstocks, improve processes for 
converting them into fuels and co-products, and reduce 
production costs in order to penetrate markets that are 
currently petroleum-based. The Committee provides an increase 
of $1,500,000 over fiscal year 2006 for expanded research to 
improve the quality and quantity of agricultural biomass 
feedstocks and develop technologies to produce biofuels and 
coproducts from agricultural commodities at the following 
locations: Peoria, Illinois, $500,000; Beltsville, Maryland, 
$300,000; and Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, $300,000.
    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) research.--The 
Committee considers research on BSE as essential if regulatory 
agencies are to develop policies and control programs based on 
the best available science. ARS is directed to implement an 
integrated BSE program in pathogenesis, diagnostics, and 
intervention. The Committee provides an increase of $4,500,000 
for this research.
    Broomweed biological controls.--The Committee recognizes 
that increased infestations of exotic brooms and gorse weeds 
are causing serious economic and environmental losses to 
agriculture and rangelands in the Western United States. The 
Committee directs that this research be continued at the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level.
    Cereal crops research.--The Committee recognizes the 
research accomplishments of the Cereal Crops Research 
Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin on the quality and improved 
production and marketing practices for small grains, 
particularly barley and oats.
    Conservation tillage.--Better management and conservation 
of natural resources is essential for sustainable crop 
production in the Columbia River Plateau and regional areas. 
The ARS Soil Conservation Laboratory at Pendleton, Oregon 
conducts non-irrigated dryland research important to this 
region. The Committee maintains the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level for this necessary research.
    Continuing programs.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of ongoing research projects in addressing problems 
faced by the Nation's food and fiber producers. In this regard, 
the Committee directs the Agricultural Research Service to 
continue to fund the following areas of research at the fiscal 
year 2006 funding levels: Aerial Application Research, College 
Station, TX, $584,089; Animal Health Consortium, $879,430; 
Animal Vaccines, Greenport, NY, $1,627,698; Appalachian 
Horticulture Research (U of TN/TN State), Poplarville, MS, 
$784,244; Aquaculture Fisheries Center, Pine Bluff, AR, 
$72,552; Aquaculture Initiative, Harbor Branch Oceanographic 
Inst., Stuttgart, AR, $1,713,477; Aquaculture Research, 
Aberdeen, ID, $628,843; Barley Food Health Benefits, 
Beltsville, MD, $477,009; Bee Research, Weslaco, TX, $244,077; 
Biological Controls and Agriculture Research, Gainesville, FL, 
$533,396; Biomineral Soil Amendments for Control of Nematodes, 
Beltsville, MD, $390,101; Biotechnology Research and 
Development Corporation, $2,684,737; Bovine Genetics, 
Beltsville, MD (U of CT/U of IL), $1,913,866; Central Great 
Plains Research Station, Akron, CO, $534,073; Cereal Crops, 
Fargo, ND, $1,725,189; Cereal Crops Research, Madison, WI, 
$902,338; Cereal Disease, St. Paul, MN, $310,971; Chronic 
Diseases of Children, Houston, TX, $496,677; Citrus Waste 
Utilization, Winter Haven, FL, $392,832; Coffee and Cocoa, 
Beltsville, MD, $790,744; Coffee and Cocoa, Miami, FL, 
$902,289; Coffee and Cocoa (Control of Perennial and Annual 
Weeds), $957,849; Conservation Research/Tillage, Pendleton, OR, 
$413,265; Corn Germplasm, Ames, IA, $851,946; Corn Rootworm, 
Ames, IA, $490,354; Cotton Genetics Research, Florence, SC, 
$242,486; Cotton Ginning Research, Las Cruces, NM, $956,565; 
Cotton Pathology, Shafter, CA, $361,805; Cropping Systems 
Research, Stoneville, MS (U TN/W TN Ag Expt. Sta.), $848,761; 
Diet and Immune Function (ACNC), $234,910; Diet Nutrition and 
Obesity Research (Pennington) New Orleans, LA, $668,570; 
Floriculture and Nursery Crops, HQ, $2,476,226; Food 
Fermentation Research, Raleigh, NC, $361,805; Food Safety for 
Listeria and E.coli, $96,994; Formosan Termite, New Orleans, 
LA, $3,743,014; Foundry Sand By-Products Utilization, 
Beltsville, MD, $685,412; Golden Nematode, Ithaca, NY, 
$425,783; Grape Genetics, Geneva, NY, $628,843; Grape 
Rootstock, Geneva, NY, $573,689; Grapefruit Juice/Drug 
Interaction, Winterhaven, FL, $373,824; Grassland Soil and 
Water Research, Temple, TX, $219,665; Great Basins Rangeland, 
Burns, OR, $193,989; Greenhouse and Hydroponics Research, 
Wooster, OH, $1,547,135; Greenhouse Lettuce Germplasm, Salinas, 
CA, $259,849; Harry Dupree National Aquaculture Research 
Center, Stuttgart, AR, $438,598; Honey Bee Research (Varroa 
Mites), Baton Rouge, LA, $390,101; Hops Research, Corvallis, 
OR, $464,258; Invasive Aphid Research, Stillwater, OK, 
$219,665; Jornada Experimental Range Research Station, Las 
Cruces, NM, $387,976; Lyme Disease 4 Poster Project, HQ, 
$751,205; Manure Management Research (National Swine Research 
Center), Ames, IA, $387,976; Medicinal and Bioactive Crops 
(Stephen F. Austin Univ./Univ. of MD), Beltsville, MD, 
$118,800; Mid-West/Mid-South Irrigation, Columbia, MO (Delta 
Center, U of MO), $692,377; Minor Use Pesticide (IR-4), 
$797,021; Mosquito Trapping Research/West Nile Virus, 
Gainesville, FL, $1,238,482; National Center for Agricultural 
Law, $701,034; National Germplasm Resources Program, 
$3,165,059; National Soil Dynamics Lab (Improved Crop 
Production), Auburn, AL, $2,497,932; Wheat and Barley Scab 
Initiative, Fargo, ND, $96,994; Nematology Research, Tifton, 
GA, $248,376; Northern Great Plains Research Laboratory, 
Mandan, ND, $62,076; NW Small Fruits Research (Eastern Filbert 
Blight), Corvallis, OR, $645,962; NW Small Fruits Research 
(Small Fruits and Nursery Crops), HQ, $881,869; Nutrition 
Interventions, HQ, $49,104; Nutritional Requirements, Houston, 
TX, $1,263,776; Ogallala Aquifer, Bushland, TX (Texas A&M;, 
Texas Tech, & KSU), $3,758,197; Olive Fruit Fly, Parlier, CA, 
$213,386; Organic Minor Crop Research, Salinas, CA, $159,036; 
Peanut Production, Dawson, GA, $74,250; Peanut Research, 
Dawson, GA, $131,799; Peanut Variety, Stillwater, OK, $178,200; 
Pecan Scab Research, Byron, GA, $603,409; Pierce's Disease/
Glassy-winged Sharpshooter, Davis, CA, $146,061; Plant Stress & 
Water Conservation Lab, Lubbock, TX, $1,560,554; Post-harvest 
and Controlled Atmosphere Chamber (Lettuce) Salinas, CA, 
$36,276; Potato Breeding, Aberdeen, ID, $365,156; Potato 
Research Enhancement, Prosser, WA, $288,057; Potato Research, 
HQ, $1,476,098; Quantify Basin Water Budget Components in the 
Southwest, Tucson, AZ, $633,265; Rainbow Trout, Aberdeen, ID, 
$1,093,728; Rangeland Resources Research, Las Cruces, NM, 
$1,767,516; Residue Management in Sugarcane (Sugarcane 
Research), Houma, LA, $1,193,413; Rice Research, Stuttgart, AR, 
$270,790; Seasonal Grazing, Coshocton, OH, $99,000; 
Sedimentation Issues in Flood Control Dam Rehabilitations, 
Oxford, MS, $460,722; Seismic and Acoustic Technologies in 
Soils Sed. Lab, Oxford, MS, $355,546; Shellfish Genetics, 
Newport, OR, $770,120; Small Farms, Booneville, AR, $1,935,612; 
Soil Tilth Research, Ames, IA, $725,903; Sorghum Cold 
Tolerance, Lubbock, TX, $263,597; Sorghum Research, Little 
Rock, AR, $145,491; Sorghum Research, Stillwater, OK, $293,107; 
Sorghum Research, Manhattan, KS, $739,441; Sorghum Research, 
Bushland, TX, $483,576; Sorghum Research, Lubbock, TX, 
$974,190; Source Water Protection Initiatives, Columbus, OH, 
$750,121; Southwest Pecan Research, College Station, TX, 
$232,786; Soybean and Nitrogen Fixation, Raleigh, NC, $408,589; 
Sugarbeet Research, Kimberly, ID, $702,592; Sugarcane Variety 
Research, Canal Point, FL, $1,404,773; Sustainable Aquaculture 
Feeds, Aberdeen, ID, $99,000; Sustainable Olive Production, 
Weslaco, TX, $389,689; Sustainable Vineyards/Viticulture 
Practices, Davis, CA, $824,249; Temperate Fruit Flies, Wapato, 
WA, $36,276; Tree Fruit Quality Research, Wenatchee, WA, 
$435,461; Turfgrass Research, U.S. National Arboretum, 
$476,911; U.S. National Arboretum (Germplasm/Ornamental 
Horticulture), $1,655,722; Virus Free Fruit Tree Cultivars, 
Wapato, WA, $242,486; Viticulture, HQ, $349,179; Viticulture, 
Corvallis, OR, $852,861; Water Management Research Laboratory, 
Brawley, CA, $334,514; Water Resources Management, Tifton, GA, 
$586,215; Water Use Management Technology, Tifton, GA, 
$340,828; Water Use Reduction, Dawson, GA, $704,635; Weed 
Management Research, Beltsville, MD, $263,597; Western 
Grazinglands, Burns, OR, $1,103,377; Wheat Quality Research, 
Wooster, OH, $413,654; Wild Rice, St. Paul, MN, $324,740; 
Cotton Ginning Research Unit, Las Cruces, NM, $1,070,332; Crop 
Production and Processing, Lubbock, TX, $1,309,706; Dale 
Bumpers Small Farms Research Center, Booneville, AR, 
$1,905,638; Fruit Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, $3,117,741; 
Market Quality and Handling Unit, Raleigh, NC, $1,202,921; 
North Appalachian Experimental Watershed Unit, Coshocton, OH, 
$1,350,313; Phytonutrients Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, 
$2,648,253; Plant Science Unit, Raleigh, NC, $1,495,157; 
Poultry Production and Products Safety, Fayetteville, AR, 
$1,754,598; and Rice Research Unit, Beaumont, TX, $1,554,839.
    Program redirections.--The Committee supports the 
redirection of the following ongoing research programs to 
enhance national initiatives for high priority research needs 
in emerging diseases of livestock and crops; food safety; 
bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE); obesity/nutrition; 
invasive species; air and water quality; biobased products/
bioenergy; genomics; and genetic resources: Aflatoxin in 
Cotton, Phoenix, AZ, $631,215; Animal Waste Treatment, 
Florence, SC, $312,701; Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center, 
$584,911; Asian Bird Influenza, Athens, GA, $45,676; Avian 
Pneumovirus, Athens, GA, $246,250; Biomass Crop Production, 
Brookings, SD, $1,213,174; Broomweed Biological Controls, 
Albany, CA, $444,820; Catfish Genome, Auburn, AL, $878,046; 
Citrus & Horticulture Research, Ft. Pierce, FL, $378,258; Corn 
Resistant to Aflatoxin, Mississippi State, MS, $486,029; Crop 
Production and Food Processing, Peoria, IL, $843,393; Dairy 
Genetics, Beltsville, MD, $929,945; Delta Nutrition 
Intervention Initiative, $4,216,358; Emissions from Livestock 
Wastewater, Florence, SC, $87,865; Food Safety for Listeria and 
E.coli, Beltsville, MD, $134,339; Food Safety for Listeria and 
E.coli, Clay Center, NE, $108,476; Food Safety for Listeria and 
E.coli, College Station, TX, $81,356; Food Safety for Listeria 
and E.coli, Wyndmoor, PA, $1,702,403; Food Safety for Listeria 
and E.coli, HQ, $1,047,504; Ft. Pierce Horticultural Research 
Laboratory, $1,662,233; Great Lakes Aquaculture Research, 
Madison, WI, $533,503; Grain Legume Plant Pathologist Position, 
Pullman, WA, $244,125; Grand Forks Human Nutrition Laboratory, 
$579,739; Improved Animal Waste Management, Florence, SC, 
$469,822; Invasive Aquatic Weeds, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, $527,745; 
Johne's Disease, Beltsville, MD, $323,313; Late Blight Fungus, 
Orono, ME, $311,986; Livestock Genome Mapping, Clay Center, NE, 
$708,056; National Germplasm Resources Program, Beltsville, MD, 
$145,491; National Germplasm Resources Program, Ft. Collins, 
CO, $584,089; National Wheat and Barley Scab Initiative, 
Raleigh, NC, $96,994; National Wheat and Barley Scab 
Initiative, Manhattan, KS, $96,994; Obesity Research, Houston, 
TX, $171,864; Olive Fruit Fly, Montpellier, FR, $347,452; 
Phytoestrogen, New Orleans, LA, $1,529,821; Pierce's Disease/
Glassy-winged Sharpshooter, Parlier, CA, $3,208,802; Pierce's 
Disease/Glassy-winged Sharpshooter, Ft. Pierce, FL, $429,778; 
Potato Disease, Beltsville, MD, $65,490; Poultry Disease, 
Athens, GA, $892,344; Poultry Diseases (Coccidiosis), 
Beltsville, MD, $438,066; Poult Enterititis-Mortality Syndrome 
(PEMS), Athens, GA, $145,903; Pre-Harvest Control of Aflatoxin, 
HQ, $838,237; Rainbow Trout, Leetown, WV, $677,359; Regional 
Grains Genotyping Research, Raleigh, NC, $692,645; Regional 
Molecular Genotyping, Manhattan, KS; Fargo, ND, $351,462; 
Regional Molecular Genotyping, Pullman, WA, $251,020; 
Salmonella, Listeria, E.coli, and Other Food Pathogens, 
Wyndmoor, PA, $295,349; Sorghum Ergot, College Station, TX, 
$71,500; Sudden Oak Disease, Davis, CA, $317,872; Sudden Oak 
Disease, Frederick, MD, $901,962; Swine Lagoon Alternatives 
Research, Florence, SC, $583,969; Vaccines and Microbe Control 
for Fish Health/Fish Diseases, Auburn, AL, $1,061,777; Vector-
borne Diseases, Gainesville, FL, $219,665; and Verticillium 
Wilt, Salinas, CA, $474,223.
    The Committee does not concur with the proposed redirection 
and directs ARS to terminate the following ongoing research 
programs: Bioinformatics Institute for Model Plant Species, 
Ames, IA, $1,815,887; Catfish Health, Stoneville, MS, 
$2,041,125; Center for Food Safety and Post-Harvest Technology, 
HQ, $1,038,924; Cotton Genomics, Breeding & Variety 
Development, Stoneville, MS, $1,454,910; Feed Efficiency in 
Cattle, Clay Center, NE, $219,665; Food Safety and Engineering, 
Wyndmoor, PA, $572,835; Geisinger Rural Aging Study, Boston, 
MA, $190,630; Hides and Leather Research, Wyndmoor, PA, 
$170,650; Human Nutrition Center on Aging (Equipment), $98,208; 
Human Nutrition Center on Aging (Obesity), $730,401; Johne's 
Disease, Ames, IA, $646,626; National Corn to Ethanol Research 
Pilot Plant, HQ, $385,522; National Warmwater Aquaculture 
Center, Stoneville, MS, $821,046; Poisonous Plant Research 
Laboratory (Locoweed), Logan, UT, $1,400,757; Poultry Disease, 
East Lansing, MI, $241,951; Red Imported Fire Ants, Stoneville, 
MS, $1,941,983; Root Diseases in Wheat and Barley, Pullman, WA, 
$72,552; Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies, Ames, IA, 
$220,968; and Wheat Quality Research, Manhattan, KS, $420,028.
    Cotton quality.--Since 1997, the U.S. textile industry has 
been in record decline, with over 196,000 jobs lost because of 
illegal transshipments of textile products into the U.S. With 
the growth of free trade and preferential trade agreements, the 
Bureau of Customs and Border Protection requires a quick and 
effective method of determining whether textile and apparel 
products entering the U.S. meet the eligibility criteria. An 
effective, economical system to track U.S. yarn from the mill 
to the finished product has been a goal of the U.S. textile 
industry for years to restore profitability to the failing 
industry. The Committee maintains the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level to the ARS Cotton Quality Research Laboratory at Clemson, 
SC for research and development of a tagging and identification 
system for the cotton textile industry.
    Genetic resources.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of acquisition, maintenance, characterization and enhancement 
of genetic resources as carried out by ARS. The Committee 
provides an increase of $650,000 over fiscal year 2006 for this 
program.
    Library and information services.--The Committee provides 
the National Agricultural Library an increase of $3,500,000 
over fiscal year 2006 to support agricultural information and 
delivery services.
    Livestock genomics.--Characterizing animal genes for traits 
of economic importance is essential to U.S. agriculture 
productivity. The Committee recommends an increase of 
$1,300,000 for genomic research in fiscal year 2007.
    Obesity/nutrition research.--The Committee continues to 
support the nutrition research carried out at the Department's 
nutrition research centers. The Committee provides an increase 
of $350,000 to assess the outcomes of healthy eating and 
physical activity patterns in preventing obesity.
    Olive fruitfly research.--The olive fruitfly is the world's 
number one pest of olives, causing devastating effects on the 
olive industry in California. The Committee maintains the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level for continued integrated pest 
management research program to control the olive fruitfly at 
ARS' European Biological Control Laboratory at Montpellier, 
France, and Parlier, CA.
    Pay act costs.--The Committee provides funding for 
increased costs associated with Federal employee's salaries and 
benefits.
    Plum Island Animal Disease Center.--The Committee directs 
that none of the funds appropriated to the Agricultural 
Research Service for the Advanced Animal Vaccine Project at the 
Plum Island Animal Disease Center may be directed for any other 
use by the Department of Homeland Security.
    Emerald ash borer.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of the research carried out by ARS on the emerald ash borer 
(EAB) and continues funding of $404,700 for this work. The EAB 
is an invasive species from Asia, first detected in the U.S. in 
2002. To date the EAB has killed or damaged millions of ash 
trees in the Great Lakes Region with the potential of 
destroying 700 million ash trees with a value between $20 and 
$60 million.
    Human nutrition.--The Committee recognizes the importance 
of plant genetic and nutrition research as it relates to 
finding solutions for America's obesity concerns. The North 
Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, North Carolina, will 
co-locate two importnat groups of scientists from the UNC 
School Systems that would combine expertise in agricultural 
genetics and production with nutrition scientists. The 
Committee encourages the USDA/ARS to work with the UNC system 
to establish a public/private partnership at the Kannapolis 
research campus and to look for new ways to address current and 
future health concerns.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES




2006 appropriation....................................      $129,883,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         8,415,000
Provided in the bill..................................       140,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +10,117,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................      +131,585,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Agricultural Research Service, Buildings and 
Facilities, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$140,000,000, an increase of $10,117,000, above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2006, and an increase of $131,585,000 
above the budget request.
    The Committee has provided engineering, design, and some 
portion of construction funds for Federal research facilities 
that are necessary to keep American agriculture competitive. 
The Committee is making every attempt to preserve these 
taxpayer investments. In fiscal year 2006, the Congress 
completed funding for the National Animal Disease Center in 
Ames, Iowa, at a total cost of about $462,000,000. There are 
several other high priority construction projects that have 
already been planned and designed and are waiting for 
construction funds. The Committee recommends funding for the 
completion of the following facilities: U.S. Agricultural 
Research Center (Salinas, CA) $6,000,000; U.S. Agricultural 
Research Service Sugarcane Research Laboratory (Houma, LA) 
$16,893,000; U.S. Center for Grape Genetics (Geneva, NY) 
$7,290,000; and, U.S. Agricultural Research Service Laboratory 
(Pullman, WA) $35,698,000. In addition, the Committee provides 
$1,500,000 for construction of the Arboretum entrance on 
Bladensburg Road in Washington, DC.
    The Committee directs the Department to provide a report by 
September 1, 2006 on the remaining construction priorities for 
the funds provided in this account.
    The Committee provides $2,700,000, $2,400,000, and 
$2,200,000, respectively for engineering and design costs at 
ARS facilities in Storrs, CT; Kerrville, TX; and Canal Point, 
FL.
    The Committee directs and approves the reprogramming of 
available construction funds from the Center for Advanced 
Viticulture and Tree Crop Research and from the Center for 
Health-Based Crop Genomics. This reprogramming will be used to 
offset construction costs for other Federal facilities in those 
states.
    The Committee directs the ARS to update the feasibility 
study that was conducted on the Athens, GA poultry research 
facility. The updated study shall include a phased construction 
plan with phases that would be complete and usable.

      Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service


                   RESEARCH AND EDUCATION ACTIVITIES




2006 appropriation \1\................................      $670,081,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       566,300,000
Provided in the bill..................................       651,606,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -18,475,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +85,306,000

