Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-515

======================================================================




  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2007

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 5647]

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS




 June 20, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed








            DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES,

     AND EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2007






109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-515

======================================================================




  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2007

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 5647]

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS




 June 20, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed


                                 _____

                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
                             WASHINGTON: 2006        

 28-324








109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-515

======================================================================



 
  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2007

                                _______
                                

 June 20, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Regula, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5647]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services (except the Food and Drug Administration and the 
Indian Health Service), and Education, Committee for Purchase 
from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled, Corporation for 
National and Community Service, Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, 
Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission, Institute of 
Museum and Library Services, Medicare Payment Advisory 
Commission, National Commission on Libraries and Information 
Science, National Council on Disability, National Labor 
Relations Board, National Mediation Board, Occupational Safety 
and Health Review Commission, Railroad Retirement Board, and 
the Social Security Administration for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2007, and for other purposes.

                Summary of Estimates and Appropriations

    The following table compares on a summary basis the 
appropriations including trust funds for fiscal year 2006, the 
budget request for fiscal year 2007 and the Committee 
recommendation for fiscal year 2007 in the accompanying bill.

                                 2007 LABOR, HHS, EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS BILL
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year--              2007 committee
                                                          ---------------------------------     compared to--
                                                                                           ---------------------
                                                              2006       2007       2007       2006       2007
                                                            adjusted    budget   committee   adjusted    budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor......................................    $14,531    $14,080    $14,605       +$74      +$525
    Advances.............................................      2,537      2,531      2,481        -56        -50
Department of Health and Human Services..................    475,252    473,290    475,117       -135     +1,827
    Advances.............................................     67,103     69,456     69,456     +2,353          0
Department of Education..................................     62,962     57,168     58,536     -4,426     +1,368
    Advances.............................................     15,034     15,034     15,484       +450       +450
Related Agencies.........................................     48,933     48,897     48,685       -248       -212
    Advances.............................................     11,510     16,810     16,810     +5,300          0
Grand Total, current year................................    601,678    593,435    596,943     -4,735     +3,508
    Advances.............................................     96,184    103,831    104,231     +8,047       +400
Current year total using 302(b) scorekeeping.............    601,398    592,485    596,502     -4,896     +4,017
    Mandatory............................................    460,310    454,691    454,572     -5,738       -119
    Discretionary........................................    141,088    137,794    141,930       +842     +4,136
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                           PROGRAM LEVEL DISCRETIONARY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year--              2007 committee
                                                          ---------------------------------     compared to--
                                                                                           ---------------------
                                                              2006       2007       2007       2006       2007
                                                            adjusted    budget   committee   adjusted    budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor......................................    $11,534    $10,983    $11,458       -$76       $475
Department of Health and Human Services..................     62,698     61,793     63,738     +1,040     +1,945
Department of Education..................................     55,953     54,331     56,149       +196     +1,818
Related Agencies.........................................     11,346     11,638     11,426        +80       -212
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
    Subtotal Program Level...............................   $141,531   $138,745   $142,771    +$1,240    +$4,026
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      General Summary of the Bill

    Funding levels in the fiscal year 2007 appropriation bill 
for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, 
Education and Related Agencies reflect the Committee's attempt 
to establish priorities within the very stringent limitations. 
This year the Committee has made a special effort to increase 
funding for programs that help low and moderate income people 
and represent a core Federal responsibility. For example, 
within the allocation, major increases over 2006 or the Budget 
Request for 2007 are being provided for Pell Grants, vocational 
education, special education, community health centers and 
immunization programs.
    Bill total.--Total funding, including offsets, for fiscal 
year 2007 in the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, Education and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
2007 is $596,502,468,000.
    Discretionary programs.--For Discretionary accounts for 
2007 the bill provides $141,930,000,000, including offsets. 
This is $842,180,000 above the fiscal year 2006 comparable 
level.
    Mandatory programs.--The bill provides $454,572,468,000 for 
entitlement programs in fiscal year 2007. This is 
$5,737,076,000 below the fiscal year 2006 comparable level. 
Funding requirements for entitlement programs are determined by 
the basic authorizing statutes. Mandatory programs include 
general fund support for the Medicare and Medicaid programs, 
Supplemental Security Income, Trade Adjustment Assistance and 
Black Lung payments. The following chart indicates the funding 
levels for the major mandatory programs in fiscal years 2006 
and 2007.

                                                    MANDATORY
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                           Fiscal Year 2006   Fiscal Year 2007        Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:
    Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances.......           $966,400           $938,600           -$27,800
    Advances to the UI and other trust funds...........            465,000            452,000            -13,000
    Special Benefits...................................            237,000            230,000             -7,000
    Special Benefits for Disabled Coal Miners..........            232,250            229,373             -2,877
    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation              96,081            102,307             +6,226
     Fund..............................................
    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund...................          1,068,000          1,071,000             +3,000
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.............             60,972             62,802             +1,830
    Medicaid current law benefits......................        204,166,276        189,499,928        -14,666,348
    Medicaid State and local administration............          9,803,100          9,349,700           -453,400
    CMS Vaccines for Children..........................          1,502,333          2,006,445           +504,112
    Medicare Payments to Healthcare Trust Funds........        178,647,200        197,017,391        +18,370,191
    Welfare Payments...................................             39,000             39,300               +300
    Child Support Enforcement..........................          4,079,494          4,076,162             -3,332
    Social Services Block Grant........................          1,700,000          1,700,000                  0
    Promoting Safe and Stable Families.................            305,000            345,000            +40,000
    Payments to States for Foster Care and Adoption....          4,940,800          5,211,000           +270,200
    Medical Benefits for Commissioned Officers.........            328,552            341,694            +13,142
Department of Education:
    Vocational Rehabilitation..........................          2,720,192          2,837,160           +116,968
    Pell Grant Shortfall Payoff........................          4,300,000                  0         -4,300,000
Related Agencies:
    Payments to Social Security Trust Funds............             20,470             27,756             +7,286
    Supplemental Security Income.......................         37,566,174         37,231,000           -335,174
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Comparisons

    Unless otherwise specified, the descriptions that follow 
highlight the program content and the significant differences 
that are occurring in 2007 compared to the 2006 enacted levels 
(including the across the board reduction enacted subsequent to 
the enactment of the 2006 appropriations acts.) One time 
supplementals are not included for purposes of comparison since 
as one-time appropriations there is no assumption that funds 
would be included in baseline funding for those programs. 
Nevertheless, comparisons to other benchmarks can be found in 
the table at the back of this report as well as in separately 
issued tables or analyses that the Committee may issue in the 
future.

                             Operating Plan

    The table at the end of this report also provides further 
details concerning the distribution of funds among activities 
and sub-activities that are recommended in this Act.
    Unless specified otherwise in the bill or this accompanying 
report, the amounts included in the budget request shall be the 
amounts provided for fiscal year 2007. Within 45 days of 
enactment each Department and related Agency funded by this Act 
shall submit an operating plan to the Committees on 
Appropriations in the House and the Senate for approval. The 
operating plan should detail any reprogramming requests which 
are based on information obtained since the submission of the 
Budget in February 2006 or based on the effects of the amounts 
provided in this Act.

                 Program Assessment Rating Tools (PART)

    A general provision is included in this Act to increase the 
role of the Congress in the Administration's PART studies, 
which have increasingly become the basis for individual budget 
requests and legislative proposals that consolidate and reduce 
program levels.
    Unless specifically exempted, no funds are provided in this 
Act to conduct or participate in the conduct of a PART analysis 
or study unless the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
and Senate have approved of the study, inclusive of the data on 
which the analysis will be based, the methodology to be 
employed and the relative weight of each of the four factors 
that will be assigned to the study in determining a final 
score.

                        E-Gov Initiative (E-Gov)

    Language is included as a general provision to this Act 
precluding the use or transfer of funds provided in this Act to 
implement the Government-wide ``E-Gov Initiative'' unless a 
reprogramming request is included in the initial or an amended 
operating plan. The Committee has become increasingly concerned 
over the failure of this initiative to produce meaningful 
results, the huge reported costs of implementation and the 
resulting delay or loss of important information technology 
investments that were requested and approved by the Congress. 
The Committee is also concerned about the large number of 
complaints it has received from career program managers who 
have been forced to transfer funds, shut down innovative and 
creative web sites and delay the development of critical 
technology because they have had to conform to inferior Agency-
wide Web sites or transfer funds to the Departmental Chief 
Information Officers (CIO) for subsequent transfer to other 
Departments or Agencies with lead responsibility for a specific 
E-Gov initiatives. The amounts being assessed on program 
offices appear to have no relationship to the benefits that are 
returned to the assessed programs. Further, claimed savings 
associated with the ``E-Gov Initiative'' can not be verified. 
Previous attempts by the Committee to ensure that the 
initiative would not impede the development of critical 
technology and the continuation of valuable, innovative or 
creative web sites have been ignored. In fact, new initiatives 
have been introduced which means higher assessments on the 
programs in the future.
    Therefore, concurrent with the submission of any request to 
reprogram or transfer funds in this Act for any purpose 
relating directly or indirectly to the ``E-Gov Initiative,'' 
the lead career executive in the program or office being 
assessed must submit a certification that: (1) states and 
attests to the accuracy of previously estimated savings the 
Department assumed to be associated with the ``E-Gov 
Initiative'' and (2) certifies that the benefits to the program 
or office that would be derived from the proposed transfer 
exceed the benefits to the program or office from the use of 
funds for the purposes for which funds were originally 
appropriated. Failure to submit this certification will 
automatically result in a denial of the request.

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


                 Employment and Training Administration


                    TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

                         (INCLUDING RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends $4,966,899,000 for this account, 
which provides funding authorized primarily by the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). This is $150,567,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 level ($121,679,000 below the 2006 level 
adjusted for the change in Job Corps funding) and $554,494,000 
above the budget request.
    The Training and Employment Services account is comprised 
of programs that enhance the employment and earnings of those 
in need of such services, operated through a decentralized 
system of skill training and related services. The account is 
mostly forward-funded on a July to June cycle, with funds 
provided for fiscal year 2007 supporting the effort from July 
1, 2007 through June 30, 2008.
    The Committee directs that the Department take no action to 
amend, through regulatory or other administrative action, the 
definition established in 20 CFR 667.220 for functions and 
activities under title I of the Workforce Investment Act until 
April 1, 2007, until such time as legislation reauthorizing the 
Act is enacted or until the Department reaches agreement with 
the Workforce and Education and Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pension Committees, whichever occurs first. Recent reports of 
significant abuses of administrative costs by local Worker 
Investment Board has prompted Congress to take immediate action 
but also highlights the importance of enacting permanent 
legislation.
    Based on an analysis of funding cycles, the Committee 
established that there remain unexpended balances in many of 
the local entities which implement workforce training and 
employment activities. A summary of this analysis follows:

    STATE FORMULA SPENDING--WIA YOUTH, ADULTS AND DISLOCATED WORKERS PROGRAMS TOTAL--PROGRAM YEARS 2000-2007
                                             [dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    Unexpended                  Total                     Expended
       Program Year Period           carry-in   New funding   available   Expenditures      (%)       Unexpended
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PY 2000..........................    $826,788*   $3,194,735   $4,021,524    $2,283,197         56.8   $1,738,327
PY 2001..........................    1,755,277    3,209,861    4,965,138     3,236,579         65.2    1,728,559
PY 2002..........................    1,706,193    3,276,241    4,982,434     3,565,273         71.6    1,417,161
PY 2003..........................    1,405,153    3,013,751    4,418,904     3,221,451         72.9    1,197,453
PY 2004..........................    1,178,102    3,034,746    4,212,848     3,069,784         72.9    1,143,064
PY 2005..........................    1,133,865    3,038,371    4,172,237     3,030,105         72.6    1,142,132
PY 2006 (est)....................    1,132,428    2,975,891    4,108,319     2,976,106         72.4    1,132,213
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*$954,392 Updated per Department of Labor accounting system (breakout by program not available).

    As a result, prior year balances are being partially 
reduced through a rescission of $325,000,000. This analysis 
supports the Department's testimony over the past two years 
concerning unspent balances. However, unexpended balances have 
dropped some and many states are using unspent funds toward 
implementing other training programs and initiatives. 
Therefore, prior year balances are being partially reduced 
through a one time rescission of $325,000,000 instead of the 
full amount of anticipated unexpended balances. The Department 
is instructed to ensure that reductions are assigned to 
entities that have the greatest excess balances, to the maximum 
extent possible. Of greatest concern to the Committee is the 
lapsing of funds in each of the past five years. Funds not 
expended in the allowable time could have been recaptured and 
applied to other urgent needs in this or other Titles in this 
Act.
    Therefore, the Department's central Budget Office is 
further directed to establish a methodology using quarterly 
reports and end of year audited statements to more intensely 
monitor the expenditure of obligations by the State and local 
funding recipients and report those findings for the latest 
program year, for each formula grant, to the Committees on 
Appropriations in the House and Senate. This information should 
be included as part of the 2008 congressional budget 
submission. In addition, the Department's central budget office 
shall provide the Committees with a detailed description of the 
funds that have been reallocated between states by the 
Secretary and between programs within states for fiscal year 
2006.
    There is evidence that the ``core'' funded activities of 
the Adult, Dislocated and Youth programs overlap with the 
similar core activities funded by the Employment Services 
account, with both WIA and ES funds often distributed to the 
same local entities, and providing the same services. This 
diminishes the overall effectiveness of the two programs and 
wastes scarce dollars. The Department is instructed to 
establish detailed funding criteria for all local entities 
receiving funds from both the WIA and Employment Services 
accounts that, to the maximum extent possible, ensures that 
overlap of core activities is reduced. The Employment Services 
Account should be the primary sponsor of core activities and 
the WIA account should be the primary source of more intensive 
services required by Adult, Dislocated and Youth individuals 
that are not able to secure employment through core services. 
The Department should incorporate these criteria into each 
local entity plan and closely monitor their implementation.

Adult employment and training activities

    For adult employment and training activities, the Committee 
recommends $854,000,000. This is $10,199,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 level and $142,000,000 above the budget request. Of 
the amount recommended $712,000,000 will become available on 
October 1, 2007. This program is authorized by the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998. The funds are allocated by formula to 
States and further distributed to local workforce investment 
boards. Services for adults will be provided through the One-
Stop Centers system and most customers receiving training use 
their individual training accounts to determine which programs 
and providers fit their needs. The Act authorizes core services 
available to all adults with no eligibility requirements, and 
intensive services for unemployed individuals who are not able 
to find jobs through core services alone.

Dislocated worker employment and training activities

    For dislocated worker employment and training activities, 
the Committee recommends $1,476,064,000. This is $4,161,000 
above the 2006 level and $361,482,000 above the budget request. 
Of the amount recommended, $1,060,000,000 will become available 
on October 1, 2007. Of the total, $1,193,264,000 is designated 
for State formula grants that support core services, intensive 
services, training, and supportive services. In addition, 
States use these funds for rapid response assistance to help 
workers affected by mass layoffs and plant closures.
    The Committee recommendation includes $282,800,000 for the 
National Reserve, which supports National Emergency Grants to 
respond to mass layoffs, plant and/or military base closings, 
and natural disasters across the country, which cannot be 
otherwise anticipated, as well as technical assistance and 
training and demonstration projects.
    Although the Committee is not in agreement with the 
separate request for a $150,000,000 Community College 
Initiative, it is not opposed to the use of community colleges 
for workforce training per se. However, the Committee remains 
concerned about the role and use of the One-Stop Centers in the 
initiative. The Committee does not agree with a shift in 
approach to worker training at this time but instead directs 
that the Department may use up to $125,000,000 of funds made 
available in the National Reserve for competitive grants to 
community colleges for dislocated worker training. This repeats 
the Committee's recommendation in fiscal year 2006. Again in 
2007, the Committee directs that future solicitations for grant 
applications for the Community Based Job Training initiative 
include One-Stop Career Centers as an eligible applicant and 
that all applicants describe the relationship of One-Stop-
Centers in their applications.
    Even so, the Committee remains concerned about the use of 
initiative grant funding for community college capacity 
building instead of training. This is a departure from 
traditional Department of Labor grant programs. Therefore, the 
Department is instructed to give highest priority to grant 
applications that will train workers with skills needed to 
operate, maintain, and troubleshoot complex integrated 
technologies and to monitor the expenditure of funds for 
capacity building and training and report these findings to the 
Committees on Appropriations in the House and Senate by March 
31, 2007. The Committee further directs the Department to 
utilize existing curricula developed by previously funded 
initiatives.

Youth employment and training activities

    For youth activities, the Committee recommends 
$935,500,000. This is $5,000,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
level and $95,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 consolidated the 
Summer Youth Employment and Training Program and Youth Training 
Grants under the Job Training Partnership Act into a single 
youth training activity. The funds are allocated by formula to 
states and further distributed to local workforce investment 
boards in accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1988.
    For the second straight year the budget request proposes 
funding in Labor under proposed legislation. To avoid the 
possibility that the Youthbuild program will not receive 
funding for fiscal year 2007, the Committee recommendation 
requires that within the amount made available for youth 
activities up to $50,000,000 may be dedicated toward the 
Youthbuild Program, the specific amount to be determined by the 
Department, and dependent on when the program is authorized for 
transfer from HUD to Labor. However, the provision requires 
that all funds shall revert to the Youth formula grant program 
if the program is not authorized for transfer by April 1, 2007.

Job Corps

    The Job Corps, authorized by the Workforce Investment Act 
of 1998, is a nationwide network of residential facilities 
chartered by Federal law to provide a comprehensive and 
intensive array of training, job placement and support services 
to at-risk young adults. The mission of Job Corps is to attract 
eligible young adults, teach them the skills they need to 
become employable and independent, and place them in meaningful 
jobs or further education. Participation in the program is open 
to people in the 16 to 24 age range who are unemployed, have 
dropped out of school or who are at risk of being involved in 
the criminal corrections system.
    For Job Corps operations the Committee recommends 
$1,465,000,000. This is $8,740,000 above the ``comparable'' 
enacted level for 2006 and $64,000,000 above the President's 
Budget Request. Funds for Job Corps staff that were included in 
operations in the fiscal year 2006 are included in ``program 
administration'' in the Budget Request and the Committee 
recommendation as it has been in every other year. Of the 
amount recommended, $591,000,000 will become available on 
October 1, 2007.
    In addition, the Committee provides $58,000,000 for 
construction, compared to $100,000,000 in the request and 
$107,920,000 for fiscal year 2006. The Committee did not 
include the request to rescind $75,000,000 in construction 
funds. However, based on the projected level of funds for 
construction and the timeline of construction activities, the 
Committee includes $50,000,000 in advanced appropriations 
rather than $100,000,000 as requested. Further, the Job Corps 
received a $16,000,000 increase in construction funds for the 
two facilities impacted by the hurricanes in the most recent 
supplemental appropriation. Finally, the previously 
appropriated funds are already available for the construction 
of two new centers.
    The Department is directed to give the highest priority to 
the maintenance, repairs and rehabilitation of existing 
facilities, prior to the use of funds for new facilities. Every 
new facility increases the future demand for funds for 
operating expenses in an increasing tight budgetary 
environment. Therefore, emphasis should be placed on 
rehabilitation and repair of existing facilities.
    Furthermore, the Committee supports the effort of the 
Workforce Investment Act of 1998 to more fully integrate Job 
Corps centers into their local communities and directs that the 
Department review the system developed and employed by 
Youthbuild America as a model for local education and training 
of at risk youth.
    After being elevated to the Office of the Secretary in 
celebration of its 40th anniversary, in 2007 the Job Corps 
program is returned to ETA, which oversees all youth training 
activities.

Native Americans

    For Native Americans, the Committee recommends $50,000,000. 
This is $3,696,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$1,458,000 below the budget request. This program, authorized 
by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, is designed to improve 
the economic well being of Native Americans (Indians, Eskimos, 
Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians) through the provision of 
training, work experience, and other employment-related 
services and opportunities that are intended to aid the 
participants to secure permanent, unsubsidized jobs. The 
Department of Labor allocates formula grants to Indian tribes 
and other Native American groups whose eligibility for such 
grants is established in accordance with Department 
regulations.
    The Committee directs the Department to require that the 
planned use of these funds by Indian tribes or Designated 
Tribal Entities be coordinated with and incorporated into the 
Indian Economic Development Block Grant plans, funded through 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development. Economic 
development funds and job training funds should go hand in 
hand.

Migrant and seasonal farm workers

    The migrant and seasonal farmworkers program, authorized by 
the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, is designed to serve 
members of economically disadvantaged families whose principal 
livelihood is derived from migratory and other forms of 
seasonal farm work, or fishing, or logging activities. 
Enrollees and their families are provided with employment 
training and related services intended to prepare them for 
stable, year-round employment within and outside of the 
agriculture industry.
    For migrant and seasonal farm workers, the Committee 
recommends $80,053,000. This is $801,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 level and $80,053,000 above the president's budget 
request. For the fourth year in a row the budget request did 
not include funds for this program, and the program continues 
to be rated as one of the least effective in the Department. 
The Committee is concerned that the program is not sufficiently 
focused on job training. Each year, more than 60% of the 
program's participants receive no job training. Further, the 
cost per participant has risen to nearly $3,500.
    However, the Committee recommendation is unwilling to 
terminate the program, as requested, until the Department has 
demonstrated that mainstream health and welfare programs, as 
well as mainstream job training programs are in place to 
provide the combination of services needed to help secure 
permanent employment for farm and forestry workers. Therefore, 
the Committee is recommending a status quo budget for 2007. As 
in prior years, the Act directs that of the amounts made 
available, $5,000,000 is targeted for migrant and seasonal 
farmworker housing grants.
    The Act further directs that not less than 70 percent of 
this amount be used for permanent housing grants. Recently the 
Committee has become aware that some of the remaining funds 
have been allocated to temporary housing. By March 1, 2007 the 
Department is to provide a list of temporary housing activities 
and should include a list of the grantees, states in which 
grantees are located, the uses of funds and the number of 
individuals or families served.

                  NATIONAL COMPETITIVE GRANT PROGRAMS

    This activity includes Workforce Investment Act authorized 
programs in support of the workforce system including technical 
assistance and incentive grants, evaluations, pilots, 
demonstrations and research.
    Pilots, Demonstrations and Research.--The Committee 
recommends $43,361,000 for grants or contracts to conduct 
research, pilots or demonstrations that improve techniques or 
demonstrate the effectiveness of programs. This is $13,661,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 level and $25,661,000 above the 2007 
budget request. Of the amount made available in this account, a 
total of $25,661,000 is dedicated to specific projects which 
are detailed below:

Agudath Israel of America Community Services, Inc., 
    Brooklyn, NY, for its Fresh Start job training and 
    counseling program..................................        $400,000
Alabama Southern Community College, Thomasville, AL, for 
    its pulp and paper training center..................         200,000
Arc of Blackstone Valley, Pawtucket, RI, for a workforce 
    development initiative..............................         150,000
Ashland County-West Holmes Career Center, Ashland, OH 
    for the Northeast Central Ohio Bioscience 
    Consortium's creation of a customized, tiered 
    training model in the biosciences...................         150,000
Asnuntuck Community College, Enfield, CT to develop a 
    multi-cluster Manufacturing Technology Center.......         300,000
Automation Alley, Troy, MI to train incumbent and new 
    workers to construct, manage, and evaluate the 
    Digital Manufacturing Network.......................         750,000
Bellingham Technical College, Bellingham, WA, for a 
    Process Technology Workforce Development Project....         150,000
Bismarck State College, Bismarck, ND, for an 
    instrumentation and control training program........         250,000
Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ, for workforce 
    training programs through its Center for Excellence 
    in Technology, Telecommunications and Economic 
    Development.........................................         250,000
Capital Idea, Austin, TX, for a workforce development 
    project.............................................         185,000
Casper Event Center, Casper, WY for infrastructure 
    improvements........................................         100,000
Center for Employment Training, San Jose, CA, for its 
    Building Trade Jobs for Out-of-School Youth Project.         200,000
Center for Training and Careers, San Jose, CA, for 
    vocational training services........................          75,000
Central Maine Community College, Auburn, ME, for a 
    training program in precision metalworking and 
    machine tool technology.............................         150,000
Charity Cultural Services Center, San Francisco, CA, for 
    job training and placement services for new or 
    recent immigrants...................................         400,000
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 
    Cincinnati, OH for the Project SEARCH job training 
    for people with disabilities........................         150,000
City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, for a 
    health care workforce training initiative through 
    the Welcome Back Center.............................         200,000
City of Alexandria, VA, for an automobile industry 
    workforce development and training initiative.......         275,000
City of Las Vegas, NV for a walk-in employment center...         366,000
City of Milwaukee, WI, for a project to train youth in 
    construction trades.................................         200,000
College of Southern Maryland, La Plata, MD, for its 
    Partnership for the Advancement of Construction and 
    Transportation Training Project.....................         250,000
Community Learning Center, Ft. Worth, TX to provide 
    training for dislocated and incumbent aerospace 
    workers.............................................         500,000
Community Solutions for Clackamas County, OR, for its 
    Working for Independence job training and workforce 
    development program.................................         250,000
Consortium for Worker Education, New York, NY, for 
    education, job readiness and occupational skills 
    training services...................................         150,000
Construction Apprenticeship Tech Prep Consortium, North 
    Kansas City, MO.....................................          50,000
County of Fresno, CA to provide vocational training 
    services............................................         200,000
Des Moines Area Community College, IA, for training for 
    dislocated workers, and for career exploration and 
    preparation for high school and community college 
    students............................................         250,000
East Los Angeles Community Union, Los Angeles, CA, for a 
    workforce training initiative.......................         500,000
Economic Growth Connection of Westmoreland County, 
    Greensburg, PA, for workforce development 
    initiatives.........................................         200,000
Enterprise South Industrial Park (ESIP) Workforce 
    Training Center, Chattanooga, TN to establish a 
    state of the art training center....................       1,300,000
Essex County Community Organization, Lynn, MA, for its 
    Education Advantage for Manufacturing project.......         250,000
FIB Economic Development Corporation, Inc., Atlanta, GA, 
    for a youth pre-apprenticeship program..............         400,000
Fifth Avenue Committee, Brooklyn, NY, for workforce 
    development services for unemployed or underemployed 
    individuals.........................................         300,000
Foundation of the Delaware County Chamber Job Readiness 
    Program, Media, PA to provide workforce development 
    services............................................          75,000
Fresno County, CA, for the West Fresno County Vocational 
    Training Project....................................         300,000
Frontier Community College, Fairfield, IL to help create 
    a lineman training program..........................         100,000
Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, for its 
    Southeastern Technology Education Program (STEP) 
    workforce training initiative.......................         400,000
Guam Community College, Barrigada, Guam, for vocational 
    training programs...................................         250,000
Home of Life Community Development Corporation, Chicago, 
    IL, for a financial services training and placement 
    program.............................................         150,000
Indochina Sino-American Community Center, New York, NY, 
    for its Immigrant Literacy, Technology and 
    Employment Project..................................         150,000
Iowa Central Community College, Ft. Dodge, IA for 
    workforce skills assessment.........................         300,000
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana Center for 
    Cybersecurity, Columbus, IN to train the existing 
    and developing workforce............................         100,000
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Center for Health 
    Information Technology, Lafayette, IN, for program 
    support and student aid.............................         100,000
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Center for 
    Orthopedic Manufacturing, Warsaw, IN for training 
    curriculum..........................................         200,000
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Warsaw, IN Center 
    for Orthopedic Manufacturing to train workers.......         350,000
Ivy Tech Community College, Center for Logistics, 
    Evansville, IN for Distribution and Transportation 
    for a technical workforce...........................         200,000
Ivy Tech Community College, Terre Haute, IN for a Center 
    for Geographical Information Systems................         500,000
Joint Systems Manufacturing Center, Lima, OH for job 
    training in manufacturing technologies..............         200,000
JumpStart, Inc., Cleveland, OH for technical assistance 
    job training........................................         200,000
Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kalamazoo, MI for 
    training and certification curriculum development...         270,000
Lancaster County Career and Technology Foundation, 
    Lancaster, PA for the Lancaster County Career and 
    Technology Center's Collision Repair Technology 
    program.............................................         100,000
Long Island Teen Challenge, West Babylon, NY for 
    vocational training program.........................         100,000
Louisiana National Guard, Carville, LA for Job Challenge 
    Program training and equipment......................         150,000
Make the Road by Walking, Brooklyn, NY, to establish an 
    English and Economic Literacy Initiative in the 
    Bushwick neighborhood...............................         200,000
Marc Center, Mesa, AZ for job training for adults with 
    disabilities........................................         200,000
Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, North Adams, MA, 
    for the Northern Tier Healthcare Workforce project..          75,000
Medina County Office of Workforce Development, Medina, 
    OH for the Building Careers in the Building Trades 
    Initiative..........................................          50,000
Medina County Office of Workforce Development, Medina, 
    OH, for the Building Careers in Healthcare 
    Initiative..........................................          50,000
Medina County Schools Educational Service Center, 
    Medina, OH for the Workforce Initiative program.....         100,000
Melwood Horticultural Training Center, Upper Marlboro, 
    MD, for workforce analysis and services to place 
    individuals with developmental disabilities into 
    competitive employment..............................         200,000
Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center, Plymouth, MI 
    for a new market sector training pilot..............         100,000
Minot State University, Minot, ND, for the Job Corps 
    Executive Management Program........................         100,000
Mission Language and Vocational School, San Francisco, 
    CA, for a training program in health-related 
    occupations.........................................         400,000
Moberly Area Community College in Moberly, MO for its 
    Integrated Systems Technology program...............         150,000
Monterey County Workforce Investment Board, CA, for a 
    study and other activities to better align the local 
    workforce development system with high-growth 
    industry sectors....................................         150,000
National Association of Street Schools Career Pathways 
    Program, Denver, CO for tools and training designed 
    to create positive life change for at-risk youth....         100,000
Northeast Bronx Redevelopment Corporation, Bronx, NY, 
    for its PROJECT SUCCESS job training initiative.....          75,000
Northern Tier Industry and Education Consortium, Dimock, 
    PA for regional career awareness and training 
    programs............................................          90,000
Oakland Community College, Oakland County, MI to lead a 
    consortium on emerging sectors in secondary 
    institutions........................................         500,000
Oil Region Alliance of Business, Industry and Tourism, 
    Oil City, PA for the Rural Technical Training 
    Initiative..........................................         200,000
Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma City, OK to fund a 
    pilot program for training nurse's aides 
    specializing in long-term care facilities...........         500,000
Opportunity, Inc., Highland Park, IL to expand the 
    Secure Document Destruction for Disabled Persons 
    Division............................................         250,000
Our Piece of the Pie, Hartford, CT, for education and 
    employment services for out-of-school youth.........         600,000
Palm Beach Education Commission, West Palm Beach, FL to 
    initiate a Quality Economic Development, Education, 
    and Employment (QE\3\) demonstration project........         100,000
Patrick County Education Foundation, Stuart, VA, for a 
    workforce development project.......................         100,000
Philadelphia Workforce Development Corporation, 
    Philadelphia, PA, for establishment of a training 
    institute...........................................         175,000
Piedmont Virginia Community College, Charlottesville, VA 
    for the Residential Construction Academy............         300,000
Precision Manufacturing Institute, Meadville, PA for 
    training in advanced manufacturing initiatives......         200,000
Project One, Louisville, KY for the Summer Earnings and 
    Enrichment program..................................         100,000
PRONTO of Long Island, Inc., Bayshore, NY, for a 
    vocational training initiative......................         100,000
Safer Foundation, Chicago, IL, for training and support 
    services to ex-offenders............................         200,000
San Diego Workforce Partnership, Inc., San Diego, CA, 
    for its Adult Special Population Contracted Training 
    Program.............................................         250,000
Schoenbaum Family Enrichment Center, Charleston, WV for 
    the Enterprise Development Initiative...............         255,000
SCLC/Women's Organizational Movement for Equality Now, 
    Inc., Atlanta, GA, for education, employment and 
    support services at its Empowerment Training Center.         100,000
Sierra College, Rocklin, CA for Mechatronics workforce 
    training initiative.................................         200,000
Signature Academy Inc., Chicago, IL, for its Exodus to 
    Excellence After School Youth Program...............          75,000
South Bay Workforce Investment Board, Hawthorne, CA, for 
    its Bridge-to-Work program..........................         335,000
South Valley Worksource Center, Palmdale, CA to increase 
    business recruitment................................         380,000
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO 
    for equipment and training..........................         350,000
Southern Queens Park Association, Jamaica, NY, for a 
    workforce skills training program...................         300,000
Southside Virginia Community College, Alberta, VA for 
    the Heavy Equipment Training Center project.........         300,000
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, OK 
    to develop new manufacturing entrepreneurs through 
    the Western Oklahoma Business Commercialization 
    Center..............................................         300,000
Three Rivers Community College, Norwich, CT for the 
    Collegiate Nurse Preceptor program..................         100,000
Union Mission, Inc., Savannah, GA, for its culinary arts 
    training program, in collaboration with Savannah 
    Technical College...................................         100,000
United Mine Workers of America, Fairfax, VA, for the 
    UMWA Career Center's mine worker training and 
    reemployment programs...............................       1,000,000
University of Saint Francis, Fort Wayne, IN for the 
    Nursing Workforce Initiative........................         200,000
University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA for the Business 
    Forecasting Center..................................         350,000
Valley Initiative for Development and Advancement, 
    Weslaco, TX, for a workforce development project....         180,000
Veteran Community Initiatives, Inc., Johnstown, PA, for 
    employment services and support programs for 
    veterans............................................         400,000
Webster University, Old Post Office Campus, St. Louis, 
    MO, for workforce development programs..............         250,000
West Los Angeles College, Culver City, CA, for a craft 
    and technician training program.....................         350,000
Westside Industrial Retention and Expansion Network 
    (WIRE-Net), Cleveland, OH, for a manufacturing 
    workforce development and job placement program.....         300,000
Worker Investment Board of Herkimer, Madison and Oneida 
    Counties, NY for an aircraft repair training program         125,000
Workforce Resource, Inc., WI, for a regional web-based 
    clearinghouse.......................................         250,000
York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC, for its 
    construction trades training program................          150,00

    Technical Assistance.--No funds are provided for the 
technical assistance program, as requested. This is $1,980,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 level. The development of 
performance measurement systems, the provision of quality 
services and the promotion of accountability and collaboration 
should be a quintessential part of every program's activity 
level.
    Evaluation.--The Committee recommends $4,921,000 to provide 
for the continuing evaluation of programs conducted under the 
Workforce Investment Act of 1998, as well as of Federally 
funded employment-related activities under other provisions of 
law. This is $2,936,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level and 
the same as the budget request.
    Responsible Reintegration of Youthful Offenders.--The 
Committee does not include funding for the Responsible 
Reintegration of Youthful Offenders program. The budget did not 
request funds for this program. The fiscal year 2006 level is 
$49,104,000.
    Prisoner Re-entry.--The Committee recommends no further 
funding for the Prisoner Re-entry Initiative until Congress has 
authorized the program and has established the authorized 
program levels. The Committee has funded the program in the 
past few years under the authority of a demonstration program. 
However, the Committee is concerned that continued funding for 
the program under the guise of a demonstration program is 
inappropriate, since all of the restrictions normally 
associated with the demonstration program would have to be 
waived in order for the program to be eligible for funding. It 
is now time for the program to be authorized or dropped.
    Community Based Job Training Initiative.--The Committee 
does not include separate funds for this initiative but 
provides that of the amount made available for the Dislocated 
Worker National Reserve competitive grant program, up to 
$125,000,000 can be made available for the Initiative. This is 
the same as provided in 2006.
    Rescissions.--The Committee has included language 
rescinding $325,000,000 in prior year WIA funds, or if needed 
other headings under this title.
    The Committee directs the Department of Labor continue to 
submit quarterly reports to the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees on the status of H-1B, National Emergency Grants, 
and High-Growth Job Training Initiative awards, and awards made 
for pilot, demonstration, multi-service, research, and multi-
state projects as directed in House Report 109-337, except that 
the Department shall identify all awards made on a sole source 
basis and provide the justification, purpose and expected 
outcomes for any such awards.

            COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT FOR OLDER AMERICANS

    The Committee recommends $420,000,000 for community service 
employment for older Americans. This is $12,311,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request. The Committee's 
recommendation directs the Department to find ways to reduce 
the significant overhead costs of the program pending enactment 
of the program's reauthorization.
    The community service employment for older Americans 
program provides grants to public and private nonprofit 
organizations that subsidize part-time work in community 
service activities for unemployed persons aged 55 and older, 
whose family's annual income does not exceed 125 percent of the 
poverty level.
    The Committee recommends new language requiring the 
Secretary of Labor to use a portion of funds to make a grant to 
the Forest Service for the Senior Community Service Employment 
Program.

              FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

    The Committee recommends $938,600,000. This is $27,800,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the budget 
request.
    The Trade Adjustment Assistance Program (TAA) provides 
assistance to certified workers adversely affected by imports 
and trade with countries covered by the North America Free 
Trade Agreement. Funding will continue the implementation of 
the TAA program with an emphasis on integrating the program 
into the One-Stop System. The Trade Adjustment Assistance 
Reform Act of 2002 expanded the eligibility to include 
secondary workers and workers whose employers shift production 
overseas.

     STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $3,411,762,000 for this account. 
This is $53,605,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$23,955,000 below the budget request. Included in the total 
available is $3,349,746,000 authorized to be drawn from the 
Employment Security Administration Account of the Unemployment 
Trust Fund and $62,016,000 to be provided from the general fund 
of the Treasury. The funds in this account are used to provide 
administrative grants and assistance to State agencies that 
administer Federal and State unemployment compensation laws and 
operate the public employment service.
    For Unemployment Insurance services, the Committee 
recommends $2,650,075,000. This is $142,405,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 level and $100,000 below the budget request. 
The total includes $2,640,175,000 for State Operations and 
$9,900,000 for National Activities. Included in the amount 
provided for State Operations is $40,000,000 for One-Stop 
Centers to conduct Unemployment Insurance eligibility 
interviews and to enable staff to investigate unemployment 
insurance identity theft as requested. However, the original 
budget request double counted funds for eligibility reviews.
    For the Employment Service, the Committee recommends 
$688,769,000, which includes $22,016,000 in general funds 
together with an authorization to spend $666,753,000 from the 
Employment Security Administration Account of the Unemployment 
Trust Fund. This is $27,114,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee recommends $32,918,000 for ES national 
activities. This is $510,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level 
and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for America's Labor 
Market Information System. This is $41,662,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 level and $23,855,000 below the budget request. This 
funding supports access for customers in labor market 
transactions, and measuring and displaying WIA performance 
information. It is important to note that the private sector 
continues to increase public, free of charge and universal 
access to job information and the States continue to implement 
their own electronic job banks. Therefore, this recommendation 
agrees with the closing of the America's Jobs Bank. Funds 
should be focused in three areas: Base Realignment and Closures 
(BRAC), the Workforce Information in Regional Economic 
Development (WIRED) and the Workforce One web site.
    The Committee concurs with the recommendation to provide no 
funds for the Work Incentives Grants program. The 2006 budget 
included $19,514,000 for this program to help persons with 
disabilities find and retain jobs through the One-Stop Career 
Center system mandated by the Workforce Investment Act. Several 
years of WIG funding have successively demonstrated approaches 
to improve accessibility to One-Stop Center services for new 
job seekers with disabilities. One-Stop Centers now incorporate 
these best practices into their normal operations.

        ADVANCES TO THE UNEMPLOYMENT TRUST FUND AND OTHER FUNDS

    The Committee recommends $452,000,000. This is $13,000,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the budget 
request. The appropriation is available to provide advances to 
several accounts for purposes authorized under various Federal 
and State unemployment compensation laws and the Black Lung 
Disability Trust Fund, whenever balances in such accounts prove 
insufficient.

                         PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

    General funds in this account provide the Federal staff to 
administer employment and training programs under the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998, the Older Americans Act, the Trade Act, 
and the National Apprenticeship Act. Trust funds provide for 
the Federal administration of employment security functions 
under title III of the Social Security Act and the Immigration 
and Nationality Act.
    The Committee recommends $211,554,000 for fiscal year 2007. 
This is $42,131,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and the 
same as the budget request. Most of the increase reflects the 
return of the Job Corps staffing cost to this account. Funds 
are allocated in accordance with the attached table at the end 
of the report. This includes $118,760,000 in general funds and 
authority to expend $92,794,000 from the Employment Security 
Administration Account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. Of the 
amount made available $700,000 is targeted to the transition of 
the Youthbuild program if the program transfer is authorized by 
April 1, 2007.

                     WORKERS COMPENSATION PROGRAMS

               Employee Benefits Security Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill provides $143,573,000 for the Employee Benefits 
Security Administration, $10,023,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of developing and 
implementing a new EFAST2 system and has provided funds in 
accordance with the request. Language is also included 
requiring that the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation share 
in the costs of the new system since they are also a 
beneficiary of the system's development. The Department is 
directed to provide a schedule for completion within 30 days of 
enactment and to report monthly on progress relative to that 
schedule to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    The Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA) is 
responsible for the enforcement of Title I of the Employee 
Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) in both civil 
and criminal areas. This involves ERISA fiduciary and 
reporting/disclosure requirements. EBSA is also responsible for 
enforcement of sections 8477 and 8478 of the Federal Employees' 
Retirement Security Act of 1986. The agency was also given 
responsibilities under the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

    The Corporation's budget for fiscal year 2007 is 
$397,644,000, which is $100,666,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Corporation is a wholly owned government corporation 
established by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 
1974 (ERISA). The law places it within the Department of Labor 
and makes the Secretary of Labor the chairperson of its board 
of directors. The Corporation receives its income from 
insurance premiums collected from covered pension plans, 
collection of employer liabilities imposed by ERISA, and 
investment earnings. It is also authorized to borrow up to 
$100,000,000 from the United States Treasury. The primary 
purpose of the Corporation is to guarantee the payment of 
pension plan benefits to participants if covered plans fail or 
go out of existence.
    The bill includes language permitting obligations in excess 
of the amount provided in the bill after approval by the Office 
of Management and Budget and the Committee on Appropriations in 
the House and Senate. Language is also included to require that 
the PBGC share in the costs of the new EFAST2 System being 
developed in EBSA, by transferring $7,000,000 to the Employee 
Benefits Security Administration.
    The Committee has included language that permits workload 
driven increases in obligational authority. Although 
unanticipated workload increases do occur, the use of 
reapportionments authority should not become an excuse for 
bypassing the normal budgetary process. The Committee directs 
the Department to submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations in the House and Senate, if administrative 
expenses increase by more than 25 percent during fiscal year 
2007.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $418,495,000 for this account. 
This is $7,431,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$18,922,000 below the budget request. The bill includes 
$416,419,000 in general funds for this account and contains 
authority to expend $2,076,000 from the Special Fund 
established by the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation 
Act. Funds are to be distributed in accordance with the table 
at the end of this Report.
    The Employment Standards Administration (ESA) is involved 
in the administration of numerous laws, including the Fair 
Labor Standards Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act, the 
Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers' Protection Act, the 
Davis-Bacon Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act, the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
Compensation Act, and the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act 
(black lung). The agency also administers Executive Order 11246 
related to affirmative action by Federal contractors and the 
Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of succession 
planning and appreciates the effort by the ESA to plan and 
train new staff for the future. However, funds were not 
provided for the staffing increase in the absence of a 
Department-wide succession plan.
    The Department is directed to work with the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture's Forest Service to implement a Forest Service 
data base on H2B forestry workers. The Department of Labor is 
instructed, through its Wage and Hour Division, to populate the 
data base with violations of wage disbursements. The Department 
is further instructed to include as part of its 2008 budget 
request, a report about its enforcement efforts on those 
companies that have violated employment standards.

                            SPECIAL BENEFITS

    The bill includes $230,000,000. This is $7,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request. This appropriation primarily provides benefits under 
the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA). The payments 
are required by law. In fiscal year 2007, an estimated 152,000 
injured Federal workers or their survivors will file claims; 
58,500 will receive long-term wage replacement benefits for 
job-related injuries, diseases, or death.

               SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR DISABLED COAL MINERS

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $229,373,000 
for special benefits for disabled coal miners, as requested. 
This is in addition to the $74,000,000 appropriated last year 
as an advance for the first quarter of fiscal year 2007. These 
funds are used to provide monthly benefits to coal miners 
disabled by black lung disease and to their widows and certain 
other dependents, as well as to pay related administrative 
costs.
    The Committee recommends an advance appropriation of 
$68,000,000 for the first quarter of fiscal year 2008, the same 
as the budget request. These funds will ensure uninterrupted 
benefit payments to coal miners, their widows, and dependents.
    The Black Lung Consolidation of Administrative 
Responsibility Act of 2002 amends the Black Lung Benefits Act 
to transfer part B black lung benefits responsibility from the 
Commissioner of Social Security to the Secretary of Labor.

    ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES, ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS 
                           COMPENSATION FUND

    The Committee recommends $102,307,000 for the Energy 
Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program authorized 
by Title XXXVI of the National Defense Authorization Act of 
2001. This is $6,226,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
the same as the budget request. Funds will be used to 
administer the program that provides compensation to employees 
or survivors of employees of the Department of Energy (DOE), 
its contractors and subcontractors, companies that provided 
beryllium to DOE, and atomic weapons employees who suffer from 
a radiation-related cancer, beryllium-related disease, or 
chronic silicosis as a result of their work in producing or 
testing nuclear weapons, and uranium workers covered under the 
Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a report on 
the implementation of the Part E program, including the level 
of coordination between the DOL and CDC-NIOSH on the special 
Exposure Cohort provisions.

                    BLACK LUNG DISABILITY TRUST FUND

    The Committee recommends such sums as necessary for payment 
of benefits and interest on advances. The Committee estimates 
that $1,071,000,000 will be required for this account. This is 
$3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the 
Administration estimates.
    The Trust Fund pays all black lung compensation/medical and 
survivor benefit expenses when no responsible mine operator can 
be assigned liability for such benefits, or when coal mine 
employment ceased prior to 1970, as well as administrative 
costs which are incurred in administering the benefits program 
and operating the Trust Fund.
    The basic financing for the Trust Fund comes from a coal 
excise tax for underground and surface-mines coal. Additional 
funds come from reimbursement payments from mine operators for 
benefit payments made by the Trust Fund before the mine 
operator is found liable. The advances to the Fund assure 
availability of necessary funds when liabilities may exceed 
other income. The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 
continues the current tax structure until 2014.
    The Committee is aware that the fund is more than 
$9,000,000,000 in debt from prior year borrowing from the 
Treasury and has no hope of keeping current on its interest 
payments. The fund is in the impossible position of having to 
borrow from the Treasury just to pay its interest that it owes 
to the Treasury. The Administration has submitted legislation 
to implement a one time restructuring of its debt to the 
Treasury, which is now before the Authorizing Committees.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $486,051,000 for the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration. This is $13,624,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 level and $2,384,000 above the budget request. 
This agency is responsible for enforcing the Occupational 
Safety and Health Act of 1970 in the Nation's workplaces. Funds 
are to be distributed in accordance with the table at the end 
of this report. Included is an increase to fully fund the 
development and implementation of the OSHA Information System. 
However, the Department is directed to provide quarterly 
reports to the Committees on Appropriations in the House and 
Senate on the progress of the system's implementation.
    The Committee continues last year's direction that OSHA 
take no further action to implement regulations requiring the 
annual testing of respiratory protection for occupational 
exposure to TB. Neither the CDC nor the health industry 
endorses the requirements in the OSHA rule.
    The Committee is once again disappointed with the lack of 
progress on the agency's regulation concerning Employer Payment 
for Personal Protective Equipment, the public comment period 
for which ended over seven years ago. The Committee is 
especially concerned because the rate of worker deaths and 
injuries, which has decreased in the last decade for all 
American workers, has increased by two percent among Hispanic 
workers during 2003 and 2004 because they take on a 
disproportionate number of jobs in the nation's most dangerous 
professions, including the construction industry. The Committee 
expects the Secretary to report to the Committee, within 30 
days of the enactment of this Act, the definitive status of 
this regulation, the agency's reasons for not issuing the 
regulation sooner, and a timetable for its issuance.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $278,869,000 for this agency. This 
is $1,183,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and $8,967,000 
below the budget request. Funds are to be distributed in 
accordance with the table at the end of this report. This 
agency enforces the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act in 
underground and surface coal and metal and non-metal mines. The 
requested funding increase was not provided since Congress is 
taking immediate actions to enhance the MSHA inspection and 
enforcement programs in the 2006 supplemental. The program 
received a $25,600,000 increase in the recent emergency 
supplemental H.R. 4939 and funds are available for two years. 
Hence the requested increase for 2007 is no longer needed.
    The Committee is concerned over several reported incidents 
where, under the guise of ``rebuilding'', certain equipment 
manufacturers have built new machines and removed MSHA Approval 
Plates (commonly referred to as ``2G tags'') from scrap 
machines, reattached these plates to the new machinery that 
they built, and then sold these machines for use in underground 
mines. Several of these machines have been involved in 
accidents that have resulted in serious injuries. The Committee 
directs MSHA to increase emphasis to ensure that all mining 
machinery sold by manufacturers and re-builders for use in a 
mine is in compliance with the MSHA Approval Plate that is on 
the machine. The Committee directs that MSHA report back to the 
Committees on Appropriations in the House and Senate 
surveillance and enforcement of this misuse of ``2G'' tags by 
January 1, 2007.
    The Committee commends MSHA for actions on the role of 
equipment technology in mine rescue efforts and directs that 
the agency work with manufacturers of new oxygen technology to 
determine the extent to which the new technology can be applied 
to mine safety.
    In addition, and in the meantime, the agency is urged to 
promote the use of refillable oxygen cylinders and tubing for 
mineworker safety.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The total funding recommended by the Committee for the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) is $565,288,000. This is 
$28,189,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and $2,000,000 
above the budget request. The Committee recommends $486,262,000 
in general funds for this account and authority to spend 
$79,026,000 from the Employment Security Administration Account 
of the Unemployment Trust Fund. The BLS is the principal fact-
finding agency in the Federal government in the broad field of 
labor economics. Its principal surveys include the Consumer 
Price Index and the monthly unemployment series. Funds are to 
be distributed in accordance with the table at the end of the 
Report.
    The Committee has provided additional funds to expand the 
American Time Use Survey (ATUS). This has become, for example, 
one of the most important surveys for determining dietary 
patterns and food consumption, an important element in the 
Nation's evolving understanding of obesity trends. An increase 
of $2,000,000 is provided to conduct a biennial module, improve 
the response rates and conduct research on non-response bias. 
BLS should conduct a module every other year, with the food use 
module conducted every fourth year and other modules on 
rotating topics conducted in between.

                 Office of Disability Employment Policy


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $20,319,000 for the Office of 
Disability Employment Policy, which is $7,336,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the budget request. The 
Office provides policy guidance and leadership to eliminate 
employment barriers to people with disabilities.
    The Committee is in agreement with the request to suspend 
the grant program until the results of the three-year research 
and demonstration grants programs has been fully assessed and 
resulting policy changes incorporated in new policy directives.
    The Committee directs the Secretaries of Labor and HUD and 
the Interagency Council on Homelessness (ICH) to develop a 
joint plan to increase the access of homeless and disabled 
veterans in locations where homeless veterans congregate, 
including grantees under the homeless provider grant and per 
diem program and the homeless veterans reintegration program, 
to facilitate re-employment.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $236,784,000 for Departmental 
Management activities. This is $60,796,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 level and $5,307,000 below the budget request. 
Included is $236,462,000 in general funds for this account 
along with authority to transfer $322,000 from the Employment 
Security Administration Account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. 
The Committee has included $28,000,000 for the Information 
Technology Crosscut which is the requested amount except for 
funds targeted to the Government-wide ``E-Gov Initiative''.
    The Departmental Management appropriation finances staff 
responsible for formulating and overseeing the implementation 
of Departmental policy and management activities. In addition, 
this appropriation includes a variety of operating programs and 
activities that are not involved in Departmental Management 
functions, but for which other salaries and expenses 
appropriations are not suitable. The allocation of the funds is 
provided in the table accompanying this report.
    The Committee agrees with the request to significantly 
reduce the role of the International Labor Affairs cooperation 
program. Clearly the role of other Agencies, including those at 
the Department of State and USAID are greatly increased in the 
areas of international labor negotiations. In addition, recent 
legislation has refocused the Department's activities on 
research, and administering the labor agreements.
    The Committee recommends that the Department's strategic 
plan for the Women's Bureau include a future use of the Women's 
Work program as part of its overall Women's Bureau activities. 
The Committee notes however, that the Women's Work program has 
been funded for years without an authorization and appears to 
have no specific performance measures. It is only fair that 
funding in the future should be contingent on the submission 
and enactment of authorizing legislation for this program, as 
is required for all others.

                    VETERANS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING

    The Committee recommends $224,440,000 for veteran 
employment and training activities. This is $2,349,000 above 
the fiscal year 2006 level and $447,000 below the budget 
request. Within this amount, $195,177,000 is to be expended 
from the Employment Security Administration account of the 
Unemployment Trust Fund for the traditional State and Federal 
administration of veterans' employment and training activities.
    Individuals leaving the military are at high risk of 
homelessness due to a lack of job skills transferable to the 
civilian sector, disrupted or dissolved family and social 
support networks, and other risk factors that preceded their 
military service. The Transition Assistance Program (TAP) has 
been established to ease the transition of separating service 
members to the civilian sector. The Committee instructs the 
Secretary of Labor to ensure that a module on homelessness 
prevention is added to the TAP curriculum. The module should 
include a presentation on risk factors for homelessness, a 
self-assessment of risk factors, and contact information for 
preventative assistance associated with homelessness.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $73,761,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General (OIG). This is $2,660,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 level and the same as the budget request. This 
includes $68,073,000 in general funds along with the authority 
to transfer $5,688,000 from the Employment Security 
Administration Account of the Unemployment Trust Fund.
    The OIG was created by law to protect the integrity of 
Departmental programs as well as the welfare of beneficiaries 
served by those programs. Through a program of audits, 
investigations, and program evaluations, the OIG attempts to 
reduce the incidence of fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement, 
and to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness 
throughout the Department.

                       WORKING CAPITAL FUND (WCF)

    The Committee includes no direct appropriation for the WCF 
for 2007 postponing further development of the core accounting 
system, until funds in the pipeline have been expended, the 
Department has completed its review and assessment of the 
individual program requirements and an in depth discussion of 
alternatives to a new core accounting system for the Department 
of Labor have been vetted with the Committees on Appropriations 
in the House and the Senate. This is $6,168,000 below the 2006 
level and $13,954,000 below the budget request.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 101. The Committee continues and amends a provision to 
prohibit the use of Job Corps funding for compensation of an 
individual that is not a Federal Employee at a rate in excess 
of Executive Level II.
    Sec. 102. The Committee repeats and amends a provision to 
permit transfers of up to one percent between appropriation 
Accounts.
    Sec. 103. The Committee continues a prior year prohibition 
on the purchase of goods that were in any part produced by 
indentured children.
    Sec. 104. Requires the Department to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the projects awarded under the 
research and demonstration projects.
    Sec. 105. The Committee recommends new language requiring 
the Secretary to issue a monthly transit subsidy of not less 
than $105 to each of the Department's eligible employees in the 
National Capital region.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES

    The Committee includes a program level total of 
$7,075,917,000 for health resources and services programs, 
which is $487,553,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
for these activities and $742,062,000 above the budget request. 
The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 
supports programs which provide health services to 
disadvantaged, medically underserved, and special populations; 
decrease infant mortality rates; assist in the education of 
health professionals; and provide technical assistance 
regarding the utilization of health resources and facilities.

Community health centers

    The Committee provides $1,988,000,000 for community health 
centers, which is $205,692,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $25,139,000 above the budget request. These 
funds support programs which include community health centers, 
migrant health centers, health care for the homeless and public 
housing health service grants. In providing this significant 
increase to the community health centers program, the Committee 
intends that funding will be used to support the development of 
over 300 new or expanded medical capacity sites. Within the 
total, $25,000,000 also is included to provide base grant 
adjustments for existing centers. In addition, the Committee 
urges the community health centers program to continue the 
initiative designed to help reduce chronic conditions of 
obesity, diabetes and heart diseases in the communities they 
serve.
    The Committee includes bill language similar to previous 
years limiting the amount of funds available for the payment of 
claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act to $44,550,000, which 
is the same as the budget request and the limitation in the 
fiscal year 2006 bill.
    The Committee does not provide additional funds for loan 
guarantee authority for community health centers under section 
330(d) of the Public Health Service Act. The Committee notes 
that an estimated $72,000,000, of the $160,000,000 appropriated 
in fiscal years 1997 and 1998, will be available in the program 
after the end of fiscal year 2006 for loan guarantee authority 
for guarantees of both loan principal and interest.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of increasing the 
use of health information technology (IT) at health centers. 
Health centers have demonstrated improved access to services 
and improved patient outcomes by utilizing electronic patient 
registries and other IT tools through their participation in 
integrated service delivery networks, the integrated 
information and communication technology project, the shared 
integrated management information system, and health 
disparities collaboratives. Given this success, the Committee 
urges HRSA to ensure that health centers have adequate 
resources to establish and expand health IT systems in order to 
further enhance the delivery of cost-effective, quality health 
care services.
    The Committee is pleased by the increasing proportion of 
National Health Service Corps (NHSC) assignees being placed at 
community, migrant, homeless, and public housing health 
centers. The Committee encourages HRSA to further expand this 
effort to ensure that health centers have access to a 
sufficient level of health professionals through the NHSC, 
especially given recent efforts to expand the health centers 
program.
    The Committee believes that adequate funding for the 
technical assistance and networking functions available for 
health centers, including through the National Association of 
Community Health Centers, state and regional primary care 
associations, and planning, developmental, and operational 
networks, is critical to the successful operation and expansion 
of the health centers program. Within amounts provided, the 
Committee encourages HRSA to make funds available to continue 
technical assistance and networking to existing centers and 
support the expansion of these activities to new communities.
    The Committee is aware that dental disease 
disproportionately affects our Nation's most vulnerable 
populations. New ways of bringing oral health care to 
underserved populations are needed to address geographic and 
other challenges that exist. The Committee encourages HRSA to 
explore innovative programs to delivering preventive and 
restorative oral health services. Specifically, the Committee 
encourages HRSA to work with the dental provider community, 
including representatives of the dentists, dental assistants, 
dental hygienists, and the African-American and Hispanic dental 
communities to explore state and community proposals and 
programs that seek to improve access to care in accordance with 
state licensing laws.

Free clinics medical malpractice

    The Committee provides $10,000 for payments of claims under 
the Federal Tort Claims Act to be made available for volunteer 
free clinic health care professionals, which is $30,000 less 
than the fiscal year 2006 funding level. The budget request did 
not include funding for this program. The program extends 
Federal Tort Claims Act coverage to health care professional 
volunteers in free clinics in order to expand access to health 
care services to low-income individuals in medically 
underserved areas. According to section 224(o) of the Public 
Health Service Act, Section 233(o), a free clinic must apply, 
consistent with the provisions applicable to community health 
centers, to have each health care professional `deemed' an 
employee of the Public Health Service, and therefore eligible 
for coverage under the Federal Tort Claims Act.

Radiation exposure screening and education program

    The Committee provides $1,917,000 for the radiation 
exposure screening and education program, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. This 
program provides grants for the education, prevention, and 
early detection of radiogenic cancers and diseases resulting 
from exposure to uranium during mining and milling at nuclear 
test sites.

National Hansen's disease program

    The Committee provides $15,905,000 for the National 
Hansen's disease program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. This program offers 
Hansen's disease treatment to 11 long-term residents who 
continue to receive care from the National Hansen's Disease 
Center and to others who receive care from grant-supported 
outpatient regional clinics. Other former long-term residents 
have been offered and elected to receive a living allowance 
from the program and now live independently. These programs 
provide treatment to about 3,000 of the 6,000 Hansen's disease 
sufferers in the continental United States.

National Hansen's disease program--buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $220,000 for National Hansen's 
disease buildings and facilities, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. These 
funds are used to finance the repair and upkeep of buildings at 
the Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease Center at Carville, 
Louisiana.

Payment to Hawaii for treatment of Hansen's disease

    The Committee provides $1,996,000 for the treatment of 
persons with Hansen's disease in the State of Hawaii, which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget 
request. The program, which provides a partial matching payment 
to the State of Hawaii, dates to the period of Father Damien's 
facility for sufferers of Hansen's disease. That facility now 
has only 40 residents who live there by choice, and the grounds 
have been converted to a historical site. Most patients 
diagnosed with Hansen's disease in Hawaii are now treated in 
the same manner as new patients on the mainland; their care is 
handled on an out-patient basis, with the program paying for 
247 active ambulatory Hansen's disease cases.

Black lung clinics

    The Committee provides $5,891,000 for black lung clinics, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
budget request. The program supports fifteen grantees that 
treat a declining population of coal miners with respiratory 
and pulmonary impairments. The clinics presently receive just 
under one-third of their funding from other sources, such as 
Medicaid and Medicare. Of the fifteen grantees, six receive 
health center funding as well as black lung grants.

National Health Service Corps: field placements

    The Committee provides $42,218,000 for field placements, 
which is $1,920,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and the budget request. These funds are used to support the 
activities of National Health Service Corps (NHSC) obligors and 
volunteers in the field, including travel and transportation 
costs of assignees, training and education, recruitment of 
students, residents and clinicians and retention activities. 
Salary costs of most new assignees are paid by the employing 
entity.

National Health Service Corps: recruitment

    The Committee provides $89,310,000 for recruitment 
activities, which is $4,080,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the budget request. The program awards 
scholarships to health professions students and assists 
graduates in repaying their student loans. In return for every 
year of support, these individuals are obligated to provide a 
year of service in health professional shortage areas of 
greatest need. The minimum obligation is two years.

Health professions

    The Committee provides $309,296,000 for all health 
professions training programs, which is $14,419,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $149,884,000 above the 
budget request. The table at the end of the report identifies 
how funding is allocated for programs authorized by titles VII 
and VIII of the Public Health Service Act. The Committee 
rejects the rescission proposal included in the budget request 
that would have cancelled unobligated balances available at 
institutions of higher education with a student loan revolving 
fund.
            Centers of excellence
    The Committee provides $11,880,000 for centers of 
excellence, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level. The budget request did not include funding for this 
program. The program is designed to strengthen the national 
capacity to educate underrepresented minority (URM) students in 
the health professions by offering special support to those 
institutions which train a significant number of URM 
individuals. Funds are used for the recruitment and retention 
of students and faculty, information resources and curricula, 
faculty and student research, and the development of plans to 
achieve institutional improvements.
    The Committee is pleased that HRSA has refocused the 
minority centers of excellence program on providing support to 
historically minority health professions institutions. The 
Committee recognizes the important role of this program in 
supporting faculty and other academic programs at minority 
institutions.
    The Committee recognizes that the intent of the Title VII 
funding for the centers of excellence (COE) has been to 
strengthen the national capacity to train students from 
minority groups that are under-represented in these health 
professions, thereby building a more diverse health care 
workforce, and that budgetary cuts in fiscal year 2006 may not 
have been adequately inclusive of grants to the health 
professions schools that would reach the Hispanic student 
population. Therefore this Committee urges, that within the 
Title VII funds appropriated in fiscal year 2007 for the COE 
program, one third of the funds should be set aside for 
regional Hispanic centers of excellence, to be selected from a 
competitive applicant pool, that are located in geographic 
areas that have a large medically underserved Hispanic 
population, and that would use a regional approach to serve 
that area.
            Health careers opportunity program
    The Committee concurs with the budget request and does not 
include funding for the health careers opportunity program. The 
fiscal year 2006 funding level for this program is $3,960,000.
            Faculty loan repayment
    The Committee concurs with the budget request and does not 
include funding for the faculty loan repayment program. The 
fiscal year 2006 funding level for this program is $1,289,000.
            Scholarships for disadvantaged students
    The Committee provides $46,657,000 for scholarships for 
disadvantaged students, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $36,924,000 above the budget request. 
The program provides grants to eligible health professions and 
nursing schools to provide scholarships to eligible individuals 
from disadvantaged backgrounds, including students who are 
members of racial and ethnic minority groups. By statute, not 
less than 16 percent of the funds must go to schools of 
nursing.
            Training in primary care and dentistry
    The Committee provides $40,851,000 for training in primary 
care and dentistry, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. The training program is comprised of four 
elements: (1) family medicine; (2) general internal medicine 
and general pediatrics; (3) physician assistants; and (4) 
general and pediatric dentistry.
            Area health education centers
    The Committee provides $28,681,000 for area health 
education centers, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. The program provides cooperative agreements to 
medical and nursing schools to encourage the establishment and 
maintenance of community-based training programs in off-campus 
rural and underserved areas. Emphasis is also placed on 
enhancing the diversity of the health personnel workforce and 
improving the practice environment and the quality of care 
available in underserved areas.
            Allied health and other disciplines
    The Committee provides $3,960,000 for allied health and 
other disciplines, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level. The budget request does not include funding for 
this program. The program assists eligible entities in meeting 
the costs associated with expanding or establishing an allied 
health professions program.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the graduate 
psychology education program, a competitive and peer reviewed 
grant program. Established five years ago, this program has 
achieved a 40 percent increase in the rate of students entering 
into and staying to practice in underserved areas following 
completion. The need for mental health services is significant 
and well documented. Through this program, psychology graduate 
students are trained along with students from over thirty other 
health professions to provide mental and behavioral health care 
services to underserved populations, such as older adults, 
children, chronically ill persons and victims of abuse or 
trauma including returning military personnel. Within the total 
for allied health and other disciplines, the Committee includes 
$2,000,000 for graduate psychology education.
            Geriatric programs
    The Committee provides $31,548,000 for geriatric programs, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2005 funding level. 
Funding for these programs was not included in either the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation or the fiscal year 2007 budget 
request. The geriatric programs are comprised of three 
activities: (1) geriatric education centers; (2) the geriatric 
training program for physicians, dentists, and behavioral and 
mental health professionals; and (3) Geriatric Academic Career 
Awards.
            Public health, preventive medicine, and dental public 
                    health programs
    The Committee concurs with the budget request and does not 
include funding for the public health, preventive medicine, and 
dental public health programs. The fiscal year 2006 funding 
level for this program is $7,920,000.
            Advanced education nursing
    The Committee provides $57,061,000 for advanced education 
nursing, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. The program provides grant 
support to eligible entities to meet the costs of: (1) projects 
that support the enhancement of advanced nursing education and 
practice; and (2) traineeships for individuals in advanced 
nursing education programs. The program prepares registered 
nurses as nurse faculty, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse 
specialists, nurse midwives, nurse anesthetists, nurse 
administrators, public health nurses and other nurse 
specialists for advanced practice roles. Within the allocation, 
the Committee encourages HRSA to allocate funding at least at 
the fiscal year 2001 level for nurse anesthetist education.
            Nurse education, practice and retention
    The Committee provides $37,291,000 for nurse education, 
practice and retention, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. The nurse education, 
practice and retention program is a broad authority with 
targeted purposes under three priority areas--education, 
practice and retention--in response to the growing nursing 
shortage.
            Nursing workforce diversity
    The Committee provides $16,107,000 for nursing workforce 
diversity, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. The program provides grants and 
contracts to schools of nursing and other eligible entities to 
meet the costs of special projects to increase nursing 
education opportunities for individuals who are from 
disadvantaged backgrounds, including racial and ethnic 
minorities, by providing student scholarships or stipends, pre-
entry preparation, and retention activities. The program also 
contributes to the basic preparation of disadvantaged and 
minority nurses for leadership positions within the nursing and 
health care community.
            Loan repayment and scholarship program
    The Committee provides $31,055,000 for the nurse loan 
repayment and scholarship program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. This 
program offers student loan repayment to nurses or scholarships 
to nursing students in exchange for an agreement to serve not 
less than two years at a health care facility with a critical 
shortage of nurses.
    The Committee recognizes that registered nurses who 
participate in the loan repayment and scholarship program repay 
their loans and scholarships by working in health care 
facilities with a critical shortage of nurses, serving many of 
the Nation's underserved populations. The Committee believes 
that HRSA should consider allowing graduate educated nurses to 
repay their service commitment by working as a nurse faculty in 
a school of nursing.
            Comprehensive geriatric nurse education
    The Committee provides $3,392,000 for comprehensive 
geriatric nurse education, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. The comprehensive 
geriatric education program supports grants for (1) providing 
training to individuals who will provide geriatric care for the 
elderly; (2) develop and disseminate curricula relating to the 
treatment of the health care problems of elderly individuals; 
(3) train faculty members in geriatrics; or (4) provide 
continuing education to individuals who provide geriatric care.
            Nursing faculty loan program
    The Committee provides $4,773,000 for the nursing faculty 
loan program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the same as the budget request. The nursing faculty 
loan program supports the development of a student loan fund in 
schools of nursing to increase the number of qualified nursing 
faculty. Students may receive loans up to $30,000 per year for 
a maximum of 5 years. The program has a cancellation provision 
for up to 85 percent of the loan for recipients working full-
time as nursing faculty for a period of 4 years.

Children's hospitals graduate medical education payment program

    The Committee provides $300,000,000 for the children's 
hospitals graduate medical education payment program, which is 
$3,000,0000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$201,000,000 above the budget request. The program provides 
support for graduate medical education training in children's 
teaching hospitals that have a separate Medicare provider 
number (``free-standing'' children's hospitals). The funding in 
this program is intended to make the level of Federal Graduate 
Medical Education support more consistent with other teaching 
hospitals, including children's hospitals which share provider 
numbers with other teaching hospitals. Payments are determined 
by formula, based on a national per-resident amount. Payments 
support training of resident physicians as defined by Medicare 
in both ambulatory and inpatient settings. The Committee 
believes this program is vital to restoring the reimbursement 
inequity faced by pediatric hospitals, which provide very high 
quality care to children with difficult and expensive 
conditions.

National practitioner data bank

    The Committee does not provide funding for the national 
practitioner data bank for fiscal year 2007, which is the same 
as both the fiscal year 2006 appropriations and the budget 
request. The Committee recommendation and the budget request 
assume that the data bank will be self-supporting, with 
collections of $15,700,000 in user fees. The national data bank 
receives, stores, and disseminates information on paid medical 
malpractice judgments and settlements, sanctions taken by 
Boards of Medical Examiners, losses of membership in 
professional societies, and certain professional review actions 
taken by health care entities. Insurance companies, State 
licensure boards and authorities, and other health care 
entities and professional societies are required to report 
information to the data bank within 30 days of each action. The 
coverage of the data bank includes dentists and physicians, 
and, with respect to malpractice settlements and judgments, 
other categories of licensed health professionals. Hospitals 
are required to search the data bank when a health care 
provider applies for employment and once every two years 
thereafter. State licensing boards, other health care entities, 
licensing authorities, and professional societies also have 
access to the data bank. Traditional bill language is included 
to ensure that user fees are collected to cover the full costs 
of the data bank operations.

Health care integrity and protection data bank

    The Committee does not provide funding for the health care 
integrity and protection data bank (HIPDB) for fiscal year 
2007. The Committee recommendation and the budget request 
assume that the data bank will be self-supporting, with 
collections of $4,000,000 in user fees. HIPDB receives, stores, 
and disseminates information on final adverse actions taken 
against health care providers, suppliers, and practitioners, 
health care related civil judgments and criminal convictions. 
This information is collected from and made available to 
Government agencies and health plans.

Maternal and child health block grant

    The Committee provides $700,000,000 for the maternal and 
child health (MCH) block grant, which is $7,000,000 above both 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request.
    The MCH block grant provides funds to States to meet a 
broad range of basic and enabling health services, including 
personal health services; general, population-wide health 
services, such as screening; family support services; and 
integrated systems of care. The authorizing statute provides 
that, up to a funding level of $600,000,000, 85 percent of the 
funds are distributed to the States, with 15 percent of the 
funds set aside for special projects of regional and national 
significance (SPRANS). When the appropriation exceeds 
$600,000,000, 12.75 percent of the amount over $600,000,000 is 
directed to the Community Integrated Service Systems set-aside 
program. The remaining 87.25 percent is distributed by the same 
85/15 percent allocation as in the basic block grant formula.
    The Committee has included bill language identifying 
$117,428,000 for the SPRANS set-aside. Within the total, the 
Committee urges HRSA to provide the highest possible funding 
level to continue and enhance the Leadership Education in 
Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LENDs) programs. 
These programs are designed to improve the health status of 
infants, children and adolescents with or at risk for 
neurodevelopmental and related disabilities and their families. 
This is accomplished through the interdisciplinary training of 
professionals for leadership roles in the provision of health 
and related care, continuing education, technical assistance, 
research and consultation. The programs focus on the special 
health care needs of children with a wide range of 
neurodevelopmental, metabolic and genetic disorders. Additional 
funding would help these programs initiate or expand their work 
in the area of Down Syndrome, autism, and genetics counseling.
    Within the total, $5,000,000 is provided in SPRANS to help 
states develop well integrated, quality oral health programs 
through grants, cooperative agreements and contracts. The 
Committee further encourages HRSA to assist states through 
partnerships with national associations and foundations to 
focus on state based early interventions to prevent early 
childhood caries. As linkages continue to be made between 
disease transmissibility and maternal behaviors, and poor birth 
outcomes and poor periodontal health, further program attention 
is warranted to avoid the need for more costly care.
    Within the total, the Committee provides $3,000,000 within 
the SPRANS set-aside to continue epilepsy demonstration 
programs. These programs are designed to improve access to 
health and other services regarding seizures and to encourage 
early detection and treatment in children and others residing 
in medically underserved and rural areas. Of the amount 
provided, the Committee recommends that up to thirty percent be 
used to continue to fund the development and testing of a 
national public health awareness campaign to increase seizure 
recognition and improve access to care among minorities and 
underserved populations. The Committee is pleased that HRSA has 
partnered with a national organization whose mission is to 
improve the lives of children and adults affected by seizure 
through research, education, advocacy and service.
    In addition, the Committee provides $3,000,000 within the 
SPRANS set-aside to continue the newborn screening for 
heritable disorders demonstrations begun several years ago. 
Newborn screening is used for early identification of infants 
affected by certain genetic, metabolic, hormonal or functional 
conditions for which there are effective treatment or 
intervention. Screening detects disorders in newborns that, 
left untreated, can cause death, disability, mental retardation 
and other serious illnesses.
    The Committee commends HRSA for convening the Secretary's 
advisory committee on heritable disorders and genetic diseases 
in newborns and children to make national recommendations to 
standardize newborn screening programs in the US; and for 
funding the regional genetic service and newborn screening 
collaboratives to address the maldistribution of genetic 
services and resources to bring services closer to local 
communities. However, the Committee is aware that wide 
disparities continue to exist in the number of conditions 
screened for in each state. The Committee believes that parents 
and healthcare providers responsible for the care of newborns 
should be able to provide the best chance at a healthy start on 
life, and therefore, strongly urges HRSA to include as a 
requirement for funding a provision that parents be informed in 
writing of the availability of additional tests that may not be 
required under state law.
    The Committee intends that within the total for the SPRANS 
set-aside, $1,500,000 will be used to develop model 
demonstration programs to develop a national data source by 
which States can report State-specific rates and improve the 
screening, detection, and treatment of vision problems that 
would otherwise result in delayed learning and education in 
children. The Committee encourages HRSA to work in partnership 
with a national voluntary health organization with expertise in 
children's vision screening and established certified vision 
screening training programs.
    Of the funds appropriated for the SPRANS set-aside, the 
Committee includes $4,000,000 to support the continuation and 
enhancement of the locally-based newborn screening follow-up 
and community-based sickle cell disease outreach and supportive 
service initiative.
    The Committee reiterates its long-standing support for the 
continuation of funding that the MCH block grant has provided 
to comprehensive thalassemia treatment centers under the SPRANS 
program. The Committee strongly encourages HRSA to continue 
this program and to coordinate with the relevant voluntary 
organizations.
    The Committee urges HRSA to maintain its funding support 
through the SPRANS set-aside of the network of hemophilia 
treatment centers, which provide comprehensive disease 
management services to persons with bleeding and clotting 
disorders.
    The Committee recognizes the contributions of the 
longstanding Provider's Partnership program and encourages HRSA 
to continue its funding. The Partnership includes a series of 
state-level projects initiated to address female psychosocial 
issues through integration of medical care with psychosocial 
services. Such partnerships enhance service integration, 
minimize demands on individual providers, and facilitate 
movement between providers and agencies to create comprehensive 
care.

Sickle cell anemia demonstration program

    The Committee provides $2,178,000 for the sickle cell 
anemia demonstration program, which is the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 funding level. This program 
was created to develop systemic mechanisms for the prevention 
and treatment of sickle cell disease.

Traumatic brain injury

    The Committee provides $8,910,000 for the traumatic brain 
injury (TBI) program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level. The budget request did not include funding for 
this program. The TBI program funds the development and 
implementation of statewide systems to ensure access to care 
including prehospital care, emergency department care, hospital 
care, rehabilitation, transitional services, rehabilitation, 
education and employment, and long-term community support. 
Grants also go to State protection and advocacy systems.

Healthy Start

    The Committee provides $101,518,000 for Healthy Start, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
budget request. Healthy Start provides grants to select 
communities with high rates of infant mortality to help them 
identify, plan, and implement a diverse range of community-
driven strategies that can successfully reduce disparities in 
perinatal health that contribute to the Nation's high infant 
mortality rate.
    Since 1990, the Maternal and Child Health Bureau has worked 
in cooperative agreement to run the National Fetal Infant 
Mortality Review (NFIMR) program. NFIMR provides training and 
assistance to enhance cooperative partnerships among local 
community health professionals, public health officers, 
community advocates and consumers to reduce infant mortality. 
The goal is to improve local services and resources for women, 
infants and families, to remove barriers to care, and to ensure 
culturally appropriate, family friendly services. Such efforts 
are crucial to understanding and addressing infant health 
disparities in communities at highest risk. The Committee 
encourages HRSA to continue to use Healthy Start funds to 
support the NFIMR project.

Universal newborn hearing screening

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for the universal 
newborn hearing screening program, which is $199,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level. The budget request did not 
include funding for this program. The program provides 
competitive grants to States for universal newborn hearing 
screening by means of physiologic testing prior to hospital 
discharge, audiologic evaluation by three months of age, and 
entry into a program of early intervention by six months of 
age.

Emergency medical services for children

    The Committee provides $19,800,000 for the emergency 
medical services for children (EMSC) program, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2006 funding level. The budget request did 
not include funding for this program. Grants are provided to 
States and territories to improve existing emergency medical 
services systems and to schools of medicine to develop and 
evaluate improved procedures and protocols for treating 
children.

Ryan White HIV/AIDS programs

    The Committee provides $2,107,713,000 for Ryan White HIV/
AIDS programs, which is $70,000,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $25,000,000 less than the budget request. The 
bill also makes available $25,000,000 in program evaluation 
funding under section 241 of the Public Health Service for 
special projects of national significance. Within the total 
provided, the Committee provides no less than the funds 
provided in fiscal year 2006 for Ryan White HIV/AIDS activities 
that are targeted to address the growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and 
its disproportionate impact upon communities of color, 
including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian 
Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders.
    The Committee is aware that over 30 percent of HIV-infected 
persons in the United States are also chronically infected with 
the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Chronic hepatitis C infection may 
lead to cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer, and is the 
leading cause of liver transplantation in the U.S. In addition, 
chronic hepatitis C disease progresses more rapidly in HIV-
infected persons, and end stage liver disease resulting from 
chronic hepatitis C infection is now a leading cause of death 
for people with HIV/AIDS. The Committee encourages HRSA to 
provide guidance to CARE Act grantees to encourage them to 
proactively address HCV care and treatment among their HIV/HCV 
co-infected patient populations, and encourages State AIDS 
Assistance Programs to provide coverage of therapies approved 
by the FDA for the treatment of HCV in HIV/HCV co-infected 
patients.
            Emergency assistance
    The Committee provides $603,993,000 for the Part A, 
emergency assistance program, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. These funds 
provide grants to metropolitan areas with very high numbers of 
HIV/AIDS cases for outpatient and ambulatory health and social 
support services. Half of the amount appropriated is allocated 
by formula and half is allocated to eligible areas 
demonstrating additional need through a competitive grant 
process.
            Comprehensive care programs
    The Committee provides $1,190,518,000 for Part B, 
comprehensive care programs, which is $70,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The funds provide formula grants to States for the 
operation of HIV service delivery consortia in the localities 
most heavily affected, for the provision of home and community-
based care, for continuation of health insurance coverage for 
infected persons, and for purchase of therapeutic drugs. The 
Committee includes bill language identifying $789,546,000 
specifically to support State AIDS Drug Assistance Programs 
(ADAP), the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
budget request.
    The Committee is aware of the success HIV therapies have 
had on prolonging and enhancing the quality of life for those 
infected with HIV/AIDS. As the infected population lives longer 
and becomes increasingly resistant to current treatment 
regimens, there is a growing need to focus on access to newer 
therapies for treatment-experienced or ``later stage'' 
patients. The Committee encourages HRSA and state ADAPs to 
prioritize coverage of treatments for later stage patients so 
that there is parity of access to effective treatments for 
patients across the HIV disease spectrum.
            Early intervention program
    The Committee provides $193,622,000 for Part C, the early 
intervention services program, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and $25,000,000 less than the budget 
request. Funds are used for discretionary grants to community 
health centers, family planning agencies, comprehensive 
hemophilia diagnostic and treatment centers, Federally-
qualified health centers, county and municipal health 
departments and other non-profit community-based programs that 
provide comprehensive primary care services to populations with 
or at risk for HIV disease. The grantees provide testing, risk 
reduction counseling, transmission prevention, oral health, 
nutritional and mental health services, and clinical care. 
Optional services include case management, outreach, and 
eligibility assistance.
            Children, youth, women, and families
    The Committee provides $71,794,000 for Part D, children, 
youth, women, and families programs, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. HIV-
infected children, youth and women and affected family members 
have multiple, complex medical, economic and social service 
needs which often require more intensive care coordination, 
intensive case management, child and respite care, and direct 
service delivery to engage and maintain adolescents and mothers 
in care. Funds support innovative and unique strategies and 
models to organize, arrange for, and deliver comprehensive 
services through integration into ongoing systems of care.
            AIDS dental services
    The Committee provides $13,086,000 for AIDS dental 
services, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. The program includes two 
components: the dental reimbursement program, which reimburses 
dental education programs for non-reimbursed costs incurred in 
providing care, and the community-based dental partnership, 
which increases access to oral health services and provider 
training in community settings.
            Education and training centers
    The Committee provides $34,700,000 for AIDS education and 
training centers (AETCs), which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. The centers train 
health care personnel who care for AIDS patients and develop 
model education programs.

Organ transplantation

    The Committee provides $23,049,000 for organ 
transplantation activities, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. The program 
supports the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients; the 
Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, which matches 
organ donors with potential recipients; and grants and 
contracts with public and private organizations to promote and 
improve organ donation.
    The Committee is pleased with the progress of the 
transplantation collaborative project to implement best 
practices in the various organ procurement organizations and 
donor hospitals across the country. This program is credited 
with increasing the rate of organ donation by 10.8 percent in 
2004 and by an additional 6.6 percent in 2005. The Committee 
urges that funding be provided to the next phase of the 
transplantation collaborative, which will help increase the 
number of organs donated per individual donor. The Committee is 
also pleased that HRSA has awarded a grant to reimburse for 
travel and subsistence expenses for individuals traveling to 
transplantation centers for the purpose of organ donation. The 
Committee urges that a careful evaluation process be 
encompassed in this effort to learn its impact on the rate of 
organ donation and organ evaluation resulting in 
transplantation. The Committee notes that there are now twenty 
states with first-person consent laws, which when combined with 
state registries, have proven to be a powerful factor in 
increasing the rate of donation.
    The Committee commends HRSA for its leadership in promoting 
increased organ and tissue donations across the nation and 
encourages the Division of Transplantation to expand its 
partnership with the pulmonary hypertension community in this 
important area.

National cord blood inventory

    The Committee concurs with the budget request and does not 
provide additional funding for the national cord blood 
inventory program. The fiscal year 2006 appropriation provided 
an additional $3,960,000 for this program. The Committee is 
very supportive of this program, but notes that from the funds 
provided in fiscal years 2004 through 2006, more than 
$22,000,000 remains available for obligation. The purpose of 
this program is to provide funds to cord blood banks to build 
an inventory of the highest quality cord blood units for 
transplantation.

Cell transplantation program

    The Committee provides $25,162,000 for the cell 
transplantation program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $2,475,000 above the budget request. The 
C.W. Bill Young Cell Transplantation Program, signed into law 
on December 20, 2005, is the successor to the National Bone 
Marrow Donor Registry.

Office of pharmacy affairs

    The Committee provides $2,970,000 for the office of 
pharmacy affairs, the same level as the budget request. The 
funding for this new budget request within HRSA will help 
resolve identified deficiencies in the 340B drug pricing 
program and is intended to make major improvements in program 
operations.
    The Committee is concerned about barriers to safety net 
pharmacies contracting with the Medicare Part D prescription 
drug plans and the subsequent impact on low income Medicare 
beneficiaries' participation. The Committee urges the office of 
pharmacy affairs to work with the Centers for Medicare and 
Medicaid Services (CMS) to assess safety net participation in 
Part D networks and expand assistance to assure that safety net 
pharmacies may participate on fair and relevant terms. The 
Committee is aware of legislation that would track and analyze 
the expenditures that safety net pharmacies make on behalf of 
their low income Medicare patients which do not count towards 
beneficiaries' true out-of-pocket expenditures, and supports 
the goal of ensuring low-income Medicare beneficiaries have 
continued access to prescription drugs through the Medicare 
program.

Poison control centers

    The Committee provides $23,068,000 for poison control 
centers, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $9,900,000 above the budget request. These funds 
support a grant program for poison control centers. In 
addition, funds are used to maintain a national toll-free 
number and to implement a media campaign to advertise that 
number, as well as to support the development of uniform 
patient management guidelines and the improvement of data 
collection.

Rural outreach grants

    The Committee provides $40,000,000 for rural outreach 
grants, which is $1,115,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $29,635,000 above the budget request. The program 
administers grant programs to deliver and improve rural health 
care services to the approximately 54,000,000 Americans living 
in rural areas.

Rural health research

    The Committee provides $9,000,000 for rural health 
research, which is $263,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. This activity supports several 
rural health research centers and the Secretary's rural health 
advisory committee.

Rural hospital flexibility grants

    The Committee provides $40,000,000 for rural hospital 
flexibility grants, which is $23,538,000 less than the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level. The budget request did not include 
funding for this program. The program is comprised of two 
components: (1) flexibility grants to States to assist small, 
at risk rural hospitals that wish to convert to Critical Access 
Hospitals and receive cost-based payments from Medicare and (2) 
small rural hospital improvement grants that provide modest 
amounts to hospitals to assist them in automation and 
compliance with confidentiality requirements.
    The Committee concurs with the budget request and does not 
include funding for the Delta health initiative. The 
$25,000,000 that was provided in fiscal year 2006 was intended 
to be a one-time project.

Rural and community access to emergency devices

    The Committee provides $1,500,000 for the rural access to 
emergency devices and the public access defibrillation 
demonstration program, which is $15,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 funding level. Funding for this program was not included 
in the budget request. The program assists both urban and rural 
communities in increasing survivability from sudden cardiac 
arrest by providing funding for the purchase, placement, and 
training in the use of automated external defibrillators 
(AEDs).

State offices of rural health

    The Committee provides $8,400,000 for State offices of 
rural health, which is $259,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the budget request. The State office of rural 
health program creates a focal point for rural health within 
each of the fifty States. In each State, the office collects 
and disseminates information on rural health, coordinates rural 
health resources and activities, provides technical assistance 
to rural providers and communities, and helps communities 
recruit and retain health professionals.

Denali Commission

    The Committee concurs with the budget request and has not 
included funding for the Denali Commission. The fiscal year 
2006 funding level is $39,283,000.

Family planning

    The Committee provides $283,103,000 for the family planning 
program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. The program provides grants to 
public and private non-profit agencies to support a range of 
family planning and reproductive services, as well as related 
preventive health services such as patient education and 
counseling, breast and cervical cancer examinations, STD and 
HIV prevention education, counseling and testing and referral, 
and pregnancy diagnosis and counseling. The program also 
supports training for providers, an information and education 
program, and a research program which focuses on family 
planning service delivery improvements.
    The bill continues to include language making clear that 
these funds shall not be expended for abortions, that all 
pregnancy counseling shall be nondirective, and that these 
funds shall not be used to promote public opposition to or 
support of any legislative proposal or candidate for public 
office.

Healthcare-related facilities and other programs

    The Committee includes bill language specifying 
$248,146,000 for healthcare-related facilities and other 
programs. No funding was included in the budget request or in 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation for this activity. This 
program provides funds for construction and renovation, 
including equipment, of healthcare and other facilities, 
directed rural health projects, telehealth grants, health 
professions training, and other health-related activities. 
These funds are to be used for the following projects and in 
the following amounts:

16th Street Community Health Center, Milwaukee, WI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         $75,000
Access Community Health Network, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         400,000
Adams County Hospital, West Union, OH for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Adventist HealthCare, Rockville, MD for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Aims Community College, Greeley, CO for equipment for 
    career training in the health professions...........         150,000
Akron General Medical Center, Akron, OH for equipment 
    for an ambulatory medical record system.............         200,000
Alabama Elk River Development Agency, Elkmont, AL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Limestone Community 
    Care Medical Clinic.................................         150,000
Alamo Community College, Floresville, TX for facilities 
    and equipment for nursing education.................         300,000
Albany Medical Center, Albany, NY for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Alleghany Memorial Hospital, Sparta, NC for an 
    electronic medical records system...................         200,000
Allegheny Mountains Community Blood Center, State 
    College, PA for a blood mobile......................         150,000
Alliance for NanoHealth, Houston, TX for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................       1,200,000
AltaMed Health Services Corporation, Los Angeles, CA for 
    facilities and equipment for a clinic in Boyle 
    Heights.............................................         500,000
AltaMed Health Services Corporation, Los Angeles, CA for 
    facilities and equipment for a clinic in El Monte...         300,000
American Oncologic Hospital of Fox Chase Cancer Center 
    in Philadelphia and the University of Maryland 
    Greenebaum Cancer Center in Baltimore, for 
    facilities and equipment for the American Russian 
    Cancer Alliance.....................................         500,000
Amite County Medical Services, Inc., Liberty, MS for 
    facilities and equipment............................         400,000
Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD for 
    facilities and equipment for health professions 
    education...........................................         500,000
Antietam Healthcare Foundation, Hagerstown, MD for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Arcadia Methodist Hospital, Arcadia, CA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................       1,000,000
Arizona Dental Foundation, Scottsdale, AZ to provide 
    dental services to low-income residents of Arizona..         100,000
Arnold Palmer Hospital, Orlando, FL for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Ashland County Oral Health Services, Inc., Ashland, OH 
    for facilities......................................          50,000
Aspirus Wausau Hospital, Wausau, WI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................       1,200,000
Atchison Hospital, Atchison, KS for equipment...........         150,000
Atlantic Health Systems, Florham Park, NJ for a 
    universal electronic health records system..........       1,000,000
AtlantiCare Behavioral Health, Egg Harbor Township, NJ 
    for facilities and equipment........................         150,000
Augustana College, Rock Island, IL for facilities and 
    equipment for its Center for Communicative Disorders          75,000
Aultman Health Foundation, Canton, OH for equipment for 
    the Aultman Hospice Center..........................         700,000
Autism Center of Virginia, Richmond, VA for equipment...         275,000
Avera St. Anthony Hospital, O'Neill, NE for electronic 
    health record interoperability......................         125,000
Avis Goodwin Community Health Center, Somersworth, NH 
    for facilities and equipment........................         300,000
Avista Adventist Hospital, Louisville, CO for an 
    electronic medical record system....................         300,000
Backus Children's Hospital at Memorial Health University 
    Medical Center, Savannah, GA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Bacon County Health Services, Alma, GA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Bad River Tribe, Odanah, WI for facilities and equipment 
    for health services.................................         750,000
Baltimore Medical Systems, Baltimore, MD for facilities 
    and equipment for a new health center in Southeast 
    Baltimore...........................................         400,000
Baltimore Pediatric HIV Program, Baltimore, MD for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
Baptist Child and Family Services, San Antonio, TX for a 
    Unified Community Response Center concept...........         500,000
Baptist Health Care, Pensacola, FL for facilities and 
    equipment for the Andrews Institute in Gulf Breeze, 
    FL..................................................         650,000
Baptist Health Medical Center, Heber Springs, AR for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Barnert Hospital, Paterson, NJ for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Barre Family Health Center, Barre, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
Barry University, Miami Shore, FL for facilities and 
    equipment for the Institute for Community and 
    Minority Health.....................................         150,000
BayCare Health System, Clearwater, FL for a medical 
    information system initiative.......................         500,000
Beaufort Memorial Hospital, Beaufort, SC for equipment 
    for the Keyserling Cancer Center....................         300,000
Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
Becker College, Worcester, MA for nursing education 
    programs............................................         100,000
Bellevue Hospital and Bellevue Senior Neighborhood 
    Corporation, Bellevue, OH for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Beloit Regional Hospice, Beloit, WI for computerization 
    of medical records..................................         100,000
Benedictine Hospital, Kingston, NY for information 
    technology..........................................         250,000
Benefis Healthcare, Great Falls, MT for equipment.......         200,000
Berea Health Ministry, Berea, KY for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................          50,000
Bleckley Memorial Hospital, Cochran, GA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................          54,000
Bloomsburg Hospital, Bloomsburg, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Blount Memorial Hospital, Maryville, TN for equipment 
    for the Breast Health Center........................         150,000
Blue Ridge Health System, Inc., Arrington, VA for 
    telehealth services.................................          75,000
Boone Hospital Center, Columbia, MO for facilities and 
    equipment for mobile screening......................         410,000
Boscobel Area Health Care, Boscobel, WI for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         455,000
Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA for facilities and 
    equipment for the J. Joseph Moakley Medical Services 
    Building............................................         800,000
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA for 
    facilities and equipment for research and treatment 
    related to amyloidosis..............................         200,000
Boys and Girls Home of Nebraska, Inc., South Sioux City, 
    NE for facilities and equipment for the Children's 
    Residential Treatment Center........................         250,000
Boys' Village, Smithfield, OH for facilities............         200,000
Brackenridge Hospital, Austin, TX for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Bradford Regional Medical Center, Bradford, PA for 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Bradley University, Peoria, IL for facilities and 
    equipment for the Collaborative Health and Education 
    Center..............................................         500,000
Brandywine YMCA, Coatesville, PA for therapy/
    rehabilitation facilities and equipment.............          50,000
Bucks County Health Improvement Partnership, Langhorne, 
    PA for the Improving Access to Health Care for Low-
    Income Residents of Bucks County project............         350,000
Buntain School of Nursing, Northwest University, 
    Kirkland, WA for facilities and equipment...........         185,000
Bureau County Community Health Clinic, Princeton, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Burke Medical Center, Waynesboro, GA for a PACS system 
    for radiology services..............................         400,000
Byrd Alzheimer's Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL 
    for the purchase of SELDI and BIOPLEX equipment for 
    identifying biomarkers..............................         150,000
California Hospital Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         800,000
California State University--San Bernardino, San 
    Bernardino, CA for equipment for the nursing and 
    health science education program at the Palm Desert 
    Campus..............................................         500,000
California State University Channel Islands, Camarillo, 
    CA for equipment for the Regional Clinical 
    Simulation Technology Laboratory....................         240,000
California State University Program for Education and 
    Research in Biotechnology, San Diego, CA, for 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
Canonsburg General Hospital, Canonsburg, PA for an 
    information technology upgrade......................         200,000
Carbon Medical Service Association, East Carbon, UT for 
    facilities and equipment............................          75,000
Cardinal Stritch University, Milwaukee, WI to expand 
    community-based nursing services in connection with 
    its nursing education program.......................          90,000
Carilion Health System, Roanoke, VA for equipment for 
    the Smart Operating Room............................         300,000
Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC for facilities 
    and equipment for its Neuromuscular/ALS-MDA Center..         300,000
Carroll College, Helena, MT for facilities and equipment 
    for the Department of Nursing Simulated Patient Care 
    Lab.................................................         230,000
Carroll County Hospital, Carrollton, KY for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         500,000
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH for the 
    National Center for Regenerative Medicine...........       1,000,000
Catholic Medical Center, Manchester, NH for equipment...         250,000
Cedar Riverside People's Center, Minneapolis, MN for 
    facilities and equipment and conversion to an 
    electronic medical records system...................         525,000
Centenary College, Hackettstown, NJ for facilities and 
    equipment for the Nurse Training Program............         100,000
Central Carolina Technical College, Sumter, SC for 
    facilities and equipment for a health sciences 
    center..............................................         500,000
Central Virginia Community College, Lynchburg, VA for 
    dental hygienist development........................         250,000
Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital Medical Center, 
    Plattsburgh, NY for facilities and equipment........         200,000
Charles A. Dean Memorial Hospital, Greenville, ME for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los 
    Angeles, CA for facilities and equipment and faculty 
    salaries and support................................         400,000
Charlotte County, Port Charlotte, FL for facilities and 
    equipment for a Regional Health Services Complex....         300,000
Cherry Street Health Services, Grand Rapids, MI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
Chester County Hospital, West Chester, PA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Chicago Botanic Gardens, Glencoe, IL for facilities and 
    equipment at the Center for Seed Conservation and 
    Medicinal Plant Research............................         400,000
Chicago Family Health Center, Chicago, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         375,000
Children's Home of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Children's Hospital and Health System, Wauwatosa, WI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         950,000
Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters Health 
    System, Norfolk, VA for a pediatric outpatient 
    mobile MRI unit located in Chesapeake, VA...........         100,000
Children's Health Fund, New York, NY for facilities and 
    equipment for the Dallas Children's Health Project..         200,000
Children's Hospital & Research Center, Oakland, CA for 
    an electronic medical records system................         370,000
Children's Hospital and Health Center, San Diego, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, 
    Seattle, WA for facilities and equipment for the 
    Center for Pediatric Bioethics......................         465,000
Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA for a 
    pediatric nursing residency program.................         200,000
Children's Hospital of Illinois, Peoria, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Children's Hospital of Orange County, Orange, CA for 
    health information technology.......................         300,000
Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters Health 
    System, Norfolk, VA for facilities equipment in the 
    Princess Anne Pediatric Medical Office Building in 
    Virginia Beach......................................       1,000,000
Children's Hospital, Denver, CO for an electronic 
    medical records system..............................         300,000
Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA for the development of 
    the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics.....         100,000
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL for a medical 
    records project.....................................         225,000
Children's National Medical Center, Washington DC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Children's Specialized Hospital, Mountainside, NJ for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
CHOC at Mission, Mission Viejo, CA for Neonatal and 
    Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Patient Monitors......         400,000
Christian Health Care Center, Wyckoff, NJ for medical 
    records system upgrades.............................         250,000
CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Children's Hospital, San Antonio, TX 
    for facilities and equipment........................         350,000
Citizens for Quality Sickle Cell Care, Inc., New 
    Britain, CT for facilities and equipment............         100,000
City of Austin, TX for facilities and equipment for 
    community health centers............................         185,000
City of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT for facilities and 
    equipment for the Health and Social Service Center..         200,000
City of Charlotte, NC for facilities and equipment for 
    the Advanced Local Emergency Response Team (ALERT)..         200,000
City of Dubuque, IA for facilities and equipment for the 
    development of a federally qualified community 
    health center.......................................         300,000
City of Gladstone, MO for emergency medical equipment...         136,000
City of Hueytown, AL for facilities and equipment for 
    the Senior Citizen Center for Health and Wellness...         200,000
City of Pembroke Pines, FL for facilities and equipment 
    for a medical facility at the Howard C. Forman Human 
    Services Campus.....................................         150,000
City of Perris, CA for hospital equipment...............         400,000
City of Stockton, CA for facilities and equipment for 
    the Airport Way Community and Health Center.........         150,000
Clackamas Community College, Oregon City, OR for 
    facilities and equipment for health professions 
    training............................................         485,000
Clarion Healthcare System, Clarion, PA for technology 
    upgrades............................................         100,000
Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH for 
    facilities for the Medical Institutes Pavilion......         500,000
Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH for equipment.         200,000
Coffeyville Regional Medical Center, Coffeyville, KS for 
    facilities and equipment............................         750,000
Coles County Council on Aging, Mattoon, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for the LifeSpan Senior 
    Center..............................................         250,000
College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN for a rural 
    health information technology project...............         600,000
Collier County, FL for facilities and equipment for the 
    Florida Health Care Center..........................         100,000
Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO for a 
    combined PET and CT scanner.........................         300,000
Colquitt Regional Medical Center, Moultrie, GA for 
    facilities and equipment............................          75,000
Columbia Memorial Hospital, Hudson, NY for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH for 
    facilities and equipment............................       1,750,000
Community Blood and Tissue Center, Dayton, OH for an 
    electronic data format..............................         100,000
Community Dental Care Foundation, Wausau, WI for dental 
    education and dental services for children..........         100,000
Community Dental, Albuquerque, NM for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         700,000
Community Health Care Services Foundation, East 
    Greenbush, NY for expansion of telemedicine services         100,000
Community Health Care, Rock Island, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................          75,000
Community Health Care, Tacoma, WA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         750,000
Community Health Center of the Berkshires, Great 
    Barrington, MA for facilities and equipment.........          75,000
Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region, 
    Castleton, VT for facilities and equipment..........         150,000
Community Health Improvement Center, Decatur, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Community Health Improvement Center, Decatur, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Frances Nelson 
    Community Health Center.............................         100,000
Community Health Integrated Partnership, Glen Burnie, MD 
    for an electronic patient record system.............         600,000
Community Hospital and Wellness Centers, Bryan, OH for 
    equipment and technology............................         100,000
Community Medical Center, Missoula, MT for the Western 
    Montana Telehealth Network..........................         500,000
Community Medical Centers, Stockton, CA for facilities 
    and equipment for the Gleason House Homeless Medical 
    Clinic..............................................         100,000
Community New Start, Inc., Austin, TX for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Comprehensive Community Action, Cranston, RI for 
    facilities and equipment for dental care............         250,000
Connecticut Hospice, Branford, CT for health information 
    technology and telemedicine equipment...............         330,000
Convergent Knowledge Solutions, LLC, Weston, FL for 
    rural healthcare delivery in Alaska.................         150,000
Cook Children's Medical Center, Ft. Worth, TX for 
    equipment...........................................       2,300,000
Cooper Green Hospital, Birmingham, AL for health 
    information technology..............................         200,000
Cooperative Education Service Agency No. 11, Turtle 
    Lake, WI for dental services........................         350,000
Coos County Family Health Services, Berlin, NH for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Costilla County, San Luis, CO for facilities and 
    equipment for a county health services facility.....          75,000
County of Peoria, Peoria, IL for facilities and 
    equipment for the Bel-Wood Nursing Home.............         200,000
County of San Mateo, CA for facilities and equipment for 
    the San Mateo Medical Center........................         450,000
Covenant Health System, Lubbock, TX for equipment.......         100,000
Creighton University, Omaha, NE for facilities and 
    equipment for the Boyne School of Dental Science 
    building............................................         250,000
Creighton University, Omaha, NE for facilities and 
    equipment for the Center for Bioterrorism Response..         250,000
Crisis Nursery of the Ozarks, Springfield, MO for 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Crouse Hospital, Syracuse, NY for an electronic 
    medication administration system....................         550,000
Crozer-Keystone Health System, Springfield, PA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Crozer-Chester 
    Nathan Speare Regional Burn Treatment Center, 
    Chester, PA.........................................         250,000
Crumley House Rehabilitation Center, Limestone, TN for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Cumberland Medical Center, Crossville, TN for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         350,000
Day Kimball Hospital, Putnam, CT for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Deborah Heart and Lung Center, Browns Mills, NJ for 
    facilities and equipment at the Women's 
    Cardiovascular Wellness Center......................         100,000
Deckerville Community Hospital, Deckerville, MI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Defiance Regional Medical Center, Fremont, OH for the 
    Breast Cancer Detection Technology project..........         100,000
Delaware Technical and Community College, Dover, DE for 
    facilities and equipment for the health and sciences 
    education building at the Stanton Campus............         250,000
Deschutes County, Bend, OR for the Family Access Network         250,000
Dorminy Medical Center, Fitzgerald, GA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         125,000
Du Bois Regional Medical Center, Du Bois, PA for a 
    Regional Health Information Organization............         300,000
DuPage County Convalescent Center, Wheaton, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
East Carolina University Metabolic Institute, 
    Greenville, NC for facilities and equipment.........         250,000
East Jefferson General Hospital, Metaire, LA for an 
    electronic medical records project..................         300,000
East Orange General Hospital, East Orange, NJ for 
    facilities and equipment............................         175,000
East Pasco Medical Center, Zephyrhills, FL for equipment         250,000
East Tennessee Children's Hospital, Knoxville, TN for a 
    Picture Archiving and Communications System.........         350,000
Easter Seals Metropolitan Chicago, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Eastern Connecticut Health Network, Manchester, CT for 
    facilities and equipment for the Rockville General 
    Hospital............................................         200,000
Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL for the 
    nursing program.....................................         150,000
Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, CA for the 
    Annenberg Pavilion..................................         350,000
El Proyecto del Barrio, Arleta, CA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Emergency Medicine Learning and Resource Center, 
    Orlando, FL for facilities and equipment............         500,000
Emerson Hospital, Concord, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Endless Mountains Health Systems, Montrose, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, NJ for 
    facilities and equipment............................         275,000
Enterprise Valley Medical Clinic, Enterprise, UT for 
    facilities and equipment............................          30,000
Ephrata Community Hospital, Ephrata, PA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Erie County Medical Center, Buffalo, NY for a 
    telemedicine project................................         100,000
Erie Family Health Center, Chicago, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         350,000
Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University of 
    Massachusetts Medical School, Waltham, MA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Excela Health Frick Hospital, Mount Pleasant, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Excela Health Westmoreland Hospital, Greensburg, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Exempla Good Samaritan Medical Center Foundation, 
    Lafayette, CO for an electronic medical record 
    system..............................................         250,000
Fairfield Medical Center, Lancaster, OH for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Family Health Center of Southern Oklahoma, Tishomingo, 
    OK for facilities and equipment.....................         150,000
Family Maternity Center of the Northern Neck, 
    Kilmarnock, VA for equipment........................         150,000
Family Medicine Center, Anchorage, AK for the Alaska 
    Family Practice Residency program...................         300,000
Family Medicine Spokane, Spokane, WA for the Rural 
    Training Assistance program.........................         150,000
Family Service and Community Mental Health Center, 
    McHenry, IL for information technology..............         200,000
Ferris State University, Big Rapids, MI for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Fisher-Titus Medical Center, Norwalk, OH for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         100,000
Fleming County Hospital, Flemingsburg, KY to purchase 
    and implement a PACS/Teleradiology system...........         100,000
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Center for Caring 
    to Reduce Health Disparities........................         300,000
Florida Dialogue on Cancer, University of South Florida, 
    Tampa, FL for database enhancement..................         300,000
Florida Hospital College of Health Sciences, Orlando, FL 
    for facilities and equipment........................         250,000
Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Autism Treatment 
    and Research Center.................................       3,000,000
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, FL for equipment for 
    the Nursing Program Laboratory......................         300,000
Fort Hudson Health System, Fort Edward, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         110,000
Foundation for Comprehensive Community Care, West Palm 
    Beach, FL for facilities and equipment..............         300,000
Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Freeman Health System, Joplin, MO for facilities and 
    equipment for a facility in McDonald County.........       1,000,000
Fremont Memorial Hospital, Fremont, OH for the 
    electronic health records and equipment project.....         100,000
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus Foundation, 
    Lake Success, NY for facilities and equipment for 
    the Southwest Texas Eye Care Collaborative..........         500,000
Fulton County Medical Center, McConnellsburg, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
Gardner Family Health Network, San Jose, CA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Gardner South 
    County Health Center................................         225,000
Gaston College, Dallas, NC for equipment for the Health 
    Education Institute.................................         300,000
Gateway Community Health Center, Laredo, TX for 
    equipment...........................................       1,000,000
Gateway to Care, Houston, TX for health information 
    technology initiatives, including training..........         200,000
Geisinger Health System Wyoming Valley, Wilkes-Barre, PA 
    for facilities and equipment for the PACE Center in 
    Nanticoke, PA.......................................         300,000
Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA for equipment.....         500,000
Genesis Healthcare System, Zanesville, OH for facilities 
    and equipment for mobile intensive care.............         300,000
George Washington University, Washington, DC for the 
    Cancer Institute....................................         150,000
Gerber Memorial Health Services, Fremont, MI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Gibson General Hospital, Princeton, IN for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Glen Rose Medical Center, Glen Rose, TX for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         700,000
Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
Goodwill Columbus, Columbus, OH for facilities and 
    equipment for the Health and Wellness Center........         200,000
Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         550,000
Grandview Hospital, Dayton, OH for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Graysville, AL for facilities and equipment for the 
    Senior Citizen Center...............................          25,000
Great Basin College, Elko, NV for facilities and 
    equipment for the Great Basin Center for Rural 
    Health Education and Services.......................         300,000
Greater New Bedford Community Health Center, New 
    Bedford, MA for facilities and equipment............         400,000
Green River Medical Clinic, Green River, UT for 
    facilities and equipment............................          45,000
Greene County Health Care, Snow Hill NC for facilities 
    and equipment for the James D. Bernstein Community 
    Healthcare Center in Greenville.....................         250,000
Greene County, MO for medical services provided in the 
    Greene County Jail through a partnership with the 
    Jordan Valley Community Health Center...............         330,000
Griffin Hospital, Derby CT for facilities and equipment.         500,000
Grossmont Hospital Foundation, La Mesa, CA for equipment         100,000
Grundy County Health Department, Grundy County, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Senior Citizen 
    Support Center......................................         125,000
Guam Memorial Hospital, Tamuning, GU for improvements to 
    hospital information systems........................         300,000
Gulf Coast Health Center, Port Arthur, TX for facilities 
    and equipment for a new community health center in 
    Beaumont, TX........................................         200,000
Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Portland, ME for 
    facilities and equipment for biomedical research....         250,000
Gundersen Lutheran, Decorah, IA for a remote fetal 
    monitoring system for patients in rural Northeast 
    Iowa................................................         350,000
Habersham County Medical Center, Demorset, GA for 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Hackettstown Regional Medical Center, Hackettstown, NJ 
    for facilities and equipment........................         250,000
Halifax Regional Health System, South Boston, VA for an 
    information technology upgrade......................         300,000
Hamilton Community Health Network, Flint, MI for health 
    information technology improvements.................         400,000
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for 
    facilities and equipment for a diabetes care program         250,000
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for 
    facilities and equipment for cardiac monitoring.....         295,000
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for 
    facilities and equipment for the Ask Your Nurse 
    telephone advice and triage system..................         100,000
Harris County, Katy, TX for facilities and equipment for 
    the Caring Hearts Seniors Community Center..........         350,000
Harris Methodist Erath County Hospital, Stephenville, TX 
    for facilities and equipment........................         150,000
Harrisburg Area Community College, York, PA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Health Careers 
    Center..............................................         350,000
Harrison Community Hospital, Cadiz, OH for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................          75,000
Harrison Medical Center, Bremerton, WA for health 
    information technology..............................         100,000
Harrison Memorial Hospital, Cynthiana, KY to purchase 
    and implement a PACS/Teleradiology system...........         200,000
Hatzoloh EMS, Monsey, NY for facilities and equipment...         250,000
HAWC Community Health Center, Reno, NV for facilities 
    and equipment in Stead, NV..........................         200,000
Haywood Regional Medical Center, Clyde, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         400,000
Health Center, Plainfield, VT for rural healthcare 
    services............................................          75,000
Health Delivery, Inc., Saginaw, MI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         175,000
HealthCare Connection, Inc., Cincinnati, OH for an 
    electronic medical and dental records system........         250,000
HealthHUB, South Royalton, VT, for facilities, equipment 
    and operating costs for a school-based dental clinic 
    in Tunbridge, VT....................................         100,000
HealthNet, Indianapolis, IN for facilities and equipment         250,000
Heartland Community Health Clinic, Peoria, IL for 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
Hektoen Institute for Medical Research, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for a health clinic........         350,000
Henderson County Hospital Corporation, Hendersonville, 
    NC for facilities and equipment at Pardee Hospital..         500,000
Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI for equipment for 
    the Manufacturing Principles Applied to Health 
    (MPATH) initiative in West Bloomfield, MI...........         350,000
Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital, Valencia, CA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................       1,000,000
Hernando County Health Department, Brooksville, FL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         450,000
Herrick Memorial Hospital, Adrian, MI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Hi-Desert Memorial Healthcare District, Joshua Tree, CA 
    for equipment for the Mobile Medical Clinic.........         300,000
Holy Cross Hospital, Silver Spring, MD for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Holy Family Hospital Telehealth Program, Spokane, WA for 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Holy Name Hospital, Teaneck, NJ for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         275,000
Home Nursing Agency, Altoona, PA for a telehealth 
    program.............................................         100,000
Home Sweet Home Ministries, Bloomington, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for the residential 
    treatment program...................................         150,000
Homecare Workers Training Center, Los Angeles, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Hood River County, Hood River, OR for facilities and 
    equipment for the Cascade Locks Integrated Health 
    Care Facility, Cascade Locks, OR....................         150,000
Hoots Memorial Hospital, Yadkinville, NC for technology 
    upgrades............................................         300,000
Hospice of Knox County, Mt. Vernon, OH for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................          50,000
Hospice of McDowell County, Inc., Marion, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Hospice of Metro Denver, Denver, CO for the Life Quality 
    Institute...........................................         100,000
Hospice of North Central Ohio, Ashland, OH for equipment 
    for the Hospice Inpatient Center....................         100,000
Hospice of the Western Reserve, Cleveland, OH for 
    equipment...........................................         225,000
House of Mercy, Des Moines, IA for facilities and 
    equipment related to substance abuse treatment......         200,000
Houston Medical Center, Warner Robins, GA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................          50,000
Hudson Headwaters Health Network, Glen Falls, NY for 
    health information system technology equipment for 
    the Warrensburg Health Center, Warrensburg, NY......         300,000
Hudson Valley Community College, Troy, NY for the 
    Weekend Nursing Program.............................         572,000
Hudson Valley Hospital, Courtlandt Manor, NY to 
    construct a cancer care center......................         750,000
Hudson-Alpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 
    for facilities and equipment for biomedical research         450,000
Humphreys County Memorial Hospital, Belzoni, MS for 
    facilities and equipment............................         450,000
Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, NJ for equipment..         200,000
Hunter's Hope Foundation, Orchard Park, NY for equipment 
    for the Hunter James Kelly Research Institute.......         250,000
Huron Hospital, East Cleveland, OH for facilities.......         500,000
Idaho Alliance of Leaders in Nursing, Boise, ID for the 
    Idaho Nursing Workforce Center......................         300,000
Idaho Caring Foundation for Children, Boise, ID for the 
    Dental Project for Low-income, Uninsured Children...         300,000
Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Illinois Primary Health Care Association, Springfield, 
    IL for electronic medical records systems...........         300,000
Indiana Regional Medical Center, Indiana, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Indiana University Center for Bone Cancer Research, 
    Indianapolis, IN for facilities.....................         150,000
Indiana University School of Medicine, Gary, IN for 
    facilities and equipment for the Northwest Indiana 
    Health Research Institute...........................         750,000
Inland Behavioral and Health Services, San Bernardino, 
    CA for facilities and equipment for the Banning 
    Family Health Center, Banning, CA...................         750,000
INOVA Health System, Falls Church, VA for facilities and 
    equipment for the Claude Moore Health Education 
    Center..............................................         250,000
Institute for Research and Rehabilitation, Houston, TX 
    for equipment.......................................         200,000
INTEGRIS Health Systems, Oklahoma City, OK for equipment 
    at rural hospitals..................................         400,000
Iowa Chronic Care Consortium, Des Moines, IA for the 
    Improving the Health Status of Rural Iowans through 
    Prevention health monitoring program................         150,000
Iroquois Memorial Hospital and Resident Home, Watseka, 
    IL for facilities and equipment.....................         150,000
Ittawamba Community College, Fulton, MS for facilities 
    and equipment for the Allied Health Center..........         500,000
Jackson Community College, Jackson, MI for equipment....         200,000
Jackson Health System, Miami, FL for a mobile health van         100,000
Jackson Health System, Miami, FL for information 
    technology infrastructure upgrades..................         250,000
James D. Bernstein Community Health Center, Greenville, 
    NC for facilities and equipment.....................         100,000
Jasper Memorial Hospital, Monticello, GA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................          50,000
Jefferson Comprehensive Health Center, Fayette, MS for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
Jefferson County Health Center, Monticello, FL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Jefferson Regional Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA for an 
    electronic medical record initiative................         100,000
Jersey Shore Hospital, Jersey Shore, PA for technology 
    upgrades............................................         200,000
John Muir Health System, Walnut Creek, CA for the 
    Regional Specialty Examination Network telemedicine 
    initiative..........................................         250,000
Johnson Memorial Hospital, Stafford Springs, CT for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Jordan Valley Community Health Center, Springfield, MO 
    for facilities and equipment........................         750,000
JPS Health Network, Fort Worth, TX for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         750,000
Jupiter Medical Center, Jupiter, FL for equipment.......         500,000
JWCH Institute, Bell Gardens, CA for facilities and 
    equipment for the Bell Gardens Health Center........         200,000
Kaweah Delta Health Care District, Visalia, CA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Kaweah Delta 
    Community Hospital..................................         100,000
Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         600,000
Kent State University's Ashtabula Campus, Ashtabula, OH 
    for facilities for the Health and Science Center....         500,000
Kern Valley Healthcare District, Lake Isabella, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Kno-Ho-Co-Ashland Community Action Commission, 
    Coshocton, OH for a dental health protection program 
    provided through a mobile dental unit...............          75,000
Knox Community Hospital, Mt. Vernon OH for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, PA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Center for Drug 
    Information and Research............................         300,000
Lakeland Community College, Mentor, OH for a Regional 
    Healthcare Workforce Development Project............         250,000
Lamoille Community Health Services, Morrisville, VT for 
    rural healthcare services...........................          75,000
Langlade Memorial Hospital, Antigo, WI for the Rural 
    Dental Health Project...............................         200,000
Lawrence Hospital Center: Bronxville, NY for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         400,000
LBJ Tropical Medical Center, Pago Pago, AS for advanced 
    training of nurses and other health care staff......         250,000
Le Bonheur Children's Medical Center, Memphis, TN for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
League Against Cancer, Miami, FL for equipment..........         200,000
Libertae, Inc., Bensalem, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
Liberty County, Bristol, FL for facilities and equipment 
    for a medical clinic................................         450,000
Lincoln Community Health Center, Durham, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         240,000
Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center, Bronx, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
Loretto Hospital, Chicago, IL for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Loretto, Syracuse, NY for facilities and equipment for 
    their elderly health care and skilled nursing 
    facilities..........................................         750,000
Los Angeles Community College District, Los Angeles, CA 
    for health professions education programs...........         400,000
Los Angeles Orthopaedic Hospital, Los Angeles, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         750,000
Louisiana Association for the Blind, Shreveport, LA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Low Vision Center..         200,000
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 
    Shreveport, LA for equipment........................         450,000
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 
    Shreveport, LA to support the Health Literacy 
    Initiative of the Louisiana Interagency Task Force 
    on Health Literacy..................................         300,000
Lourdes Health System, Lourdes Medical Center of 
    Burlington County, Willingsboro, NJ for equipment...         200,000
Lowell Community Health Center, Lowell, MA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Lower Bucks Hospital, Bristol, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Loyola University Health System, Maywood, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         225,000
Madison Center, South Bend, IN for facilities and 
    equipment for an Attention Deficit Hyperactivity 
    Disorder Clinic.....................................         500,000
Madison County Community Health Center, Anderson, IN for 
    an electronic medical records system................         200,000
Madison County Memorial Hospital, Rexburg, ID for 
    facilities and equipment............................         400,000
Madison St. Joseph Health Center, Madisonville, TX for 
    facilities and equipment............................         165,000
Maine Primary Care Association, Augusta, ME for an 
    electronic medical record project...................         150,000
Malone College, Canton, OH for facilities and equipment.         700,000
Malone Medical Center, Malone, FL for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................          50,000
Manchester College, North Manchester, IN for facilities 
    and equipment for the Health and Physical Recreation 
    Center..............................................       1,000,000
Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, CT for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Manchester Memorial Hospital, Manchester, KY for a 
    telemedicine and telehealth program.................         100,000
Marian Community Hospital, Carbondale, PA for patient 
    safety technology upgrades..........................         250,000
Marietta Senior Health Center, Marietta, GA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         800,000
Marquette General Hospital, Marquette, MI for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI for dental outreach 
    services to train healthcare professionals..........         200,000
Marshalltown Medical and Surgical Center, Marshalltown, 
    IA for equipment....................................         320,000
Martinsburg City Hospital, Martinsburg, WV for 
    electronic medical records technology...............         200,000
Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Mary Rutan Hospital, Bellefontaine, OH for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Mary Scott Nursing Home, Dayton, OH for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Mason County Health Department, Maysville, KY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, 
    Boston, MA for telehealth and pharmacy training 
    programs at its Worcester campus....................         300,000
Mattawa Community Medical Center, Mattawa, WA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         100,000
Maury Regional Hospital, Columbia, TN for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         450,000
Mayaguez Medical Center, Mayaguez, PR for equipment.....         200,000
Medina General Hospital, Medina, OH for expansion of its 
    Emergency Department................................       1,000,000
Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         400,000
Memorial Hermann Healthcare System, Houston, TX for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Mendocino Coast District Hospital, Fort Bragg, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Mendocino Community Health Clinic, Ukiah, California for 
    facilities and equipment for the Lakeside Health 
    Center..............................................         300,000
Mercer County Hospital, Aledo, IL for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Mercy Hospital, Buffalo, NY for facilities and equipment         300,000
Mercy Hospital, Miami, FL for facilities and equipment..         350,000
Mercy Jeanette Hospital, Jeanette, PA for patient 
    monitoring and wireless telecommunications 
    technology..........................................         200,000
Mercy Medical Center, Canton, OH for facilities.........         700,000
Mercy Medical Center, Redding, CA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
Mercy Medical Center, Springfield, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
Mercy Medical Center-North Iowa, Mason City, IA for 
    electronic medical records upgrades.................         150,000
Mercy Memorial Hospital System, Monroe, MI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
Mescalero Apache Tribe, Mescalero, NM for equipment.....         400,000
Methodist College, Fayetteville, NC for facilities and 
    equipment for training physician assistants.........         250,000
Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX for equipment...........         400,000
Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX for pharmacy-related 
    information technology..............................         300,000
Metroplex Hospital, Killeen, TX for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
MetroWest Medical Center, Framingham, MA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         100,000
Miami Dade College, Miami, FL for facilities and 
    equipment for a mobile health unit..................         350,000
Mid Valley Hospital, Peckville, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Middlesex Community College, Lowell, MA for facilities 
    and equipment for training nurses and other health 
    professionals.......................................         250,000
Mid-Hudson Family Health Institute, New Paltz, NY for 
    electronic medical record systems...................         150,000
Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ for a rural 
    postgraduate educational program at Sierra Vista 
    Regional Medical Center.............................         400,000
Miller Children's Hospital, Long Beach, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         450,000
Mission Community Hospital, Panorama City, CA for 
    facilities and equipment for its San Fernando 
    Community Campus for Health and Education...........         100,000
Mission Hospitals, Asheville, NC for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................       1,250,000
Missouri Delta Medical Center, Sikeston, MO for 
    equipment...........................................       1,000,000
Mobile Infirmary Health System, Mobile, AL for 
    facilities and equipment for the North Baldwin 
    Infirmary...........................................         100,000
Modoc County, Alturas, CA for equipment for the Modoc 
    Medical Center......................................         350,000
Monongahela Valley Hospital, Monongahela, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Monroe County Hospital, Forsyth, GA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................          45,000
Montgomery County Board of Supervisors, Kilmichael, MS 
    for facilities and equipment for Kilmichael Hospital         100,000
Montgomery County, Rockville, MD for facilities and 
    equipment for the Montgomery Cares health care 
    program.............................................         350,000
Morehead State University, Morehead, KY for rural 
    outreach............................................         500,000
Morris Heights Health Center, Bronx, NY for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         150,000
Morton Hospital, Taunton, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College, PA for 
    equipment and technology............................         300,000
Mount Union College, Alliance, OH for facilities........         700,000
Mount Vernon Hospital, Mount Vernon, NY for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
Mount Wachusett Community College, Gardner, MA for 
    facilities and equipment for nursing education......         650,000
Mountain States Health Alliance, Johnson City, TN for 
    facilities and equipment for the Children's Hospital 
    at the Johnson City Medical Center..................         350,000
Muckleshoot Indian Tribe, Auburn, WA for facilities and 
    equipment for the Health and Wellness Center........         100,000
Municipality of Camuy, PR for medical equipment for the 
    Quebrada Health Center..............................         125,000
Municipality of Ponce, PR for facilities and equipment 
    for the Autism Center...............................         225,000
National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington, DC for 
    telemedicine and health information technology 
    initiatives.........................................         500,000
Nebraska Hospital Association, Lincoln, NE for the 
    Nebraska Statewide Telehealth Network...............         400,000
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV for facilities and 
    equipment for a School Based Health Center..........         400,000
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV for the Nursing 
    Faculty Enhancement Program.........................         500,000
New Hampshire Community Technical College System, 
    Concord, NH for facilities and equipment for nursing 
    education programs..................................         500,000
New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, New 
    York, NY for health information technology for the 
    Upper Manhattan Health Initiative...................         350,000
New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY for 
    telemetry technology................................         750,000
Newport Hospital, Newport, RI for health care 
    information technology..............................         650,000
Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center, Niagara Falls, NY 
    for facilities and equipment........................         250,000
Nicholas County Hospital, Carlisle, KY for an electronic 
    medical records system..............................         300,000
Norman Regional Hospital, Norman, OK for health 
    information technology equipment and upgrades.......         250,000
North Central Community Medicine Foundation, Rock Hill, 
    SC for an electronic medical records system in 
    partnership with Sandhills Medical Foundation.......         100,000
North Dakota State University, College of Pharmacy, 
    Fargo, ND for a telepharmacy project................         350,000
North General Hospital, New York, NY for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Great 
    Neck, NY for facilities and equipment for the 
    Ambulatory Surgery Center...........................         450,000
North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Great 
    Neck, NY for facilities and equipment for Zucker 
    Hillside Hospital...................................         300,000
NorthEast Ohio Neighborhood Health Services, Cleveland, 
    OH for an electronic health records system..........         250,000
Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine and 
    College of Pharmacy, Rootstown, OH for facilities...         500,000
Northeastern Technology Center for Individuals with 
    Disabilities, Clifton Park, NY for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck, NY for health 
    care information technology.........................         200,000
Northwest Alabama Mental Health Center, Jasper, AL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         190,000
Northwest Community Health Care, Pascoag, RI for 
    facilities and equipment in Foster, RI..............         300,000
Northwest Health Center, Burillville, RI for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
Northwest Hospital Center, Randallstown, MD for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Northwest Nazarene University, Nampa, ID for facilities 
    and equipment for a nursing facility................         300,000
Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for Prentice Women's 
    Hospital............................................         400,000
Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY for equipment at 
    Kosair Children's Hospital..........................         300,000
Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, CT for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Center for 
    Collaborative Bio-medical Research..................         500,000
Nurses for Newborns Foundation, St. Louis, MO for 
    program support.....................................         350,000
Nurses for Newborns, Nashville, TN for perinatal 
    services............................................         150,000
Oakland University School of Nursing, Rochester, MI for 
    facilities and equipment for the Center for Pre-
    Symptom Healthcare and Societal Health Research.....         300,000
Ocean Beach Hospital, Ilwaco, WA for the Western 
    Washington Rural Health Care Collaborative 
    telepharmacy program................................         450,000
Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA for the 
    Ochsner Pediatric Cancer Survivorship Program.......         100,000
Ohio Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Columbus, 
    OH for the End of Life Resource Center..............         250,000
Ohio State University, Columbus, OH for facilities and 
    equipment for the Comprehensive Cancer Center.......         700,000
Ohio State University's Ohio Agricultural Research and 
    Development Center, Wooster, OH for facilities......         700,000
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 
    for facilities and equipment........................         750,000
Oklahoma State University Network for Telemedicine and 
    Distance Learning, Tulsa, OK for equipment..........         200,000
Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK for the Center for 
    Health Science for telemedicine and a distance 
    learning network to rural hospitals and clinics.....         200,000
Olympic Community Action Programs, Port Townsend, WA for 
    facilities and equipment for dental care............         125,000
Open Cities Health Center, St. Paul, MN for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         150,000
Orange County, Orlando, FL for Primary Care Access 
    Network Clinics.....................................         500,000
Oregon Coast Community College, Newport, OR for 
    facilities and equipment for health professions 
    education...........................................         100,000
Orrville Hospital Foundation, Dunlap Memorial Hospital, 
    Orrville, OH for equipment..........................         250,000
Osceola Medical Center, Osceola, WI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Oswego Health, Oswego, NY for an electronic health 
    records system......................................         100,000
Our Lady of Lourdes Memorial Hospital, Binghamton, NY 
    for facilities and equipment........................         350,000
Owens Community College, Toledo, OH for initiatives to 
    improve nurse education and training, in cooperation 
    with the Medical University of Ohio Hospital and 
    other health care institutions......................         250,000
Pacific Renal Care Foundation, Honolulu, HI for 
    equipment and telemedicine initiatives related to 
    chronic kidney disease..............................         250,000
Palisades Medical Center, North Bergen, NJ for 
    facilities and equipment............................         275,000
Palmetto Health, Columbia, SC for facilities and 
    equipment for its Children's Hospital...............         450,000
Parkland Health Center, Farmington, MO for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
Passavant Area Hospital, Jacksonville, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
Pattie E. Clay Regional Medical Center, Richmond, KY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         400,000
Pedia Manor, Inc., Pipersville, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................          30,000
Pee Dee Healthy Start, Florence, SC for programs to 
    improve maternal and infant health..................         150,000
Penn Foundation, Inc., Sellersville, PA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         100,000
People, Inc., Williamsville, NY for electronic health 
    records.............................................         350,000
Perry Hospital, Perry, GA for facilities and equipment..          50,000
Person Memorial Hospital, Roxboro, NC for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, 
    Philadelphia, PA for facilities and equipment for a 
    laboratory on the Lawrenceville, GA campus..........         200,000
Piedmont Access to Health Services, Danville, VA for an 
    electronic medical records system...................         100,000
Piedmont Technical College, Greenwood, SC for equipment.         400,000
Pima Community Access Program, Tucson, AZ for a Regional 
    Health Information Organization.....................         500,000
Pinelas County Human Services Department, Clearwater, FL 
    for the mobile medical unit.........................         200,000
Pioneer Center of McHenry County, McHenry, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Senior Residence 
    Center for Adults with Disabilities.................         200,000
Placer County, Auburn, CA for facilities and equipment 
    for the Children's Health Center and Emergency 
    Shelter.............................................         800,000
Portage Community Outreach Center, Portage, MI for 
    facilities and equipment for the Family Health 
    Clinic..............................................          80,000
Portneuf Medical Center, Pocatello, ID for the cardiac 
    and vascular services center........................         400,000
Pottstown Area Center, Pottstown, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Powell County Medical Center, Deer Lodge, MT for 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
Powell Hospital District, Powell, WY for electronic 
    information technology..............................         250,000
PrairieStar Health Center, Hutchinson, KS for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
Prescott Hospice House, Prescott, AZ for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................          50,000
Preston Memorial Hospital, Kingwood, WV for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         330,000
Primary Care Development Corp., New York, NY for a 
    primary care emergency preparedness initiative......         200,000
Providence Holy Cross Medical Center, Mission Hills, CA 
    for facilities and equipment........................         200,000
PULSE of New York, Wantagh, NY for the reduction of 
    medical errors through increased patient safety 
    education...........................................          70,000
Putnam Hospital Center, Carmel, NY for construction of 
    an oncology center..................................         400,000
Queens Hospital Center, Jamaica, NY for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Quincy Valley Medical Center, Quincy, WA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Ramapo College, Mahwah, NJ for nursing laboratory 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Rapid City Community Health Center, Rapid City, SD for 
    facilities and equipment............................         600,000
Reading Hospital School of Nursing, West Reading, PA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         373,000
Regional Responses Network, Sterling, CO for facilities 
    and equipment for the alcohol and substance abuse 
    detox/residential treatment facility................         200,000
Regis College,Weston, MA for facilities and equipment 
    for nursing education...............................         100,000
Ridges Hospital, Burnsville, MN for an ambulatory 
    electronic medical record system....................         200,000
Rio Arriba County, Espanola, NM for facilities and 
    equipment for health services.......................         350,000
Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno Valley, 
    CA for facilities and equipment.....................         400,000
Riverside Medical Center, Kankakee, IL for equipment....         150,000
Rocking Horse Children's Health Center, Springfield, OH 
    for facilities and equipment........................         400,000
Roseland Christian Health Ministries, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for a health center in 
    Dolton, IL..........................................         200,000
Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY for 
    facilities and equipment for cancer treatment in 
    collaboration with WCA Hospital in Jamestown, NY....         450,000
RUSH Initiative, Birmingham, AL for school-based health 
    care for rural children.............................         350,000
Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Rush-Copley Medical Center, Aurora, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         500,000
Rutherford Hospital, Inc., Rutherfordton, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Saint Clare's Hospital, Denville, NJ for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         750,000
Saint Xavier University, Chicago, IL for equipment for 
    the Nursing Skills Laboratory in Orland Park........         275,000
Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center, Kansas City, MO for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
San Joaquin County, French Camp, CA for an electronic 
    health record system................................         375,000
Sandoval County, Bernalillo, NM for medical facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital, Orange, CA for an 
    intensive care telemedicine and information 
    technology project..................................         250,000
Saratoga Hospital, Saratoga Springs, NY for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
School-Community Health Alliance of Michigan, Okemos, MI 
    for an integrated school health network.............         100,000
Scotland Memorial Hospital, Laurinburg, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale, AZ for an electronic 
    medical records system..............................         500,000
Sea View Hospital Rehabilitation Center and Home, Staten 
    Island, NY for equipment............................         300,000
Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         500,000
Serenity House of Volusia Inc., Daytona Beach, FL for 
    facilities and equipment for a health-focused 
    treatment facility..................................         200,000
Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA for facilities and 
    equipment for a biotechnology lab...................         500,000
Sierra County Health and Human Services, Loyalton, CA 
    for medical technology improvements.................          60,000
Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital Foundation, Grass 
    Valley, CA for an electronic health record system...         390,000
Singing River Hospital System, Gautier, MS for 
    facilities and equipment............................         550,000
Sistersville General Hospital, Sistersville, WV for 
    computer system upgrades............................         145,000
Skagit Valley Hospital, Mount Vernon, WA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hospital, Wellsboro, PA 
    for equipment.......................................         200,000
Somerset County Board of Commissioners, Somerset, PA for 
    a medical records system............................         250,000
South of Market Health Center, San Francisco, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         750,000
South Shore Hospital, Weymouth, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         550,000
Southampton Hospital, Southampton, NY for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         400,000
Southdale Hospital, Edina, MN for equipment.............         250,000
Southeast Cancer Network, Dothan, AL for equipment for 
    the Mobile Mammography Unit.........................         300,000
Southeast Community College, Cumberland, KY for 
    facilities and equipment for an allied health 
    training center.....................................         500,000
Southeastern Community College, West Burlington, IA for 
    facilities and equipment for the health care 
    education program...................................         250,000
Southern Ohio Health Services Network, Milford, OH for 
    information technology equipment....................         200,000
Spectrum Health United Memorial, Greenville, MI for an 
    electronic health record system.....................         150,000
Spokane County Medical Society Foundation, Spokane, WA 
    for Project Access..................................         250,000
St. Anne's Hospital, Fall River, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
St. Anthony Memorial Health Centers, Michigan City, IN 
    for facilities and equipment........................         300,000
St. Anthony's Health Center, Alton, IL for community 
    health center operations............................         300,000
St. Bernard Parish, LA for facilities and equipment for 
    primary health care.................................         500,000
St. Bernardine Medical Center, San Bernardino, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
St. Catharine College, St. Catharine, KY for equipment 
    for the St. Catharine Allied Health and Sciences 
    Education Project...................................         200,000
St. Catherine of Siena Hospital, Smithtown, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
St. Charles Community Health Center, Inc., St. Charles 
    Parish, LA for equipment............................         150,000
St. Clair Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
St. Claire Regional Medical Center, Morehead, KY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
St. Clare Health Care Foundation, Baraboo, WI for 
    facilities and equipment for a mobile health clinic.         350,000
St. Francis Foundation, Wilmington, DE to support the 
    Tiny Steps Program, St. Clare Van, and Center of 
    Hope................................................         150,000
St. Francis Health Center, Topeka, KS for equipment.....         250,000
St. Francis Healthcare System, Honolulu, HI for a 
    telemedicine demonstration project..................         300,000
St. Francis Hospital, Escanaba, MI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
St. Francis Hospital, Mooresville, IN for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
St. Francis Medical Center, Trenton, NJ for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         350,000
St. James Hospital and Health Centers, Chicago Heights, 
    IL for facilities and equipment.....................         400,000
St. James Parish Hospital, Lutcher, LA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         300,000
St. John's North Shores Hospital, Harrison Township, MI 
    for facilities and equipment........................         340,000
St. Joseph of the Pines, Southern Pines, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
St. Joseph Regional Medical Center, South Bend, IN for a 
    health information technology system................       1,000,000
St. Joseph's Hospital, Buckhannon, WV for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         800,000
St. Josephs Hospital, Nashua, NH for an electronic 
    medical records system..............................         150,000
St. Joseph's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ for facilities and 
    equipment for its mobile maternity outreach program.         150,000
St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center, Paterson, NJ for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
St. Landry Parish Rural Health Network, Opelousas, LA 
    for the Community Enrichment Outreach Programs......         250,000
St. Luke's Cornwall Hospital, Cornwall, NY for 
    construction of a cancer center.....................         600,000
St. Luke's Regional Medical Center, Boise, ID for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
St. Mary Medical Center, Apple Valley, CA for the 
    electronic intensive care unit......................         500,000
St. Mary-Corwin Medical Center, Pueblo, CO for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
St. Mary's Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI for an 
    automated record system.............................         100,000
St. Mary's Hospital Foundation, Grand Junction, CO for 
    facilities and equipment for the Saccomanno 
    Education Center....................................         425,000
St. Mary's Hospital, Madison, WI for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
St. Mary's Medical Center North, Knoxville, TN for 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
St. Mary's Medical Center, Galesburg, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
St. Mary's Medical Center, Huntington, WV for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         600,000
St. Peter's Hospital Foundation, Albany, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Orthotics and 
    Prosthetics program.................................       1,000,000
St. Vincent Charity Hospital, Cleveland OH for 
    facilities and equipment............................         750,000
St. Vincent Healthcare, Billings, MT for the Center for 
    Healthy Aging Geriatric Fellowship Program..........         350,000
St. Vincent's Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT for 
    facilities and equipment............................         400,000
Stamford Hospital, Stamford, CT for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
Stark State College of Technology, North Canton, OH for 
    facilities and equipment............................         800,000
State Fair Community College, Sedalia, MO for facilities 
    and equipment for nursing and allied health 
    professions education...............................         650,000
Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         700,000
Staywell Health Center, Inc., Waterbury, CT for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
StemCyte Research Institute, Arcadia, CA for an 
    umbilical cord blood bank...........................         500,000
Stepping Stone School for Exceptional Children, Alma, AR 
    for equipment.......................................         100,000
Stewart-Marchman Center, Inc., Daytona Beach, FL for 
    facilities and equipment for the Florida Regional 
    Residential Addictions Treatment Center.............         150,000
Stonewall Primary Care Clinic, Stonewall, OK for 
    facilities and equipment............................         360,000
Suburban Hospital Health Care System, Bethesda, MD for 
    health information technology.......................         150,000
Summa Health System, Akron, OH for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         400,000
Susquehanna Health System, Williamsport, PA for an 
    electronic health records system....................         400,000
Swedish Covenant Hospital, Chicago, IL for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
SwedishAmerican Health System, Rockford, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for the SwedishAmerican 
    Health System and the Crusader Clinic...............         350,000
Sweetser, Saco, ME for an electronic client record 
    system..............................................         150,000
Sylvan Grove Hospital, Jackson, GA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................          47,000
Sylvan Springs, AL for facilities and equipment for the 
    Senior Citizens Center for Health and Wellness......          30,000
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, Tallahassee, FL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, FL for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX for the 
    Center for Rural Nursing............................         500,000
Tarrant County Infant Mortality Task Force, Fort Worth, 
    TX for updated county reporting and education and 
    outreach activities.................................          50,000
Taylor Regional Hospital, Hawkinsville, GA for 
    facilities and equipment............................          54,000
Tecumseh YMCA, New Carlisle, OH for facilities and 
    equipment for physical and occupational therapy, 
    wellness programs, and health education.............         500,000
Temple Health and Bioscience Economic Development 
    District, Temple, TX for facilities and equipment...         650,000
Terra State Community College, Fremont, OH for equipment         100,000
Teton Valley Hospital, Driggs, ID for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Texas Institute of Genomic Medicine, College Station, TX 
    for equipment.......................................         350,000
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, El Paso, 
    TX for facilities and equipment for the Center for 
    New and Re-Emerging Infectious Diseases.............         300,000
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock, 
    TX for facilities and equipment for the West Texas 
    Rural Health Institute..............................       1,500,000
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 
    for facilities and equipment for its Breast Care 
    Center..............................................         350,000
Thompson Health Services, Canandaigua, NY for medical 
    technology upgrades.................................         200,000
Thumb Rural Health Network, Port Austin, MI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Thundermist Health Centers, Woonsocket, RI for health 
    information technology..............................         500,000
TMC HealthCare, Tucson, AZ for facilities and equipment.         500,000
Town of Argo, AL for facilities and equipment for the 
    Senior Citizen Center for Health and Wellness.......         100,000
Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ 
    for facilities and equipment........................         750,000
Transylvania Community Hospital, Brevard, NC for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Troy University, Troy, AL for facilities and equipment 
    for the Health and Science Complex..................         150,000
Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation, Tuba City, 
    AZ for facilities and equipment.....................         350,000
Tulare Local Healthcare District, Tulare, CA for a 
    computerized radiography/picture archive 
    communication system................................         250,000
Twin City Hospital, Dennison, OH for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Tyler Memorial Hospital, Tunkhannock, PA for upgrades to 
    the emergency department............................         200,000
UMass Memorial Health Care, Worcester, MA for a high-
    speed network and Picture Archiving and 
    Communication System................................         350,000
Union Hospital, Terre Haute, IN for the 
    RuralHousecalls.com program.........................         250,000
Uniontown Hospital, Uniontown, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
United Cerebral Palsy of Southwestern Pennsylvania, 
    Washington, PA for facilities and equipment for Your 
    Child's Place.......................................         250,000
Unity Health Center, Shawnee, OK for an electronic 
    medical records program.............................         750,000
Unity Health System, Rochester, NY for facilities and 
    equipment for the Park Ridge Hospital Emergency 
    Center..............................................         400,000
University Hospitals Health System, Cleveland, OH for 
    facilities..........................................         300,000
University Medical Center, Tucson, AZ for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................       1,000,000
University of Akron, Akron, OH for the Medina University 
    Campus for facilities...............................         700,000
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL for facilities and 
    equipment for the Autism Center.....................         350,000
University of Arizona College of Nursing, Tucson, AZ for 
    facilities and equipment for the Patient Care 
    Learning Center.....................................         500,000
University of Arkansas Community College at Hope, AR for 
    facilities and equipment for health professions 
    education...........................................         200,000
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little 
    Rock, AR for facilities and equipment...............         200,000
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little 
    Rock, AR for the Antenatal and Neonatal Guidelines, 
    Education and Learning System (ANGELS)..............         200,000
University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT for facilities 
    and equipment for the dental hygiene clinic.........         200,000
University of California, Davis Health System, 
    Sacramento, CA for facilities and equipment for the 
    medical library and education center................         690,000
University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL for 
    facilities and equipment for Comer Children's 
    Hospital............................................         250,000
University of Colorado, Aurora, CO for facilities and 
    equipment for the Center for Women's Health Research         200,000
University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, MI for facilities 
    and equipment for dental education and treatment....         250,000
University of Findlay, Findlay, OH for facilities and 
    equipment for the Actual Learning Environment 
    Response Training (ALERT) Center....................         300,000
University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, 
    FL for facilities and equipment for a joint project 
    with Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.....         400,000
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL for facilities 
    and equipment for a proton beam cancer treatment 
    facility............................................         300,000
University of Georgia, Athens, GA for facilities and 
    equipment for the Georgia Center for the Prevention 
    of Obesity and Related Disorders....................         350,000
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA for equipment for the 
    genetic eye disease lab.............................         250,000
University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA for facilities and 
    equipment for the Midwest Center Public Health 
    Laboratory..........................................         250,000
University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, 
    KY for facilities and equipment.....................       1,000,000
University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA for an 
    Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope..........         300,000
University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA for 
    facilities and equipment for the Health Science 
    building............................................       1,000,000
University of Miami Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, 
    FL for equipment for the Hope for Vision Inherited 
    Eye Disease project.................................         250,000
University of Miami, Miami, FL for facilities and 
    equipment for the Center for Research in Medical 
    Education...........................................         750,000
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI for 
    infectious disease laboratory facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         375,000
University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 
    for equipment for the Obesity Research Center.......         500,000
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
University of North Texas, Denton, TX for facilities and 
    equipment for the Center for Computational 
    Epidemiology........................................         400,000
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO for 
    facilities and equipment for the National Center for 
    Nursing Education...................................         500,000
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO for the 
    Basic Science Project at the Rocky Mountain Cancer 
    Rehabilitation Institute............................         150,000
University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO for the 
    Maple Tree Project at the Rocky Mountain Cancer 
    Rehabilitation Institute............................         250,000
University of Oklahoma-Tulsa, Tulsa, OK for facilities 
    and equipment for the Simulation Center.............         200,000
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL for a real time 
    medical electronic data exchange....................         250,000
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL for the Florida 
    Network for Cancer Clinical Trials..................         300,000
University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME for 
    facilities and equipment for nursing education......         150,000
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, TN for a low 
    birth weight study..................................         500,000
University of Texas Health Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 
    for equipment for the Pulmonary Fibrosis Treatment 
    Initiative..........................................         150,000
University of Texas Health Center at Tyler, Tyler, TX 
    for facilities and equipment for the Lung Institute.         300,000
University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX for 
    facilities and equipment for its maternal and child 
    health program in Pasadena..........................         100,000
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 
    TX and University of Texas at Dallas for facilities 
    and equipment for their joint program on sickle cell 
    disease.............................................         175,000
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 
    TX for equipment for the Nanotechnology Cancer 
    Center..............................................         100,000
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 
    TX for facilities and equipment for the Center for 
    Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism Research...........         650,000
University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, 
    VA for a telehealth project related to cancer 
    prevention, education and treatment in Southwest 
    Virginia............................................         200,000
University of Washington at Bothell, for an initiative 
    to train nursing faculty in partnership with a 
    consortium of colleges..............................         185,000
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI for 
    facilities and equipment for the Living Health 
    Community Clinic....................................         100,000
Urologic Research Institute, Wheeling, WV for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         200,000
Utah Navajo Health System, Montezuma Creek, UT for 
    facilities and equipment............................         500,000
Uwchlan Ambulance Corps, Chester County, PA for 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
Valley Cooperative Health Care Organization, Hudson, WI 
    for an electronic health record initiative..........         450,000
Valley Hospice, Steubenville, OH for facilities and 
    equipment for a hospice in Wheeling, WV.............         250,000
Valley Hospital, Ridgewood, NJ for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Valley-Wide Health Systems, Alamosa, CO for facilities 
    and equipment for a primary care and dental facility 
    in Durango..........................................         150,000
Van Andel Institute, Grand Rapids, MI for equipment for 
    the West Michigan Community Bio-Med/Molecular 
    Cooperative.........................................         200,000
Vanguard University, Costa Mesa, CA for facilities and 
    equipment for the Academic Center for Science, 
    Nursing and Technology..............................         450,000
Vermont Dental Care Programs, Winooski, VT for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Via Health of Wayne, Newark, NY for facilities and 
    equipment for the Newark-Wayne Community Hospital...         800,000
Village of Columbus, NM for emergency medical ambulance 
    services............................................         200,000
Vincennes University, Vincennes, IN for equipment for 
    the health information management and nursing labs..         500,000
Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center, 
    Richmond, VA for facilities and equipment...........       1,000,000
Virginia Dental Health Foundation, Richmond, VA for 
    medical equipment...................................         125,000
Virtua Health, Marlton, NJ for facilities and equipment.         300,000
Visiting Nurse Association Healthcare Partners of Ohio, 
    Cleveland, OH for equipment for the VNA CareWatch 
    program in Northwest Ohio...........................         300,000
Visiting Nurse Association of Manchester and Southern 
    New Hampshire, Manchester, NH for equipment.........         150,000
VNA-Hospice of Southern Carroll County and Vicinity, 
    Wolfeboro, NH for the establishment of a Southern 
    Carroll County VNA Point of Service program.........         150,000
Wake County, Raleigh NC for facilities and equipment for 
    a mental health facility............................         240,000
WakeMed Health and Hospitals, Raleigh, NC for health 
    information technology..............................         140,000
Walsh University, North Canton, OH for facilities.......         700,000
Warren County Primary Care Center, Bowling Green, KY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Washington County, Plymouth, NC for facilities and 
    equipment for the Washington County Hospital........         300,000
Washington Hospital, Washington, PA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
Washington State University, Pullman, WA for facilities 
    and equipment for the Nursing School building.......         150,000
Waterbury Hospital Health Center, Waterbury, CT for a 
    clinical information system.........................         150,000
Wayne Medical Center, Waynesboro, TN for the Picture 
    Archiving System....................................         275,000
Wayne Memorial Hospital, Honesdale, PA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         250,000
Wayne Memorial Hospital, Jesup, GA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
Weeks Medical Center, Lancaster, NH for facilities and 
    equipment at the Weeks Medical Regional Dental Care 
    Center, Whitefield, NH..............................         300,000
Wentworth Douglas Hospital, Dover, NH for an electronic 
    medical record program..............................         250,000
West Jefferson Medical Center, Marrero, LA for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
West Shore Medical Center, Manistee, MI for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         175,000
West Side Community Health Services, St. Paul, MN for 
    health information technology.......................          75,000
WestCare California, Fresno, CA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
WestCare Health System, Sylva, NC for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI for 
    facilities and equipment for smart nanosensor 
    research............................................         300,000
Western Wayne Family Health Center, Dearborn, MI for 
    facilities and equipment............................         250,000
Wetzel County Hospital, New Martinsville, WV for 
    facilities and equipment............................         175,000
Whidden Memorial Hospital, Everett, MA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         350,000
White County Memorial Hospital, Monticello, IN for 
    facilities and equipment............................         300,000
White Memorial Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA for 
    facilities and equipment............................       1,000,000
White Plains Hospital Center, White Plains, NY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         450,000
White River Health System, Batesville, AR for facilities 
    and equipment for a clinic in Cherokee Village......         250,000
Wichita State University, Wichita, KS for facilities and 
    equipment for the Center for BioMEMS and Biodevices.         200,000
William B. Kessler Memorial Hospital, Hammonton, NJ for 
    an integrated hospital information system...........         200,000
William Backus Hospital, Norwich, CT for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Wind River Community Health Center, Riverton, WY for 
    facilities and equipment............................         200,000
Windham Hospital, Windham, CT for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         155,000
Wing Memorial Hospital, Palmer, MA for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         450,000
Winneshiek Medical Center, Decorah, IA for equipment....         400,000
Wolfson Children's Hospital, Jacksonville, FL for 
    facilities and equipment............................         350,000
Women's Health Services, Santa Fe, NM for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Women's Choice Pregnancy Clinic, Whiteriver, AZ and Hope 
    Maternity House, Show Low, AZ for facilities and 
    equipment for the Hope House Maternity Home.........          50,000
Woodhull Hospital, Brooklyn, NY for a training program 
    in radiologic technology............................         375,000
World Impact Good Samartian Clinic, Wichita, KS for 
    facilities and equipment............................         150,000
Wyoming Community Hospital Foundation, Warsaw, NY for 
    facilities and equipment for the Wyoming County 
    Community Hospital and Nursing Facility.............         300,000
Wyoming Health Resources Network, Inc., Cheyenne, WY for 
    recruitment and retention of health care providers 
    in Wyoming..........................................         200,000
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT for 
    facilities and equipment for an ovarian cancer 
    prevention and early detection program..............         400,000
YMCA of Central Stark County, Canton, OH for facilities.         750,000
YMCA of York and York County, York, PA for facilities 
    and equipment.......................................         100,000
Youth Crisis Center, Jacksonville, FL for facilities and 
    equipment...........................................         350,000
Youth For Tomorrow, Bristow, VA for facilities..........         100,000