\1\ Does not include $594,000 in grants that were funded as general
  provisions in FY2006.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Research and Education Activities, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $651,606,000, a decrease of 
$18,475,000 below the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
an increase of $85,306,000 above the budget request.
    For payments under the Hatch Act, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $183,275,000, an increase of $6,306,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$6,355,000 above the budget request. This funding level 
represents a 3 percent increase above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level. The recommended funding level for this program 
is the first time this program has increased since fiscal year 
1999.
    For cooperative forestry research, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $22,668,000, an increase of $660,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$685,000 above the budget request. This funding level 
represents a 3 percent increase above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level. The recommended funding level for this program 
is the first time this program has increased since 1999.
    For the Evans-Allen Program (payments to the 1890 land-
grant colleges, Tuskegee University, and West Virginia State 
University), the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$38,331,000, an increase of $1,116,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $463,000 
above the budget request. This funding level represents a 3 
percent increase above the fiscal year 2006 funding level.
    For the National Research Initiative, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $190,000,000, an increase of 
$8,830,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $57,500,000 below the budget request. This 
funding level represents a 5 percent increase above the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level.
    Applied Agricultural and Environmental Research.--The 
Committee provides $1,250,000, of which $150,000 is for Cal-
Poly-San Luis Obispo, for Applied Agricultural and 
Environmental Research. This research will provide for 
technology transfer and information dissemination directly to 
producers, processors, and consumers. These funds shall be 
equally divided between California State-Fresno, California 
State-San Luis Obispo, California State-Pomona, and California 
State-Chico.
    Agriculture water policy.--The Committee provides $882,000 
for agriculture water quality in Georgia. The goal of this 
project is to establish a virtual center for water policy 
research in Georgia. This center will not involve construction 
of new buildings but rather brings together key research and 
outreach activities on water policy in Georgia and across the 
Southeast. A distance learning program has been established and 
continues to be refined; Global Information Systems and Global 
Positioning Systems for mapping current and projected water use 
from wells, water permits and population growth is under way; 
and systems dynamics models will be used to create scenarios 
for water use. Accomplishments related to the current project 
include 90 percent completion of a report summarizing analyses 
of benefits and costs of a state wetlands policy and a 
recommended policy for Georgia; a white paper on community 
pricing structure changes is in review; design of an Aquifer 
Storage and Recovery Facility for the Flint River Basin is 
underway; a report on stakeholder consensus for research 
priorities in water management decision making along with a 
review of water management institutions in selected states is 
near completion; and design of a Farmer Portal is complete for 
a Data Management Database to make metering data useful to 
farmers for land and water resource decision making at the farm 
scale is complete, along with 60 percent of the data 
collection. In fiscal year 2001, $250,000 was provided in non-
federal matching funds from state sources. In fiscal year 2002, 
approximately $1,200,000 was provided from state sources in 
non-federal matching funds, and a similar amount was provided 
in fiscal years 2003, 2004, and 2005. Fiscal year 2006 funds 
are expected to be slightly higher. These funds include state 
innovations grants and collaborations with the Georgia Soil and 
Water Conservation Commission.
    Animal Waste Management.--The Committee provides $396,000 
for animal waste management in Oklahoma. The goal of this 
research is to develop best management practices for the 
expanded animal industry that will protect ground water 
supplies from pollution of nutrients, salts, and pathogens; 
maintain air quality; and minimize odors derived from the 
entire swine-house, lagoon, land-application, soil-cropping, 
and/or rangeland production system, thus maintaining the 
quality of life in the rural sector. Sub-surface drip 
irrigation in the Panhandle region has shown significant water 
conservation over standard irrigation practices. An economic 
model was developed to maximize daily profits for the producer 
by choosing optimal feed ingredients. Non-federal support for 
this project for 2003 was in the form of state funding of 
$4,177,000 and industry funding of $24,500 for a total of 
$4,201,500. State funding includes research, salaries and 
construction of a $4,000,000 swine research and teaching 
facility to be completed in 2004. In 2004 state funds of 
$177,000 and industry funds of $60,500 were provided for the 
project.
    Aquaculture.--The Committee provides $900,000 for 
aquaculture in Ohio. The Committee has previously directed that 
funds for this project be used in northwest and central lake 
counties, where aquifer levels are the highest in the state. 
There is concern that this directive has not been achieved. The 
Committee directs that a report be provided with respect to 
what steps are and will be taken to meet this directive. The 
goal of the program is to establish a program in Ohio to foster 
the development of a state-wide aquaculture industry. Research 
conducted under this program has provided science-based 
information on optimal fertilization regimens for yellow perch, 
tested size-grading strategies that may improve production 
efficiency, and results of sensory comparisons of farm-raised 
to wild-caught yellow perch concluded that farm-raised yellow 
perch compares favorably to wild-caught perch. Research using 
methods developed in the beef industry were used to determine 
if there are unique protein expression patterns that are 
correlated with specific traits that can be used to examine 
muscle in fish. In studies on yellow perch muscle proteins, 
five muscle proteins associated with body weight and nine 
muscle proteins associated with body length were identified. 
These proteins are currently undergoing primary sequence 
analysis for protein characterization. This information will be 
useful in identifying gene products unique to enhanced muscle 
growth and development and will allow for producers to develop 
useful breeding strategies for the production of yellow perch. 
The latest accomplishments report included information on the 
genetic trials on yellow perch. Preliminary data from studies 
looking at 36 strains of yellow perch for a selective breeding 
program, seem to show that a strain of yellow perch from North 
Carolina may perform better than others in aquaculture 
situations. In conjunction with collaborators at Washington 
State University, muscle satellite cells from yellow perch have 
been isolated and preserved. This is the first report of the 
establishment of isolated muscle satellite cells from yellow 
perch. Non-federal funding in support of the fiscal year 2003 
initiative was $47,970, and $117,800 was made available in 
support of the fiscal year 2004 project. Non-federal funding 
used in support of this project in fiscal year 2005 was 
$130,442. Non-federal funding in support of this project comes 
primarily from state sources.
    Center for Food Industry Excellence.--The Committee 
provides $1,567,000 for the Center for Food Industry Excellence 
in Texas. The goal of this project is to provide food safety 
research and educational support to food production and 
processing companies. The investigators have completed the 
objectives for 2004 fiscal year funding. They have developed a 
direct-fed microbial that reduces E. coli O157 in beef cattle. 
They optimized concentrations of organic acids and acidified 
sodium chlorite in treating beef carcasses to ensure the 
quality and safety of the final product. In outreach area, 
Texas Tech University developed a website for processors and 
consumers and started a new outreach publication, 
``TECHniques'' for consumers and processors. They have 
developed 15 outreach bulletins and started a newsletter for 
the food industry. Objectives for fiscal year 2005 funding are 
in progress and will be completed in June 2007. According to 
the principal investigator, the non-federal sources and funds 
provided for this project for fiscal year 2003 include $667,627 
from Commodity; $1,542,476 from Industry; and $257,800 from 
State and University; and for fiscal year 2004, $93,000 from 
Brashears-Nutrition Physiology Corporation; $138,258 from 
Brashears-National Cattleman's Beef Association; $6,000 from 
Supachill Technologies; $279,940 from National Cattlemen's Beef 
Association; $32,750 from National Pork Board; $64,923 from 
Texas Hair Sheep Association; $5,400 from Nebraska Beef of 
Omaha; $30,621 from Nutrition Physiology Corporation; $8,000 
from Marks and Spencer of London; $50,000 from Endowment for 
Endowed Chair in Animal and Food Sciences; $36,150 from Tyson 
Fresh Meats; $85,000 from National Cattlemen's Beef 
Association, National Pork Board, Cryovac, Inc; $80,285 from 
National Cattlemen's Beef Association; $34,100 from Wirebelt; 
and, $25,000 from Texas Tech University.
    Climate Forecasting.--The Committee provides $3,602,000 for 
climate forecasting in Florida. The goal of this research is to 
improve climate forecasting and crop models to reduce risk for 
agricultural producers and the crop insurance industry. This is 
being accomplished by designing and developing a climate 
forecast information component, a state and region-wide 
agricultural outlook component, and a commodity-based 
component; and produce an Agriculture Climate Information and 
Decision Support system. Additional research at the Southeast 
Climate Consortium includes the integration of weather 
generators with climate models; the assessment of agricultural 
impact through the analysis of historical crop yields and 
simulated yield potentials; understanding forestry risk and its 
minimization; water quality assessment and policy analysis; and 
the development of crop management optimization toolkits and 
programs to explore optimal management options under different 
ENSO conditions and optimization criteria. The project 
accomplishments to date include: annual regional freeze 
forecasts; ENSO phase assessment; historic weather data by 
county; weather generator; coupled climate-ocean-land surface-
crop modeling; bimonthly wildfire and forest risk forecasts; 
crop simulation model; historic yield data by county; 
assessments of yield response to climate; county level climate-
crop yield forecasts; and cattle heat stress forecast. The 
program has greatly improved its prototype crop yield risk tool 
which helps analyze yield potential based on climate forecast 
and planting dates. The web based system is a Climate-Related 
Tool for Agriculture and Natural Resources Management and 
referred to as AgClimate Tools. The Climate Forecast Tool 
provides county level monthly climate forecasts of average 
precipitation and min/max temperatures; probabilities for these 
variables to help you analyze risk and observed values for the 
past five years. The crop yield risk tool helps analyze yield 
potential based on climate forecast and planting dates. The 
results are based on crop model simulations and are only 
available for a limited number of counties, depending on the 
crop selected. Crops under implementation are: peanuts for 
selected counties in Alabama, Georgia, and Florida; potato for 
Suwannee County, Florida; and Fresh Tomato for South Florida. 
In-kind support such as facilities, equipment, and 
administrative support are provided by each institution.
    Cotton research.--The Committee provides $2,500,000 for 
cotton research in Texas. The goal of this project is to 
provide comprehensive multi-disciplinary research to improve 
cotton production in West Texas and expand the demand for 
cotton grown in the area. The research has made improvements in 
cotton varieties through traditional genetics and genetic 
engineering aimed at improving seedling establishment, 
increasing photosynthetic efficiency and yields, and developing 
resistance to pest and diseases. Cotton Economic and Marketing 
research projects have provided an analysis of feasibility and 
market impact of new technologies, improvement of pricing and 
market reporting, understanding market behavior, and factors 
related to international competitiveness. The estimate for non-
federal funds supporting the project were: 2003, $1,225,000; 
2004, $1,350,000; and 2005, $1,400,000.
    Data information system--REEIS.--The Committee provides 
$2,723,000 for the data information system. The original and 
ultimate objective of the system is to enable users to measure 
the impact and effectiveness of research, extension, and 
education programs. REEIS is meeting this goal by incrementally 
incorporating data from more and more programs, and continually 
expanding the data available for currently incorporated 
programs. In January 2003, the first fully operational release 
of REEIS was made available on the Internet. In 2004 and 2005, 
REEIS continued to operate and provide data from the following 
agencies: CSREES, Forest Service, National Agricultural 
Statistics Service, National Science Foundation, Patent and 
Trademark Office, and U.S. Census Bureau. Information is 
provided for the following topics: agricultural research 
efforts, forestry research efforts, statistics about students, 
institutions, faculty, and degrees related to agriculture, 
partner institution snapshots, food and nutrition efforts, 4-H 
programs, impact reports, agricultural snapshots of each state 
and outlying areas, agriculture related patents and citations, 
and Internet links to related agencies, institutions, and data 
bases. Data is routinely refreshed and made easier to retrieve 
by the addition or expansion of data storage capabilities. Also 
in 2005, the web user interface was redesigned and is now in 
compliance with USDA guidelines. Non-federal funding does not 
apply at this time. However, non-federal entities are making 
significant in-kind contributions as partners to the 
development of REEIS.
    Dietary intervention.--Within funds provided for dietary 
intervention research, $800,000 is provided for Ohio State 
University, and $500,000 is provided for the University of 
Toledo. The goal of the research at Ohio State University 
project is to conduct a Phase I clinical trial to evaluate the 
toxicity and pharmacokinetics of uptake of black raspberries 
and their components in humans. This trial was initiated in 
June, 2003 and completed in November, 2004. A Phase Ib clinical 
trial to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried black raspberries 
to influence the progression of Barrett's esophagus in patients 
with gastroesophageal reflux disease, GERDl, was initiated in 
November, 2003 and is expected to be completed in June, 2006. 
Chemical analysis and studies of the component anthocyanins in 
freeze-dried black raspberries and in other berry types and 
their uptake into cultured cells were initiated in November, 
2003. Some of these have been completed, and the ongoing 
studies are expected to be completed in June, 2006. In 2005, 
the University of Toledo began its research with the original 
goal to identify the specific dietary fat components in the 
western diet that reduce liver CEACAM1 levels and cause obesity 
and its progression to diabetes. This goal has three specific 
aims: to investigate whether macrophages are involved in high 
fat diet-induced insulin resistance; to investigate whether 
supplementing high fat with high sugar exacerbates the 
metabolic abnormality and leads to a more rapid onset of 
diabetes: and to apply genomics-based analysis to identify 
other proteins that may contribute to diet-induced insulin 
resistance. Most work will be completed on specific aim 1 this 
year with aim 2 and aim 3 in progress. It is not anticipated 
that work on all three aims will be completed within the 2005-
2006 time frame. The Ohio State University received $25,000 
from the California Strawberry Association, $52,000 from the 
James Cancer Hospital Development Fund, and $216,000 from the 
Ohio Department of Agriculture for berry research in 2003. In 
2004 and 2005, The Ohio State University received approximately 
$30,000 each year from the James Cancer Hospital Development 
Fund and $216,000 per year from the Ohio Department of 
Agriculture for berry research. The University of Toledo 
received no non-federal funds.
    High value horticultural crops.--The Committee provides 
$775,000 for high value horticultural crops in Virginia. The 
goal of this grant is to build capacity in the area of renewal 
and sustainable resources at the Institute for Advance Learning 
and Research; this effort was conducted in close collaboration 
with the Departments of Forest and Horticulture and Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State University. Short term 
objectives of this undertaking are: (1) Organize and equip the 
plant tissue culture/agricultural biotechnology laboratory. (2) 
Solicit sub-licenses for the production of polyploid orchids, 
for the production of landscape ornamentals and other unique, 
high value horticultural crops. Initiate research on the novel 
varieties of ornamentals and new hybrid vegetable crops. In 
fiscal year 2003, the plant tissue culture/agricultural 
biotechnology laboratory was designed and equipped. Fast 
growing clones of loblolly pines that are to be used in 
Institute research were planted at the Reynolds Homestead. In 
fiscal year 2004, technicians were hired and participated in 
in-depth training at VPI&SU--Horticulture--;, Georgia Institute 
of Technology--Biology--, and North Carolina State University--
Plant Pathology. A horticulture graduate student was employed 
to teach and document protocols for orchid propagation. Three 
Danville-based faculty positions were filled in 2005: two 
molecular breeding faculty positions and a Virginia Plant 
Introduction Program Coordinator. Limited greenhouse space--
under renovation--will be available for plant establishment at 
the Reynolds Homestead facility in Critz, Virginia--associated 
with VPI&SU; Department of Forestry. As they become available, 
new ornamentals and trees developed through the program will be 
field tested in collaboration with the Virginia Nursery and 
Landscape Association. The VPI&SU; Department of Horticulture 
and the IALR was awarded a grant from the Virginia Tobacco 
Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission to 
establish test sites for plant introductions. The VPI&SU; 
Department of Forestry has hired a new faculty member with 
expertise in forest tree genetics and functional genomics, to 
collaborate with researchers at the Institute. Collaborative 
meetings have been held with several potential partners, both 
educational and commercial, including North Carolina State 
University, CellFor, and HZPC. In fiscal year 2003, the source 
and amount of non-federal funds were: $15 million from 
Pittsylvania County and the city of Danville, Virginia; $2 
million from a national tobacco settlement fund managed by the 
Virginia Tobacco Commission; and a small amount from other 
partners. In fiscal year 2004, non-federal funds included: 
Commonwealth of Virginia State Appropriation, $87,000; State 
Council of Higher Education for Virginia, Equipment Trust Fund, 
$134,000; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 
grant; VPI&SU; provided funding for the principal investigators 
for time committed to executing this project; the IALR assumed 
utility payments for the lab involved in this project.
    NE Center for Invasive Plants.--The Committee provides 
$425,000 for the NE Center for Invasive Plants in Connecticut, 
Vermont, and Maine. This is a new award in fiscal year 2006. 
The goal is to develop a multi-state, interdisciplinary 
research program to address the problems caused by invasive 
species that are important to New England and the nation. There 
are five main goals: (A) development of non-invasive, sterile 
landscape plants; (B) assessment of the ecological impact of 
invasive plants and ecological evaluation of new ``super-
sterile'' cultivars; (C) assessment of the economic impact of 
invasive species in New England; (D) development of alternative 
native crops; and (E) public education and outreach efforts to 
limit and control invasive species. More than 12 faculty 
members at the University of Connecticut, University of 
Vermont, and University of Maine will be involved in this 
project. The total estimated amount contributed by the three 
universities in the form of faculty salary and associated 
fringe benefits based on the faculty time commitment to this 
project is $40,000 per year. In addition, no indirect costs 
will be charged to the project. The indirect cost of this 
project is about $66,300. Thus, the total amount contributed to 
this project from non-federal sources is more than $100,000.
    PM-10 Study.--The Committee provides $387,000 for the PM-10 
study in Washington. The goals of this research are to measure 
the PM-10 emission rates from significant crop and tillage 
practices, to determine the source of PM-10 emissions on soils 
in agricultural regions of the Columbia River Basin in the 
Pacific Northwest, and to explore cost-effective alternative 
agricultural practices to control these emissions. More 
recently, studies of finer PM-2.5 particulates have been 
included because of their recognized potential health risks. 
Studies in the Columbia River Basin are being conducted in 
Washington on a number of agricultural practices in the rain-
fed and dryland croplands. Susceptible climatic and soil 
conditions and tillage and cropping practices have been 
identified and are being used to develop prediction tools to 
assist growers to adopt alternative practices to reduce 
potential air pollution by PM-10 and PM-2.5 particulate 
emissions. Direct seeding practices are also being tested for 
their efficacy in reducing dust emissions from wind erosion. 
Sixteen subprojects are currently funded by this project and a 
few of their accomplishments follow. PM-10 emission predictive 
maps based on soils databases and measured erodibility indices 
have been produced and used to modify USDA Conservation Reserve 
program eligibility. These data are also very useful for 
determining relative emissions for regional modeling work. 
Identification has been made of the mechanism by which Columbia 
Plateau soils erode during high wind events. Research has shown 
that direct suspension rather than saltation-induced sand 
blasting--common to many soils--was responsible for emission of 
PM-10-sized particles for significant parts of the Columbia 
Plateau region. Events of elevated PM-10 caused by wind erosion 
of the Columbia Plateau were not associated with increased 
mortality in Spokane. Post-harvest weed ecology approaches and 
how to manage them to conserve soil water and control wind 
erosion have been developed. Estimates have been made of 
anthropogenic rates in comparison to non-anthropogenic rates of 
wind erosion that demonstrate the potential impact farming 
practices can have on dust deposition. Economics of various 
cropping systems at the producer level have been fairly well 
documented from the longer-term projects such that producers 
can make informed decisions pertaining to the adoption of 
alternative farming practices. The Northwest Columbia Plateau 
PM-10 Project Annual Conference has been held annually since 
the beginning of the project as a means of communication 
between researchers, extension educators, and stakeholders. The 
conference provides an opportunity to report on research 
results and also receive feedback from other scientists and 
stakeholders. This two-way communication is extremely valuable 
to both parties as a means to help understand research and also 
design future research. In California, the program was matched 
by State funds in the form of salaries, benefits, and operating 
costs. In Washington, there were no state or non-Federal funds 
in support of the PM-10 project in 1994 and 1995. In 1996, 
state support was $22,566, and in 1997, state support was 
$102,364. Similar funding was continued in 1998 through 2005.
    Precision Agriculture/Tennessee Valley Research Center.--
The Committee provides $599,000 for precision agriculture. The 
goal of this research is to evaluate precision technologies at 
the Tennessee Valley Research and Extension Center for 
application to site-specific farming and to timber harvesting, 
and support training in the use of those technologies. Recent 
work has examined the interaction of soil nutrients and soil 
physical properties on cotton yield. Cotton yield has also been 
examined in response to conservation tillage, variable rate 
nitrogen application, and irrigation. The use of thermal 
infrared remote sensing to detect crop stress has also been 
investigated. Multi-year studies that examine variable-rate 
nitrogen application for corn and wheat are continuing. A 2003 
survey of 77 farmers and 34 agribusinesses regarding precision 
agriculture provided several measures of potential technology 
adoption and indicated high current interest by producers. Two 
Field Crop Days on precision farming attracted 200 growers in 
2004, and were replicated in 2005. A herbicide applicator 
backpack with a Global Positioning System has been developed 
and fully tested to minimize herbicide use and improve 
efficiency. The estimate for non-federal funds, from state 
sources, providing support for this grant were estimated at 
$97,000 for fiscal year 2000; $157,000 for fiscal year 2001; 
$385,000 for fiscal year 2002; $225,000 for fiscal year 2003; 
$94,000 from industry for fiscal year 2004; and $740,000 for 
fiscal year 2005.
    Shrimp aquaculture.--The Committee provides $4,200,000 for 
shrimp aquaculture in Arizona, Hawii, Mississippi, 
Massachusetts, South Carolina, Louisiana, and Texas. The goal 
of this program is to increase domestic production of marine 
shrimp through aquaculture. Key accomplishments under this 
program include: development of breeding programs for select 
lines of disease-resistant shrimp; identification of shrimp 
diseases that have affected world shrimp production; diagnostic 
tools for the detection of shrimp diseases; development of 
land-based shrimp culture systems; development of genetics-
based pedigree-tracking; development of biosecurity protocols 
that are used world-wide for the prevention of the spread of 
diseases in marine shrimp; and development of more-efficient 
shrimp feeds. Recent accomplishments include: further 
elucidation of molecular mechanisms of disease resistance; 
monoclonal antibodies developed and licensed for rapid field 
diagnosis of a common bacterial disease in shrimp; improved 
shrimp culture systems that reduce effluents; and development 
of new shrimp feeds that have lower inclusion rates of fish 
meal and fish oil. The Program Administrator estimates that 
approximately 50 percent of total funding for this research 
comes from individual Consortium institutions and from states 
where these institutions are located.
    Water quality.--The Committee provides $500,000 for water 
quality in North Dakota. The original goal of this project 
included water management to control flooding in wet years and 
water conservation in dry years. Sulfite emissions from sugar 
beet refinery wastewater were successfully reduced and water 
audits at a corn processing facility reduced water use. Non-
federal funds included: in fiscal year 2002, $60,000 in fees 
and $5,859 of non-federal funds were collected; in fiscal year 
2003, $65,000 in fees and $21,370 in spin-off projects were 
obtained; in fiscal year 2004, $65,000 in fees and $108,066 in 
spin-off projects; and in fiscal year 2005, $55,000 in fees and 
$12,000 in spin-off projects were obtained.
    Center for Innovative Food Technology.--The Committee 
provides $1,145,000 for the Center for Innovative Food 
Technology in Ohio. Building on the successful Great Lakes 
Signature Beef product CIFT shall make efforts to expand meat 
processing capabilities in northwest Ohio, identify other local 
food niche specialties from coastal Ohio and develop ways to 
bring them to broader regional and national markets.
    Greenhouse Nurseries.--The Committee provides $726,000 for 
greenhouse nurseries in Ohio. This project is intended to 
develop marketing plans to showcase this industry that has 
branded itself as ``Maumee Valley Growers'', to help build a 
community identity as a floriculture center and expand value-
added opportunities through ecotourism.
    The following table reflects the amount provided by the 
Committee:



    Agroecology.--The Committee provices $406,000 for 
agroecology in Maryland. The goal of this project is to 
preserve farm and forest land in the Chesapeake Bay to prevent 
conversion to housing. Recent accomplishments include valuing 
ecosystem services from forest land such as carbon 
sequestration, wildlife habitat, and water filtration to 
prevent conversion to urban use. Cover cropping practices on 
cropland to reduce nitrates to the Bay are also being modeled 
to estimate improvements from increased cover crops. For fiscal 
years 2001-2005, the total State-appropriated non-federal funds 
are $271,000 per year.
    Air quality.--The Committee provides $1,574,000 for air 
quality in Texas and Kansas. This research and technology-
transfer initiative was created to form a Federal/state 
partnership that is: (1) characterizing odor, odorous gases, 
particulate matter, and green house gases from open-lot CAFO's; 
(2) developing and evaluating cost-effective abatement 
measures; (3) providing a sound, scientific basis for specific 
air pollution regulations, including appropriate emission 
factors for particulates, odor, and odorous gases for the 
Southern Great Plains; (4) determining the potential impact of 
these air contaminants on animal health and productivity with 
inferences related to human health concerns; and (5) providing 
technology transfer to the public and agricultural producers. 
The following are accomplishments to date by objective.
    Objective 1. Emissions Characterizations. Multi-agency 
field sampling was conducted at a 50,000 head cattle feedlot in 
spring and summer 2004 and 2005. Hydrogen sulfide--
H2S--concentrations were 3 orders of magnitude lower 
than ammonia--NH3-concentrations. Diurnal patterns 
were observed for both H2S and NH3 
emissions, which varied with temperature. Both flux gradient/
micromet and surface isolation flux chamber approaches were 
used with acceptable agreement. Simulated runoff holding pond 
surfaces produced low ammonia emissions. NH3 
emissions observed with flux chambers were much higher within 
24 hours after urine deposition, as compared to a relatively 
dry feedlot surface.
    Objective 2. Abatement Measures. Weight-drop test 
chambers--WDTC--produced regression relationships between 
vertical energy imparted on simulated dry feedlot surfaces and 
PM-10 emissions in relation to manure depth and moisture 
content, with 2,, depth and 20 percent surface moisture 
appearing to be potential threshold areas for PM-10 reduction. 
Horizontal mode of hoof activity will be simulated in future 
WDTC experiments. Record 12-month rainfall totals reduced field 
work on water curtain experiments. A surface applied urease 
inhibitor did not produce a significant reduction in NH3 
emissions in a field scale experiment. Evaporation rate from a 
feedlot surface was 30-70 percent or less of overall grass-
reference Evapotranspiration (ET), depending on temperature and 
other climatic variables, and hygroscopic absorption at night.
    Objective 3. Scientific Basis of Emission Factors. 
Protocols were improved for particulate matter (PM) 
measurement, using co-located PM-10 and total suspended 
particles (TSP) samplers along with particle size distribution. 
A Gaussian (ISCST3) model provided accurate results for 
predicting PM-10 emissions from downwind concentrations, but a 
BLS model predicted 10-fold higher emissions when used 
conjunctively with the ISCST3 model. Peak PM-10 and TSP 
concentrations in summer evenings were 10-20 times daytime 
concentrations, being accentuated by low-level inversions along 
with diurnal peaks of aggressive cattle activity. Development 
of refined emission factors for cattle feedyards and dairies is 
progressing, including a road dust component.
    Objective 4. Animal Health. Ventilated calf exposure 
chambers to produce controlled concentrations of feedyard dust 
are nearly complete for a graduate student research project. 
Particle agglomeration in lung fluids is being examined as a 
potential mitigation factor in cattle exposure to feedlot PM.
    Objective 5. Technology Transfer. A research peer review 
with industry participation was conducted with positive, 
constructive feedback for project focus. Coinvestigators 
produced 50 manuscripts, and made 38 scientific presentations.
    Non-federal matching funds for this proposal were estimated 
at $817,000 for fiscal year 2002; $435,000 identified in 2003, 
$514,483 reported in 2004, $807,000 in 2005.
    Animal disease.--The Committee provides $350,000 for animal 
disease research in Wyoming. The goal of this program when 
initiated in 2003 was to better understand the epidemiology and 
transmission of chronic wasting disease in free-ranging deer. 
Since initiated in 2003, the researchers have successfully 
identified chronic wasting disease-positive free-ranging deer 
in southeastern Wyoming. Data from these positive deer are 
still being analyzed for dispersal rates, migration patterns, 
survival rates, home range size, habitat use, daily activity 
patterns, and interaction of deer with cattle. Studies have 
also been expanded to characterize the impact of West Nile 
virus on greater sage-grouse in Wyoming. Data from this study 
confirms that West Nile virus may cause localized population 
declines or possibly localized extinctions in greater sage-
grouse, and it was determined that the range-wide implications 
of West Nile virus in sage-grouse require more intensive and 
longer-term study. In fiscal year 2003, a total of $580,000 was 
contributed by the University of Wyoming, Wyoming Game and Fish 
Department, and other state appropriations. In fiscal year 
2004, a total of $256,149 was contributed by other universities 
and miscellaneous sources. In fiscal year 2005, state 
contributions totaled $256,282, which included the University 
of Wyoming, Colorado Division of Wildlife, Wyoming Game and 
Fish Department, Wyoming Department of Health, and the Wyoming 
Livestock Board. Miscellaneous contributions for fiscal year 
2005 totaled $64,852.
    Animal Science Food Safety Consortium.--The Committee 
provides $1,432,000 for the Animal Science Food Safety 
Consortium in Arkansas, Kansas, and Iowa. The goals were to 
bring together several universities to provide research that is 
relevant to food safety. The Consortium focus continues to be 
methods of development for the isolation, detection, and 
quantification of microbial and chemical hazards and the 
elimination of those hazards. This research has also resulted 
in the expansion of research into risk assessment, economics, 
policy, and trade. The food safety work has enabled the 
consortium to address food security that may be a result of 
bioterrorism and/or natural disasters. Iowa State University is 
also supporting in the coming year an integrated risk and cost-
based analysis of salmonella in the pork production chain. This 
project will suggest the segments of the pork production, 
processing, and delivery process where salmonella may be 
controlled most effectively, and the points at which control is 
cost-effective. The non-federal funds and sources provided for 
this project are as follows: fiscal year 2002, $2,520,750; 
fiscal year 2003, $1,361,562; fiscal year 2004, $2,097,086; and 
fiscal year 2005, $4,898,000.
    Aquaculture (LA).--The Committee provides $429,000 for 
aquaculture in Louisiana. The goal of the research was to 
provide science-based information that specifically addressed 
the needs of the aquaculture industry in Louisiana and the 
Southern region. Over the years, the Aquaculture, Louisiana, 
program has led to advances in new stocking, culture, and 
harvest techniques for commercial crawfish production. New 
processing technologies for crawfish, catfish, and other 
aquaculture products have also been developed improving food 
quality and safety. Genetics research has led to the 
development of gene maps for commercial strains of channel 
catfish and has improved cryopreservation techniques for 
genetic banking of commercially-important aquaculture species. 
New, least-cost feed formulations that meet the nutritional 
needs of aquaculture species has led to reductions in feed 
costs. Recent accomplishments under this program have improved 
crawfish harvest efficiency through the use of improved winter 
baits, the use of square-mesh traps during harvest, and through 
the use of non-traditional pond-draining schedules. 
Additionally, there have been improvements made in disease 
control by the development of new vaccines for channel catfish. 
The university estimates that non-federal funding for this 
program is as follows: $603,489 in fiscal year 2002; $336,383 
in fiscal year 2003; and approximately $310,955 in nonfederal 
support was made available in support of this project in fiscal 
year 2004. The university estimates that $501,148 in non-
federal support was made available for projects outlined in the 
FY 2005 submission coming primarily from state funds.
    Biomass-based energy research.--The Committee provides 
$1,200,000 for biomass-based energy research in Oklahoma and 
Mississippi. The primary goal is to develop a cost-effective 
biomass conversion-to-ethanol production system utilizing a 
unique gasification-fermentation process. Breeding efforts for 
bermudagrass and switchgrass as energy crops have resulted in 
genetic improvement and new cultivar development. Additional 
biomass feedstocks such as cotton gin waste and sawdust have 
been processed to evaluate handling and storage, material 
composition, and synthesis gas yield and quality. Two 
gasifiers, a fluidized-bed reactor and a downdraft unit, have 
been optimized using switchgrass, bermudagrass, and corn 
fermentation waste as inputs. The bioreactor is ready to scale 
up to 100 liters, and an optimal growth medium for the 
biocatalyst has been formulated for cell growth. Optimization 
of trace metals for a second biocatalyst to be evaluated 
resulted in an increase of over 200 percent in ethanol 
production in routine culture. An economic analysis to 
determine the potential economies of scale from a coordinated 
biorefinery operation focused on harvesting and handling. 
Combined, the Oklahoma and Mississippi Agricultural Experiment 
Stations provide over $250,000 per year. Aventine Renewable 
Energy, Incorporated, formerly Williams Bio-Energy, committed a 
total of $200,000 through fiscal year 2005.
    Efficient irrigation.--The Committee provides $1,675,000 
for efficient irrigation in New Mexico and Texas. Research 
areas addressed include irrigation district studies; an 
irrigation technology center for education and training; legal 
and institutional barriers to efficient water use; evaluation 
of on-farm irrigation systems management; urban landscape and 
in-home water conservation; environment, ecology, and water 
quality protection; saline and waste water management and water 
use; satellite imagery for basinwide hydrology studies, 
salinity modeling, and technology; and project oversight, 
communications, biometric support, and accountability for the 
multi-components of this multi-state project. Accomplishments 
in 2005 reported by the project include: (1) development and 
organization of a project to conduct an extensive on-farm 
research demonstration in which growers were actively involved 
in the evaluation of limited irrigation programs; because the 
demonstration included most of the irrigated farms in the Rio 
Grande region, 311,000 to 413,000 acre-feet of water will be 
saved each year; (2) deficit irrigation was used in a study 
involving spinach production and resulted in a 23 percent water 
savings, equivalent to 1,100 acre feet or 361 million gallons 
of water per year; (3) researchers determined that by using 
monthly water budgets based on landscape size, potential 
evapotranspiration value, and landscape coefficient, homeowners 
could reduce their annual landscape water usage by 48 percent 
annually; and (4) utilizing seepage loss data, researchers 
concluded that by lining over 10 miles of canal in the Upper 
Rio Grande Valley, enough water could be salvaged to irrigate 
1,000 acres of crops or provide water to 8,000 households; 
researchers are helping irrigation districts target canals that 
will result in the highest water conservation. In fiscal year 
2004, the project received from state appropriated research and 
general accounts funds to support scientists' salaries and 
fringe benefits totaling $232,576; from Texas Higher Education 
Coordinating Board, El Paso Water Utilities, San Antonio Water 
System, and other state and municipal sources, $590,801; and 
from industry associations, $216,477. In fiscal year 2005, the 
project received from state appropriated research and general 
accounts funds to support scientists' salaries and fringe 
benefits totaling $239,554; from the American Water Works 
Research Foundation and Metropolitan Water District of Southern 
California, $246,697; from the International Boundary and Water 
Commission, $136,000; from other state and municipal sources, 
$703,413; and from industry associations, $31,000.
    Environmental risk factors.--The Committee provides 
$217,000 for environmental risks factors in New York. The goals 
of this research are to evaluate the scientific information on 
pesticides, other chemicals, and diet, and the relationships of 
these factors to breast cancer risk. The following have been 
accomplished: (1) Established an expansion of a database of 
critical evaluations on current scientific evidence of 
carcinogenicity for selected agricultural chemicals; (2) 
Communicated obesity prevention and breast cancer risk 
reduction information to the public, researchers, health 
professionals, scientific community, agricultural community, 
Federal agencies, and others in technical and non-technical 
formats; (3) Increased communication in rural and suburban 
areas in a variety of formats; and (4) A community needs 
assessment for obesity prevention and breast cancer reduction 
in rural areas. The non-federal funds and sources provided for 
this grant were as follows: $150,000 state appropriations for 
fiscal year 1996; $250,000 per year in state funds were 
provided for fiscal years 1997 and 1998; $350,000 state funds 
for 1999 and 2000; $250,000 state funds were received for 
fiscal year 2001; $350,000 was received from New York State for 
fiscal year 2002; $350,000 was received from New York State for 
fiscal year 2003; $450,000 for fiscal year 2004; $450,000 for 
fiscal year 2005; and $450,000 has been negotiated for fiscal 
year 2006.
    Exotic pest diseases.--The Committee provides $1,929,000 
for exotic pest diseases in California. The goal of this 
research is to improve the prevention and management of exotic 
pests and diseases affecting California's agricultural, urban, 
and natural systems. The long-term goal of the grants program 
is to develop a systematic methodology for dealing with exotic 
pests in risk assessment; early detection; and rapid 
development of control or eradication measures leading to 
improved Integrated Pest Management practices through 
biological, microbial, genetic, and chemical practices. Because 
a new exotic pest enters California every 60 days, the 
challenge is to have current scientific information available 
to prevent these introduced pests from becoming established. 
The project aims to establish a strategic, collaborative 
research approach to support urgently needed exclusion and 
prevention programs for potential introductions and proven 
management and eradication methods for established pests. To 
date, 83 research projects are yielding scientific knowledge on 
targeted pest species and to develop methods to control and 
manage the pests that are already in California or those 
species that pose a real threat to the State. In previous 
years, California commodity boards funded approximately 
$400,000 annually in research on invasive species; and the 
State of California funded approximately $600,000 annually in 
fruit fly research. Currently, California commodity boards are 
funding approximately $800,000 on invasive species research and 
$3 million for research on Pierce's Disease. The State of 
California and the University of California are funding 
approximately $230,000 in invasive species research.
    Feedstock conversion.--The Committee provides $675,000 for 
feedstock conversion in South Dakota. The goal of this research 
was to develop the mission of the Sun Grant Initiative, to 
identify five leading universities as regional centers, to plan 
individual and collaborative activities at each center, and to 
establish a working relationship between these universities and 
Federal agencies. A nation-wide series of planning conferences 
and stakeholder input sessions have been conducted by each of 
five Centers. A report on these activities has been prepared, 
illustrating the widespread support and commitment to the Sun 
Grant Initiative, even from non-member institutions. 
Development of regional academic programs involving multiple 
institutions has been initiated, with curriculum planned on 
bio-based products and bio-energy. Regional assessments of 
available and current curriculum took place, as well as an 
analysis and projection of past, present, and future fuel use. 
The key project leaders actively involved in enhancing 
networking within industries by helping to plan, and 
participating in, several professional and trade organization 
meetings. No non-federal funds have been identified for the 
purposes of this special grant.
    Food and Agriculture Policy Institute.--The Committee 
provides $1,712,000 for the Food and Agriculture Policy 
Institute in Iowa and Missouri. The goal was to develop the 
analytical capability to assess and evaluate U.S. farm policies 
on the U.S. agricultural sector and disseminate this 
information to farmers, farm and other agricultural 
organizations, and public policymakers. The mission has been 
expanded to include assessment of trade and environmental 
policy impacts and their interaction with the agricultural 
sector at national, regional, and farm levels. The models in 
place are also used to assess fiscal and monetary policy 
implications and impacts of new technologies such as 
biotechnological innovations on the agricultural sector. Both 
institutions maintain large econometric models and datasets 
which are regularly updated to analyze farm and trade policy 
alternatives and the impacts of various programs on the several 
sub sectors of the agricultural economy. During the past year, 
the FAPRI prepared the final agricultural projections on world 
agricultural production, consumption, and trade. Major drivers 
of the 2005 baseline include continuing strong economic growth 
world wide, recovery from past weather shocks in key producing 
countries, recent SPS shocks, and the U.S. dollar's weakness in 
industrialized countries and its strength in Latin America. An 
outside review, re-evaluation of projections, and completion of 
the final baseline is also prepared. These final projections 
for domestic and world agricultural markets are found in the 
FAPRI 2005 U.S. and World Agricultural Outlook. FAPRI 
projections assume average weather patterns worldwide, existing 
policy, and policy commitments under current trade agreements. 
FAPRI projections do not include conjectures on potential 
policy changes, such as those resulting from the likely 
accession of China to the World Trade Organization. The FAPRI 
staff has made numerous public appearances throughout the U.S. 
to agricultural groups and Congressional committees and 
Executive branch groups addressing policy issues. The non-
federal funds and sources provided for this grant are as 
follows: $260,355 State appropriations, $113,565 industry, and 
$37,913 miscellaneous for a total of $411,833 in 1991; $321,074 
State appropriations, $51,500 industry, and $35,100 
miscellaneous for a total of $407,674 in 1992; $234,796 State 
appropriations and $70,378 industry for a total of $305,174 in 
1993; $78,286 State appropriations, $43,925 industry, and 
$29,750 miscellaneous in 1994 for a total of $151,961 in 1994; 
$80,155 State appropriations, $37,128 industry, and $42,236 
miscellaneous for a total of $159,519 for 1995; $124,123 in 
State appropriations with no other funding for 1996; $79,000 in 
State appropriations, $50,000 industry, and $25,000 
miscellaneous for a total of $154,000 in 1997; and $88,800 
State appropriations, $75,200 industry, and $34,687 
miscellaneous for a total of $198,687 in 1998. Also, there were 
$15,316 in private funds in 2003. No non-federal dollars 2005.
    Global change/ultraviolet radiation.--The Committee 
provides $2,425,000 for global change/ultraviolet radiation. 
The USDA Global Change/Ultraviolet Monitoring and Research 
Network was designed to provide accurate, 
geographicallydispersed data on ultraviolet radiation reaching 
the surface of the earth and to detect trends over time. 
Instruments have been deployed and are currently in operation 
at 33 monitoring sites across the United States and Canada, 
including Hawaii and Alaska, and a site in New Zealand which is 
located under the Antarctic ozone hole during part of the year. 
Data from these sites are available within 24 hours of 
collection via the Web. The United States Department of 
Agriculture is also a participant in the development of a 
central calibration facility at the Department of Commerce 
facilities in Boulder, Colorado. The purpose of the central 
calibration facility is to ensure uniform and acceptable 
calibration and characterization of all instruments used in 
interagency ultraviolet monitoring programs. Some project funds 
are expended each year to partially support studies by 
collaborators across the country to address plant, animal, and 
ecological impacts from ultraviolet exposure. This, of course, 
represents a small fraction of all the scientific studies being 
conducted with these data by the broader scientific community. 
No non-federal funds have been provided for this grant since 
1995.
    Human nutrition (IA).--The Committee provides $750,000 for 
human nutrition in Iowa. Researchers have found that the 
activity of soy sphingolipids in inhibiting cancer can be 
modulated by genetics and processing techniques. The omega-3 
fatty acid content of walleye fillets was increased by feeding 
the fish non-marine lipids. PCBs were below detectable limits 
in the walleye fillets. The fillets with enhanced 
concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids do not have undesirable 
sensory attributes and were not more rancid after more than six 
months of freezer storage. Studies have demonstrated that 
resveratrol aglycone in grapes is active in the cell cycle 
arrest of colon cancer cells. Finally, investigators have 
determined the accessibility of rural elderly to fresh fruits, 
vegetables, high quality protein foods, and dietary 
supplements, examining the social and economic barriers to 
these important nutrients. They are formulating a public policy 
framework and conducting analyses to be used to better 
understand current food consumption patterns, their 
relationship to performance and health, and the development and 
evaluation of new policies and regulations which relate to 
changes in new technologies for foods.The non-federal funds and 
sources provided for this grant were as follows: $1,173,857 
university and $2,087,789 private and state sources in 2002; 
and $887,503 university and $1,081,313 private and state 
sources in 2003; and $122,243 University and $1,949,366 private 
and state sources in 2004.
    Michigan Biotechnology Consortium.--The Committee provides 
$555,000 for the Michigan Biotechnology Consortium. The goal of 
this research was to select and develop market-viable 
technologies for the production of industrial products from 
agricultural raw materials. Accomplishments for 2005 include 
improved extraction of protein from grains and switchgrass 
using an aqueous ammonia process; preparation of cellulose 
nanofibers from corn stover and characterization of them by 
transmission electron microscopy; identification and cloning of 
a gene encoding an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of 
carboxylic acid groups to aldehydes; and identification and 
cloning of two genes for enhancing succinic acid production 
from glycerol containing waste streams. The source and amount 
of non-federal funds are as follows: in fiscal year 2002, 
$51,090 from industry and the State of Michigan; in fiscal year 
2003, $100,000 from industry; and iIi fiscal year 2004, 
$163,097 from industry. There were no direct nonfederal funds 
in support of the project in fiscal year 2005.
    Nevada arid rangelands initiative.--The Committee provides 
$504,000 for the Nevada arid rangelands initiative. The goal of 
this research was to develop research management and 
educational programs to promote healthy productive and 
sustainable use of Nevada rangeland. The project is based on 
four program goals, which were identified in partnership with 
rural communities and families and in consultation with other 
agencies and organizations with range concerns. The goals are: 
healthy rangeland for multiple uses; improved campus based 
education; healthy ranch, community, and county; and public 
land decision support models. A survey of pigmy rabbit 
population showed that they are present in much of the 
historical range, and an Endangered Species designation is not 
needed. Considerable progress has been made in range weed 
control, assessment of pinyon-juniper expansion and range 
management/wildlife interaction. The estimate for non-federal 
funds provided for this program from state funds by fiscal 
years: 2000, $237,000; 2001, $241,000; 2002, $525,000; 2003, 
$475,000; and 2004, $457,000. The non-federal support for this 
project in 2005 has been estimated at $415,000. In addition, a 
large number of state and Federal agencies and non-governmental 
organizations are cooperating with this project. Their 
contributions are not reflected in these estimates and are 
accounted for in their own projects.
    Oyster post-harvest treatment.--The Committee provides 
$450,000 for oyster post-harvest treatment in Florida. The goal 
of this research was to increase the options and capacity for 
post-harvest treatments that can be used to reduce health risks 
associated with the consumption of raw oysters commercially 
processed in Florida. Recent program focus has been to develop 
and advance commercial use, regulatory recognition, and buyer 
confidence in freezing as an effective post-harvest process to 
reduce and eliminate problematic bacteria in oysters destined 
for raw consumption. A progress update for the approval of the 
use of irradiation in seafood was obtained from the National 
Fisheries Institute and the Federal Drug Administration's--
FDA--Office of Pre-market Approval. In addition, contact has 
been established with SUREBEAM Corporation to obtain the cost 
of treating the product or to install a new treatment facility. 
Recently, technical trials are suggesting that irradiation 
could reduce potential pathogens from raw shellfish, but there 
are resulting concerns for subsequent product shelf-life, 
operational costs, and regulatory approvals that could restrict 
use of this technology. Specific accomplishments include: an 
active steering committee with participation from industry, 
government, and academia has been established; an industry 
survey has been conducted that documents compliance with the 
Federal mandates for program capacity goals; the steering 
committee and industry have compiled and discussed the 
different post-harvest technologies alternatives that are 
available and concluded that freezing, whole and halfshell 
oysters, was the best alternative for Florida. A new product 
developed from this research includes FROSTED Oysters. Past 
accomplishments have conducted surveys to document post-harvest 
treatment capacity in the Florida oyster industry; a validation 
protocol for the use of freezing as a post-harvest treatment 
has been developed and sent to the FDA, the International 
Shellfish Sanitation Commission, and the Florida Department of 
Agriculture and Consumer Services' representatives for comment; 
and commercially-frozen oysters were evaluated to determine 
organoleptic characteristics. Non-federal funds used in support 
of this program in fiscal year 2004 were $58,000 coming 
primarily from state and industry sources. Non-federal funding 
supporting this project has not been made available to the 
agency.
    Pierce's disease.--The Committee provides $2,211,000 for 
Pierce's disease in CA. The initial goal of the research was to 
control the spread of the glassy-winged sharpshooter in order 
to slow the spread of the disease. However, controlling the 
insect alone will not solve the problem in the long term. The 
over-arching goal of the research is to learn how to control 
the disease, preferably through the development of resistant 
grape clones, supplemented with integrated management methods. 
The total non-federal contribution to this project for fiscal 
year 2000 through 2006 is approximately $15 million. These 
funds are coming from the State of California, the viticultural 
industry in California, the Citrus Research Board and Almond 
Board of California and Kern and Tulare Counties, with the 
California Department of Food and Agriculture have all 
contributed funds.
    Regional barley gene mapping project.--The Committee 
provides $682,000 for the regional barley gene mapping project 
in Oregon. The goal of this project has been to increase the 
profitability and sustainability of barley production. Specific 
goals are to develop a molecular map for important barley 
traits and provide molecular markers for barley breeders. The 
major accomplishment of this project in 2005 was the result of 
the fundamental tools and resources for barley genetics it has 
developed. These resources, the cumulative product of 
collaborative research in this project, were essential for 
securing one of only two highly competitive and prestigious 
USDA/CSREES Coordinated Agricultural Project awards, also known 
as a ``CAP'' award, in 2005. As indicated by the title of the 
successful project, ``Leveraging genomics, genetics, and 
breeding for gene discovery and barley improvement'', the award 
has leveraged every component of this project--from providing 
the seed money for development of the Barley Gene Chip to 
pioneering genetic mapping and dissection of quantitative 
traits. Over the next five years, the Barley CAP award will 
fund a national, coordinated effort to apply the latest genetic 
technologies, developed by this project, to barley variety 
development. The present project will continue to support 
complementary development of the tools and knowledge necessary 
for the next generation of progress.The non-federal funds and 
sources provided for this grant were as follows: $203,760 from 
industry in 1991; $212,750 from industry in 1992; $115,000 from 
industry in 1993; $89,000 from industry in 1994; and $35,000 
from the State of Washington and $108,000 in other non-federal 
funding, for a total of $143,000 in 1995; $163,000 for 1996; 
$178,240 for 1997; for 1998, $147,000; for 1999, $156,000; for 
2000, $154,000; for 2001, $70,000; for 2002, $60,000 from 
industry; and for 2003, $62,000 from industry, specifically 
from Anheuser-Busch, Inc. In addition, each researcher on the 
project contributes from 5 to 20 percent of their salary. In 
state funds--that is, excluding researchers from the USDA 
Agricultural Research Service that are associated with the 
project--this has been approximately $400,000 in 2002, $412,000 
in 2003, and $424,000 in 2004.
    Rural Policies Institute.--The Committee provides 
$1,205,000 for the Rural Policies Institute in Nebraska, Iowa, 
and Missouri. The goal of the Rural Policy Research Institute 
was to create a new model for providing timely, unbiased 
estimates of the impacts of policies and new policy initiatives 
on rural people and places. That model was developed. Policy 
analysis research and dissemination activities expanded in 
response to current and emerging issues in rural America. RUPRI 
facilitates panels of researchers who collaborate on topical 
areas and form the fabric of its research capacity. Their 
research is published and cited in academic journals, discussed 
in the media, and used by policy decision makers at all levels 
of government. In 2005 RUPRI hosted one international 
conference and Fellows program and six national conferences; 
participated in nine hearing or briefing testimonies at the 
national, regional, or state level; and published over 40 
policy studies, white papers and working papers. The 
international conference was held in Abingdon, Virginia, and 
built on three previous conferences to emphasize the sharing of 
education, culture, and environment across nations with 
attention to implications for rural policy and governance. Over 
300 people from 46 countries participated. RUPRI Fellows 
traveled to Brussels to study European Union policy in 
agriculture and rural development. Nationally, RUPRI provided 
organizational leadership for the National Rural Network, a 
consortium of 50 national organizations, institutions, and non-
governmental entities working to create a framework for 
national rural policy. It also hosted a Rural Regional 
Innovation Policy Dialogue to build a common platform for rural 
development initiatives. Regionally, RUPRI began a Community 
Clustering Initiative, with funding from the Northwest Area 
Foundation, to strengthen governance in multi-community regions 
of the northwest. State level activities included a meeting of 
State Rural Policy Centers to study on-going initiatives, co-
hosting the second annual Rural Policy Academy for state 
legislators, and collaboration on a Missouri Rural 
Entrepreneurship Initiative. It continued working in the areas 
of entrepreneurship, health policy, telecommunications, and 
poverty amelioration. It conducted six Home town 
Competitiveness Academies and eight Energizing Entrepreneurship 
Workshops. In 2005, RUPRI reconfigured its work in poverty and 
rural health to establish its Rural Human Services and Poverty 
Policy Center and formed a Rural Human Services National 
Advisory Committee.Aggregated non-federal funds to support 
RUPRI across the three involved universities include indirect 
costs, salary support from university and other non-federal 
sources, and various other grants, contracts, and reimbursable 
agreements. They amounted to $548,005 for fiscal year 2003; 
$629,299 for fiscal year 2004; and $1,681,287 for fiscal year 
2005.
    Small fruit research.--The Committee provides $443,000 for 
small fruit research in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. The goal 
of this research was the genetic improvement of small fruit 
cultivars to enhance quality, yield, and marketability. This 
grant supports research using genetic material from national 
germplasm collections and the discovery of new isolates, which 
expand these genetic holdings. Studies supported by this 
project use advanced selections in breeding programs and 
approaches that utilize genetic engineering. Another industry 
wide-goal of this program is to identify new potentially 
harmful virus disorders in nursery stock and eliminate them 
prior to introduction into small fruit production systems. The 
selection and development of new small fruit varieties is 
essential to maintaining the competitiveness of the United 
States in the world market and in maintaining export advantages 
required for our international balance of trade. The Federal 
investment in this program leverages an additional 20 percent 
of additional funding from research investments contributed by 
the private sector. Annual combined contributions range from 
$60,000 to $80,000. Following peer review and grant ranking 
this project will fund the highest ranked proposals until the 
program's grant dollars are exhausted. Commodity groups and 
grower associations then review the remaining unfunded 
proposals and use their non-Federal resources to fund 
additional research based upon their commodities specific 
research needs.
    Sustainable beef supply.--The Committee provides $1,000,000 
for sustainable beef supply in Montana. The Montana Beef 
Network has three primary objectives: (1) develop and implement 
certification programs for feeder calves that have met beef 
quality assurance management protocols; (2) provide information 
from the feedlot and packing plant to the cow-calf producer to 
determine if feeder calves met industry requirements for 
quality, consistency, and yield of red meat; and (3) provide 
educational programs aimed at sharing results of research 
projects and methods to meet beef quality assurance standards 
with beef producers in Montana. To date, more than 1,200 
producers are certified through the Beef Quality Assurance 
Program; more than 51,000 calves were enrolled in 2005 for 
source verification, age verification, and tracking carcass 
data; educational programs and hands-on demonstrations of 
animal identification were conducted throughout Montana; a 
website was developed for sharing information; and a newsletter 
was distributed in August through December of each year. 
Approximately $120,000 per year for each of fiscal years 1999, 
2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 were provided from state 
appropriations. In fiscal year 2000, the Montana Department of 
Agriculture contributed $15,000 and the Montana Stockgrowers 
Association contributed $5,000. Montana beef producers 
contributed $10,000 in fiscal years 2001, 2002, and 2003. In 
fiscal year 2004, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association 
contributed $100,000.
    Tillage, silviculture, waste management.--The Committee 
provides $500,000 for tillage, siviculture, and waste 
management in Louisiana. The goal of this grant was to improve 
conservation tillage systems for Louisiana crops and to address 
manure issues from dairy and poultry operations. This project 
has improved local methods of conservation tillage to control 
erosion for cotton, corn, wheat, and rice, as well as managing 
insect pests with the increased crop stubble under the warm, 
humid local conditions. Pollution from poultry has been managed 
by modifying the diet with phytase and virginiamycin to reduce 
phosphorus outputs and identify alternative manure uses on 
forage grasses and loblolly pine plantations. Dairy manure is 
being managed with solids separation and aerobic digestion to 
reduce E. coli pathogens and improve nutrient management. 
Research projects were supported by non-federal funds in the 
amount of $540,000.
    Water use efficiency and water quality enhancements.--The 
Committee provides $500,000 for water use efficiency and water 
quality enhancements in Georgia. The goal of this research is 
to develop and expedite the implementation of new technologies 
to improve water use efficiency and water quality at both a 
state and watershed scale. Detailed information on three 
variable rate irrigation systems was collected on three Georgia 
farms, and water quality data on several sites has been 
collected with the goal of optimizing yield, water quality, and 
field cropping patterns with a minimum of water use. The 
project has developed and aided in the commercialization of a 
first generation commercial variable rate center pivot system 
and 25 of these have been installed with a 16 percent reduction 
in water consumption and improved crop productivity. Design of 
a next generation sensing system using wireless internet tools 
and solar power is complete, and work on integrating the 
sensors with the pivot controller is underway. Water quality 
monitoring has been installed on several sites, and results of 
a dissertation funded by this project have lead to 
recommendations for riparian buffers as crucial landscape Best 
Management Practices for reducing herbicide runoff from 
agricultural production on Georgia's coastal plain. In fiscal 
year 2002, approximately $337,000 was provided in non-federal 
matching funds. These funds were contributed by state agencies 
and non-profit organizations. Similar amount of matching funds 
were provided for fiscal years 2003, 2004, and 2005. It is 
anticipated that matching funds for 2006 will be similar.
    Wood utilization.--The Committee provides $6,371,000 for 
wood utilization in Oregon, Mississipi, North Carolina, 
Minnesota, Maine, Michigan, Idaho, Tennessee, Alaska, and West 
Virginia. There were two goals in the original grant: (1) 
provide science that addresses the problems associated with 
harvesting, transporting, manufacturing, and marketing 
economical forest products in three regions, and (2) educate 
graduate students to be knowledgeable in wood as a renewable 
resource. The program has been expanded to include additional 
university research locations. These have included new regions 
of indigenous forests and specific manufacturing techniques. 
The following are new accomplishments with their impacts:

University of Alaska

    1. Issue. Restructuring of the forest products industry by 
supporting efforts to develop new markets, processing 
technology, and value added products in order to stimulate the 
economy and create more jobs in rural Alaska.
    2. Response: Sponsored a demonstration project on marketing 
a high-value wood product, Umbrella Swift, a specialty item 
used to detangle yarn. Marketing was done using tradeshows, 
journal ads, and the World Wide Web.
    3. Impact. Gross sales of the company increased by 225 
percent over the course of the project and valuable information 
was gained on what type of marketing worked and what did not.

University of Minnesota, Duluth

    1. Issue. The United States forest products industry is 
facing tremendous competitive pressures from global competition 
and increased raw material costs.
    2. Response: Lean manufacturing production simulations, 
educational training and project facilitation programs have 
been developed and implemented to promote global 
competitiveness and sustainable growth for over 75 small and 
medium wood products manufacturers in Minnesota and across the 
Midwest United States.
    3. Impact. Productivity improvements of 50-75 percent, cost 
reductions of 25-50 percent, and lead time reductions of 50-90 
percent, with a financial impact of over $750,000.

Mississippi State University

    1. Issue. Need to create a new inventory of Mississippi 
forests and quantify the economic impacts of the state's forest 
products industry, and improved the performance of timber 
harvesting firms and mills.
    2. Response: The MSU Department of Forestry pursued 
research to provide quantitative data.
    3. Impact. Research yielded a map of the state's forests to 
support a new inventory, improved the performance of timber 
harvesting firms--actually preventing two from going out of 
business for a loss of 42 jobs--, and reduced the need for 
mills to build more wood storage facilities, with a total 
economic impact of $7 million.
    1. Issue. Enable furniture manufacturers to increase their 
competitiveness through improving the rational design of 
furniture frames and durable performance of their products.
    2. Response: Evaluate and design computer based finite 
element modeling techniques and provide details on performance 
of structural components.
    3. Impact. Implementation of this technology by a furniture 
manufacturer would save upwards of $1 million annually.

North Carolina State University

    1. Issue. Need to improve competitiveness of furniture 
manufacturing.
    2. Response: Developed and transferred technology for high 
speed manufacturing to U.S. based upholstered furniture 
manufacturers.
    3. Impact. Several millions of dollars in increased revenue 
for U.S. based furniture manufacturers that would have 
otherwise been lost to overseas competition and enabled 
upholstered furniture manufacturers to continue to employ 
thousands of workers.

University of Idaho, University of Montana, Washington State University

    1. Issue. Lignin is the second most abundant organic 
compound on earth and is currently a highly underutilized 
natural resource and industrial byproduct. Among the many 
research steps taken toward new practical lignin applications 
is one involving the chemical modification of lignin to form 
processable thermoplastics. Such lignin-based materials could 
potentially be used as a direct substitute for petroleum based 
plastics.
    2. Response: This preliminary research addressed the 
esterification reactions of kraft and agricultural-hydrolysis 
lignins, the byproducts of the kraft paper-making process and 
of ethanol production, respectively. These lignins were reacted 
with acetic, propanoic, butyric, and hexanoic acid anhydrides 
to form their respective lignin esters. The chemical structures 
of the resulting compounds were analyzed using proton nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy--lH-NMR--, diffuse reflectance 
Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy--DR-FTIR--, and 
pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry--GC-MS. Thermal 
transitions were detected using differential scanning 
calorimetry--DSC--and dynamic rheology.
    3. Impact. The results showed that kraft lignin was easily 
modified by esterification into thermally processable plastics. 
However, successful modification of the agricultural lignins 
has proven more difficult due to their highly condensed 
structure. The effect of phenolation--to selectively 
depolymerize lignin--prior to esterification of the lignins is 
being examined as a possible solution to these difficulties. 
Results also showed that the lignin ester thermal properties 
can be controlled by simple changes in esterification reaction 
parameters. Future work will look at the mechanical properties 
of the materials using dynamic mechanical analysis--DMA.
    1. Issue. According to forest inventory data, grand fir--
Abies grandis--is a predominant species in the forests of the 
Inland Northwest region. Western Wood Products Association 
statistics show that grand fir lumber represented approximately 
35 percent--approximately one billion board feet--of all 
softwood lumber produced in the region in 2003. At sawmills 
within the region, grand fir lumber is considered one of the 
most difficult species to dry. Drying times are often more than 
60 hours, energy consumption is high, and variable moisture 
content--pieces above the 19 percent MC grade specification--in 
dried lumber is common.
    2. Response: Eighteen-hundred grand fir--Abies grandis--
studs were kiln dried to determine effects of high-temperature 
drying and restraint on drying time, energy consumption, warp--
bow, crook, and twist--, and moisture content variability. The 
results showed that a high-temperature drying schedule--240 
degrees F--consumed approximately one-half the energy of a 
lower-temperature drying schedule typically used within the 
region and that drying time was cut in half. In addition, 
moisture variability and warp within high temperature dried 
lumber were no worse than in lumber dried with the conventional 
schedule. Results also showed that when restraint was added, 
warp in lumber dried with the high-temperature schedule was 
reduced in the top six courses of the stack.
    Results of this research were presented at the Inland 
Northwest Kiln Drying Workshop at the University of Idaho 
during October 2005. Operators and supervisors of 22 dry-kilns 
attended the workshops and represented large and small lumber 
manufacturers in Idaho, Washington, and Montana.
    3. Impact. This research has already benefited sawmills 
within the Inland Northwest region. Two sawmills have adopted 
this technology, and they have realized a 200 billion Btu 
savings in natural gas and wood energy per year which 
represents approximately 20 percent of all energy used at those 
plants. This is enough energy to heat and cool approximately 
2,000 homes in Minneapolis for one year. Additionally, the long 
drying times for grand fir lumber at many of these mills create 
a ``bottleneck'' at the dry kilns. Operations and production at 
these sawmills could be improved with the use of high-
temperature drying of grand fir lumber.
    As a result of the 2005 Inland Northwest Kiln Drying 
Workshop, two large lumber manufacturers--Riley Creek Lumber 
and Stimpson Lumber--plan to use hightemperature drying of 
grand fir lumber. These companies manufacture a large 
proportion of the lumber in North Idaho. Energy savings could 
be increased by ten times the equivalent of 5.5 million cubic 
meters mentioned above. This is enough energy to heat and cool 
approximately 20,000 homes in Minneapolis for one year.

West Virginia University

    1. Issue. The feasibility of stranding oak residues--slash 
from logging--was studied to see if a strand could be produced 
that would be acceptable for use in manufacturing oriented 
strand board-OSB--and if a method could be created to 
manufacture strands in commercial volumes.
    2. Response: It was found that the stranding process needed 
to be significantly modified to produce oak strands with 
characteristics compatible with industry standards. Eventually, 
West Virginia University produced a stranding configuration 
that did create acceptable strands and are now working to 
modify one existing strander at the Weyerhaeuser Flatwoods OSB 
mill to this configuration for a full scale production test.
    3. Impact. The dollar impact of this portion of research 
could be significant if the full scale production effort proves 
successful. Oak residues are widely available across the state 
of West Virginia and have no current value as furnish for OSB 
mill. The addition of oak residue as a raw material source for 
OSB would increase the value of oak residue 100-fold to 
landowners and loggers, while increasing the supply and 
lowering the overall cost of raw material to the mills, 
resulting in several million dollars in economic impact 
annually in West Virginia. This technology is also exportable 
to other parts of the Appalachian region and would have similar 
impact in states with OSB mills.

University of Tennessee

    1. Issue. New process monitoring technology is needed to 
improve manufacturing efficiency of wood products, enhancing 
the competitive position of the industry in the face of 
globalization.
    2. Response: A genetic algorithm/neural network--GANN--
system was developed to predict the physical properties of wood 
composites. The GANN system was validated at one medium density 
fiberboard--MDF--and one OSB plant.
    3. Impact. Use of the GANN system at the MDF test site 
resulted in a cost savings of $700,000 over a six-month period 
in 2005 due to reduced resin consumption. Validation is ongoing 
to assess impacts on further savings from reduced wood waste, 
faster throughput, and lower energy use.

University of Maine

    Research at the University of Maine supported by Wood 
Utilization Research funding on optimizing oxygen 
delignification for use with high lignin pulps has been 
implemented commercially. A major paper company in Maine has 
invested $600,000 in new equipment, based on the experimental 
results, that significantly improved the bleaching process 
leading to a 40 percent reduction in bleaching cost and a 
reduction in chlorinated organics and chemical oxygen demand 
(COD) going to the wastewater treatment plant.
    The following are non-federal funds provided by states:
    --Mississippi State University non-federal funds were: 
State appropriations, $2,498,800; $2,178,725; $2,353,225; 
$2,331,691; $2,650,230; $2,778,535; $2,582,617; $2,543,017; 
$2,717,448; $2,993,888; and $3,217,908 for the years 1991-2001, 
respectively. In addition, industrial funds averaged $9,588,871 
for the 5 years from 1995-2000 in support of Mississippi's 
research. For fiscal year 2002, state and industry 
contributions amounted to $3,870,884; for 2003, the State 
contributed $805,015; for 2004, State and industry contributed 
$1.1 million; and in 2005, $845,000.
    --Oregon State University state appropriations were: 
$1,337,962; $1,394,304; $1,256,750; $1,252,750; $1,417,755; 
$1,117,000; $1,100,000; $1,352,000; $1,337,000; $1,492,000; and 
$976,000, for the years 1991-2001, respectively. Non-federal 
support for 2002 was $1,200,000; for 2003, $2,386,000; and for 
2004, $1,672,885.
    --Michigan State University non-federal contributions were 
$605,000; $590,000; $700,000; $600,000; $896,000; and $900,000 
for the years 1997-2002, respectively. Non-federal funds for 
fiscal year 2003 were $850,000 and $767,400 for 2004.
    --University of Minnesota-Duluth non-federal match were 
$590,000; $550,000; $560,000; $371,930; $307,532; $510,939; 
$1,506,000; $2,126,000; and $2,100,000 for the years 1994-2002, 
respectively. The non-federal match for fiscal year 2003 was 
$2,598,000; $200,000 for 2004 and $300,000 for 2005.
    --North Carolina State University non-federal contributions 
were $60,000; $126,000; $165,000; $135,000; $163,216; $323,134; 
$369,122; $432,118; $346,380; and $364,530, for the years 1994-
2003, respectively. Non-federal funds for fiscal year 2004 were 
$203,980 and $628,682 for 2005.
    --University of Maine non-federal contributions were 
$6,000,000; $445,723; $459,100; $477,464; $526,210; $148,032; 
$619,898; $557,842; and $547,577, for the years 1994-2002, 
respectively. Non-federal funds for fiscal year 2003 were 
$529,500 and $518,235 for 2004.
    Two centers were added in 1999:
    --The University of Tennessee non-federal funds for 1999-
2002 were $150,987; $241,696; $1,715,000; and $400,000, 
respectively. For 2003, it was $279,300 and $385,000 for 2004.
    --The consortium of the Universities of Idaho and Montana 
and Washington State University non-federal funds for 1999-2001 
were $305,000; $406,000; and $1,321,931, respectively. Non-
federal funds for fiscal year 2003 were $551,468. Non-federal 
funds for fiscal year 2005 were $1,206,834.
    --The University of Alaska, Wood Utilization Research 
Center, was added in 2000. The University of Alaska non-federal 
funds were $257,872; $5,800; and $75,000 for 2000, 2001, and 
2002, respectively. For fiscal year 2003, it was $50,000.
    --The latest addition--2004--is West Virginia University. 
Non-federal support for 2004 was $100,000 and $138,000 for 
2005.
    --Total non-federal funds provided by states and industries 
for fiscal year 2003 were $8,253,263.
    Phytosensors for Crop Security and Precision Agriculture.--
The Committee encourages the Service to engage in and promote 
activities to enhance, create, and combine technologies in 
biotechnology and photonics that produce crop plants for use as 
early-warning sentinels for the detection of plant diseases.
    The Committee is concerned with the level of participation 
by 1890 Universities in the Department's research activities, 
particularly those administered by the Agricultural Research 
Service (ARS) and the Cooperative State Research, Education and 
Extension Service (CSREES). The Committee directs the Secretary 
to develop a demonstration program which encourages and fosters 
expanded cooperative, collaborative, and/or multi-state 
research opportunities between 1890 institutions and larger 
land grant institutions, and to report back to the Committee 
with an action plan as well as potential strategies to expand 
research collaborative opportunities for all 1890 Universities 
program by March 15, 2007.