Bioterrorism hospital grants to States

    The Committee provides $486,606,000 for bioterrorism 
hospital grants to States, which is $8,394,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. Within this total, $474,210,000 is provided for 
hospital preparedness grants and $12,396,000 is provided for 
the training and curriculum development program. Within the 
funding provided, the Committee does not include funding for a 
targeted mass casualty earmark requested by the Administration.

Telehealth

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for telehealth, which is 
$3,181,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
budget request. The telehealth program works with and supports 
communities in their efforts to develop cost-effective uses of 
telehealth technologies. These technologies bring health 
services to isolated populations and health-related education 
to the practitioners who serve them. The Committee encourages 
HRSA, when awarding grants for telehealth resource centers, to 
ensure that all types of eligible communities, including urban 
medically underserved communities, are considered and to 
provide technical assistance to those grantees that are in 
eligible communities, but are not successful in the grant 
competition.

Program management

    The Committee provides $141,071,000 for the cost of Federal 
staff and related activities to coordinate, direct, and manage 
the programs of the Health Resources and Services 
Administration, which is $3,461,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The Committee 
expects HRSA to use no more than one percent of the funds 
allocated for projects for agency administrative expenses.

           HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Health Education Assistance Loans (HEAL) program 
insures loans provided by non-Federal lenders to students in 
health professions schools. Under the accounting rules 
established in the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, one account 
is maintained to pay the obligations arising from loans 
guaranteed prior to fiscal year 1992. A second account pays 
obligations and collects income from premiums on loans 
guaranteed in fiscal year 1992 and beyond. Each annual cohort 
of loans is independently tracked in this account. The 
authority for this program expired in fiscal year 1999. Fiscal 
year 1998 was the last year in which loans were obligated to 
previous borrowers under the HEAL authority.
    The Committee provides $1,000,000 to liquidate obligations 
from loans guaranteed prior to 1992, which is $3,000,000 less 
than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as budget 
request.
    The Committee provides $2,887,000 for HEAL program 
management, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request.

                 VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION TRUST FUND

    The Committee makes available the release of $66,366,000 
from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund in fiscal year 
2007, which is $1,830,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program provides a 
system of compensation for individuals with vaccine-associated 
injuries or deaths. Funds for claims from vaccines administered 
on or after October 1, 1988 are generated by a per-dose excise 
tax on the sale of selected prescribed vaccines. Revenues 
raised by this tax are maintained in a Vaccine Injury 
Compensation Trust Fund.
    Trust funds made available in the bill will support the 
liability costs of vaccines administered after September 30, 
1988. They will also support the $3,564,000 in costs incurred 
by the agency in the operation of the program, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget 
request.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                DISEASE CONTROL, RESEARCH, AND TRAINING

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$6,173,368,000 for the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC), which is $82,182,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $74,316,000 above the budget request. Of 
the funds provided, $99,865,000 shall be derived from 
evaluation set-aside funds available under Section 241 of the 
Public Health Service Act, which is $165,235,000 below both the 
fiscal year 2006 and requested set-aside.
    The CDC assists state and local health authorities and 
other non-governmental health-related organizations to 
understand, control, and reduce disease and other health 
problems. The activities of CDC focus on several major 
priorities, including providing core public health functions, 
responding to urgent public health threats, monitoring the 
Nation's health using scientific methods, building the Nation's 
public health infrastructure, promoting health throughout each 
life-stage, and providing leadership in the implementation of 
nationwide prevention strategies to encourage responsible 
behavior and adoption of lifestyles that are conducive to good 
health.
    The Committee considers the table accompanying this report 
and the numbers identified in the paragraphs that follow to be 
determinative of the CDC budget. Funds should be apportioned 
and allocated accordingly, and any changes in funding are 
subject to the normal reprogramming and notification 
procedures.

Infectious diseases

    The Committee provides a program level of $1,841,637,000 
for infectious diseases, which is $148,420,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and $55,953,000 above the budget 
request. Of the funds provided, $12,794,000 shall be derived 
from evaluation set-aside funds available under Section 241 of 
the Public Health Service Act, as proposed in the budget 
request.
            Infectious diseases control
    The Committee provides $225,938,000 for infectious diseases 
control, which is $830,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $19,408,000 less than the budget request. 
This program supports national surveillance of infectious 
diseases, the development of new or improved prevention and 
control methods and techniques, the acceleration of the general 
application of accepted prevention technologies, and 
strengthening of the capability to respond to outbreaks of new 
and re-emerging infectious diseases.
    Hepatitis.--The Committee has included $17,670,000 to 
support activities of the Viral Hepatitis Division and to 
implement the National Hepatitis C Prevention Strategy. This 
funding level is the same as provided in fiscal year 2006 and 
is $177,000 more than the budget request.
    The Committee is concerned that more than 75 percent of the 
4,000,000 people with hepatitis C are unaware of their 
condition and urges CDC to support a campaign of public 
announcements that will highlight the need for appropriate 
screening and medical follow up for target populations. The 
Committee also encourages the Division of Viral Hepatitis to 
collaborate with the Health Resources and Services 
Administration (HRSA) to implement improved HCV screening 
programs for HIV-infected individuals served by HRSA programs.
    The Committee encourages the Division of Viral Hepatitis to 
develop and implement a plan for prevention and medical 
management of hepatitis B, including strategies for expanded 
vaccination, preventive education, surveillance and early 
detection.
    Pandemic influenza.--The Committee does not provide 
$34,700,000 in funding requested by the Administration for 
pandemic influenza activities in the infectious disease control 
program in this appropriation. The Committee has provided 
$200,000,000 through fiscal year 2006 supplemental 
appropriations for CDC activities related to preparing for the 
potential for an influenza pandemic. A second emergency 
supplemental appropriation for pandemic influenza is pending.
    West Nile virus.--The Committee intends that of the funds 
provided for infectious disease control, no less than the funds 
provided in fiscal year 2006 for the West Nile virus program 
should be provided in fiscal year 2007.
    Emerging infectious diseases.--The Committee provides 
$101,623,000 to support CDC's emerging infectious diseases 
activities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $4,853,000 above the budget request.
    Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus 
aureus (CA-MRSA).--The Committee is concerned about the 
explosion in virulence and prevalence of MRSA strains in the 
United States. Compounding this problem is a fundamental shift 
from primarily hospital-based transmission to community-based 
transmission of MRSA. The spread of CA-MRSA through perfectly 
healthy community members with no hospital contact concerns the 
Committee. Within the funds provided, the Committee encourages 
CDC to conduct a strong, extramural research program in MRSA 
epidemiology and pathophysiology. The Committee encourages CDC 
to maximize this MRSA research through continued support for 
entities with established MRSA research programs.
            HIV/AIDS, STD and TB prevention
    The Committee provides $1,001,122,000 for HIV/AIDS, STD and 
TB prevention, which is $54,545,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $31,847,000 below the request.
    Within the total, $706,316,000 is for HIV/AIDS programs, 
which is $55,198,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and $33,263,000 below the budget request. The HIV/AIDS programs 
support HIV research, surveillance, epidemiologic and 
laboratory studies, and prevention activities. CDC provides 
funds to state and local health departments to develop and 
implement integrated community prevention plans. The Committee 
supports the domestic HIV/AIDS initiative proposed in the 
budget request and provides $60,000,000 for the testing 
component of the initiative within CDC.
    Within the total, $157,383,000 is for the STD program, 
which is $653,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and $454,000 more than the budget request. The STD program 
awards grants to state and local health departments and other 
nonprofit entities to support a wide variety of public health 
activities to prevent and treat STDs. CDC directly conducts 
special investigations, surveillance and epidemiologic 
research.
    Within the total, $137,423,000 is for the tuberculosis (TB) 
program. The TB program provides grants to states and large 
cities for a broad range of tuberculosis control activities. In 
addition, the CDC supports state and local laboratories and 
conducts research, epidemiological investigations, and 
education and training seminars.
    Infertility Prevention.--The Committee is aware that 
chlamydia is the most frequently reported disease in the United 
States and is the number one cause of infertility in the 
country. From 1987 through 2004 the reported rate of chlamydial 
infection in women increased from 78.5 cases to 485.0 cases per 
100,000. There are an estimated 3,000,000 new infections each 
year. The nation spends an estimated $2,400,000,000 in direct 
and indirect costs for chlamydial infections each year. The 
Committee is aware that where it has been established, CDC's 
infertility prevention program has reduced chlamydia rates by 
66 percent and decreased treatment costs by over 80 percent. 
The Committee encourages CDC to expand the infertility 
screening program.
    Minority HIV/AIDS initiative.--Within the total provided, 
not less than the fiscal year 2006 amount is provided for 
fiscal year 2007 for activities that are targeted to address 
the growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disparate impact on 
communities of color, including African Americans, Latinos, 
Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and 
Pacific Islanders.
    Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM).--Mycobacteria are 
environmental organisms found in both water and soil that can 
cause substantial respiratory damage. The Committee is aware of 
the increasing incidence of NTM pulmonary infections in women, 
particularly involving rapidly growing mycobacteria, an 
inherently resistant subspecies. The Committee encourages CDC 
to work towards a better understanding of NTM and enhancing 
diagnostics and treatment and promoting education of health 
care providers. Further, the Committee encourages CDC to 
dedicate efforts to organize, coordinate and implement an NTM 
program to evaluate prevalence, risk factors, and 
comorbidities.
    Sexually transmitted infections.--The Committee is pleased 
that CDC has funded research aimed at assessing the extent to 
which medical students and physicians are familiar with and 
practice screening and counseling tailored to individual 
patients. Despite widespread condom social marketing for the 
past twenty years, 40,000 new HIV infections are reported every 
year and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are at 
unprecedented levels. Significant deficits exist in the current 
sexual health medical education, and many members of the public 
at risk for STIs are unaware of their need to be screened. To 
address these problems the Committee urges CDC to: (1) promote 
evidence-based medical school curriculum guidelines for sexual 
health that will promote risk avoidance and non-condom-related 
risk reduction; and (2) harness the ever-growing power of the 
Internet to develop innovative and attractive strategies in a 
manner that promotes risk avoidance and non-condom-related risk 
reduction that will efficiently educate the public about their 
STI risks.
    Syphilis elimination.--The Committee is aware that progress 
in controlling syphilis has been substantial as a result of 
focused efforts in targeted populations. The Committee 
recognizes the urgency of controlling syphilis because of the 
impact of this STD on the spread of HIV infection and on infant 
health. The Committee is concerned that syphilis demonstrates 
the continuance of racial disparities in health and recommends 
CDC provide resources to expand the syphilis control program.
    Tuberculosis.--The Committee urges the CDC to accelerate TB 
control and elimination through the Intensified Support and 
Activities to Accelerate Control (ISAAC), an initiative 
targeting TB along the U.S./Mexico Border, genotyping all 
culture positive cases, and expanding clinical trials for the 
diagnosis and treatment of TB.
            Immunization
    The Committee provides a program level of $614,577,000 for 
immunization, which is $94,705,000 over the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $107,208,000 above the current law budget 
request. Of the amount provided, $12,794,000 is to be derived 
from section 241 evaluation set-aside funds, as provided in 
fiscal year 2006 and as proposed in the request. In addition, 
the current Vaccines for Children (VFC) program is expected to 
provide $2,006,445,000 in vaccine purchases and distribution 
support in fiscal year 2007, for a total of $2,621,022,000 for 
immunization activities in fiscal year 2007.
    Immunization project grants are awarded to states and local 
agencies for planning, developing, and conducting childhood 
immunization programs including enhancement of the vaccine 
delivery infrastructure. CDC directly maintains a stockpile of 
vaccines, supports consolidated purchase of vaccines for state 
and local health agencies, and conducts surveillance, 
investigations, and research into the safety and efficacy of 
new and presently used vaccines. The Committee notes that there 
are other Federal programs that provide immunizations to 
children, including the State Children's Health Insurance 
Program (SCHIP), the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, and 
community health centers.
    Within the total, the Committee includes $327,000,000 for 
vaccine purchase grants, which is $63,977,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and $94,544,000 above the budget 
request. Also within the total, $200,000,000 is for state 
operations/infrastructure grants, which is $6,160,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $7,520,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee is aware that prior to 2000 and the 
introduction of new vaccines, such as the pneumococcal vaccine, 
the 317 immunization program was adequately providing vaccines 
to children traditionally dependent on the public sector for 
support, but who were not eligible for the Vaccines for 
Children (VFC) program. It is the Committee's expectation that 
the additional funding included above the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation will allow eligible children to receive the full 
recommended vaccine schedule and that there will be a 
significant increase in the total number of children served by 
the program.
    The Committee directs CDC to provide a report by February 
1, 2007, that provides information on how much funding would be 
needed in fiscal year 2008 to cover the same relative 
proportion of eligible children, adolescents and adults under 
the section 317 program as was provided in previous years. The 
report should include information on the cost of adding each 
new vaccine recommended for routine vaccination of children and 
adolescents by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices 
since 1999, and annual data on state coverage rates for new 
vaccines. The report should address the barriers and time lag 
related to implementation of new vaccines, including data on 
two-tiered states that are unable to offer all recommended 
vaccines to all children. The report should also include five-
year historical data on section 317 operations infrastructure 
funding for childhood, adolescent and adult immunization 
programs, and include information on the ongoing and emerging 
needs to support provider and public education on new vaccines, 
investigate disease outbreaks, identify and address barriers to 
immunization, and other activities relative to the current 
funding level. Finally, the report should include ten-year 
historical data on the percentage of childhood, adolescent and 
adult immunization covered by funding source.
    The Committee understands that five states have enacted 
legislation banning the administration of annual flu vaccine to 
children and pregnant women if it contains more than trace 
amounts of mercury. Similar legislation is pending in 16 
states. The effective date for most of the existing bans, 
affecting more than 4,000,000 children and nearly 1,000,000 
pregnant women, is July 2006. The Committee directs CDC to 
issue a report that: (1) includes information on the ability of 
these fives states to meet these mandates for the 2006-2007 flu 
season; (2) outlines specific actions CDC has taken to 
encourage manufacturers to increase the supply of mercury-free 
(trace amounts) flu vaccine to help states meet the 
requirements for the 2007-2008 flu season; and (3) provides a 
timeline by which CDC will fulfill the goal established in July 
1999 to remove mercury from all routine childhood 
immunizations, including influenza vaccine.
    Within the total, $19,800,000 is to fund states to increase 
demand for annual influenza vaccine as proposed in the budget 
request. The Committee provides this funding to increase 
vaccine demand in order to stimulate vaccine manufacturers to 
produce additional vaccine, thereby increasing vaccine 
production capacity.
    Also within the total, the Committee includes $22,500,000 
for vaccine safety activities, which is $4,997,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $5,110,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee recognizes the importance of directing 
additional funding toward vaccine safety research, specifically 
funding to develop better screening methods for children at 
risk for serious adverse reactions. The Committee 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 above the request for the 
CDC to expand funding for vaccine safety research, particularly 
with respect to investigator initiated, peer reviewed, 
extramural research. Furthermore, the Committee urges that this 
funding be used for non-epidemiology research, to better 
understand risk factors for serious adverse reactions, to 
develop screening tools to eliminate from vaccination those 
children at greater risk for such reactions, and to develop 
effective treatments and interventions for children suffering 
severe adverse reactions.
    Immunization safety.--The Committee is concerned that CDC 
has failed to implement the recommendations of the Institute of 
Medicine (IOM) report: Vaccine Safety Research, Data Access and 
Public Trust. In fiscal year 2006, this Committee expressed 
particular interest in seeing CDC move forward with the IOM 
recommendations that the CDC: (1) establish an independent 
oversight board to review CDC's vaccine safety research agenda, 
study protocols, and changes in study protocols, and (2) 
initiate conversations with managed care organizations involved 
in the vaccine safety datalink (VSD) to ensure that independent 
researchers have access to all VSD data, particularly post-2000 
data through the National Center for Health Statistics. The 
Committee expects the CDC to implement these provisions 
immediately.
    Meningococcal disease.--Meningococcal disease is one of the 
few diseases that can be fatal or severely debilitating to an 
otherwise healthy individual within a matter of hours of 
initial onset. While its early symptoms are easily mistaken for 
influenza, the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment 
include loss of hearing, limb loss, brain damage and death, yet 
meningococcal disease is vaccine preventable in most cases. The 
Committee is aware of the recent improvements in the meningitis 
vaccine and of CDC's efforts to increase the availability and 
focus of information on meningococcal disease and ways to 
prevent it so that the general public will be better educated 
on the symptoms and prevention methods. The Committee 
encourages CDC to improve meningococcal education and 
adolescent immunization programs, including giving 
consideration to partnering with relevant professional and 
voluntary health associations to ensure that all families, 
especially those with adolescents and young adults, are 
effectively educated on this disease, vaccine availability, and 
all methods of prevention.

Health promotion

    The Committee provides $964,466,000 for health promotion, 
which is $1,040,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and $35,258,000 above the budget request.
            Chronic disease prevention, health promotion, and genomics
    The Committee provides $846,744,000 for chronic disease 
prevention, health promotion, and genomics, which is $8,080,000 
more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $28,017,000 
more than the budget request. Chronic diseases have had a 
profound human and economic toll on our nation. More than 
1,700,000 Americans die of a chronic disease each year. The 
programs funded by CDC provide support for state and community 
programs, surveillance, prevention research, evaluation, and 
health promotion.
    Within the total provided, the Committee includes the 
following amounts for chronic disease prevention, health 
promotion, and genomics activities:
          $53,000,000 for heart disease and stroke programs, 
        which is $8,531,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding 
        level and $9,112,000 above the budget request;
          $69,000,000 for diabetes programs, which is 
        $5,881,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
        $6,580,000 above the budget request;
          $307,536,000 for cancer prevention and control 
        programs, which is $377,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
        funding level and $2,846,000 more than the budget 
        request;
          $22,441,000 for arthritis and other chronic diseases 
        programs, which is $26,000 less than the fiscal year 
        2006 funding level and $8,684,000 more than the budget 
        request (included within this total is $7,684,000 for 
        epilepsy programs and $1,000,000 for the national lupus 
        patient registry);
          $102,253,000 for tobacco programs, which is 
        $2,546,000 below the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
        $432,000 below the budget request;
          $41,477,000 for nutrition, physical activity and 
        obesity programs, which is $43,000 less than the fiscal 
        year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
        request;
          $25,727,000 for health promotion, which is $1,716,000 
        less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
        $1,567,000 more than the budget request (included 
        within this total is $1,633,000 for Alzheimer's disease 
        programs and $1,782,000 for chronic kidney disease 
        programs);
          $55,820,000 for school health programs, which is 
        $372,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request;
          $44,009,000 for the safe motherhood/infant health 
        programs, which is $283,000 less than the fiscal year 
        2006 funding level and the same as the budget request;
          $11,022,000 for oral health programs, which is 
        $660,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request;
          $29,700,000 for prevention centers, which is the same 
        as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $494,000 more 
        than the budget request;
          $43,857,000 for Steps to a Healthier U.S., which is 
        the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
        $1,398,000 less than the budget request;
          $34,259,000 for REACH, which is the same as the 
        fiscal year 2006 funding level and $317,000 more than 
        the budget request, and;
          $6,643,000 for genomics, which is $309,000 less than 
        the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $247,000 more 
        than the budget request.
    Alzheimer's disease and healthy aging.--Studies have found 
lifestyle measures taken to improve physical health may also 
help protect brain health and lower risks of Alzheimer's 
disease and related disorders. Epidemiological research reveals 
that individuals taking anti-inflammatory drugs to treat 
conditions such as arthritis have a lower-than-expected 
occurrence of Alzheimer's; other studies appear to link known 
risk factors for diabetes and heart disease to risk factors for 
Alzheimer's and dementia. In light of this evidence, two years 
ago the Committee launched a CDC brain health initiative to 
promote greater public awareness and communication, specific 
public health interventions and more prevention research. In 
light of the continuing threat Alzheimer's presents to a 
growing number of Americans, the Committee recommends that CDC 
continue this important initiative.
    Blindness.--The Committee commends CDC for its partnership 
with the nation's leading voluntary health association 
dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight, to improve 
education and early detection of potentially blinding eye 
diseases and encourages CDC to continue this partnership. 
Despite the fact that half of all blindness can be prevented 
through education, early detection and treatment, it is 
estimated that the number of blind and visually impaired people 
will double by 2030 if nothing is done to curb vision problems.
    Breast and cervical cancer early detection.--The Committee 
recognizes that the national breast and cervical cancer early 
detection program (NBCCEDP) administered by CDC is an 
indispensable health program in helping underserved women gain 
access to screening programs for early detection of breast and 
cervical cancers. The NBCCEDP has served over 2,500,000 women; 
provided 5,800,000 screening examinations, including more than 
2,800,000 mammograms; and diagnosed more than 22,000 breast 
cancers, 76,000 precancerous cervical lesions and 1,500 
cervical cancers. Early detection and treatment of breast and 
cervical cancers greatly increase a woman's odds of conquering 
these diseases.
    Cancer survivorship.--The Committee strongly supports the 
ongoing partnership between CDC and the cancer survivorship 
resource center to address the needs of the approximately 
10,000,000 cancer survivors living with, through, and beyond 
cancer. The national cancer survivorship resource center serves 
as a national resource for cancer patients, survivors, and 
their family and friends. The Committee is especially 
supportive of efforts to provide comprehensive services to 
cancer patients and survivors through multiple partnerships, 
which in turn provide individuals the one stop resource they 
need and deserve.
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).--COPD is the 
fourth leading cause of death in the United States and the only 
one of the top ten causes of death that is on the increase. The 
Committee urges CDC to expand its data collection efforts on 
COPD. Specifically, the Committee encourages CDC to include 
questions in the National Health and Nutrition Examination 
Survey, the National Health Interview Study and the Behavioral 
Risk Factor Surveillance Survey that asks about COPD by name.
    Colorectal cancer.--Colorectal cancer is the third most 
commonly diagnosed cancer among both men and women in the 
United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related 
deaths. When colorectal cancer is detected and treated early, 
survival is greatly enhanced. The Committee is pleased with the 
leadership of CDC's national colorectal cancer roundtable in 
promoting the availability and advisability of screening to 
both health care providers and the general public. The 
Committee encourages CDC to continue to expand its partnerships 
with state health departments, professional and patient 
organizations, and private industry to combat this devastating 
disease.
    Diabetes.--Diabetes is now the sixth leading cause of death 
in the United States, and costs the nation over 
$132,000,000,000 in direct and indirect costs. Approximately 
14,600,000 Americans have diabetes, and an estimated 6,200,000 
people are undiagnosed and therefore untreated. The incidence 
of the disease in America has increased approximately 14 
percent in the last two years alone, and over 1,300,000 new 
cases of diabetes are diagnosed each year.
    The collateral health effects of diabetes can be 
devastating, often causing heart disease, stroke, blindness, 
kidney failure, pregnancy complications, amputations of the 
leg, foot, and toe, as well as deaths related to flu and 
pneumonia. Known preventive measures can reduce the impact of 
diabetes, but these preventions are not currently practiced 
universally. As a result, public awareness campaigns must be 
promoted to reach the general population so that at-risk 
individuals are encouraged to take appropriate measures to 
identify the stage of their diabetes and take action to prevent 
or slow the progression of their disease. A goal of the CDC is 
to increase the percentage of individuals with diabetes who 
receive annual eye and foot exams, and at least two A1C 
measures per year.
    It is estimated that maintaining a certain blood glucose 
level (A1C target of seven or below) would reduce complications 
of diabetes and achieve direct medical cost savings of 
$35,000,000,000 and indirect cost savings of $50,000,000,000 
over 10 years. The Committee encourages CDC to consider 
establishing national public-private partnerships to leverage 
Federal resources with private-sector contributions to expand 
the National Diabetes Education Program and establish a new 
public awareness campaign to encourage individuals with 
diabetes to be tested and know their A1C levels so that they 
can take appropriate action to control their condition.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee supports the CDC epilepsy program, 
which is making valuable progress in research, epidemiology and 
surveillance, early detection, improved treatment, public 
education and expansion of interventions to support people with 
epilepsy and their families in their communities. Despite this 
progress, the Committee acknowledges that significant work must 
be done to improve the quality of care for individuals with 
epilepsy.
    The Committee applauds CDC's partnership with the epilepsy 
community in developing and implementing the recommendations of 
Living Well with Epilepsy II. The Committee is pleased with the 
activities to train first-responders, educators, school nurses, 
and other health care professionals with the recognition, 
diagnosis and treatment of seizures. The Committee provides 
funding to continue efforts to expand public health activities 
on behalf of persons with epilepsy.
    Genomics.--The coming era of personalized medicine has 
broad applicability for the field of public health. The 
Committee urges CDC to conduct and sponsor public health 
genomics research and develop appropriate programs to identify 
people at risk for disease and early death. CDC is further 
urged to use genomic information to provide targeted and 
personalized interventions that will prevent disease, 
disability, and death, and may ultimately save public 
resources.
    Gynecologic cancer education and awareness program.--The 
Committee is encouraged by the progress that has been made by 
CDC, in coordination with the Office of Women's Health, to 
initiate a national education campaign on gynecologic cancers, 
working with qualified nonprofit private sector entities. The 
Committee strongly urges the continuation and expansion of this 
program, given that early detection can mean the difference 
between a 25 percent five-year survival rate and an 80 percent 
five-year survival rate for women diagnosed with a gynecologic 
cancer. The Committee also encourages CDC to conduct an 
examination of the coordination of HHS' current activities to 
educate women on gynecologic cancers.
    Heart disease and stroke.--The Committee commends CDC for 
creating a division of heart disease and stroke prevention to 
consolidate and elevate efforts to prevent and control heart 
disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. Given that 
cardiovascular diseases remain the number one killer in every 
state, the Committee continues to strongly believe that each 
state should receive funding for basic implementation of a 
state heart disease and stroke prevention program. Recognizing 
that many states still need this program, the Committee remains 
concerned that no new states have been added to this program 
since 2002. The Committee is aware that CDC is instituting an 
open competition, allowing non-funded states to apply for this 
program for the first time since 2002 and requiring all 33 
funded states to re-compete for support. The Committee urges 
CDC to fund additional states for basic program implementation 
and add additional states to begin program planning for the 
state heart disease and stroke prevention program, maintain the 
Paul Coverdell national acute stroke registry, and, initiate 
the development of a state-based cardiac arrest registry.
    Inflammatory bowel disease.--It is estimated that up to 
1,400,000 people in the United States suffer from Crohn's 
disease or ulcerative colitis, collectively known as 
inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The Committee has included 
funding to continue this important initiative.
    Kidney disease.--The Committee is pleased with the progress 
CDC is making to implement the chronic kidney disease program. 
For fiscal year 2007, the Committee provides no less than the 
level provided in fiscal year 2006 to continue development and 
implementation of a public health kidney disease action plan.
    Obesity.--The multiple factors contributing to the 
overweight and obesity epidemic took years to develop. 
Reversing the epidemic will require a long-term, well-
coordinated, concerted approach to reach Americans were they 
live, work, play, and pray. Effective collaboration among the 
public, voluntary, and private sectors is critical to reshape 
the social and physical environment of our nation's communities 
and provide the necessary support, information, tools, and 
realistic strategies needed to reverse the current obesity 
trends nationwide. To effectively address this epidemic, the 
Committee encourages CDC to provide leadership and coordination 
for the federal government's efforts to address the overweight 
and obesity epidemic.
    Oral Health.--The Committee recognizes that to effectively 
reduce disparities in oral diseases efforts at state and local 
levels are critical. The Committee has provided funding to 
strengthen state capacities to target effective interventions, 
such as additional water fluoridation and school-linked sealant 
programs, and resources to the underserved, to assess trends in 
oral diseases, and to evaluate changes in policies and programs 
to reduce the disease burden. The Committee encourages CDC to 
advance efforts to reduce the disparities and health burden 
from oral diseases that are closely linked to chronic diseases 
such as diabetes and heart disease.
    Primary immunodeficiency diseases.--The Committee has made 
funds available for CDC to support the national physician 
education and public awareness campaign for primary immune 
deficiency syndrome. The campaign has featured public service 
announcements, physician symposia, publications, and the 
development of website and educational materials, as well as 
mailings to physicians, school nurses, daycare centers, and 
others. This program has been characterized as a model of 
public-private cooperation. The campaign was expanded to reach 
the underserved African-American and Hispanic populations in 
fiscal year 2006.
    Pulmonary hypertension.--The Committee continues to be 
interested in pulmonary hypertension (PH), a rare, progressive 
and fatal disease that predominantly affects women, regardless 
of age or race. PH causes deadly deterioration of the heart and 
lungs and is a secondary condition in many other serious 
disorders such as scleroderma and lupus. Because early 
detection of PH is critical to a patient's survival and quality 
of life, the Committee continues to encourage CDC to work in 
partnership with the pulmonary hypertension community to foster 
greater awareness of the disease.
    Sleep disorders.--The Committee continues to be concerned 
about the prevalence of sleep disorders and recognizes the need 
for enhanced public and professional awareness on sleep and 
sleep disorders. The Committee continues to urge CDC to work 
with other agencies and voluntary health organizations to 
support and implement a sleep education and public awareness 
initiative. The Committee also urges CDC to increase support 
for initiatives connecting sleep to overall health and safety.
            Birth defects, developmental disabilities, disability and 
                    health
    The Committee provides $117,722,000 for birth defects, 
developmental disabilities, disability and health, which is 
$7,040,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$7,241,000 more than the budget request. This program collects, 
analyzes, and makes available data on the incidence and causes 
of birth defects and developmental disabilities.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for birth defects, developmental disabilities, 
disability, and health activities:
          $38,525,000 for birth defects and developmental 
        disabilities, which is $134,000 below the fiscal year 
        2006 funding level and $227,000 more than the budget 
        request;
          $59,996,000 for human development and disability, 
        which is $6,246,000 below the fiscal year 2006 funding 
        level and $5,601,000 above the budget request (included 
        within this total is: $1,782,000 for Tourette syndrome 
        programs; $7,000,000 for early hearing detection and 
        intervention; $8,000,000 for muscular dystrophy 
        programs; $1,717,000 for attention deficit/
        hyperactivity disorder programs; $6,000,000 for spina 
        bifida programs; and $15,500,000 for autism programs); 
        and,
          $19,201,000 for hereditary blood disorders, which is 
        $660,000 below the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
        $1,413,000 more than the budget request (included 
        within this total is $1,944,000 for thallasemia 
        programs).
    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.--The Committee is aware 
that Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Alpha-1) is the major 
genetic risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 
(COPD) and cryptogenic liver disease. Early detection allows 
individuals to engage in preventative health measures and 
receive appropriate therapies which significantly improve their 
health status. In addition, utilization of well defined disease 
management programs significantly reduces exacerbations and 
health care costs. The Committee encourages CDC to develop a 
partnership with appropriate patient and professional 
organizations to actively support Alpha-1 targeted detection 
efforts that utilize public and professional education 
regarding obstructive lung disease, both genetic and tobacco 
related.
    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD).--Current 
estimates indicate that as many as 7.8 percent of school-age 
children have AD/HD and more than two-thirds of these children 
will continue to experience symptoms through adulthood. Only 
half of all children with AD/HD receive necessary treatment, 
with lower diagnostic and treatment rates among girls, 
minorities and children in foster care. The Surgeon General has 
reported a severe lack of professionals trained to diagnose and 
treat the condition effectively. The Committee continues to 
support the national resource center on AD/HD and has provided 
funding in fiscal year 2007 to continue the activities to 
respond to the overwhelming demand for information and support 
services; to better reach special populations in need; to 
educate health and education professionals on AD/HD; and to 
enable CDC to continue its population-based research and 
surveillance, and consider public health intervention 
opportunities.
    Autism spectrum disorders.--The Committee is aware of the 
progress that has been made with the autism programs. The 
Committee acknowledges the importance of this work by the CDC 
in the area of autism surveillance and research, and urges this 
work to continue in a timely manner. As previously highlighted 
in this report, the Committee includes $15,500,000 for autism 
activities. Within that amount, $12,800,000 is provided for 
surveillance and research programs and $2,700,000 is for the 
autism awareness campaign.
    Birth defects research and surveillance.--The Committee 
supports CDC's efforts in the area of birth defects 
surveillance, research and prevention and encourages CDC to 
continue the promising research being conducted by the regional 
centers for birth defects research and prevention and to 
increase assistance to states to implement community-based 
birth defects tracking systems, programs to prevent birth 
defects, and activities to improve access to health services 
for children with birth defects.
    Blindness.--The Committee is concerned that people with 
vision impairment and blindness have a significant unmet need 
for appropriate public health interventions and information to 
prevent further impairment and disability. The lack of such 
appropriate interventions has resulted in people with vision 
loss having higher rates of depression, hypertension, heart 
disease, stroke, and physical injuries than people without 
sensory impairments. The Committee urges additional evidence-
based research for effective public health interventions, as 
well as the national dissemination of these interventions 
through a website and other means accessible to the blind and 
visually impaired. The Committee urges CDC to launch this 
initiative and to partner with a national non-profit 
organization that is recognized for leadership in providing 
information to persons who are blind or visually impaired, 
including published resource guides, directories of services 
for consumers in the field, scholarly journals on blindness and 
vision loss, assistive technology magazines, and talking books.
    Cerebral palsy.--The Committee encourages CDC to establish 
cerebral palsy surveillance and epidemiology sites throughout 
the United States based on methodology developed in the 
Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Study and the 
Metropolitan Atlanta Developmental Disabilities Surveillance 
Program. The Committee encourages CDC to build upon the 
infrastructure established for the autism developmental 
disability monitoring sites and the centers for autism and 
developmental disabilities research and epidemiology sites and 
to establish surveillance and epidemiology centers for cerebral 
palsy as was done for autism.
    Cooley's anemia.--The Committee remains pleased with the 
progress that CDC has made with regard to the establishment of 
a blood safety surveillance program for Cooley's anemia 
patients, who are the largest consumers of red blood cells. Six 
treatment centers throughout the Nation handle the medical 
monitoring and treatment; a private foundation provides 
education and awareness, patient recruitment, and other 
services; and, CDC has created an archive of tested and 
analyzed blood samples. The Committee urges CDC to utilize this 
program to enhance the safety of the blood supply while 
improving the health of Cooley's anemia patients.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee encourages CDC to continue 
its research on the secondary and related developmental and 
mental disorders in individuals with Down syndrome that it 
began in fiscal year 2005.
    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD).--The 
Committee is pleased that CDC developed and submitted its 
Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Strategic Plan to 
Congress. To ensure the goals of this plan are achieved by the 
intended deadlines, the Committee provides funding to expand 
the existing surveillance, epidemiological, and education 
initiatives and to establish a nationwide DBMD patient registry 
by July 1, 2007. The Committee believes a nationwide DBMD 
patient registry will build upon the existing surveillance work 
and ensure the data gathered are deposited in one centralized 
repository. Additionally, to help ensure adequate patient data 
are collected, the Committee strongly urges CDC to expand the 
muscular dystrophy surveillance tracking and research network 
by one additional site in 2007. The Committee continues to be 
pleased with the work being done through the joint public/
private education and outreach cooperative agreement and would 
encourage that additional funds be used to continue and expand 
this program. The Committee is pleased that CDC is working with 
the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to establish 
evidence-driven standards of care for DBMD patients, and 
encourages both agencies to complete this work by February 1, 
2007.
    Folic acid education campaign.--The Committee is encouraged 
with the progress made in preventing neural tube defects, but 
notes that recent research shows only 40 percent of women of 
childbearing age consume enough folic acid daily. The Committee 
has provided the same funding level for fiscal year 2007 as was 
provided in fiscal year 2006 to enhance the national education 
campaign to increase the number of women taking folic acid 
daily.
    Fragile X.--The Committee is encouraged by CDC's efforts 
related to Fragile X and support for the Fragile X public 
health program to expand surveillance and epidemiological 
research of Fragile X. Given the limited resources available, 
the Committee urges CDC to ensure that the agency's educational 
and awareness activities under this initiative are not 
duplicative of current efforts of nationally recognized 
authorities in the area of Fragile X, but are instead focused 
on supporting the further dissemination and distribution of 
existing informational materials.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee continues to encourage CDC to 
take steps to ensure that additional patient-based 
organizations can participate in its hemophilia grant program 
on an annual basis. The Committee requests that CDC prepare a 
report on this recommendation by January 1, 2007. In addition, 
the Committee encourages CDC to sustain support for the 
hemophilia treatment center network to ensure continued access 
to comprehensive chronic disease management for people with 
bleeding and clotting disorders.
    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).--HHT, also 
known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is a multi-system vascular 
genetic disorder producing blood vessel malformations in the 
brain and lung which may result in stroke, hemorrhage, aneurysm 
and death. Sudden death or disability may occur in 20 percent 
of children and adults, but is largely preventable with proper 
intervention. The Committee encourages CDC to establish, 
through a joint initiative with the HHT treatment centers, 
effective evidence-based interventions and treatment to improve 
outcomes and the quality of life for people living with HHT.
    Marfan syndrome.--The Committee continues to be interested 
in Marfan syndrome, a progressive and degenerative genetic 
disorder which can result in sudden loss of life from aortic 
aneurysms. Unfortunately, many individuals affected by Marfan 
syndrome are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed until they experience 
a cardiac complication. Increasing awareness of this life-
threatening disease is vital to ensuring accurate diagnosis and 
appropriate disease management in patients who are at risk for 
cardiovascular complications. The Committee encourages CDC to 
partner with the Marfan syndrome community to increase 
awareness of the disease among the general public and health 
care providers.
    Spina bifida.--The Committee recognizes that spina bifida 
is the leading permanently disabling birth defect in the U.S. 
While spina bifida and related neural tube defects are highly 
preventable through proper nutrition, including appropriate 
folic acid consumption, and its secondary effects can be 
mitigated through appropriate and proactive medical care and 
management, such efforts have not been adequately supported or 
coordinated to result in significant reductions in these costly 
conditions. In an effort to continue to improve the quality-of-
life for individuals affected by spina bifida and reduce and 
prevent the occurrence of, and suffering from, this birth 
defect, the Committee encourages CDC to coordinate with the 
appropriate health organization to promote the prevention of 
spina bifida and to enhance the lives of all affected. Within 
the funds provided for spina bifida, the Committee supports the 
maintenance and continuation of the national spina bifida 
clearinghouse and resource center to meet the current and 
growing demand for information and support services for 
individuals and families affected by spina bifida. In addition, 
the Committee supports the Memorandum of Understanding between 
CDC and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to 
examine clinical treatment of spina bifida and improve quality 
of life.
    The Committee recognizes that the Agent Orange database of 
health and educational services composes the largest repository 
of longitudinal treatment information of people with spina 
bifida and can provide much-needed insight and understanding 
into the needs of people with spina bifida. The Committee 
commends CDC and the Department of Veterans Affairs for their 
collaborative efforts to review and analyze the Agent Orange 
database to gain better understanding of the treatment, 
educational, and vocational benefits needs and utilization by 
people with spina bifida. The Committee encourages the on-going 
collaboration to analyze this data and requests a report 
summarizing the analysis of the data, including recommendations 
based on the analysis as to how to improve treatment and 
quality-of-life for people with spina bifida.
    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).--TSC is a genetic 
disorder that causes uncontrollable tumor growth. Because this 
disorder can affect multiple organs of the body, it is 
difficult to diagnose, track and properly treat. The Committee 
encourages CDC to develop a joint initiative with an 
appropriate health organization to collect and analyze data 
from the nationwide network of TSC clinics; support 
surveillance and epidemiological studies; and to educate health 
care professionals and teachers who come into contact with TSC 
patients.

Health information and service

    The Committee provides $226,400,000 for health information 
and service, which is $3,497,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 
program level and $35,274,000 less than the budget request. The 
Committee does not concur with the budget request that a 
portion of the funding is to be derived from section 241 
evaluation set aside funds to carry out National Center for 
Health Statistics surveys, Public Health Informatics 
evaluations, and health marketing evaluations. The Committee, 
instead, provides a sufficient amount of budget authority to 
carry out those activities.
            Health statistics
    The Committee provides a total of $109,421,000 for health 
statistics, which is $400,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the budget request. The health statistics 
program is responsible for collecting, interpreting, and 
disseminating data on the health status of the U.S. population 
and the use of health services. Surveys include the National 
Vital Statistics System, the National Health Interview Survey, 
the National Survey of Family Growth, the National Health and 
Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), and the National Health 
Care Survey.
    Within the total provided, the Committee includes $400,000 
to conduct a study of the feasibility of linking food 
assistance state based program administrative records to the 
NHANES database. The feasibility test will determine whether 
such linkages are logistically and technically feasible, the 
cost of such linkages, and the potential benefits of the linked 
files. In addition, alternative data collection options for 
obtaining needed information on food assistance programs and 
food purchasing knowledge and behaviors should be explored. The 
Committee requests that CDC prepare a report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations regarding this study within 
180 days of enactment of this Act.
    The Committee commends the National Center for Health 
Statistics (NCHS) for fulfilling its mission as the nation's 
premiere health statistics agency and for ensuring the 
credibility and integrity of the data it produces. In 
particular, the Committee congratulates the agency for its 
timely release of critical data and encourages it to continue 
making information, including data from NHANES and the National 
Health Interview Study, accessible to the public as soon as 
possible.
    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).--The Committee is 
concerned that NTM incidence continues to rise. Mycobacteria 
are environmental organisms found in both water and soil that 
cause substantial respiratory damage. The Committee encourages 
the national center for health statistics to include questions 
regarding NTM testing in ongoing surveys to gain a better 
understanding of the epidemiology of this emergent disease.
    Psoriasis.--The Committee urges NCHS to ensure that any 
data collected on psoriasis be comprehensive and include the 
full age range of individuals affected by the disease including 
children, adolescents, and adults. The Committee is interested 
in having NCHS collect and report psoriasis incidence and 
prevalence data that are based on nationwide epidemiological 
studies. If such data are not currently available, the 
Committee urges NCHS to undertake a comprehensive 
epidemiological study with a focus on determining incidence of 
psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The Committee urges CDC to 
consider working with a national psoriasis organization to 
develop a surveillance program to ascertain and monitor 
psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis incidence and co-morbidities.
            Public health informatics
    The Committee provides a total of $73,738,000 for public 
health informatics, which is $3,097,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and $35,455,000 less than the budget 
request.
    Pandemic influenza.--The Committee does not provide 
$39,600,000 in funding requested by the Administration for 
pandemic influenza activities in public health informatics in 
this appropriation. The Committee has provided $200,000,000 
through fiscal year 2006 supplemental appropriations for CDC 
activities related to preparing for the potential for an 
influenza pandemic. A second emergency supplemental 
appropriation for pandemic influenza is pending.
            Health marketing
    The Committee provides a total of $43,241,000 for health 
marketing, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $219,000 less than the budget request.

Environmental health and injury prevention

    The Committee provides $278,000,000 for environmental 
health and injury prevention, which is $11,021,000 less than 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $1,309,000 less than the 
budget request.
            Environmental health
    The Committee provides $139,439,000 for environmental 
health, which is $10,546,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $1,656,000 less than the budget request.
    Asthma.--The Committee is pleased with the work that CDC 
has done to address the increasing prevalence of asthma. 
However, the increase in asthma among children remains 
alarming. The Committee urges CDC to continue to expand its 
outreach aimed at increasing public awareness of asthma control 
and prevention strategies, particularly among at-risk 
populations in underserved communities. To further facilitate 
this effort, CDC is urged to partner with voluntary health 
organizations to support program activity consistent with the 
CDC's efforts to fund community-based interventions that apply 
effective approaches demonstrated in research projects within 
the scientific and public health community.
    Biomonitoring.--The Committee applauds the CDC's 
biomonitoring efforts and encourages the agency to continue 
this program and continue to improve its efforts to communicate 
these results in context. In particular, the CDC's National 
Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals is a 
significant new exposure tool that provides invaluable 
information for setting research priorities and for tracking 
trends in human exposures over time. Accordingly, the Committee 
continues to support the CDC environmental health laboratory's 
efforts to provide exposure information about environmental 
chemicals. However, as CDC has recognized, this information 
does not by itself suggest harmful effects in humans. In fact, 
for most chemicals, it is currently difficult to interpret 
biomonitoring information in a health risk context. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages CDC to collaborate with federal 
government and private sector toxicologists, health scientists 
and laboratory analytical chemists, to facilitate the 
development of the necessary methods to interpret human 
biomonitoring concentrations in the context of potential health 
risks.
    Childhood lead poisoning prevention.--The Committee 
commends CDC for its commitment to support the enhanced 
development of a portable, hand-held lead screening device that 
holds great promise for increasing childhood screening rates in 
underserved communities. Further development of this device 
will help ensure its application in community health settings.
    Environmental health laboratory.--The Committee recognizes 
the extraordinary services of CDC's environmental health 
laboratory to develop new and improved biomonitoring methods to 
accurately and rapidly assess human exposure to mercury and 
arsenic, including exposure to the form of mercury in 
thimerosal, and to improve health risk assessment by expanding 
studies of the relationship between biomonitoring exposure 
levels and disease.
    Landmine survivors.--The Committee commends CDC for its 
partnership with a private landmine survivors organization that 
has developed peer support networks for landmine survivors in 
six mine-affected countries around the world. For fiscal year 
2007, the Committee provides no less than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level to expand peer support networks and the number of 
survivors that are reached in network and non-network 
countries; strengthen the capacity of medical and 
rehabilitative care facilities to address the needs of 
amputees; enhance economic opportunities for survivors; and 
further CDC programs and research for victims of landmines, 
civil strife and warfare.
    National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.--The 
National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network seeks to 
expand the program to monitor, link, and assess environmental 
and health data to identify problems and effective solutions 
that will reduce the burden of chronic and other non-infectious 
disease in the American population. With health tracking, 
public health officials can better target preventive services, 
health care providers can offer better health care, and the 
public will be able to develop a clear understanding of what is 
occurring in their communities and how overall health can be 
improved. A critical component of the program is to ensure that 
various stakeholders, especially communities, are engaged in 
the process of developing the state networks and ultimately the 
network. Therefore, the Committee urges CDC and the State and 
local programs take actions to include communities and other 
stakeholders in the development and implementation of the 
tracking network.
            Injury prevention and control
    The Committee provides $138,561,000 for the injury 
prevention and control program, which is $475,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $347,000 above the budget 
request. The injury prevention and control program supports 
intramural research, injury control research centers, 
extramural research grants, and technical assistance to state 
and local health departments.
    Child maltreatment.--The Committee applauds CDC's 
activities in the areas of child maltreatment. A growing body 
of research indicates that childhood abuse and neglect may 
contribute significantly to the development of both acute and 
chronic health conditions throughout the lifespan, including 
obesity and heart disease. The Committee encourages CDC to 
develop a network of consortia that will address research and 
training, as well as the dissemination of best practices and 
prevention efforts, on the health harms of child abuse and 
neglect.
    Gun control advocacy.--The Committee recommendation 
maintains bill language prohibiting federal funds from being 
used to lobby for or against the passage of specific federal, 
state or local legislation intended to advocate or promote gun 
control. The Committee understands that CDC's responsibility in 
this area is primarily data collection and the dissemination of 
that information and expects that research in this area to be 
objective and grants to be awarded through an impartial, 
scientific peer review process.

Occupational safety and health

    The Committee provides $251,000,000 for occupational safety 
and health, which is $4,272,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $806,000 above the request. Of the amount 
provided, $87,071,000 is to be derived from section 241 
evaluation set-aside funds, as proposed in the budget request.
    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 
(NIOSH) conducts applied research, develops criteria for 
occupational safety and health standards, and provides 
technical services to government, labor and industry, including 
training for the prevention of work-related diseases and 
injuries. This appropriation supports surveillance, health 
hazard evaluations, intramural and extramural research, 
instrument and methods development, dissemination, and training 
grants.
    The Committee notes that an additional $10,000,000 for 
research to develop mine safety technology has been provided to 
NIOSH within a fiscal year 2006 supplemental appropriations 
bill. This funding is available through fiscal year 2007.

Global health

    The Committee provides $312,000,000 for global health, 
which is $1,251,000 below the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and $69,103,000 below the budget request.
    Through its Global Health activities, CDC coordinates, 
cooperates, participates with, and provides consultation to 
other nations, U.S. agencies, and international organizations 
to prevent and contain diseases and environmental health 
problems and to develop and apply health promotion activities. 
In cooperation with Ministries of Health and other appropriate 
organizations, CDC tracks and assesses evolving global health 
issues and identifies and develops activities to apply CDC's 
technical expertise to be of maximum public health benefit.
    Within the total, the following amounts are included for 
global health activities:
          $121,952,000 for the global AIDS program, which is 
        $692,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request;
          $144,398,000 for the global immunization program, 
        which is $638,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 
        funding level and $144,000 more than the budget 
        request;
          $33,259,000 for global disease detection, which is 
        $91,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request;
          $8,970,000 for the global malaria program, which is 
        $52,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request, and;
          $3,421,000 for other global health activities, which 
        is $40,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and $69,247,000 less than the budget request.
    Pandemic influenza.--The Committee does not provide 
$69,300,000 in funding requested by the Administration for 
pandemic influenza activities in this appropriation. The 
Committee has provided $430,000,000 through fiscal year 2006 
supplemental appropriations for CDC activities related to 
preparing for the potential for an influenza pandemic.
    Tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS.--The Committee understands that 
TB is the leading killer of people with AIDS. The Committee 
strongly urges the CDC to increase its efforts through the 
global AIDS program and the global disease detection initiative 
to provide technical assistance and expertise to nations with 
high incidence of TB-HIV co-infections.

Terrorism preparedness and response

    The Committee provides $1,605,000,000 for terrorism 
preparedness and response, which is $27,743,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $52,161,000 below the budget 
request. Within the funds provided:
          $823,674,000 is for upgrading state and local 
        capacity, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
        funding level and the budget request;
          $135,628,000 is for upgrading CDC capacity, which is 
        $964,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request;
          $13,860,000 is for the anthrax research study which 
        is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level;
          $2,970,000 is for the new botulinum toxin research 
        program, the same funding level included in the budget 
        request;
          $78,868,000 is for the biosurveillance initiative, 
        which is $437,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 
        funding level and $23,373,000 less than the budget 
        request, and;
          $550,000,000 is for the strategic national stockpile, 
        which is $25,300,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding 
        level and $42,648,000 below the budget request.
    Botulinum neurotoxin research.--The Committee requests that 
CDC submit a plan to accompany the fiscal year 2008 President's 
budget request to Congress to participate and share in the 
development of advanced in-vitro and cell-based fluorescence 
resonance energy transfer assays for the detection and 
classification of botulinum neurotoxins being developed by the 
United States Army's Medical Research Institute of Chemical 
Defense. The plan should identify how the Army program can be 
leveraged to meet CDC requirements and how CDC will participate 
in co-development of the assay.
    Pandemic influenza.--The Committee does not provide 
$24,800,000 in funding requested by the Administration for 
pandemic influenza activities within the terrorism programs in 
this appropriation. The Committee has provided $200,000,000 
through fiscal year 2006 supplemental appropriations for CDC 
activities related to preparing for the potential for an 
influenza pandemic. A second emergency supplemental 
appropriation for pandemic influenza is pending.
    Strategic national stockpile.--The Committee recognizes 
that, in the wake of the Gulf Coast hurricanes of 2005, CDC is 
considering how to reconfigure the strategic national stockpile 
to fulfill a broader disaster response mission. Psychotropic 
medications such as anti-psychotic, anti-depressant and anti-
seizure medications are widely prescribed and critical to the 
quality of life of those who take them. Moreover, the sudden 
deprivation of these drugs, particularly in the wake of trauma 
and stress of a disaster, can create major mental illness 
management challenges for emergency responders, diverting 
crucial resources and impeding recovery. For these reasons, the 
Committee strongly encourages the CDC to include psychotropic 
medications in a reconfigured strategic national stockpile.

Public health research

    The Committee provides $31,000,000 for public health 
research, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. The Committee does not provide 
these funds through the section 241 evaluation set-aside funds 
as proposed in the budget request, but instead provides these 
funds through budget authority.
    Through this activity, CDC supports high-quality public 
health research that studies the best methods for making the 
transition from research to practice. Funds support research 
that is proposed by experienced investigators working with 
communities, health practitioners, and policymakers to address 
local priority health concerns.

Public health improvement and leadership

    The Committee provides $207,165,000 for public health 
improvement and leadership, which is $17,342,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $17,000,000 above the budget 
request.
    This activity supports several cross-cutting areas within 
CDC. Included is the CDC's leadership and management function, 
which funds the CDC office of the director, coordinating 
centers, and each constituent center and office. The public 
health improvement and leadership line item also supports the 
CDC's public health workforce and career development efforts, 
the director's discretionary fund, and Congressional projects.
    The Committee is pleased that CDC has continued to support 
the cooperative program with an association representing 
minority health professions and urges continued expansion of 
this activity, including sponsorship of public health and 
biomedical symposiums aimed at increasing career opportunities 
for minority students.
    The Committee includes the following projects and 
activities and in the following amounts for fiscal year 2007:

1490 Enterprises, Inc Buffalo, NY for a program to 
    improve physical activity and nutrition among senior 
    citizens............................................         100,000
Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington, PA for breast and 
    cervical cancer outreach, education and screening 
    programs for medically underserved populations......         125,000
Adler Aphasia Center, Maywood, NJ for a program to 
    improve communication and other life skills for 
    people with aphasia.................................         200,000
Alameda County Public Health Department, Office of AIDS 
    Administration, Oakland, CA for an HIV/AIDS 
    prevention and testing initiative...................         250,000
American Cities Foundation, Philadelphia, PA for 
    community health outreach and education programs....         250,000
American Foundation for the Blind, Dallas, TX for the 
    Center on Vision Loss...............................         250,000
Arkansas Alliance of YMCAs, Warren, AR for programs in 
    the cities of Pine Bluff, Warren, and Hot Springs to 
    reduce childhood obesity............................         250,000
Barnes-Kasson County Hospital, Susquehanna, PA for 
    Obstetrics Education and related programs...........         200,000
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX for 
    epidemiological research and educational outreach 
    related to childhood cancer in cooperation with the 
    Vanie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology 
    Clinic in McAllen, TX...............................         450,000
Bayside Community Center, San Diego, CA for its STEPS 
    health education and outreach program for senior 
    citizens............................................         100,000
Boys & Girls Club of Delaware County, Jay, OK for 
    equipment and operating expenses for programs to 
    improve diet, physical activity and emotional health         300,000
California State University-Fullerton, Fullerton, CA for 
    programs aimed at preventing obesity and promoting 
    health in children..................................         250,000
Capital Breast Care Center, Washington, DC for 
    education, screening and counseling related to 
    breast cancer.......................................         175,000
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA for the Poison 
    Control Center......................................         250,000
Christiana Care Women First Community Center of 
    Excellence, Wilmington, DE to link healthcare 
    providers and consumers to better serve gender and 
    ethnic differences in health........................         200,000
City of Dana Point, CA for the Doheny State Park Beach 
    Epidemiological Study...............................         600,000
Columbus Children's Research Institute, Children's 
    Hospital, Columbus, OH for activities at the Injury 
    Research Center.....................................         250,000
Community College Foundation, Sacramento, CA for the 
    ePassport foster child health and education data 
    tracking program....................................         200,000
Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium, Lake Charles, 
    LA for technology upgrades..........................         250,000
County of Marin, San Rafael, CA for research and 
    analysis related to breast cancer incidence and 
    mortality in the county.............................         300,000
CREATE Foundation, Tupelo, MS to help schools and 
    communities combat childhood obesity in North 
    Mississippi.........................................         500,000
CureSearch National Childhood Cancer Foundation, 
    Bethesda, MD for disease diagnosis, education, and 
    outreach............................................         200,000
Federation of State Medical Boards, Euless, TX to 
    develop a Physician Data Center.....................         100,000
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus Foundation, 
    Lake Success, NY to provide glaucoma screenings and 
    follow-up in the New York metropolitan area.........         350,000
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus Foundation, 
    Lake Success, NY to provide glaucoma screenings and 
    follow-up in the U.S. Virgin Islands................         325,000
Fulton County Department of Health and Wellness, 
    Atlanta, GA for emergency preparedness activities 
    including volunteer programs and public information.         250,000
Georgia Chapter of the American Lung Association, 
    Smyrna, GA to study the relationship between 
    residential floor coverings and distributive 
    patterns of airborne particulates...................         350,000
Gilda's Club Louisville, Inc., Louisville, KY for 
    psycho-social support services for cancer survivors.         300,000
Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, San Francisco, 
    CA for the Healthy Parks and Healthy Communities 
    project.............................................         100,000
Haitian American Association Against Cancer, Miami, FL 
    for cancer education, outreach, screening and 
    related programs....................................         200,000
Healthy Eating Lifestyle Principles, Monterey, CA for a 
    program to improve nutrition by promoting the 
    accessibility and consumption of fresh fruits and 
    vegetables in schools...............................         150,000
Hyacinth AIDS Foundation, New Brunswick, NJ for an HIV/
    AIDS counseling and testing program.................          75,000
Ingham Regional Medical Center, Lansing, MI for health 
    and educational outreach............................         100,000
International Rett Syndrome Association, Clinton, MD for 
    education and awareness programs regarding Rett 
    syndrome............................................         200,000
International Species Information System (ISIS), Eagen, 
    MN for the ZIMS project.............................         400,000
James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children, 
    Indianapolis, IN for continuation of autism programs 
    at the Christian Sarkine Autism Treatment Center....         250,000
John B. Amos Cancer Center, Columbus Regional Healthcare 
    System, Columbus, GA for cancer education and early 
    detection programs..................................         350,000
Kids First, Providence, RI for education and technical 
    assistance programs to improve nutrition and 
    physical activity among children....................         150,000
King County Emergency Management Division, Seattle, WA 
    to support a 24-hour communication and public health 
    notification system.................................         200,000
King County, Seattle, WA for influenza pandemic 
    preparedness........................................         150,000
Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club, Bronx, NY for a nutrition 
    and anti-obesity demonstration program for 6-to 12-
    year-old children...................................         275,000
La Rabida Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL for education 
    and outreach related to diabetes and sickle cell 
    disease.............................................         300,000
Learning Disabilities Association of Central New York, 
    East Syracuse, NY for mental health, family 
    counseling and other support services...............         100,000
Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY for asthma 
    education, counseling and prevention programs.......         250,000
MetroHealth System, Cleveland, OH for the Northeast Ohio 
    Senior Health and Wellness Center...................         100,000
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN, for 
    research and education regarding ways of increasing 
    physical activity and fitness among children and 
    adolescents.........................................         110,000
Natividad Medical Center, Salinas, CA for a diabetes 
    care management program.............................         150,000
New Haven Public Schools, New Haven, CT for a PE4Life 
    physical education initiative.......................         150,000
North Shore Health Project, Gloucester, MA for outreach 
    and education on hepatitis C........................         150,000
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL for the Juvenile 
    Project longitudinal youth study....................         250,000
Pacoima Beautiful, Pacoima, CA for a program to reduce 
    the impact of environmental health hazards in homes 
    and childcare centers...............................          50,000
Produce for Better Health Foundation, Wilmington, DE for 
    education programs in Cape Girardeau, MO............         100,000
Provena Mercy Center, Aurora, IL for diabetes education 
    and prevention......................................         355,000
Providence Health System, Portland, OR for the Oregon 
    Rural and Underserved Cancer Outreach Project.......         250,000
Pulmonary Hypertension Association, Silver Spring, MD 
    for public education and outreach...................         250,000
Queens Pride House, Queens, NY for a health education 
    and awareness campaign focusing on prevention of 
    diseases such as hepatitis A and B and diabetes.....          50,000
S.L.E. Foundation, New York, NY for outreach and 
    education regarding lupus...........................         200,000
San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San Antonio, 
    TX for further studies and public health outreach 
    regarding environmental health concerns at and near 
    the former Kelly Air Force Base.....................         200,000
Silent Spring Institute, Newton, MA for studies of the 
    impact of environmental pollutants on breast cancer 
    and other disorders.................................         125,000
Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA for the 
    Center on Disability and Health to promote and 
    encourage regular physical activity.................         150,000
South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD for studies 
    related to childhood obesity........................         125,000
Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats, 
    Atlanta, GA.........................................         500,000
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX for the 
    Medical Anthropology Program........................         100,000
St. John's Regional Medical Center, Oxnard, CA for 
    diabetes prevention and management programs.........         200,000
St. John's Well Child & Family Center, Los Angeles, CA 
    for a patient education program to address obesity, 
    diabetes and hypertension...........................         150,000
Sustainable Resources Center, Minneapolis, MN for a lead 
    poisoning screening and education program...........         175,000
Toledo Public Schools, Toledo, OH for a nutrition 
    demonstration program linked to locally provided 
    foods...............................................         250,000
Union Hospital, Terre Haute, IN for a chronic disease 
    management assessment program.......................         250,000
United Cerebral Palsy Association, Washington, DC for a 
    national public education and outreach initiative...         150,000
University of Texas, Brownsville, TX for studies 
    regarding the health of the Hispanic population in 
    the Rio Grande Valley...............................         250,000
Visiting Nurse Association Healthcare Partners of Ohio, 
    Cleveland, OH for the CareWatch program in Stark, 
    Wayne, Medina and Ashland Counties..................         100,000
Voorhees College, Denmark, SC, for its Healthy Campus 
    chronic disease prevention research and 
    demonstration program...............................         100,000
WakeMed Health and Hospitals, Raleigh, NC for pediatric 
    diabetes education and prevention activities........         150,000
Wayne County Department of Public Health, Detroit, MI 
    for a lead poisoning assessment, prevention and 
    intervention program................................         175,000
Wayne County Department of Public Services, Detroit, MI 
    for an Infant Mortality Prevention Program..........         300,000
West Babylon, NY School District for an anti-obesity 
    initiative..........................................         200,000
WestCare Foundation, Las Vegas, NV to expand the 
    Batterers Intervention Program in Needles, CA and 
    surrounding communities.............................         350,000
Yale New Haven Health System, New Haven, CT for a 
    specialty center for public health preparedness.....         500,000
Youth Becoming Healthy Project, Albany, GA for programs 
    to improve nutrition and increase physical activity 
    among middle school students........................          75,000

Preventive health and health services block grant

    The Committee provides $100,000,000 for the preventive 
health and health services block grant, which is $1,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 funding level. The budget request 
did not include funding for this program. This block grant 
provides flexible funds to states by formula for a wide range 
of public and preventive health activities. The flexibility 
afforded to the states, allows them to target funds to address 
chronic diseases, such as diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, 
and stroke, to direct funds to meet challenges of outbreaks of 
infectious diseases, such as West Nile virus and influenza, 
and/or to implement prevention and control programs related to 
injury and abuse.
    As a result of providing funding for the preventive health 
and health services block grant rather than eliminating it as 
requested by the Administration, the Committee does not include 
bill language requested by the Administration that would 
authorize states to reallocate up to five percent of the 
funding they receive in CDC categorical grants for the purposes 
related to those conducted through the preventive health and 
health services block grant.

Buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $29,700,000 for buildings and 
facilities, which is $128,700,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the same as the budget request. These funds 
support efficient maintenance and operations of new and 
existing facilities to protect the interest and investment of 
the government so that deterioration of CDC facilities does not 
occur again.

Business services and support

    The Committee provides $327,000,000 for business services 
and support, which is $28,384,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $23,146,000 above the budget request. Some of 
the activities that are supported through this funding are 
administrative services and programs, the human resources 
center, capital planning and investment control, financial 
management, security and emergency preparedness, and 
information technology services.
    It is the Committee's intention that funds provided in 
business services and support are sufficient to carry out CDC's 
business functions. The Committee will not support the 
continuation of programmatic ``tapping'' to achieve additional 
funding in this area. It is for this reason that the Committee 
has increased the funding for this program above both the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. If 
additional funding is required for activities that are funded 
within this budget line, the Committee expects CDC to work with 
the Department of Health and Human Services to prepare a 
reprogramming request to be submitted to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.
    Within the amount provided, sufficient funds are provided 
for data center operations and maintenance and for a data 
storage hardware capital lease purchase payment. This funding 
is to further provide for the remote mirroring of information 
between CDC data centers and recovery sites and to provide 
heterogeneous connectivity to existing systems in use at CDC in 
order to ensure the protection, recovery, and availability of 
critical resources. The funding also will provide for enhanced 
security-specific technologies and services in concert with 
critical infrastructure protection requirements.

                     National Institutes of Health

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$28,250,003,000 for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 
which yields a total program level of $28,258,203,000. This 
program level is $17,694,000 above the fiscal year 2006 non-
emergency appropriation and equal to the request. The Committee 
recommends a substantial increase in the Office of the Director 
for activities that benefit multiple institutes and centers 
(ICs) under the Roadmap initiative, and has recommended 
corresponding reductions to the budget of each IC as proposed 
in the budget request.
    Budget justification materials.--While the Committee 
appreciates the detailed mechanism tables and pleonastic 
descriptions of science advances that were submitted as part of 
each institute, center or office's (IC's) budget justification 
for fiscal year 2007, the Committee is troubled by the lack of 
program-level detail displayed for each IC. Therefore, the 
Committee directs NIH, in its fiscal year 2008 budget 
submission, to include the following additional information for 
each IC for which funding is requested: a table showing funding 
at the program level, including comparisons between the 
requested level and the two prior fiscal year appropriations; a 
table depicting major program or activity increases and 
decreases as compared to the previous fiscal year along with a 
detailed justification of the reasons for the increases or 
decreases; and, for each new initiative proposed in fiscal year 
2008, the cost and goals of that initiative and a detailed 
justification of the activities proposed to be undertaken in 
the initiative (including costs of each major activity). While 
the Committee does not direct funding to particular diseases 
and has traditionally provided maximum flexibility to NIH in 
order to allow it to fund programs and projects in a manner 
consistent with the state of the science, it is appropriate 
that the American people and their elected representatives have 
access to more detailed information regarding the manner in 
which NIH invests and proposes to invest increasingly scarce 
taxpayer resources.

                       NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

    The Committee recommends $4,753,609,000 for the National 
Cancer Institute (NCI), which is $39,747,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NCI conducts and supports basic and applied 
cancer research in early detection, diagnosis, prevention, 
treatment and rehabilitation. NCI provides training support for 
research scientists, clinicians and educators, and maintains a 
national network of cancer centers, clinical cooperative 
groups, and community clinical oncology programs, along with 
cancer prevention and control initiatives and outreach programs 
to rapidly translate basic research findings into clinical 
practice.
    American Russian Cancer Alliance (ARCA).--The Committee 
commends the members of the American Russian Cancer Alliance 
(ARCA) for their continued pursuit of novel cancer research 
activities that capitalize on the particular strengths of the 
respective participating institutions. The Committee 
specifically recognizes the progress made in the ARCA-sponsored 
projects in molecular imaging and radioisotope-targeted cancer 
therapy and diagnosis that effectively utilizes the 
complementary expertise of the leading Russian nuclear research 
center and American cancer centers. The ARCA initiatives 
planned in cancer prevention and the ongoing sponsorship of 
educational and training activities will continue to bring 
together ARCA institutional expertise in the pursuit of 
cutting-edge cancer research. The Committee applauds the 
considerable commitment of NCI in providing support to the ARCA 
infrastructure and cancer prevention pilot projects, and in 
facilitating scientific exchange between the American and 
Russian partners, including the support of visiting scientists 
and scientific conferences. The Committee encourages NCI to 
continue its support of the cancer prevention research 
initiatives and the educational aspects of the ARCA agenda, 
including conference support and scientific exchange and 
training, which promote the Alliance's cancer research 
activities while concurrently supporting the national interest 
in developing new, productive avenues for the use of nuclear 
stockpiles previously earmarked for weapons development.
    Cancer centers.--The Committee commends NCI on the success 
of its cancer centers program. Given that minority populations 
suffer disproportionately from virtually every form of cancer, 
the Committee encourages NCI to support the establishment of a 
comprehensive center at a minority institution focused on 
research, treatment, and prevention of cancer in African 
American and other minority communities.
    Cancer metastasis to bone.--A frequent complication of 
cancer is its spread to bone (bone metastasis), causing severe 
bone pain and pathologic fractures. The Committee encourages 
NCI, in collaboration with NIAMS, NIA, and NIDDK to support 
research to determine mechanisms and to identify, block and 
treat cancer metastasis to bone.
    Furthermore, the Committee encourages NCI to expand 
research on osteosarcoma to improve survival and quality of 
life and to prevent metastatic osteosarcoma in children and 
teenagers who develop this cancer.
    Community cancer centers.--The Committee commends NCI for 
its foresight in developing the community cancer centers 
program, which is a direct mechanism to translate the most 
promising advances in cancer treatment from major medical 
research institutions to community hospitals around the 
country. The Committee request a report by September 30, 2007 
regarding the feasibility of expanding this pilot program.
    Gynecologic cancers.--Today, in the United States, one 
woman will be diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer every seven 
minutes. That is almost 200 per day and 80,000 in a given year. 
Furthermore, almost 30,000 women die from a gynecologic cancer 
each year. Existing NCI funding for SPOREs, program projects, 
the Early Detection Network, and investigator initiated grants 
has accelerated basic, molecular-based research discoveries for 
gynecologic cancers. Recent progress combined with the need for 
further innovation makes this group of cancers an important 
focus under NCI's broader ``roadmap'' initiatives. The 
Committee encourages NCI to give priority to gynecologic 
cancers under its Nanotechnology Plan (CNPlan), its Oncology 
Biomarker Qualifications Initiative (QBQI), and its Cancer 
Genomics Atlas Project (TCGA), jointly conducted with the 
National Human Genome Research Institute. This inclusion will 
allow laboratory discoveries to be translated into clinical 
applications at the bedside causing a decrease in the mortality 
rates for women with gynecologic cancer.
    Gynecologic oncology clinical trials.--Organized in 1970, 
the Gynecologic Oncology Clinical Trials Cooperative Group 
(GOG) has conducted over 300 clinical trials involving almost 
100,000 patients. With over 550 manuscripts in peer reviewed 
literature, the GOG is recognized as the leader in the 
development of new therapies for women with gynecologic cancer. 
The Committee encourages NCI to support translational research 
involving biologic prognosticators and therapeutic effects of 
chemotherapy to speed the development and delivery of new 
cancer treatments to women with gynecologic cancers.
    Liver cancer.--The Committee is pleased that NCI has issued 
program announcements requesting research projects on 
hepatocellular carcinoma. The Committee remains concerned, 
however, with the increasing incidence of primary liver cancer, 
and the small number of effective treatments, which is in sharp 
contrast to many other forms of cancer where the incidence is 
declining and the treatment options are rapidly increasing. The 
Committee encourages NCI to continue to support the NIDDK 
sponsored HALT-C clinical trial, which has particular relevance 
to the NCI mission. NCI is further encouraged to collaborate 
with the National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and 
Bioengineering on the development of improved early liver 
cancer diagnostic techniques.
    Lung cancer.--The Committee remains concerned that the five 
year survival rate for lung cancer is only 15 percent, thirty-
five years after the passage of the National Cancer Act. The 
Committee recognizes that lung cancer is the leading cause of 
cancer deaths for both men and women--accounting for nearly one 
in every three deaths. The Committee encourages the National 
Cancer Institute to work with CDC, the Centers for Medicare & 
Medicaid, the Food and Drug Administration, the Agency for 
Healthcare Quality and Research, the Department of Defense and 
other federal agencies to coordinate federal efforts on lung 
cancer in areas including research, early and late state 
diagnosis, treatment, and disease management, with goal of 
increasing five-year survival rates and, ultimately, curing 
lung cancer.
    Neurofibromatosis (NF).--The committee is pleased that NCI 
conducted clinical trials of NF patients and encourages it to 
continue its commitment to NF research. Recognizing NF's 
connection to many of the most common forms of cancer, the 
Committee encourages NCI to strengthen its NF research 
portfolio in such areas as further development of animal 
models, natural history studies, genetic and drug screening, 
therapeutic experimentation, and pre-clinical and clinical 
trials. The Committee further encourages NCI to apply existing 
cancer drugs to NF patients in clinical trials both 
extramurally and intramurally, and to develop new drugs for NF 
that could then apply to the general population because of NF's 
connection to many forms of human cancer. The Committee 
encourages NCI to continue to coordinate its efforts with other 
NIH institutes and government agencies.
    Specialized Programs for Research Excellence (SPOREs).--The 
Committee has long supported NCI's Specialized Programs of 
Research Excellence (SPOREs), and encourages NCI to provide 
support for the important work done by SPOREs at a level as 
close to the amount provided in fiscal year 2004 as possible, 
and in the current form, until such time as the Translational 
Research Working Group concludes its evaluation and provides 
recommendations to support translational research more 
effectively.

               NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE

    The Committee recommends $2,901,012,000 for the National 
Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is $20,745,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the 
budget request.
    Mission.--The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 
provides leadership for a national research program in diseases 
of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and blood, in transfusion 
medicine, and in sleep disorders through support of basic, 
clinical, and population-based and health education research.
    Bleeding and clotting disorders.--The Committee commends 
NHLBI for its commitment to research in bleeding and clotting 
disorders and encourages the institute to continue these 
efforts focusing on improved and novel therapies for these 
disorders and maintaining its collaborative relationship with 
the scientific and medical research community.
    Bone marrow diseases.--The Committee encourages NHLBI and 
NCI to collaborate on a comprehensive study of the prevalence 
of bone marrow diseases in Asian countries. A better 
understanding of the disproportionate prevalence among Asians 
may lead to new scientific breakthroughs identifying the causes 
and cures for aplastic anemia and other bone marrow diseases.
    Cardiovascular disease and women.--The Committee remains 
concerned that as the population ages, cardiovascular disease 
will reach pandemic proportions, and that women will continue 
to be affected at high rates. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages the institute to place a high priority on heart 
disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases in women by 
increasing resources to stimulate, strengthen, and intensify 
its investment in basic, clinical, translational, and trans-
institute cardiovascular disease research through all available 
mechanisms. Despite new therapies, the Committee continues to 
believe that more research is needed to understand better the 
causes of these diseases in women, develop more effective 
treatments and cures, and prevent cardiovascular diseases.
    Cardiovascular diseases.--The Committee continues to 
encourage the institute to place a high priority on research 
for heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, 
including strengthening its research portfolio through all 
available mechanisms into the causes, cure, prevention and 
treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
    Cooley's anemia.--The Committee remains supportive of the 
focused research effort that is being undertaken by the 
Thalassemia Clinical Research Network, which is comprised of 
the leading research institutions in the field of thalassemia, 
or Cooley's anemia. The Committee believes that this network is 
just beginning to meet its promise and encourages NHLBI to 
continue supporting this research. In addition, the Committee 
commends NHLBI for convening a meeting with regard to gene 
therapy and encourages the institute to move much more 
aggressively in pursuing a research agenda that will lead to a 
cure at the earliest possible time.
    Cystic fibrosis.--The Committee encourages NHLBI to 
increase support for research aimed at understanding the 
precise mechanisms by which small molecules correct protein 
misfolding and mistrafficking relevant to lung diseases. 
Understanding the mechanisms of correction of protein folding 
and trafficking may contribute to NIH-supported efforts to 
identify additional ways to affect positively these cellular 
processes. Also, such investigator-initiated grant proposals 
could augment current efforts by NIDDK to use screening methods 
to identify promising molecules to address protein misfolding. 
The Committee also encourages the NHLBI to continue to explore 
opportunities to support clinical research networks to 
accelerate therapeutic development.
    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).--The Committee remains very 
interested in efforts to find a cure for LAM, a progressive and 
often fatal lung disease of women with no effective treatment. 
The Committee understands that recent scientific findings have 
presented new treatment approaches for clinical testing, and 
that expermental trials with the drug sirolimus have begun. The 
Committee encourages the NHLBI to explore opportunities for 
funding clinical treatment trials through both intramural and 
extramural means and to use all available mechanisms as 
appropriate, including support of state-of-the-science 
symposia, request for applications, and facilitating access to 
human tissues, to stimulate a broad range of clinical and basic 
LAM research.
    Marfan syndrome.--Marfan syndrome is a life threatening 
disorder characterized by aortic aneurysms, painful orthopedic 
issues, pulmonary issues and ocular manifestations. The 
Committee commends NHLBI's Pediatric Heart Network for its 
support of a clinical trial to test a potential new drug 
therapy for Marfan syndrome. The Committee encourages NHLBI to 
continue to build on the exciting new advances made in this 
field to prolong life and dramatically improve the quality of 
life for people affected with this disorder through all 
available mechanisms.
    National COPD education and prevention program.--The 
Committee is pleased that NHLBI held a preliminary workshop to 
formulate strategies towards implementing a National Chronic 
Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Education and Prevention 
Program. Since COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the 
United States, the Committee encourages NHLBI to continue its 
education efforts to bring advances in medical care to the 
public. Early identification of those at-risk for or who have 
COPD is essential in the effort to stem the growth of the 
population with COPD. The Committee encourages NHLBI to 
continue its efforts in this area, working with national lung 
organizations to develop a national education campaign for 
providers and the public about COPD.
    Neurofibromatosis (NF).--Significant advances continue to 
be made in research on NF's implications with heart disease 
and, in particular, its involvement with hypertension and 
congenital heart disease that together affect over 50 million 
Americans. The Committee applauds NHLBI for its involvement 
with NF research and with NF patient advocacy groups and 
encourages the institute to continue its NF research portfolio 
in light of the significant implications for the general 
population.
    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).--Mycobacteria are 
environmental organisms found in both water and soil that can 
cause significant respiratory damage. The Committee is aware of 
the increasing incidence of NTM pulmonary infections in women, 
particularly involving rapidly growing mycobacteria, an 
inherently resistant subspecies. The Committee encourages NHLBI 
to collaborate with NIAID and other institutes on research that 
will lead to a better understanding of NTM, enhanced 
diagnostics and treatment and appropriate education of health 
care providers.
    Outcomes research in cardiovascular diseases.--The 
Committee commends NHLBI for convening a Working Group on 
Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and for 
subsequently publishing a report identifying priority areas for 
research, including developing national surveillance of 
cardiovascular care and outcomes, promoting patient-centered 
care, translating best practice into clinical practice, 
involving patients in care, and placing the cost of 
interventions in the context of their real-world effectiveness. 
The Committee encourages the institute to fund the priority 
areas highlighted in the report to enhance the prevention and 
treatment of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular 
diseases.
    Preventing weight gain in young adults.--The Committee is 
concerned about the ever increasing obesity rates and resulting 
chronic disease burden. Given the typical increase in weight 
throughout adulthood, evidence suggests that reducing the 
obesity epidemic will require significant attention to 
preventing progressive weight gain starting in early adulthood. 
Yet, little is known about the best methods to achieve weight 
management in this population. The Committee encourages NHLBI 
to develop and test innovative practical, cost-effective ways 
for preventing weight gain in young adults to reduce heart 
disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases.
    Pulmonary hypertension.--The Committee continues to view 
pulmonary hypertension research as a high priority and 
encourages NHLBI to support three to four Specialized Centers 
of Clinically Orientated Research (SCCOR) in pulmonary 
hypertension in fiscal year 2007.
    Sleep disorders.--The Committee is pleased that public and 
professional awareness on sleep will be a component of NHLBI's 
strategic planning process and encourages the institute to 
engage voluntary organizations throughout this process. The 
Committee continues to encourage the National Center on Sleep 
Disorders Research to partner with other federal agencies, such 
as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as 
voluntary health organizations to implement a sleep education 
and public awareness initiative using the roundtable model that 
has been successful for other institutes and Public Health 
Service agencies.

         NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL AND CRANIOFACIAL RESEARCH

    The Committee recommends $386,095,000 for the National 
Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), which is 
$3,241,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--The mission of NIDCR is to improve the Nation's 
oral, dental and craniofacial health through research, research 
training, and the dissemination of health information. NIDCR 
accomplishes its mission by performing and supporting basic and 
clinical research; conducting and funding research training and 
career development programs to ensure an adequate number of 
talented, well-prepared and diverse investigators; coordinating 
and assisting relevant research and research-related activities 
among all sectors of the research community; and promoting the 
timely transfer of knowledge gained from research and its 
implications for health to the public, health professionals, 
researchers, and policy-makers.
    Saliva.--The Committee is aware that research on saliva has 
progressed rapidly and holds the potential to be an inexpensive 
non-invasive diagnostic tool for early detection of breast 
cancer, osteoporosis, hepatitis, HIV, and Sjogren's disease. 
The Committee encourages NIDCR to work cooperatively with NCI 
and other appropriate institutes in pursuing research 
initiatives on the development of saliva as a diagnostic tool.

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES AND DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES

    The Committee recommends $1,694,298,000 for the National 
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases 
(NIDDK), which is $10,627,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request. In addition, 
$150,000,000 in mandatory funds are available for juvenile 
diabetes research at NIDDK.
    Mission.--NIDDK supports research in three major disease 
categories: diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases; 
digestive diseases and nutrition; and kidney, urologic, and 
hematologic diseases. NIDDK supports a coordinated program of 
fundamental and clinical research and demonstration projects 
relating to the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of 
diseases within these categories. The Institute also supports 
efforts to transfer the knowledge gained from its research 
program to health professionals, patients, and the general 
public.
    Action plan for liver disease research.--The Committee is 
pleased that the NIH Director approved a trans-NIH action plan 
for liver disease research in December 2005. The Committee 
applauds the NIDDK-led efforts to evaluate and critique 
progress being made in each of the sixteen research areas 
identified by the plan. The Committee looks forward to being 
kept informed as to the progress being made to implement the 
goals of the plan and continuing efforts by NIH to establish 
priorities within the framework of each individual research 
area and among the sixteen areas as a whole.
    Acute liver failure.--The Committee applauds the leadership 
of NIDDK to convene a meeting in December 2006 meeting to 
address the important issue of acute liver failure. The 
Committee encourages that attendance at the December 2006 
meeting be broad enough to determine what improvements can be 
made in the U.S. based on best practices in other countries.
    Biliary atresia.--The Committee is pleased that the number 
of Biliary Atresia Research Network Centers has increased from 
9 to 10 and that NIDDK, in conjunction with HRSA, will conduct 
a newborn screening conference in September 2006. This 
conference will permit a review and evaluation of best 
practices in other countries around the world. The Committee 
looks forward to being informed as to the results of the 
conference.
    Cooley's anemia.--The Committee continues to support the 
high quality research being conducted by NIDDK on such issues 
as iron chelation, non-invasive iron measurement, fetal 
hemoglobin, and other topics critical to improving the lives of 
Cooley's anemia patients. The development of a less burdensome 
means of iron chelation is urgently needed. In addition, the 
Committee encourages NIDDK to continue to work closely with 
NIBIB to develop and perfect non-invasive means of measuring 
iron.
    Cystic fibrosis.--The Committee commends NIDDK for awarding 
two new Cystic Fibrosis Research and Translational Centers. 
These new awards will facilitate better communication and 
collaboration at these centers on basic and clinical research 
to develop and test new therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF).
    The Committee also commends NIDDK for issuing a program 
announcement entitled, ``Targeting Diseases Caused by Protein 
Misfolding or Misprocessing.'' Awards for this research will 
greatly assist in the identification of products through 
screening that can correct the basic protein defect in cystic 
fibrosis (CF) and that may be developed as new CF treatments. 
The Committee encourages NIDDK to continue its support of CF 
research efforts, including protein misfolding, and to 
collaborate with other institutes to support research to 
further examine the agents that show promise in treating CF. 
The Committee also encourages NIDDK to continue to explore 
opportunities to support clinical research networks to 
accelerate therapeutic development.
    Digestive diseases.--Diseases of the digestive system 
continue to affect more than one-half of all Americans at some 
time in their lives. Serious disorders such as colorectal 
cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, 
hemochromatosis, celiac disease, and hepatitis take a 
tremendous toll in terms of human suffering, mortality, and 
economic burden. The Committee commends NIDDK on the success of 
its Digestive Disease Centers program in addressing a wide 
range of disorders that result in tremendous human suffering 
and economic cost. The Committee continues to encourage NIDDK 
to expand this important program with an increased emphasis on 
irritable bowel syndrome.
    Drug induced liver injury.--The Committee is aware of 
increased incidence of drug induced liver injury and encourages 
additional research focused on identifying the cause of this 
drug induced morbidity and recommendations for prevention.
    End stage renal disease (ESRD).--The Committee is concerned 
about the significant differences among minority groups in the 
incidence and prevalence of patients suffering from ESRD. The 
U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) reports that incidence rates for 
African-Americans for hemodialysis are more than quadruple that 
for white Americans, and rates for Native Americans and 
Hispanic-Americans are more than double those for white 
Americans; while transplant rates are highest in non-Hispanics. 
The Committee encourages NIDDK to take steps to ensure adequate 
inclusion of minority ESRD patients in the Comprehensive 
Dialysis Study and other relevant research so that such trends 
can be understood for their impact on these populations.
    Fatty liver disease.--The Committee notes that there is an 
emerging, obesity-related chronic liver disease that may affect 
as many as one in four adults and a significant number of obese 
children. This diagnosis encompasses a spectrum of severity 
with many cases evolving into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis 
(NASH) and, ultimately, cirrhosis. NASH-related liver disease 
has already become an important indicator for liver 
transplantation, and in the absence of better treatments, the 
need for NASH-related liver transplantation will increase 
significantly over time. The Committee is pleased that NIDDK is 
funding a fatty liver disease clinical trial that includes both 
adult and pediatric populations, and that NIH has generated a 
significant increase in highly competitive science and research 
focused on fatty liver disease.
    Glomerular disease research.--The Committee continues to be 
pleased with the work of NIDDK in the area of glomerular 
disease research, particularly as it relates to focal segmental 
glomerulosclerosis. The Committee commends NIDDK for conducting 
the recent Glomerular Disease Workshop in January of 2005, and 
encourages NIDDK to issue a specific program announcement or 
other appropriate mechanism to ensure the initiation of grant 
proposals, training positions, and other activities to expand 
the NIDDK portfolio in this important area of research. The 
Committee requests a report on progress made in this area by 
August 1, 2007.
    Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.--The Committee also 
is aware of wide geographic and ethnic variances in rates of 
hemodialysis, both center-based and home hemodialysis, as well 
as peritoneal dialysis, for patients suffering from End Stage 
Renal Disease (ESRD). The Committee understands that a large 
clinical trial involving hemodialysis is underway and 
encourages NIDDK to expand its research in this area to include 
peritoneal dialysis, or to develop a similar review for 
peritoneal dialysis that examines medical outcomes, quality of 
life, and clinical improvements for ESRD patients who choose 
this important and well-established therapy.
    Hemophilia and hepatitis C (HCV).--The Committee 
understands that hepatitis C continues to have a devastating 
impact on the hemophilia population, with nearly half of all 
persons with hemophilia having contracted HCV, and many of 
these individuals co-infected with HIV. The Committee 
encourages NIDDK to convene a panel of experts and develop a 
research agenda that would address issues related to co-
infection and the progression of liver disease in this 
population.
    Hepatitis B.--The Committee is aware that there are 
currently 1.25 million Americans chronically infected with 
hepatitis B, a disease that disproportionately affects Asian 
Americans. The Committee applauds the leadership of NIDDK in 
conducting an experts' conference in April 2006, and is aware 
that a significant number of new research opportunities have 
been identified. The Committee encourages continued research 
for hepatitis B. The Committee also encourages that a focus be 
placed on identifying best practices for treatment of hepatitis 
B and supports efforts to reduce the disproportionately high 
annual treatment costs. Additionally, the Committee encourages 
NIDDK to collaborate with CDC to develop a document to reach 
at-risk populations for intensive public health screening, 
outreach and testing campaigns.
    Incontinence.--Many otherwise healthy, active individuals 
suffer from incontinence. Fecal incontinence, also called bowel 
incontinence, affects people of all ages and is associated with 
a wide variety of causes. The Committee is pleased that NIDDK 
is collaborating with NICHD and the Office of Medical 
Applications of Research on the incontinence state-of-the-
science conference.
    Inflammatory bowel disease.--The Committee has been 
encouraged in recent years by discoveries related to Crohn's 
disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as 
inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These extremely complex 
disorders represent a major cause of morbidity from intestinal 
illness. The Committee commends NIDDK for its strong leadership 
in this area and continues to encourage the institute to 
increase funding for research focused on; (1) the cellular, 
molecular and genetic structure of IBD, (2) identification of 
the genes that determine susceptibility or resistance to IBD in 
various patient subgroups, and (3) translation of basic 
research findings into patient clinical trails as outlined in 
the research agenda developed by the scientific community 
entitled, ``Challenges in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.''
    The Committee also encourages NIDDK to continue to 
strengthen its partnership with the IBD community and increase 
support for its successful Digestive Disease Centers program 
with an emphasis on IBD.
    Finally, the Committee is aware that IBD manifests itself 
differently in children than it does in adults, highlighting 
the importance of pediatric-focused research if improved 
diagnostic and treatment tools are to be available. The 
scientific priorities identified by patients, physicians and 
professional societies include growth failure and bone disease; 
identification of the genes responsible for early onset IBD; 
and the relationship between children's immune system and IBD 
onset and treatment. As a next step, the Committee encourages 
NIDDK to conduct focused conferences on these priorities and 
develop research initiatives that will lead to a better 
understanding of the unique issues in pediatric IBD.
    Interstitial cystitis (IC).--Research on interstitial 
cystitis is still in its infancy and while there has been 
important progress in this area in the last decade, there is 
still very little known about the etiology and pathogenesis of 
the disease. The Committee encourages NIDDK to place emphasis 
on IC-specific funding in order to focus on the basic science 
of IC and to attract and sustain research in the field.
    The Committee is concerned about the lack of clarity 
surrounding the definition of IC. While the Committee 
recognizes that this is a complex challenge, NIDDK is 
encouraged to develop a research definition of IC to clarify 
the investigative questions and ensure that the research 
results are comparable and therefore, more meaningful. The 
Committee is concerned that studies of interstitial cystitis 
epidemiology are hamstrung by a lack of clarity and leadership 
in this area.
    The Committee is pleased that NIDDK worked closely with the 
IC Community to sponsor an international scientific symposium 
on IC. The Committee is also encouraged by NIDDK's efforts to 
elevate awareness of IC among providers and encourages NIDDK to 
work more closely with the interstitial cystitis patient 
community and CDC to utilize its resources and expertise 
effectively.
    Irritable bowel syndrome.--The Committee is pleased that 
NIDDK is formulating an action plan for digestive diseases 
through the National Commission on Digestive Diseases and that 
irritable bowel syndrome or IBS will be included. The Committee 
encourages NIDDK to expedite this plan.
    Living donor transplantation.--The Committee notes that 
approximately 9% of liver transplants in the adult population 
and 35% in the pediatric population are made possible due to 
living donations.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS).--The Committee is gratified by 
NIDDK's efforts to enhance research on MPS disorders. The 
Committee appreciates NIDDK's leadership and outreach to NIAMS 
in the interest of improving collaborative bone and joint 
disease research in MPS disorders. Research focused on the 
underlying pathophysiology of bone and joint lesions, the gene 
mutations and substrates that are stored, and potential 
therapeutic approaches continue to be of significant interest 
of the Committee. The Committee commends NIDDK on its 
accessibility to the affected community as well as its 
collaborations with NINDS, NICHD, NCRR, and ORD in advancing 
broad-based MPS-related research.
    Pediatric kidney disease.--Kidney disease is a major cause 
of illness and death in infants, children and adolescents. The 
increasing awareness that many diseases like diabetes and 
hypertension that lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-
stage renal disease (ESRD) in adults begin in childhood, 
demands that strategies to prevent kidney disease must begin 
early in life. The Committee recognizes the urgent need to 
better understand the pathogenesis of these conditions, and 
encourages NIDDK to continue to support research focused on the 
identification and study of genes and gene mutations that cause 
and increase the risk of progressive kidney disease. In 
addition, translational research aimed at clarifying the 
mechanisms underlying the genesis and evolution of kidney 
injury will help create targeted interventions to prevent, 
identify, and treat kideny disease in children. Specifically, 
the Committee recommends that emphasis be placed on research to 
determine how obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension 
contribute to the evolution of CKD, and what interventions may 
limit cardiovascular morbidity in patients with these disease.
    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD).--The Committee is pleased 
to learn that NIH-supported PKD research and partnerships with 
private organizations have rapidly led to multiple clinical 
drug trials in humans and to interdisciplinary blood pressure 
and heart studies to validate the advantage in slowing PKD 
disease progression. The Committee is encouraged that new 
innovative therapies may soon be developed to slow or reverse 
the progression of PKD. The Committee also recognizes the 
crucial role federal research funds played leading to the 
recent publication of data that improves measurement of disease 
progression and that dramatically reduces the number of 
patients needed to obtain valid results from clinical trials. 
The Committee recognizes the significant benefits emanating 
from the PKD Centers of Excellence in promoting 
interdisciplinary scientific research and developing 
alternative animal models and encourages NIDDK to support the 
efforts of the PKD Centers to the maximum extent possible. The 
Committee also encourages NIDDK to pursue fulfillment of the 
PKD Strategic Plan and long-range planning to facilitate PKD 
clinical trials and multidisciplinary research.

        NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKE

    The Committee recommends $1,524,750,000 for the National 
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), which 
is $10,007,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NINDS supports and conducts basic and clinical 
neurological research and research training to increase 
understanding of the brain and improve the prevention and 
treatment of neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The 
NINDS mission encompasses over 600 disorders, including stroke, 
head and spinal cord injury, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and 
neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
    Alzheimer's disease.--Research supported by NINDS continues 
to play an integral role in widening the scientific base of 
knowledge about Alzheimer's disease. In a study supported 
jointly by NINDS, NIA and the Alzheimer's Association, 
scientists found that administering lithium to genetically 
engineered mice reduced the accumulation of an abnormal protein 
that contributes to the degeneration of neurons in Alzheimer's 
disease. Further research will determine whether lithium could 
also reduce neuronal degeneration if administered before any 
significant structural abnormalities occur in neurons. The 
Committee encourages NINDS to continue to assign a high 
priority to its Alzheimer's research portfolio, and to continue 
to work closely with NIA and other institutes.
    Down syndrome.--As a follow-up to its successful Down 
syndrome workshop to address research priorities relating to 
the synaptic structure and function of neuronal circuits, NINDS 
is encouraged to issue program announcements related to its 
workshop findings. Specifically, the Committee encourages NINDS 
to support investigations relating to the genetic and cellular 
basis for abnormalities in the structure and function of 
neuronal circuits in both developing and mature nervous 
systems. NINDS is also encouraged to work with the Office of 
the Director, OPASI, and other institutes to develop a 
strategic plan for Down syndrome research and to coordinate all 
Down syndrome research within NIH. In anticipation of future 
clinical trials that will seek to measure accurately cognitive 
improvement in individuals with Down syndrome, the Committee 
further encourages NINDS to develop better measurement 
standards and a common data base that can be used generally for 
such trials.
    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).--The Committee is 
pleased that the Muscular Dystrophy Coordinating Committee 
(MDCC) has approved the Action Plan for the Muscular 
Dystrophies. While the Committee is glad a comprehensive final 
plan has been issued, there remain concerns that the plan does 
not adequately clarify which agencies are tasked with primary 
and secondary responsibilities for achieving each of the 76 
research objectives. The Committee requests that the MDCC 
identify, by February 1, 2007, the agencies and organizations 
with primary and secondary responsibilities for each thematic 
grouping of research objectives in the Action Plan for the 
Muscular Dystrophies. The Committee requests that NIH's annual 
report to Congress, authorized in the MD Care Act, include 
information detailing the NIH's current DMD research goals, the 
progress made toward goals, the total amount of money invested 
toward the goals, and projected spending on DMD research for 
the present and future fiscal year.
    The Committee encourages NINDS to partner with NIAMS and 
NHLBI to provide the funding needed to adequately support the 
research agenda at each of the six Wellstone Muscular Dystrophy 
Cooperative Research Centers.
    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DBMD) translational 
research.--The Committee is advised that NIH is working toward 
prioritizing opportunities for DBMD translational research 
projects and plans to convene a workshop examining DBMD 
translational opportunities later this year. The Committee is 
pleased with this development and requests that NIH--through 
NINDS, the MDCC, and the other relevant institutes--develop 
specific measurable milestones, including a timeline, needed to 
establish a DBMD Translational Research Initiative (TRI). This 
information should be included in the annual report to Congress 
authorized by the MD Care Act. The Committee encourages NIH to 
include representatives from the six MD Centers of Excellence 
in the process for establishing the DBMD TRI.
    Dystonia.--The Committee continues to support the expansion 
of research and treatment developments regarding dystonia. The 
Committee is pleased with progress made in expanding the 
dystonia research portfolio resulting from the joint dystonia 
research program announcement and understands that eleven new 
grants have been funded as a result of this initiative. The 
Committee commends NINDS on its sponsorship of the scientific 
workshop on dystonia planned for June 2006, and looks forward 
to initiatives based on this activity.
    Epilepsy.--Epilepsy remains a major, unsolved public health 
problem affecting the lives of millions of Americans and their 
families. The Committee encourages intensified efforts by the 
Institute to produce breakthroughs in the prevention, 
treatment, and eventual cure of epilepsy. The Committee 
applauds the development of benchmarks for epilepsy research 
resulting from the ``Curing Epilepsy: Focus on the Future'' 
conference held in March, 2000 and encourages the institute to 
address important research issues raised at the ``Living Well 
with Epilepsy II'' conference held in July, 2003. The Committee 
further encourages NINDS to continue to carry out its benchmark 
priorities, to develop plans and goals for the anti-epileptic 
drug development program, and to report to the Committee on its 
activities to further these important areas of research.
    Hypoglycemia.--Hypoglycemia or extremely low blood sugar is 
especially difficult to manage in young children with type 1 
diabetes but can quickly result in serious consequences such as 
cognitive impairment, nerve damage, seizure, coma, or death. 
NINDS is encouraged to foster research on understanding the 
biology of the brain and nervous system under conditions of low 
glucose, devising better glucose management technologies that 
reduce the risk of hypoglycemia, and develop new agents to 
protect patients from hypoglycemia-related nerve damage.
    Neurofibromatosis (NF).--Advances in NF research have 
linked NF to cancer, brain tumors, learning disabilities, 
memory loss and heart disease. The Committee encourages NINDS 
to expand its NF clinical, pre-clinical and basic research 
portfolios and to continue its efforts to accelerate the 
process of translational research. The Committee commends NINDS 
for its leadership role in NF research and in coordinating 
efforts with other institutes and government agencies engaged 
in NF research. The Committee encourages NINDS to continue its 
efforts in the creation, implementation and funding of NF pre-
clinical and clinical trials infrastructures, including NF 
centers, translational research, genetic and drug screening, 
training of new NF researchers, and clinical trials using 
existing and new drugs on NF patients. The Committee encourages 
NINDS to continue to coordinate its efforts with other 
appropriate institutes at NIH as well as other government 
agencies.
    Parkinson's disease.--The Committee supports the innovative 
multidisciplinary research and training concerning Parkinson's 
disease provided by the Morris K. Udall Parkinson's Disease 
Research Centers of Excellence. The Committee encourages NINDS 
to require that the Udall Centers include a significant 
clinical/translational component, in addition to ongoing basic 
research. The Committee encourages the Director to provide 
funding expeditiously at the conclusion of the neuroprotection 
trials (NET-PD) for phase III clinical trials of all the 
neuroprotection compounds that survive futility testing. The 
Committee requests that the Director report on funding for 
phase III trials three-months after the conclusion of each of 
the NET-PD trials. The Committee recognizes that continuation 
of promising research is an integral part of the strategic plan 
for future investments in Parkinson's research.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--SMA is the leading genetic 
killer of infants and toddlers. The Committee understands that 
the severity of the disease, its relatively high incidence, and 
the possibility of imminent treatments have led NINDS to 
execute the SMA Therapeutics Development Program. The Committee 
commends NINDS for this initiative and encourages NINDS to 
continue the project mission of identifying and completing 
preclinical research and development of drug candidate 
therapeutics for SMA in the coming year. More importantly, the 
Committee encourages NINDS to begin planning and budgeting for 
the necessary next stages of drug development. The Committee 
requests that NINDS provide a progress report on all aspects of 
SMA research by April 30, 2007.
    Stroke.--The Committee continues to place a high priority 
on stroke research and encourages NINDS to allocate resources 
to basic, clinical and translational research into stroke. The 
Committee encourages NINDS to continue implementing the long-
range strategic plan for stroke research and to continue 
efforts to improve stroke diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation 
and prevention.
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI).--The Committee encourages 
NINDS to build upon basic and translational research in brain 
injury rehabilitation at the National Center on Medical 
Rehabilitation and Research (NCMRR). NCMRR has awarded grants 
to eight bench science research centers and a data center to 
establish the cooperative multi-center traumatic brain injury 
clinical trials network. The Committee encourages NINDS to 
participate in supporting these centers and to support training 
grants for TBI researchers.

         NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    The Committee recommends $4,270,496,000 for the National 
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), which is 
$112,805,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and 
$125,000,000 below the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation does not include bill language requested by the 
Administration to permit the transfer of $100,000,000 to the 
global AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria fund. Instead, the 
Committee has recommended an increase of $130,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation for HRSA and CDC domestic HIV/
AIDS programs, and has provided $121,952,000 for global HIV/
AIDS activities at CDC. In addition, the Committee 
recommendation does not include bill language that would 
provide $25,000,000 for the construction of extramural 
facilities for research on infectious agents and 
countermeasures. The Committee understands that these funds are 
intended to support new facilities rather than completion of 
laboratories that are already partially constructed. Therefore, 
the Committee has provided the requested $25,000,000 to the 
National Center for Research Resources for open competition 
among all institutions rather than a competition specifically 
aimed at infectious agents.
    Mission.--NIAID supports and conducts basic and clinical 
research and research training programs in infectious diseases 
caused by, or associated with, disorders of the immune system. 
NIAID supported research includes research on AIDS, asthma and 
allergies, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, 
tropical diseases, and emerging microbes. The goals of NIAID 
research are to understand disease pathogenesis better, to 
improve disease diagnosis, to develop new and improved drugs to 
treat diseases, and to develop new and improved vaccines to 
prevent disease, many of which significantly affect public 
health.
    Asthma.--The Committee is pleased with NIAID's leadership 
regarding asthma research and management. The Committee 
encourages NIAID to continue to improve its focus and effort on 
asthma management, especially as it relates to children. The 
Committee also encourages NIAID to continue to support asthma 
prevention, treatment, and research activities.
    Coinfection research.--The Committee is concerned that 
there is growing evidence of liver toxicity of highly active 
antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in those with decompensated 
liver disease awaiting liver transplantation. There also 
appears to be an emerging problem of liver cancer in co-
infected patients (HCV and/or HBV with HIV). The Committee 
encourages NIAID to initiate research initiatives in both of 
these areas.
    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine development.--The Committee 
is pleased to learn that phase I of a small hepatitis vaccine 
human trial has been successfully completed and that phase II 
regarding efficacy is underway. The Committee expects to be 
kept informed on progress regarding the development of this 
vaccine and its potential application for intervening in the 
development of chronic disease among the population currently 
infected with the hepatitis C virus. The Committee is concerned 
with preliminary information that this vaccine candidate may 
not be universally effective against all genotypes of hepatitis 
C and therefore encourages the simultaneous development of 
other vaccine candidates against hepatitis C vaccine.
    Implementation of the transplantation research action 
plan.--The Committee is pleased that NIAID convened an experts 
conference and developed a five-year transplantation research 
action plan identifying the most urgently needed research to 
facilitate and increase in the success of organ 
transplantation. The Committee encourages an annual review of 
progress made in the various research areas identified by the 
plan with recommendations and appropriate follow up to enhance 
progress in promising, but low yielding areas of research 
specifically as they relate to organ donation, organ evaluation 
and organ transplantation.
    Inflammatory bowel disease.--The Committee continues to 
note with interest a scientific research agenda for Crohn's 
disease and ulcerative colitis (collectively known as 
inflammatory bowel disease) entitled ``Challenges in 
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).'' This report identifies 
strong linkages between the functions of the immune system and 
IBD. The Committee encourages the Institute to focus on: (1) 
the immunology of IBD and (2) the interaction of genetics and 
environmental factors in the development of the disease.
    Living donor transplantation.--The Committee recognizes 
that the transplantation of organs, tissues, and cells is a 
powerful mode of treatment for dozens of life-threatening 
diseases affecting millions of Americans. The Committee 
encourages NIAID's basic and clinical research programs in 
transplantation to focus efforts on the study of living donor 
transplantation to enhance success rates by reducing morbidity 
and mortality. Additionally the Committee requests to be 
informed on the institute's plans to initiate a cohort study to 
assess the health outcomes of living donors not only following 
the period immediately after the donation but for the quality 
of life implications for decades post donation.
    Meningococcal disease-serogroup B immunization research.--
Although the Committee recognizes that meningococcal disease is 
vaccine-preventable in most cases, approximately 30 percent of 
the deaths and disabilities from this bacterial infection are 
attributed to serogroup B, which is not vaccine-preventable. 
The Committee encourages NIAID to increase specific research 
efforts to develop an effective, low-cost vaccine against 
serogroup B that will help protect infants and adolescents in 
the near term.
    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI).--NIAID is the lead 
agency for research into bone marrow transplantation (BMT). 
Recently, the survival rate for severe combined immune 
deficiency (SCID) from related HLA-identical donors has 
resulted in a survival rate of over 90%. Unfortunately for most 
patients, there are no HLA identical donors. Alternative 
approaches using HLA-matched unrelated donors and HLA-
mismatched related donors have produced very promising results. 
These new approaches have been designed to eliminate graft 
versus host disease, and other complications. The Committee 
encourages NIAID to develop therapeutic approaches to treating 
SCID patients who require BMT. Advancements in BMT will benefit 
not only children with SCID, but persons with many other 
diseases (such as cancer, lupus, and HIV/AIDS) who rely on this 
therapy.
    Tuberculosis (TB).--The Committee is pleased with NIAID's 
efforts to develop an effective TB vaccine, and encourages 
expansion of work on this important initiative.

             NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF GENERAL MEDICAL SCIENCES

    The Committee recommends $1,923,481,000 for the National 
Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), which is 
$12,137,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NIGMS supports research and research training in 
the basic biomedical sciences. Institute grantees, working in 
such fields as cell biology, biophysics, genetics, 
developmental biology, pharmacology, physiology, biological 
chemistry, bioinformatics, and computational biology study 
normal biological processes to better understand what goes 
wrong when disease occurs. In this way, NIGMS supports the new 
knowledge, theories, and technologies that can then be applied 
to the disease-targeted studies supported by other NIH 
components. NIGMS-supported basic research advances also find 
applications in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical 
industries. The Institute's training programs help provide the 
scientists needed by industry and academia. NIGMS also has 
programs to increase the diversity of the biomedical workforce.
    Cystic fibrosis (CF).--The Committee encourages NIGMS to 
support methods for the creation of tools and reagents and 
advances in techniques for precision monitoring of folding and 
trafficking events and to encourage sharing of resulting data, 
especially in area of protein folding or imaging. These tools 
will support ongoing research efforts by other NIH institutes 
to screen molecules that may affect improper protein folding 
and trafficking, as well as efforts to develop therapies to 
correct this defect for CF and other diseases.
    Minority scientist training programs.--The Committee 
continues to be pleased with the quality of NIGMS's training 
programs, particularly those that have a special focus on 
increasing the number of minority scientists such as the 
Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) and Minority 
Biomedical Research Support (MBRS) programs. The Committee 
encourages NIGMS to continue to support these important 
initiatives, and is particularly pleased that NIGMS has 
supported biomedical career opportunity programs for high 
school and undergraduate college students in conjunction with 
historically black health professions schools. The Committee 
encourages continued, long-term support of this program.

        national institute of child health and human development

    The Committee recommends $1,257,418,000 for the National 
Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), which 
is $7,351,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--The NICHD conducts and supports laboratory and 
clinical research on the reproductive, developmental, and 
behavioral processes that determine and maintain the health and 
well-being of children, adults, families and populations. In 
addition, research in medical rehabilitation is supported.
    National Children's Study.--The Committee is very 
disappointed to see that the proposed elimination of funding 
for the National Children's Study is mentioned only in passing 
under the ``Items of Significant Interest'' section and nowhere 
else in the entirety of NIH's fiscal year 2007 justification 
material. The lack of discussion related to this significant 
termination, which has enjoyed bipartisan support in the House 
of Representatives, highlights a serious shortcoming in the 
justification materials--one the Committee expects will be 
remedied in the fiscal year 2008 submission and beyond. As a 
result, the Committee has included bill language directing 
NICHD to dedicate $69,000,000 from within funds provided to 
continue the National Children's Study, including funding all 
Vanguard Centers and any other activities that were planned for 
fiscal year 2007. If NIH wishes to request that Congress 
discontinue the study in future fiscal years, the Committee 
directs that a complete justification of the reasons for 
terminating the study accompany the budget request, rather than 
one sentence tucked away in response to prior year report 
language.
    Autism spectrum disorders.--The Committee is aware of 
research into the genetic basis of autism spectrum disorders 
and of NICHD's support for the High Risk Baby Sibling Autism 
Research Project (Baby SIBS) on the incidence of autism among 
children in the same families. Accordingly, the Committee 
encourages the Institute to enhance its support for the Baby 
SIBS project, and encourages the NICHD to enhance its work with 
and support for similar public-private partnerships. The 
Committee also encourages the Institute to enhance its autism 
research portfolio on gene-environment interactions.
    Best practices for planned vaginal birth.--The committee 
commends the NIH state-of-the-science panel for its work on 
cesarean section by maternal request, and notes that this panel 
called for ``increased research devoted to strategies to 
predict and influence the likelihood of successful vaginal 
birth, particularly in the first pregnancy'' and for future 
studies to ``determine whether there are modifiable factors in 
the management of labor that can decrease maternal and neonatal 
complications.'' Therefore the Committee encourages NICHD to 
develop a prospective study to compare optimal best practices 
for planned vaginal birth, measuring a broad range of physical 
and mental health outcomes appropriate to the sample size, 
including breastfeeding, attachment and other dimensions of the 
mother-baby relationship, secondary fertility, and the process 
and outcomes of subsequent pregnancies; and to support 
translational research to identify effective ways to bring best 
vaginal birth practices for healthy low-risk mothers into 
practice. The Committee further encourages NICHD to include the 
full range of health professionals involved with maternity care 
(midwives, obstetricians, family physicians, pediatricians, 
nurses, doulas) and social scientists in planning, 
implementation and reporting of this research.
    Demographic research.--The Committee commends NICHD for its 
impressive demographic research portfolio. Demographic research 
is essential for understanding the health, socioeconomic, and 
geographic implications of the rapidly changing U.S. 
population. The Committee encourages the Institute to invest in 
its demographic training programs to prepare the next 
generation of social scientists. Further, the Committee 
encourages the Institute, in a partnership with other Federal 
agencies, to continue supporting critical, accessible 
databases. Data from these resources and other studies 
supported by the NICHD Demographic and Behavioral Sciences 
Branch are key to informing programs and policies aimed at 
improving the health and productivity of the American people.
    Down syndrome.--NICHD is encouraged to partner with NINDS 
and other agencies to define additional mouse models needed to 
link important structural and functional abnormalities that 
underlie cognitive difficulties to the actions of specific 
genes and gene pathways.
    Drug safety for children.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of ensuring that drugs are safe and effective for 
use by children. The Committee supports continued 
implementation of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act of 
2002, which supports the pediatric testing of off-patent drugs, 
as well as on-patent drugs not being studied through existing 
mechanisms. In implementing this provision, NICHD should 
continue to act as coordinator for all other institutes within 
NIH for which pediatric pharmacological drug research may have 
therapeutic relevance, and in consultation with the Food and 
Drug Administration, develop study requests designed to yield 
improved pediatric labeling. In preparation for reauthorization 
of BPCA in 2007, the Committee requests NICHD to provide a 
report on the implementation process instituted, including the 
process for prioritizing drug studies; the number of pediatric 
studies supported to date both through the Research Fund and 
through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health 
(FNIH); the contributions of the individual NIH institutes to 
the studies; the estimated cost of each ongoing or proposed 
study; the nature and type of studies proposed or undertaken 
including whether any studies are comparative; the number of 
study requests referred to the FNIH after being declined by 
drug manufacturers and whether the number declined is 
increasing or decreasing annually; the estimated completion 
date of all proposed or ongoing studies; the patent status of 
the drugs studied; the number of drugs remaining on the 
priority list; and the key ethical, scientific, intellectual 
property, and operational issues that have arisen in the 
implementation of the program.
    Epilepsy.--Epilepsy often begins in childhood and can have 
potentially devastating effects. Even in its mildest forms, 
epilepsy can modify brain development and have lifelong effects 
on cognitive processes, employment and other quality of life 
measures. Recurring seizures are also common for children with 
autism, brain tumors, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, 
tuberous sclerosis and a variety of genetic syndromes and may 
dramatically add to the burden of these disorders. The 
Committee encourages the Institute to actively participate in 
the NINDS 2007 ``Curing Epilepsy'' conference to fully develop 
a research agenda related to epilepsy and children.
    Mental retardation/developmental disabilities research 
centers (MR/DDRC).--The Committee recognizes the outstanding 
contributions of MR/DDRCs toward understanding why child 
development goes awry, discovering ways to prevent 
developmental disabilities, and discovering treatments and 
interventions to improve the lives of people with developmental 
disabilities and their families. The Committee is particularly 
pleased with the MR/DDRC contributions in the areas of autism, 
fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome and other genetic and 
environmentally induced disorders. These centers have greatly 
improved our understanding of the causes of developmental 
disabilities. However, the Committee is concerned that the MR/
DDRC Centers do not have sufficient resources to sustain the 
progress made in this critical area. The Committee encourages 
NICHD to provide sufficient resources to the MR/DDRCs to 
maintain the level of support available for the fourteen 
centers that were in the network during 2005.
    Near-term births.--The Committee has learned that the 
preterm birth rate is now over 12 percent of all live births, 
and of these 75 percent are near term births. It is estimated 
that this group encompasses 40 percent of neonatal ICU 
admissions. These infants are at risk for sepsis, pneumonia, 
feeding difficulties, white matter damage, seizures, apnea, and 
remain at risk for higher morbidities in early infancy. The 
Committee encourages NICHD to support research in this area.
    Neurofibromatosis (NF).--Learning disabilities occur with 
high frequency in children with NF and in approximately five 
percent of the entire world's population. The Committee 
encourages NICHD to expand its NF research portfolio through 
all suitable mechanisms, including RFAs and clinical trials. 
The Committee further encourages NICHD to coordinate its 
efforts with other NIH institutes and government agencies.
    Obstetric systematic reviews.--The Committee applauds 
NICHD's efforts supporting the Neonatal Cochrane Review Group 
since 1995 that not only provides a substantial scientific 
resource but also allows the community access to these reviews 
via the NICHD website. These reviews are a valuable resource, 
providing the most comprehensive and timely review of clinical 
topics. The Committee encourages NICHD to provide a similar 
service to the obstetrical community by supporting obstetric 
systematic reviews and providing them free of cost to the 
general public, a critical gap in the medical community.
    Preterm birth.--The Committee commends NICHD for its 
commitment to reducing the incidence of premature birth and its 
consequences through its longstanding support for the Maternal-
Fetal Medicine Unit and the Neonatal Research Network, as well 
as the new Genomics and Proteomics Network for Premature Birth 
Research. The Committee is pleased that NICHD is one of the 
sponsors of an Institute of Medicine study to define and 
address the health related and economic consequences of 
premature birth and looks forward to publication of the 
recommendations. The Committee encourages NICHD to expand its 
research on the causes of preterm labor and delivery and 
improving the care and treatment of preterm and low birthweight 
infants, to work with the Office of the NIH Director to develop 
a strategic plan for research, and to coordinate its research 
with other institutes.
    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI).--The Committee is 
pleased with NICHD's dedication of financial and personnel 
resources to physician education and public awareness programs. 
The Committee is encouraged by the institute's commitment to 
develop newborn screening procedures for PI, particularly 
various forms of SCID, utilizing microarray technologies. The 
Committee encourages NICHD to move ahead with this initiative 
in partnership with the Foundation, other NIH institutes and 
private industry.
    Pulmonary rehabilitation.--Pulmonary rehabilitation has 
been increasingly recognized as an important treatment option 
for the many patients with disabling chronic lung diseases, 
like COPD. The Committee encourages the National Center for 
Medical Rehabilitation Research to expand research 
opportunities in this area.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--SMA is the leading genetic 
killer of infants and toddlers, and is the most prevalent 
genetic motor neuron disease. The severity of the disease, its 
relatively high incidence, and the possibility of imminent 
treatments led NINDS to initiate the innovative SMA project. 
The Committee encourages NICHD to continue to formulate a plan 
for expanding its work and funding for SMA research. 
Specifically, the Committee encourages NICHD to coordinate 
funding with NINDS to ensure increased participation of 
investigators in SMA and developmental neurobiology relevant to 
SMA. Further, the Committee encourages NICHD to take the lead 
on developing a cross-institute working group comprised of 
NICHD, NINDS and NIGMS to study broader questions of care and 
the role of exercise and nutrition on SMA and other 
neuromuscular disease.
    Stillbirth.--The Committee applauds NICHD's efforts in 
addressing stillbirth, a major public health issue. The 
Committee is aware that NICHD cooperative network has initiated 
a pilot study with the overall study using a standard protocol 
planned to start this year, and encourages NICHD to continue to 
support this effort.

                         national eye institute

    The Committee recommends $661,358,000 for the National Eye 
Institute (NEI), which is $5,398,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NEI conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research, research training, and other programs with respect to 
blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual 
function, preservation of sight, and the special health 
problems and needs of individuals who are visually-impaired or 
blind. In addition, NEI is responsible for the dissemination of 
information, specifically public and professional education 
programs aimed at the prevention of blindness.
    Diabetic eye disease.--The Committee applauds NEI for the 
collaborative efforts of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical 
Research Network to test innovative treatment for diabetic eye 
disease. The Institute is encouraged to expand and extend the 
network by increasing the number of clinical trials with new 
drugs and therapeutics that can reverse or prevent diabetic 
retinopathy.

          national institute of environmental health sciences

    The Committee recommends $637,323,000 for the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS), which is 
$3,809,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--The mission of NIEHS is to prevent disease and 
improve human health by using environmental sciences to 
understand human biology and disease. This mission is achieved 
through conducting and supporting disease-oriented biomedical 
research (basic, integrative, clinical, and epidemiologic), 
enhancing research capacity in environmental health sciences, 
prevention and intervention strategies, and communication with 
researchers, public health and health care providers, and the 
public.
    Asthma.--Given the link between environmental factors and 
the onset of asthma, COPD, and pulmonary fibrosis, the 
Committee encourages NIEHS to further develop research 
initiatives to understand the environmental and genetic risk 
factors for predisposing some individuals to and in controlling 
the severity of these lung diseases.
    Autism spectrum disorders.--The Committee is aware of the 
important research into the genetic and environmental basis of 
autism spectrum disorders. Accordingly, the Committee 
encourages the Institute to expand its support and funding for 
gene-environment interaction research in autism, and encourages 
the institute to expand its work with and support for similar 
public-private partnerships.
    Mercury.--In order to properly research gaps in the area of 
mercury exposure and brain chemistry, and given recent hearings 
on mercury exposure and relationships between autism and 
Alzheimer's disease and mercury exposure, NIEHS is encouraged 
to pursue studies of how inorganic mercury and organic mercury 
compounds (including ethyl, methyl, and other forms of mercury 
from all sources) are processed in the bodies of children and 
adults. NIEHS is also encouraged to support studies of the 
toxic effects of inorganic mercury and organic mercury 
compounds on the nervous systems of young children, adults, and 
the elderly and methods of properly removing mercury and 
mercury-containing compounds from the brains of affected 
humans.
    National Toxicology Program Interagency Center for the 
Evaluation of Alternative Methods/Interagency Coordinating 
Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (NICEATM/
ICCVAM).--The Committee commends the NICEATM/ICCVAM for its 
leadership role in the assessment of new, revised and 
alternative scientifically validated methods for the federal 
government. The Committee also commends the National Toxicology 
Program (NTP) for finalizing its ``Roadmap to Achieve the NTP 
Vision, A Toxicology Program for the 21st Century'', which 
commits to ``develop and validate improved testing methods and, 
where feasible, ensure that they reduce, refine or replace the 
use of animals'' as one of its top four goals.
    The Committee requests that the NICEATM/ICCVAM, in 
partnership with the relevant federal agency program offices 
and the NTP, build on the NTP Roadmap to create a five-year 
plan to research, develop, translate and validate new and 
revised non-animal and other alternative assays for integration 
of relevant and reliable methods into the federal agency 
testing programs. In this five-year plan the Committee expects 
that federal agency program offices will identify areas of high 
priority for new and revised non-animal and alternative assays 
or batteries of those assays to create a path forward for the 
replacement, reduction and refinement of animal tests, when 
this is scientifically valid and appropriate. The Committee 
requests the plan by November 15, 2007. Furthermore, the 
Committee expects that the cost of assembling this plan will 
not reduce the NICEATM/ICCVAM funding base.
    Parkinson's disease (PD).--The Committee commends the NIEHS 
on the work of its Collaborative Centers for Parkinson's 
Disease Environmental Research (CCPDER) Consortium Program to 
foster multidisciplinary research approaches to discover gene-
environment interactions in PD. The Committee encourages NIEHS 
to work in conjunction with other NIH institutes and CDC, as 
necessary, to investigate and submit a report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations, on the incidence of 
Parkinson's disease, including age, occupation, and geographic 
population clusters, and related environmental factors relating 
to the disease. The Committee requests the report by June 30, 
2007.
    Toxic exposure and brain development.--Notwithstanding the 
Institute of Medicine May 2004 report on autism, the Committee 
believes it is important to develop a more complete 
understanding of the impact that toxic exposures may have on 
brain development. There is a convergence of findings from 
tissue culture studies, animal models, and clinical studies of 
immune dysfunction in children with autism and other 
neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) that suggests a biological 
link between genetic sensitivity and damage to developing 
brains from certain toxins. It is important that NIH continue 
this research to better understand the impact that exposures to 
mercury (including thimerosal) and other toxins have on brain 
development. A more complete understanding of the impact of 
these exposures through research, including animal models, will 
help to develop more effective interventions.

                      NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING

    The Committee recommends $1,039,828,000 for the National 
Institute on Aging (NIA), which is $6,803,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NIA supports and conducts biomedical, social and 
behavioral research, training, and health information 
dissemination with respect to the aging process and the 
diseases and other special problems and needs of older 
Americans.
    Alzheimer's disease.--The Committee continues to regard 
Alzheimer's disease as a high research priority for the 
Institute, which is encouraged to enhance its investment in 
Alzheimer's disease research, placing special emphasis on 
expediting the translation of research findings into effective 
treatments and prevention strategies for at-risk individuals.
    Bone strength.--The Committee has learned that although 
bone mineral density has been a useful predictor of 
susceptibility to fracture, other properties of the skeleton 
contribute to bone strength, including exercise and mechanisms 
of biomineralization. However, little is understood as to how 
these properties assist in the maintenance of bone strength. 
The Committee encourages NIA, in collaboration with NIAMS, 
NIBIB, NICHD, and NHLB to support research that will achieve 
identification of these parameters and lead to better 
prediction for prevention and treatment of bone diseases such 
as osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, bone loss due to 
kidney disease, and heart attacks due to hardening of the 
arteries.
    Demographic and economic research.--The Committee commends 
NIA for supporting exceptional demographic and economic 
research on the implications of population aging. The Committee 
encourages the Institute to continue supporting the Health and 
Retirement Study (HRS)--an important resource policymakers rely 
on to help inform potential changes to the Social Security and 
Medicare programs. The Committee applauds the Institute for 
proactively reviewing its data collection activities and looks 
forward to learning more about the outcome of this review and 
how the future of major surveys, such as the HRS and the 
National Long-Term Care Survey, may be affected.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee commends NIA for its support 
of studies to examine the cellular, molecular and genetic bases 
for age-related neuropathological and cognitive abnormalities 
in people with Down syndrome. The Committee encourages NIA to 
further examine these abnormalities and to devise new methods 
for diagnosing and treating them. Given that all people with 
Down syndrome develop the neuropathological changes of 
Alzheimer's disease, and that many or most go on to suffer 
dementia, NIA is further encouraged to consider how studies of 
the Down syndrome population might enhance the ability to 
understand, diagnose and treat Alzheimer's disease.
    Edward R. Roybal Research Centers on Applied Genontology.--
The Committee supports the Edward R. Roybal Research Centers on 
Applied Gerontology, which are designed to move promising 
social and behavioral basic research findings out of the 
laboratory and into programs, practices, and policies that will 
improve the lives of older people and the capacity of society 
to adapt to societal aging. The Committee encourages NIA to 
expand the numbers of centers, to develop new topics for 
research especially in the area of diversity and ethnic and 
minority communities, and to provide opportunities for 
collaborative, interdisciplinary research between the Roybal 
Centers and other program initiatives such as the Resource 
Centers for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR) and the Demographic 
Centers.
    Epilepsy.--Epidemiologic studies now show that the 
incidence of epilepsy increases in old age, often in 
association with stroke, cardiovascular disease, brain tumors 
and Alzheimer's disease. The Committee encourages NIA, working 
with NINDS, to carry out research to better understand why 
epilepsy frequently develops in association with diseases of 
the elderly and to develop therapies to prevent the occurrence 
of epilepsy in the elderly and diminish its consequences. The 
Committee also encourages NIA to actively participate in NINDS 
2007 ``Curing Epilepsy'' conference to further develop a 
research agenda related to epilepsy and the elderly.

 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ARTHRITIS AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND SKIN DISEASES

    The Committee recommends $504,533,000 for the National 
Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases 
(NIAMS), which is $3,399,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NIAMS conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research and research training, and the dissemination of health 
information on the more than 100 forms of arthritis; 
osteoporosis and other bone diseases; muscle biology and muscle 
diseases; orthopedic disorders, such as back pain and sports 
injuries; and numerous skin diseases.
    Burden of skin diseases.--The Committee notes the 
relationship between the recent Burden of Skin Diseases report 
and the September 2002 workshop on the burden of skin diseases 
sponsored by NIAMS. The committee continues to encourage NIAMS 
to expand the research portfolio on skin disease and develop 
partnerships with the skin disease research community to 
address the recognized challenges and future research 
endeavors.
    Congenic and genetic disease of bone.--The Committee is 
aware that thousands of children and adolescents nationwide 
suffer from musculoskeletal disorders and malformations. 
Diseases such as osteogenesis imperfecta, fibrous dysplasia, 
osteopetrosis, and Paget's disease are caused by poorly 
understood genetic mutations. In Paget's disease, underlying 
genetic defects can also be exacerbated by environmental 
factors. The Committee encourages NIAMS and NICHD to support 
research focusing on mechanisms of preventing fractures and 
improving bone quality and correcting malformations, on 
innovations in surgical and non-surgical approaches to 
treatment, on physical factors that affect growth, and on 
genetic defects that cause bone disease.
    Lupus.--The Committee is aware that despite numerous 
important research advances, few new therapies are available to 
patients with lupus. Treatment with steroids, anti-inflammatory 
agents and immunosuppressive medications may be palliative but 
these medications have numerous side effects and may become 
less effective over time. Advances in the identification of 
lupus susceptibility genes and biomarkers make it imperative 
that a sustained effort be made to translate these research 
advances into clinically relevant treatments. The Committee 
encourages the Institute to develop focused programs designed 
to move research advances beyond the laboratory.
    Marfan syndrome.--The Committee commends NIAMS and its 
collaborative efforts with other institutes to provide vital 
research on Marfan syndrome, a life-threatening, progressive 
and degenerative genetic disorder which is characterized by 
aortic aneurysms, orthopedic disabilities and ocular 
manifestations. Management of the syndrome by complicated 
aortic surgery is extending the life span of many. However, it 
has introduced a new generation of people with debilitating 
painful orthopedic issues such as early-onset arthritis, back 
pain and headaches due to dural ectasia and joint, leg and foot 
pain. Basic, translational and clinical research including the 
natural history of skeletal problems in this area is needed to 
investigate the underlying causes of these manifestations and 
to investigate therapeutic choices. This research is essential 
to improve the quality of life of those suffering from Marfan 
syndrome. The Committee encourages NIAMS to support research in 
this area through all available mechanisms, as appropriate.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS).--The Committee encourages the 
NIAMS to support and work collaboratively with NIDDK in an 
effort to achieve a greater understanding of bone and joint 
lesions in MPS disorders. The Committee supports meaningful 
NIAMS involvement with other institutes in research that 
specifically addresses the underlying pathophysiology of bone 
and joint lesions, the gene mutations and substrates that are 
stored, and potential therapeutic approaches to treating these 
debilitating aspects of MPS and related disorders. The 
Committee encourages NIAMS to work with participating NIH 
institutes and the MPS academic and patient advocate community 
to support and focus efforts in this area of study that can be 
particularly beneficial to patients.
    Osteoporosis.--The Committee is aware that osteoporosis is 
becoming widespread in all ages of our population. The 
Committee encourages NIAMS to collaborate with other institutes 
to support research into the pathophysiology of bone loss in 
varied populations and in targeted therapies to improve bone 
density and bone quality according to the etiology of 
osteoporosis. Furthermore, the Committee encourages research to 
identify patients at risk for fracture who do not meet current 
criteria for osteoporosis, as well as to study the effects of 
available and developing osteoporosis treatments on the 
reduction of fracture risk in these patients.

    NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

    The Committee recommends $391,556,000 for the National 
Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 
(NIDCD), which is $1,902,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NIDCD funds and conducts research in human 
communication. Included in its program areas are research and 
research training in the normal and disordered mechanisms of 
hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. The 
Institute addresses special biomedical and behavioral problems 
associated with people who have communication impairments or 
disorders. In addition, NIDCD is actively involved in health 
promotion and disease prevention, dissemination of research 
results, and supports efforts to create devices that substitute 
for lost and impaired sensory and communication functions.

                 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NURSING RESEARCH

    The Committee recommends $136,550,000 for the National 
Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), which is $792,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request.
    Mission.--NINR supports and conducts scientific research 
and research training to reduce the burden of illness and 
disability; improve health-related quality of life; and 
establish better approaches to promote health and prevent 
disease.
    Behavioral research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of behavioral research in preventing and treating 
disease. While understanding the biological basis of disease is 
essential, behavioral factors have a critical influence on the 
onset, course, and duration of disease and in the successful 
management of many disease conditions. The Committee encourages 
NINR to support behavioral research, including research that 
examines the interactions of biological and behavioral factors 
and their effect on treatment and prevention.
    Eliminating health disparities.--Health disparities, 
whether in race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status, continue 
to be of concern to the Committee. Reducing and ultimately 
eliminating health disparities is a critical priority for all 
areas of healthcare research. The Committee encourages NINR to 
fund research into the causes of health disparities and into 
new ways to overcome such disparities. Developing new nurse 
scientists from underserved populations will prove valuable for 
encouraging new health disparities research.
    End of life research.--The Committee recognizes that 
improving the care of terminally ill patients and their loved 
ones at the end of life is an urgent public health need, 
especially in view of the increasing numbers of older 
Americans; and that additional research is needed in improving 
palliative care, improving patient/clinician communication, and 
reducing caregiver burden. The Committee appreciates NINR's 
leadership in promoting end-of-life research and encourages the 
institute's continued focus in this area.
    Research training.--Increasing the number of new nurse 
scientists is critical for advancing nursing research, 
especially in light of the ongoing nursing shortage. Innovative 
strategies for recruiting and training new researchers are 
needed. The Committee encourages NINR to support training 
programs that will develop the next generation of nurse 
scientists, especially those with multidisciplinary research 
skills and those from underserved populations.

           NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM

    The Committee recommends $433,318,000 for the National 
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), which is 
$2,612,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NIAAA supports research to generate new knowledge 
to answer crucial questions about why people drink; why some 
individuals are vulnerable to alcohol dependence or alcohol-
related diseases and others are not; the relationship of 
genetic and environmental factors involved in alcoholism; the 
mechanisms whereby alcohol produces its disabling effects, 
including organ damage; how to prevent alcohol abuse and 
associated damage, especially in the underage population; and 
how alcoholism treatment can be improved. NIAAA addresses these 
questions through a program of biomedical, behavioral, and 
epidemiologic research on alcoholism, alcohol abuse, and 
related problems.
    Underage drinking.--The Committee is aware of new NIAAA-
funded research findings suggesting that exposure to alcohol 
advertising increases the likelihood that young people will 
drink and drink heavily. The Committee encourages NIAAA to 
engage in additional study of alcohol advertising issues as an 
underage drinking prevention research priority, and encourages 
this research to include data on youth brand and beverage 
preferences.

                    NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE

    The Committee recommends $994,829,000 for the National 
Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), which is $5,200,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request.
    Mission.--NIDA-supported science addresses questions about 
drug abuse and addiction, which range from its causes and 
consequences to its prevention and treatment. NIDA research 
explores how drugs of abuse affect the brain and behavior and 
develops effective prevention and treatment strategies; the 
Institute works to ensure the transfer of scientific data to 
policy makers, practitioners, and the public.
    Adolescent brain development.--The Committee notes 
neuroimaging research by NIDA and others showing that the human 
brain does not fully develop until about age 25. This adds to 
the rationale for referring to addiction as a ``developmental 
disease.'' The Committee encourages NIDA to continue its 
emphasis on adolescent brain development to better understand 
how developmental processes and outcomes are affected by drug 
exposure, the environment and genetics.
    Drug treatment in criminal justice setting.--The Committee 
is very concerned about the well-known connections between drug 
use and crime. Research continues to demonstrate that providing 
treatment to individuals involved in the criminal justice 
system significantly decreases future drug use and criminal 
behavior, while improving social functioning. The Committee 
supports NIDA's efforts in this area, particularly the Criminal 
Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS).
    HIV/AIDS.--The Committee understands that one of the most 
significant causes of HIV virus acquisition and transmission is 
drug taking practices and related risk factors in different 
populations. Drug abuse prevention and treatment interventions 
can be very effective in reducing HIV risk. The Committee 
commends NIDA on its ``Drug Abuse and HIV--Learn the Link'' 
public awareness campaign, targeting young people, and 
encourages the Institute to continue supporting research that 
focuses on developing and testing drug-abuse related 
interventions designed to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS.
    Reducing health disparities.--The Committee notes that the 
consequences of drug abuse disproportionately impact 
minorities, especially African American populations. The 
Committee is pleased to learn that NIDA is encouraging 
researchers to conduct more studies in this population and to 
target studies in geographic areas where HIV/AIDS is high and/
or growing among African Americans, including in criminal 
justice settings.
    Reducing prescription drug abuse.--The Committee notes the 
continued increases in the numbers of people, especially young 
people, who use prescription drugs for non-medical purposes. 
The Committee is particularly concerned about the inappropriate 
use of opiod analgesics--very powerful pain medications. The 
Committee commends NIDA for its research focus in this area, 
and for the new Prescription Opioid Use and Abuse in the 
Treatment of Pain initiative. Research targeting a reduction in 
prescription drug abuse, particularly among our nation's youth, 
should continue to be a priority for NIDA.
    Translating research to communities.--The Committee 
commends NIDA for its outreach and work with State substance 
abuse authorities to reduce the current 15-to-20-year lag 
between the discovery of an effective treatment intervention 
and its availability at the community level. In particular, the 
Committee applauds NIDA for continuing its work with SAMHSA to 
strengthen State agencies' capacity to support and engage in 
research that will foster statewide adoption of meritorious 
science-based policies and practices. The Committee encourages 
NIDA to continue collaborative work with states to ensure the 
research findings are relevant and adaptable by state substance 
abuse systems.

                  NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH

    The Committee recommends $1,394,806,000 for the National 
Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which is $8,709,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request.
    Mission.--NIMH is responsible for research activities that 
seek to improve diagnosis, treatments, and overall quality of 
care for persons with mental illnesses. Disorders of high 
priority to NIMH include schizophrenia, depression and manic 
depressive illness, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety 
disorders and other mental and behavioral disorders that occur 
across the lifespan; these include childhood mental disorders 
such as autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; 
eating disorders; and other illnesses. NIMH supports and 
conducts fundamental research in neuroscience, genetics, and 
behavioral science. In addition to laboratory and controlled 
clinical studies, the NIMH supports research on the mental 
health needs of special populations and health services 
research.
    Adolescent depression and suicide.--Depressive disorders--
one of the major risk factors for suicide--continue to be very 
common in adolescence. The Committee is pleased to note that 
NIMH, in partnership with NIDA and NIAAA, is supporting three 
research centers whose primary focus is on new trials to reduce 
adolescent suicide, which now accounts for 13 percent of all 
adolescent deaths and ranks third as a cause of death among 
teenagers. The Committee therefore encourages NIMH to continue 
this investment in finding ways to better identify the risk 
factors in children and adolescents, and examining the outcomes 
of actions taken to assist those found to be at risk.
    Alzheimer's disease.--NIMH continues to play an important 
part in efforts to develop effective treatment strategies for 
Alzheimer's disease. The Institute is currently supporting 
research examining various aspects of the pathophysiology and 
genetics of Alzheimer's disease, and studies examining 
behavioral, emotional and psychiatric symptoms associated with 
the disorder and their treatment. The Committee encourages NIMH 
to continue to assign a high priority to this research.
    Disaster relief.--The Committee encourages NIMH to consider 
supporting the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) 
mental health consortium to serve as a clearinghouse for 
responding to the mental health needs of the poor and 
underserved immediately following a disaster.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee encourages NIMH to develop 
new strategies for cataloging, understanding, diagnosing and 
treating behavioral disorders that are common in people with 
Down syndrome, including autism, pervasive developmental 
disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression and 
psychosis. The Committee encourages NIMH to coordinate its 
research on Down syndrome with NICHD, NINDS, NIA and other 
institutes.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee applauds the NIMH for its recent 
RFA on the etiology and treatment of comorbid mental and 
neurologic disorders. Studies looking at the connections 
between epilepsy and depression as well as the cognitive burden 
of epilepsy are of particular importance and relevance to this 
initiative. The Committee encourages NIMH to actively 
participate in the NINDS 2007 ``Curing Epilepsy'' conference 
and to continue to advance research related to epilepsy and 
mental health.
    Mental health for older Americans.--The Committee is aware 
that demographics will demand a greatly increased focus on 
mental disorders in older persons and commends NIMH for 
recently recognizing the need to place higher priority on the 
mental health needs of that population. The Committee 
encourages the Institute to follow through on the 2004 
recommendations promulgated by the NIMH Aging Research 
Workgroup and the restructuring of the Adult and Geriatric 
Treatment and Preventive Intervention Research Branch. However, 
the Committee believes it is critical that studies related to 
the elderly keep pace with the rapid growth of this cohort. 
Despite the recent internal reorganization to focus 
intervention efforts on the aging population, the Committee 
encourages NIMH to continue to emphasize research on adults 
over age 65 to reflect the growth in numbers of this 
population, particularly in light of the public health 
consequences of an inadequate knowledge base about late-life 
mental illness. A correlating issue is the need for greater 
numbers of investigators focused on late-life mental health 
research. Therefore, the Committee encourages NIMH to expand 
research in this area, including issues relating to 
neurodegenerative disorders, and to provide adequate resources 
to advance the geriatric mental health research agenda. The 
Committee encourages NIMH to continue its commitment to 
research on late-life mental illness as a means to act as a 
catalyst for investigators to focus on this critical area of 
research.
    Minority training.--The Committee is disappointed to learn 
that NIMH intends to reduce its commitment to training minority 
scientists through the Minority Fellowship Program and the 
Career Opportunities in Research Program. Both of these 
programs have demonstrated success in training biomedical and 
behavioral scientists who are addressing critical ethnic 
minority mental health issues. The Minority Fellowship Program 
in particular has been an important national program that has 
provided access to training to all, without regional or 
university-specific restrictions. The Committee encourages NIMH 
to continue to fund programs to meet the demands for research 
on disparities in mental disorders.
    Parkinson's disease.--The Committee encourages continued 
collaborations including additional intramural activities 
between NINDS, NIMH, and NIA to enhance understanding of the 
important psychiatric component of neurodegenerative diseases, 
particularly Parkinson's.
    Psoriasis.--Psoriasis is associated with elevated rates of 
mental disability, depression and suicidal ideation. The 
Committee encourages NIMH to conduct research into the mental 
health aspects of psoriasis, especially as it relates to 
quality of life and burden of the disease. Furthermore, a 2005 
study of 44 autoimmune diseases found that only psoriasis, when 
present in women around the time of pregnancy, was 
significantly associated with autism, doubling the risk of 
autism spectrum disorder in their children. The Committee 
encourages NIMH to support further study of the link between 
psoriasis and autism.

                NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    The Committee recommends $482,942,000 for the National 
Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), which is $3,107,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the 
budget request.
    Mission.--NHGRI coordinates extramural and intramural 
research, as well as research training, in the areas of 
genomics and genetics. The Division of Extramural Research 
supports research on sequence and function of both human and 
non-human genomes, human genetic variation, technology 
development for genome research, database management and 
analysis, and research on the ethical, legal, and social 
implications of human genome research. The Division of 
Intramural Research focuses on applying the tools and 
technologies of the successful Human Genome Project to 
understanding the genetic and environmental basis of disease, 
and developing DNA-based diagnostics and gene-based therapies.
    Cancer genome.--The Committee commends NHGRI and NCI for 
jointly launching the pilot phase of the Cancer Genome Atlas 
(TCGA). This important new effort will accelerate the 
understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the 
application of genome analysis technologies, including large-
scale genome sequencing. Using technologies developed by the 
Human Genome Project and recent advances in applying genetic 
information to improve cancer diagnosis and treatment, this 
effort should lead to new tests to detect cancer in its early, 
most treatable stages; new ways to predict which cancers will 
respond to which treatments; new therapies to target cancer at 
its most vulnerable points; and, ultimately, new strategies to 
prevent cancer.
    Genes and environment.--The Committee commends NIH and the 
Foundation for the NIH (FNIH) for initiating the Genetic 
Association Information Network (GAIN), a public-private 
partnership using genetic analysis of existing case-control 
studies to identify the genetic roots of common illnesses. The 
Committee also commends NIH for building on the momentum of 
GAIN to advance the trans-NIH and DHHS Genes, Environment and 
Health Initiative (GEI), beginning in fiscal year 2007. This 
new research effort combines genetic analysis and environmental 
technology development to understand the causes of common 
diseases such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, stroke, cancer, asthma, 
and heart disease. The Committee encourages NHGRI to work with 
the NIEHS on this important project. The Committee also 
encourages NHGRI to follow up on the working group 
recommendations on a ``Population-Based Cohort Study to 
Determine the Relationships among Genes, Environment, and 
Health.'' This kind of prospective cohort study of a large 
sample of Americans could provide a valuable complement to the 
work of GAIN and GEI.
    Liver disease.--The Committee encourages NHGRI to focus on 
the genetic component of biliary atresia and other liver 
diseases with a significant identified genetic component.
    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI).--The Committee 
commends NHGRI for its outstanding work in creating a 
collaboration to develop a newborn screening test for X-linked 
SCID, the most severe form of primary immunodeficiency. The 
Committee looks forward to learning of the results of this 
effort and encourages further use of this model of public-
private partnerships.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--The Committee is aware that 
SMA carrier testing is available to help persons of 
childbearing age make more informed reproductive decisions with 
regard to the risk of SMA in their offspring. The Committee 
encourages NHGRI to develop a pilot program to assess the 
optimal practices for delivery of population-based screening 
for SMA carriers.

      NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF BIOMEDICAL IMAGING AND BIOENGINEERING

    The Committee recommends $294,850,000 for the National 
Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), 
which is $1,960,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation 
and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--The NIBIB mission is to improve human health by 
leading the development and accelerating the application of 
biomedical technologies. The Institute is committed to 
integrating the engineering and physical sciences with the life 
sciences to advance basic research and medical care.
    Liver tissue engineering.--The Committee encourages NIBIB 
to focus efforts on expanding the Tissue Engineering Program to 
examine how the development and function of engineered tissues 
and organs can improve treatment techniques for patients 
afflicted with liver disease.
    Liver imaging techniques.--Consistent with NIBIB's mission 
to improve all diagnostic imaging technologies, the Committee 
encourages NIBIB to continue to make liver imaging techniques a 
primary focus, speeding the development of new modalities that 
better capture the early stages of various liver diseases, 
including cancer, as well as offering the potential for less 
invasive combinations of diagnosis and treatment and the 
evaluation of livers from cadaver donors. The Committee 
encourages NIBIB to participate actively in trans-NIH 
initiatives that address these priorities.
    Technological competitiveness.--As the institute charged 
with developing new technologies with broad applications to 
virtually all of the diseases and organ systems that constitute 
the missions of the other NIH institutes, NIBIB can play a key 
role in strengthening U.S. technological competitiveness. The 
leadership of NIBIB in supporting research at the interface of 
the physical and life sciences is especially important in light 
of the President's proposal to increase our investment 
significantly in basic research in the physical sciences. NIH 
is responsible for more than 50 percent of total federal 
spending for basic scientific research and thus can contribute 
substantially to this plan.

                 NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES

    The Committee recommends $1,123,242,000 for the National 
Center for Research Resources (NCRR), which is $24,141,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $25,000,000 above 
the budget request. The Committee includes bill language 
identifying $25,000,000 for extramural facility construction, 
which is $25,000,000 above the request and the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation.
    Mission.--The National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) 
provides laboratory scientists and clinical researchers with 
environments and tools that they can use to prevent, detect, 
and treat a wide range of diseases. This support enables 
discoveries that begin at the molecular and cellular level, 
move to animal-based studies, and then are translated to 
patient-oriented clinical research, resulting in cures and 
treatments for both common and rare diseases. NCRR connects 
researchers with each other and with patients and communities 
across the nation to bring the power of shared resources and 
research to improve human health.
    Extramural facilities.--The Committee provides $25,000,000 
for extramural facilities construction grants. The Committee 
encourages NCRR to give special consideration to applications 
for extramural construction from potential grantees in states 
who are under-represented with regard to NIH awards and to 
projects at historically minority institutions that have 
developed a comprehensive plan to address the disproportionate 
impact of cancer in minority communities. The Committee 
requests to be notified of expenditures under this program, 
including the primary purpose of facilities selected for 
funding, after the peer review process for extramural awards 
has been completed. The Committee intends that facilities for 
research on infectious agents and countermeasures should be 
eligible to compete for this funding.
    General Clinical Research Centers (GCRCs)/Clinical and 
Translational Science Awards (CTSAs).--In fiscal year 2006 
Congress provided funds to begin the CTSA program, in order to 
move basic research into clinical practice and fundamentally 
transform clinical and translational research. The Committee is 
pleased that NIH, through NCRR, has developed the mechanisms 
necessary to foster the interdisciplinary collaborations that 
are increasingly necessary for success in curing disease. The 
Committee understands that the clinical research services 
provided through the current GCRCs will be a component of the 
CTSAs. These clinical services, as well as other linked 
clinical grant mechanisms, will provide the locus for a robust 
clinical and translational research enterprise. As the CTSA 
initiative is implemented, the Committee reminds NIH about the 
need to ensure that the program improves on the current 
clinical research infrastucture provided through the existing 
GCRCs. The Committee requests a report on NCRR's progress in 
implementing the CTSA program by July 1, 2007.
    Institutional Development Awards (IDeA).--The Committee 
recommends $215,938,000 for the IDeA program, which is the same 
as the budget request and $4,048,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation. The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) and the IDeA 
Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) programs, 
and expects funding for COBRE to be at a level of at least 
$130,000,000 and INBRE funding to be at least $85,000,000.
    Research centers at minority institutions (RCMI).--The 
Committee continues to recognize the critical role played by 
minority institutions at both the graduate and undergraduate 
level in addressing the health research and training needs of 
minority populations. These programs help facilitate the 
preparation of a new generation of scientists at these 
institutions. The RCMI program continues to impact 
significantly on these problems. The Committee encourages NIH 
to strengthen participation from minority institutions and 
increase resources available in this area. The Committee also 
encourages NIH to work with minority institutions with a track 
record of producing minority scholars in science and 
technology.

       NATIONAL CENTER FOR COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE

    The Committee recommends $120,554,000 for the National 
Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), 
which is $911,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and 
the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NCCAM was established to stimulate, develop, and 
support rigorous and relevant research of high quality and 
open, objective inquiry into the safety and effectiveness of 
complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices and to 
train individuals to apply the tools of exacting science to CAM 
systems and modalities in order to provide health care 
professionals and the American public with reliable information 
about these practices.
    Ameliorating liver disease.--The Committee is pleased with 
NCCAM's efforts to conduct clinical trials in collaboration 
with NIDDK regarding the use of milk thistle as a possible 
treatment in slowing the progression of nonalcoholic 
steatohepatitis and to reduce the side effects of hepatitis C 
interferon treatments. The Committee looks forward to the 
development and dissemination of the research results 
associated with the use of milk thistle as a treatment to 
ameliorate liver disease.
    Parkinson's disease (PD).--The Committee encourages NCCAM 
to continue exploration of exercise in its many forms including 
aerobic, anaerobic and exercises such as Tai Chi Chuan in the 
treatment of PD. Recent studies show exercise may increase 
neuroprotective chemicals in the brain and decrease falls in 
the elderly. The Committee also encourages continued research 
into significant non-motor co-morbidities in Parkinson's 
including magnetic stimulation for depression, and the 
phytomedicine Valerian for sleep dysfunction. Finally, NCCAM is 
encouraged to work the Office of Dietary Supplements in 
investigating supplements which may be neuroprotective, such as 
berries, alpha lipoic acid, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, acetyl-L-
carnitine, vitamin E, ginko biloba, vitamin D, vitamin B12, 
phosphatidylcholine, and glyconutrients. In light of the many 
ways cell death can occur, NCCAM is encouraged to study the 
concurrent implementation of multiple exercise and nutrition-
based strategies.

       NATIONAL CENTER ON MINORITY HEALTH AND HEALTH DISPARITIES

    The Committee recommends $194,299,000 for the National 
Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD), which 
is $1,106,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    Mission.--NCMHD conducts and supports research, training, 
information dissemination and other programs aimed at reducing 
the disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of 
disease, burden of illness and mortality experienced by certain 
American populations, including racial and ethnic minorities 
and other groups, such as the urban and rural poor, with 
disparate health status.
    Cancer in minority communities.--The Committee commends 
NCMHD for its leadership in addressing the disproportionate 
impact of cancer in minority communities. The Committee 
encourages NCMHD to consider collaborating with NCRR and NCI to 
support the establishment of a cancer center at a historically 
minority institution focused on research, treatment, and 
prevention of cancer in African American and other minority 
communities.
    Disaster-related mental health issues in minority 
communities.--The Committee is aware that Hispanic survivors of 
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita may have experienced increased 
risks for certain mental health conditions due, in part, to 
barriers encountered in the mainstream mental health and 
disaster relief systems. Therefore the Committee encourages 
NCHMD to seek out research sites that can conduct research into 
culturally-competent and linguistically-appropriate treatment 
strategies for minority survivors of natural and man-made 
disasters; to develop and evaluate community-based pilot 
programs to test such strategies; and to submit a report to 
Congress including recommendations for public policy and 
practice to improve the Hispanic community's access to quality 
mental health treatment.
    Extramural facility construction.--The Committee commends 
NCMHD for its successful ``Project EXPORT'' initiative and 
encourages continued support for this important program. 
Finally, the Committee encourages the director of NCMHD to 
coordinate with the NIH Director and the National Center for 
Research Resources to support extramural facility construction 
and the development of other research and research library 
infrastructure at minority health professions schools.
    Glomerular disease.--The Committee understands that 
glomerular disease, a group of diseases affecting the filtering 
mechanisms of the kidneys, is more prevalent among African 
Americans than the general population. The Committee encourages 
NCMHD to explore collaboration with NIDDK to support research 
activities related to glomerular injury and requests a report 
on progress made in this area by August 1, 2007.
    Health disparities among Hispanic-Americans.--The Committee 
is aware of promising research about health disparities among 
Hispanic-Americans that is being conducted, and is particularly 
impressed that this is the first study of its scope that has 
been implemented in a Hispanic population in the United States. 
The Committee therefore encourages NCMHD to continue to conduct 
similar research, in close coordination with Hispanic 
researchers and faculty at institutes of higher education that 
have experience in regional factors affecting such health 
disparities, with the goal of identifying the best proposals 
and the most promising avenues for national, regional and 
disease-specific research in order to continue to make progress 
in addressing health disparities among Hispanic-Americans.
    Liver disease.--The Committee notes that many liver 
diseases, such as hepatitis C, hepatitis B and nonalcoholic 
steatohepatitis, are more common in the African-American, 
Hispanic, Asian Pacific Islander and Native American 
populations, than in whites. In addition, access to and 
acceptance of care is particularly problematic in these 
populations. The Committee therefore continues to encourage 
NCMHD to initiate and participate with NIDDK, NIDA and NCI in 
research focused on addressing and reducing these disparities 
and requests that NCMHD report on progress in this regard by 
July 1, 2007.
    Lung disease.--The Committee is concerned with the 
disproportionate impact of lung diseases on minority 
populations. The Committee encourages the NCMHD to partner with 
other NIH institutes, including NHLBI, to develop an 
epidemiological approach to determine the disproportionate 
impact of airway disease on minority populations.
    Research endowment.--The Committee commends NCMHD for its 
leadership in addressing the longstanding problem of health 
disparities in minority and medically underserved populations. 
For fiscal year 2007, the Committee continues to encourage 
NCMHD to implement its successful Research Endowment program as 
an ongoing initiative. Moreover, the Committee encourages NCMHD 
to implement the program in a manner that is consistent with 
the authorizing legislation.

                  JOHN E. FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER

    The Committee recommends $66,681,000 for the Fogarty 
International Center (FIC), which is $303,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Mission.--FIC was established to improve the health of the 
people of the United States and other nations through 
international cooperation in the biomedical sciences. In 
support of this mission, the FIC pursues the following four 
goals: mobilize international research efforts against global 
health threats; advance science through international 
cooperation; develop human resources to meet global research 
challenges; and provide leadership in international science 
policy and research strategies.
    American Russian Cancer Alliance (ARCA).--The Committee 
again recognizes the members of ARCA in their continued pursuit 
of novel cancer research activities that capitalize on the 
particular strengths of the respective participating 
institutions, and notes the achievements in the ARCA-sponsored 
projects in molecular imaging and radioisotope-targeted cancer 
therapy and diagnosis. As the principal NIH institute charged 
with overseeing and supporting international biomedical 
scientific activities and initiatives, FIC is well positioned 
to provide grant support for bi-national pilot studies, and the 
Committee looks to Fogarty to assist the Alliance in 
identifying and, when appropriate, in applying for support of 
pilot studies in cancer prevention, treatment, or diagnosis 
research.
    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).--The 
Committee encourages FIC to expand its COPD research and 
training activities.
    Tuberculosis training.--The Committee is pleased with FIC's 
efforts to supplement grants in the AIDS International Training 
and Research Program (AITRP) and International Training and 
Research Program in Emerging Infectious Diseases (ERID), which 
train tuberculosis experts in the developing world. Given the 
magnitude of global TB, the Committee encourages FIC to develop 
a specific free-standing TB training program.

                      NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE

    The Committee recommends $313,269,000 for the National 
Library of Medicine (NLM), which is $1,641,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget request. In 
addition, $8,200,000 is made available from program evaluation 
funds as requested by the Administration to support the 
National Center on Health Services Research, which is equal to 
what was provided in fiscal year 2006.
    Mission.--NLM collects, organizes, and disseminates 
information important to biomedicine; serves as a national 
information resource for medical education, research, and 
health service activities; enhances access to biomedical 
literature through electronic services; serves the public by 
providing electronic access to reliable health information for 
consumers; supports and directs the National Network of 
Libraries of Medicine; provides grants for research in 
biomedical communications, medical library development, and 
training health information specialists; conducts and supports 
research in biomedical informatics and computational biology; 
and creates information resources for genomics, molecular 
biology, toxicology, medical images, environmental health, 
emergency preparedness and response, and health services 
research.
    Disease management technology.--The Committee encourages 
NLM to conduct outreach activities to all public and private 
sector organizations that have demonstrated capabilities in 
health information technology. The Committee is particularly 
interested in disease management technology as it relates to 
improving care for the chronically ill and reducing health care 
costs.
    Outreach.--The Committee encourages NLM, in coordination 
with medical librarians and other health information 
specialists, to continue its outreach activities aimed at 
educating health care professionals and the general public 
about its products and services.
    PubMed Central.--The Committee commends NLM for its 
leadership in developing PubMed Central, an electronic online 
repository for life science articles. Because of the high level 
of expertise health information specialists have in the 
organization, collection, and dissemination of medical 
information, the Committee believes that health sciences 
librarians have a key role to play in the further development 
of PubMed Central. The Committee encourages NLM to work with 
the medical library community regarding issues related to 
copyright, fair use, peer-review and classification of 
information on PubMed Central.