              NATIVE AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS ENDOWMENT FUND




2006 appropriation....................................       $12,000,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        11,880,000
Provided in the bill..................................        11,880,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          -120,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Native American Institutions Endowment Fund, the 
Committee provides $11,880,000, a decrease of $120,000 below 
the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and the same as the 
budget request.

                          EXTENSION ACTIVITIES




2006 appropriation....................................      $451,395,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       430,727,000
Provided in the bill..................................       457,042,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +5,647,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +26,315,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Extension Activities, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $457,042,000, an increase of $5,647,000 over 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$26,315,000 above the budget request.
    The following table reflects the amount provided by the 
Committee:


    Farm Safety: AgrAbility.--Within the funds provided for 
Smith-Lever 3(d) for Farm Safety, the Committee recommends 
$4,517,000 for the AgrAbility program, which helps people with 
disabilities to be able to farm safely, efficiently, and 
profitably through on-the-farm education and assistance.
    Ag in the classroom.--The Committee provides $742,000 for 
Ag in the classroom. In 1981, USDA initiated this program in 
response to the declining numbers of persons engaged in 
farming. USDA urged governors to convene small groups of state 
leaders knowledgeable about education and agriculture to 
develop recommendations and committees that would address 
methods for helping educate the public about agriculture. Over 
the years, Agriculture in the Classroom program activities have 
become focused on incorporating agriculture into core classroom 
curricula and educating teachers about the effectiveness of 
agriculture's use as a teaching tool. Since the target audience 
is persons with little knowledge about agriculture, Agriculture 
in the Classroom staff stress the usefulness of the activities 
to teach core curricula. Over the years, program staff have 
received numerous comments from workshop participants and 
teachers stating that they view agriculture differently, and 
always more positively, since becoming involved with 
Agriculture in the Classroom. State Agriculture in the 
Classroom program raise their own funds for individual program 
operation. These funds are from a number of sources. Some 
programs are state or university funded, others operate through 
farming organizations, and some are independently funded. 
Additionally, many state programs seek grants for additional 
program areas or raise their own funds through fund raising 
activities.
    Alabama Beef Connection.--The Committee provides $850,000 
for the Alabama Beef Connection. This program was originally 
designed to create a cattle marketing and communications 
framework for Alabama beef cattle producers. The number of beef 
cattle tracked through the Alabama Beef Connection has steadily 
increased since the project was initiated in fiscal year 2003. 
More than 17,500 calves have been enrolled in the program and 
are currently in feedlots. Thus far, carcass data have been 
obtained from about 40 percent of the cattle enrolled in the 
program. The carcass data from fiscal years 2003 and 2004 
indicated that the average USDA yield and quality grade of 
carcasses from Alabama calves is not different than the current 
average of the beef industry in the United States. In addition, 
more than 20 county/regional producer meetings, 6 state 
meetings, and 2 national meetings were conducted to share 
information with beef producers regarding premises 
identification and individual identification of beef cattle. In 
fiscal years 2003 and 2004, approximately $30,000 per year from 
state funding and $20,000 per year from Alabama beef producers 
were provided for this project. In fiscal year 2005, 
approximately $101,500 was provided by state funding and the 
Alabama beef producers for this program.
    Dairy education.--The Committee provides $229,000 for dairy 
education in Iowa. The original goals of this program were to 
retain and grow the business of existing dairy farm families, 
foster the development of new--beginning--family dairy 
operations, recruit dairy families from other regions to 
Northeast Iowa, improve the image of the dairy industry, and 
support specialized dairy production and processing. These 
goals were to be realized by providing educational 
opportunities for current and future dairy industry 
participants; conducting applied research and demonstration 
that impacts the regional dairy industry; add value to milk and 
dairy products; be an advocate for the dairy farm family; 
provide training in production systems that provide 
environmental protection and enhancement; provide assistance 
for intergenerational transfers; provide educational 
opportunities for youth; and finally, be a community resource 
for economic development. Several demonstrations and research 
trials of practical importance to the dairy industry have been 
conducted or are in progress at the Center. Topics include 
Johne's disease, calfhood vaccinations, calf starter and 
accelerated calf growth, multiple milkings in early lactation, 
zero dry day periods, mastitis in purchased cows, barrier teat 
dips, and tails vs. docked tails in lactating cows. The Center 
collaborates with Iowa State University, the National Animal 
Disease Center, and private industry in these efforts.
    A second dairy herd has been added at facilities adjacent 
to the Dairy Center. The new herd is rotationally grazed in 
warm months and housed in a composting bedded pack building in 
the winter months. Facilities are designed to demonstrate a low 
capital investment in milking and housing, a model for new 
dairy producers, and existing producers wanting to transition 
their operations. This grazing center complements the existing 
dairy production facility, providing the capacity to educate 
and demonstrate both styles of milk production and herd 
management. Overall student enrollment in the two year program 
has increased from 15 students to 90 students, and 112 degrees 
have been awarded in Dairy Technology, Dairy Science 
Technology, and Dairy Herd Management since the Dairy Center 
was created. Of the 2005 dairy science sophomore class, 40 
percent are returning to their family farms, 26 percent will be 
herd managers or work in the industry, and 34 percent are 
continuing their education. Iowa's Dairy Story will surpass 
5,000 reached this Spring, with 3rd, 4th, and 5th grade 
students from 18 different districts enrolled. Upgraded and 
expanded display areas were added in 2005. The curriculum 
connects students to the industry with lessons in history, 
science, human nutrition and health, and animal care.
    The total amount of non-federal funds provided for this 
project for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1999, was 
$4,898,796; for fiscal year 2000 the amount was $1,947,721; for 
fiscal year 2001, $1,487,190; for fiscal year 2002, $146,084; 
and for fiscal year 2003, $140,174. In fiscal year 2004, 
$313,000 was provided, including $293,000 from Northeast Iowa 
Community College, mostly for personnel dedicated to the Dairy 
Center, and $20,000 from memberships.
    Diabetes detection and prevention.--The Committee provides 
$1,093,000 for diabetes detection and prevention in 
Pennsylvania and Washington. The original goal of this 
integrated extension outreach project was to develop and test a 
model to provide diabetes screening, prevention education, and 
case management services for selected rural and urban patient 
populations in Washington and Hawaii. This goal has been 
expanded over the course of the grant to provide:
    --screening for diabetes among selected rural and urban 
minority populations in Washington, Hawaii, New Mexico, West 
Virginia and Pennsylvania, using an innovative, non-invasive 
ocular fluorescence detection technology developed by 
scientists at The Joslin Diabetes Center, and blood glucose 
measures;
    --culturally-sensitive and science-based diabetes education 
prevention and care materials to the targeted audience; and
    --case management support and follow-up services for 
patient referrals.
    In brief, the project has attempted to develop a diabetes 
program that can be delivered to under-served audiences who are 
outside the standard medical care system and by health 
professionals and educators without a medical diabetes 
background.
    Since it began, the project has had many accomplishments. 
Following are several:

                 A. TRAINING, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Developed and presented a pre-conference workshop at the 
Society for Nutrition Education Conference in Salt Lake City, 
Utah on July 16, 2004. This ``Diabetes Toolbox'' session was 
aimed at CSREES personnel and partners from those states that 
do not receive direct funding from the current grant. 
Approximately 40 Extension health professionals attended the 
three-hour session. In addition to the ``On the Road Program'', 
the toolbox included the exercise video, diabetes-extension 
website access, a program from New Mexico called ``Kitchen 
Creations'', from Washington, ``Living Well with Diabetes'', 
and West Virginia's ``Dining With Diabetes''.
    Developed and presented a one to two hour update and 
awareness for participants at the 2003 Priester National Health 
Conference, held April 2003 in Phoenix, Arizona, and attended 
by 35 extension health professionals.
    Participants were introduced to the strategies being used 
by the partnering extension programs to deliver diabetes 
education, to recent scientific information about pre-diabetes 
and to Small Steps. ``Big Rewards'', the new education campaign 
launched by the Centers for Disease Control and the National 
Institutes of Health. Extension faculty from each of the 15 
states represented at the session indicated an interest in 
participating in the project.
    Developed and presented a one-day seven-hour pre-conference 
workshop for Extension health personnel, at the 2002 Priester 
National Health Conference, ``Health Across the Life Span'', 
held May 7-10 in Orlando, Florida. Fifty-six extension faculty 
and community health professionals participated in the 
conference. The focus of the workshop was innovations in 
educational strategies for involving Cooperative Extension in 
diabetes control and prevention activities; the workshop also 
provided updates on scientific advances in diabetes detection 
and treatment. The presenters were the project directors for 
the four partnering institutions. Extension faculty from 20 
states indicated an interest in participating in the project.
    Presented the project at the 2003, 2002, and 2001 National 
Diabetes Translation Conference sponsored by the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention held in Boston, Massachusetts, 
St. Louis, Missouri, and Seattle, Washington, respectively. 
These presentations helped introduce the programs and networks 
of the Extension System to those of State Diabetes Control 
Programs and other non-traditional extension partners.
    Benchmarked involvement of state extension faculty in 
diabetes education and prevention activities, and the nature of 
those activities, thereby establishing a basis for a shared 
vision about Extension's role in eliminating racial and ethnic 
health disparities.
    Presented the Joslin/Extension partnering model to 
participants at Bridging the Gap, a national diabetes education 
conference sponsored by the West Virginia Extension Service, in 
Charleston, West Virginia.
    Armed teaching and extension professionals in the human 
sciences land-grant and family and consumer sciences 
communities with the latest research-based information on 
diabetes, including information on prevention strategies, 
interrelationships among diabetes, diet and nutrition, physical 
activity, and obesity.

           B. REACHING UNDER SERVED AND UN-REACHED AUDIENCES

    Developed, field-tested, and published a culturally-
sensitive and science-based instructional client handbook for 
use with the targeted audiences. More than 15,000 copies of 
``On the Road to Living Well with Diabetes'', an 18-page, low 
literacy, easy-to-use guide for diabetes care, was disseminated 
through the project to partners, state diabetes control staff, 
and attendees at national conferences.
    Developed and field-tested an enrollment questionnaire for 
initial screening of project participants and assessment of 
referral needs.
    Developed, field-tested, and published an instructional 
chart as a companion to the client handbook, for use by 
Extension faculty with the targeted audience.
    Held cooking demonstrations that can help educate 
individuals with diabetes to manage diabetes through diet.
    Increased the Project's outreach to Native American Tribal 
Groups and Hispanic Americans. Two states--Hawaii and 
Washington--were included in the original earmark. The third 
state, New Mexico, was included in fiscal year 2002; West 
Virginia has been added during fiscal year 2003; Pennsylvania 
was added during fiscal year 2004.

                            C. COLLABORATION

    Established new partnerships with more than 25 community-
based agencies/institutions in the five participating states, 
which have led to enhanced opportunities to reduce diabetes.
    Established a memorandum of understanding between the 
CSREES and the Joslin Diabetes Center. This document identifies 
the parties to be involved, the purpose and potential outcomes 
of the partnership, the background of the parties and their 
authority, the roles and responsibilities of the parties, and 
the duration of the partnership.
    Established partnerships with the National Diabetes 
Education Program sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention, the National Institute for Diabetes & Digestive 
& Kidney Diseases, and the Office of Minority Health of the 
Department of Health and Human Resources.
    Established partnerships between the Diabetes Control 
Program state offices and the Cooperative Extension programs in 
Washington, Hawaii, New Mexico, West Virginia, and 
Pennsylvania.

        D. SCIENTIFIC ADVANCEMENT AND INFORMATION DISSEMINATION

    Developed, tested, and validated the ocular fluorescence 
detection instrument.
    Disseminated information on and promoted the educational 
campaigns of the National Diabetes Education Program, ``Control 
Your Diabetes for Life'', and ``Small Steps, Big Rewards''. 
Access to these resources--provided by the Centers for Disease 
Control and the National Institute for Diabetes, Digestive and 
Kidney Diseases--is facilitated by the Project.
    Disseminated information on ``Take a Loved One to the 
Doctor Day'', part of the Department of Health and Human 
Service's Campaign, ``Closing the Gap'' to help close the 
health gap for racial and ethnic minorities.
    Created a project website, to facilitate increased access 
to project information and partners. The website, based at The 
Joslin Diabetes Center, will be linked to the website at CSREES 
and websites at the participating institutions.

                          E. PROJECT OVERSIGHT

    Conducted site visits to Hawaii, Washington, and New Mexico 
programs. These site visits to Hawaii, Washington, and New 
Mexico were conducted by staff from The Joslin Diabetes Center; 
the site visit to the Hawaii program was conducted by USDA 
staff.
    Held four face-to-face planning meetings of the partnering 
institutions in Seattle, Washington; Orlando, Florida; Phoenix, 
Arizona; and Baltimore, Maryland, at which the partners 
achieved consensus on program priorities, future directions, 
and priority audiences across the three-state region.
    Regular teleconference calls are held to review and examine 
progress toward goals and objectives.
    In summary, the Project has been a catalyst in facilitating 
a broader understanding of diabetes, its consequences for 
individuals and families, and how it can be prevented and 
maintained. County Extension faculty increasingly participate 
in a variety of diabetes education training programs offered at 
local and state levels to enhance their knowledge of diabetes 
and new scientific information resulting from clinical trials 
and basic research.
    Each of the partners, the Joslin Diabetes Center and the 
State Cooperative Extension programs in Hawaii, Washington, New 
Mexico, and West Virginia, provides financial support and in-
kind services for the implementation of this project. 
Additional in-kind support, primarily in the form of diabetes 
awareness, education, and self-management materials, is 
provided by the National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive 
and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health and 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Diabetes 
Control Offices in each of the participating states also 
provides support, largely via materials and technical 
expertise. Local community partners also provide assistance, 
for example by offering equipment and space in facilities free 
of charge, or sharing professional expertise such as nurses and 
certified diabetes educators.
    We estimate the following non-Federal support for the 
project: Fiscal Year 2002--$175,000; Fiscal Year 2003--
$200,000; Fiscal Year 2004--$200,000
    Efficient irrigation.--The Committee provides $2,825,000 
for efficient irrigation in New Mexico and Texas. Subject areas 
addressed include irrigation district studies; irrigation 
education and training; institutional incentives for efficient 
water use; on-farm irrigation system management; urban 
landscape and in-home water conservation; environment, ecology, 
and water quality protection; saline and waste water management 
and water use; basin-wide hydrology studies, salinity modeling, 
and technology; and project oversight, communications, 
biometric support, and accountability for the multi-components 
of this multi-state project.
    The project's 2005 accomplishments include: pipeline 
replacements saving a total of 939 acre-feet per year, which 
equals approximately 303 million gallons of water saved. A 
project aimed at increasing the use of drip irrigation and 
mulch systems for urban specialty crops has helped cooperators 
reduce water application by 29.3 percent. A team of engineers 
with Texas Cooperative Extension assisted the city of 
Brownsville with justification of an on-farm water metering 
program that results in an estimated water savings of 1,100 
acre-feet or approximately 360 million gallons per year. 
Technical assistance such as this has saved districts $1.8 
million in the cost of hiring consultants. New Mexico 
Cooperative Extension produced a series of crop commodity fact 
sheets on New Mexico agriculture detailing water management and 
efficient resource usage.
    In 2003, the project received from state appropriated 
university accounts funds to support outreach personnel 
salaries and fringe benefits totaling $257,300; from the New 
Mexico Legislative Salt Cedar Control Funding, $5,000,000; from 
the Elephant Butte Irrigation District, $4,500,000; from other 
state and municipal sources, $260,550; and from industry 
associations and others, $60,355. In 2004, the project received 
from state appropriated university accounts funds to support 
outreach personnel salaries and fringe benefits totaling 
$265,020; from the New Mexico Legislative Salt Cedar Control 
Funding, $5,000,000; from the Elephant Butte Irrigation 
District, $4,500,000; from Cotton, Incorporated, $20,000; from 
other state and municipal sources, $86,600; and from industry 
associations and others, $8,000. In 2005, the project received 
from state appropriated university accounts funds to support 
outreach personnel salaries and fringe benefits totaling 
$272,971; from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation 
board, $92,222; from the New Mexico Governor's Water Innovation 
Fund, $235,217; from other state and municipal sources, 
$528,522; and from industry associations and others, $55,000.
    Food animal residue avoidance database.--The Committee 
provides $806,000 for food animal residue avoidance database. 
The original goal of this program was to ensure the production 
of safe foods of animal origin through the prevention and 
mitigation of violative chemical residues in food animal 
products. This has been accomplished, and continues to be 
accomplished through the establishment of a toll-free telephone 
hotline and website which provides residue avoidance advice and 
information. In addition, FARARD is unique in that it provides 
guidance through use of its databank by trained personnel to 
provide information on prevention and mitigation of violative 
chemical residues and supply recommended withdrawal intervals 
to allow safe extralabel use of drugs in food animals based on 
sound principles of residue avoidance. From fiscal years 2001 
through 2004, state contributions from the participating land 
grant universities were estimated at $147,820 per year, and 
miscellaneous contributions at $2,500 per year. In fiscal year 
2005, state contributions from the participating land grant 
universities were estimated at $133,173, and contributions from 
industry were $3,500.
    Income enhancement demonstration.--The Committee provides 
$1,247,000 for income enhancement demonstration in Ohio. The 
original goal of this project was to develop new agricultural 
businesses and restructure and expand existing businesses in 
response to domestic and international challenges. However, in 
2005 the Project was moved from the Ohio State University to 
the Edison Industrial Systems Center, and more specifically to 
a non-profit subsidiary of that company, the Innovative Food 
Technology Center. The proposal listed several target 
activities all of which are underway. Accomplishments in each 
area are as follows: Greenhouse/Nursery Project: thus far, 
studies on energy consumption and usage have been completed at 
seven greenhouse operations; Analyses have focused on boiler 
efficiencies, infiltration losses, design parameters, and the 
incorporation of new technologies, particularly those that use 
renewable fuels; the final results will be published in a 
summary report; and, interim reports are being published in 
several greenhouse newsletters. Direct Marketing Research: 
research on methods and requirements for growing and preparing 
items for sale to local institutions, including schools, 
universities, social programs, and restaurants; interim results 
are being published and circulated locally; and a final report 
will be prepared upon completion. Grape/Wine Industry 
Enhancement: Research was completed, and sensory evaluations 
completed, on minimally, non-thermally processed grape juices; 
marketing research is being conducted to determine the 
potential viability of such products; and a feasibility study 
has been completed to determine the economic scale necessary 
for economic viability of a grape seed extract cooperative 
venture. Waste-to-Energy Project: Matching funds in the amount 
of $50,000 were acquired for this project from the State of 
Ohio; a pilot anaerobic digester was designed and constructed 
in cooperation with the Agricultural Research and Development 
Center of the Ohio State University; this unit is being used to 
assess the viability of waste streams from food processing 
establishments, livestock operations, dairy operations, either 
alone or in combination; and, the date generated by this 
project will be used to evaluate the economic justification of 
anaerobic digestion for specific applications. The non-federal 
funds and sources provided to this project are as follows: The 
State of Ohio has appropriated the following funds: $65,000 
from State appropriations and $39,000 from private sources for 
a total of $104,000 in 2002; for 2003, a total of $244,125 were 
from non-federal sources; for fiscal years 2004, non-federal 
sources were not provided. In 2005, $50,000 was provided; and 
for 2006, non-federal funds in the amount of $100,000 will be 
contributed by the State of Ohio.
    Nursery production.--The Committee provides $295,000 for 
nursery production in Rhode Island. The original goal of this 
project was to provide enhanced services and outreach 
programming to growers. Technical and extension support 
personnel were hired to increase outreach activities and 
diagnostic services to the Rhode Island green industry. An 
increased number of onsite problem solving visits were made to 
nurseries, greenhouses, and landscapers. Signage and an 
interpretive brochure were developed to enhance the educational 
value of the University of Rhode Island's plant demonstration 
garden. Information is now readily available to growers on the 
university's websites. Demonstrations of new technology are 
conducted. More than 100 accessioned trees and shrubs were 
planted, their performance is being assessed, and propagules 
are available to cooperating nurseries and arboreta. A new tree 
and shrub breeding program was initiated in 2005 to create 
improved, sustainable landscape plants. Application of research 
on reducing deer damage should have an immediate impact by 
reducing costs associated with damage by five to ten percent. 
The results of research on irrigation practices and modified 
container media requirements will increase production potential 
and reduce production costs by 10-30 percent. Our research on 
plant growth and marketing will boost industry sales and 
increase production potential by identifying plants that will 
stimulate consumer interest and increase purchasing. At the 
same time, information and practices for optimizing production 
potential of new crops will be generated for growers. It is 
estimated that new crops information and production standards 
will increase industry sales by 5-10 percent. Research on 
reducing damage by deer in nurseries and landscapes should have 
an immediate impact of $3,000 to $15,000 per nursery, and an 
overall impact in nurseries and homeowner landscapes through 
reduced costs associated with lost plants and reduced 
production of 5-10 percent. Research on sustainable roadside 
planters will have an impact on public enjoyment of scenic 
bikeways and associate thoroughfares. Farm safety programming 
was expanded to emphasize Lyme disease prevention, recognition, 
and treatment. Programs were conducted to promote crop 
insurance participation. Technology upgrades to Demonstration 
Greenhouse System, Media Analysis facility, and demonstration 
micro-irrigation system and continuously implemented. 
Continuous implementation of signage, landscape alterations, 
lighting and irrigation to increase value of Learning Landscape 
to the industry occurs. All diagnostic activities--turf, ticks, 
plant clinic, turf clinic, etc. have been consolidated. The 
source and amount of non-federal funds are as follows: in 
fiscal year 2003, the Nursery Industry contributed an estimated 
$200,000 in improvements installed in the Learning Landscape, a 
four-acre plant demonstration garden, $20,000 as an endowment, 
and $50,000 as start-up funds for a new position. In fiscal 
year 2004, the Rhode Island Nursery and Landscape Association 
contributed $55,000 to fund the development of the plant 
breeding program and to get research underway at the University 
of Rhode Island evaluating the impact of invasive species 
regulations on the nursery industry in Rhode Island.
    Pilot technology transfer projects.--The Committee provides 
$300,000 for pilot technology transfer projects in Oklahoma and 
Mississippi. The primary goal of these programs is to 
contribute to an increase in business productivity, employment 
opportunities, and per capita income by increasing information 
technology capital, locally and throughout the states, and 
applying information from Federal laboratories, Cooperative 
Extension, and other university departments and non-campus 
agencies. Specific program objectives are to enhance 
profitability for existing enterprises; aid in the acquisition, 
creation, or expansion of business and industry in the area; 
establish an effective response process for technological and 
industrial-related inquires; devise effective communication 
procedures regarding the program for the relevant audiences; 
and provide one-on-one and on-site engineering, technology, and 
management assistance to small-scale rural manufacturers. The 
Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence--Oklahoma's 
Manufacturing Extension Partnership--has received national 
acclaim for its noteworthy and effective partnership with the 
land-grant university.
    In 2005, the impact of the Integrated Technology Transfer 
and Applications Engineering Programs resulted in the following 
benefits: Sales increased $6,908,800; Sales retained that would 
have otherwise been lost, $3,360,000; Cost savings, $2,322,443; 
Costs avoided, $884,200; 35 new jobs created at $75,511 per job 
equaling $2,642,885; 50 jobs retained at $75,511 per job 
equaled $3,775,550; Investment in new plant facilities and 
equipment, $2,559,200; Total benefits equaling $22,453,078.
    Benefits resulting from the Mississippi project during 2005 
include: Spanish language materials being made available via 
the Internet; multi-media learning modules added to Internet; 
digital image diagnosis of insect and plant disease; training 
of small business owners to develop web-based business sites. 
Numerous technologies, such as microcomputers, satellite 
receiver systems, geographic information systems, remote 
sensing technology, the Internet, computer networking, cellular 
communications, precision farming, specialized software, etc., 
have been evaluated and integrated into new and existing 
Cooperative Extension educational programs. All 82 county 
offices have been linked into a wide-area network. Since 
project inception, rural communities and governments have 
received hundreds of educational workshops to teach clientele 
how to best utilize these technologies.
    For every Federal dollar invested in the Technology 
Transfer Project, the Oklahoma program currently leverages more 
than $6 in state support for engineering assistance to small 
manufacturers. In addition, Oklahoma State University is 
providing administrative support for the program through 
faculty and staff salaries. Oklahoma State funding in 2005 was 
$524,000. Mississippi State University has provided matching 
funds at least equal to the amount of Federal funds in the past 
ten years. For example, equipment expenditures for the 
Cooperative Extension Service to support new and emerging 
technology integration in the past two and a half years alone 
have been approximately $1,500,000.

                         INTEGRATED ACTIVITIES




2006 appropriation....................................       $55,234,000
2007 budget estimates.................................        19,120,000
Provided in the bill..................................        55,234,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +36,114,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Integrated Activities, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $55,234,000, the same as the amount available 
for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $36,114,000 above the 
budget request.
    The following table reflects the amount provided by the 
Committee:


              OUTREACH FOR SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED FARMERS




2006 appropriation....................................        $5,940,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         6,930,000
Provided in the bill..................................         6,930,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +990,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Outreach for Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and 
Ranchers Program, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$6,930,000, an increase of $990,000 above the amount available 
for fiscal year 2006 and the same amount as the budget request.

  Office of the Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs





2006 appropriation....................................          $717,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           741,000
Provided in the bill..................................           741,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +24,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Marketing and 
Regulatory Programs, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$741,000, an increase of $24,000 above the amount available for 
fiscal year 2006 and the same amount as the budget request.

               Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




2006 appropriation ...................................      $807,306,000
2007 budget estimate \1\..............................       945,153,000
Provided in the bill..................................       898,116,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +90,810,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -47,037,000

\1\ The budget estimate does not include proposed user fees in the
  amount of $8,221,000.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
Salaries and Expenses, the Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $898,116,000, an increase of $90,810,000 above 
the amount appropriated in fiscal year 2006, and a decrease of 
$47,037,000 below the budget request.
    The recommendation does not include $8,221,000 in Animal 
Welfare Act user fees, as proposed in the President's budget. 
The Committee does not recommend establishing such fees in 
annual appropriations acts, but will consider such fees should 
they achieve authorization.
    The following table reflects the amounts provided by the 
Committee:


    To maintain agency functions the Committee provides the 
requested amount for cost of living requirements.
    Funding for indemnities is provided for the brucellosis, 
tuberculosis, chronic wasting disease, and scrapie programs. 
The funding is made available until expended, so that unused 
indemnity funds can be carried over to benefit the program.
    High Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI).--The Committee 
recommendation includes $47,205,000 for the HPAI program. In 
addition, the funding provided in the fiscal year 2006 
supplemental funding for avian influenza, $80,280,000, is 
available until September 30, 2007. Of the supplemental 
funding, the agency is expected to carry over approximately 
$14,000,000 into fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee appreciates the agency's quick response in 
designing and implementing an HPAI program to protect against 
the H5N1 strain of the avian influenza virus internationally 
and domestically. The recommended funding includes: $17,503,000 
for domestic surveillance and diagnosis, including anti-
smuggling activities; $14,160,000 for wildlife surveillance; 
$10,992,000 for preparedness and communication, which includes 
funds for the veterinary vaccine stockpile; and $4,550,000 for 
international capacity building, primarily for in-country 
experts in those places most affected by the disease. APHIS is 
collaborating with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the 
United Nations to identify critical needs in other countries' 
abilities to find HPAI and prevent its spread.
    Agricultural Quarantine Inspection.--The Committee includes 
an appropriation of $25,822,000 for this program, including 
$2,512,000 for the National Germplasm and Biotechnology 
Laboratory, as requested.
    Fruit Fly Exclusion and Detection.--The Committee 
recommendation includes an increase of $4,541,000 for fruit fly 
exclusion and detection, within which is an increase of 
$4,000,000 for Medfly. Within the total is $3,563,000 for 
Mexican fruitfly control in Texas, as requested.
    Import-Export.--The recommendation provides $12,149,000 for 
the program, of which $1,000,000 is for continued funding to 
enhance inspection and surveillance activities for products 
entering California.
    Animal health monitoring and surveillance.--The Committee 
provides $147,418,000 for animal health monitoring and 
surveillance, an increase of $1,443,000 over the fiscal year 
2006 amount.
    Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) surveillance.--The 
Department has been conducting an enhanced BSE surveillance 
program since fiscal year 2004. To fund the enhanced program, a 
total of $143.9 million has been transferred from the Commodity 
Credit Corporation (CCC): $80.4 million in fiscal year 2004, 
$42.1 million in fiscal year 2005 and $21.4 million in fiscal 
year 2006. In addition, appropriated funds over that time 
period have totaled approximately $42 million. As of April 28, 
2006, APHIS has completed 696,644 tests as part of the enhanced 
program, and is still conducting about 7,000 per week. The 
design for the regular or ``maintenance'' surveillance program 
is not complete. The fiscal year 2007 budget request for APHIS 
includes $17,243,000 for BSE surveillance, which supports 
40,000 tests per year. The Committee recommendation includes 
full funding of the request. However, the Committee continues 
to closely monitor the adoption of the maintenance surveillance 
program. The Secretary announced on April 26, 2006, the release 
of the report ``Summary of Enhanced BSE Surveillance in the 
United States,'' and stated that the report would be undergoing 
peer review in May 2006. He further noted that the conclusions 
of that peer review would help to determine the design of the 
maintenance BSE surveillance, and that any surveillance plan 
adopted would meet or exceed international standards. The 
Committee requests a complete briefing on the final plan before 
its adoption.
    Swine surveillance.--The Committee is concerned about the 
representation of the swine industry in APHIS' surveillance 
plans. Last year, funding was provided for the National Animal 
Health Monitoring System to conduct the fourth national swine 
study. The Committee encourages APHIS to continue to include 
swine in its surveillance plans, to expand current market swine 
surveillance so that a sufficient percentage of market hogs are 
included.
    Animal Identification.--Through fiscal year 2006, a total 
of $84,700,000 has been provided for a National Animal 
Identification System. Of that amount, approximately 
$27,000,000 has been used for cooperative agreements with 
states and Tribes to assist in registration. The fiscal year 
2007 request is for $33,107,000. Until August 2005, the 
Department had stated that program data would be held 
centrally; however, the Secretary announced in August that data 
would be held by private entities that meet certain 
requirements. In addition, the program is voluntary, but there 
have been mixed signals about participation becoming mandatory 
in the future. At least one state has made data collection 
compulsory, and states have the discretion to charge fees for 
registration. Given these management challenges, and the fact 
that just 10 percent of the premises have been registered, the 
Committee has concerns about the program. Premises 
identification is a necessary building block, but in itself 
does not offer any means of animal traceback. The Committee 
feels that all interested parties would benefit from a 
transparent process of decision making on the national plans 
for animal identification and therefore requires that the 
Secretary use an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to 
state the Administration's plans for animal identification, and 
to solicit feedback from all interested parties.
    The Committee directs that not less than $2,000,000 be 
provided for a cooperative agreement with the Wisconsin 
Livestock Identification Consortium. This project supports the 
national plan to establish an animal and livestock 48-hour 
traceback system.
    The Committee provides not less than $600,000 for the Farm 
Animal Identification and Records (FAIR) program. Both the 
Wisconsin consortium and the FAIR project should also be 
eligible to apply for cooperative agreement funding for animal 
identification, which is funded within the NAIS total.
    The Committee provides $300,000 to implement a database of 
North Carolina's agriculture industry for rapid response 
capabilities.
    The Committee provides funding for the New Mexico Syndromic 
Validation Program at $450,000 to support early detection of 
pathogens in animals and prevent their spread.
    The Committee provides $550,000 for Iowa State University's 
work regarding risk assessments of genetically modified 
agricultural products.
    Emergency management systems.--The Committee provides 
$4,359,000 for Field emergency coordinators and $4,900,000 for 
the vaccine bank.
    Pest detection.--The Committee provides an increase of 
$7,186,000 for Pest Detection, including an increase of 
$1,495,000 for surveys through the state-based Cooperative 
Agricultural Pest Surveys system and an increase of $2,295,000 
for surveillance.
    The Committee provides $900,000 in funding to continue a 
cooperative agreement with the California County Pest Detection 
Augmentation Program.
    Select Agents.--The total provided is an increase of 
$1,839,000 over the fiscal year 2006 amount, as requested.
    The Committee is concerned about the management issues 
raised in audits conducted by the Office of the Inspector 
General; in particular, about controls and security of select 
agents. The Committee provides the full amount requested for 
the Select Agents program, and experts resolution of all issues 
raised by the OIG.
    Biological Control.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$9,683,000 for biological control, the same as the budget 
request. Within that amount, funding is included to support the 
Vine Mealy Bug control operations at no less than the current 
level of $150,000.
    Brucellosis.--The Committee continues to provide the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level for the Greater Yellowstone Interagency 
Brucellosis Committee to eliminate brucellosis from wildlife in 
the Greater Yellowstone area.
    Chronic wasting disease.--For chronic wasting disease, the 
Committee provides $17,056,000. The Committee directs that of 
this amount $1,750,000 shall go to the State of Wisconsin.
    Cotton Pests.--The Committee recommendation includes the 
consolidation of the Boll Weevil and Pink Bollworm line items 
into a new Cotton Pests program, as requested. The total 
provided is $40,269,000, to address boll weevil, pink bollworm, 
and other cotton pests or diseases. This amount is $24,260,000 
above the budget request.
    Emerging plant pests.--The Committee expects the Secretary 
of Agriculture to continue to use the authority provided in 
this bill to transfer funds from the Commodity Credit 
Corporation (CCC) for the arrest and eradication of animal and 
plant pests and diseases that threaten American agriculture. By 
providing funds in this account, the Committee is enhancing, 
but not replacing, the use of CCC funding for emergency 
outbreaks.
    For emerging plant pests, the Committee includes 
$114,793,000 an increase of $15,578,000 over the fiscal year 
2006 level. The Committee provides the following amounts for 
eradication and control activities: $38,623,000 for citrus 
pests and diseases, $24,184,000 for Glassy-winged Sharpshooter/
Pierce's Disease, $20,000,000 for Emerald Ash Borer, $6,508,000 
for Sudden Oak Death, $19,927,000 for Asian Long-horned Beetle, 
and $2,751,000 for Karnal bunt.
    The Committee provides $20,000,000 in this account for 
control and eradication of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), which 
is a $12,045,000 increase over the fiscal year 2006 level. In 
addition, in April 2006, the Administration made $7,500,000 
available from the Commodity Credit Corporation for the EAB 
program. The Administration should continue the support of the 
EAB program through appropriate and necessary use of the CCC. 
The Committee expects the EAB program to focus on eradication 
of outbreaks found in Ohio, Indiana, and the Upper Peninsula so 
that EAB does not spread, and to take action to prevent any 
means of spread.
    For control of the Asian Long-horned Beetle (ALB), the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $19,927,000, an increase 
of $4,037,000 over last year's amount. ALB threatens all 
hardwood trees, and is of great concern in the Northeast, 
particularly in New York and New Jersey.
    The Committee provides $38,623,000 to the Citrus Health 
Response Program (CHRP) to address the immediate threat of 
exotic citrus pests and diseases, perform regulatory oversight 
of fruit certification for shipment both domestically and 
internationally, protect the integrity of the citrus nursery 
and budwood certification programs, and prevent the spread of 
citrus pests and diseases.
    The Committee encourages APHIS to monitor plan importations 
for Sudden Oak Death (SOD), harmonize federal and state SOD 
regulations, and to conduct outreach and education activities 
with outdoor recreational users and commercial entities (such 
as, construction companies) that could contribute to soil 
movement as well as with affected SOD industries, including 
nurseries.
    The Committee provides $800,000 for hydrilla eradication 
around Lake Gaston in Virginia and North Carolina, and expects 
APHIS to monitor the effectiveness of hydrilla eradication 
around Smith Mountain Lake in Virginia.
    Imported fire ant.--The Committee provides $2,140,000 for 
imported fire ant of which $45,000 is for New Mexico.
    Johne's Disease.--The Committee provides $7,706,000 for 
Johne's disease, which is $5,351,000 above the budget request.
    Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza.--The Committee provides 
$16,715,000, the same as the request, for activities relating 
to the prevention, control, and eradication of Low Pathogenic 
Avian Influenza (LPAI). Within the total amount, $2,823,000 is 
to support surveillance through the National Poultry 
Improvement Plan and $5,332,000 to support surveillance in live 
bird markets. In addition, $12,000,000 for indemnities, which 
was provided in fiscal year 2005, remains available to the 
program.
    The Committee notes for the third consecutive year that 
APHIS has combated Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza through both 
depopulation and vaccination, depending on individual 
circumstances. An emergency vaccination protocol was agreed to 
by APHIS and used most successfully after an outbreak on a farm 
in Connecticut for which there has been no indemnification. The 
Committee notes that the Secretary of Agriculture has the 
authority to utilize funds of the Commodity Credit Corporation 
or other authority to compensate producers for vaccination 
costs and related flock losses previously incurred due to the 
outbreak in Connecticut, and the resulting sequential 
depopulation and restricted use of a USDA approved and 
authorized avian influenza vaccine. The Committee expects APHIS 
to act on its authority and utilize available funds, including 
funds of the Commodity Credit Corporation, to indemnify 
Connecticut producers this year who have previously filed a 
claim for costs and losses related to this avian influenza 
outbreak.
    Wildlife services.--The Committee continues the fiscal year 
2006 funding level for aviation safety and provides increases 
for wildlife surveillance and wildlife services state 
operations, as requested. The recommendation assumes the 
continuation of current cost share levels for cooperators. The 
Committee directs that, other than funding for the specific 
items noted in this report, the funds provided in the Wildlife 
Services line item are available for general operations needs.
    The Committee continues to provide $1,240,000 for wolf 
predation management, of which $1,065,000 is for Wisconsin, 
Minnesota, and Michigan, and $175,000 is for New Mexico and 
Arizona.
    The Committee continues funding for the following projects: 
$300,000 for Beaver management in North Carolina; $325,000 for 
crop and aquaculture losses in southeast Missouri; $200,000 for 
predation wildlife services in western and southside Virginia; 
$150,000 for blackbird control in Louisiana; $1,324,000 for 
predator control programs in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming; 
$1,000,000 for wildlife services in Texas; $300,000 for beaver 
management and damage in Wisconsin; $940,000 for brown tree 
snake management in Guam; $400,000 for Hawaii and Guam 
operations; $1,000,000 for cormorant control in New York; 
$300,000 for cormorant control in Michigan and Ohio; and 
maintains the fiscal year 2006 funding level for surveillance 
in North Dakota.
    The Committee provides a $1,000,000 increase above the 
fiscal year 2006 level for a cooperative rabies oral rabies 
vaccination program, for a total of $24,344,000. The Committee 
expects APHIS to use program funding to appropriately address 
rabies in Broward County, Florida.
    Within the Aviation Safety activities, the Committee 
encourages APHIS to expand research work into what can be done 
to deter birds from the increasing number of wind turbine 
generators around the nation.
    Veterinary Diagnostics.--Within the total provided for 
Veterinary Diagnostics, the fiscal year 2006 amount is 
continued for an Agricultural Biosecurity Center at Kansas 
State University. The funding level supports not less than 
$5,500,000 for the National Animal Health Laboratory Network.
    Wildlife services methods development.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the requested Avian 
influenza initiative to study the virus in swine. The Committee 
provides $650,000 in funding for the National Wildlife Research 
Station in Kingsville, Texas, to address emerging infectious 
disease issues associated with wildlife populations.
    The Committee provides funding to continue the cooperative 
agreement between the Hawaii Agricultural Research Center and 
the National Wildlife Research Center in Hilo at the fiscal 
year 2006 level.
    Animal welfare.--The Committee recommendation includes an 
increase of $1,839,000 to further improve Animal Welfare Act 
enforcement, for a total of $19,142,000, as requested. This 
responds to Animal Care's significantly increased workload as a 
result of rapid growth in the number of new licensees and 
registrants.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES




2006 appropriation....................................        $4,946,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         6,431,000
Provided in the bill..................................         5,946,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +1,000,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................          -485,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buildings 
and Facilities, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$5,946,000, an increase of $1,000,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $485,000 below 
the budget request.

                     Agricultural Marketing Service


                           MARKETING SERVICES




2006 appropriation....................................       $74,622,000
2007 budget estimate \1\..............................        81,498,000
Provided in the bill..................................        77,269,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +2,647,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -4,229,000

\1\ The budget estimate does not include proposed user fees in the
  amount of $2,212,000.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Marketing Services of the Agricultural Marketing 
Service, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$77,269,000, an increase of $2,647,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $4,229,000 
below the budget request.
    Included in the appropriated amount are the requested pay 
cost increases and a program increase of $432,000 for the 
Federal Seed Program. The Committee recommendation does not 
include the proposed termination of the Microbiological Data 
Program. It is continued at the fiscal year 2006 level.
    The Committee does not provide the increase requested for a 
new commodity purchasing computer system in this account. The 
Committee addresses the issue under the Section 32 Account.
    The Committee provides an increase of $1,137,000 for 
activities relating to Organic Standards for a total of 
$3,130,000.
    The recommendation does not include $2,212,000 in 
standardization user fees, as proposed in the President's 
budget. The Committee does not recommend establishing such fees 
in annual appropriations acts, but will consider such fees 
should they achieve authorization.
    The Committee continues to provide $1,000,000 in this 
account for the Farmers' Market Promotion Program to make 
grants to eligible entities for projects to establish, expand, 
and promote farmers' markets. The Committee directs that no 
entity should receive more than $75,000 in funding from the 
program, and requests a report on the grants made, including 
the entity, purpose, and location, and the administrative costs 
of the program by March 31, 2007.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES




2006 limitation.......................................     ($65,667,000)
2007 budget limitation................................      (62,211,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (62,211,000)
Comparison:
    2006 limitation...................................        -3,456,000
    2007 budget limitation............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For a Limitation on Administrative Expenses of the 
Agricultural Marketing Service, the Committee provides 
$62,211,000, a decrease of $3,456,000 below the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget 
request.

          FUNDS FOR STRENGTHENING MARKETS, INCOME, AND SUPPLY

                              (SECTION 32)

                     MARKETING AGREEMENT AND ORDERS




2006 appropriation \1\................................     ($16,055,000)
2007 budget estimate \2\..............................       (4,106,000)
Provided in the bill \3\..............................      (16,425,000)
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +370,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +12,319,000

\1\ Does not include $20,000,000 in funding for commodity system
  replacement.
\2\ The budget estimate does not include proposed user fees of
  $12,000,000.
\3\ Does not include $9,900,000 in funding for commodity system
  replacement.

    The following table reflects the status of this fund for 
fiscal years 2005 through 2007:


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Marketing Agreements and Orders Program, the 
Committee provides a transfer from section 32 funds of 
$16,425,000, an increase of $370,000 above the amount available 
for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $12,319,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee provides not less than $9,900,000 in funding 
for the Web-based Supply Chain Management System (WBSCM) in 
this account.
    The Committee reiterates its position that administrative 
expenses to support section 32 purposes are expressly allowed, 
and that purchase and maintenance of a computer system 
supporting commodity purchases is an authorized administrative 
expense. Development and maintenance of all previous computer 
systems to support commodity purchase, including the existing 
Processed Commodity Inventory Management System (PCIMS), have 
been funded through section 32.

                   PAYMENTS TO STATES AND POSSESSIONS




2006 appropriation....................................        $3,809,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         1,334,000
Provided in the bill..................................         1,334,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        -2,475,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Payments to States and Possessions, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $1,334,000, a decrease of 
$2,475,000 below the amount available for fiscal year 2006, and 
the same as the budget request.

        Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




2006 appropriation....................................       $38,059,000
2007 budget estimate \1\..............................        21,844,000
Provided in the bill..................................        39,737,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +1,678,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +17,893,000

\1\ The budget estimate does not include proposed user fees in the
  amount of $19,663,000.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, the Committee provides $39,737,000, an increase 
of $1,678,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006, 
and an increase of $17,893,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation does not include $19,663,000 in grain 
standardization and Packers and Stockyards licensing fees, as 
proposed in the President's budget. The Committee does not 
recommend establishing such fees in annual appropriations acts, 
but will consider such fees should they achieve authorization.
    The Committee notes that the Office of Inspector General 
completed an audit of the Packers and Stockyards Program 
operations in December 2005. The findings included significant 
concerns about program management. The Administrator of GIPSA 
and the OIG reached management decision on all ten 
recommendations. Corrective actions are complete on six of the 
findings; actions on the remaining four are scheduled for 
completion in June 2006 and September 2006. The Committee is 
encouraged by this commitment and progress, and expects an 
update upon completion of all recommendations.
    The Committee continues its interest in the study on 
marketing arrangements that GIPSA has undertaken with 
$4,500,000 provided in fiscal year 2004 for that purpose. The 
Committee has been notified that the draft final report is to 
be completed in November 2006, and the report will be finalized 
shortly after that. Until the study is finalized and a briefing 
conducted for the Committee, the Committee directs GIPSA to 
provide regular reports on its progress.
    Product Verification Protocols Pilot.--Congress has funded 
a product verification protocols pilot since fiscal year 2003. 
This is the final year of the pilot to establish controls for 
regulated seed varieties and to augment grain marketing. The 
Committee provides $500,000 to complete the program with the 
Missouri and Illinois Corn Growers Associations and requires a 
final report on the performance of the pilot and its effect on 
the industry.

        LIMITATION ON INSPECTION AND WEIGHING SERVICES EXPENSES




2006 limitation.......................................     ($42,463,000)
2007 budget limitation................................      (42,463,000)
Provided in the bill..................................      (42,463,000)
Comparison:
    2006 limitation...................................             - - -
    2007 budget limitation............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee includes a limitation on inspection and 
weighing services expenses of $42,463,000, the same as the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same as the 
budget request. The bill includes authority to exceed by 10 
percent the limitation on inspection and weighing services with 
notification to the Committees on Appropriations. This allows 
for flexibility if export activities require additional 
supervision and oversight or other uncontrollable factors 
occur.

             Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety





2006 appropriation....................................          $596,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           696,000
Provided in the bill..................................           656,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +60,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................           -40,000



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Food Safety, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $656,000, an increase of 
$60,000 above the amount provided for fiscal year 2006 and a 
decrease of $40,000 below the budget request.

                   Food Safety and Inspection Service





2006 appropriation....................................      $829,378,000
2007 budget estimate \1\..............................       757,470,000
Provided in the bill..................................       853,249,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +23,871,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +95,779,000

\1\ The budget estimate does not include proposed user fees in the
  amount 5,000,000.


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Food Safety and Inspection Service, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $853,249,000, an increase of 
$23,871,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
an increase of $95,779,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation does not include $105,000,000 in meat 
inspection user fees, as proposed in the President's budget. 
The Committee does not recommend establishing such fees in 
annual appropriations acts, but will consider such fees should 
they achieve authorization.
    The Committee provides the full amount requested to cover 
pay costs, an increase of $16,625,000, for risk-based 
management and control of Salmonella, an increase of 
$2,600,000, and information technology to support inspection, 
an increase of $1,886,000. The Committee provides an increase 
of $4,200,000 for food defense activities, including $1,000,000 
for the Food Emergency Response Network (FERN) and $3,200,000 
for laboratory capacity and equipment. Within the base 
resources provided is $5,000,000 for enforcement of The Humane 
Methods of Slaughter Act, as included in the request. The 
Committee recommendation includes the proposed cut of 
$4,000,000 in the information technology line item as requested 
in the budget.
    The Committee directs that within the amount provided for 
food safety and counterterrorism activities, priority should be 
given to maintaining existing personnel and operations that are 
critical to ensuring the safety of domestic and imported food, 
rather than funding new functions, grants, or agreements.
    The Food Safety Institute of the Americas (FSIA) has been a 
component of FSIS since October 2004. Although the FSIA mission 
is complementary to that of FSIS, the Committee considers FSIA 
to be more closely aligned with the mission of the Foreign 
Agricultural Service. Therefore, the Committee directs that 
FSIA be transferred to the Foreign Agricultural Service, and 
$500,000 is cut from the FSIS Account and provided to the 
Foreign Agricultural Service to support the FSIA.
    The Committee provides $2,000,000, the same as fiscal year 
2006, for outsourcing of microbiological testing, which 
supports the goal of establishing a continuous baseline for 
risk assessment. The Committee expects the Department to 
outsource the testing to private American Association for 
Laboratory Accreditation International Standards Organization-
approved laboratories. The Committee directs FSIS to report on 
the status of this project within 60 days of enactment.
    The Committee provides $3,029,000, as requested, for Codex 
Alimentarius activities, which are critical for maintaining 
food safety worldwide and facilitating international trade and 
$600,000, as requested, for the International Trade Data 
System.

                        FARM ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS


    Office of the Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural 
                                Services





2006 appropriation....................................          $629,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           737,000
Provided in the bill..................................           691,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +62,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................           -46,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign 
Agricultural Services, the Committee provides an appropriation 
of $691,000, an increase of $62,000 above the amount available 
for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $46,000 below the budget 
request.

                          Farm Service Agency


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES


                                                                              Transfer from
                                                            Appropriation    program accts.     Total, FSA, S&E;

2006 appropriation......................................    $1,019,700,000    ($306,551,000)    ($1,326,251,000)
2007 budget estimate....................................     1,091,359,000     (319,294,000)     (1,410,653,000)
Provided in the bill....................................     1,053,760,000     (310,335,000)     (1,364,095,000)
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation..................................       +34,060,000      (+3,784,000)       (+37,844,000)
    2007 budget estimate................................       -37,599,000      (-8,959,000)       (-46,558,000)


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Salaries and Expenses of the Farm Service Agency (FSA), 
the Committee provides an appropriation of $1,053,760,000 and 
transfers from other accounts of $310,335,000, for a total 
program level of $1,364,095,000. This is an increase of 
$37,844,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $46,558,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$25,922,000 for pay cost and $14,000,000 to modernize FSA 
business processes needs and associated system requirements.
    The Committee provides to the Administrator of the Farm 
Service Agency, $24,000,000, the same as the fiscal year 2006 
level, for the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP). 
This amount is in addition to any provided by cooperating funds 
from any other federal, state, or local government funding for 
NAIP. Of this amount, $1,500,000 is for the storage, security, 
and dissemination technologies for NAIP.
    The Committee retains statutory language on closure of any 
local or county office of the Farm Service Agency.

                         STATE MEDIATION GRANTS




2006 appropriation....................................        $4,208,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         4,208,000
Provided in the bill..................................         4,208,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For State Mediation Grants, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $4,208,000 the same as the amount available in 
fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget request.

               GRASSROOTS SOURCE WATER PROTECTION PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................        $3,713,000
2007 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................         3,713,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................        +3,713,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Grassroots Source Water Protection Program, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $3,713,000, the same as 
the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$3,713,000 above the budget request.

                        DAIRY INDEMNITY PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................          $100,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           100,000
Provided in the bill..................................           100,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Dairy Indemnity Program, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $100,000, the same as the amount available for 
fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget request.

           AGRICULTURAL CREDIT INSURANCE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                         ESTIMATED LOAN LEVELS




2006 loan level.......................................    $3,747,804,000
2007 budget estimate..................................     3,427,470,000
Provided in the bill..................................     3,551,864,000
Comparison:
    2006 loan level...................................      -195,940,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................      +124,394,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    Approximate loan levels provided by the Committee for 
fiscal year 2007 for the Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund 
Programs are: $1,422,750,000 for farm ownership loans, of which 
$222,750,000 is for direct loans and $1,200,000,000 is for 
guaranteed loans; $2,065,754,000 for farm operating loans, of 
which $643,500,000 is for direct loans, $272,254,000 is for 
guaranteed subsidized loans, and $1,150,000,000 is for 
guaranteed unsubsidized loans; $3,960,000 for Indian tribe land 
acquisition loans; and $59,400,000 for boll weevil eradication 
loans.
    The Committee has included language in this account to 
restrict the fees FSA can collect for the guaranteed ownership 
and operating loan programs. An additional $35,394,000 has been 
provided to support the recommended guaranteed ownership and 
operating loan levels.

                AGRICULTURE CREDIT PROGRAMS--LOAN LEVELS

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2007        Committee
                                                                  FY 2006  level     estimate       provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Farm loan programs:
  Farm ownership:
    Direct......................................................        $205,918        $222,750        $222,750
    Guaranteed..................................................       1,386,000       1,200,000       1,200,000
  Farm operating:
    Direct......................................................         643,500         643,500         643,500
    Unsubsidized guaranteed.....................................       1,138,500       1,025,610       1,150,000
    Subsidized guaranteed.......................................         271,886         272,250         272,254
Indian tribe land acquisition...................................           2,000           3,960           3,960
Boll Weevil Eradication.........................................         100,000          59,400          59,400
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total, farm loans.........................................      $3,747,804      $3,427,470      $3,551,864
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS

                                            [In thousands of dollars]

                                                                 Direct loan    Guaranteed loan   Administrative
                                                                   subsidy          subsidy          expenses

2006 appropriation...........................................          $74,652          $75,136           $7,920
2007 budget estimate.........................................           86,525           27,387            7,920
Provided in the bill.........................................           86,525           62,781            7,920
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation.......................................          +11,873          -12,355            - - -
    2007 budget estimate.....................................            - - -          +35,394            - - -



    The following table reflects the costs of loan programs 
under credit reform:

                                     AGRICULTURE CREDIT PROGRAMS--Subsidies
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 FY 2006           FY 2007          Committee
                                                                estimate          estimate         provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan subsidies:
  Farm ownership:
    Direct................................................           $10,544            $9,333            $9,333
    Guaranteed............................................             6,653             - - -             6,960
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal............................................            17,197             9,333            16,293
                                                           =====================================================
  Farm operating:
    Direct................................................            64,028            75,225            75,225
    Guaranteed unsubsidized...............................            34,497             2,667            28,405
    Guaranteed subsidized.................................            33,986            24,720            27,416
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal............................................           132,511           102,612           131,046
                                                           =====================================================
Indian tribe land acquisition.............................                80               838               838
Bollweevil eradication loans..............................             - - -             1,129             1,129
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    Total, Loan subsidies.................................          $149,788          $113,912          $149,306
                                                           =====================================================
ACIF expenses:
  Salaries and expenses...................................           301,545           311,737           307,338
  Administrative expenses.................................             7,920             7,920             7,920
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
    Total, ACIF expenses..................................          $309,465          $319,657          $315,258
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Risk Management Agency





2006 appropriation....................................       $76,278,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        80,797,000
Provided in the bill..................................        77,197,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           919,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -3,600,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Risk Management Agency, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $77,197,000, an increase of $919,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$3,600,000 below the budget request.

                              CORPORATIONS


                Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund





2006 appropriation.............................         1 $3,159,379,000
2007 budget estimate...........................          1 4,131,035,000
Provided in the bill...........................          1 4,131,035,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation.........................             +971,656,000
    2007 budget estimate.......................                    - - -


\1\ Current indefinite appropriation.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation Fund, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of such sums as may be 
necessary (estimated to be $4,131,035,000 in the President's 
fiscal year 2007 Budget Request), an increase of $971,656,000 
above the amount provided in fiscal year 2006 and the same as 
the budget request.

                   Commodity Credit Corporation Fund


                 REIMBURSEMENT FOR NET REALIZED LOSSES




2006 appropriation.............................        1 $25,690,000,000
2007 budget estimate...........................         1 19,740,000,000
Provided in the bill...........................       \1\ 19,740,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation.........................           -5,950,000,000
    2007 budget estimate.......................                    - - -


1 Current indefinite appropriation.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Reimbursement for Net Realized Losses to the Commodity 
Credit Corporation, the Committee provides such sums as may be 
necessary to reimburse for net realized losses sustained, but 
not previously reimbursed (estimated to be $19,470,000,000 in 
the President's fiscal year 2007 Budget Request), a decrease of 
$5,950,000,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2006 
and the same as the budget request.

                       HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT




2006 limitation................................               $5,000,000
2007 budget estimate...........................                5,000,000
Provided in the bill...........................                5,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 limitation............................                    - - -
    2007 budget estimate.......................                    - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For CCC Hazardous Waste Management, the Committee provides 
a limitation of $5,000,000, the same as the amount available 
for fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget request.

              FARM STORAGE FACILITY LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT




2006 appropriation.............................                    - - -
2007 budget estimate...........................                4,560,000
Provided in the bill...........................                    - - -
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation.........................                    - - -
    2007 budget estimate.......................               -4,560,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommendation does not include $4,560,000 
for the Farm Storage Facility Loans program as proposed in the 
President's budget. The Farm Storage Facility Loans program has 
been authorized since fiscal year 2000. This is the first 
budget request to include administrative expenses in this 
account. The budget request did not provide adequate 
justification for the inclusion of administrative expenses in 
this account.

                    TITLE II--CONSERVATION PROGRAMS

  Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources and Environment




2006 appropriation....................................          $737,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           957,000
Provided in the bill..................................           810,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +73,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................          -147,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Natural Resources 
and Environment, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$810,000, an increase of $73,000 above the amount available for 
fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $147,000 below the budget 
request.