                         OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $667,825,000 for the Office of the 
Director (OD), which is $140,259,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request. Included 
within funding for the Office of the Director is $96,030,000 
for radiological, nuclear and chemical countermeasures. It is 
intended that the Director allocate these funds to those 
institutes that support these areas of countermeasure research.
    Mission.--OD provides leadership to the NIH research 
enterprise and coordinates and directs initiatives that cross-
cut the NIH. OD is responsible for the development and 
management of intramural and extramural research and research 
training policy, the review of program quality and 
effectiveness, the coordination of selected NIH-wide program 
activities, and the administration of centralized support 
activities essential to the operations of NIH.
    The bill repeats language included in prior years 
authorizing the collection of third party payments for the cost 
of clinical services, providing the Director of NIH with one 
percent transfer authority, and allocating up to $500,000 of 
funds within the Office of the Director appropriation for the 
Foundation for the National Institutes of Health. The Committee 
recommends $120,700,000 within the Office of the Director for 
the Director's Discretionary Fund (DDF), which is the same as 
the request and $28,630,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation. In addition, the Committee recommendation 
includes $159,500,000 for the advanced development of 
biodefense countermeasures. The Committee also includes bill 
language providing $10,000 as requested by the Administration 
for representation allowances when specifically approved by the 
Director of NIH.
    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the Office of 
Portfolio Analysis and Strategic Initiatives (OPASI) as 
requested by the Administration. The Committee believes that 
OPASI is a critical mechanism to review the NIH research 
portfolio as a whole, to address the issues raised by external 
groups about the coding of diseases for funding reporting, and, 
most importantly, as a tool to help direct future research 
efforts in order to maximize the significant public investment 
in biomedical research to cure disease.
    The Committee includes bill language from last year's bill 
identifying maximum of $332,000,000 that may be transferred 
from ICs to the Common Fund, which supports activities that are 
of benefit to multiple institutes and centers. The language 
also requires the Director to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations every six months detailing all 
deposits to and expenditures from the Common Fund.
    Priority setting.--The Committee recognizes the role of 
serendipity in science, but continues to believe that thorough 
and thoughtful strategic planning is a far superior 
alternative. The Committee commends each IC that has undertaken 
a strategic planning process in conjunction with the best and 
brightest minds in the extramural community. Accordingly, the 
Committee directs each IC to develop a report, to be submitted 
no later than February 15, 2007, that identifies, by IC, 
measures to be taken to ensure that awards made via the peer 
review process in fiscal year 2007 and beyond reflect the 
strategic plans that have been published by each IC in 
conjunction with the extramural community. The Committee 
expects that such reports will identify specific steps such as 
mechanisms to ensure that strategic directions, as identified 
in strategic plans, are included in the peer review process for 
unsolicited grant applications as well as an increased emphasis 
on the use of requests for applications (RFAs) that identify 
specific research themes to achieve the strategic goals of each 
IC, as identified in the strategic plan. Furthermore, the 
Committee expects that each IC will adopt a tactical approach 
to implementing strategic plans so as to maximize the 
significant public investment with the ultimate aim of curing 
diseases.

Office of Research on Women's Health

    The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) works in 
collaboration with the institutes and centers of NIH to promote 
and foster efforts to address gaps in knowledge related to 
women's health through the enhancement and expansion of funded 
research and/or the initiation of new investigative studies. 
ORWH is responsible for ensuring the inclusion of women in 
clinical research funded by NIH, including the development of a 
computerized tracking system and the implementation of 
guidelines on such inclusion. ORWH is also involved in 
promoting programs to increase the number of women in 
biomedical science careers, and in the development of women's 
health and sex and gender factors in biology as a focus of 
medical/scientific research.
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).--The Committee is pleased 
with the increased focus on IBS at ORWH and encourages the 
office to continue expanding research on this prevalent 
functional gastrointestinal disorder.

Office of AIDS Research

    The Office of AIDS Research (OAR) is responsible for 
coordination of the scientific, budgetary, legislative, and 
policy elements of the NIH AIDS research program. OAR develops 
a comprehensive plan for NIH AIDS-related research activities 
which is updated annually. The plan is the basis for the 
president's budget distribution of AIDS-related funds to the 
Institutes, and centers within NIH. The Committee expects the 
Director of NIH to use this plan and the budget developed by 
OAR to guide his decisions on the allocation of AIDS funding 
among the Institutes. The Director of NIH also should use the 
full authority of his office to ensure that the institutes and 
centers spend their AIDS research dollars in a manner 
consistent with the plan. In addition, OAR allocates an 
emergency AIDS discretionary fund to support research that was 
not anticipated when budget allocations were made.
    The Committee has included the same general provisions in 
bill language that were contained in the fiscal year 2006 
appropriations bill. This language permits the Director of OAR, 
jointly with the Director of NIH, to transfer between ICs up to 
three percent of the funding determined by NIH to be related to 
AIDS research. This authority could be exercised throughout the 
fiscal year subject to normal reprogramming procedures, and is 
intended to give NIH flexibility to adjust the AIDS allocations 
among institutes if research opportunities and needs should 
change. The Committee also repeats language from last year's 
bill making the research funds identified by NIH as being AIDS-
related available to the OAR account for transfer to the 
institutes. This provision permits the flow of funds through 
the OAR in the spirit of the authorization legislation without 
requiring the Congress to earmark a specific dollar amount for 
AIDS research.

Office of Dietary Supplements

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) was established in 
recognition that dietary supplements can have an important 
impact on the prevention and management of disease and on the 
maintenance of health. ODS is charged with promoting, 
conducting, and coordinating scientific research within NIH 
relating to dietary supplements.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

    The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research 
(OBSSR) provides leadership and direction for the development 
of a trans-NIH plan to increase the scope of and support for 
behavioral and social science research and in defining an 
overall strategy for the integration of these disciplines 
across NIH institutes and centers; develops initiatives to 
stimulate research in the behavioral and social sciences arena 
and integrate a biobehavioral perspective across the research 
areas of NIH; and promotes studies to evaluate the 
contributions of behavioral, social and lifestyle determinants 
in the development, course, treatment, and prevention of 
illness and related public health problems.
    Basic behavioral research.--The Committee encourages OBSSR 
to continue working to build alliances among institutes that 
support and nurture basic behavioral and social sciences 
research. In particular, the Committee encourages OBSSR to 
partner with NIGMS and other funders of basic research to 
enhance support for work on methods, animal models, and the 
interplay of biological factors, behavioral and social 
influences underlying phenomena such as stress that influence 
multiple health conditions.

Office of Rare Disease Research

    The Office of Rare Disease Research (ORD) was established 
in recognition of the need to provide a focal point of 
attention and coordination at NIH for research on rare 
diseases. ORD works with Federal and non-Federal national and 
international organizations concerned with rare disease 
research and orphan products development; develops a 
centralized database on rare diseases research; and stimulates 
rare diseases research by supporting scientific workshops and 
symposia to identify research opportunities.
    Pediatric liver diseases.--The Committee is pleased that 
ORD has continued to provide significant funding to support 10 
centers within the Biliary Atresia Clinical Research 
Consortium, as well as working with NCRR to research 
cholastatic liver disease in children.

Multi-Institute Research Issues

    Amyloidosis.--The Committee encourages NIH to continue to 
intensify its research efforts into the amyloidosis, a group of 
rare diseases characterized by abnormally folded protein 
deposits in tissues. These diseases are often fatal and there 
is no known cure. Treatment involving large-dose intravenous 
chemotherapy followed by stem cell replacement or rescue is 
effective for many patients, but this procedure is risky, 
unsuitable for many patients, and not a cure. The Committee 
understands that NIH will be holding a national conference on 
amyloidosis and participating in an international conference. 
The Committee looks forward to being informed on the results of 
these conferences and to receiving from NIH the results and 
recommendations identifying the next steps that need to be 
taken to increase the understanding, prevention and treatment 
of this devastating group of diseases.
    Clinical and translational research.--The Committee 
believes that using clinical and translational research to move 
scientific advances developed in the laboratory to mainstream 
medical practice is critical to the effort to cure disease. As 
such, the Committee commends NIH for launching the Clinical and 
Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program, which will help to 
transform the manner in which basic and applied research reach 
patients. Accordingly, the Committee encourages NIH to expand 
the use of this concept across multiple ICs as quickly as 
possible in order to ensure that potentially life-saving 
breakthroughs reach patients without delay. The Committee 
requests a report by April 1, 2007 detailing NIH's progress in 
this area, including identifying any potential barriers to 
widespread implementation of the CSTA program.
    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.--The Committee is aware 
that Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (Alpha-1) is a major 
genetic risk factor for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 
(COPD). The Committee commends NIH, particularly NHLBI, for its 
plans to focus additional research in the area of COPD. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI, NIDDK, NHGRI and other appropriate 
institutes to enhance the NIH research portfolio, encourage 
targeted detection, raise public awareness about Alpha-1 and 
provide appropriate information to health professionals.
    Autism and vaccines.--The Committee continues to be aware 
of concerns about reports of a possible association between the 
measles component of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine 
and a subset of autism termed autistic entercolitis. The 
Committee continues its interest in this issue and encourages 
the Interagency Coordinating Committee to continue to give 
serious attention to these reports. The Committee is aware that 
NIH-supported research is underway, and encourages NIH to avoid 
further delays in this research.
    The Committee is also concerned that there is some evidence 
that infant exposures to thimerosal in the 1990s may be related 
to the epidemic of neurodevelopmental disorders in children. 
CDC's most extensive review of Vaccine Safety Datalink data 
concluded that more research needs to be conducted in this 
arena to answer these questions with certainty. The Committee 
concurs with the need for this continued research, particularly 
given the recent expansion of flu vaccine for children and the 
fact that most childhood vaccines administered in developing 
countries still contain thimerosal.
    The Committee encourages NIH to dedicate significant 
resources to pursue the recommended research initiatives 
outlined in the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Immunization 
Review. These reports have identified the research needed to 
understand better why a number of children suffer severe 
adverse reactions to childhood vaccines. Continuation of this 
research to develop a better understanding of biological 
mechanism is critical to understanding with certainty whether 
or not thimerosal and other vaccines exposures might cause 
increased risks for some children.
    Autism spectrum disorders.--The Committee is encouraged by 
NIH's autism research matrix and encourages NIH to devote 
sufficient resources to this research agenda. The Committee 
encourages NIH when implementing the autism research matrix to 
coordinate with autism organizations already funding research 
initiatives to ensure the most efficient use of its resources. 
The Committee also notes the promise of particular areas cited 
in the matrix, including genetic, gene-environment 
interactions, behavioral characterizations of the disorder, 
screening and early diagnosis, and the development of evidence-
based interventions.
    Carcinoid tumor disease.--Carcinoid cancer and related 
neuroendocrine tumors are small, slow growing tumors found 
mostly in the gastrointestinal system, but can also be found in 
other parts of the body such as the pancreas and the lung. The 
Committee encourages the Director to expand and coordinate 
research and related activities with respect to carcinoid 
disease and carcinoid tumor biology across all relevant 
institutes, centers and offices, particularly at NCI, to help 
foster early and accurate diagnosis as well as develop new, 
safe, and effective treatments for the disease and move toward 
a cure. In addition, the Committee encourages NCI to hold a 
summit on carcinoid cancer and requests a report by June 1, 
2007 on future research plans for carcinoid cancer.
    Chromosome abnormalities.--The Committee commends NIH for 
its efforts over the past year to encourage new research into 
molecular, genetic, clinical and therapeutic aspects of 
chromosome abnormalities. Because of the multisystemic 
consequences of a chromosome abnormality, multidisciplinary and 
multi-institute support by NIH will be required in order to 
make progress that will be meaningful to those affected. The 
Committee continues to encourage NIH to seek ways to expand and 
intensify such research, especially studies involving the 
syndromes of chromosome 18.
    Cystic fibrosis.--The Committee commends the Director and 
NIH for facilitating progress in finding new ways to treat 
individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Progress from the 1960s 
when children with CF did not live long enough to attend 
elementary school to today's median life expectancy of 35 years 
has resulted from significant contributions of both NIH and the 
private sector. The Committee encourages NIH to support more 
research in CF to cure this disease, a goal that is achievable, 
and can result in lessons to benefit research on other rare, 
genetic diseases.
    The Committee commends the Director for recent initiatives 
in the NIH Roadmap to re-engineer the clinical research system 
by issuing grants to establish integrative academic homes for 
clinical and translational science. The Committee encourages 
the Director to consider as a model the CF clinical trials 
network, and to continue to support this model network, which 
is making great advances in developing new treatments for 
cystic fibrosis.
    Down syndrome.--The Committee encourages the Director to 
establish an NIH Down syndrome research task force on cognition 
to develop a strategic plan for genetic and neurobiological 
research relating to the cognitive dysfunction and the 
progressive late-life dementia associated with Down syndrome. 
The purpose of the strategic plan is to provide a guide for 
coordinating Down syndrome research on cognition across NIH and 
for enhancing the development of new research efforts based on 
identification of areas of greatest scientific opportunity, 
especially as they relate to the development of future 
treatments. The plan should include short, intermediate and 
long-term goals for basic and clinical research with strategies 
for achieving goals and with specified time frames for 
implementation.
    Dystonia.--The Committee is very pleased with progress 
demonstrated by the NIH intramural research program in the 
treatment and understanding of dystonia. NIH intramural 
researchers have successfully utilized injections of Botox to 
treat many patients who otherwise would be severely debilitated 
by dystonia. The Committee encourages continued work in this 
important area of study and treatment.
    Gene therapy research.--The Committee is encouraged by 
promising research being undertaken in gene therapy, especially 
in regard to thalassemia, or Cooley's anemia. The Committee is 
concerned, however, that the current mechanism for funding gene 
therapy research, while promoting advancement of individual 
components of gene therapy, lacks an overarching strategy that 
will coalesce these advances and encourage the ultimate goal of 
curing genetic disorders expeditiously. The Committee is 
equally concerned that the most innovative research in curative 
gene therapy is being conducted in Europe rather than in the 
U.S. Last year, the Committee urged the Director to assess the 
prospects for the most promising areas for breakthroughs in 
this field and to develop an aggressive program to focus 
resources on it. A meeting was convened on the topic, but the 
Committee believes that more focused and aggressive action is 
needed. NIH should assess the prospects for success in a broad 
range of diseases, with the goal of curing a single gene 
disorder in the shortest possible time utilizing gene therapy. 
The Committee requests a plan for implementing an aggressive 
research agenda by January 1, 2007.
    Heart disease research and prevention action plan.--The 
Committee is pleased to learn that the NIH, through the NHLBI, 
will convene a national conference in 2006 to assess progress 
and opportunities in heart disease research and prevention and 
to develop a comprehensive, long-range, trans-agency action 
plan. The Committee looks forward to receiving the report by 
March 1, 2007, and expects the report to be a long-range, 
trans-agency action plan on heart disease research and 
prevention, with quantifiable goals and benchmarks to measure 
progress in the battle against heart disease.
    Human tissue supply.--The Committee remains interested in 
matching the increased needs of NIH grantees and intramural 
researchers who rely upon human tissues and organs to study 
disease and search for cures, including for those researchers 
dedicated to the study and cure of rare diseases. The Committee 
is aware that NIH has established a multi-institute initiative 
on human tissue supply. While this is promising, there is still 
an unmet demand for the use of human tissue in research. The 
Committee encourages the Director to strengthen the core for 
this initiative and to broaden its scope to other institutes 
such as NCI, NHLBI, and NINDS that have not previously 
participated in the initiative's core support.
    Lymphatic research and lymphatic diseases.--In light of the 
transformational impact of lymphatic biology and disease 
research, which requires the participation of multiple 
institutes and centers, the Committee encourages the Director 
to give careful consideration to the development of an 
initiative for lymphatic biology and disease under the auspices 
of OPASI. In addition, the Committee encourages the Director 
and the Trans-NIH Coordinating Committee on the Lymphatic 
System to pursue the goals of fostering lymphatic research 
initiatives and awareness across all NIH institutes and 
centers.
    Microbicides.--There is an urgent need to expand the 
development pipeline with more microbicide candidate products, 
particularly those that target HIV in new ways. In addition to 
candidates that may arise from basic research efforts, the best 
possibilities may be found within pharmaceutical companies 
where there are, today, dozens of potential compounds already 
developed as therapeutics that could move into clinical 
development as microbicides if made available. As outlined in 
the ``NIH Roadmap,'' NIH has mechanisms in place to encourage 
partnerships among researchers in academia, government and the 
private sector. The Committee encourages the leadership at NIH 
to support the microbicide field by encouraging the 
pharmaceutical industry to allow its drug candidates to be 
developed as microbicides. In recent years, the International 
Partnership for Microbicides has entered into innovative 
agreements with leading pharmaceutical companies to test and 
develop leading AIDS drugs as microbicides. More partnerships 
like these between the pharmaceutical industry and the non-
profit community will be critical.
    Microbicides to prevent HIV/AIDS.--The Committee notes with 
alarm that being female, married and poor are often the most 
significant risk factors for acquiring HIV. Once developed, 
microbicides will be a critical element of a comprehensive 
response to HIV/AIDS that takes into account the unequal impact 
of the epidemic on women. The Committee encourages greater 
emphasis on microbicide research and development at NIH. The 
Committee has long advocated that NIH establish a dedicated 
microbicide unit with clearly identified leadership, funding 
and staffing to accelerate and coordinate NIH-supported 
microbicide research. Greater leadership and coordination on 
this issue is especially critical given that a microbicide-
specific clinical trial network is under active review for 
approval.
    Minority institution research infrastructure.--The 
Committee continues to be pleased with the NIH Director's 
implementation of various programs focused on developing 
research infrastructure at minority health professions 
institutions, including Research Centers at Minority 
Institutions, extramural biomedical research facilities, and 
the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities. 
The Committee encourages the NIH Director to work closely with 
the Director of NCMHD to establish a program of coordination 
among these various mechanisms to partner with minority health 
professions schools to address their infrastructure needs.
    Mucolipidosis Type IV (ML4).--The Committee commends NINDS, 
NIMH and NICHD for efforts to create a strain of mice that 
replicates the genetic mutation that causes ML4 in humans. The 
Committee encourages continued research in the effort to cure 
ML4 and similar genetic disorders.
    Musculoskeletal trauma and skeletal pain.--The Committee 
encourages NIAMS, NIA, NIDCR, and NCCAM to study ways to 
understand better the epidemiology of back pain, and improve on 
or develop new diagnostic techniques for back pain. The 
Committee also encourages expansion of research to improve 
diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to lower the impact of 
musculoskeletal trauma.
    Osteoporosis and bone health action plan.--The Committee 
appreciates the report the Surgeon General submitted on bone 
health in October 2004. In the report, the Surgeon General 
calls for a national action plan for bone health. To accomplish 
this, the Committee encourages NIH to convene a national summit 
and develop a National Action Plan for Bone Health and 
Osteoporosis.
    Parkinson's disease (PD).--The Committee continues to 
encourage NIH to develop a strategic plan for future 
investments in PD research, based on the findings of a planning 
conference tasked with identifying the current shortcomings and 
future opportunities for more effective treatments and 
potential cures for the disease, and with a clearly defined 
budget for achieving those objectives. The Committee understood 
last year that NIH convened a conference in June of 2005 and 
instructed NIH to report back to Congress the conclusions and 
recommended research plan for the next three years of PD 
research. The Committee further encourages NIH to submit an 
implementation plan that outlines progress already made and 
specific results of investments outlined in that plan by June 
30, 2007.
    The Committee also encourages continued collaborations 
including additional intramural activities between NINDS, NIMH, 
NIA and NHGRI to enhance understanding of neurodegenerative 
diseases and develop therapeutic applications for gene 
discoveries.
    Psoriasis.--The Committee encourages the Director to expand 
and coordinate research and related activities with respect to 
psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis across all relevant ICs, 
particularly at NIAMS and NIAID, to help foster new, safe, and 
effective treatments for these diseases and move toward a cure.
    Rett syndrome.--The Committee applauds NIH's continued 
commitment to Rett syndrome research, a gentically-based 
neurological disorder seen almost exclusive in females, which 
is estimated to occur in approximately one in ten thousand 
female births. Recent discoveries suggest that mutations in the 
gene responsible for Rett syndrome are associated with other 
disorders including learning disability, autism, schizophrenia, 
mental retardation, and in infant males, a progressive, fatal 
encephalopathy. New basic biomedical discoveries are also 
providing insights on general mechanisms of postnatal brain 
development, providing a roadmap of new avenues of 
interventions with the potential to treat Rett syndrome and 
other neurological disorders.
    The Committee is pleased that NINDS, NIMH, and NICHD have 
partnered with existing advocacy groups in the development of 
co-funded projects, and encourages additional support for 
development of new animal models and for continuation of the 
ongoing genotype/phenotype investigations to hasten progress in 
eliminating this and other neurologically based disorders.
    The Committee encourages expansion of research in applied 
areas that will improve the quality of life for individuals 
with Rett syndrome and others with communicative disorders, and 
encourages NIH to redouble its effort to integrate the work of 
appropriate institutes in this area, including NICHD, NINDS, 
NIA, NIMH, NIDCD, NHGRI, NHLBI, NIAMS, NIDDK, NIGMS, and NCRR. 
The Committee also admires the progress made by the Office of 
Rare Diseases in the development of the Rare Disease Clinical 
Research Network, and is pleased by the implementation of 
clinical research protocols to create better understanding of 
the scope of Rett syndrome and other rare disorders.
    Shaken baby syndrome.--The Committee encourages NIH to 
expand its programs to raise public awareness of shaken baby 
syndrome (SBS) and to expand its programs of research on the 
prevention and treatment of the syndrome.
    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).--The Committee encourages 
the Director to ensure the success of the SMA project by 
providing active and ongoing support from the OD as well as 
from other related institutes. The Committee is aware that the 
current SMA project is scheduled to conclude in 2007 and 
encourages the Director to begin planning for the necessary 
follow-on effort to maximize the results of this innovative 
project for SMA and to ensure it serves as a model for other 
diseases.
    Study of gender differences.--The Committee notes that in 
2001 the Institute of Medicine released a report that stressed 
the importance of gender as a basic variable that needs to be 
considered in all areas of biomedical research. Recent findings 
have demonstrated that significant differences between men and 
women exist in health and disease. One of the fields where such 
differences are most pronounced is neuroscience. The Committee 
encourages each of the fifteen institutes involved in the NIH 
Neuroscience Blueprint to analyze carefully its entire NIH 
Neuroscience Blueprint research portfolio to ensure gender is 
included as a variable, when appropriate, and to require that 
all reported results include gender specific analysis. The 
Committee requests a written report from the Director that 
includes information on the progress of these efforts at all 
fifteen of the NIH Neuroscience Blueprint institutes prior to 
the fiscal year 2008 hearings.
    Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS).--The Committee encourages the 
Director to develop collaborative, multidisciplinary research, 
translational and clinical studies on SWS with appropriate 
institutes and centers, as well as with other, appropriate 
government agencies. The Committee encourages NIH to utilize 
all appropriate mechanisms and resources in carrying out these 
studies.
    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC).--TSC is a genetic 
disorder that triggers uncontrollable tumor growth in multiple 
organs of the body, including the brain, heart, kidneys, lungs, 
liver, eyes or skin. Because of the effects of TSC on multiple 
organ systems, the Committee encourages the Office of the 
Director to work with all institutes involved in TSC research 
to revise the 10-year TSC Research Plan into a comprehensive 
TSC Research Strategy for a Cure. The Committee encourages NIH 
to organize a conference with all institutes supporting TSC 
research. Also, the Committee encourages the Director to 
support translational research and to fund new investigators in 
the TSC research field. The Committee is encouraged by the 
collaborative efforts that have been brought forth to produce 
the Program Announcement on Understanding and Treating Tuberous 
Sclerosis Complex. The Committee encourages NIH to continue 
this program announcement in future years and expand the number 
of participating institutes.
    Vulvodynia.--Since fiscal year 1998, Congress has 
highlighted the need for research on the prevalence, causes and 
treatment of vulvodynia, a painful and often debilitating 
disorder of the female reproductive system. The Committee is 
pleased that some progress has been made since that time. For 
example, NICHD has supported a major study of the prevalence of 
this disorder. The Committee calls upon the Director to build 
upon these initial successes by coordinating through the Office 
of Women's Health Research an expanded and collaborative 
extramural and intramural research effort into the causes of 
and treatments for vulvodynia. This expanded effort should 
involve ORWH, NICHD, NINDS and other relevant ICs as well as 
the NIH Pain Consortium and should emphasize etiology and 
multi-center therapeutic trials. In addition, the Committee is 
concerned that many women with vulvodynia remain undiagnosed. 
To address this shortcoming, the Committee encourages NIH to 
include information about vulvodynia on its website and that it 
work with relevant groups to implement a national education 
program for primary care health professionals, patients and the 
general public on vulvodynia its symptoms, diagnosis and 
treatment options. The Committee encourages the Director to 
include experts on vulvodynia and related chronic pain and 
female reproductive system conditions on peer review panels. 
Finally, the Committee encourages NICHD to reissue its request 
for applications in this area and to fund high quality 
applications.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Committee recommends $81,081,000 for buildings and 
facilities, which is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the budget request.
    Mission.--The Buildings and Facilities appropriation 
provides for the design, construction, improvement, and major 
repair of clinical, laboratory, and office buildings and 
supporting facilities essential to the mission of the National 
Institutes of Health. The funds in this appropriation support 
the 77 buildings on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland; 
the Animal Center in Poolesville, Maryland; the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences facility in Research 
Triangle Park, North Carolina; and other smaller facilities 
throughout the United States.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

    The Committee provides a program level of $3,343,135,000 
for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA), which is $16,397,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and $83,134,000 above the budget 
request. Within the total, $126,129,000 is provided through the 
evaluation set-aside as requested.
    SAMHSA is responsible for supporting mental health and 
alcohol and drug abuse prevention and treatment services 
nationwide through discretionary capacity expansion and science 
to service activities, formula block grants to the States and 
associated technical assistance efforts. The agency consists of 
three principal centers: the Center for Mental Health Services, 
the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, and the Center for 
Substance Abuse Prevention. The Office of the Administrator is 
responsible for overall agency management.
    The Committee expects that no less than the amounts 
allocated in fiscal year 2006 will be spent in fiscal year 2007 
for activities throughout SAMHSA that are targeted to address 
the growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disparate impact on 
communities of color, including African Americans, Latinos, 
Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and 
Pacific Islanders. These funds provide grants to organizations 
with a history of providing culturally competent, community 
specific, and linguistically appropriate services in hard to 
reach and high-risk communities of color to expand service 
infrastructure and capacity.
    The Committee includes within the total provided for 
programs of regional and national significance across SAMHSA, 
$46,391,000 for homeless programs, which is the same funding 
level provided in fiscal year 2006 and $5,757,000 more than the 
budget request. The Committee is hopeful that programs that 
provide supportive services to individuals in permanent housing 
settings will help to end long-term homelessness in this 
country and encourages SAMHSA to develop supportive services 
programs within the authority of the programs of regional and 
national significance.
    Health disparities need to be addressed as the demographics 
of our society are changing dramatically. The Committee notes 
that minorities represent 30 percent of the population and are 
projected to increase to 40 percent by 2025. Yet, only 23 
percent of recent doctorates in psychology, social work and 
nursing were awarded to minorities. For fiscal year 2007, the 
Committee has provided no less than the level allocated in 
fiscal year 2006 for the minority fellowship program in order 
to train culturally competent mental health, and substance 
abuse treatment and prevention professionals.
    The Committee expects that none of the funds provided for 
SAMHSA will be used to support attachment therapy (AT), a 
controversial ``treatment'' on adoptive and foster children who 
present disciplinary problems. Reports have suggested that AT 
has been the cause of abuse, and even death, in several 
nationally prominent cases. While proponents of the ``therapy'' 
have been marketing AT to child-protection agencies and 
workers, social-work professionals, parents, and others, AT is 
an un-validated intervention.

Center for Mental Health Services

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$890,114,000 for the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), 
which is $5,866,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and $41,202,000 above the budget request. Within the total, 
$21,629,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside as 
requested. The Committee does not include requested bill 
language that would require states to use amounts above their 
minimum mental health block grant allotment for transformation 
activities.
            Programs of regional and national significance
    The Committee provides $269,303,000 for mental health 
programs of regional and national significance, which is 
$6,040,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$41,202,000 above the budget request. The program includes 
studies that identify the most effective service delivery 
practices, knowledge synthesis activities that translate 
program findings into useful products for the field, and 
knowledge application projects that support adoption of 
exemplary service approaches throughout the country.
    The Committee provides $25,740,000 for the state incentive 
grants for transformation, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $5,944,000 more than the budget request. 
These comprehensive state mental health plans will enhance the 
use of existing resources at the state and local levels and 
expand the options and array of available supports. These 
grants are not intended to provide direct services, but rather 
are to aid states in developing broad systems changes to better 
serve persons with mental illness.
    The Committee recommends that SAMHSA continue to work with 
states and planning and advisory councils to integrate the 
principles of transformation with a state's service-delivery 
system, including the mental health block grant. The Committee 
encourages SAMHSA to provide a mechanism within the state 
incentive grants for transformation to ensure that full and 
active participation by community-based organizations 
representing consumers is present in all facets of 
transformation planning and implementation.
    While the Committee is pleased that SAMHSA is focusing on 
helping persons with mental illnesses achieve recovery, a 
parallel effort must be made to strengthen the service capacity 
of safety net community-based mental health providers. 
Therefore, SAMHSA is urged to produce a comprehensive study for 
the Committee regarding the technical assistance furnished to 
community mental health centers over the last five years on 
such issues as personnel preparation, evidenced-based 
practices, quality improvement, integrated treatment, and 
individualized care.
    The Committee provides $89,000,000 for school violence 
programs, which is $13,290,000 more than the budget request and 
$4,298,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level. At 
this funding level, it is the Committee's intention that grants 
will be awarded to school districts with the goals of promoting 
the healthy development of children and youth, fostering their 
resilience in the face of adversity, and preventing violence.
    Within funds provided, the Committee recommends $29,500,000 
for the national child traumatic stress initiative, $38,000 
more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget 
request. This program has established 54 treatment development 
and community service centers to treat children who have 
experienced trauma and also supports the national center for 
traumatic stress. It is estimated that up to 40,000 traumatized 
children and their families will directly benefit from services 
delivered as a result of this initiative.
    The mental health needs of our Nation's seniors are largely 
ignored within our mental health system. While many older 
Americans experience depression, dementia, anxiety and 
substance abuse disorders, far too often these conditions are 
not recognized or treated. Outreach to elderly persons 
conducted in places frequented by seniors, such as senior 
centers, meal sites, primary care settings and other locations, 
is needed. The elderly treatment and outreach program is the 
only federally funded services program dedicated specifically 
to the mental health care of older adults. It is for this 
reason that within the funds provided, the Committee recommends 
that no less than the level allocated in fiscal year 2006 be 
allocated for the older adults program.
    The Committee remains deeply concerned that suicide is the 
third leading cause of death among adolescents. Consistent with 
the recommendations of the President's New Freedom Commission 
on Mental Health, the Committee has in the past called upon 
SAMHSA to award grants to local educational systems or non-
profit entities in conjunction with local educational systems 
for analyzing screening mechanisms and to identify evidence-
based practices for facilitating treatment for youth at risk. 
The Committee strongly urges SAMHSA to continue this effort in 
fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee recommends that within the funding provided, 
programs that address youth suicide prevention and early 
intervention strategies, including the suicide resource center, 
be funded in fiscal year 2007 at no less than the amounts 
allocated in fiscal year 2006. In addition, the Committee 
provides $5,000,000 to support suicide hotlines, which is 
$1,979,000 more than both the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and the budget request.
    The Committee recognizes the value of marriage and family 
therapy (MFT). As one of the five ``core mental health 
professions'' designated by the Health Resources and Services 
Administration, the Committee encourages SAMHSA to permit MFT 
students to be granted eligibility to participate in the 
minority fellowship program.
    The Committee includes the following projects and 
activities and in the following amount for fiscal year 2007:

American Red Cross, Lower Bucks County Chapter, 
    Levittown, PA to provide mental health counseling 
    and case management services, along with related 
    services............................................        $250,000
Community Shelter Board, Columbus, OH for a National 
    Model to House Homeless Families....................         175,000
Family Support Systems Unlimited, Inc., Bronx, NY for 
    mental health services..............................         175,000
Fulton County Department of Mental Health, Atlanta, GA 
    for a Jail Diversion Program........................         300,000
Heartland Health Outreach, Chicago IL for mental health 
    services to refugee children........................         150,000
Helen Wheeler Center for Community Mental Health, 
    Kankakee, IL to increase service capacity...........         315,000
Jefferson Behavioral Health System, Steubenville, OH for 
    mental health services at Beacon House..............         250,000
Jewish Association for Residential Care, Farmington 
    Hills, MI for mental health support services........         300,000
Lane County, Eugene, OR for mental health and substance 
    abuse treatment services for at-risk youth..........         200,000
Orange County, Orlando, FL to provide for an intensive 
    case management model to manage people released from 
    acute care and jail settings who are diagnosed with 
    serious and persistent mental illnesses and co-
    occurring substance use disorders...................         250,000
Pacific Clinics, Arcadia, CA for mental health and 
    suicide prevention programs for adolescents.........         450,000
Peninsula Counseling Center, Woodmere, NY for mental 
    health services for older adults....................         250,000
Prince George's County Health Department, Largo, MD for 
    mental health services through wellness centers in 
    high schools........................................         100,000
Progreso Latino, Central Falls, RI for mental health 
    services for senior citizens........................         100,000
San Francisco Department of Public Health, San 
    Francisco, CA for mental health and substance abuse 
    services for homeless persons in supportive housing.       1,500,000
St. Mary's Home for Children, North Providence, RI for 
    mental health services to children..................         350,000
United Jewish Federation, Pittsburgh, PA for services to 
    adults with mental illness..........................         150,000
United Way of Lake County, Mentor, OH for the Lake 
    County Drop-in Center...............................         115,000
University of South Florida, Louis de la Parte Florida 
    Mental Health Institute, Tampa, FL to close the 
    knowledge/practice gap in mental health and 
    substance abuse programs............................         200,000
Ventura County Probation Office, Ventura, CA for 
    treatment and related services for juvenile 
    offenders with mental health and chemical dependency 
    problems............................................         250,000
Ventura County Sheriff's Department, Ventura, CA for the 
    Crisis Intervention Team Training Program...........         210,000

            Mental health block grant
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$428,472,000 for the mental health block grant, which is 
$174,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The block grant provides funds to 
states to support mental health prevention, treatment, and 
rehabilitation services. Funds are allocated according to 
statutory formula among the states that have submitted approved 
annual plans. The Committee notes that the mental health block 
grant funding represents less than two percent of total state 
mental health funding and less than three percent of state 
community-based mental health services. Within the total, 
$21,629,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside as 
requested.
    The Community Mental Health Services Block Grant Program 
distributes funds to 59 eligible states and territories through 
a formula based upon specified economic and demographic 
factors. Applications must include an annual plan for providing 
comprehensive community mental health services to adults with a 
serious mental illness and children with a serious emotional 
disturbance. Because the mental health needs of our Nation's 
elderly population are often not met by existing programs and 
because the need for such services is dramatically and rapidly 
increasing, the Committee recommends that SAMHSA require that 
states' plans include specific provisions for mental health 
services for older adults.
            Children's mental health
    The Committee provides $104,078,000 for the grant program 
for comprehensive community mental health services for children 
with serious emotional disturbance, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. Funding 
for this program supports grants and technical assistance for 
community-based services for children and adolescents up to age 
22 with serious emotional, behavioral, or mental disorders. The 
program assists states and local jurisdictions in developing 
integrated systems of community care. Each individual served 
receives an individual service plan developed with the 
participation of the family and the child. Grantees are 
required to provide increasing levels of matching funds over 
the six-year grant period.
            Grants to states for the homeless (PATH)
    The Committee provides $54,261,000 for the grants to states 
for the homeless (PATH) program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. PATH 
grants to states provide assistance to individuals suffering 
from severe mental illness and/or substance abuse disorders and 
who are homeless or at imminent risk of becoming homeless. 
Grants may be used for outreach, screening and diagnostic 
treatment services, rehabilitation services, community mental 
health services, alcohol or drug treatment services, training, 
case management services, supportive and supervisory services 
in residential settings, and a limited set of housing services.
            Protection and advocacy
    The Committee provides $34,000,000 for the protection and 
advocacy program, which is the same as the budget request and 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level. This funding is distributed 
to states according to a formula based on population and income 
to assist state-designated independent advocates to provide 
legal assistance to mentally ill individuals during their 
residence in state-operated facilities and for 90 days 
following their discharge.

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$2,160,695,000 for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment 
(CSAT), which is $3,155,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $26,725,000 above the budget request. Within the 
total, $83,500,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside 
as requested.
            Programs of regional and national significance
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$326,695,000 for substance abuse treatment programs of regional 
and national significance, which is $72,254,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $48,684,000 below the budget 
request. Within the total, $4,300,000 is provided through the 
evaluation set-aside as requested. The program supports 
activities to improve the accountability, capacity and 
effectiveness of substance abuse treatment services and 
services delivery. These activities include capacity expansion 
initiatives to help communities respond to serious, emerging 
and unmet treatment needs and science into services initiatives 
through monitoring and accreditation of treatment programs, 
training, dissemination and knowledge application activities. 
The program promotes the adoption of science- and evidence-
based treatment practices by developing and field-testing new 
treatment models in order to facilitate the provision of 
quality treatment services and service delivery. These 
activities are undertaken in actual service settings rather 
than laboratories and results are disseminated to state 
agencies and community treatment providers. The goal is to 
promote continuous, positive treatment service delivery change 
for those people who use and abuse alcohol and drugs.
    The Committee does not provide funding for the new access 
to recovery (ATR) voucher incentive program that would create 
incentive for states to use a portion of their substance abuse 
prevention and treatment block grant to provide services 
through vouchers. The budget request proposes $70,488,000 for 
this program. As this is a new request, no funding was provided 
for the voucher incentive program in fiscal year 2006. The 
Committee understands that states already have the authority to 
initiate voucher programs in their states without this 
incentive program. As a result, the Committee includes an 
increase of $75,409,000 to the substance abuse prevention and 
treatment block grant and encourages SAMHSA to provide 
technical assistance and share best practices with those states 
that may want to develop a voucher program with their block 
grant funding.
    The budget request proposes $24,750,000 for a 
methamphetamine treatment voucher program that would require 
states to purchase methamphetamine treatment services through 
the use of vouchers, using the ATR treatment voucher program as 
a model. The Committee appreciates and supports the 
Administration's interest in dedicating resources to help 
expand access to clinically appropriate methamphetamine 
treatment. The Committee is aware that state addiction systems 
employ a broad range of purchasing mechanisms that are 
developed to effectively tailor service delivery in ways that 
best address state and local needs and circumstances. The 
Committee favors the allocation of grants to states in a manner 
that allows flexibility in managing funds to acknowledge the 
variation in state systems and to continue to support programs 
that are achieving effective outcomes. As a result, the 
Committee is not allocating funding for the proposed treatment 
voucher program, but instead, the Committee provides 
$25,000,000 for methamphetamine treatment to state substance 
abuse agencies without requiring states to employ vouchers or 
any other one specific required service delivery purchasing 
mechanism. The Committee directs SAMHSA to allow state 
substance abuse agencies to choose financing strategies for 
methamphetamine treatment services that are most appropriate 
for their own unique systems, including but not limited to 
vouchers.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee recommends 
$31,151,000 for the screening, brief intervention, referral, 
and treatment (SBIRT) program as requested. This competitive 
grant program assists states, territories, and Tribes in 
targeting non-dependent drug users and is designed to avert the 
progression of patients from chronic substance abuse problems. 
The SBIRT program works in primary and general care settings to 
identify patients in need of treatment and to provide them with 
appropriate intervention and treatment options.
    The Committee includes the following projects and 
activities and in the following amounts for fiscal year 2007:

AIDS Resource Center, Dayton, OH for treatment services.        $250,000
Augsburg College, Minneapolis, MN for the StepUP program 
    to assist students in recovery from chemical 
    dependency..........................................         250,000
Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore, MD to 
    expand buprenorphine treatment services.............         150,000
Chesterfield County, VA for the Dual Treatment Track 
    program.............................................         100,000
City of Jackson, TN for the Jackson Drug Court program..         200,000
City of Las Vegas, NV for mental health and substance 
    abuse treatment services within the EVOLVE program..         250,000
Community Corrections Department, Dakota County, 
    Hastings, MN for the All Children Excel 
    demonstration project...............................         150,000
Gaudenzia, Inc., Norristown, PA to establish the 
    Institute for Professional Development..............         100,000
Gavin Foundation, South Boston, MA for substance abuse 
    treatment services..................................         300,000
Jefferson County Medical Society Outreach Program, Inc. 
    (The Healing Place), Louisville, KY for the Women's 
    Recovery Program....................................         225,000
Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center, Minneapolis, 
    MN for a dual diagnosis outpatient treatment program         230,000
N Street Village Washington, DC for its Recovery Housing 
    treatment program for women with dual diagnoses of 
    addiction and mental illness........................         150,000
Nexstep to Independence, Inc., Louisville, KY for a 
    prisoner re-entry program...........................          60,000
Northeast Guidance Center; Detroit, MI for substance 
    abuse treatment and mental health services at The 
    Family Life Center..................................         150,000
Patrician Movement, San Antonio, TX for substance abuse 
    prevention and treatment programs...................         250,000
Self Help Movement, Inc., Philadelphia, PA for inpatient 
    treatment services..................................          30,000
Sheriffs Youth Program, Inver Grove Heights, MN for 
    chemical dependency treatment services..............         150,000
Washington County, Hillsboro, OR for a residential 
    treatment program for persons with dual diagnoses...         200,000
Westcare Kentucky, Frankfort, KY for comprehensive 
    substance abuse treatment services at the Pikeville, 
    KY facility.........................................         500,000
            Substance abuse prevention and treatment block grant
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$1,834,000,000 for the substance abuse prevention and treatment 
(SAPT) block grant, which is $75,409,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. Within the 
total, $79,200,000 is provided through the evaluation set-aside 
as requested. The SAPT block grant provides funds to states to 
support alcohol and drug abuse prevention, treatment, and 
rehabilitation services. Funds are allocated among the states 
according to a statutory formula. State applications including 
comprehensive state plans must be approved annually by SAMHSA 
as a condition of receiving funds.
    The Committee expresses its strong support for the SAPT 
block grant, an effective and efficient funding stream that is 
directed to every state and territory. The block grant is the 
foundation of our publicly funded substance abuse prevention 
and treatment system and serves our most vulnerable citizens, 
including pregnant and parenting women, those with HIV/AIDS and 
others. As a result, the Committee remains concerned with any 
action that could erode, weaken, or in any way disrupt this 
vital funding mechanism.
    The Committee is aware of SAMHSA's collaborative work with 
state substance abuse directors, also known as single state 
authorities (SSAs) for substance abuse, to improve the quality 
of substance abuse prevention and treatment data by seeking 
information on a core set of national outcome measures (NOMs) 
across all SAMHSA funding mechanisms, including services funded 
by the SAPT block grant. The Committee commends SAMHSA for 
working with states and territories to streamline data 
reporting requirements while improving accountability. The 
Committee encourages SAMHSA to continue working directly with 
the national association representing state substance abuse 
directors on the variety of implementation issues related to 
NOMs to ensure continued progress, including work to examine 
effective non-proprietary data management tools that could 
continue to implement this initiative in an efficient and cost-
effective manner.

Center for substance abuse prevention

            Programs of regional and national significance
    The Committee provides $195,805,000 for the substance abuse 
prevention programs of regional and national significance, 
which is $2,904,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $15,207,000 more than the budget request. The program 
identifies and disseminates evidence-based substance abuse 
prevention approaches.
    Within the total, the Committee provides $300,000 for the 
Advertising Council's parent-oriented media campaign to combat 
underage drinking. Funding should be used to continue the 
campaign, refresh media spots, and evaluate results.
    The Committee is pleased that the Inter-Agency Coordinating 
Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking (ICCPUD) has 
taken steps to engage State officials on evdience-based 
strategies for combating underage drinking and to promote 
increased State action to reduce youth alcohol use. The 
Committee appreciates the ICCPUD's January 2006 submission of a 
proposed federal underage drinking prevention plan, and is very 
pleased that it included plans for a Surgeon General's ``Call 
to Action'' on underage drinking prevention to be releaed in 
spring of 2006. The Committee urges the ICCPUD to ensure that 
the ``Call to Action'' is vigorously promoted and disseminated 
to policy-makers and the public.
    The Committee includes the following projects and 
activities and in the following amounts for fiscal year 2007:

City of Detroit, for substance abuse prevention and 
    treatment services for youth through the SAFETY 
    program.............................................        $425,000
Hamilton County Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention 
    Coalition, Jennings, FL for a youth academic and 
    social development program..........................         150,000
Institute for the Advanced Study of the Black Family, 
    Oakland, CA for an integrated HIV/AIDS and substance 
    abuse treatment initiative..........................         100,000
Kids Hope United, Lake Villa, IL to expand its multi-
    systemic therapy program............................         200,000
Lawrence County Family Center, New Castle, PA for the 
    Lawrence County Strategic Alliance for Stable 
    Families............................................         500,000
Long Island Crisis Center, Bellmore, NY to conduct a 
    public education and awareness campaign for 
    vulnerable families.................................          80,000
National Center for Children Exposed to Violence, Yale 
    University Child Study Center, New Haven, CT for 
    training, technical assistance, consultation and 
    other services relating to the effects of violence 
    on children.........................................         650,000
Ohio Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 
    Counselors, Shaker Heights, OH for the Ohio Alcohol 
    and Drug Workforce Development Project..............         100,000
Relief Nursery, Eugene, OR for services to 
    methamphetamine-affected children and their families         350,000
South Boston Community Health Center, South Boston, MA 
    for substance abuse prevention programs.............         350,000

Program management

    The Committee provides a program level total of $96,521,000 
for program management, of which $21,000,000 is provided 
through the evaluation set-aside as requested. The fiscal year 
2007 program level is $4,472,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
appropriation provides funding to coordinate, direct, and 
manage the agency's programs. Funds are used for salaries, 
benefits, space, supplies, equipment, travel and overhead.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    The Committee provides a total of $318,695,000 for the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget 
request.
    The mission of the agency is to generate and disseminate 
information that improves the delivery of health care. Its 
research goals are to determine what works best in clinical 
practice; improve the cost-effective use of health care 
resources; help consumers make more informed choices; and 
measure and improve the quality of care.
    The Committee provides $260,695,000 for research on health 
costs, quality, and outcomes, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. This program 
identifies the most effective and efficient approaches to 
organize, deliver, finance, and reimburse health care services; 
determines how the structure of the delivery system, financial 
incentives, market forces, and better information affects the 
use, quality, and cost of health services; and facilitates the 
translation of research findings for providers, patients, 
plans, purchasers, and policymakers. It also funds research 
that determines what works best in increasing the cost 
effectiveness and appropriateness of clinical practice; 
supports the development of tools to measure and evaluate 
health outcomes, quality of care, and consumer satisfaction 
with health care system performance; and facilitates the 
translation of information into practical uses through the 
development and dissemination of research databases. The 
Committee also encourages AHRQ to look favorably on proposals 
that would proactively detect medical errors and preemptively 
control injury via compact medical devices that acquire, 
analyze and filter data from multiple, disparate, wireless and 
wired sources.
    Within the total for research on health costs, quality, and 
outcomes, the Committee provides $84,000,000 for the patient 
safety program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the budget request. This amount includes 
$50,000,000 for grants to support the health information 
technology (HIT) initiative. The Committee urges AHRQ to play a 
key role in the initiative being developed in the Office of the 
National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. The 
Committee is aware of several pilot projects being funded that 
demonstrate the reduction in patient harm from the use of 
integrated medication delivery systems and urges AHRQ to 
continue making such systems a component of its HIT grants.
    Also within the total for research on health costs, quality 
and outcomes, the Committee provides $15,000,000 for 
comparative clinical effectiveness research. This is the same 
as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request.
    The Committee is concerned about the prevalence of 
undiagnosed and untreated mental illness among older Americans. 
Affective disorders, including depression, anxiety, dementia, 
and substance abuse and dependence, are often misdiagnosed or 
not recognized at all by primary and specialty care physicians 
in their elderly patients. Research has shown that the 
treatment of mental illness can improve health outcomes for 
those with other chronic diseases. While effective treatments 
for these conditions are available, there is an urgent need to 
translate advancements from biomedical and behavioral research 
to clinical practice. The Committee urges AHRQ to support 
evidence-based research projects focused on the diagnosis and 
treatment of mental illnesses in the geriatric population, and 
to disseminate evidence-based reports to physicians and other 
health care professionals.
    The Committee is aware that heart disease, stroke and other 
cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death among 
women. The Committee requests that AHRQ, no later than 
September 30, 2007, prepare and submit to the Committee, a 
report on the quality of and access to care for women with 
heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases. The 
report should contain recommendations for eliminating 
disparities in, and improving the treatment of, heart disease, 
stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases in women.
    The Committee is aware that obesity rates in children have 
risen dramatically in recent years and that obesity may soon 
overtake tobacco as the leading preventable cause of death. The 
Committee requests that AHRQ submit a report on the 
effectiveness of weight reduction programs to the Committee not 
later than 18 months after the enactment of this Act. The 
report should evaluate the available scientific evidence 
regarding the safety and effectiveness of the programs, 
behavior modification, and other weight loss methods, and how 
successful the programs are in helping individuals achieve 
short-term and long-term weight loss and sustain long-term 
weight maintenance.
    The Committee is pleased that AHRQ is working with the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to establish 
evidence-driven standards of care for Duchenne and Becker 
muscular dystrophy patients, and encourages both agencies to 
complete this work by February 1, 2007.
    The Committee is aware that simulation-based medical 
education can ensure clinical competence and reinforce best 
practices by allowing medical students and experienced 
clinicians to practice procedures in a realistic setting. The 
enhanced clinical skill development provided by simulation-
based medical training benefits patients and healthcare 
consumers in the form of improved health outcomes, patient 
safety, and quality; reduced medical errors and deaths; and 
increased healthcare cost savings. The Committee encourages 
AHRQ to support research, convene workshops, and perform 
outreach to medical, nursing, and allied health schools to 
improve the utilization and development of simulation 
technologies in medical education and demonstrate the value of 
simulation-based medical training. AHRQ is encouraged to 
collaborate with the Department of Defense, the Telemedicine 
and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), the Department 
of Veterans Affairs, and the National Institutes of Health in 
the further deployment of medical simulation research, tools, 
and training to improve patient care.
    The Committee is concerned about end stage renal disease 
(ESRD) and the difference in prevalence of treatment 
modalities, especially the significant difference between 
peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. The Committee urges AHRQ 
to conduct a comprehensive meta-analysis of the best available 
research studies comparing short and long term outcomes of 
dialysis methods, especially those affecting the quality of 
life of ESRD patients, and the costs associated with the 
treatment of these patients.
    The Committee provides $55,300,000 for the Medical 
Expenditures Panel Surveys (MEPS), which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. The MEPS 
provide data for timely national estimates of health care use 
and expenditures, private and public health insurance coverage, 
and the availability, costs, and scope of private health 
insurance benefits. This activity also provides data for 
analysis of changes in behavior as a result of market forces or 
policy changes on health care use, expenditures, and insurance 
coverage; develops cost/savings estimates of proposed changes 
in policy; and identifies the impact of changes in policy for 
subgroups of the population.
    For program support, the Committee provides $2,700,000 
which is the same as fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
budget request. This activity supports the overall direction 
and management of the agency.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services


                     GRANTS TO STATES FOR MEDICAID

    The Committee provides $138,072,248,000 for the Federal 
share of current law state Medicaid costs, which is 
$18,882,171,000 below the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. This amount does not include 
$62,783,825,000 which was advance funded in the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation for the first quarter of fiscal year 2007. 
In addition, the Committee provides an advance appropriation of 
$65,257,617,000 for program costs in the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2008. The Committee has also included indefinite 
budget authority for unanticipated costs in fiscal year 2007.
    Federal Medicaid grants reimburse states for 50 to 83 
percent (depending on per capita income) of their expenditures 
in providing health care for individuals whose income and 
resources fall below specified levels. Subject to certain 
minimum requirements, states have broad authority within the 
law to set eligibility, coverage, and payment levels. Over 
51,000,000 low-income individuals will receive health care 
services in 2007 under the Medicaid program. state costs of 
administering the program are matched at rates that generally 
range from 50 to 100 percent, depending upon the type of cost. 
Total funding for Medicaid includes $2,006,445,000 for the 
entitlement Vaccines for Children program. These funds, which 
are transferred to the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention for administration, support the costs of 
immunization for children who are on Medicaid, uninsured or 
underinsured and receiving immunizations at Federally qualified 
health centers or rural health clinics.
    The Committee is concerned that certain states have plans 
to use the Federal matching dollars available under Medicaid, 
not to improve the quality of hospital care in their state, but 
to fill state budget gaps at the expense of quality healthcare 
for patients. That is clearly not the intention of this program 
and we encourage the committees of jurisdiction to take 
appropriate remedial action.

                  PAYMENTS TO HEALTH CARE TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee provides $197,017,391,000 for the Payments to 
the Health Care Trust Funds account, which is $18,370,191,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $118,404,000 less 
than the budget request. This entitlement account includes the 
general fund subsidy to the Federal Supplementary Medical 
Insurance Trust Fund for Medicare Part B benefits and for 
Medicare drug benefits and administration as well as other 
reimbursements to the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for 
benefits and related administrative costs, which have not been 
financed by payroll taxes or premium contributions. Funds are 
not provided for reimbursement for health care fraud and abuse 
control, since the Committee did not fund this new account. The 
Committee continues to include bill language requested by the 
Administration providing indefinite authority for paying the 
general revenue portion of the Part B premium match and 
provides resources for the Part D drug benefit program in the 
event that the annual appropriation is insufficient.

                           PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

    The Committee makes available $3,153,547,000 in trust funds 
for Federal administration of the Medicare and Medicaid 
programs, which is $73,729,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $5,145,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee includes bill language that extends the availability 
of $146,760,000 until September 30, 2008 for Medicare 
contracting reform activities as requested. The Committee also 
includes bill language requested by the Administration which 
authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services to charge 
fees associated with conducting revisit surveys on health care 
facilities. Such fees, estimated at $35,000,000, shall be 
credited to this appropriation as an offsetting collection to 
remain available until expended.

Research, demonstration, and evaluation

    The Committee provides $46,673,000 for research, 
demonstration and evaluation, which is $10,747,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $5,145,000 above the budget 
request. These funds support a variety of studies and 
demonstrations in such areas as monitoring and evaluating 
health system performance; improving health care financing and 
delivery mechanisms; modernization of the Medicare program; the 
needs of vulnerable populations in the areas of health care 
access, delivery systems, and financing; and information to 
improve consumer choice and health status.
    The Committee includes bill language referring to the 
following projects and activities and in the following amounts 
for fiscal year 2007:

Access Health, Inc., Muskegon, MI for the small business 
    health coverage program.............................        $300,000
Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, NY for a Men's 
    Health Initiative to demonstrate means of improving 
    health care and preventive services for low-income 
    minority men........................................         400,000
Chai Lifeline, New York, NY for support programs for 
    seriously ill children and their families...........         100,000
City of Detroit, MI for a project to improve access to 
    primary care and preventive health services for low-
    income and uninsured persons........................         550,000
City of Los Angeles, CA for a demonstration project to 
    provide mobile medical services for the homeless....         300,000
Gadsden County Community Health Council, Quincy, FL for 
    a project to help low-income residents obtain 
    prescription drugs..................................         170,000
Genesys Health System, Grand Blanc, MI for a 
    demonstration program through the Health Access 
    network to improve access to dental care for low-
    income uninsured patients...........................          50,000
Good Shepherd Home, Ashland, OH for an elderly health 
    care delivery demonstration.........................         150,000
Medicare Rights Center, New York, NY for the Medicare 
    Interactive program.................................         500,000
National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, 
    Alexandria, VA for an initiative to increase 
    underserved participation in end-of-life care.......         350,000
Patient Services Inc., Midlothian, VA for a Medical 
    Insurance and Co-payment Assistance Case Management 
    Program for Chronic Diseases, including Hepatitis C.         100,000
Riverside Regional Medical Center, Newport News, VA for 
    the Patient Navigator Program.......................         200,000
San Francisco Department of Public Health, San 
    Francisco, CA for a demonstration project to improve 
    HIV/AIDS treatment and prevention services..........       1,500,000
Stark Prescription Assistance Network, Inc., Canton, OH 
    for prescription assistance to the uninsured........         100,000
Thurston-Mason County Medical Society Volunteer Care 
    Institute, Olympia, WA for its Project Access 
    initiative to provide care for low-income uninsured 
    patients............................................         200,000
Virginia Association of Area Agencies on Aging, 
    Richmond, VA for a program to educate potential 
    recipients regarding the Medicare part D drug 
    benefit.............................................         175,000

Medicare operations

    The Committee provides $2,145,208,000 to support Medicare 
claims processing contracts, which is $41,966,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
request.

Revitalization plan

    The Committee provides $22,765,000 to remain available for 
two years, as the fourth year of investment in CMS's efforts to 
make significant improvements to key aspects of managing both 
the agency and the Medicare program. This amount is the same as 
the budget request and $1,198,000 less than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level. Funding will target information technology 
involving modernization of Medicare fee-for-service claims 
processing and modernization of the data environment.

State survey and certification

    The Committee provides $283,524,000 for state inspections 
of facilities serving Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, 
which is $25,396,000 above the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and the same as the budget request.
    Survey and certification activities ensure that 
institutions and agencies providing care to Medicare and 
Medicaid beneficiaries meet Federal health, safety and program 
standards. On-site surveys are conducted by state survey 
agencies, with a pool of Federal surveyors performing random 
monitoring surveys. Over 72,000 surveys and complaint 
investigations are estimated be performed in fiscal year 2007.

Federal administration

    The Committee provides $655,377,000 to support Federal 
administrative activities related to the Medicare and Medicaid 
programs, which is $18,312,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the same as the budget request. This amount 
includes $12,900,000 for the Healthy Start, Grow Smart program 
as proposed in the budget request. The Committee continues bill 
language identifying $48,960,000 for the contract costs of the 
health-care integrated general ledger accounting system.
    The Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance 
programs ensure the health care security of about 90,000,000 
beneficiaries. The Federal administration budget provides funds 
for the staff and operations of CMS to administer these 
programs.
    The Committee commends CMS for expanding the Quality of 
Life Demonstration (QoL) project to include oral chemotherapy 
regimens in its data collection on this project. The QoL as 
implemented by CMS in 2005 was an excellent first step in 
gathering data on the impact of chemotherapy as it started to 
measure important outcomes for cancer patients specifically 
related to infused chemotherapy. The Committee is pleased with 
CMS' decision to broaden the demonstration in 2006 to collect 
data on all types of cancer management. The inclusion of oral 
chemotherapy regimens will provide a more comprehensive 
understanding of the quality of life issues impacting all 
cancer patients. The demonstration project is intended to 
provide a better understanding from cancer patients receiving 
chemotherapy on such important issues as their pain control 
management, minimization of nausea and vomiting, and the 
reduction of fatigue. The action taken by CMS to expand the 
demonstration project will provide important data on all anti-
cancer regimens and their impact on patients' quality of life.
    The Committee believes that the growing gap between the 
size of the nation's aging baby boom population and the number 
of pulmonary/critical care physicians poses challenges to the 
future delivery of high quality, efficient care under Medicare 
and Medicaid. The Committee requests that CMS review a recently 
released report by HRSA on the healthcare workforce, a portion 
of which focuses on the critical care workforce shortage, and 
that CMS also review other relevant research and consult with 
the relevant critical care societies in order to develop 
recommendations for addressing the critical care workforce 
shortage issue, including the possible use of the pulmonary/
critical care specialty as a model for developing and testing 
policy approaches to address workforce shortage issues.
    The Committee is aware that heart disease, stroke and other 
cardiovascular disease are the leading cause of death among 
women and is concerned that women are less likely than men to 
receive treatments for cardiovascular disease, perhaps due to 
lack of awareness and the presence of different symptoms in 
women than in men. The Committee also recognizes that certain 
diagnostic tests for cardiovascular disease may be less 
accurate in women than men. Therefore, the Committee urges the 
Center for Beneficiary Choices of CMS to develop and distribute 
to female Medicare beneficiaries, physicians, and other 
appropriate health care professionals educational materials 
relating to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart 
disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular disease in women.
    The Committee recognizes that CMS has initiated some 
commendable community-based activities for an MMA education and 
outreach campaign directed towards dual elibigle persons, but 
the Committee is also aware that there is considerable evidence 
that low-income dual eligible persons with mental disabilities 
continue to need direct help with Part D enrollment. Therefore, 
within the amounts appropriated, the Committee encourages that 
five percent of the funds be directed for one-on-one 
pharmaceutical benefits counseling to be provided through 
community-based organizations and safety net community mental 
health centers.
    The Committee is concerned that patients suffering from end 
stage renal disease (ESRD) are offered the proper modality for 
the best medical outcome and the highest quality of life. The 
Committee is particularly concerned about factors that may be 
influencing the choice of modality and the availability of 
services to ESRD patients. Given that Medicate provides 
coverage for 90 percent of the prevalent dialysis population 
and 69 percent of those with a transplant, the Committee urges 
CMS, in conjunction with other health agencies, to review these 
patterns and requests CMS to provide the Committee with 
recommendations to ensure public health policies, in the form 
of reimbursement rates, public health service, research or 
other activities related to ESRD, give priority to positive 
medical outcomes and quality of life for ESRD patients.

                Administration for Children and Families


  PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT AND FAMILY SUPPORT 
                                PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $2,752,697,000 for the Child 
Support Enforcement and Family Support programs, and 
$1,000,000,000 in advance funding for the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2008 to ensure timely payments for the child 
support enforcement program. This is the same as the budget 
request. The Committee recommends estimated funding of 
$38,000,000 for Payments to Territories, the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. The Committee 
also recommends $1,000,000 for the repatriation program, which 
is the authorized funding level under section 1113(d) of the 
Social Security Act.

                   LOW INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $1,930,000,000 for the Low-Income 
Home Energy Assistance state formula grants. This is 
$50,000,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$148,000,000 more than the budget request. The Committee 
recommends $181,170,000 for the contingent emergency reserve. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level. No 
funds were requested for this program.
    For Fiscal year 2006, the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (as 
amended by Public Law 109-204) provided $500,000,000 for State 
formula grants and $500,000,000 for the contingency emergency 
reserve (in addition to the funds appropriated for these items 
in the general appropriation Act).
    The low-income home energy assistance program (LIHEAP) 
provides assistance to low-income households to help pay the 
costs of home energy. Funds are provided through grants to 
states, Indian Tribes, and territories and are used for summer 
cooling, winter heating, and crisis assistance programs.

                     REFUGEE AND ENTRANT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $604,329,000 for refugee 
assistance programs. This is $34,506,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and $10,606,000 less than the budget 
request.
    In addition, the Committee recommends that the Office of 
Refugee Resettlement (ORR) be granted authority to carry over 
unexpended funds from fiscal year 2007 to reimburse the costs 
of services provided through September 30, 2009, for all 
programs within ORR's jurisdiction.

Transitional and medical services

    The Committee recommends $282,333,000 for transitional and 
medical services. This is $16,786,000 more than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
transitional and medical services program provides funding for 
the state-administered cash and medical assistance program that 
assists refugees who are not categorically eligible for TANF or 
Medicaid, the unaccompanied minors program that reimburses 
states for the cost of foster care, and the voluntary agency 
grant program in which participating National refugee 
resettlement agencies provide resettlement assistance with a 
combination of Federal and matched funds.

Victims of trafficking

    The Committee recommends up to $9,816,000 for the victims 
of trafficking program. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $5,000,000 less than the budget request. 
The funds will ensure continued administration of a national 
network for identification, tracking, and certification of 
trafficking victims.
    The Committee supports efforts to ensure that child 
trafficking victims do not remain trapped in life-threatening 
situations out of fear of being interrogated by law enforcement 
authorities. The Committee supports the efforts of the 
Department, under the Trafficking Victim Protection Act of 
2000, to independently certify children as child trafficking 
victims eligible for benefits and services and encourages the 
Department to facilitate the provision of guardians ad litem 
for child trafficking victims to help ensure their access to 
emergency benefits and services until their ultimate placement 
in foster care.

Social Services

    The Committee recommends $154,004,000 for social services. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$4,394,000 more than the budget request. Funds are distributed 
by formula as well as through the discretionary grant-making 
process for special projects.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee has included 
$19,000,000 for support to communities with large 
concentrations of Cuban and Haitian entrants of varying ages 
whose cultural differences make assimilation especially 
difficult, justifying a more intense level and longer duration 
of Federal assistance.
    The Committee continues to request the Administration for 
Children and Families (ACF) to adequately fund refugee school 
impact grants.

Preventive health

    The Committee recommends $4,748,000 for preventive health 
services. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. These funds are awarded to the 
states to ensure adequate health assessment activities for 
refugees.

Targeted assistance

    The Committee recommends $48,590,000 for the targeted 
assistance program. This is the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. These grants provide 
assistance to areas with high concentrations of refugees.

Unaccompanied minors

    The Committee recommends $95,022,000 for the unaccompanied 
minors program. This is $17,720,000 more than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $10,000,000 less than the budget 
request.
    The Committee recognizes the legal representation crisis 
and need for guardians for unaccompanied children and is 
pleased with the progress ORR has made in implementing pro bono 
pilot programs to test the benefits of providing pro bono 
counsel and guardians for unaccompanied children through its 
grant to Vera Institute for Justice. The Committee has included 
additional funds to expand the pilot pro-bono legal services 
program to a national level. The Committee has also included 
additional funds for the care and placement of an increasing 
number of unaccompanied alien children through foster care, 
shelter care, staff secure or secure detention centers, and for 
additional field staff in areas of high apprehensions. The 
Committee does not recommend that funds be included for 
expanded background checks before placement of unaccompanied 
minors. The Committee expects the Department to continue to 
perform the rigorous background checks on the adult to whom the 
minor is released and to conduct home assessments as 
circumstances warrant.

Victims of torture

    The Committee recommends $9,816,000 to provide a 
comprehensive program of support for domestic centers and 
programs for victims of torture. This is the same as both the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request.

   PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee recommends $2,062,081,000 for the child care 
and development block grant program, the same as both the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request.
    The discretionary funds provided in this bill, along with 
annual child care entitlement funds and matching funds, 
constitute the Child Care and Development Fund. That Fund 
enables states, Territories, and Indian Tribes to provide child 
care services for low-income families. The Deficit Reduction 
Act of 2005 increased the annual child care entitlement 
contribution to that fund through 2010 to $2,917,000,000, an 
annual increase of $200,000,000.

                      SOCIAL SERVICES BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee recommends $1,700,000,000 for the social 
services block grant (SSBG). This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 level. The Committee rejects language proposed in the 
budget request to override the authorized funding level set 
forth in section 2003(c) of the Social Security Act.
    SSBGs are designed to encourage states to furnish a variety 
of social services to needy individuals to prevent and reduce 
dependency; help individuals achieve and maintain self-
sufficiency; prevent or reduce inappropriate institutional 
care; secure admission or referral for institutional care when 
other forms of care are not appropriate; and prevent neglect, 
abuse, and exploitation of children and adults.

                CHILDREN AND FAMILIES SERVICES PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends a program level total of 
$8,663,166,000 for children and families services programs. 
This is $194,213,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $414,064,000 more than the budget request. Within the 
total provided, $10,500,000 is provided through the evaluation 
set-aside. This account finances a number of programs aimed at 
enhancing the well-being of the Nation's children and families, 
particularly those who are disadvantaged or troubled.

Head Start

    The Committee recommends $6,788,571,000 for the Head Start 
program, the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and an 
increase of $2,800,000 over the budget request. Of this total, 
the Committee recommends advancing $1,388,800,000 of this 
account for fiscal year 2008.
    Head Start provides comprehensive child development 
services to economically disadvantaged children and their 
families. Intended primarily for preschoolers from low-income 
families, the program promotes school readiness by enhancing 
the social and cognitive development of children through 
educational, health, nutritional, social and other services. At 
least 10 percent of enrollment opportunities in each state are 
made available to handicapped children.
    Grants to carry out Head Start programs are awarded to 
public and private nonprofit and for-profit agencies. Unless a 
waiver is approved, grantees must contribute 20 percent of the 
total cost of the program from non-Federal funds, which is 
usually an in-kind contribution. No more than 15 percent of 
total costs may be for program administration.
    The Committee continues to point to the 2001 study 
published by the Department of Health and Human Services, 
documenting that only 19 percent of eligible children were able 
to access Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Programs. The 
Committee supports the provision included in H.R. 2123, the 
School Readiness Act of 2005 as passed by the House, which 
would address the funding shortfall facing Migrant and Seasonal 
Head Start Programs by reserving 5 percent of the total annual 
Head Start appropriation for Migrant and Seasonal Head Start 
Programs. Until such time as the Bureau can put in place a 
system to ensure that access to funding for migrant and 
seasonal children is comparable to the access enjoyed by other 
eligible children, the Committee encourages the Bureau to 
develop strategies to better serve the needs of migrant and 
seasonal farm workers and their children and requests that the 
Secretary submit a report on the Bureau's ongoing plans to 
ensure that Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs are able 
to serve a larger percentage of the children eligible for 
services.

Consolidated runaway and homeless youth program

    The Committee recommends $87,837,000 for runaway and 
homeless youth activities. This is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. Funds for this 
program are distributed between the basic center program and 
the transitional living program under a statutory formula.
    The runaway and homeless youth programs provide grants to 
local public and private organizations to establish and operate 
runaway and homeless youth shelters to address the crisis needs 
of runaway and homeless youth and their families. Grants are 
used to develop or strengthen community-based shelters, which 
are outside the law enforcement, juvenile justice, child 
welfare, and mental health systems.
    The Committee request that ACF work with nonprofit 
organizations that are trained and dedicated to meeting the 
needs of young homeless children and their families. The 
Committee directs the Department to refrain from vouchering 
transitional living program funds to provide maternity group 
home services. The Committee believes that the voucher policy 
is ill-advised and, furthermore, that the Runaway and Homeless 
Youth Act does not authorize the Department to issue such 
vouchers. Rather, it is the Committee's continued expectation 
that current transitional living program grantees will provide 
transitional living opportunities and supports to pregnant and 
parenting homeless youth, as is their current practice. The 
Committee continues to encourage the Secretary, acting through 
the network of federally-funded runaway and homeless youth 
training and technical assistance providers, to offer guidance 
to grantees and others on the programmatic modifications 
required to address the unique needs of pregnant and parenting 
youth and on the various sources of funding available for 
residential services to this population.

Prevention grants to reduce abuse of runaway youth

    The Committee recommends $15,027,000 for prevention grants 
to reduce abuse of runaway youth. This is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. This 
program is designed to reduce the sexual abuse of runaway youth 
by providing grants to support street-based outreach and 
education to runaway, homeless, and street youth who have been 
sexually abused or who are at-risk of sexual abuse. The street 
outreach program ensures rapid engagement with young people in 
an effort to prevent the most terrible situations that take 
place when they are subjected to life on the streets, including 
physical and sexual abuse, assault, commercial sexual 
exploitation, disease, long-term homelessness, and even death.

Child abuse state grants and discretionary activities

    For child abuse state grants and discretionary activities, 
the Committee recommends $53,137,000. This is $350,000 more 
than both the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget 
request. Within this total, the recommendation includes 
$27,007,000 for state grants and $26,130,000 for child abuse 
discretionary activities.
    Within the funds provided for child abuse discretionary 
activities, the Committee includes funding for the following 
items:

Children's Advocacy Center of Manhattan, New York, NY 
    for assessment and treatment services to victims of 
    child abuse.........................................        $150,000
Jefferson County, CO for reengineering of child abuse 
    prevention infrastructure...........................         150,000
McKenzie's Hope, Huntington, IN for child abuse and 
    neglect programs....................................          50,000

Community-based child abuse prevention

    The Committee recommends $42,430,000 for community-based 
child abuse prevention. This is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. Funds are 
provided to lead state agencies and are used to develop, 
operate, expand, and enhance community-based efforts to 
strengthen and support families in an effort to prevent child 
abuse and neglect.

Abandoned infants assistance

    The Committee recommends $11,835,000 for the Abandoned 
Infants Assistance program. This is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. The purpose of 
this program is to provide financial support to public and 
private community and faith-based entities to develop, 
implement, and operate demonstration projects that will prevent 
the abandonment of infants and young children exposed to HIV/
AIDS and drugs; identify and address their needs; assist such 
children to reside with their natural families or in foster 
care; recruit, train, and retain foster parents as well as 
health and social services personnel; provide respite care for 
families and foster families; and prevent the abandonment of 
infants and young children.

Child welfare services and training

    The Committee recommends $286,753,000 for child welfare 
services. This is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. This program provides grants to 
states to assist public welfare agencies to improve child 
welfare services. state services include preventive 
intervention in order for children to stay in their homes, 
alternative placement like foster care or adoption if it is not 
possible for children to remain at home, and reunification 
programs so that, if appropriate, children can return home.
    The Committee recommends $7,335,000 for child welfare 
training. This is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. The Committee recognizes the need 
for trained, skilled, and qualified child welfare service 
workers. This program provides grants to institutions of higher 
education to develop and improve education and training 
programs and resources for child welfare service providers as 
well as students seeking degrees in social work.

Adoption opportunities

    The Committee recommends $26,848,000 for adoption 
opportunities. This is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
funding specifically targeted to improving the adoption of 
children, particularly those with special needs, and for 
providing innovative services that support families involved in 
adoption.

Adoption incentives

    The Committee recommends $17,820,000 for the adoption 
incentives program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $11,834,000 less than the budget request. 
This program targets incentives specifically for older 
children. Funds are awarded to states using three baselines: 
one for the total number of children adopted, one for children 
with special needs under the age of nine, and one for children 
aged nine and older. The goal of this program is to increase 
the number of adoptions nationwide.

Adoption awareness

    The Committee recommends $12,674,000 for the adoption 
awareness program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
training to designated staff of eligible health centers in 
providing adoption information and referrals to pregnant women 
on an equal basis with all other courses of action included in 
non-directive counseling to pregnant women.

Compassion capital fund

    The Committee recommends $54,549,000 for the compassion 
capital fund. This is $9,801,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $45,451,000 less than the budget request. 
This program provides grants to intermediary organizations that 
in turn provide training and technical assistance to faith and 
community based organizations. The program also provides 
capacity-building grants directly to the latter organizations, 
which include organizations that foster supportive 
relationships with youth.

Social services and income maintenance research

    The Committee recommends a program level total of 
$14,395,000 for social services and income maintenance 
research, $6,000,000 of which is through the evaluation set-
aside. The program level total is $8,527,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $14,395,000 more than the 
budget request. These funds support research, demonstration, 
evaluation, and dissemination activities. Recent topics funded 
through this program include welfare-to-work strategies and 
programs to strengthen family relationships and promote healthy 
marriages.
    While the Child Support Enforcement program continues to 
make gains in enforcing child support orders--child support 
collections reached $23 billion in 2005, serving an estimated 
16 million child support cases--the costs and complexities of 
tracking, locating and coordinating child support cases is 
imposing heavy burdens on State automation systems. Both the 
General Accountability Office and the Office of the Inspector 
General have recommended that ACF provide more technical 
assistance to help States better administer and manage these 
systems. In addition, broader administration and reporting 
requirements contained in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 
will place additional strain on the States' ability to manage 
this program. ACF is currently working with the State 
Information Technology Consortium to expand data exchange 
capabilities between the courts and State child support 
enforcement agencies as well as increase collection efficiency 
in States and tribal organizations. The Committee recommends 
that collaborative effort continue.
    Within the funds provided for this program, the Committee 
includes funding for the following items:

Abstinence the Better Choice, Inc., Akron, OH to expand 
    educational methods of the Responsible Social Values 
    program and to update technology....................         $25,000
Arrowhead Economic Opportunity Agency, Virginia, MN for 
    the Family to Family community-based mentoring 
    program to assist low-income families...............         250,000
Beth El House, Alexandria, VA for social services and 
    transitional housing for formerly homeless women and 
    their children......................................          75,000
Beth Gavriel Bukharian Jewish Congregation, Queens, NY 
    for a demonstration project to address the needs of 
    elderly immigrants..................................         150,000
Cherokee County Commission, Centre, Alabama, for 
    Cherokee County Family Resource Center..............         100,000
Child Adoption Resource Association, Inc., New London, 
    CT for adoption services............................          60,000
Children's Home Society of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, SD 
    for services related to domestic violence, child 
    abuse and neglect...................................         250,000
Children's Center of Southwest Missouri, Joplin, MO for 
    child advocacy......................................          50,000
Children's Home Society of Idaho, Boise, ID for foster 
    care................................................         260,000
Children's Hunger Alliance, Columbus, OH for the 
    nutrition and obesity education program.............         100,000
Children's Rights Council, Hyattsville, MD for Safe 
    Haven Access Centers in Stark County, OH............          50,000
Christian Outreach of Lutherans (COOL), Waukegan, IL for 
    Latino leadership development in underserved areas..         125,000
City and County of Denver, CO for housing assistance, 
    mentoring and other services to homeless families 
    and seniors.........................................         150,000
City of Chicago, IL Department of Housing for assistance 
    to chronically homeless families....................         150,000
City of Detroit, MI for an Individual Development 
    Account initiative..................................         250,000
City of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, TX for early childhood 
    development program.................................         250,000
City of Lansing, MI for Michigan Center for Infant Loss.         350,000
City of Portland, OR for services to prevent and end 
    family homelessness.................................         250,000
City of San Jose, CA for its Services for New Americans 
    program, including assistance with job seeking 
    skills, citizenship, family safety and resettlement.         200,000
Clearbrook Clinical Services, Arlington Heights, IL for 
    services to children with developmental disabilities         210,000
Clearbrook, Arlington Heights, IL to enhance its 
    residential services for persons with developmental 
    disabilities........................................         100,000
Cleveland Avenue YMCA, Montgomery, AL for family support 
    services for at- risk youth.........................         100,000
Cliff Hagan Boys and Girls Club, Owensboro, KY for 
    computers, fitness equipment, and furnishings of new 
    facility............................................         300,000
Community Mediation Center of Stark County, OH for a 
    conflict resolution program.........................          50,000
Community of Hope, Washington, DC for social services to 
    homeless families using a Housing First model.......         225,000
Community Support Services, Brookfield, IL for 
    counseling and services for people with 
    developmental disabilities and their families.......         150,000
Connecticut Council of Family Service Agencies, 
    Wethersfield, CT for the Empowering People for 
    Success welfare-to-work initiative..................         300,000
Cross Road Foundation, Staten Island, NY for crisis 
    pregnancy services..................................          25,000
District Attorney, 32nd Judicial District, Houma, LA for 
    counseling and other intervention services for at-
    risk youth and their families.......................         100,000
Domestic Violence Clearinghouse and Legal Hotline, 
    Honolulu, HI for education and other services 
    related to domestic violence prevention.............         250,000
Dreams with Wings, Inc., Louisville, KY for its Dream 
    Builders--Day Program for mentally disabled adults..          50,000
East Akron Community House, Akron, OH for youth services 
    programs............................................          50,000
Family and Children First, Inc., Louisville, KY for 
    abused and neglected children's services............          50,000
Family Center of Columbus, Columbus, GA for family 
    counseling, youth mentoring, and other services for 
    families dealing with consequences of divorce.......         200,000
Gerard Treatment Programs, Austin, MN for program for 
    abused and neglected children with severe emotional 
    or behavioral problems..............................         500,000
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, Clearwater, FL for 
    the Training and Best Practices Research Center for 
    Victims of Torture and Genocide.....................         300,000
Helping Children Worldwide, Herndon, VA for support 
    programs for low- income students and their families         250,000
Hope Village for Children, Meridan, MS for expansion of 
    urgent shelter and therapeutic group care...........         300,000
Interagency Council on Child Abuse and Neglect, El 
    Monte, CA, for a mentoring program for foster 
    children in Los Angeles County......................         240,000
J.W. Darden Foundation, Opelika, AL for a health 
    resource and education screening center.............         100,000
Jewish Community Center of Cleveland, Beechwood, OH for 
    human services programs for children and families...         100,000
Kids Hope United, Miami, FL for the WINGS program.......         200,000
L.I.F.T. Women's Resource Center, Detroit, MI, for 
    services to improve self- suficiency and life skills 
    of women transitioning from substance abuse, 
    domestic violence or homelessness...................         150,000
Lutheran Social Services, Duluth, MN for services to 
    runaway, homeless and other at-risk youth and their 
    families............................................         250,000
Mary's Family, Orlean, VA to develop a respite program 
    for Winchester-area special needs families..........         100,000
Mecklenburg County, NC for the Mecklenburg County 
    Domestic Violence Initiative........................         150,000
Mecklenburg Domestic Violence Shelter, Mecklenburg, NC 
    for equipment.......................................         300,000
Missouri Bootheel Regional Consortium, Sikeston, MO for 
    the Fatherhood First program........................         300,000
Monterey County Probation Department, Salinas, CA for 
    the Silver Star gang prevention and intervention 
    program.............................................         500,000
National Energy Assistance Directors' Association, 
    Washington, DC for research and information 
    dissemination related to the Low-Income Home Energy 
    Assistance Program..................................         200,000
New Hope for Families, Pawtucket, RI for case management 
    and other supportive services for families leaving 
    emergency shelter...................................         200,000
Nihonmachi Little Friends, San Francisco, CA for child 
    care and family resource and referral services......         200,000
PathWays PA, Holmes, PA for programs for teen mothers...         120,000
Pathways/Senderos and the National Campaign to Prevent 
    Teen Pregnancy, New Britain, CT for education and 
    outreach............................................         400,000
Peace River Center, Bartow, FL for Joint Family 
    Intensive Therapy Team..............................         350,000
Pennsylvania Women Work, Pittsburgh, PA for program for 
    single parents and displaced homemakers.............         500,000
Public Health Department of Dakota County, West St. 
    Paul, MN for the Dakota County Healthy Families 
    program.............................................         300,000
Quality Services for the Autism Community, Astoria, NY 
    to improve training and skills of health care 
    workers and others serving people with autism.......         150,000
Ridgely, Caroline County, MD for curriculum and program 
    development, staff and consultants, communication 
    devices, and technical support......................         600,000
Safe Haven of Tarrant County, Arlington, TX for shelter 
    and associated services for victims of domestic 
    violence............................................          70,000
Sephardic Bikur Holim of Monmouth County, Deal, NJ for 
    social services programs............................         100,000
Shelter for Abused Women, Winchester, VA to develop a 
    model for service delivery for domestic violence 
    victims in rural communities........................         100,000
South Shore Women's Center, North Plymouth, MA for 
    domestic violence prevention and intervention 
    services............................................          75,000
TLC for Children and Families, Olathe, KS for a 
    transitional living program for at-risk and homeless 
    youth...............................................         250,000
Union Station Foundation, Pasadena, CA for services to 
    homeless families...................................         150,000
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY to enhance 
    clinical services for education and training 
    initiatives in autism...............................         800,000
Visitation Home, Inc., Yardville, NJ for care of 
    developmentally disabled residents..................         110,000
Visually Impaired Preschool Services, Louisville, KY for 
    preschool programs for the blind and visually 
    impaired............................................         200,000
Voyager Program Inc., Canton, OH for domestic violence 
    prevention..........................................          50,000
Women's Center of Beaver County, PA for the ``Building 
    Foundations'' project...............................          75,000
Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven, CT for 
    diagnostic and intervention services for children 
    affected by autism or related developmental 
    disorders...........................................         400,000

Developmental disabilities

    For programs authorized by the Developmental Disabilities 
Assistance and Bill of Rights Act and the Help America Vote 
Act, the Committee recommends $170,836,000. This is the same as 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $1,000 more than the 
budget request.
    The account total includes $71,771,000 for allotments to 
the states to fund state Councils, the same as both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 funding level. These Councils 
engage in such activities as planning, policy analysis, 
demonstrations, training, outreach, interagency coordination, 
and public education. They do not provide direct services to 
the developmentally disabled population.
    Within the total, $38,718,000 will be available to the 
states to be used for operating a protection and advocacy 
system to protect the legal and human rights of the 
developmentally disabled. This is the same as both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 funding level.
    The Committee recommends $15,720,000 for voting access for 
individuals with disabilities programs. This is the same as 
both the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. 
Within the funds provided, $10,890,000 is for payments to 
states to promote access for voters with disabilities and 
$4,830,000 is for state protection and advocacy systems. These 
programs are intended to make polling places accessible and 
provide equal access and participation for individuals with 
disabilities. The protection and advocacy program will ensure 
that individuals can fully participate in the electoral 
process, including registering to vote, accessing polling 
places, and casting a vote.
    The Committee recommends $11,414,000 for developmental 
disabilities projects of national significance. This is the 
same as both the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget 
request.
    The Committee recommends $33,213,000 for the university 
centers for excellence in developmental disabilities. This is 
the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $1,000 more 
than the budget request. This funding provides discretionary 
grants to public or not-for-profit entities associated with 
universities. The grants provide basic operational and 
administrative core support for these agencies. In addition, 
these funds support interdisciplinary training, community 
services, research and technical assistance, and information 
dissemination.

Native American programs

    The Committee recommends $44,332,000 for Native American 
programs. This is the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level. The Native American programs 
assist Tribal and Village governments, Native American 
institutions and organizations to support and develop stable, 
diversified local economies. In promoting social and economic 
self-sufficiency, this program provides financial assistance 
through direct grants for individual projects, training and 
technical assistance, and research and demonstration programs.

Community services

    The Committee recommends $507,878,000 for community 
services activities. This is $483,426,000 more than the budget 
request and $186,696,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level.

State block grants

    For State block grants, the Committee recommends 
$449,037,000. This is $181,388,000 less than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level. No funds were requested for this program. 
This program provides grants to states, territories, and Indian 
Tribes for services to meet employment, housing, nutrition, 
energy, emergency services, and health needs of low-income 
people. By law, 90 percent of these funds are passed directly 
through to local community action agencies that have previously 
received block grant funds.
    The Committee recognizes the impact that its recommended 
funding level may have on rural areas. Rural areas highly 
depend on these funds to provide the infrastructure to deliver 
antipoverty services. Therefore, the Committee encourages the 
authorizing Committee of jurisdiction to review the funding 
allocations for the Community Services Block Grant to ensure 
that limited funding is reaching those areas with the greatest 
need.

Community economic development

    The Committee recommends $27,022,000 for community economic 
development. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level. No funds were requested for this program. This program 
provides assistance to private, locally initiated community 
development corporations that sponsor enterprises providing 
employment, training, and business development opportunities 
for low-income residents in poor communities.

Job opportunities for low-income individuals

    The Committee concurs with the budget request not to 
include funding for job opportunities for low-income 
individuals. The fiscal year 2006 funding level for this 
program is $5,382,000. This program provides competitive grants 
to non-profit organizations to create new employment and 
business opportunities for TANF recipients and other low-income 
individuals.

Individual development accounts

    The Committee recommends $24,452,000 for individual 
development accounts. This is the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. Individual 
development accounts are dedicated savings accounts that can be 
used by families with limited means for purchasing a first 
home, paying for postsecondary education or capitalizing a 
business. The intent of the program is to encourage 
participants to develop and reinforce strong habits for saving 
money. Section 501(c)(3) organizations are eligible to apply 
for the funds and applicants must match Federal funds with non-
Federal funds.

Rural community facilities

    The Committee recommends $7,367,000 for the rural community 
facilities program. This is $74,000 more than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level. No funds were requested for this program. 
The Committee includes these funds to be used solely for the 
purpose of improving water and wastewater facilities in poor, 
rural communities. As in the past, these funds should be 
allocated to regional rural community assistance programs.

Violent crime reduction programs

    The Committee recommends $124,731,000 for family violence 
prevention and services and battered women's shelters. This is 
the same as both the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the 
budget request. This program is designed to assist states and 
Indian Tribes in efforts to prevent family violence and to 
provide immediate shelter and related assistance for victims of 
family violence and their dependents. The program also provides 
technical assistance and training relating to family violence 
programs to state and local public agencies (including law 
enforcement agencies), nonprofit private organizations, and 
persons seeking such assistance.
    The Committee also includes $2,970,000 to continue funding 
the national domestic violence hotline. This is the same as 
both the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request.

Mentoring children of prisoners

    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for the mentoring 
children of prisoners program. This is $9,493,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This program supports competitively awarded grants to 
states and local governments, Indian tribes and consortia, and 
faith- and community-based organizations to mentor children of 
prisoners and those recently released from prison.

Independent living training vouchers

    The Committee recommends $46,157,000 for independent living 
training vouchers. This is the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. These funds support 
vouchers for college tuition or vocational training for 
individuals who age out of the foster care system so they can 
be better prepared to live independently.

Abstinence education

    The Committee recommends a program level total of 
$113,400,000 for the community-based abstinence education 
program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and $27,765,000 below the budget request. As requested, 
$4,500,000 is provided within the total through the evaluation 
set-aside. The program provides support to public and private 
entities for implementation of community-based abstinence 
education programs for adolescents aged 12 through 18 (as 
defined in Section 510(b)(2)(A)-(H)). The entire focus of these 
programs is to educate young people and create an environment 
within communities that supports teen decisions to postpone 
sexual activity until marriage. There is no funding match 
requirement for these grants. The Committee intends that up to 
five percent of these funds be used to provide technical 
assistance and capacity-building support to grantees. Within 
the total, up to $10,000,000 may be used to carry out a 
National Abstinence Education Campaign.
    The Committee urges the Administration for Children and 
Families (ACF) to utilize the set-aside to ensure that programs 
around the country are using appropriate and approved curricula 
that are evidence-based and comply with the appropriate Federal 
legislation. To that end, the Committee requests ACF to issue a 
report to the Committees on Appropriation of the House and 
Senate no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on the 
use of the 5 percent set-aside and the intended use of the 
fiscal year 2007 funds. The Committee also requests ACF to 
include in this report the funds from the National Abstinence 
Education Campaign that are being used for training and 
technical assistance.
    The Committee reinforces the guidance from its report 
accompanying the fiscal year 2005 appropriation with respect to 
the abstinence messages given by the public health entities 
that are grantees in the community-based abstinence education 
program and to the conduct of evaluation activities for the 
program.

Faith-based center

    The Committee recommends $1,386,000 for the faith-based 
center. This is the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level. The center will support 
implementation of faith-based and community initiatives in 
accordance with the President's executive order.

Program direction

    The Committee recommends $186,265,000 for program direction 
expenses for ACF. This is $2,900,000 more than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $1,858,000 less than the budget request.

                   PROMOTING SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES

    The Committee recommends $434,100,000 for the promoting 
safe and stable families program. This is $40,000,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. Of this amount, $345,000,000 are mandatory funds and 
$89,100,000 are discretionary.

           PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR FOSTER CARE AND ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $5,211,000,000 for payments to 
states for foster care and adoption assistance. This is 
$270,200,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. The Committee also includes an 
advance appropriation of $1,810,000,000 for the first quarter 
of fiscal year 2008 to ensure timely completion of first 
quarter grant awards.
    Within the total appropriation, including the advance 
appropriation from the prior year, the Committee recommends 
$4,757,000,000 for the foster care program to provide 
maintenance payments to states on behalf of children who must 
live outside their homes. This is the same as the budget 
request and $72,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level.
    Within the total appropriation, the Committee recommends 
$2,044,000,000 for adoption assistance. This is $161,000,000 
more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as 
the budget request. This program provides training for parents 
and state administrative staff as well as payments on behalf of 
categorically eligible children considered difficult to adopt. 
This annually appropriated entitlement is designed to provide 
alternatives to long, inappropriate stays in foster care by 
developing permanent placements with families.
    Within the total appropriation for this account, the 
Committee recommends $140,000,000 for the independent living 
program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding level 
and the budget request. The program is designed to assist 
foster children age 16 or older to make successful transitions 
to independence. Funds assist children to earn high school 
diplomas, receive vocational training, and obtain training in 
daily living skills. Funds are awarded to states on the basis 
of the number of children on behalf of whom Federal foster care 
payments are received.

                        Administration on Aging


                        AGING SERVICES PROGRAMS

    For programs administered by the Administration on Aging 
(AoA), the Committee recommends a total of $1,390,306,000. This 
is $27,447,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$55,471,000 more than the budget request. This account funds 
the programs under the Older Americans Act except for the 
Community Services Employment Program, which is administered by 
the Department of Labor.

Supportive services and centers

    The Committee recommends $350,595,000 for supportive 
services and centers. This is the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and the budget request. Funds for supportive 
services and centers are awarded to states and territories for 
in-home and community-based services for frail elderly persons 
who are at risk of losing their self-sufficiency due to 
physical or mental impairments. The funds contained in the bill 
will support a variety of activities including transportation 
services, information and assistance, and personal care 
services.

Preventive health

    The Committee recommends $21,400,000 for preventive health 
services. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level. No funds were requested for this program. These funds 
are awarded to states and territories to support activities 
that educate older adults about the importance of healthy 
lifestyles and promote healthy behaviors that can prevent or 
delay chronic disease and disability.

Protection of vulnerable older Americans

    The Committee recommends $20,156,000 for the protection of 
vulnerable older Americans. This is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $990,000 more than the budget request. 
This includes funding for both the long-term care ombudsman 
program and the prevention of elder abuse, neglect, and 
exploitation program. The former program protects the rights 
and interests of residents in nursing homes, board and care 
homes, assisted living facilities, and similar adult care 
facilities. The latter program trains law enforcement and 
medical professionals in recognition of and response to elder 
abuse.

National family caregiver support program

    The Committee recommends $156,167,000 for the family 
caregivers program. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $1,980,000 more than the budget request. The 
family caregiver program provides formula grants to states to 
provide a support system in each state for family caregivers. 
All states are expected to put in place five basic system 
components as follows: individualized information on available 
resources; assistance to families in locating services from 
private and voluntary agencies; caregiver counseling, training 
and peer support; respite care; and other supplemental 
services.

Native American caregiver support program

    The Committee recommends $6,241,000 for the Native American 
caregiver support program. This is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level and the budget request. The program 
assists Tribes in providing multifaceted systems of support 
services for family caregivers as well as for grandparents 
caring for grandchildren.

Nutrition programs

    For congregate and home-delivered meals, as well as the 
nutrition services incentive program, the Committee recommends 
$722,292,000. This is $7,222,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $10,783,000 more than the budget request. The 
funding distribution for these programs is included in the 
detailed table accompanying this report. These programs are 
intended to address some of the difficulties confronting older 
individuals; namely, nutrition deficiencies due to inadequate 
income, lack of adequate facilities to prepare food, and social 
isolation.

Grants for Native Americans

    The Committee recommends $26,134,000 for grants for Native 
Americans. This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 funding 
level and the budget request. Grants are distributed to tribal 
organizations to be used to help Native American elders remain 
healthy and independent by providing transportation, nutrition, 
health screening, and other services.

Program innovations

    The Committee recommends $44,135,000 for program 
innovations. This is $19,540,000 more than the fiscal year 
funding level and $8,650,000 more than the budget request. 
Funds under this program are used for competitive grants and 
contracts to support projects that develop new and promising 
practices to serve older adults and their families.
    Alzheimer's disease often causes patients to exhibit 
unusual and unpredictable behavior, including physical 
aggression and combativeness and drastic mood swings. AoA funds 
support a 24-hour call center to help families in crisis manage 
these behaviors with expert advice, consultation and referrals. 
The Committee has provided $1,000,000 to continue this valuable 
resource.
    Within this total, the Committee provides $28,000,000 to 
begin national implementation of the Choices for Independence 
initiative. Choices for Independence builds on the successful 
program innovations administered by AoA over the last four 
years, including Aging and Disability Resource Centers that are 
currently operating in 43 States, evidence-based disease 
prevention efforts, and the cash and counseling initiative. 
Funding is provided to sustain and expand these efforts through 
a coordinated approach that will provide States with enhanced 
tools for redirecting their long-term care systems to make them 
more consumer-directed and provide moderate and low-income 
individuals at high risk of institutionalization with more 
options to remain at home and in the community. In implementing 
Choices for Independence, the Committee encourages AoA to 
continue its close partnership efforts with the Centers for 
Medicare and Medicaid Services and other agencies.
    Within the funds provided for program innovations, the 
Committee includes funding for the following items:

Allied Jewish Federation of Colorado, Denver, CO for a 
    naturally occurring retirement communities 
    demonstration project...............................         200,000
Alzheimer's Family Organization, New Port Richey, FL for 
    training and qualification of dementia care 
    professionals.......................................         200,000
Boise State University, Boise, ID for Center for the 
    Study of Aging......................................         300,000
Cyber Seniors, Detroit, MI for the ExperienceSeniorPower 
    program.............................................         100,000
Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation, Durham, NC for a 
    demonstration program to improve assistance to 
    family caregivers...................................         140,000
Experience Corps, Port Arthur, TX for capacity building 
    and expansion.......................................         350,000
Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater 
    Washington, Fairfax, VA for naturally occurring 
    retirement community demonstration project..........         150,000
Jewish Family & Children's Service of Greater Boston, 
    Waltham, MA for a naturally occurring retirement 
    communities demonstration project...................         200,000
Jewish Family and Children's Service of Minneapolis, 
    Minnetonka, MN for a naturally occurring retirement 
    communities demonstration project...................         400,000
Jewish Family Service, Albuquerque, NM for a naturally 
    occurring retirement community demonstration project         400,000
Jewish Family Service, Los Angeles, CA for a naturally 
    occurring retirement communities demonstration 
    project in Park La Brea & West Hollywood............         300,000
Jewish Family Services of Delaware, Wilmington, DE for a 
    naturally occurring retirement community 
    demonstration project...............................         150,000
Jewish Family Services of Washtenaw County, Ann Arbor, 
    MI for a naturally occurring retirement communities 
    demonstration project...............................         125,000
Jewish Federation of Central New Jersey, Scotch Plains, 
    NJ for the naturally occurring retirement 
    communities demonstration project...................         150,000
Jewish Federation of Greater Indianapolis, Indianapolis, 
    IN for a naturally occurring retirement communities 
    supportive services demonstration...................         300,000
Jewish Federation of Greater Monmouth County, NJ for a 
    naturally occurring retirement community 
    demonstration project...............................         200,000
Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven, Woodbridge, CT 
    to develop, test, evaluate and disseminate an 
    innovative community-based approach to family 
    caregiver support services..........................         200,000
Jewish Federation of Middlesex County, South Amboy, NJ 
    for a naturally occurring retirement communities 
    demonstration project...............................         200,000
Legal Assistance for Seniors, Oakland, CA for a 
    demonstration project, including training, to 
    improve assistance to elderly victims of financial 
    abuse...............................................         250,000
Nebraska Hospice and Palliative Care Association, 
    Lincoln, NE for data collection and evaluation......         400,000
Nursing Assistant Institute at the Jefferson Area Board 
    for Aging, Charlottesville, VA for assessment and 
    address of nursing assistant shortages in long-term 
    care settings.......................................         100,000
People Inc., Buffalo, NY for an integrated Alzheimer's 
    and dementia respite care demonstration project.....          75,000
Prevent Blindness Ohio, Columbus, OH for the Ohio Senior 
    Eye project.........................................         250,000
Rebuilding Together, Inc., Washington, D.C. for 
    education, training, technical assistance and other 
    services related to its national program to reduce 
    the risk of injury to seniors through home 
    modifications.......................................         300,000
Samuel Field YM&YWHA;, Little Neck, NY for a naturally 
    occurring retirement communities demonstration 
    project.............................................         150,000
Senior Legal Hotline, Sacramento, CA for a demonstration 
    project to increase services to non-English-speaking 
    seniors.............................................          60,000
Shenandoah Area Agency of Aging, Front Royal, VA for a 
    model group respite center for persons with 
    Alzheimer's disease or dementia.....................         150,000
The Aging in New York Fund, Inc. of the New York City 
    Department for the Aging, New York, NY to develop 
    best practices in the treatment of Alzheimer's 
    disease.............................................         750,000
UJA Federation of Bergen County, NJ for the Safe and 
    Secure Senior Program...............................         300,000
United Jewish Communities of Metrowest, Parsipanny, NJ 
    for naturally occurring retirement communities 
    demonstration project...............................         500,000
Visiting Nurses Association Healthcare Partners of Ohio, 
    Mansfield, OH for CareWatch.........................         100,000
Warbasse Community Services, Brooklyn, NY for a 
    naturally occurring retirement communities 
    demonstration project addressing mental health needs         200,000

Aging network support activities

    The Committee recommends $13,133,000 for aging network 
support activities, which include five ongoing programs: the 
Eldercare Locator, Pension Counseling, Senior Medicare Patrols, 
the National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center, and the 
National Center on Elder Abuse. This is the same as both the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and the budget request. These 
established programs, which began as demonstration projects, 
provide critical support for the national aging services 
network.

Alzheimer's disease demonstration grants

    The Committee recommends $11,668,000 for Alzheimer's 
disease demonstration grants. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 funding level. No funds were requested for this 
program. The program provides competitive grants to States to 
help them plan and establish programs to provide models of care 
to individuals with Alzheimer's disease. Funds are used for 
respite care and supportive services, clearinghouses, training, 
and administrative costs for State offices. An estimated 70 
percent of Americans with Alzheimer's disease live at home, 
where family members provide the preponderance of care. The 
Alzheimer's disease demonstration grant program currently 
supports matching grants to 38 States to help stimulate and 
coordinate services to assist families caring for Alzheimer 
patients, particularly those living in underserved rural 
communities and minorities. Unlike other AoA general service 
activities, this program is designed to address the unique 
demands Alzheimer's disease places on families and emphasizes 
systems change to meet those demands.

Program administration

    The Committee recommends $18,385,000 for program 
administration expenses. This is the same as the budget request 
and $685,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level. This 
activity provides administrative and management support for all 
Older Americans Act programs administered by AoA.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    The Committee provides $363,592,000 for general 
departmental management, which is $5,697,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 level and $4,827,000 below the budget request. 
Included in this amount is authority to spend $5,792,000 from 
the Medicare trust funds. In addition, the Office of the 
Secretary has access to $39,552,000 of policy evaluation 
funding.
    This appropriation supports those activities that are 
associated with the Secretary's roles as policy officer and 
general manager of the Department. The Office of the Secretary 
also implements Administration and Congressional directives, 
and provides assistance, direction and coordination to the 
headquarters, regions and field organizations of the 
Department. This account also supports several small health 
promotion and disease prevention activities that are centrally 
administered.
    The Committee includes the amounts within the Office of the 
Secretary for the following projects and activities in fiscal 
year 2007 listed below:

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 
    TX (in cooperation with UT Dallas) for a program to 
    recruit minority students into biomedical research 
    (including outreach, mentoring and/or scholarships 
    and fellowships)....................................         $75,000
Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, NJ for its Latino 
    Healthcare Initiative...............................         100,000
National Hispanic Medical Association, Washington, DC 
    for development of a Hispanic Health Portal to 
    provide on-line health education materials..........         250,000
New Hampshire Minority Health Coalition, Manchester, NH 
    to expand the Medical Interoperation Services 
    Project.............................................         300,000
Northern Virginia Family Services, Oakton, VA to develop 
    a network of local pediatricians providing 
    affordable health care to the working poor in 
    Loudoun County, VA..................................         100,000
St. Luke Free Community Clinic, Front Royal, VA to 
    coordinate a seven-county effort to address adult 
    hypertension and inadequate dental care for the 
    uninsured...........................................         350,000
University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, 
    NV for translation, training, and technology related 
    to its Interpretive Services Program................         250,000
University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, 
    Newark, NJ for research, education and community 
    outreach activities of the Institute for the 
    Elimination of Health Disparities...................         275,000

Adolescent family life

    The Committee provides $30,277,000 for the Adolescent 
Family Life program, which is the same as the 2006 level and 
$95,000 below the budget request. The Committee repeats bill 
language requested by the Administration allocating all funds 
for prevention demonstrations to be available for abstinence 
education activities under section 510(b)(2) of the Social 
Security Act. The program provides comprehensive and integrated 
approaches to the delivery of care services for pregnant and 
parenting adolescents, and prevention services that promote 
abstinence from sexual activity among non-parenting teens.

Office of Minority Health

    The Committee provides $46,775,000 for the Office of 
Minority Health (OMH), which is $9,719,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 amount and the same as the budget request. The 2006 
appropriation included a one-time project costing $9,900,000. 
The OMH works with Public Health Service agencies and other 
agencies of the Department in a leadership and policy 
development role to establish goals and coordinate other 
activities in the Department regarding disease prevention, 
health promotion, service delivery and research relating to 
disadvantaged and minority individuals; concludes interagency 
agreements to stimulate and undertake innovative projects; 
supports research, demonstration, and evaluation projects; and 
coordinates efforts to promote minority health programs and 
policies in the voluntary and corporate sectors.
    Historically black medical schools.--The Committee 
continues to be concerned about the diminished partnership 
between OMH and the nation's historically black medical 
schools. Consistent with the fiscal year 2006 conference 
report, the Committee encourages OMH to: (1) re-establish its 
unique cooperative agreement with Meharry Medical College; (2) 
develop a formal partnership with the Morehouse School of 
Medicine and its National Center for Primary Care; and (3) 
coordinate a response to the challenges facing the Charles R. 
Drew University of Medicine and Science, including expanded 
opportunities for biomedical research and support for residency 
training faculty. The Committee requests a report on the status 
of these activities by January 1, 2007.

Office on Women's Health

    The Committee provides $28,265,000 for the Office on 
Women's Health, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 level 
and $104,000 below the budget request. The Office on Women's 
Health advises the Secretary and provides Department-wide 
coordination of programs focusing specifically on women's 
health.

HIV/AIDS in minority communities

    The Committee provides $51,891,000 to be available to the 
Secretary to transfer to the Department's operating agencies 
for specific program activities to address the high-priority 
HIV prevention and treatment needs of minority communities. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2006 level and the budget 
request. These funds are provided to promote an effective 
culturally competent and linguistically appropriate public 
health response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
    Within the total provided, the Committee expects that 
activities that are targeted to address the growing HIV/AIDS 
epidemic and its disproportionate impact upon communities of 
color, including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, 
Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders, will 
be supported at no less than last year's funding level.

Afghanistan

    The Committee includes $5,892,000, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 level and $124,000 below the budget request. 
These funds will be used for the joint Department of Defense 
and HHS initiative to improve the largest women's hospital in 
Kabul, Afghanistan and to create four satellite teaching 
clinics. Bill language is included identifying the amount of 
assistance and citing as authority the Afghanistan Freedom 
Support Act of 2002.

Embryo adoption awareness campaign

    The Committee does not provide funding for the embryo 
adoption awareness campaign, which is $1,980,000 below both the 
Administration request and the fiscal year 2006 level. HHS has 
received funding for four years to conduct embryo adoption 
public awareness activities.
    Public education campaigns.--The Committee recognizes the 
important role that minority-owned and -operated media serve in 
reaching key segments of the public, and the U.S. Hispanic 
population in particular. Given the importance of reaching 
these communities, the Committee encourages the Department to 
consider the importance of these media and their constituencies 
when conducting national public health education campaigns, and 
to target resources to reach these communities through 
minority-owned and -operated media. This is particularly 
critical when that media serves residents whose first language 
is not English, such as in Spanish language print media, and 
when the public health campaigns are targeting conditions that 
affect non-English speaking populations disproportionately, 
such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and obesity.
    Obesity.--The Committee requests the Secretary, not later 
than one year after the enactment of this Act, to submit a 
report to the Committee describing research being conducted on 
health implications of obesity and being overweight. The report 
should describe the types and numbers of studies completed or 
being conducted by NIH; the types of studies completed or being 
conducted by CDC on individual and community interventions to 
prevent individuals from becoming overweight or obese; and 
recommendations on further research that is needed.
    Cardiovascular disease and women.--The Committee is 
concerned that there continues to be a lack of awareness among 
health care providers that cardiovascular disease is the 
leading killer of women in the United States. The Committee 
encourages the Secretary to conduct an education and awareness 
campaign for physicians and other health care professionals 
relating to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart 
disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases in women.
    Sodium.--High sodium diets are strongly correlated with 
hypertension, heart attack, and stroke. The National Heart, 
Lung, and Blood Institute's working group on hypertension has 
called for a fifty percent reduction in salt consumption over 
ten years. The Committee encourages the Surgeon General to 
issue a report on salt and hypertension within one year of the 
passage of this bill.
    Bioterrorism funds: state and local capacity.--The 
Committee continues to recognize that bioterrorism events will 
occur at the local level and will require local capacity, 
preparedness and initial response. The Committee notes that 
HHS' cooperative agreement guidance now includes explicit 
requirements for local concurrence with state spending plans 
for public health emergency preparedness and urges CDC to 
monitor and enforce these requirements.
    The Committee also recognizes that HHS has incorporated the 
National Preparedness Goal into the cooperative agreement 
guidance and established new CDC Preparedness Goals. The 
Committee urges the Department to assure that the performance 
metrics for the CDC Preparedness Goals, by which local health 
department preparedness will be measured, are fully consistent 
with the target capabilities list of the National Preparedness 
Goal.
    Sleep disorders.--At the National Institutes of Health's 
Frontiers of Knowledge in Sleep and Sleep Disorders conference 
in March, 2004, the U.S. Surgeon General reported on the 
profound impact that chronic sleep loss and untreated sleep 
disorders have on Americans of all ages and that the public 
health model is well suited to translate these essential health 
messages to society. The Committee continues to urge the 
Surgeon General to develop a Surgeon General's Report on Sleep 
and Sleep Disorders and requests a report regarding progress 
made on this initiative.
    Food allergy.--The Committee notes that approximately three 
million children under the age of eighteen suffer from food 
allergies. There are no Federal guidelines concerning the 
management of life-threatening food allergies in a school 
setting. The Committee encourages the Secretary, working with 
the Secretary of Education, to develop a policy to be used on a 
voluntary basis to manage the risk of food allergy and 
anaphylaxis in schools within six months of the enactment of 
this Act. These guidelines should include detailed emergency 
treatment procedures in the event of anaphylaxis or other food 
allergy reaction, strategies to reduce the risk of exposure to 
anaphylactic causative agents in classrooms and common school 
areas such as the cafeteria, and consideration of the 
authorization of school personnel to administer epinephrine 
when the school nurse is not immediately available.
    Office of Population Affairs (OPA).--The appropriations 
bill has had a longstanding provision making clear that no 
family planning provider is exempt from any State law requiring 
notification or reporting of child abuse, child molestation, 
sexual abuse, rape or incest. The committee is pleased that OPA 
is developing an audit for a representative sample of Title X 
recipients to measure the level of compliance with each of 
these statutory requirements. The committee directs OPA to 
begin this audit in calendar year 2006, giving particular 
attention to states where issues of non-compliance have been 
raised by state government officials. The committee directs the 
OPA to submit a report no later than March 1, 2007 to the House 
and Senate Appropriations Committees detailing the fundings 
from the audit, including the number of abuse cases that have 
been reported consistent with State law. The Committee again 
directs the OPA to send Title X grantees a reminder 
notification of this Federal requirement and a report no later 
than March 1, 2007, to the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committee detailing their progress in notifying all grantees of 
this federal requirement.
    Steroid use.--The Committee supports education efforts to 
demonstrate the consequences of using performance-enhancing 
drugs. The Department should undertake a comprehensive campaign 
to educate youth on the dangers of steroid use for 5th through 
8th graders, an education program authorized in the Anabolic 
Steroid Control Act of 2004.
    Genetic screening.--The Committee is pleased that the 
Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders and 
Genetic Diseases in Newborns and Children has recommended a 
uniform screening panel for which all newborns should be 
screened. The Advisory Committee is encouraged to update the 
panel of recommended tests periodically, as well as provide the 
Secretary with recommendations, advice or information on steps 
to improve newborn screening programs. This Committee strongly 
urges the Secretary to adopt or reject recommendations no later 
than 180 days after the Advisory Committee issues them, and to 
make public the justification for such determination.

                OFFICE OF MEDICARE HEARINGS AND APPEALS

    The Committee provides $70,000,000 for this Office, which 
is $10,600,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and $4,250,000 
below the Administration request. This office supports hearing 
at the administrative law judge level, the third level of 
Medicare claims appeals. More than 40,000 appeals are projected 
to be heard in fiscal year 2007.

  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COORDINATOR FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee provides $98,000,000 for the health 
information technology office, of which $86,070,000 is 
available in budget authority and $11,930,000 in program 
evaluation tap funding. This total is $36,728,000 above the 
amount made available in fiscal year 2006 and $17,872,000 below 
the Administration request. In addition, $50,000,000 is 
provided for health information technology activities in the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. This AHRQ activity 
is the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 
level.
    This program is intended to bring together decision-makers 
to develop standards for modern information technology, to 
devise certification procedures, to develop electronic 
information architecture and to test privacy standards. The 
ultimate goal is the accurate and rapid transfer of a patient's 
health information electronically.
    The Committee encourages the Department to develop an 
interoperability standard, tool set, and validation protocol 
that facilitate seamless medical device information sharing and 
device connectivity.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee provides $41,415,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $2,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2006 level and $2,345,000 less than the budget 
request. Permanent appropriations for this office are contained 
in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 
1996, as well as the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Total funds 
provided between this bill and the permanent appropriations 
would be $226,415,000 in fiscal year 2007.
    The Office of the Inspector General was created by law to 
protect the integrity of Departmental programs as well as the 
health and welfare of beneficiaries served by those programs. 
Through a comprehensive program of audits, investigations, 
inspections and program evaluations, the OIG attempts to reduce 
the incidence of fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement, and to 
promote economy, efficiency and effectiveness throughout the 
Department.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

    The Committee provides $36,283,000 for the Office of Civil 
Rights (OCR), which is $1,637,000 more than the fiscal year 
2006 level and the same as the budget request. This includes 
authority to transfer $3,314,000 from the Medicare trust funds.
    The Office for Civil Rights is responsible for enforcing 
civil rights statutes that prohibit discrimination in health 
and human services programs. OCR implements the civil rights 
laws through a compliance program designed to generate 
voluntary compliance among all HHS recipients.

               MEDICAL BENEFITS FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

    The Committee provides an estimated $341,694,000 for 
medical benefits for commissioned officers of the U.S. Public 
Health Service. This is the same as the Administration request 
and $13,142,000 above the fiscal year 2006 amount.
    This account provides for retirement payments to U.S. 
Public Health Service officers who are retired for age, 
disability or length of service; payments to survivors of 
deceased officers; medical care for active duty and retired 
members and dependents and beneficiaries; and for payments to 
the Social Security Administration for military service 
credits.

            PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES EMERGENCY FUND

    The Committee provides $160,475,000 for the public health 
and social services emergency fund for homeland security 
related activities within the Office of the Secretary, which is 
$100,448,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as 
the budget request. Within the amount, $81,595,000 is for 
homeland security preparedness activities within the Office of 
the Secretary and $78,880,000 is for pandemic influenza 
preparedness.
    In addition, the Committee provides for homeland security 
activities $1,606,000,000 within CDC; $487,000,000 within HRSA; 
and $1,866,000,000 within NIH.
    The Committee does not provide funding within the Office of 
the Secretary for healthcare provider credentialing. The 
Committee believes a better use of resources would be to expand 
the ongoing credentialing program operated by HRSA to permit 
cross-state credentialing.
    Funding is included for develpment of a national vaccine/
anti-viral medication logistics management system. This system 
would integrate geospatial analysis, data capture, influenza 
outcome models, and situational decision-making tools to assist 
Federal emergency response in conjunction with state and local 
governments.
    In light of the imminent hurricane season and potential 
pandemic flu considerations, the Committee is concerned that 
responses to recent hurricanes revealed problems in assuring 
availability of an adequate blood supply through implementation 
of the National Response Plan. In particular, the local non-
profit community-based blood centers experienced shortages of: 
fuel for generators to collect and maintain as well as vehicles 
to distribute a viable blood stock; reliable access to 
emergency comunications; and availability of emergency 
transportation for distribution of blood and supplies. The 
Committee expects the Secretary of Health and Human Services, 
by August 1, 2006, to submit an operating plan with policies 
and procedures that ensure FDA-licensed or registered blood 
centers received priority access to fuel, communications 
equipment and frequencies, and transportation, consistent with 
their role as providers of emergency medical services. Further, 
this plan shall identify any impediments related to State 
responsibilities in providing priority access to those 
resources. In preparing the plan, the Secretary shall consult 
with the Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of 
Transportation regarding coordination with their 
responsibilities under the National Response Plan.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 201. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
amount available for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Sec. 202. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
number of Public Health Service employees assigned to assist in 
child survival activities and to work in AIDS programs through 
and with funds provided by the Agency for International 
Development, the United Nations International Children's 
Emergency Fund or the World Health Organization.
    Sec. 203. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds to implement section 399F(b) of the Public 
Health Service Act or section 1503 of the NIH Revitalization 
Act of 1993.
    Sec. 204. The Committee continues and amends a provision to 
limit the salary of an individual through an NIH, AHRQ, or 
SAMHSA grant or other extramural mechanism to not more than the 
rate of Executive Level II.
    Sec. 205. The Committee includes a provision limiting the 
compensation of an individual working in Head Start to the 
Federal Executive Level II salary.
    Sec. 206. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the Secretary from using evaluation set-aside funds until the 
Committee receives a report detailing the planned use of such 
funds.
    Sec. 207. The Committee continues a provision, although 
changes the percentage provided in the fiscal year 2006 bill, 
permitting the Secretary to use up to 1.0 percent of funds 
authorized under the PHS Act for the evaluation of programs.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 208. The Committee continues and amends a provision 
permitting the Secretary of HHS to transfer up to one percent 
of any discretionary appropriation from an account, provided 
that no appropriation is increased by more than three percent 
by any such transfer.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 209. The Committee continues a provision to provide 
the Director of NIH, jointly with the Director of the Office of 
AIDS Research, the authority to transfer up to three percent of 
human immunodeficiency virus funds.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 210. The Committee continues a provision to make NIH 
funds available for human immunodeficiency virus research 
available to the Office of AIDS Research.
    Sec. 211. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of Title X funds unless the applicant for the award 
certifies to the Secretary that it encourages family 
participation in the decision of minors to seek family planning 
services and that it provides counseling to minors on how to 
resist attempts to coerce minors into engaging in sexual 
activities.
    Sec. 212. The Committee continues a provision related to 
the Medicare Advantage program.
    Sec. 213. The Committee continues a provision stating that 
no provider of services under title X shall be exempt from any 
state law requiring notification or the reporting of child 
abuse, child molestation, sexual abuse, rape, or incest.
    Sec. 214. The Committee continues a provision to exempt 
states from Synar provisions if certain funding criteria are 
met.
    Sec. 215. The Committee continues a provision to allow 
funding for CDC international HIV/AIDS and other infectious 
disease, chronic and environmental disease, and other health 
activities abroad to be spent under the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956.
    Sec. 216. The Committee continues a provision granting 
authority to the Office of the Director of the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) to enter directly into transactions 
in order to implement the NIH Roadmap for medical research and 
permitting the Director to utilize peer review procedures, as 
appropriate, to obtain assessments of scientific and technical 
merit.
    Sec. 217. The Committee continues a provision that permits 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency 
for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to transfer funds 
that are available for Individual Learning Accounts to 
``Disease Control, Research, and Training''.
    Sec. 218. The Committee continues a provision permitting 
the Secretary of Health and Human Services to waive regulations 
requiring child restraint systems and vehicle monitors on buses 
that transport children attending Head Start programs. The 
reauthorization of the Head Start program will remedy the 
disruption caused by these regulations and thus the waiver 
authority expires upon enactment the reauthorization.
    Sec. 219. The Committee continues a provision granting 
authority to the Secretary of HHS to use charter aircraft under 
contract with CDC.
    Sec. 220. The Committee includes a provision requiring NIH-
funded authors to deposit final, peer-reviewed manuscripts in 
the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central database 
within twelve months of the official date of publication.
    Sec. 221. The Committee recommends new language to preclude 
funds made available in this Act from being used to phase down 
or reduce below 6 percent certain taxes under section 
433.68(f)(3) of title 42, Code of Federal Regulations.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                    Education for the Disadvantaged

    The bill includes $14,652,541,000 for the education for the 
disadvantaged programs. This amount is $1,817,000,000 less than 
the budget request and $171,380,000 higher than the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation. Of the total amount available, 
$7,099,907,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2007 for 
obligation after July 1, 2007 and $7,383,301,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2008 for obligation on or after 
October 1, 2007. This appropriation account includes 
compensatory education programs authorized under title I of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; and title IV of 
the Higher Education Act.

Grants to local educational agencies

    Of the amounts provided for title I programs, 
$6,808,408,000 is available for basic grants to local education 
agencies. This amount is the same as both last year's level and 
the request.
    Funding for concentration grants, which targets funds to 
local educational agencies in school districts with high levels 
of disadvantaged children, is $1,365,031,000, the same as both 
last year and the request level.
    The bill includes $2,269,843,000 for targeted grants, the 
same as both last year and the request.
    A total of $2,269,843,000 is included for education finance 
incentive grants, the same as both the request and last year's 
level.
    Financial assistance flows to school districts by formula, 
based primarily on the number of school-aged children from low-
income families. Within districts, local school officials 
target funds on school attendance areas with the greatest 
number or percentage of children from poor families. Local 
school districts develop and implement their own programs to 
help ensure that students in high-poverty schools meet 
challenging State academic standards.
    Funds under this account are also used to pay the Federal 
share of State administrative costs for title I programs. The 
maximum State administrative grant is equal to one percent of 
title one local educational agency grants or $400,000, 
whichever is greater.
    The Committee does not include bill language requested by 
the Administration to override existing statutory language that 
prohibits State educational agencies from reserving the full 
four percent of their allocations for school improvement 
programs if the formula reduces any local educational agency 
allocations. The Committee supports the effort to provide State 
agencies with funding to address school improvement efforts, 
especially as more schools fall into needing improvement 
categories, but is reluctant to change the statute when No 
Child Left Behind (NCLB) will be considered for reauthorization 
next year.
    With the renewed focus on science, technology, engineering 
and mathematics (STEM) education, the Committee notes with 
concern the under-representation of Hispanics, African 
Americans, and Native Americans in the STEM fields. For 
example, the Center for the Advancement of Hispanics in Science 
and Engineering Education notes that Hispanic Americans 
constitute 12 percent of the population in the United States, 
and yet represent less than three percent of the engineering 
and scientific community nationwide. With the goal of 
increasing the percentage of all minority subgroups that 
contribute to the STEM fields, the Committee encourages the 
Department to investigate the reasons for this disparity and 
issue a report within one year with the findings of that 
investigation, including suggested remedies to bridge the 
divide.

Even Start

    The Committee provides $70,000,000 for Even Start, 
$29,000,000 below last year and $70,000,000 above the request. 
Even Start provides grants for programs focusing on the 
education of low-income families, including parents eligible 
for services under the adult Education and Family Literacy Act 
and their children, aged birth-7 years. These parents are not 
in school, are above the State's compulsory school attendance 
age limit, and have not earned a high school diploma (or 
equivalent). Even Start funds are allocated to the States, 
generally in proportion to title I Part A funds.

School improvement grants

    The Committee provides $200,000,000 for the first year of 
funding for school improvement grants, authorized under section 
1003(g) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This is 
the same as the Administration request. This formula grant 
program will make awards to States to provide assistance for 
local school improvement activities required for title I 
schools that do not make adequate yearly progress for at least 
two consecutive years. This assistance will help ensure that 
States and localities have the resources necessary to carry out 
the continuous improvement required to meet the annual and 
long-term proficiency goals of NCLB.
    The Committees does not include bill language requested by 
the Administration overriding the statutory requirement that 
States subgrant 95 percent of their grant funds to local 
educational agencies. The Committee hopes this issue will be 
considered during the authorization of No Child Left Behind 
next year.

Reading First State Grants

    The bill provides $1,029,234,000 for Reading First State 
grants, which is the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. This program provides assistance to 
states and school districts in establishing scientific 
research-based reading programs for children in kindergarten 
through grade three. The program also provides for professional 
development and other support to ensure that teachers can 
identify children at-risk for reading failure and provide the 
most effective early instruction to overcome specific barriers 
to reading proficiency.

Early Reading First

    The bill provides $103,118,000 for Early Reading First, the 
same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. 
This is a competitive grant program targeted toward children 
from birth three through age five, and supports the development 
of verbal skills, phonemic awareness, pre-reading development 
and assistance for professional development for teachers in 
evidence-based strategies of instruction.

Striving Readers

    The bill provides $35,000,000 for Striving Readers, 
$65,000,000 below the budget request and $5,300,000 above last 
year's level. Striving Readers makes competitive grants to 
develop, implement and evaluate reading interventions for 
middle- or high-school students who are reading significantly 
below grade level.