                 Natural Resources Conservation Service


                        CONSERVATION OPERATIONS




2006 appropriation....................................      $831,124,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       744,877,000
Provided in the bill..................................       791,498,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -39,626,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +46,621,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Conservation Operations, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $791,498,000, a decrease of $39,626,000 below 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$46,621,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes not more than $94,170,800 for National 
Headquarters salaries and expenses, as requested.
    The Committee provides $27,225,000 for the Grazing Lands 
Conservation Initiative, instead of no funding, as proposed in 
the request. The Committee recommendation includes the 
requested amounts, as follows: $10,588,000 for the Snow Survey 
and Water Supply Forecasting program, $10,678,000 for Plant 
Materials Centers, and $89,291,000 for the Soil Surveys 
Program. For Conservation Technical Assistance, $653,716,000 is 
provided. The recommendation for each program includes pay 
costs, as requested. The Committee recommendation includes 
funding for one American Heritage River navigator position on 
the Hudson River.
    State funding allocations.--The Committee is concerned that 
funding allocations to the States are being reduced in 
proportion to Congressional earmarks funded in the Conservation 
Operations account. The Committee directs the Chief of the 
NRCS, in making the fiscal year 2007 Conservation Operations 
funding allocations to the States, to treat Congressional 
earmarks as additions to the States' funding allocation. The 
Committee directs the NRCS to provide a report to the Committee 
on Appropriations, not later than 45 days after the enactment 
of this Act, including the following: fiscal year 2006 
Conservation Operations allocation by State, fiscal year 2007 
Conservation Operations allocation by State, the fiscal year 
2007 Congressional earmarks by State, and the total 
conservation operations allocation by State. In addition, the 
Chief of the NRCS is directed to inform the Committee 
immediately about any changes to the formula or process by 
which the base state allocations are made.
    Conservation Technical Assistance Projects.--Funding for 
fiscal year 2006 projects is not continued in fiscal year 2007 
unless specifically mentioned in this report. The following 
funds are directed to be used in cooperative agreements, 
continued with the same cooperator entities as in the fiscal 
year 2006 agreements, except as noted: National Water 
Management Center (AR)--$2,750,000; Mojave Water Agency (CA) 
non-native plant removal--$2,000,000; Monterey Bay Sanctuary--
$600,000; Municipal Water District of Orange County for 
efficient irrigation (CA)--$200,000; Cooperative Agreement with 
Tufts University to improve conservation practices (CT)--
$480,000; Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission 
Cooperative Agreement--$3,600,000; Community Nutrient 
Management Facilities (GA)--$350,000; Idaho One Plan--$200,000; 
Trees Forever Program (IL)--$100,000; Illinois River Basin--
$600,000 through EQIP; Hungry Canyon/Loess Hills Erosion 
Control/Western Iowa--$1,200,000; Trees Forever Program (IA)--
$100,000; CEMSA w/Iowa Soybean Association--$431,500; Technical 
assistance to providing grants to Soil Conservation Districts 
in Kentucky--$1,000,000; cooperative agreement with Louisiana 
State University on effectiveness of agriculture and forestry 
(LA)--$400,000; False River sedimentation/Bayou Sere (LA)--
$200,000; Chesapeake Bay activities--$6,000,000; Weed It Now-
Taconic Mountains (MA/NY/CT)--$200,000; cooperative agreement 
with New York Nature Conservancy for the Adirondack Park 
Invasive Plant Program (NY)--$100,000; Choctaw County (MS) 
feasibility study for surface impoundment--$250,000; Upper 
White River Water Quality Project Office in southern Missouri--
$455,073; State conservation cost share program (NJ)--
$1,000,000; Pastureland Management/Rotational Grazing (NY)--
$600,000; Best management practices/Skaneateles and Owasco 
Watersheds (NY)--$325,000; Address non-point pollution in 
Onondaga and Oneida Lake Watersheds (NY)--$500,000; Technical 
assistance to livestock/poultry industry (NC)--$450,000; Maumee 
Watershed Hydrological Study and Flood Mitigation Plan (OH)--
$1,000,000; Study to characterize land use change while 
preserving natural resources in cooperation with Clemson 
University (SC)--$900,000; Bexar, Medina, Uvalde Counties 
irrigation in Edwards Aquifer (TX)--$500,000; Field office 
telecommunications advanced pilot program (TX)--$2,400,000; 
Range vegetation pilot project, Ft. Hood (TX)--$500,000; Texas 
Water Resources Institute cooperative agreement for Tarrant 
County--$500,000 and Hood County--$200,000 (TX); Design/
implement natural stream restoration initiatives (WV)--
$800,000; Soil survey geographic database in the Mid-Atlantic 
Highlands (WV)--$200,000; Grazing Lands Initiative/Wisconsin 
Department of Agriculture--$950,000; On-farm Management Systems 
Evaluation Network--$250,000; Audubon at Home Pilot Program--
$500,000; Operation Oak Program to restore hardwoods--$400,000; 
Suwannee, Dixie, and Lafayette Counties dairy and poultry waste 
treatment (FL)--$1,000,000; Long Island Sound watershed 
initiative (NY)--$200,000; Pace University Land Use Law center 
(NY)--$200,000; Erosion Control and Stabilization for Hudson 
River shoreline at Village of Tarrytown (NY)--$250,000; 
cooperative agreement with the Green Institute (FL)--$400,000; 
cooperative agreement with Sand County Foundation (WI)--
$900,000; Soil survey mapping project (WY)--$300,000; and 
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Partnerships--$3,000,000.
    Animal Feeding Operations Pilot Projects.--The Committee 
provides $6,000,000 for the management and implementation of 
pilot projects for innovative technology systems resulting in a 
75 percent reduction in nutrients of waste stream discharged by 
animal feeding operations to be managed by Farm Pilot Project 
Coordination, Inc.
    The Committee continues funding of $2,400,000 for the West 
Texas advanced field telecommunications pilot. This project has 
been used to evaluate and test telecommunication solutions to 
improve NRCS operations. The pilot has contributed to 
development of an online Web Soil Survey and the ProTracts 
system. According to NRCS estimates, the benefit of 
implementation of these programs nationwide is $25 million per 
year. Having a mobile capability for surveys was also helpful 
to USDA after the hurricanes of 2005. The advanced phase of the 
pilot is to support development of an NRCS ``virtual'' office, 
with the capability of accessing all data needed from a mobile 
unit, and writing contracts on-site. West Texas has been an 
excellent location for development and testing, with 
exceptional staff, and benefits accruing to the national 
program at a 10:1 ratio. NRCS is encouraged to match the 
funding provided for this project to address the Service's 
national needs for efficient web-based customer support.
    Plant Materials Centers.--The Committee recognizes the 
valuable work of the Kika de la Garza Plant Materials Center 
and commends the Department for its recognition of this 
Center's contributions. The Committee directs the Department to 
fund this Center at no less than the FY2006 level.

                     WATERSHED SURVEYS AND PLANNING




2006 appropriation....................................        $6,022,000
2007 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................         6,022,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................        +6,022,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Watershed Surveys and Planning, the Committee provides 
an appropriation of $6,022,000, the same as the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $6,022,000 
above the budget request.

               WATERSHED AND FLOOD PREVENTION OPERATIONS




2006 appropriation....................................       $74,250,000
2007 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................        40,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -34,250,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +40,000,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Watershed and Flood Prevention Operations, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $40,000,000, a decrease 
of $34,250,000 below fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$40,000,000 above the budget request. Language is included 
which limits the amount spent on technical assistance to not 
more than $20,000,000.
    The Committee is aware of and expects progress to continue 
and/or to provide financial/technical assistance for the next 
phase for the following projects: Lake Okeechobee Watershed 
Project (FL); Wailuka-Alenaio Watershed (HI); Upcountry Maui 
Watershed (HI); Honey Creek (IN); Madison County Water Supply 
Project Phase II (IA); Soap Creek (IA); Lyon's Creek Watershed 
No. 41 (KS); Doyle Creek (KS); Lower Elk River and Upper Walnut 
North Watersheds (KS); Pigeon Roost Creek project, Jackson 
County (KY); Kagman Watershed, Commonwealth of the Northern 
Marianas; Turkey Creek (OK); Repaupo Creek Project (NJ); 
Callicoon Creek Watershed (NY); Esopus Creek (NY); Neshaminy 
Creek Watershed Project, Bucks County (PA); Tuplehocken Creek 
Watershed (PA); Lower Colorado River water conservation project 
(TX); Four pilot projects in North Florida related to dairy and 
poultry cleanup efforts (FL); Big Creek (Tri-County) Watershed 
Project (TX); Big Cypress Reservation Water Conservation 
project (FL) as part of Everglades restoration; and Buena Vista 
Watershed (VA).

                    WATERSHED REHABILITATION PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................       $31,245,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        15,300,000
Provided in the bill..................................        31,245,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +15,945,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Watershed Rehabilitation Program, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $31,245,000, the same as the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$15,945,000 above the budget request.

                 RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT




2006 appropriation....................................       $50,787,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        25,933,000
Provided in the bill..................................        50,787,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +24,854,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Resource Conservation and Development, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $50,787,000, the same as the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$24,854,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation includes funding for each of the 375 
Resource Conservation and Development (RC&D;) Councils to have a 
Federal coordinator. The budget request proposes cutting the 
number of coordinators by half, and having coordinators serve 
several councils. The Committee notes that no pilot test or 
cost analysis was conducted to determine the feasibility of 
such an action, or the potential effect on Council performance. 
This is a concern, considering that the coordinator plays an 
important role in leveraging Federal funding to meet local 
needs. According to data provided by NRCS for the Record, 
Federal funding to Councils is matched by non-Federal funding 
at an eight-to-one ratio; in fiscal year 2005, Federal funding 
to councils totaled $51,641,000; non-Federal assistance totaled 
$416,027,000.
    The Committee requests that NRCS continue to work with the 
Councils to develop appropriate measures of effectiveness for 
both conservation and economic development. Therefore future 
budget proposals can be based on the effectiveness and 
performance of the program.
    The Committee expects the NRCS to promptly fill RC&D; 
coordinator vacancies, and to allocate funding equitably among 
the existing councils.
    The Committee has included bill language related to a 
cooperative agreement with a national association.
    The Committee has included bill language limiting the 
amount that can be spent at national headquarters from this 
account.

                    Healthy Forests Reserve program





2006 appropriation....................................        $2,475,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         2,475,000
Provided in the bill..................................             - - -
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        -2,475,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        -2,475,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommendation does not include $2,475,000 
for the Healthy Forests Reserve Program as proposed in the 
President's budget.

                 TITLE III--RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

          Office of the Under Secretary for Rural Development




2006 appropriation....................................          $629,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           823,000
Provided in the bill..................................           692,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +63,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................          -131,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Rural 
Development, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$692,000, an increase of $63,000 above the amount available for 
fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $131,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Committee directs the Under Secretary to give 
consideration to the following projects or organizations 
requesting financial and/or technical assistance, and grants 
and/or loans made available under the Rural Development mission 
area: Water and wastewater treatment facility, Val Verde County 
(TX); Water and wastewater infrastructure improvements, 
Williamson and Bell Counties (TX); Union-Lincoln Regional Water 
Supply Initiative (LA); Agricultural Center for West Ouachita 
H.S. (LA); Demonstration of Stationary Fuel Cells using Ethanol 
as a Fuel (CT); Greenwood Lake Water Treatment Facility (CA); 
Chester Storm Drain Improvements (CA); Grizzly Flat Community 
Center (CA); Loyalton Wastewater Treatment Plant (CA); Colfax 
Wastewater Treatment Facility (CA); Sierra Lakes County 
Wastewater Treatment Plant (CA); Grass Valley EMS Station 
Remodel (CA); Cascade Shores Water Treatment Plant (CA); 
Halifax Regional Health System (VA); Cumberland County 
Courthouse Water Project (VA); Institute for Advanced Learning 
and Research Bioenergy from Novel Crops Project (VA); Nichols 
Park Beautification Project (NY); Vassar Brothers Medical 
Information Technology (NY); TechniTrain program (NY); Peoria 
County, sewer system improvements (IL); Midwest Emergency 
Department Services (IL); Big Bear Lake Pipeline Replacement 
for Fire Flow Protection (CA); Big Bear Lake, Lake Williams 
Interconnection Pipeline (CA); City of Gadsden Animal Safety 
Center (AL); Maine Public Broadcasting Network (ME); East Baton 
Rouge Parish, City of Baker fire department (LA); East 
Feliciana Parish Police Jury's Council on Aging Program (LA); 
Livingston Parish, establishment of wetlands bank (LA); 
Southern University, Center for Advanced Renewable Energy 
Systems (LA); Southern University/eCenter for rural health 
research and services (LA); Water system improvements for 
Southern Anderson County (SC); Batesville Wastewater Treatment 
Plant and Pumping Facility (AR); Small Farm Outreach Wetlands 
Water Management and Training Facility (AR); Northeast Arkansas 
Public Water Authority (AR); Ozark Mountain Regional Public 
Water Authority (AR); Weber County, Rural EMS Enhancements 
Project (UT); City of Ty Ty, back-up generator for water well 
and waste water treatment facility (GA); City of Meigs, water 
well upgrade and repair (GA); City of Vienna, municipal service 
support (GA); Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land 
Assistance Fund, East Point (GA); SW Georgia high-speed 
wireless internet assistance (GA); City of Atmore, Pine Barren 
watershed extension (AL); Pea Ridge Water Association (AR); 
Ozone Water Project, Johnson County (AR); Washington County 
Rural Development Authority, SE Washington County water project 
(AR); Highway 71 Water Users Association (AR); Awendaw Water 
System (Phase III) Project (SC); the Seewee to Santee Community 
wells project, Mount Pleasant Water Works (SC); Economic 
Development through Citrus County Central Florida Community 
College (FL); Telemedicine program, James Whitcomb Riley 
Hospital for Children (IN); Construction of a new water tower, 
Town of Windfall (IN); Paw Paw sanitary sewer system upgrade 
(WV); Gene Salem Senior Citizens Center (WV); Rural-to-Urban 
Tourism Links project (MO); Clark County Recreation Center 
(KY); Hospice Care Plus Community Center (KY); Waste water 
collection and treatment system infrastructure improvements, 
U.S. Virgin Islands (VI); Repair and extend wastewater system, 
Town of Hollywood (SC); Expand existing water lines, Town of 
Elloree (SC); Voorhees College for the Rural and Small Town 
Development Center (SC); Water improvements, Berkeley County 
(SC); Kings County Senior Center Facility (CA); Expansion of 
wastewater treatment plant, City of Mendota (CA); Shawnee 
Health Services, Illinois Centre Dental Program (IL); Southern 
Illinois Regional Social Services, Inc (IL); Southern Illinois 
Healthcare Foundation telehealth program (IL); Rainsville 
AgriCenter, City of Rainsville (AL); Laredo Agriculture 
Community Pavilion (TX); Zapata County Agricultural Community 
Pavilion (TX); Cotulla County Agricultural Community Pavilion 
(TX); Comal Junior Livestock Show Association Events Center 
(TX); La Presa water and sewer improvement (TX); Fleming 
Country Health and Fitness Center (KY); Owenton River raw water 
intake, Owen County (KY); Bracken County Regional Wastewater 
Treatment (KY); Sadieville Sewer system improvements, Scott 
County (KY); University of South Florida, Center for Technology 
Transformation, Underserved Rural Health Care Initiative (FL); 
City of Coburg Wastewater System (OR); Centro Tejano Community 
Center, Alton (TX); 3 Rivers Wet Weather Demonstration Program 
Project (PA); Imperial Valley Sugarcane Renewable Energy 
Ethanol Project (CA); Design and construction of sanitary 
system for Arturo LLuberas, Yauco (PR); Sanitary sewer system 
for Ollas Hondas, Juana Diaz (PR); Ciales' Water Improvement 
Project, construction of water treatment plant Las Delicias, 
Ciales (PR); Lares' Water Improvement Project, construction of 
water treatment plant Indiera Alta, Lares (PR); Villalba's 
Water Improvement Project in Aceituna Community, Phase 2 (PR); 
Chattooga County, water system expansion (GA); Virginia Tech 
Innovation Communities for Rural Development Program (VA); De 
Soto County fire station replacement (FL); I-376 High Tech 
Development Initiative (PA); City of Warden, waste water system 
(WA); The 21st Century Fredonia Vineyard Lab (NY); Rio Grande 
Valley Sugar Growers, Boiler Expansion and Renewable Energy 
Project (TX); City of Turner, reservoir project (OR); North 
Santiam Canyon Economic Development Corporation, Opal Creek 
Wilderness Area (OR); Southern University, Center for Food, 
Nutrition, and Health Promotion, Preventative Nutrition and 
Health Promotion Project (LA); Appalachian Quilt Trails Project 
(TN); Northern Columbia County Community Cultural Center (PA); 
Alleghany County Business Center (NY); City of Fairfax, water 
and sewer system (OK); City of Perkins, waste water collection 
and treatment system (OK); City of Perkins, water distribution 
system (OK); Calaveras Healthy Impact Product Solutions (CA); 
San Juan County Fire, EMS, and Rescue Building (UT); Solid 
waste transfer station project, Transportation and Community 
Development Committee (UT); Montezuma Creek Community Library 
(UT); Cellulose/Biomass to Ethanol Pilot Project, Center for 
Rural Life Stewardship (UT); Springhill, water system 
improvement (LA); Claiborne Parish Fire House, Haynesville 
(LA); International Paper Ticonderoga Mill Woody Biomass 
Extraction Project (NY); University of North Carolina at 
Pembroke's National Debris/Waste to Resource Center (NC); 
Bladen County Agri-Industrial Expo Center (NC); North Carolina 
State University Consortium for the Black Belt South (NC); Red 
Hills Coop, Mobile Poultry Processing Unit (GA); Water/sewer 
improvements, Village of Canajoharie (NY); Farmers market, City 
of Gloversville (NY); Excelsior College for Rural College 
Readiness distance learning program (NY); Sewer system 
improvements, New Iberia (LA); Town of Golden Meadow pumping 
station refurbishing (LA); Company Canal Pump Station Project 
(LA); Industrial Park, St. Mary (LA); Crescent City Wastewater 
Rehabilitation Project (FL); Florida Agricultural Museum 
Construction Project in Flagler County (FL); Old Hastings Civic 
Center Upgrade Project in the Town of Hastings (FL); Katahdin 
Area Forest Product Cluster Enhancement in Millinocket (ME); 
Aroostook County Empowerment Zone funding and expansion (ME); 
Moore Township, Snover Wastewater System (MI); Emmett 
Wastewater Treatment System (MI); Marymount Distance Learning 
and mentoring program (VA); Western Kansas Veterans-Patriot 
Center, WaKeeney (KS); Operational equipment for South Franklin 
Township (PA); Springfield Public market, feasibility and 
design (MA); Oglethorpe County Long Creek Watershed Project 
(GA); Askov Wastewater Treatment Facility (MN); Vanlue Water 
Project (OH); Mechanicsburg Waterline Repair (OH); Water and 
wastewater improvements for the Village of Columbus (NM); Water 
system upgrades for the Town of Tatum (NM); Sewer improvements 
for the City of Hagerman (NM); Water supply system 
improvements, Seminary (MS); Waste water system improvements, 
Flora (MS); Fire Station/City Hall renovation, New Hebron (MS); 
Rankin County Historical Museum (MS); San Joaquin County, 
Agricultural Service Center (CA); Clark County School District 
for Agricultural Science Education Program (NV); Connected 
Technologies Corridors Program to assist with the delivery of 
broadband services of rural communities (WV); Lake County 
Mission Mountain Market, specialty food and value-added 
agriculture businesses (MT); Community Development Financial 
Institution Program (TX); Lukachukai Community Board of 
Education (AZ); Ganado Chapter Municipal Water Project (AZ); 
Klagetoh Landfill Clean Closure and Open Dump Cleanup (AZ); 
Agriculture Innovation Center (MI); Upper Petit Jean Site 3, 
South Logan/Scott County Water Project (AR); Mill Creek of 
Arkansas (AR); San Luis Valley Sustainable Environmental and 
Economic Development Park (CO); Vermont Food Venture Center for 
a Light Processing Project (VT); Northeast Organic Farmers 
Association of Vermont for a Farm-to-Schools Program (VT); 
Wyoming County Emergency Management Center (PA); Expand 
operations of the Pennsylvania Center for Dairy Excellence 
(PA); Pennsylvania Rural Manufacturing Initiative (PA); Water 
and wastewater infrastructure, High Springs (FL); Village of 
Pomeroy wastewater collection system expansion, Meigs County 
(OH); Phase IV waterline extensions, Washington County (OH); 
Mt. Victory waterline extension, Belmont County (OH); Community 
Access Network, Washington County (OH); Union/Rome, sewer 
wastewater treatment plant project (OH); Build a healthcare 
facility, Mackinac Straits Hospital (MI); Jail expansion, 
Arenac County Sheriff Office (MI); Tuscarora Township 
Wastewater System (MI); Construct a joint fire/police facility, 
City of Munising (MI); Northern Lakes Economic Alliance to 
establish a Rural Michigan Technology Center (MI); Agricultural 
Land Conservation Assistance Program (NY); Lower Lake Historic 
Museum Structural Retrofit (CA); construct a new fire station 
in the Town of Clarksburg (CA); Water storage tank for Trinidad 
(CA); Mendocino County Integrated Water Resource Planning (CA); 
Laytonville wastewater treatment (CA); Greater Chimayo Mutual 
Domestic Water Consumers Association Water System Project Phase 
II (NM); Picuris Pueblo Environmental Education Facility (NM); 
Southern Oregon University for the Klamath-Siskiyou Education 
and Research Station (OR); Eastern Oregon University for the 
Oregon Center for Rural Development and Policy Studies (OR); 
City of Oak Ridge for The Highland View Project (TN); 
Underserved Rural Health Care Initiative (FL); Phase II of 
Alligator Rural Water and Sewer Company's Alligator Sewer 
Project in Chesterfield County (SC); Wellcare Model Project in 
Screven County (GA); Fairbanks North Star Borough Kitchen 
Facility in Fairbanks (AK); City of Wrangell Boat Harbor Float 
System (AK); and Mat-Su Agricultural Processing/Product 
Development Center (AK).
    The Committee expects the Under Secretary to approve these 
projects only when such applications are judged to be 
meritorious when subject to established review procedures.

                  RURAL COMMUNITY ADVANCEMENT PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................      $694,922,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       600,762,000
Provided in the bill..................................       699,893,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +4,971,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +99,131,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Community Advancement Program, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $699,893,000, an increase of 
$4,971,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
an increase of $99,131,000 above the budget request.
    The following table provides the Committee's 
recommendations as compared to the budget request:

                   RURAL COMMUNITY ADVANCEMENT PROGRAM
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     FY 2006      FY 2007     Committee
                                      level      estimated    provisions
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Community facilities:
    Community facility direct           $9,950      $19,038      $19,038
     loans.......................
    Community facility guaranteed          748        7,609        7,609
     loans.......................
    Community facility grants....       16,830       16,830       18,830
    Rural community development          6,287            0            0
     initiative..................
    Other........................       47,979            0        4,000
    Rescission...................          827            0            0
                                  --------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Community           82,620       43,477       49,477
           facilities............
                                  ======================================
Utilities:
    Water and waste disposal
     loans:
        Direct...................       68,409      164,736       77,220
    Water and waste disposal           437,748      345,920      479,067
     grants......................
    Solid waste management grants        3,465        3,465        3,465
    Emergency community water           13,692            0            0
     assistance grants...........
    Other........................        1,485            0        1,500
    Rescission...................        5,301            0            0
                                  --------------------------------------
          Subtotal, utilities....      530,100      514,121      561,252
Business:
    Business and industry loans:
        Guaranteed...............       43,779       43,164       43,164
    Rural business enterprise           39,600            0       40,000
     grants......................
    Rural business opportunity           2,970            0        3,000
     grants......................
    Delta regional authority.....        1,980            0        3,000
    Rescission...................          892            0            0
                                  --------------------------------------
          Subtotal, business.....       89,221       43,164       89,164
                                  ======================================
    Rescission...................       -7,020            0            0
                                  ======================================
          Total, loans and grants     $694,922     $600,762     $699,893
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following earmarks are included in bill language for 
the Rural Community Advancement Program: $500,000 is for 
revolving funds for financing water and wastewater projects; 
$1,000,000 is for grants to nonprofit organizations to finance 
construction, refurbishing, and servicing of individually-owned 
household water well systems in rural areas; $24,000,000 for 
Federally Recognized Native American Tribes, of which 
$4,000,000 is for community facilities grants to tribal 
colleges, and of which $250,000 is for transportation technical 
assistance; $500,000 is for rural transportation technical 
assistance; $3,000,000 is for grants to the Delta Regional 
Authority; $25,000,000 is for water and waste disposal systems 
in the Colonias; $16,215,000 is for technical assistance for 
rural water and waste systems, of which $5,600,000 is for a 
rural community assistance program; $14,000,000 is for a 
circuit rider program; and $22,800,000 is for empowerment zones 
and enterprise communities (EZ/EC) and communities designated 
as Rural Economic Area Partnership Zones, of which $1,100,000 
is for rural community programs, of which $13,400,000 is for 
rural utilities programs, and of which $8,300,000 is for the 
rural business and cooperative development programs.
    The Committee provides $561,252,000 for the Rural Utilities 
Programs, of which $77,220,000 is for the water and waste 
disposal loan program and $479,067,000 is for water and waste 
disposal grants. The Committee expects this program to be 
operated at a higher grant to loan ratio than was requested in 
the President's budget.
    The Committee expects the Department to coordinate with the 
Foundation for Affordable Drinking Water to carry out the 
provisions of section 7 U.S.C. 1926e of the Consolidated Farm 
and Rural Development Act.
    The Committee expects the Department to carry out the 
provisions of 7 U.S.C. 1926(a)(2)(B) to coordinate with groups 
who have expertise in operating revolving funds similar to that 
authorized under 7 U.S.C. 1926(a)(2), including Rural Community 
Assistance Programs.
    The Committee encourages the Rural Utilities Service to 
continue a partnership with the Kentucky PRIDE program in 
providing technical expertise and program guidelines.

                Rural Development Salaries and Expenses


                                            [In thousands of dollars]

                                                                                                    Committee
                                                            FY 2006 estimate  FY 2007 estimate     provisions

Appropriations............................................          $162,979          $170,741          $182,860
Transfer from:
    Rural Housing Insurance Fund Program Account..........           450,261           455,776           430,080
    Multifamily Housing Revitalization Program Account....             - - -             - - -               990
    Rural Development Loan Fund Program Account...........             4,745             4,950             4,780
    Rural Electrification and Telecommunications Loans                38,396            39,600            39,101
     Program Account......................................
    Rural Telephone Bank Program Account..................             2,475             - - -             - - -
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, RD Salaries and Expenses.....................          $658,856          $671,067          $657,811


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Salaries and Expenses of the Rural Development mission 
areas, the Committee provides an appropriation of $182,860,000 
and transfers from other accounts of $474,951,000, for a total 
program level of $657,811,000. This is a decrease of $1,045,000 
below the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease 
of $13,256,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee encourages the Department to provide 
assistance made available under the rural enterprise zone 
program of the Department of Agriculture for the project for 
flood control, St. Johns Bayou and New Madrid Floodway, 
Missouri, as authorized in section 331 of P.L. 104-313.
    The Committee encourages the Department to provide 
assistance to the Rural Development office in Illinois to 
complete a statewide rural water map.

                         Rural Housing Service


              RURAL HOUSING INSURANCE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                         ESTIMATED LOAN LEVELS




2006 loan level.......................................    $5,027,750,000
2007 budget estimate..................................     5,057,622,000
Provided in the bill..................................     5,059,625,000
Comparison:
    2006 loan level...................................       +31,875,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        +2,003,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Housing Insurance Fund program account, the 
Committee provides a loan level of $5,059,625,000, an increase 
of $31,875,000 above the amount available in fiscal year 2006 
and an increase of $2,003,000 above the budget request.
    The following table reflects the loan levels for the Rural 
Housing Insurance Fund program account:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                           FY 2006 level     FY 2007 estimate      provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rural Housing Insurance Fund Loans and Grant:
    Single family housing (sec. 502):
        Direct.........................................         $1,129,391         $1,237,498         $1,237,498
        Unsubsidized guaranteed........................          3,644,224          3,564,238          3,564,238
    Housing repair (sec. 504)..........................             34,652             36,382             36,382
    Rental housing (sec. 515)..........................             99,000              - - -            100,000
     Multi-family guaranteed (sec. 538)................             99,000            197,997            100,000
    Housing site development (sec. 524)................              5,000              5,045              5,045
    Credit sales of acquired property..................             11,485             11,482             11,482
    Self-help housing land development fund............              4,998              4,980              4,980
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Loan authorization........................         $5,027,750         $5,057,622         $5,059,625
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                           FY 2006 level     FY 2007 estimate      provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Rural Housing Insurance Fund Program Account (loan
 subsidies):
    Single family housing (sec. 502):
        Direct.........................................           $128,638           $124,121           $124,121
        Unsubsidized guaranteed........................             40,491              7,772              7,772
    Housing repair (sec. 504)..........................             10,136             10,751             10,751
    Rental housing (sec. 515)..........................             45,421              - - -             45,670
    Multi-family guaranteed (sec. 538).................              5,366             15,325              7,740
    Credit sales of acquired property..................                674                720                720
    Multi-family housing preservation..................              8,910              - - -              - - -
    Self-help housing land development fund............                 51                123                123
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Loan subsidies............................           $239,687           $158,812           $196,897
                                                        ========================================================
RHIF expenses:
    Administrative expenses............................           $450,261           $455,776           $430,080
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       RENTAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................      $646,571,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       486,320,000
Provided in the bill..................................       335,400,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................      -311,171,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................      -150,920,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rental Assistance Program, the Committee provides a 
program level of $335,400,000, a decrease of $311,171,000 below 
the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$150,920,000 below the budget request.
    These funds will be used for renewal of expiring rental 
assistance contracts and new construction contracts for a one-
year term. In addition, this funding level provides a four 
month funding reserve to cover any unforeseen disruptions for 
renewing contracts. This one-year agreement term will minimize 
the cost fluctuations in this account.

                     RURAL HOUSING VOUCHER PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................       $15,840,000
2007 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................             - - -
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -15,840,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Housing Voucher Program, the Committee does 
not propose funding as requested in the President's budget. 
Funding for this program is provided in the Multifamily Housing 
Revitalization Program Account.

           MULTIFAMILY HOUSING REVITALIZATION PROGRAM ACCOUNT

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                         Administrative
                                      Budget authority      expenses
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2006 appropriation..................             - - -             - - -
2007 budget estimate................       $74,250,000             - - -
Provided in the bill................        28,000,000          $990,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation..............       +28,000,000          +990,000
    2007 budget estimate............       -46,250,000          +990,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    For the Multifamily Housing Revitalization Program Account, 
the Committee provides an appropriation of $28,990,000, an 
increase of $28,990,000 above the amount available in fiscal 
year 2006 and a decrease of $45,260,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Committee provides $16,000,000 for the rural housing 
voucher program; $3,000,000 for the preservation of the section 
515 multi-family housing portfolio; $9,000,000 to continue a 
demonstration program for projects financed under the section 
515 program; and $990,000 for the Secretary to acquire the 
necessary automation and technical support needed to 
restructure section 515 mortgages.
    The Committee proposes to provide authority to the Rural 
Housing Service to administer out of this account the rural 
housing voucher program and the demonstration programs that 
were funded in fiscal year 2006 in the Rural Housing Insurance 
Fund and the Rural Housing Assistance Grant accounts. The 
Committee also includes authority to allow the Secretary to use 
funds made available for the demonstration program to carry out 
a section 515 multi-family rental housing loan restructuring 
program when it becomes authorized, with prior approval of the 
Committee.

                  MUTUAL AND SELF-HELP HOUSING GRANTS




2006 appropriation....................................       $33,660,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        37,620,000
Provided in the bill..................................        37,620,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +3,960,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Mutual and Self-Help Housing Grants, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $37,620,000, an increase of 
$3,960,000 above the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and 
the same amount as the budget request.

                    RURAL HOUSING ASSISTANCE GRANTS




2006 appropriation....................................       $43,536,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        40,590,000
Provided in the bill..................................        40,590,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        -2,946,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Housing Assistance Grants program, the 
Committee provides an appropriation of $40,590,000, a decrease 
of $2,946,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 2006 and 
the same amount as the budget request. The appropriated amount 
includes $990,000 for supervisory and technical assistance.

                       FARM LABOR PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Loan level       Subsidy level        Grants
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2006 appropriation........................................           $38,117           $16,996           $13,860
2007 budget estimate......................................            41,580            19,938            13,860
Provided in the bill......................................            50,000            23,975            23,550
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation....................................           +11,883            +6,979            +9,690
    2007 budget estimate..................................            +8,420            +4,037            +9,690
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Farm Labor program account, the Committee provides 
a loan subsidy of $23,975,000, which supports a loan level of 
$50,000,000, an increase of $6,979,000 in loan subsidy and an 
increase of $11,883,000 in loan level above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2006, and an increase of $4,037,000 in 
loan subsidy and an increase of $8,420,000 in loan level above 
the amount in the budget request.
    The Committee also provides $23,550,000 in grants, an 
increase of $9,690,000 above the amount available in fiscal 
year 2006 and an increase of $9,690,000 above the budget 
request.

                   Rural Business-Cooperative Service


              RURAL DEVELOPMENT LOAN FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                          ESTIMATED LOAN LEVEL




2006 loan level.......................................       $33,870,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        33,925,000
Provided in the bill..................................        33,925,000
Comparison:
    2006 loan level...................................           +55,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Development Loan Fund program account, the 
Committee provides for a loan level of $33,925,000, an increase 
of $55,000 above the amount provided for fiscal year 2006 and 
the same as the budget request.

       ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS


                                         Direct loan     Administrative
                                           subsidy          expenses

2006 appropriation..................       $14,571,000        $4,745,000
2007 budget estimate................        14,951,000         4,950,000
Provided in the bill................        14,951,000         4,780,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation..............          +380,000           +35,000
    2007 budget estimates...........             - - -          -170,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the estimated loan subsidy, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $14,951,000, an increase of $380,000 above the 
amount available in fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget 
request.
    The Committee also provides $4,780,000 in administrative 
expenses, an increase of $35,000 above the amount available in 
fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $170,000 below the budget 
request.

            RURAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                          ESTIMATED LOAN LEVEL




2006 loan level.......................................       $24,752,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        34,652,000
Provided in the bill..................................        34,652,000
Comparison:
    2006 loan level...................................        +9,900,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Economic Development Loans program account, 
the Committee provides for a loan level of $34,652,000, an 
increase of $9,900,000 above the amount available for fiscal 
year 2006 and the same as the budget request.

                         ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY


                                                   Direct loan subsidy

2006 appropriation.............................           \1\ $4,943,000
2007 budget estimate...........................            \1\ 7,568,000
Provided in the bill...........................            \1\ 7,568,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation.........................               +2,625,000
    2007 budget estimate.......................                    - - -

\1\ Offset by a rescission from interest on the cushion of credit
  payments, as authorized by section 313 of the Rural Electrification
  Act of 1936.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the estimated loan subsidy, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $7,568,000, an increase of $2,625,000 above 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and the same as the 
budget request.

                  RURAL COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT GRANTS




2006 appropriation....................................       $29,193,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        27,225,000
Provided in the bill..................................         9,913,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       -19,280,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -17,312,000



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Rural Cooperative Development Grants, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $9,913,000, a decrease of 
$19,280,000 below the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $17,312,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee provides a total of $37,913,000 for the Rural 
Cooperative Development Grant program, of which: $28,000,000 is 
made available by section 6401 of Public Law 107-171 for the 
value-added agricultural product market development grant 
program; $3,000,000 is provided for a cooperative agreement for 
the Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas (ATTRA) 
program through a cooperative agreement with the National 
Center for Appropriate Technology; $1,485,000 is for 
cooperatives or associations of cooperatives whose primary 
focus is to provide assistance to small, minority producers; 
and $500,000 is for a cooperative research agreement with a 
qualified academic institution.
    The Committee encourages the Department to restart the 
Agriculture Innovations Center Program in the Rural Business-
Cooperative Service. The program has, in past years, provided 
assistance to farmers in value-added agriculture production and 
marketing.

       RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES GRANTS




2006 appropriation....................................       $11,088,000
2007 budget estimate..................................                 0
Provided in the bill..................................        11,088,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +11,088,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Rural Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Communities 
Grants, the Committee provides an appropriation of $11,088,000, 
the same as the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and an 
increase of $11,088,000 above the budget request.

                        RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................       $22,770,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        10,163,000
Provided in the bill..................................        20,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        -2,770,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        +9,837,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Renewable Energy Program, the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $20,000,000, a decrease of $2,770,000 below 
the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$9,837,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee provides a total of $23,000,000 for the 
Renewable Energy Program, of which $3,000,000 is made available 
by section 9006(f) of the Farm Security and Rural Investment 
Act of 2002.

                        Rural Utilities Service


   RURAL ELECTRIFICATION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                          ESTIMATED LOAN LEVEL




2006 loan level.......................................    $6,076,760,000
2007 budget estimate..................................     4,527,799,000
Provided in the bill..................................     5,377,197,000
Comparison:
    2006 loan level...................................      -699,563,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................      +849,398,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The following table reflects the loan levels for the Rural 
Electrification and Telecommunications Loans Program account:

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                    Committee
                                                             FY 2006 enacted  FY 2007 estimate     provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan authorizations:
    Electric:
        Direct, 5%........................................           $99,000           $99,018           $99,018
        Direct, Municipal rate............................            99,000            39,602            99,000
        Direct, FFB.......................................         2,600,000         3,000,000         3,000,000
        Direct, Treasury Rate.............................           990,000           700,000           990,000
        Guaranteed electric...............................            99,000             - - -             - - -
        Guaranteed underwriting...........................         1,500,000             - - -           500,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal......................................         5,387,000         3,838,620         4,688,018
                                                           =====================================================
    Telecommunications:
        Direct, 5%........................................           145,000           143,513           143,513
        Direct, Treasury rate.............................           419,760           246,666           246,666
        Direct, FFB.......................................           125,000           299,000           299,000
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal......................................           689,760           689,179           689,179
                                                           =====================================================
            Total, Loan authorizations....................        $6,076,760        $4,527,799        $5,377,197
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

       ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                    Committee
                                                             FY 2006 enacted  FY 2007 estimate     provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Loan subsidies:
    Electric:
        Direct, 5%........................................              $911            $2,119            $2,119
        Direct, Municipal rate............................             5,000               598             1,495
        Direct, Treasury rate.............................                99             - - -             - - -
        Guaranteed Electric...............................                89             - - -             - - -
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal......................................             6,099             2,717             3,614
                                                           =====================================================
    Telecommunications:
        Direct, 5%........................................             - - -               531               531
        Direct, Treasury rate.............................               210                74                74
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal......................................               210               605               605
                                                           =====================================================
            Total, Loan subsidies.........................            $6,309            $3,322            $4,219
                                                           =====================================================
    E & T expenses:
        Administrative expenses...........................           $38,396           $39,600           $39,101
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation includes a general provision 
to limit RUS from drafting or implementing any regulation or 
rule insofar as it would require recertification of rural 
status for each electric and telecommunications borrower for 
the Rural Electrification and Telecommunication Loans program. 
The Committee is concerned by the Departments proposal to 
change the long-standing practice of the ``Once Rural, Always 
Rural'' principle.

                  RURAL TELEPHONE BANK PROGRAM ACCOUNT

       ESTIMATED LOAN SUBSIDY AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES LEVELS

                         [Dollars in thousands]


                                         Direct loan     Administrative
                                           subsidy          expenses

2006 appropriation..................             - - -    \1\ $2,475,000
2007 budget estimate................             - - -             - - -
Provided in the bill................             - - -             - - -
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation..............             - - -        -2,475,000
    2007 budget estimate............             - - -             - - -

\1\ Offset by a rescission of unobligated balances from the RTB
  Liquidating account.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Rural Telephone Bank Program, the Committee does 
not propose funding as requested in the President's budget for 
administrative expenses, a decrease of $2,475,000 below the 
amount available in fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget 
request.

         DISTANCE LEARNING, TELEMEDICINE AND BROADBAND PROGRAM

                         [Dollars in thousands]


                                                                   Loan level      Subsidy level      Grants

2006 appropriation............................................      $519,750,000     $11,014,000     $38,610,000
2007 budget estimate..........................................       356,419,000      10,826,000      24,750,000
Provided in the bill..........................................       503,535,000      10,826,000      33,660,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation........................................       -16,215,000        -188,000      -4,950,000
    2007 budget estimates.....................................      +147,116,000           - - -      +8,910,000



                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Distance Learning, Telemedicine, and Broadband 
Program, the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$44,486,000, a decrease of $5,138,000 below the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $8,910,000 
above the budget request, including: $24,750,000 for Distance 
Learning and Telemedicine Grants; $10,826,000 for Broadband 
Telecommunications loan subsidy, which supports a loan level of 
$503,535,000; and $8,910,000 for Broadband Grants.
    The Committee did not provide an appropriation for the 
Distance Learning and Telemedicine loan program. The Committee 
notes there are unobligated balances expected to be available 
in fiscal year 2007 to support this loan program.

                    TITLE IV--DOMESTIC FOOD PROGRAMS

Office of the Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services




2006 appropriation....................................          $593,000
2007 budget estimate..................................           732,000
Provided in the bill..................................           652,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................           +59,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................           -80,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Office of the Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition 
and Consumer Services, the Committee provides an appropriation 
of $652,000, an increase of $59,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $80,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Committee is aware that the State of Texas has entered 
into a contract to privatize certain operations of the Food 
Stamp program. The Committee directs the Secretary to continue 
to provide quarterly reports to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the status of this contract, including the 
effects it is having on program access, error rates, and 
spending on administrative expenses.

                       Food and Nutrition Service


                        CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS



                                                               Direct         Transfer from      Total program
                                                           appropriation        section 32           level

2006 appropriation.....................................     $7,473,208,000     $5,187,621,000    $12,660,829,000
2007 budget estimate...................................      8,063,200,000      5,582,287,000     13,645,487,000
Provided in the bill...................................      7,610,897,000      5,734,590,000     13,345,487,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation.................................       +137,689,000       +546,969,000       +684,658,000
    2007 budget estimate...............................       -452,303,000       +152,303,000       -300,000,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Child Nutrition Programs, the Committee provides a 
total of $13,345,487,000, an increase of $684,658,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$300,000,000 below the budget request. Of the total amount 
provided, $7,610,897,000 is by direct appropriation and 
$5,734,590,000 is by transfer from Section 32.

    The Committee did not provide a contingency fund as 
requested in the President's budget.
    The Committee includes a general provision to expand the 
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program to all States and on Indian 
reservations. The Committee provides up to $500,000 for each 
State to carry out a program to make free fresh fruits and 
vegetables available to elementary or secondary schools to make 
available to students throughout the school day.
    The Committee notes the Child Nutrition and WIC 
Reauthorization Act of 2004 authorized a pilot study on 
eliminating the reduced price school meal program, subject to 
the availability of funds. The Food and Nutrition Service 
estimates that this pilot study, conducted Statewide in five 
average size States, would cost $375,000,000 over five years. 
Eliminating reduced price meals nationwide by increasing the 
limit for free meals to 185 percent of poverty, would cost 
$3,500,000,000 over five years.

                         [Dollars in thousands]



Child Nutrition Programs:
    School lunch program..............................        $7,760,857
    School breakfast program..........................         2,251,275
    Child and adult care food program.................         2,272,053
    Summer food service program.......................           305,897
    Special milk program..............................            13,988
    State administrative expenses.....................           165,481
    Commodity procurement.............................           550,173
    Team nutrition....................................            10,027
    Food safety education.............................             1,007
    Coordinated review................................             5,335
    Computer support and processing...................             9,394
                                                       -----------------
        Total.........................................       $13,345,487


SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTAL NUTRITION PROGRAM FOR WOMEN, INFANTS, AND CHILDREN 
                                 (WIC)




2006 appropriation....................................    $5,204,430,000
2007 budget estimate..................................     5,200,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................     5,244,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +39,570,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       +44,000,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, 
Infants, and Children (WIC), the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $5,244,000,000, an increase of $39,570,000 
above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase 
of $44,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation for the Special Supplemental 
Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is 
$5,244,000,000. The Committee notes that since the budget 
request was submitted last February, several estimates provided 
in the Presidents budget for the WIC program have changed. The 
Committee also does not include several proposals requested in 
the President's budget, changing the estimated program needs in 
the WIC program. Estimates for participation and food costs 
have declined for fiscal year 2006 and fiscal year 2007, 
increasing the expected carry-over funds from fiscal year 2006 
to 2007 and decreasing the estimate for program needs in fiscal 
year 2007. Also, there is currently estimated the WIC program 
will have an unobligated balance in the contingency reserve of 
about $142,600,000, which is $17,600,000 above the original 
appropriation of $125,000,000 provided for the reserve. The 
Committee included a provision to allow the unobligated balance 
over $125,000,000 to be used for program needs.
    The Committee does not include the provision as requested 
in the President's budget, that requires funding for nutrition 
services and administration (NSA) grants to State be capped at 
25 percent of the total amount provided, increasing the 
estimate for NSA funding.
    The Committee provided an appropriation for the Commodity 
Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) in the Commodity Assistance 
Program. The President's budget did not request funding for the 
CSFP program and estimated a higher participation rate in the 
WIC and FSP for the CSFP participants in fiscal year 2007.
    Therefore, the recommended funding level, $44,000,000 above 
the budget request, is currently estimated to be sufficient to 
meet program needs. However, the Committee will continue to 
monitor WIC food costs, participation, and carry-over funds, 
and take additional action as necessary to ensure that funding 
provided in fiscal year 2007 is sufficient to serve all 
eligible applicants.
    The recommended funding level includes $15,000,000 for 
continuation of the breastfeeding peer counselor program.
    The Committee provides $20,000,000 for investments in 
management information systems, if the Secretary determines 
that those funds are not needed to maintain caseload and will 
not require use of the contingency fund.
    The Committee does not include language requested by the 
Administration, that provides guidance that funds under this 
heading shall not be used for WIC benefits for individuals who 
receive medical assistance or whose family member is a pregnant 
woman or infant who receives assistance, unless their family 
falls below 250 percent of the applicable poverty guidelines.
    Electronic Benefit Transfer.--The Committee recommendation 
includes language to allow funds to be used for WIC electronic 
benefit transfer (EBT) systems and sets the authorized level of 
infrastructure funding at $13,600,000, which includes funding 
to develop EBT systems.
    WIC Services and Referrals.--While the Committee supports 
State and local agency efforts to utilize WIC as a means of 
participation referral to other health care services, it also 
recognizes the constraints that WIC programs experience as a 
result of expanding health care priorities and continuing 
demand for core WIC program activities. The Committee wishes to 
clarify that while WIC plays an important role in screening and 
referral to other health care services, it is not the 
Committee's intention that WIC should perform aggressive 
screening, referral and assessment functions in a manner that 
supplants the responsibilities of other programs, nor should 
WIC State and local agencies assume the burden of entering into 
and negotiating appropriate cost sharing agreements. The 
committee again includes language in the bill to preserve WIC 
funding for WIC services authorized by law to ensure that WIC 
funds are not used to pay the expenses or to coordinate 
operations or activities other than those allowable pursuant to 
section 17 of the Child Nutrition Act of 1966, unless fully 
reimbursed by the appropriate Federal agency.
    Food Prescription Package.--The Committee notes the Child 
Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 requires the 
Department to issue a final rule, within 18 months of receiving 
the Institute of Medicine's report, to modify the WIC food 
packages. The Committee directs the Department to move 
expeditiously in consultation with WIC agencies to develop for 
public comment a food prescription rule responding to the needs 
of the WIC population and to provide quarterly reports to the 
Committee regarding the status and publication of a final rule 
beginning July 1, 2006.

                           FOOD STAMP PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................   $40,711,365,000
2007 budget estimate..................................    37,934,231,000
Provided in the bill..................................    37,865,231,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................    -2,846,134,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -69,000,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Food Stamp Program, the Committee provides 
$37,865,231,000, a decrease of $2,846,134,000 below the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $69,000,000 
below the budget request. The total amount includes 
$3,000,000,000 for a contingency reserve in fiscal year 2007 
and $140,000,000 for The Emergency Food Assistance Program 
(TEFAP).
    The Committee does not include the provision, requested in 
the President's budget, which provides funding as a monthly 
transitional benefit to Commodity Supplemental Food Program 
(CSFP) participants. The committee provided an appropriation 
for the CSFP in the Commodity Assistance Program.
    The Committee includes statutory language to exclude 
special pay for military personnel deployed to designated 
combat areas when determining food stamp eligibility.

                      COMMODITY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM




2006 appropriation....................................      $177,572,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        70,370,000
Provided in the bill..................................       189,370,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +11,798,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................      +119,000,000




                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee provides an appropriation of $189,370,000 for 
the Commodity Assistance Program, an increase of $11,798,000 
above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase 
of $119,000,000 above the budget request.
    The recommended funding level for the Commodity 
Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) is $118,289,000, an increase 
of $11,087,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 
and an increase of $118,289,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee strongly encourages USDA to make every effort to 
maintain the fiscal year 2006 caseload by making full use of 
CSFP inventory and carryover from preceding years, and to 
access all available resources from bonus commodity holdings 
and CCC stocks.
    The Committee has included $50,000,000 for administration 
of TEFAP, an increase of $500,000 above the amount available in 
fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $500,000 above the budget 
request. These funds may be used for administration purposes or 
for food costs at the discretion of the States. In addition, 
the Committee recommendation includes language that allows the 
Secretary to transfer up to $10,000,000 of TEFAP commodity 
funding to processing, storage, and distribution costs.
    For the Food Donations Programs the Committee provides an 
appropriation of $1,081,000 for Pacific Island Assistance, an 
increase of $11,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 
2006 and an increase of $11,000 above the budget request.
    Farmers' Market Nutrition Program.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $20,000,000 for the Farmers' Market 
Nutrition Program, an increase of $200,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of $200,000 
above the budget request.
    Seniors Farmers' Market Program.--Public Law 107-171, 
Section 4402, directs mandatory funding for this program from 
funds available to the Commodity Credit Corporation. The 
funding level is $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2007.

                   nutrition programs administration





2006 appropriation....................................      $139,353,000
2007 budget estimate..................................       160,429,000
Provided in the bill..................................       142,314,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +2,961,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -18,115,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Nutrition Programs Administration, the Committee has 
provided $142,314,000, an increase of $2,961,000 above the 
amount available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of 
$18,115,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee provides $200,000 for the Food and Nutrition 
Service to continue a feasibility study, in consultation with 
WIC State agencies, to explore a common cost effective strategy 
to implement the cash value voucher for fruits and vegetables 
that may be adopted in response to recommendations outlined in 
the Institute of Medicine report on the food packages provided 
by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, 
Infants and Children (WIC).

            TITLE V--FOREIGN ASSISTANCE AND RELATED PROGRAMS

                      Foreign Agricultural Service

                                             [Dollars in thousands]

                                                                                 Transfer from
                                                                 Appropriation   loan accounts     Total, FAS

2006 appropriation............................................        $146,422        ($3,572)        ($149,994)
2007 budget estimate..........................................         157,486         (4,985)         (162,471)
Provided in the bill..........................................         156,486         (4,985)         (161,471)
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation........................................         +10,064        (+1,413)         (+11,477)
    2007 budget estimate......................................          -1,000           - - -          (-1,000)


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Foreign Agricultural Service, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $156,486,000 and transfers of 
$4,985,000, for a total salaries and expenses level of 
$161,471,000, an increase of $11,477,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006 and a decrease of $1,000,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes: $2,164,000 for pay 
cost; $1,100,000 for ICASS; $3,400,000 to offset the increased 
costs in overseas currency rates; the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level for FAS to promote American agricultural products in 
Baghdad; and, $2,900,000 for the capital surcharge being levied 
on the Foreign Agricultural Service by the State Department.
    The Committee recommendation includes the fiscal year 2006 
funding level for technical assistance for the promotion of 
specialty crop experts.
    The Committee has included bill language that allows for 
the use of not more than $5,000,000 of funds transferred to the 
Foreign Agricultural Service from the Commodity Credit 
Corporation for Information Resource Management requirements.
    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000 for the Food 
Safety Institute of the Americas in Miami. This activity was 
previously funded under the Food Safety and Inspection Service. 
The Committee believes that the Institute would better serve 
the USDA in a trade-related role, and would bolster efforts 
with international bodies such as the Inter-American Institute 
for Cooperation in Agriculture.
    The Committee recognizes the work of the Borlaug Fellows 
program and encourages the Department to continue and expand 
activities related to this program.
    The Trade Assistance Act for Farmers requires that 
technical assistance be provided to farmers negatively impacted 
by imports. This technical assistance is an education program 
that helps farmers develop marketing opportunities, increase 
production efficiency and seek alternatives to offset losses 
created by imports. The Committee directs that from the funds 
made available by the Trade Adjustment Act that $3,000,000 be 
available to the Digital Center for Risk Management Education 
to coordinate an intensive technical assistance program for 
farmers.

                             Public Law 480


                       PROGRAM AND GRANT ACCOUNTS

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The following table reflects the loan levels, subsidy 
levels, and administrative costs for all Public Law 480 
programs:

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                    Committee
                                                             FY 2006 enacted  FY 2007 estimate     provisions
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Law 480 Program Account:
    Title I--Credit sales:
        Direct loans......................................         ($74,032)          ($- - -)             - - -
        Loan subsidies....................................            64,390             - - -             - - -
        Ocean freight differential........................            11,821             - - -             - - -
    Title II--Commodities for disposition abroad:
        Program level.....................................       (1,138,500)       (1,218,500)       (1,218,500)
        Appropriation.....................................         1,138,500         1,218,500         1,223,100
    Salaries and expenses:
        FAS...............................................               166             - - -             - - -
        FSA...............................................             3,185             2,651             2,651
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
          Total, P.L. 480-S&E.............................;             3,351             2,651             2,651

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    CCC EXPORT LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES




2006 appropriation....................................        $5,227,000
2007 budget estimate..................................         5,331,000
Provided in the bill..................................         5,331,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................          +104,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For administrative expenses of the Commodity Credit 
Corporation Export Loans Program Account, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $5,331,000, an increase of 
$104,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
the same amount as the budget request.

  MCGOVERN-DOLE INTERNATIONAL FOOD FOR EDUCATION AND CHILD NUTRITION 
                             PROGRAM GRANTS




2006 appropriation....................................       $99,000,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        99,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................       100,000,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        +1,000,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................        +1,000,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For McGovern-Dole Food for Education and Child Nutrition 
Program Grants, as authorized by Section 3107 of P.L. 107-171 
(7 U.S.C. 1736o-1), the Committee provides an appropriation of 
$100,000,000, an increase of $1,000,000 above the amount 
available for fiscal year 2006, and an increase of $1,000,000 
above the budget request.

      TITLE VI--RELATED AGENCIES AND FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                      Food and Drug Administration

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES


                                                                              Drug, device and
                                                             Appropriation    animal drug user   Total, FDA, S&E;
                                                                                    fees

2006 appropriation......................................      $1,466,801,000      $356,950,000    $1,823,751,000
2007 budget estimate....................................       1,540,399,000       375,930,000     1,916,329,000
Provided in the bill....................................       1,538,452,000       375,930,000     1,914,382,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation..................................         +71,651,000       +18,980,000       +90,631,000
    2007 budget estimate................................          -1,947,000             - - -        -1,947,000


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    The Committee provides an appropriation of $1,538,452,000 
in budget authority, an increase of $71,651,000 above the 
amount available in fiscal year 2006, and a decrease of 
$1,947,000 below the budget request. In addition, the Committee 
makes available $320,600,000 in prescription drug user fees, 
$43,726,000 in medical device user fees and $11,604,000 in 
animal drug user fees for total Salaries and Expenses of 
$1,914,382,000.
    Included in the budget authority funding level are 
increases of $28,100,000 for Pandemic Preparedness; $9,960,000 
for Human Drugs; $4,940,000 for the critical path initiative; 
$4,880,000 for food safety and counter-terrorism activities; 
$8,197,000 to meet ADUFA and MDUFMA trigger needs; $14,265,000 
for GSA rental payments and White Oak consolidation, $2,475,000 
for human tissues safety, and $15,634,000 for cost of living 
expenses.
    The Committee directs that within the amount provided for 
food safety and counterterrorism activities, priority should be 
given to maintaining existing personnel and operations that are 
critical to ensuring the safety of domestic and imported food, 
rather than funding new functions, grants, or agreements.
    Within the budget authority provided for Other Activities 
in the Act, $29,965,000 is for the Office of the Commissioner; 
$37,382,000 is for the Office of Management; $6,891,000 is for 
the Office of External Relations; $5,397,000 is for the Office 
of Policy and Planning; and $6,755,000 is for central services 
for the Offices in this account. The Committee notes that funds 
for these Offices, as well as for the other activities, 
programs, or projects named in this Act, are subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of this Act.
    Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN).--The 
Committee does not approve of the redirection of funds from 
CSFAN. Funding for operations, including funding for facility 
reinspection, food and animal export certificates, the food 
contact notification program, participation in Codex 
Alimentarius activities, timely consideration of food and color 
additive petitions, monitoring for chemical contaminants, and 
otherwise meeting the statutory duties of the Federal Food, 
Drug and Cosmetic Act are continued.
    Pandemic preparedness.--The Committee provides a fiscal 
year 2007 funding level of $28,100,000 for pandemic 
preparedness, of which $20,000,000 is for the annualization of 
the vaccine-related funding that was included in the December 
2005 supplemental. That supplemental provided $18,000,000 for 
the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research and $2,000,000 
for Other Activities, and remains available until September 30, 
2007. In addition, the Committee provides an increase of 
$8,100,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level for other 
requested activities.
    Of the $8,100,000 increase, the Committee provides 
$5,100,000 for CFSAN for research on and effects of pandemic 
and avian influenza on foods, including surveillance and 
testing of food products and examining the effects of influenza 
treatments on foods for human consumption; and, $3,000,000 for 
the CVM to develop analytical methods to detect antiviral drugs 
in tissues, to detect illegal use of drugs and compounds, and 
to identify counterfeit products.
    Critical Path.--The Committee provides an increase of 
$4,940,000 for the critical path to personalized medicine 
initiative. The Committee notes that the cost of bringing a new 
drug to market ranges from $2 to $2.5 billion, and up to 15 
years to clear the FDA approval process. The Committee believes 
that this funding will help FDA to assist industry in 
modernizing medical product development. The Committee 
continues the fiscal year 2006 funding level for the C-Path 
Institute.
    Drug Safety.--The Committee provides an increase of 
$3,960,000 to modernize the Adverse Event Reporting System and 
integrate with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) 
to obtain access to drug safety information housed in the CMS 
population-based database. In addition, the Committee provides 
$1,000,000 for drug safety to allow the FDA to authenticate 
drug products, and prevent counterfeiting through the use of 
nanotechnology.
    Generic Drugs.--Since fiscal year 2005, the Congress has 
set a spending floor of $56,228,000 for the generic drug 
program. The FDA spent $61,867,000 in fiscal year 2005, and the 
FDA is planning to spend $62,884,000 in fiscal year 2006 and 
$64,663,000 in fiscal year 2007. Funding for the Office of 
Generic Drugs has increased from $26,924,000 in fiscal year 
2005, to $28,347,000 in fiscal year 2006, and the fiscal year 
2007 budget includes $29,079,000. The Committee recommendation 
includes an increase of $5,000,000 above the budget request for 
the Office of Generic Drugs. This is a vital program and the 
Committee is concerned that its potential as part of the 
solution to high quality and affordable health care is 
realized.
    Expedited filing.--The Committee directs the Commissioner 
to expedite and support the filing, review, and final action on 
any new drug application, or supplement to a new drug 
application seeking approval or a reformulated and active 
ingredient previously-approved as safe and effective, or of a 
combination of active ingredients previously-approved as safe 
and effective, that would replace or provide a therapeutic 
alternative to a currently-marketed drug product that contains 
an active ingredient that currently is the subject of diversion 
and/or abuse outside regulated channels of commerce.
    Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE).--The Committee 
provides $29,566,000 for BSE, as requested. This funding 
supports yearly inspections of all renderers and feed mills 
processing products containing prohibited materials, extending 
BSE inspections into targeted segments subject to the BSE Feed 
regulation, validating test methods for the detection of 
bovine-derived proteins in animal feed, and continuing to 
conduct research on transmissible spongiform encephalopathies 
in FDA's product centers.
    Orphan products.--The Committee directs that no less than 
$14,696,000 be available for grants and contracts awarded under 
section 5 of the Orphan Drug Act, an increase of $147,000 above 
the amount available in fiscal year 2006.
    Rent and related activities.--The Committee provides 
$25,552,000 in budget authority, an increase of $3,797,000 for 
relocation costs to the White Oak, Maryland, facility as 
requested.
    Financial management.--The Committee directs that no more 
than $9,389,000, the same amount as fiscal year 2006, is 
available for UFMS, and requires a quarterly report on the 
expenditures. The Committee reiterates that any additional 
costs for this purpose, either direct or by transfer, are 
subject to approval by the Committee.
    Human resources.--The Committee requests a report within 60 
days of enactment regarding the DHHS human resource 
consolidation including: total FDA obligations; an update on 
the performance metrics specified in the service level 
agreement between FDA and DHHS; a description of any cases in 
which the performance measures were not met during fiscal year 
2006, and the resolution of those cases; and a list of the DHHS 
operating divisions that are participating in the 
consolidation.
    Food safety.--The Committee recognizes the contributions 
which the National Center for Food Safety and Technology 
(NCFST) is making toward ensuring the security of the nation's 
food supply. The Committee directs that FDA provide the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level to NCFST through the cooperative 
agreement. This funding shall be exclusive of any additional 
initiative funds that FDA may award to NCFST.
    Test method evaluation.--The Committee directs that the 
agency continue its contract to conduct method evaluation of 
rapid test methods of fresh fruits and vegetables for 
microbiological pathogens with New Mexico State University's 
Physical Science Laboratory at the fiscal year 2006 level.
    DNA UV Molecular Filters.--The Committee directs the FDA to 
survey potential new methods of protection from UV induced DNA 
damage and to provide a report to the Committee by July 1, 2007 
that describes new technologies and potential ways for the FDA 
to assist in bringing forth such additional methods of 
preventing skin cancer.
    Women's health.--The Committee recommendation includes not 
less than $4,000,000 for the Office of Women's Health. The 
Committee continues to be committed to this function, and in 
particular activities related to cardiovascular disease in 
women and the hormone therapy education program.
    Consolidation.--The Committee directs DHHS to include all 
future consolidations that impact FDA in the President's budget 
request submitted to Congress.
    Fees.--The Committee directs that none of the funds made 
available to FDA in this bill be for any assessments, fees, or 
charges by DHHS or any other Department or Office unless such 
assessments, fees, or charges are identified in the FDA budget 
justification and expressly provided by Congress, or approved 
by Congress in the official reprogramming process as required 
in the General Provisions of this bill.
    Shellfish safety.--The Committee expects that FDA will 
continue its work with the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation 
Commission (ISSC) to promote educational and research 
activities related to shellfish safety in general, and Vibrio 
vulnificus in particular. The Committee directs the use of not 
less than $250,000 for this effort. In addition, the Committee 
expects that FDA will continue its work with ISSC through a 
memorandum of understanding, and that FDA will devote not less 
than $200,000 to that work. The Committee expects the FDA to 
require all states to work cooperatively in conformity with the 
National Shellfish Sanitation Program implemented by the ISSC.
    WERC.--The Committee expects the FDA to continue its 
support for the Waste Management Education and Research 
Consortium (WERC) and its work in food safety technology 
verification and education at the fiscal year 2006 level.
    Redeployment.--The Committee is including the redeployment 
requested by FDA for the Center for Biologics Evaluation and 
Research, the National Center for Toxicological Research, and 
for the Other Activities area on the understanding--and with 
the direction--that these reductions will not adversely affect 
public health or safety or the ability of the agency to ensure 
the safety of the products regulated.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES




2006 appropriation....................................        $7,920,000
2007 budget estimate..................................        $4,950,000
Provided in the bill..................................         4,950,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................        -2,970,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................             - - -


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For Buildings and Facilities of the Food and Drug 
Administration, the Committee provides $4,950,000, a decrease 
of $2,970,000 below the amount available in fiscal year 2006, 
and the same amount as the budget request.

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES


                  Commodity Futures Trading Commission





2006 appropriation....................................       $97,402,000
2007 budget estimate \1\..............................       127,000,000
Provided in the bill..................................       109,402,000
Comparison:
    2006 appropriation................................       +12,000,000
    2007 budget estimate..............................       -17,598,000

\1\ Funded by a proposed fee on futures transactions.

                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the Committee 
provides an appropriation of $109,402,000, an increase of 
$12,000,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and 
a decrease of $17,598,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee does not adopt the President's request to 
impose fees on futures transactions, totaling $127,000,000.
    The Committee recommendation includes the requested 
increases for pay costs and benefits; for program funding for 
enforcement, human resources and outreach activities; and for 
completion of contract requirements, including rent. Funding is 
not provided to increase pay parity to the level of other 
financial agencies, or hire 37 additional staff.

                       Farm Credit Administration


                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES




2006 limitation.......................................     ($44,250,000)
2007 budget estimate..................................             - - -
Provided in the bill..................................      (44,250,000)
Comparison:
    2006 limitation...................................             - - -
    2007 budget estimate..............................     (+44,250,000)


                          COMMITTEE PROVISIONS

    For a limitation on the expenses of the Farm Credit 
Administration, the Committee provides $44,250,000, the same as 
the amount available for fiscal year 2006 and an increase of 
$44,250,000 above the budget request.

                     TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONS

              INCLUDING RESCISSIONS AND TRANSFERS OF FUNDS

    The General Provisions contained in the accompanying bill 
for fiscal year 2006 are fundamentally the same as those 
included in last year's appropriations bill.
    Section 716: Language is included that provides $2,500,000 
for a hunger fellowship program.
    Section 717: Language is included that provides $250,000 
for the National Sheep Improvement Center.
    Section 718: Language is included that allows funds to be 
used to carry out a competitive grants program.
    Section 719: Language is included that limits the dam 
rehabilitation program.
    Section 720: Language is included that limits the wetlands 
reserve program.
    Section 721: Language is included that limits the 
environmental quality incentives program.
    Section 722: Language is included that limits the broadband 
program.
    Section 723: Language is included that allows for 
reimbursement of the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust.
    Section 724: Language is included that limits the Value-
Added Market Development Grants Program.
    Section 725: Language is included that ensures that 
sufficient funds are available to pay the subsidy costs for 
note guarantees for certain rural electric programs.
    Section 726: Language is included that limits the 
conservation security program.
    Section 727: Language is included that limits the Wildlife 
Habitat Incentive Program.
    Section 728: Language is included that limits the Farm and 
Ranch Lands Protection Program.
    Section 729: Language is included that limits the Ground 
and Surface Water Conservation Program.
    Section 730: Language is included related to final 
rulemaking on cost-sharing for APHIS animal and plant health 
emergency programs.
    Section 731: Language is included to allow the disbursement 
of certain prior year obligations.
    Section 732: Language is included related to certain 
grants.
    Section 733: Language is included that limits the 
Agricultural Management Assistance Program.
    Section 734: Language is included regarding the 
recertification of rural status.
    Section 735: Language is included that relates to 
government sponsored news stories.
    Section 736: The Committee includes $15,600,000 for a 
specialty crops competitiveness program.
    Section 737: Language is included that limits certain 
mandatory funds.
    Section 738: Language is included that provides funding for 
a Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Program.
    Section 739: Language is included related to competitive 
sourcing related to rural development and farm loan programs.
    Section 740: Language is included that rescinds certain 
funds.
    Section 741: Language is included related to the premium 
discounting program authorized by Section 508(e)(3) of the 
Federal Crop Insurance Act.
    Section 742: Language is included regarding the prohibition 
of funds for certain FDA activities.
    Section 743: Language is included regarding certain fees.
    Section 744: Language is included that rescinds certain 
funds.
    Section 745: The Committee includes language that provides 
that certain locations shall be considered eligible for rural 
housing loan and grant programs.
    Section 746: Language is included regarding funding 
allocations for the expanded food nutrition and education 
program.
    Section 747: Language is included that limits 
implementation of a rule concerning countries eligible to 
export poultry products to the United States.
    Section 748: Language is included regarding equine health 
certification forms.
    Section 749: Language is included to extend the peanut 
storage program.
    Section 750: Language is included to prohibit the use of 
Food and Drug Administration funds for activities related to 
importation of drugs.
    Section 751: Language is included regarding Food and Drug 
Administration requirements for drug safety studies.
    Section 752: Language is included to extend the milk price 
support program until September 30, 2007.

              HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORT REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

                        CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives states that:

          Each report of a committee on a bill or joint 
        resolution of a public character, shall include a 
        statement citing the specific powers granted to the 
        Congress in the Constitution to enact the law proposed 
        by the bill or joint resolution.

    The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to 
report this legislation from Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States of America which 
states:

          No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
        consequence of Appropriations made by law * * *

    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

                           Transfer of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statement is submitted 
describing the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying 
bill.
    1. Agriculture Buildings and Facilities and Rental 
Payments.--The bill allows funds to be transferred to cover the 
costs of new or replacement space.
    2. Hazardous Materials Management.--The bill allows the 
funds appropriated to the Department for hazardous materials 
management to be transferred to agencies of the Department as 
required.
    3. Departmental Administration.--The bill requires 
reimbursement for expenses related to certain hearings.
    4. Office of the Assistant Secretary for Congressional 
Relations.--The bill allows a portion of the funds appropriated 
to the Office of the Assistant Secretary to be transferred to 
agencies.
    5. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.--Authority 
is included to enable the Secretary of Agriculture to transfer 
from other appropriations or funds of the Department such sums 
as may be necessary to combat emergency outbreaks of certain 
diseases of animals, plants, and poultry.
    6. Agricultural Marketing Service.--The bill limits the 
transfer of section 32 funds to purposes specified in the bill.
    7. Farm Service Agency.--The bill provides that funds 
provided to other accounts in the agency may be merged with the 
salaries and expenses account of the Farm Service Agency.
    8. Dairy Indemnity Program.--The bill authorizes the 
transfer of funds to the Commodity Credit Corporation, by 
reference.
    9. Agricultural Credit Insurance Fund.--The bill provides 
that funds from the account shall be transferred to the Farm 
Service Agency salaries and expenses account, and that funds 
may be transferred among lending programs.
    10. Rural Community Advancement Program.--The bill provides 
that prior year balances for high cost energy grants shall be 
transferred to and merged with the High Energy Costs Grants 
Account.
    11. Rural Development Salaries and Expenses.--The bill 
provides that prior year balances from certain accounts shall 
be transferred to and merged with this account.
    12. Rural Housing Insurance Fund program account; Rural 
Development Loan Fund program account; Rural Electrification 
and Telecommunications Loans program account; and Multifamily 
Housing Revitalization program account.--The bill provides that 
administrative funds shall be transferred to the Rural 
Development Salaries and Expenses Account.
    13. Rural Housing Insurance Fund program account and Rural 
Housing Assistance Grants account.--The bill provides that 
balances for demonstration programs shall be transferred to and 
merged with the Rural Housing Service, Multifamily Housing 
Revitalization Program Account.
    14. Child Nutrition Programs.--The bill includes authority 
to transfer section 32 funds to these programs.
    15. Foreign Agricultural Service.--The bill allows for the 
transfer of funds from the Commodity Credit Corporation Export 
Loan Program Account and from the Public Law 480 Program 
Account.
    16. Public Law 480 Title I Program Account.--The bill 
allows funds to be transferred to the Farm Service Agency, 
Salaries and Expenses accounts.
    17. Commodity Credit Corporation Export Loans Program.--The 
bill provides for transfer of funds to the Foreign Agricultural 
Service and to the Farm Service Agency for overhead expenses 
associated with credit reform.
    18. Food and Drug Administration, Salaries and Expenses.--
The bill allows funds to be transferred among activities.

               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law. In most instances, these 
provisions have been included in prior appropriations bills, 
often at the request of or with the knowledge and consent of 
the responsible legislative committees.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities of those Federal agencies which 
require annual authorization or additional legislation which to 
date has not been enacted.
    Language is included in the bill in several accounts that 
earmarks funds for empowerment zones and enterprise communities 
as authorized by title XIII of the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act of 1995.
    The bill includes a number of provisions which place 
limitations on the use of funds in the bill or change existing 
limitations and which might, under some circumstances, be 
construed as changing the application of existing law:
    1. Office of the Secretary.--Language is included to limit 
the amount of funds for official reception and representation 
expenses, as determined by the Secretary.
    2. Common Computing Environment.--Language is included to 
provide that obligation of funds shall be consistent with the 
Service Center Modernization Plan, and with the concurrence of 
the Chief Information Officer.
    3. Agriculture Buildings and Facilities and Rental 
Payments.--Language is included that allows for the 
reconfiguration and release of space back into the General 
Services Administration inventory in order to reduce space 
rental cost for space not needed for USDA programs.
    4. Departmental Administration.--Language is included to 
reimburse the agency for travel expenses incident to the 
holding of hearings.
    5. Agricultural Research Service.--Language is included 
that allows the Agricultural Research Service to grant 
easements at the Beltsville, MD agricultural research center.
    6. Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension 
Service.--The bill includes language that prohibits funds from 
being used to carry out research related to the production, 
processing or marketing of tobacco or tobacco products.
    7. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.--A provision 
carried in the bill since fiscal year 1973 regarding state 
matching funds has been continued to assure more effective 
operation of the brucellosis control program through state cost 
sharing, with resulting savings to the Federal budget.
    Language is included to allow APHIS to recoup expenses 
incurred from providing technical assistance goods, or services 
to non-APHIS personnel, and to allow transfers of funds for 
Agricultural emergencies.
    Language is included to restrict obligation of funds for an 
animal identification program.
    8. Agricultural Marketing Service.--The bill includes 
language that allows the Secretary to charge user fees for AMS 
activity related to preparation of standards.
    9. Agricultural Marketing Service, Limitation on 
Administrative Expenses.--The bill includes language to allow 
AMS to exceed the limitation on administrative expenses by 10 
percent with notification to the Appropriations Committees. 
This allows flexibility in case crop size is understated and/or 
other uncontrollable events occur.
    10. Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards 
Administration, Inspection and Weighing Services.--The bill 
includes authority to exceed the limitation on inspection and 
weighing services by 10 percent with notification to the 
Appropriations Committees. This allows for flexibility if 
export activities require additional supervision and oversight, 
or other uncontrollable factors occur.
    11. Food Safety and Inspection Service.--Language is 
included to allow construction of a laboratory facility.
    12. Dairy Indemnity Program.--Language is included by 
reference that allows the Secretary to utilize the services of 
the Commodity Credit Corporation for the purpose of making 
dairy indemnity payments.
    13. Risk Management Agency.--Language is included to limit 
the amount of funds for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    14. Commodity Credit Corporation Fund.--Language is 
included to provide for the reimbursement appropriation. 
Language is also included which limits the amount of funds that 
can be spent on operation and maintenance costs of CCC 
hazardous waste sites.
    15. Natural Resources Conservation Service--Conservation 
Operations.--Language which has been included in the bill since 
1938 prohibits construction of buildings on land not owned by 
the government, although construction on land owned by states 
and counties is authorized by basic law.
    16. Watershed and Flood Prevention Operations.--Language 
which was included in the Emergency Jobs Bill of 1983 (P.L. 98-
8) and all bills since 1984 provides that funds may be used for 
rehabilitation of existing works.
    17. Rural Housing Service--Rental Assistance Program.--
Language is included which provides that agreements entered 
into during the current fiscal year be funded for a one-year 
period.
    18. Rural Electrification and Telecommunications Loan 
program account.--Language is included to allow borrowers' 
interest rates for loans to exceed seven percent.
    19. Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, 
Infants, and Children (WIC).--Language is included to: provide 
funds for a breastfeeding support initiative; prohibit funds 
from being used for studies and evaluations; pay administrative 
expenses of clinics except those that have an announced policy 
prohibiting smoking within the space used to carry out the 
program; purchase infant formula except in accordance with law; 
or pay for activities that are not fully reimbursed by other 
departments or agencies unless authorized by law.
    20. Food Stamp Program.--Language is included to exclude 
special pay for military personnel deployed to designated 
combat areas.
    21. Foreign Agricultural Service.--Language carried since 
1979 enables this agency to use funds received by an advance or 
by reimbursement to carry out its activities involving 
international development and technical cooperation. Language 
is included to limit the amount of funds for official reception 
and representation expenses. Language is included to allow 
certain funds transferred from the Commodity Credit Corporation 
to be used for information resource management.
    22. Commodity Futures Trading Commission.--Language is 
included to limit the amount of funds for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    23. General Provisions.--
          Section 702: This provision, carried since 1976, is 
        again included which provides that certain 
        appropriations in this Act shall remain available until 
        expended where the programs or projects involved are 
        continuing in nature under the provisions of 
        authorizing legislation, but for which such legislation 
        may not specifically provide for extended availability. 
        This authority tends to result in savings by preventing 
        the wasteful practice often found in government of 
        rushing to commit funds at the end of the fiscal year 
        without due regard to the value of the purpose for 
        which the funds are used. Such extended availability is 
        also essential in view of the long lead time frequently 
        required to negotiate agreements or contracts which 
        normally extend over a period of more than one year. 
        Under these conditions such authority is commonly 
        provided in Appropriations Acts where omitted from 
        basic law. These provisions have been carried through 
        the years in this Act to facilitate efficient and 
        effective program execution and to assure maximum 
        savings. They involve the following items: Animal and 
        Plant Health Inspection Service, the contingency fund 
        to meet emergency conditions, information technology 
        infrastructure, the cotton pests program, low pathogen 
        avian influenza program, high pathogen avian influenza 
        program, up to 25 percent of the screwworm program, up 
        to $33,107,000 for an animal identification program, up 
        to $3,934,000 for scrapie-related indemnities, up to 
        $682,000 in the brucellosis program for indemnities, up 
        to $2,888,000 in the chronic wasting disease program 
        for indemnities, up to $2,387,000 in the tuberculosis 
        program for indemnities, up to $1,000,000 for wildlife 
        services methods development, fruit fly program, 
        emerging plant pests, up to $1,000,000 for Wildlife 
        Services aviation safety, and up to $4,900,000 for a 
        vaccine bank; Food Safety and Inspection Service, field 
        automation and information management project; 
        Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension 
        Service, funds for competitive research grants; Farm 
        Service Agency, salaries and expenses to county 
        committees; Foreign Agricultural Service, middle-income 
        country training program and up to $2,000,000 for 
        foreign currency fluctuations.
          Section 706: This provision provides that none of the 
        funds in this Act may be made available to pay indirect 
        costs charged against competitive agricultural 
        research, education, or extension grants awarded by the 
        Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension 
        Service in excess of 22 percent of total direct costs, 
        except for grants available under the Small Business 
        Innovation and Development Act.
          Section 707: This provision allows funds made 
        available in the current fiscal year for the Rural 
        Development Loan Fund program account; the Rural 
        Electrification and Telecommunications Loans program 
        account; and the Rural Housing Insurance Fund program 
        account to remain available until expended to disburse 
        obligations. The Credit Reform Act requires that the 
        lifetime costs of loans be appropriated. Current law 
        requires that funds unexpended after five years expire. 
        The life of some loans extends well beyond the five-
        year period and this provision allows funds 
        appropriated to remain available until the loans are 
        closed out.
          Section 708: Provides that of the funds made 
        available, not more than $1,800,000 shall be used to 
        cover expenses of activities related to all advisory 
        committees, panels, commissions, and task forces of the 
        Department of Agriculture except for panels used to 
        comply with negotiated rule makings and panels used to 
        evaluate competitively awarded grants.
          Section 709: Provides that none of the funds may be 
        used to carry out certain provisions of meat and 
        poultry inspection acts.
          Section 710: This provision prohibits any employee of 
        the Department of Agriculture from being detailed or 
        assigned to any other agency or office of the 
        Department for more than 30 days unless the 
        individual's employing agency or office is fully 
        reimbursed by the receiving agency or office for the 
        salary and expenses of the employee for the period of 
        assignment.
          Section 711: This provision prohibits the Department 
        of Agriculture from transmitting or making available to 
        any non-Department of Agriculture or the Food and Drug 
        Administration employee questions or responses to 
        questions that are a result of information requested 
        for the appropriations hearing process.
          Section 712: Language is included that requires 
        approval of the Chief Information Officer and the 
        concurrence of the Executive Information Technology 
        Investment Review Board for acquisition of new 
        information technology systems or significant upgrades, 
        and that prohibits the transfer of funds to the Office 
        of the Chief Information Officer without the 
        notification of the Committees on Appropriations of 
        both Houses of Congress.
          Section 713: Language is included that requires 
        certain reprogramming procedures of funds provided in 
        Appropriations Acts.
          Section 714: Language is included that prohibits 
        funds from being used to prepare a budget submission to 
        Congress that assumes reductions from the previous 
        year's budget due to user fee proposals unless the 
        submission also identifies spending reductions which 
        should occur if the user fees are not enacted.
          Section 715: Language is included that provides that 
        no funds may be used to close or relocate a state Rural 
        Development office unless or until cost effectiveness 
        and enhancement of program delivery have been 
        determined.
          Section 716: Language is included that provides 
        $2,500,000 for a hunger fellowship program.
          Section 717: Language is included that provides funds 
        for the National Sheep Improvement Center used to carry 
        out a competitive grants program.
          Section 723: Language is included that allows for 
        reimbursement of the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust.
          Section 725: Language is included that ensures that 
        sufficient funds are available to pay the subsidy costs 
        for note guarantees for certain rural electric 
        programs.
          Section 730: Language is included related to final 
        rulemaking on cost-sharing for APHIS animal and plant 
        health emergency programs.
          Section 732: Language is included regarding grants.
          Section 734: Language is included regarding the 
        recertification of rural status.
          Section 735: Language is included that relates to 
        government sponsored news stories.
          Section 736: The Committee includes funding for a 
        specialty crops competitiveness program.
          Section 738: Language is included that provides 
        funding for a Fruit and Vegetable Pilot Program.
          Section 739: Language is included related to 
        competitive sourcing related to rural development or 
        farm loan programs.
          Section 740: Language is included that rescinds 
        certain funds.
          Section 741: Language is included related to the 
        premium discounting program authorized by Section 
        508(e)(3) of the Federal Crop Insurance Act.
          Section 742: Language is included regarding the 
        prohibition of funds for certain FDA activities.
          Section 743: Language is included regarding certain 
        fees.
          Section 744: Language is included that rescinds 
        certain funds.
          Section 745: The Committee includes language that 
        provides that certain locations shall be considered 
        eligible for rural housing loan and grant programs.
          Section 746: Language is included regarding funding 
        allocations for the expanded food nutrition and 
        education program.
          Section 749: Language is included to extend the 
        peanut storage program.
          Section 751: Language is included regarding Food and 
        Drug Administration authorities and requirements for 
        drug safety studies.
          Section 752: Language is included to extend the milk 
        price support program.

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

        Compliance With Clause 3(e) of Rule XIII (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


   SECTION 716 OF THE AGRICULTURE, RURAL, DEVELOPMENT, FOOD AND DRUG 
     ADMINISTRATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2007


                    (Division A of Public Law 108-7)

    Sec. 721. In addition to amounts otherwise appropriated or 
made available by this Act, $2,500,000 is appropriated for the 
purpose of providing Bill Emerson and Mickey Leland Hunger 
Fellowships[, as authorized by section 4404 of Public Law 107-
171 (2 U.S.C. 1161)] through the Congressional Hunger Center.

             FARM SECURITY AND RURAL INVESTMENT ACT OF 2002




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE I--COMMODITY PROGRAMS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle C--Peanuts

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1307. MARKETING ASSISTANCE LOANS AND LOAN DEFICIENCY PAYMENTS FOR 
                    PEANUTS.

  (a) Nonrecourse Loans Available.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (6) Payment of peanut storage costs.--Effective for 
        the 2002 through [2006] 2007 crops of peanuts, to 
        ensure proper storage of peanuts for which a loan is 
        made under this section, the Secretary shall use the 
        funds of the Commodity Credit Corporation to pay 
        storage, handling, and other associated costs. This 
        authority terminates beginning with the [2007] 2008 
        crop of peanuts.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle E--Dairy

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1502. NATIONAL DAIRY MARKET LOSS PAYMENTS.

  (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Amount.--Payments to a producer under this section shall 
be calculated by multiplying (as determined by the Secretary)--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3)(A) during the period beginning on the first day 
        of the month the producers on a dairy farm enter into a 
        contract under this section and ending on September 30, 
        2005, 45 percent; and
          (B) during the period beginning on October 1, 2005, 
        and ending on [August 31, 2007, 34 percent; and] 
        September 30, 2007, 34 percent.
          [(C) during the period beginning on September 1, 
        2007, 0 percent.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:
      

                                             [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                 Appropriations
    Program and last year of authorization           Authorization level        in last year of   Appropriations
                                                                                 authorization     in this bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act
 (42 U.S.C. 1766(q)(3))
    Food and Nutrition Service:
        Child and Adult Care Food Program....  $1,000                                    $1,000           $1,000
Commodity Futures Trading Commission.........  Indefinite                               $93,572         $109,402
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following information is 
submitted describing the rescissions recommended in the 
accompanying bill:
    The bill proposes rescissions of $78,514,000 of funds 
derived from interest on the cushion of credit payments in 
fiscal year 2007 under the Rural Economic Development Loans 
Program Account, which is an annual technical adjustment 
contained in the budget estimates; $25,265,000 from the High 
Energy Cost grants account; and $9,900,000 from unobligated 
balances in Section 32.

                   Comparison With Budget Resolution

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, which requires that the report accompanying a bill 
providing new budget authority contain a statement detailing 
how that authority compares with the reports submitted under 
section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from 
the Committee's section 302(a) allocation. This information 
follows:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  302(b) allocation             This bill
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                     Full committee data                         Budget                    Budget
                                                               authority     Outlays     authority     Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison with Budget Resolution:
    Discretionary...........................................      $17,812      $19,519      $17,812  \1\ $19,527
    Mandatory...............................................       70,945       52,946       70,945       52,946
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The bill is over the suballocation in discretionary outlays as the result of an amendment adopted during
  Full Committee consideration. This overage will be eliminated at the next opportunity so that the outlays in
  the bill will not exceed the suballocation.

                      Five-Year Outlay Projections

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill:

             [Five year projections, in millions of dollars]
Outlays:
    2007..............................................            61,617
    2008..............................................            10,792
    2009..............................................             1,377
    2010..............................................               714
    2011 and beyond...................................             2,676


               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the financial assistance to 
state and local governments is as follows:


                        [In millions of dollars]
New budget authority..................................            24,991
Fiscal year 2007 outlays resulting therefrom..........            22,917


                     Program, Project, and Activity

    During fiscal year 2007 for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
the following information provides the definition of the term 
``program, project, and activity'' for departments and agencies 
under the jurisdiction of the Agriculture, Rural Development, 
Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee. The term ``program, project, and activity'' shall 
include the most specific level of budget items identified in 
the Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
Administration, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act of 
2007, the House and Senate Committee reports, and the 
conference report and accompanying joint explanatory statement 
of the managers of the committee of conference.
    If a Sequestration Order is necessary, in implementing the 
required Presidential Order, departments and agencies shall 
apply any percentage reduction for fiscal year 2007 pursuant to 
the provisions of Public Law 99-177 to all items specified in 
the explanatory notes submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate in support of the fiscal 
year 2007 budget estimates, as amended, for such departments 
and agencies, as modified by congressional action, and in 
addition:
    For the Agricultural Research Service the definition shall 
include specific research locations as identified in the 
explanatory notes and lines of research specifically identified 
in the reports of the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees.
    For the Natural Resources Conservation Service the 
definition shall include individual flood prevention projects 
as identified in the explanatory notes and individual 
operational watershed projects as summarized in the notes.
    For the Farm Service Agency the definition shall include 
individual state, district, and county offices.



  ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF ROSA L. DeLAURO, MAURICE D. HINCHEY, SAM FARR, 
              ALLEN BOYD, MARCY KAPTUR, AND DAVID R. OBEY

    The chairman's mark, as presented to the subcommittee, made 
a number of improvements in the administration's budget 
request. But the bill became significantly better because of 
Democratic amendments in subcommittee and full committee:
           Rep. DeLauro offered an amendment, passed at 
        subcommittee, to stop an ill-advised Bush 
        administration proposal to allow processed chicken from 
        China to enter the U.S., despite concerns about avian 
        influenza.
           The manager's amendment adopted in full 
        committee included an additional increase of $4 million 
        for the Office of Generics Drugs, as requested by Rep. 
        DeLauro.
           Rep. Obey offered an amendment, adopted in 
        full committee, to extend the MILC program through 
        September 30, 2007, instead of arbitrarily cutting it 
        off on August 31, 2007.
           Rep. Hinchey offered an amendment, passed in 
        full committee, to strike weak language on conflicts of 
        interest by FDA advisory committee members, and replace 
        it with language passed by the full House last year 
        that would prohibit persons with such conflicts from 
        voting on these panels.
           Rep. DeLauro's amendment to give FDA the 
        authority to order drugs from the market if 
        manufacturers refuse to conduct needed safety studies 
        was agreed to in full committee.
    These amendments addressed key problems in FDA's 
operations, provided fair treatment for America's dairy 
farmers, and helped protect the public health.
    But we would also like to make Members aware of our 
disappointment with the Committee's failure to pass, by a 
rollcall vote of 24-36, the amendment by Rep. DeLauro to help 
secure our nation's energy supplies and strengthen our rural 
communities. The DeLauro amendment was part of a fiscally 
disciplined, balanced Democratic approach that would return 
Congressional budgeting to the principle of ``paying-as-you-
go,'' providing additional funding for key domestic investments 
and reducing the deficit by scaling back the supersized average 
tax cut for those making more than $1 million a year.
    The amendment proposed to invest $500 million in a number 
of key USDA programs, in order to reenergize our farm economy 
and communities and jumpstart our country's energy independence 
efforts.
    To promote American energy independence, the amendment: 
provided funding for the first time ever for the Biorefinery 
Development Grants program, at $50 million; restored $120 
million to the Bioenergy Program; funded the Value-Added 
Agricultural Product Market Development Grant program at its 
authorized level of $40 million; provided the first funding for 
the energy audit program to help farmers and ranchers assess 
their options for energy conservation and renewable fuel usage; 
doubled funding for the section 9006 renewable energy/energy 
efficiency program and the section 9008 biomass R&D; program; 
set aside funds for loans to small businesses in rural areas 
for improving access to renewable fuel filling stations in 
rural areas; and provided an increase of $25 million for our 
nation's agriculture schools for research on biofuels.
    On the rural development side, the DeLauro amendment 
increased funding for rural water and sewer grants by 44% over 
the bill; doubled the 2006 level of funding for grants for 
essential rural community facilities, such as libraries and 
health clinics; provided a 40% increase in funding in the bill 
for distance learning and telemedicine grants that help link 
remote rural communities with remote education institutions and 
medical experts; and provided a 75% increase in funding for 
broadband grants to rural communities to give access to modern 
high-speed telecommunications services. We know these funds 
would be used immediately--USDA turned away many, many 
qualified communities that applied for funding under these 
programs last year because it ran out of money.
    The amendment was fully paid for by asking those making 
more than $1 million per year to forgo less than $1,400 of the 
more than $114,000 they receive from the Republican tax cut 
bills. American families are sacrificing enough--it is time 
this Congress asked the most well-off to do their part meet 
this challenge, as well. The failure of the Majority to adopt 
this responsible, fiscally disciplined amendment is 
particularly ironic given that the next day, the Majority 
pushed a bill through the House that provides taxpayers with 
incomes greater than $1 million per year tax cuts of $42,000, 
while families with incomes of $50,000 a year would only get on 
average a $46 tax cut.
    Americans are ready to declare their energy independence. 
And with this amendment, we could have made that possible by 
tapping the promise our farms hold to reduce our dependence on 
oil and providing a more secure economic future for our 
farmers.
    Because of the importance of these issues to our nation and 
our rural communities, we plan to submit the amendment to the 
Rules Committee and request that its consideration be made in 
order when the bill comes before the House.
    We look forward to that debate.
                                   Dave Obey.
                                   Maurice Hinchey.
                                   Sam Farr.
                                   Rosa L. DeLauro.
                                   Marcy Kaptur.
                                   F. Allen Boyd, Jr.