Math Now

    The bill does not provide $250,000,000 requested by the 
Administration for two new programs, Math Now for Elementary 
School Students and Math Now for Middle School Students. The 
Committee supports efforts to improve mathematics instruction, 
but has concerns about beginning additional programs when 
ongoing programs exist that target math and science 
instruction. The Committee does provide funding for the 
national mathematics panel to develop mathematics content and 
principles for programs like Math Now.

Literacy through school libraries

    The bill provides $19,486,000 for literacy through school 
libraries, the same as both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 level. This program helps school districts provide 
students with increased access to up-to-date school library 
materials, a well-equipped, technologically advanced school 
library media center, and well-trained, and professionally 
certified school library media specialists. At appropriations 
of less than $100,000,000 the Department makes competitive 
awards to districts with a child poverty rate of at least 20 
percent.

High school intervention

    The bill does not include funding for the high school 
intervention program proposed by the Administration at 
$1,475,000,000. The Committee supports the Administration's 
goals in this program, which are to increase the achievement of 
high school students, particularly students at risk of failing 
to meet challenging State academic content standards; to 
eliminate gaps in achievement between students from different 
ethnic and racial groups and between disadvantaged students and 
their more advantaged peers; and to enable all high school 
students to graduate with the education, skills, and knowledge 
necessary to succeed in postsecondary education and in a 
demanding, high-technology economy. However, the Committee 
notes that this program has not been authorized.

America's opportunity scholarships for kids

    The bill does not include funding for the America's 
opportunity scholarships for kids program proposed by the 
Administration at $100,000,000. This demonstration program 
would provide parents with funds either to send their child to 
a private school or receive intensive tutoring assistance. 
Instead, the Committee provides $200,000,000 for assistance to 
schools that do not make adequate yearly progress through the 
School Improvement Grants program.

State agency programs: migrant

    The bill includes $386,524,000 for the migrant education 
program, the same as both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation. This program supports formula grants 
to State agencies for the support of special educational and 
related services to children of migratory agricultural workers 
and fishermen. The purpose of this program is to provide 
supplementary academic education, remedial or compensatory 
instruction, English for limited English proficient students, 
testing, plus guidance, counseling and other activities to 
promote coordination of services across States for migrant 
children whose education is interrupted by frequent moves.

State agency programs: neglected and delinquent

    For the State agency program for neglected and delinquent 
children, the bill includes $49,797,000, which is the same as 
both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. 
This formula grant program provides services to participants in 
institutions for juvenile delinquents, adult correctional 
institutions, or institutions for the neglected.

Evaluation

    The Committee provides $9,330,000 for evaluation, the same 
as both the 2006 appropriation and the budget request. Title I 
evaluation supports large scale national evaluations that 
examine how title I is contributing to improved student 
performance at the State, local education agency, and school 
levels. It also supports short-term studies that document 
promising models.

Comprehensive school reform

    The bill includes $3,000,000 for the Comprehensive School 
Reform (CSR) Program, $3,000,000 above the request and 
$4,920,000 below last year's level. The Committee has included 
bill language providing funding for continuation costs of the 
quality initiative awards and the comprehensive school reform 
clearinghouse. The CSR program provided incentive grants of at 
least $50,000 per year, for 3 years, for schools to implement 
effective, research-driven strategies for schoolwide reform. 
Recent studies have demonstrated that comprehensive school-
improvement models, when well implemented, boost student 
achievement to a greater extent than other interventions 
designed to serve similar student populations. Now that the 
NCLB has spurred an increased emphasis school reform 
activities, programs supported by CSR can be funded through 
Title I grants to local educational agencies.

Migrant education, high school equivalency program

    The bill includes $18,550,000 for the high school 
equivalency program. This amount is the same as both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 level. The high school 
equivalency program recruits migrant students aged 16 and over 
and provides academic and support services to help those 
students obtain a high school equivalency certificate and 
subsequently to gain employment or admission to a postsecondary 
institution or training program.

College assistance migrant programs

    The bill includes $15,377,000 for the college assistance 
migrant programs. This amount is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2006 level and the budget request. The college assistance 
migrant program (CAMP) provides tutoring and counseling 
services to first-year, undergraduate migrant students and 
assists those students in obtaining student financial aid for 
their remaining undergraduate years.

                               Impact Aid

    The bill provides $1,228,453,000 for Federal impact aid 
programs in fiscal year 2007, the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation and the budget request. This account 
supports payments to school districts affected by Federal 
activities. Impact Aid represents a Federal responsibility to 
local schools educating children whose families are connected 
with the military or who live on Indian land.
    The bill also repeats language, as requested by the 
Administration, ensuring that schools serving the children of 
military personnel continue to receive Impact Aid funds when 
the military parents who live on-base are deployed and the 
child continues to attend the same school and in cases in which 
an on-base military parent is killed while on active duty and 
the child continues to attend the same school.

Basic support payments

    The bill includes $1,091,867,000 for basic support payments 
to local educational agencies, the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 level and the budget request. Basic support payments 
compensate school districts for lost tax revenue and are made 
on behalf of Federally-connected children such as children of 
members of the uniformed services who live on Federal property.

Payments for children with disabilities

    The Committee recommends $49,466,000 for payments on behalf 
of Federally-connected children with disabilities, the same as 
both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. 
These payments compensate school districts for the increased 
costs of serving Federally-connected children with 
disabilities.

Facilities maintenance

    The Committee recommends $4,950,000 for facilities 
maintenance, the same as both the fiscal year 2006 amount and 
the budget request. These capital payments are authorized for 
maintenance of certain facilities owned by the Department of 
Education.

Construction

    The Committee recommends $17,820,000 for the construction 
program, which is the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 level. This program provides formula and competitive 
grants to local educational agencies that educate Federally 
connected students or have Federally owned land for building 
and renovating school facilities. The Committee provides 
funding for the formula program rather than, as requested by 
the Administration, for the competitive program.

Payments for Federal property

    The bill provides $64,350,000 for payments related to 
Federal property, the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level 
and the budget request. Funds are awarded to school districts 
to compensate for lost tax revenue as the result of Federal 
acquisition of real property since 1938.

                      School Improvement Programs

    The bill includes $4,764,559,000 for school improvement 
programs. This amount is $490,918,000 less than the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation and $208,599,000 less than the budget 
request. This appropriation account includes programs 
authorized under titles II, IV, V, VI, and VII of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act; the McKinney-Vento 
Homeless Assistance Act, title IV-A of the Civil Rights Act, 
section 203 of the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 
2002, and section 105 of the Compact of Free Association 
Amendments Act of 2003.

State grants for improving teacher quality

    The bill includes $2,587,000,000 for state grants for 
improving teacher quality, which is $300,439,000 less than both 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. This program 
gives States and districts a flexible source of funding with 
which to meet their particular needs in strengthening the 
skills and knowledge of teachers and administrators to enable 
them to improve student achievement. States are authorized to 
retain 2.5 percent of funds for state activities, including 
reforming teacher certification, re-certification or licensure 
requirements; expanding, establishing or improving alternative 
routes to state certification; carrying out programs that 
include support during the initial teaching and leadership 
experience, such as mentoring programs; assisting school 
districts in effectively recruiting and retaining highly 
qualified and effective teachers and principals; reforming 
tenure systems; and developing professional development 
programs for principals.
    States send funding to the local level by formula and by 
competitive grant. Among other things, local uses of funds 
include initiatives to assist recruitment of principals and 
fully qualified teachers; initiatives to promote retention of 
highly qualified teachers and principals; programs designed to 
improve the quality of the teacher work force; teacher 
opportunity payments; professional development activities; 
teacher advancement initiatives and hiring fully qualified 
teachers in order to reduce class size. In the 2003-2004 school 
year, the Department reports that states transferred 
$140,000,000 out of teacher quality State grants for use in 
other NCLB programs.

Early childhood educator professional development

    The bill includes $14,549,000 for early childhood educator 
professional development, the same as both the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2006 level. This program provides 
competitive grants to partnerships to improve the knowledge and 
skills of early childhood educators and caregivers who work in 
communities that have high concentrations of children living in 
poverty.

Mathematics and science partnerships

    The bill includes $225,000,000 for mathematics and science 
partnerships, $42,840,000 above both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. This program promotes strong math and 
science teaching skills for elementary and secondary school 
teachers. Grantees may use program funds to develop rigorous 
math and science curricula, establish distance learning 
programs, and recruit math, science and engineering majors into 
the teaching profession. They may also provide professional 
development opportunities. Grants are made to States by formula 
based on the number of children aged 5 to 17 who are from 
families with incomes below the poverty line, and States then 
award the funds competitively to partnerships that must include 
the State agency, an engineering, math or science department of 
an institution of higher education, and a high-need school 
district. Other partners may also be involved. The Committee 
has increased funding for this program in response to the 
Administration's K-12 mathematics instruction initiative.

State grants for innovative programs

    The bill includes $150,000,000 for state grants for 
innovative programs, which is $51,000,000 above both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 level. This program provides 
funding to state and local educational agencies for 27 purposes 
identified in statute, including obtaining technology and 
technology-related training, combating illiteracy among 
children and adults, addressing the educational needs of gifted 
and talented children, and implementing school improvement and 
parental involvement activities under ESEA Title I. The 
Committee has increased funding for this program to expand 
funding available to states, for use as they determine 
appropriate for their needs, in areas such as educational 
technology, library enhancements, teacher training, counseling, 
school-based mental health services, dropout prevention, and 
gifted and talented education.

Educational technology state grants

    The bill does not include funding for education technology 
activities, consistent with the Administration budget request. 
The program was funded at $272,250,000 in fiscal year 2006. 
Under this program, states have directed funding to school 
districts for access to technology; teacher professional 
development; and initiatives using technology to increase 
academic achievement. This program has received almost 
$2,900,000,000 over the last five years. Ninety-three percent 
of schools report that they have access to the internet in 
instructional rooms as well as declining student-instructional 
computer ratios. State grants for innovative programs and 
Improving Teacher Quality State grants can be used for 
technology-related professional development and infrastructure. 
There is additional support for technology infrastructure 
through the E-Rate program, administered by the Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC), which supports connectivity in 
schools and libraries by offering discounted rates on 
telecommunications and Internet service, as well as basic 
maintenance of connections. In the funding year that ended in 
June, 2005, the FCC committed $2,300,000,000 through the e-rate 
program. Approximately 98 percent of the funds go to a school, 
school district, or consortium; the remaining 2 percent goes to 
libraries.

Supplemental education grants

    The bill provides $18,001,000 for supplemental education 
grants to the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic 
of the Marshall Islands, which is the same as the budget 
request and the 2006 appropriation. The Compact of Free 
Association Amendments Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-188) authorizes 
these entities to receive funding for general education 
assistance. Bill language is included providing a consolidated 
amount for supplemental education grants since the underlying 
statute determines the allocation between Micronesia and the 
Marshall Islands.

21st century community learning centers

    The bill provides $981,166,000 for 21st century community 
learning centers, the same as both the 2007 request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. This program is a formula grant to 
states. Ninety-five percent of funds are distributed on a 
competitive basis from the state to local school districts, 
community-based organizations and other public entities and 
private organizations. Grantees must target students who attend 
low-performing schools. Funds may be used for before and after 
school activities that advance student academic achievement 
including remedial education and academic enrichment 
activities; math, science, arts, music, entrepreneurial and 
technology education; tutoring and mentoring; recreational 
activities; and expanded library service hours.

State assessments

    The bill includes $407,563,000 for state assessments, the 
same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. 
This program provides states with funding to develop annual 
assessments and to carry out activities related to ensuring 
accountability for results in the state's schools and school 
districts.

Javits gifted and talented education

    The bill does not include funding for gifted and talented 
education, the same as the budget request and $9,596,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 level. This program supports grants to 
build and enhance the ability of elementary and secondary 
schools to meet the needs of gifted and talented students. 
Competitive grants are awarded to states and school districts, 
institutions or higher education and other public and private 
entities.

Foreign language assistance grants

    The bill includes $21,780,000 for foreign language 
assistance grants, $2,000,000 below the budget request and the 
same as the 2006 level. The program supports competitive grants 
to school districts and States to increase the quality and 
quantity of elementary and secondary-level foreign language 
instruction in the United States.

Education for homeless children and youth

    For the education of homeless children and youth program, 
the Committee recommends $61,871,000, the same as both the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. Grants 
are allocated to States in proportion to the total that each 
State receives under the title I program. For local grants, at 
least 50 percent must be used for direct services to homeless 
children and youth, including tutoring or remedial or other 
educational services.

Training and advisory services

    The bill includes $7,113,000 for training and advisory 
services authorized by title IV-A of the Civil Rights Act. This 
amount is the same as both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 amount. Title IV-A authorizes technical assistance 
and training services for local educational agencies to address 
problems associated with desegregation on the basis of race, 
sex, or national origin. The Department awards 3-year grants to 
regional equity assistance centers (EACs) located in each of 
the ten Department of Education regions. The EACs provide 
services to school districts upon request. Typical activities 
include disseminating information on successful education 
practices and legal requirements related to nondiscrimination 
on the basis of race, sex, and national origin in educational 
programs; training designed to develop educators' skills in 
specific areas, such as the identification of race and sex bias 
in instructional materials; increasing the skills of 
educational personnel in dealing with race-based confrontations 
such as hate crimes; and providing technical assistance in the 
identification and selection of appropriate educational 
programs to meet the needs of limited English proficient 
students.

Education for Native Hawaiians

    The Committee recommends $31,433,000 for education for 
Native Hawaiians, which is the same as the budget request and 
$2,474,000 below the fiscal year 2006 amount. A number of 
authorized programs limited to Native Hawaiians are supported 
with these funds, including a model curriculum project, family-
based education centers, postsecondary education fellowships, 
gifted and talented education projects, and special education 
projects for disabled pupils.

Alaska Native education equity

    The Committee recommends $33,908,000 for the Alaska Native 
education equity program, which is the same as the budget 
request and $1,000 above the fiscal year 2006 amount. These 
funds are used to develop supplemental educational programs to 
benefit Alaska Natives.

Rural education

    The bill includes $168,918,000 for rural education 
programs, the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the 
budget request. This fund includes two programs to assist rural 
school districts to improve teaching and learning in their 
schools. The small, rural schools achievement program provides 
funds to rural districts that serve a small number of students; 
the rural and low-income schools program provides funds to 
rural districts that serve concentrations of poor students, 
regardless of the number of students served by the district.

Comprehensive centers

    The bill includes $56,257,000 for comprehensive centers, 
the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the budget 
request.
    These funds are used for the 21 new comprehensive centers 
first funded in fiscal year 2005. The centers include 16 
regional centers that will provide training and technical 
assistance to State educational agencies within their 
geographic regions to help them implement provisions of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act State-wide and five 
content centers, each specializing in a different area.

                            Indian Education

    The bill includes $118,690,000 for Indian education. This 
amount is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 appropriation 
and the budget request. This account supports programs 
authorized by part A of Title VII of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act.

Grants to local educational agencies

    The bill provides $95,331,000 for grants to local education 
agencies. This program provides assistance through formula 
grants to school districts and schools supported or operated by 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The purpose of this program is to 
reform elementary and secondary school programs that serve 
Indian students, including preschool children. Grantees must 
develop a comprehensive plan and assure that the programs they 
carry out will help Indian students reach the same challenging 
standards that apply to all students. This program supplements 
the regular school program to help Indian children sharpen 
their academic skills, bolster their self-confidence, and 
participate in enrichment activities that would otherwise be 
unavailable.

Special programs for Indian children

    The Committee recommends $19,399,000 for special programs 
for Indian children. These programs make competitive awards to 
improve the quality of education for Indian students. This 
program also funds the American Indian Teacher Corps and the 
American Indian Administrator Corps to recruit and support 
American Indians as teachers and school administrators.

National activities

    The bill provides $3,960,000 for national activities. Funds 
under this authority support research, evaluation and data 
collection to provide information on the status of education 
for the Indian population and on the effectiveness of Indian 
education programs.

                       Innovation and Improvement

    The bill includes $911,413,000 for innovation and 
improvement programs. This amount is $25,073,000 less than the 
comparable fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $60,447,000 more 
than the budget request. This appropriation account includes 
programs authorized under part G of title I and portions of 
titles II and V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Troops to teachers

    The bill includes $14,645,000 for troops to teachers, the 
same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. 
This program is designed to assist eligible members of the 
armed forces to obtain certification or licensure as elementary 
and secondary school teachers, or vocational or technical 
teachers. The Committee includes bill language permitting 
stipends and bonuses under this program to be available to 
those serving in schools receiving title I funding.

Transition to teaching

    The bill includes $44,484,000 for transition to teaching, 
the same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 
level. Transition to teaching is designed to help mitigate the 
shortage of qualified licensed or certified teachers. The 
program provides competitive grants to help support State and 
local educational agencies' efforts to recruit, train and place 
talented individuals into teaching positions and to support 
them during their first years in the classroom. In particular, 
the program focuses on mid-career professionals with 
substantial career experience and recent college graduates. 
Grants are made on a competitive basis.

National writing project

    The bill provides $21,532,000 for the National Writing 
Project, the same as the fiscal year 2006 level. The 
President's budget did not request funding for this program. 
Funds are provided to the National Writing Project, a nonprofit 
educational organization that supports training programs to 
teach writing effectively. To provide these services, the 
National Writing Project contracts with numerous institutions 
of higher education and nonprofit education providers to 
operate small teacher training programs. Federal funds support 
50 percent of the costs of these programs, and recipients must 
contribute an equal amount.

Teaching of traditional American history

    The bill includes $50,000,000 for the teaching of 
traditional American history, the same as the budget request 
and $69,790,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level. This program 
supports competitive grants to school districts to promote the 
teaching of American history in elementary and secondary 
schools as a separate academic subject. The number of quality 
applications for assitance under this program has been 
insufficient to justify the current level of funding.

School leadership

    The bill includes $14,731,000 for school leadership 
activities, the same as the fiscal year 2006 level. The 
President's budget did not propose funding for this program. 
The program provides competitive grants to assist high-need 
school districts with recruiting, training, and retaining 
principals and assistant principals.

Advanced credentialing

    The bill includes $18,695,000 for advanced credentialing, 
$2,000,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and $10,695,000 
above the budget request. The program supports activities to 
encourage and support teachers seeking advanced certification 
or credentialing. The Committee intends that $10,695,000 of the 
funds be awarded to the National Board for Professional 
Teaching Standards and that $8,000,000 be awarded to the 
American Board for the Certification of Teacher Excellence.

Charter school grants

    The Committee recommends $214,782,000 for support of 
charter schools, the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 amount. Charter schools are developed and 
administered by individuals or groups of individuals, which may 
include teachers, administrators, and parents. These groups 
enter into charters for operation of their schools, which must 
be granted exemptions from State and local rules that limit 
flexibility in school operation and management. Under this 
program, grants are made to State educational agencies in 
States that have charter school laws; the State educational 
agencies in turn make sub-grants to authorized public 
chartering agencies in partnerships with developers of charter 
schools.

Credit enhancement for charter school facilities

    The bill includes $36,611,000 for credit enhancement for 
charter school facilities, the same as both the budget request 
and fiscal year 2006. This program helps charter schools meet 
their facility needs by providing funding on a competitive 
basis to leverage other funds and help charter schools obtain 
school facilities by means such as purchase, lease and 
donation. Charter schools are more likely than traditional 
schools to have problems obtaining adequate facilities because 
they are perceived as more financially risky than other 
schools, and unlike traditional school districts, charter 
schools generally lack the ability to issue general obligation 
bonds backed by property taxes.

Voluntary public school choice

    The bill includes $26,278,000 for voluntary public school 
choice, the same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 
2006 level. This program supports efforts to establish intra-
district and inter-district public school choice programs to 
provide students in participating schools with the widest 
variety of options for their education. Funds are used to make 
competitive awards to States, school districts or partnerships.

Magnet schools assistance

    The bill includes $106,693,000 for the magnet schools 
assistance program, the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. The magnet schools assistance program 
awards competitive grants to local educational agencies for use 
in establishing or operating magnet schools that are part of a 
desegregation plan approved by a court or by the Department of 
Education's Office for Civil Rights. A magnet school is defined 
by the statute as ``a school or education center that offers a 
special curriculum capable of attracting substantial numbers of 
students of different racial backgrounds.'' A funding priority 
is given to local educational agencies that did not receive a 
grant in the preceding fiscal year.

Fund for the improvement of education

    The bill includes $183,962,000 for the fund for the 
improvement of education (FIE), which is $25,452,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 level and $79,919,000 above the budget 
request. The fund for the improvement of education has a broad 
portfolio of activities. Under the fund, the Secretary of 
Education supports activities that identify and disseminate 
innovative educational approaches. Several separate program 
authorities are included in this line item such as Reading is 
Fundamental, Arts in Education, the national mathematics panel, 
and Reach Out and Read.
    $10,000,000 is included in FIE for an ``Officers to 
Principals'' demonstration. Based on the School Leadership 
program model, the demonstration would provide grants to local 
educational agencies to recruit military officers, provide 
professional development programs in instructional leadership 
and management, and create financial incentives for officers to 
become and remain school principals. The Department should give 
high priority to school districts that have been identified as 
not making adequate yearly progress in the allocation of these 
funds. The program should emphasize training opportunities that 
permit the officers to be placed quickly into administrative 
positions. The Committee believes that creating a program to 
attract military officers to school leadership positions would 
provide school districts with a needed talent pool of able, 
experienced, committed leaders who could be role models for 
students. The Committee has learned that an Officers to 
Principals program is currently operating in the State of 
Maryland, and encourages the Secretary to review that program 
as it establishes the parameters for this demonstration.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee includes funding 
for the following activities:

ABC Unified School District, Cerritos, CA, for an after 
    school program at Melbourne Elementary School.......         $75,000
Academy for Urban School Leadership, Chicago, IL, for 
    The Chicago Academy and Chicago Academy High School, 
    which may include support for resident teachers.....         350,000
Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Bridgeport, 
    CT to develop a total learning model for Bridgeport, 
    CT schools..........................................         100,000
African-American Male Achievers Network, Inglewood, CA, 
    for its Project STEP program for at-risk youth......          40,000
AFSA Education Foundation, Washington, DC for financial 
    literacy education..................................          50,000
AHEAD Foundation, Inc., Massillon, OH for after school 
    programs, CARE TEAMS and its Collaborative Community 
    Network.............................................         100,000
Alamance-Burlington School District, Burlington, NC for 
    the Teacher Professional Development Academy for 
    curriculum and materials............................         150,000
Albany State University, Albany, GA, for its Jump Start 
    college preparation initiative for at-risk students.         300,000
Aledo Independent School District, Aledo, TX for 
    implementation of the English as a Second Language 
    program.............................................         200,000
All Kinds of Minds, Chapel Hill, NC for teacher training         200,000
Allens Lane Art Center, Philadelphia, PA, for after 
    school and summer arts education and enrichment 
    activities..........................................          50,000
Althea Gibson Community Center, Philadelphia, PA, for 
    education and enrichment programs for youth.........         350,000
American Ballet Theatre, New York, NY, for music 
    education programs..................................         300,000
American Theater Arts for Youth, MT for the Montana Arts 
    in Education Program................................         100,000
An Achievable Dream, Inc., Newport News, VA, for 
    education and support services for at-risk children, 
    which may include teacher stipend scholarships......         550,000
Antigo School District, WI, for an after school program.         180,000
Apache County Schools, Apache County, AZ for teacher 
    training............................................         250,000
Appalachian Leadership & Education Foundation, 
    Huntington, WV for a program to develop character, 
    leadership and technical skills of secondary school 
    students............................................         400,000
Arizona State University Institute of Civil Rights, 
    Tempe, AZ, for dropout prevention and other 
    education projects..................................         250,000
Armory Center for the Arts, Pasadena, CA, for its Walk 
    to Art program for low-income children..............          50,000
Army Heritage Center Foundation, Carlisle, PA for 
    teacher preparation for the Voices of the Past Speak 
    to the Future Program...............................         200,000
Arts Center of the Grand Prairie, Stuttgart, AR, for an 
    after school program................................          50,000
Arts Council in Buffalo and Erie County, Buffalo, NY, 
    for arts education programs.........................         100,000
ArtsQuest--The Banana Factory, Bethlehem, PA for the B-
    Smart arts education program........................          75,000
Ashland School District, WI, for an after school program         250,000
Augusta Public Schools, Augusta, KS to encourage staff 
    development in technology...........................         300,000
Austin Independent School District, Austin, TX for 
    supplies for the Technology Enhancement Program for 
    low income middle-school students...................         250,000
AVANCE, Inc.--Waco, TX, for its early childhood 
    education and family literacy programs..............          75,000
AVANCE, Inc., McAllen, TX, for an early childhood 
    development and family literacy program in Corpus 
    Christi, TX.........................................         300,000
Bakersfield Music Theatre, Bakersfield, CA for the Stars 
    School of Fine Arts.................................         100,000
Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners, Baltimore, 
    MD, for a teacher professional development 
    initiative..........................................         250,000
Battelle for Kids, Columbus, OH for the value-added 
    student assessment program..........................         300,000
Bay Haven Charter Academy Middle School, Lynn Haven, FL, 
    for its physical education program, which may 
    include equipment...................................          50,000
Bayfield School District, WI, for an after school 
    program.............................................         200,000
Baylor University, Waco, TX, for its Language and 
    Literacy Center.....................................         150,000
Bellefaire Jewish Children's Bureau, Cleveland, OH for 
    education programs..................................          50,000
Best Buddies International, Inc., for mentoring programs 
    for persons with intellectual disabilities..........         800,000
Best Buddies Maryland, Baltimore, MD, for mentoring 
    programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.         150,000
Best Buddies Rhode Island, Providence, RI, for mentoring 
    programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.         300,000
Best Buddies Virginia, McLean, VA, for mentoring 
    programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.         250,000
Big Top Chautauqua, WI, for educational activities......         250,000
Birchwood School District, WI, for an after school 
    program.............................................         200,000
Blue Ribbon Schools of Excellence, Columbia, SC, for a 
    project to implement technology-based best practices 
    in one or more schools in South Carolina, which may 
    include acquisition of equipment....................         100,000
Bowie State University, Bowie, MD, for establishment of 
    a Principal's Academy Institute.....................         200,000
Boys & Girls Club of the Lowcountry, Beaufort, SC for 
    learning activities for disadvantaged children and 
    teens...............................................         150,000
Boys and Girls Club of San Bernardino, CA, for an after 
    school program in the Delman Heights community......         125,000
Boys and Girls Harbor Inc., New York, NY, for a literacy 
    center..............................................         100,000
Boys&Girls; Town of Missouri, Columbia, MO for 
    educational equipment...............................         250,000
Bradford Area School District, Bradford, PA for 
    technology upgrades.................................         100,000
Brainerd Public School District (Independent School 
    District 181), Brainerd, MN, for its Teacher Support 
    System..............................................         150,000
Bright Side Opportunities Corporation, Lancaster, PA for 
    the operation of a Community Technology Center for 
    disadvantaged youth.................................         300,000
Broadtree Adventures in Education, Chicago, IL, for 
    alternative and environmental education programs for 
    at-risk youth.......................................          50,000
Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ, for a Student 
    Success Center in Asbury Park, which may include 
    purchase of equipment...............................         250,000
Brooklyn Academy of Music, Brooklyn, NY for its Brooklyn 
    Reads initiative....................................         250,000
Bruce School District, WI, for an after school program..         200,000
Butte County, Oroville, CA for the Literacy Is For 
    Everyone (LIFE) Program.............................         200,000
Butternut School District, WI, for an after school 
    program.............................................         200,000
Caldwell Community Center, Toledo, OH, for after school 
    academic and enrichment activities for children and 
    youth in North Toledo...............................         300,000
California Professional Firefighters Foundation, 
    Sacramento, CA, to provide its Team SAFE-T emergency 
    preparedness and safety initiative in public schools         450,000
California State University Northridge, CA, for 
    development of an assessment and accountability 
    system for teacher education........................         350,000
California State University, San Bernardino, CA, for a 
    leadership training program for urban youth.........         325,000
Camp Fire USA Northeast Ohio Council, Medina, OH for the 
    Young Leaders Serving Ohio program..................          50,000
Canton City School District, Canton, OH for the PE 4 
    Life project........................................         100,000
Canton Symphony Orchestra Association, Canton, OH for 
    implementation of the Northeast Ohio Arts Education 
    Collaborative.......................................         100,000
Carnegie Hall, New York, NY, for its National Music 
    Education Program...................................         250,000
Cedar Crest College, Allentown, Lehigh County, PA for a 
    partnership with the Allentown School District and 
    the Da Vinci Discovery Center on secondary school 
    science education...................................         100,000
Center for Community Transformation, Chicago, IL, to 
    support faculty, student fellowships, and ongoing 
    secular educational activities in community 
    leadership transformation...........................         100,000
Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science and 
    Technology, Pleasant Gap, PA for curriculum and 
    equipment for its vocational training program.......         600,000
Charlotte County Public Schools, Port Charlotte, FL to 
    implement the MISSING Program in schools............         300,000
Charter School Development Foundation, Las Vegas, NV, 
    for the Andre Agassi College Preparatory Academy....         175,000
Chesterfield County, VA for assistive technology for 
    special needs students..............................         150,000
Chetek School District, WI, for an after school program.         250,000
Chicago Public Schools, Chicago, IL, for after school 
    and extended learning opportunities.................         275,000
Chippewa Falls School District, WI, for an after school 
    program.............................................         200,000
Choctaw Elementary School, Choctaw, OK for equipment for 
    the Dreamcatcher Playground Project.................         100,000
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati, OH for the 
    Sound Discoveries Program for K-12 students.........         300,000
City of Brisbane, CA, for equipment for a homework 
    assistance center for youth.........................          50,000
City of Fairfield, CA, for after school programs........         300,000
City of La Habra, La Habra, CA for the KinderScience 
    Program.............................................         125,000
City of Pembroke Pines, FL, for the autism program at 
    the Pembroke Pines--Florida State University Charter 
    School..............................................         400,000
City of Rocklin, Rocklin, CA for the Integrated Schools 
    Program.............................................         195,000
City of St. Paul, MN, for after-school and out-of-school 
    youth academic and enrichment programs..............         375,000
City of Whittier, Whittier, CA, for after school 
    programs............................................         225,000
City School District of New Rochelle, New Rochelle, NY, 
    for after school learning centers...................         525,000
Clark County School District, Clark County, NV for 
    filling critical teacher shortages..................         200,000
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV, for its 
    Parent Initiative, which may include training for 
    teachers and parents................................          75,000
Cleary University, Howell, MI to purchase equipment and 
    develop technology instruction for high school 
    students............................................         200,000
Clemson University, Clemson, SC for the Call Me Mister 
    program.............................................         200,000
Cleveland Institute of Music, Cleveland, OH for distance 
    learning............................................          50,000
Cleveland Orchestra, Cleveland, OH for education 
    programs............................................         100,000
Clovis Unified School District, Clovis, CA for curricula 
    and training to increase student graduation rates...         100,000
College of Alameda, Alameda, CA, for professional 
    development services and science laboratory 
    equipment for the Alameda Science and Technology 
    Institute...........................................         130,000
College Summit, Inc., Washington, DC, for an initiative 
    to increase college enrollment of low-income youth 
    in South Carolina...................................         250,000
Collegiate Consortium for Workforce and Economic 
    Development, Philadelphia, PA for vocational 
    education...........................................         250,000
Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Powell, OH for the Columbus 
    Zoo High School.....................................         250,000
Communities in Schools of Coweta, Inc., Newnan, GA for 
    equipment for Performance Learning Centers..........         100,000
Communities In Schools of Glynn County, Brunswick, GA 
    for computers, curriculum and training in an effort 
    to reduce school dropouts...........................         100,000
Communities in Schools of Marietta/Cobb County, 
    Marietta, GA for equipment and program development 
    for a performance learning center...................         100,000
Communities in Schools, Northeast Texas, Mt. Pleasant, 
    TX for the CIS-NETX national stay-in-school network.         350,000
Community Development Commission of the County of Los 
    Angeles, Monterey Park, CA, for the South Whitter 
    community education and computer center.............          45,000
Community Education Partnership, West Valley City, UT 
    for math, science and reading programs..............         300,000
Community Kollel, Des Moines, IA, for K-12 education 
    programs............................................         100,000
Compassion Coalition, Inc., Utica, NY for after school 
    programs............................................         125,000
Connecticut Humanities Council, Middletown, CT, for its 
    Motheread/Fatheread family literacy program.........          90,000
Connecticut Public Broadcasting, Inc./Connecticut Public 
    Television, Hartford, CT, for production, evaluation 
    and promotion of a math education program...........         350,000
Contra Costa College, San Pablo, CA, for its Bridges to 
    the Future Program..................................         300,000
CORA Services, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, for youth 
    development and education services..................          75,000
Council for Excellence in Government, Washington, DC, 
    for the Campaign for the Civic Mission of Schools 
    for development of an online inventory of 
    instructional units, courses, and practices on civic 
    learning and teaching...............................         500,000
CREATE Foundation, Tupelo, MS to conduct College for 
    All, a four-year pilot project in school-based 
    college and career counseling in two school 
    districts in MS.....................................         200,000
Crotched Mountain Foundation TRUST Center, Greenfield, 
    NH for equipment for an education program for 
    children with autism................................         150,000
Denton Independent School District, Denton, TX for the 
    English instruction program.........................         100,000
DePaul School, Louisville, KY for outreach to students 
    with dyslexia and other learning disabilities.......         200,000
Devereaux Glenholme School, Washington, CT for 
    professional training in early childhood development         300,000
Dupage County, Wheaton, IL for a countywide physical 
    fitness assessment project pilot....................         150,000
Early Childhood Resource Center, Canton, OH for early 
    childhood teacher training..........................          50,000
East Atlanta Computer Technology Center, Atlanta, GA, 
    for an after school program, which may include 
    equipment for a computer lab........................         150,000
Education Service Center, Region 12, Hillsboro, TX, for 
    a GEAR UP college preparedness program..............         250,000
Educational Advancement Alliance, Philadelphia, PA, for 
    a college preparation initiative, which may include 
    student scholarships................................         400,000
EduNet24, Bowling Green, KY for educational software for 
    Spanish speaking students for the Tecumseh YMCA in 
    New Carlisle, OH....................................         400,000
Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, FL, for a math and 
    science initiative to assist low-performing students         250,000
Eisner Pediatric & Family Medical Center, Los Angeles, 
    CA, for its Parent Child Home Program...............         250,000
Ennis Independent School District, Ennis, TX for an 
    English Instruction Program.........................         500,000
Envision Schools, San Francisco, CA, for establishment 
    of the Metropolitan Arts and Technology High School.         450,000
Erskine College, Due West, SC for the Fine Arts Network 
    for Assisting Rural Education.......................         100,000
eta Creative Arts Foundation, Inc., Chicago, IL, for 
    arts education programs.............................         100,000
Exchange City, Portsmouth, NH for an EarthWorks 
    immersive math and science program..................         100,000
Exploratorium, San Francisco, CA, for its Bay Area 
    Science Teacher Recruitment, Retention and 
    Improvement Initiative..............................         550,000
Fairfax County Park Authority, Fairfax, VA to develop a 
    handicapped- accessible playground..................         100,000
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA for an 
    innovative Chinese, Arabic and Korean language 
    program in Fairfax and Clarke County schools........         300,000
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA for the 
    Emergency Medical Services Academy..................         150,000
Families In Schools, Los Angeles, CA, for its Read with 
    Me/Lea Conmigo family literacy program..............         150,000
Fayetteville Technical Community College, Fayetteville, 
    NC for the Congressional Scholars program...........         250,000
Florida Bay County District Schools, Panama City, FL, 
    for a drug abuse prevention program in middle 
    schools.............................................          30,000
Florida Gulf Coast University, Ft. Myers, FL for 
    educational outreach................................         350,000
Fontana Unified School District, Fontana, CA, for an 
    integrated technology program.......................         100,000
Franklin Special School District, Franklin, TN for 
    information technology equipment....................         300,000
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge, Valley Forge, PA to 
    conduct a conference on American history for 
    teachers in Oxford, MS..............................         140,000
Friendship Circle, West Bloomfield, MI for educational 
    programs for children with special needs............         350,000
Gallup International Research and Education Center, 
    Omaha, NE for curriculum development of 
    entrepreneurship centers in Lincoln and Norfolk.....         300,000
Georgia Project, Inc., Dalton, GA, for initiatives to 
    assist English language learners....................         225,000
Girl Scouts of the USA, Washington, DC, for Fair Play...         150,000
Give Every Child A Chance, Manteca, CA for expansion of 
    educational enrichment services.....................         450,000
Glade Run Foundation, Zelienople, PA for educational 
    programming and technology upgrades.................         100,000
Graham County Schools, Graham County, AZ for 
    professional development............................         250,000
Greenlee County Schools, Greenlee County, AZ for 
    computer equipment..................................         100,000
Hayward School District, WI, for an after school program         150,000
Heartbeats to the City, Canton, OH for education 
    mentoring programs..................................          50,000
Heartland Educational Consortium, Lake Placid, FL for 
    teacher professional development....................         100,000
Helen Keller Interational, NY, for the ChildSight Vision 
    Screening Program and to provide eyeglasses to 
    children whose educational performance may be 
    hindered because of poor vision.....................       1,000,000
Hoke County Schools, Raeford, NC for instructional 
    technology..........................................         100,000
Huntington Beach Art Center, Huntington Beach, CA for an 
    arts education program for underserved groups.......          50,000
Institute for Advanced Learning and Research, Danville, 
    VA for the Boosting Student Achievement for 
    Competitiveness program.............................         100,000
Institute for Student Achievement, Lake Success, NY for 
    an education enhancement program at Annandale High 
    School, Annandale, VA...............................         100,000
Institute for Student Achievement, Lake Success, NY, for 
    school reform activities at Wyandanch High School...         185,000
Institute for Student Achievement, Lake Success, NY, to 
    implement small learning communities at Morris High 
    School in the Bronx.................................          75,000
InTune Foundation Group, Washington, DC, for its Kids in 
    Tune music career and education program.............         500,000
Jacob Burns Film Center, Pleasantville, NY, for 
    education programs..................................         200,000
JASON Project, Needham Heights, MA for the STEP-UP Ohio 
    education program...................................         100,000
Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York, NY, for music 
    education programs..................................         500,000
Jersey Shore Area School District, Jersey Shore, PA for 
    equipment to create a digital classroom.............         100,000
JFYNetWorks, Boston, MA, for implementation of its 
    computer-based JFYNet: Academic Support for Adequate 
    Yearly Progress initiative in Malden, Revere, and 
    Framingham, MA......................................         150,000
JFYNetWorks, Boston, MA, for implementation of its 
    computer-based JFYNet: Academic Support for Adequate 
    Yearly Progress project in one or more low-
    performing schools in the Boston public school 
    system..............................................         250,000
Joplin School District, Joplin, MO for the eJOPLIN 
    initiative to improve teaching through technology...         200,000
Joplin School District, Joplin, MO for the SMART Board 
    interactive whiteboard..............................          50,000
Jumpstart for Young Children, San Francisco, CA, for an 
    early childhood enhancement project to provide 
    student mentors to preschool children...............         450,000
Jumpstart, Boston, MA, for an early literacy program for 
    at-risk children....................................         250,000
Kelberman Center, Utica, NY to expand programs for pre-
    school and school age children with autism spectrum 
    disorder............................................         100,000
Kentucky Arts Council, Frankfort, KY for arts education 
    programs in cities of the first class in Kentucky...         200,000
Kewanee Community School District #229, Kewanee, IL, for 
    equipment and technology............................         200,000
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA for KIPP Reach 
    College Preparatory in Oklahoma City, OK............         200,000
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA for leadership 
    training and extended learning time at KIPP schools.       1,000,000
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA, for KIPP schools in 
    the State of Maryland to support school leadership 
    and extended learning time..........................         150,000
KIPP Foundation, San Francisco, CA, for the KIPP Delta 
    College Preparatory School in Helena, AR............         200,000
Klingberg Family Centers, New Britain, CT for the 
    Special Education Enhancement Initiative............         300,000
KnowledgeWorks Intermediary, LLC, Cincinnati, OH for the 
    Ohio High School Transformation Initiative..........         250,000
Kohl Children's Museum of Greater Chicago, Glenview, IL 
    for the Early Childhood Connections Outreach 
    Initiative..........................................         175,000
La Crosse School District, La Crosse, WI, for student 
    and parent education, enrichment and support 
    services at its Hamilton Family Learning Center.....          95,000
Lab School of Washington, Washington, DC for the 
    Academic Achievement Program........................         100,000
Lafourche Parish School Board, Lafourche, LA, for early 
    childhood learning centers, which may include 
    portable classrooms and equipment...................         100,000
Laramie County School District Number One, Cheyenne, WY 
    for the English as a Second Language Pilot Program..         100,000
LaSalle High School, Olla, LA for books, material and 
    equipment...........................................         550,000
Learning Collaborative, Indianapolis, IN for the 
    Washington County, IN K-12 Web Portal Technology 
    Development Initiative..............................         500,000
Learning Point Associates/North Central Regional 
    Education Laboratory, Naperville, IL to help schools 
    implement No Child Left Behind......................         200,000
Lee Pesky Learning Center, Boise, ID to provide 
    educational materials for the Literacy Matters! 
    Program.............................................         300,000
Lemay Child & Family Center, St. Louis, MO, for early 
    childhood education and family literacy programs....         100,000
Lexington City Schools, Lexington, TN for the Technology 
    Enabled Alternative Education Program...............          82,000
Lighthouse Community Learning Center, Eagle Lake, TX, 
    for vocational, computer, arts and/or other 
    education services for youth, which may include the 
    purchase of equipment...............................         100,000
Little Black Pearl Art and Design Center, Chicago, IL, 
    for its Art Smarts after school program and for in-
    school workshops....................................         100,000
Logan City School District, Logan, UT for the sixth 
    grade reading assistance project....................         200,000
Longview Independent School District, Longview, TX for 
    its English language instruction programs...........         100,000
Louisiana Resource Center for Educators, Baton Rouge, LA 
    to provide statewide training for all schools and 
    libraries...........................................         200,000
Lower East Side Conservancy, New York, NY, for education 
    programs and outreach...............................         200,000
Luther F. Carson Four Rivers Center, Paducah, KY for the 
    Class Acts Education Series for preschool through 
    high school students................................         100,000
Madison County School System, Madison County, AL, for 
    development of the Madison County Schools Crisis 
    Management Project..................................         200,000
Martinez Unified School District, Martinez, CA, for a 
    science education project at Martinez Junior High 
    School..............................................         100,000
Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore, MD, 
    for a study on teacher education (in reading 
    instruction) in Maryland............................         300,000
Math for America, New York, NY, for implementation of 
    its Newton Fellowship Program in Northern Virginia 
    in partnership, with Marymount University...........         350,000
Medford School District, WI, for an after school program         250,000
Meredith-Dunn Learning Disabilities Center, Inc., 
    Louisville, KY for speech and language therapy 
    programs............................................         300,000
Merrimack College, McQuade Library, North Andover, MA, 
    for an information literacy training and community 
    outreach project....................................         250,000
Metropolitan Wilmington Urban League, Wilmington, DE for 
    the Achievement Matters! Initiative.................         100,000
Mid-State Technical College, Wisconsin Rapids, WI, for 
    training and development of a renewable energy 
    technologies program................................         250,000
Milne-Kelvin Grove School District 91, Lockport, IL for 
    enhanced technology and computing systems and 
    professional development............................         100,000
Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, Washington DC, to 
    implement a Youth Safe Haven after school program in 
    Irvington Township, NJ..............................         100,000
Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, Washington, D.C., for 
    the Full Service Community Schools program in the 
    Canton City Schools.................................         100,000
Milton S. Eisenhower Foundation, Washington, DC, for its 
    full-service community schools initiative in 
    Maryland............................................         200,000
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI, for after 
    school and/or summer community learning centers.....         600,000
Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS for 
    strengthening partnerships between K-12 parents and 
    their children's teachers, principals, 
    superintendents, and other school personnel.........         500,000
Monroe County School District, Key West, FL for 
    equipment to implement a district-wide technology 
    initiative..........................................         200,000
Montana Schools E-Learning Consortium, Helena, MT for 
    equipment and curriculum development for a State-
    wide distance learning program......................         250,000
National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, 
    Morristown, NJ, for the Play It Smart Program.......         300,000
National Hispanic University, San Jose, CA, for 
    development of a ``Smart Start'' early childhood 
    development training and certification program......         350,000
National Resource Center for Deafblindness, East 
    Greenville, Montgomery County, PA for an interactive 
    DVD training program for children with sensory 
    impairments.........................................         100,000
National Science Center, Augusta, GA for the DLP STEP-UP 
    program to improve student achievement in 
    underserved populations.............................         100,000
National Teachers Hall of Fame, Emporia, KS to recognize 
    exceptional career teachers.........................         200,000
Nenana Student Living Center, Nenana, AK for a 
    residential facility for high school students from 
    villages throughout Alaska..........................         200,000
Network for Closing the Achievement Gap, Des Plaines, IL 
    for Project AYP in suburban Cook County, IL.........         200,000
New Mexico Public Education Department, Santa Fe, NM for 
    summer reading and math institutes throughout the 
    State...............................................         250,000
New York University, New York, NY for the Child Study 
    Center to complete an evaluation of ParentCorps.....         250,000
Nicetown Community Development Corporation Community 
    Center, Philadelphia, PA, for an after school 
    program.............................................          75,000
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University, 
    Greensboro, NC, for a project to reduce suspension 
    rates of minority students in the Guilford County 
    School System.......................................         300,000
North Carolina Technology Association Education 
    Foundation, Raleigh, NC for school technology 
    demonstration projects..............................         150,000
North Philadelphia Youth Association, Philadelphia, PA, 
    for education and enrichment services for youth.....          50,000
Norwich Public School District, Norwich, CT for the 
    English instruction program.........................         400,000
Ogden City School District, Ogden, UT for the Ogden 
    Telepresence-Enabled Academic Mentoring project.....         150,000
Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH for Charter 
    Colleges of Education...............................         200,000
Oklahoma City Public Schools Foundation, Oklahoma City, 
    OK to support the ``College for All'' pilot program 
    for at-risk youth...................................         500,000
O'Neill Sea Odyssey, Santa Cruz, CA, for science 
    education programs for elementary school children...         150,000
OneWorld Now!, Seattle, WA, for after school programs 
    and student scholarships for study in foreign 
    countries...........................................         250,000
Ossining Union Free School District, Ossining, NY, for 
    after school, literacy and/or school reform 
    initiatives.........................................         450,000
Ouachita Parish School Board, Monroe, LA for family 
    literacy programs...................................         350,000
P.E. 4 Life, Kansas City, MO to establish a P.E. Academy 
    in North Mississippi................................         325,000
Pacific Science Center, Seattle, WA for curriculum 
    development for an inquiry-based science program....         350,000
Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach, FL, 
    for a teacher and principal mentoring program.......         500,000
Parent Institute for Quality Education, San Diego, CA, 
    for a parent training program.......................         350,000
Pawtucket School Department, Pawtucket, RI, for musical 
    instruments, equipment and instructional materials 
    for the Jacqueline Walsh School of the Performing 
    and Visual Arts.....................................         500,000
PE4life, Kansas City, MO to expand the P.E. program in 
    the Titusville School District, PA across the state.         300,000
Peoria School District 150, Peoria, IL for the Tapping 
    Future Leaders for Urban Schools Initiative.........         100,000
Person to Person, Minneapolis, MN, for its Hungry Lil' 
    Readers Club Family Literacy Program................          50,000
Phillips School District, WI, for an after school 
    program.............................................         170,000
Port Chester--Rye Union Free School District, Port 
    Chester, NY, for academic enrichment, professional 
    development, family engagement and/or other 
    activities to implement full service community 
    schools.............................................         500,000
Project GRAD USA, Houston, TX, for school improvement 
    activities at one or more schools in the Houston 
    Independent School District and the 18th 
    Congressional District..............................         200,000
Project MORE, Putnam County Educational Service Center, 
    Ottawa, OH for reading programs for students with 
    disabilities........................................         100,000
Project One Youth Education Program, Cincinnati, OH for 
    after-school instruction for economically 
    disadvantaged youth.................................         200,000
PUENTE Learning Center, Los Angeles, CA, for education 
    programs............................................         100,000
Puget Sound Educational Service District, Fife, WA, for 
    its Arts Impact teacher training initiative.........         150,000
Purchase College, State of University of New York, 
    Purchase, NY, for a program to address a shortage of 
    high school science and math teachers...............         250,000
Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, IN, for equipment 
    and start-up expenses for a magnet school...........         350,000
Queens Theatre in the Park, Flushing, NY, for a project 
    to provide youth with career planning and 
    development in the performing arts industry.........         100,000
RARE Foundation, Troy, MI for educational programs for 
    children............................................         100,000
Reach for the Stars Learning Center, Brooklyn, NY to 
    expand and enhance programs for autistic children...         200,000
ReadNet Foundation, New York, NY for an online literacy 
    program for at-risk youth in Hudson, NY.............       1,000,000
Readnet Foundation, NY, for the ReadNet Online Program 
    for school and public libraries in Newport, 
    Jamestown, Middletown, and Portsmouth, Rhode Island.         300,000
Ready to Learn, Springfield, MO to develop a program for 
    pre-kindergarten academic, reading readiness and 
    social and emotional skill development for pre-
    school age children and their parents...............         600,000
Rhode Island Philharmonic, Providence, RI, for an arts 
    education initiative for children in Northern Rhode 
    Island..............................................         100,000
Riverside County Office of Education, Riverside, CA for 
    the High School Science Initiative..................         300,000
Rochester City School District, NY, for its Rochester 
    Children's Zone student achievement initiative......         400,000
Roseville City School District, Roseville, CA for 
    English as a Second Language program................         200,000
Salesian Boys and Girls Club of Los Angeles, CA, for 
    education and support services for middle and high 
    school students.....................................         100,000
San Bernardino City Unified School District, San 
    Bernardino, CA for the English Learners Program.....         500,000
San Bernardino County Superintendents of Schools, San 
    Bernardino, CA for English Language Learners 
    Initiative..........................................         350,000
San Diego Environmental Foundation, Inc., San Diego, CA, 
    for a science-based education program on alternative 
    fuels for students..................................         100,000
San Joaquin County, Stockton, CA for the San Joaquin A 
    Plus, program to ensure access to tutors and improve 
    reading skills for third to sixth graders...........         500,000
San Mateo County, CA, for its Preschool for All program.         100,000
San Pasqual Academy, Escondido, CA for technology 
    upgrades............................................         100,000
Save San Francisco Bay Association, Oakland, CA, for 
    science education programs..........................         200,000
Save the Children, Westport, CT to implement 
    supplemental literacy programs serving children in 
    the first congressional district of Arizona.........         400,000
Save the Children, Westport, CT, for a children's 
    literacy initiative in Campbell County and Fentress 
    County in Tennessee.................................         200,000
Save the Children, Westport, CT, for a literacy 
    initiative in South Carolina........................         150,000
School Board of Broward County, Broward County, FL for 
    the Broward Virtual Education online high school....         250,000
School Board of Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, FL for 
    teacher support and development.....................         500,000
School for Children with Hidden Intelligence (SCHI), 
    Lakewood, NJ for the special education program......         200,000
Schultz Center for Teaching and Leadership, 
    Jacksonville, FL for expansion of Florida's 
    educational videoconferencing network...............         250,000
Schuylkill Intermediate Unit 29, Mar Lin, PA, for 
    equipment and technology for the Schuylkill 
    Technology Centers..................................         350,000
Selden/Centereach Youth Association, Selden, NY, for an 
    after school program................................          75,000
Silver Crescent Foundation, Charleston, SC for 
    engineering/technology camps for middle and high 
    school students across the State....................         200,000
Smethport Area School District, Smethport, PA for 
    technology upgrades.................................         100,000
Sociedad Latina, Roxbury, MA, for its Mission Community 
    Enrichment Program..................................         100,000
South Bay Workforce Investment Board, Hawthorne, CA, for 
    its Fit For Gold after school program...............         100,000
SouthEastern Pennsylvania Consortium, Glenside, PA for 
    professional development for elementary and high 
    school teachers.....................................         800,000
Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, College of 
    Education and Human Services, Carbondale, IL, for 
    the Saluki Kids' Academy............................         300,000
Southwest Arkansas Community Development Corporation, 
    Magnolia, Arkansas, for summer and after school 
    programs............................................         100,000
Sparta School District, Sparta, WI, for its Right Step 
    Program.............................................         100,000
St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, MO for a 
    pilot program that will provide early intervention & 
    mainstreaming services to severely deaf children in 
    selected unserved or underserved areas..............         150,000
St. Mary's County Public Schools, Leonardtown, MD, for a 
    mathematics, science, and technology academy........         500,000
St. Xavier University, Chicago, IL, for development of 
    an early childhood professional development center 
    and other program enhancements......................         375,000
Stamford Public Schools, Stamford, CT for the Technology 
    for Teaching initiative.............................         200,000
Stark Education Partnership, Canton, OH to implement the 
    P-16 model..........................................          75,000
State College Area School District, State College, PA 
    for technology enhancements.........................         100,000
State of Rhode Island, Division of Information 
    Technology, Providence, RI, for its Children's Data 
    Sharing Project.....................................         250,000
Steelton-Highspire School District, Steelton, PA, for 
    equipment, technology and technology training.......         150,000
Summit Educational Resources, Tonawanda, NY for 
    technology and equipment for classrooms for children 
    with autism.........................................         200,000
Superior School District, WI, for an after school 
    program.............................................         250,000
Susannah Wesley Community Center, Honolulu, HI, for 
    computers and technology to serve at-risk high 
    school students, and other students in an after 
    school program......................................          50,000
Tarrytown Union Free School District, Sleepy Hollow, NY, 
    for family literacy activities and professional 
    development to support literacy instruction.........         225,000
Texarkana Independent School District, Texarkana, TX for 
    curriculum development and training with an 
    engineering and math focus..........................         120,000
Texas Southern University, Houston, TX, for the TSU/
    Cuney Homes Project Lab School, which may include 
    equipment and technology............................         200,000
Texas State University System, Austin, TX at San Angelo, 
    TX and satellite campuses to develop and implement a 
    comprehensive mathematics program for K-12 students.         350,000
Third Street Music School Settlement, New York, NY, for 
    its Music Instruction on the Lower East Side (MILES) 
    arts education program..............................          75,000
Thornton Township High School District 205, South 
    Holland, IL, for its Mastery Learning Labs project..         250,000
Toledo Jazz Society, Toledo, OH, for music education 
    initiatives for youth and teachers..................         100,000
Township of Colony, AL for technology upgrades at a 
    school computer lab, available for students grades 
    K-12................................................          20,000
Towson University, Towson, MD, for an education 
    partnership with the City of Baltimore, Baltimore 
    City Public School System and the Cherry Hill, MD 
    community...........................................         300,000
Tracy Unified School District, Tracy, CA for the English 
    as a Secondary Language Program.....................         400,000
Triangle Urban League, Raleigh, NC, for its National 
    Achievers' Society program..........................         100,000
Tri-County Educational Service Center, Wooster, OH for a 
    pilot project of the Olweus Bullying Prevention 
    Program.............................................         100,000
Tri-County Educational Service Center, Wooster, OH for 
    technology education................................         100,000
Turlock Unified School District, Turlock, CA to develop 
    and obtain software to be used for instruction in 
    the English as a Second Language Program............         350,000
Unified School District 259, Wichita Public Schools, 
    Wichita, KS for technology, software and equipment 
    for special education students......................         300,000
Union County Public Schools, Monroe, NC for the North 
    Carolina Central Academy of Technology and Arts.....         200,000
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY for after 
    school programs operated through contract with local 
    non-profit organizations............................       1,000,000
University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA, for its Urban 
    School Transformation Study Project.................         150,000
University of Memphis, TN, for a Model Teacher Program 
    in collaboration with the Memphis City School System         300,000
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM for an Indian 
    education demonstration.............................         300,000
University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL for a 
    Virtual School Readiness Incubator Project..........         250,000
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA to expand 
    the National Institute of Technology for Inclusive 
    Education We Build Communication Access Through 
    Technology (WeBCATT) program........................         200,000
Valle Lindo School District, South El Monte, CA, for 
    technology upgrades.................................          70,000
Van Go Mobile Arts, Inc., Lawrence, KS, for education 
    and vocational training for at-risk youth...........         100,000
Vaughn Next Century Learning Center, Pacoima, CA, for an 
    international studies academy for high school 
    students, which may include technology and equipment         350,000
Victory School, North Miami Beach, FL, for professional 
    development, student services and community outreach 
    activities..........................................          50,000
Virginia Aquarium, Virginia Beach, VA for educational 
    programs............................................         300,000
Wallace Accelerated High School, Colorado City, TX to 
    support a charter program for at-risk students in 
    grades 8-12.........................................         150,000
Washington County School District, St. George, UT, for 
    its Family Focus family literacy project............         350,000
Washington National Opera, Washington, DC, for a music 
    education project serving Maryland schools..........         150,000
Washington State University, Takoma, WA, for education 
    and enrichment services for youth at its Center for 
    Community Education, Enrichment and Urban Studies...         240,000
Wausau School District, WI, for educational activities 
    and technology......................................         550,000
Way of a Champion, Chesapeake, VA to expand the after-
    school program for at-risk children to three other 
    areas...............................................         300,000
WE CARE San Jacinto Valley, Inc., San Jacinto, CA for 
    the after-school tutoring program...................         100,000
Webster School District, WI, for an after school program         250,000
West County Unified School District, El Cerrito, CA, for 
    a building trades apprenticeship program at JFK High 
    School..............................................         150,000
Western Nebraska Community College, Scottsbluff, NE for 
    the Entrepreneurship Center to serve Scottsbluff and 
    Gering schools......................................         225,000
Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, OH for 
    education programs..................................          50,000
Widener University, Chester, PA for the K-5 Chester-
    Widener Community Demonstration School..............         100,000
William Barrett Neighbors Community Center, 
    Philadelphia, PA, for after school and summer 
    academic and enrichment activities..................          50,000
Wisconsin Rapids School District, WI, for an after 
    school program......................................         200,000
Wolf Trap Foundation, Vienna, VA for the Performing Arts 
    in Vienna, VA to develop early childhood education 
    programs............................................         200,000
Woodstock Challenger Learning Center for Science & 
    Technology, Woodstock, IL for equipment for the 
    Edventure Area......................................         100,000
Yakima Public Schools, Yakima, WA for equipment for the 
    English Language Instruction Program................         225,000
Yellowstone Boys & Girls Ranch, Billings, MT for 
    equipment to integrate counseling services and 
    distance learning...................................         700,000
YMCA of the East Bay, Richmond, CA, for after school 
    programs, which may include youth scholarships......         180,000
Yonkers Public Schools, Yonkers, NY, for after-school 
    and Saturday academic enrichment, literacy and 
    professional development services, and for parental 
    involvement activities..............................       1,000,000
York Technical College, Rock Hill, SC, for its Camp 
    Success engineering and technology program for 
    middle and high school students.....................         150,000
Youngstown City School District, OH, for a Pathways to 
    Building Trades Program in the Youngstown and 
    Warren, OH school districts.........................         200,000
Youngstown Symphony Society, Inc., Youngstown, OH for 
    educational programs................................          50,000
YouthFriends, Kansas City, MO, for a mentoring project..         250,000
YWCA of Alliance, Alliance, OH for the Alliance 
    Neighborhood Center Apple Seed Project..............         100,000

Teacher incentive fund

    The Committee has included $99,000,000 for the teacher 
incentive program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 
level and the budget request. Of this amount, $4,950,000 is 
made available October 1, 2006 for technical assistance 
training, and evaluation activities. The program provides 
financial incentives for teachers and principals who raise 
student achievement and close the achievement gap in some of 
the Nation's highest-need schools.

Ready to learn television

    The bill does not include funding for the Ready to Learn 
Television program, $24,255,000 below both the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2006 level. Ready to Learn supports the 
development and distribution of educational video programming 
for preschool children, elementary school children and their 
parents. Only public telecommunications entities are eligible 
to receive awards.

Dropout prevention programs

    The bill does not include funding for the dropout 
prevention program, the same as the budget request. This 
program was funded at $4,851,000 in fiscal year 2006. The 
dropout prevention program provides assistance to help schools 
implement effective school dropout prevention and reentry 
programs. Districts desiring to implement dropout prevention 
programs can use funds reserved by States under title I Part A 
to support such efforts.

Close Up fellowships

    The bill does not include funding for Close Up fellowships, 
the same as the budget request and $1,454,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 level. The Close Up Foundation provides fellowships 
to students from low income families and their teachers to 
enable them to participate with other students and teachers for 
a week of seminars on government and meetings with 
representatives of the three branches of the Federal 
government.
    In 2004, the funds appropriated for Close Up fellowships 
contributed less than 6 percent of the overall Close Up 
Foundation budget, which totaled $24,400,000. In 2002, Close 
Up's national programs received support from some 55 
corporations and foundations, and other funders have been added 
since that time. The Foundation's participation in Federal 
grants and contracts has expanded. The organization is a key 
Department of State contractor for different exchanges between 
countries involving youth and adults. Close Up also 
participates in several grants funded under the Department of 
Education's Teaching American History program.

Advanced placement program grants

    The Committee recommends $80,000,000 for the advanced 
placement program. This recommendation is $42,175,000 below the 
budget request and $47,825,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
amount. The advanced placement test fee program awards grants 
to States to enable them to cover part or all of the cost of 
advanced placement test fees of low-income students who are 
enrolled in advanced placement classes and plan to take the 
advanced placement test. This program also supports competitive 
grants to states, school districts and national nonprofit 
educational agencies for programs that encourage greater 
participation by low-income students in advanced placement 
courses.
    Because the Committee does not wish to override current 
statutory authorities, it does not include bill language 
requested by the Administration to require school districts 
participating in the program to provide incentives for teachers 
to become qualified to teach advanced placement classes in 
math, science and foreign languages and for those whose 
students pass the advanced placement tests in these areas. The 
Committee also does not include requested bill language 
requiring grantees to provide a two-to-one funding match by 
States and the private sector. However, the Committee 
understands that the Department of Education may have 
sufficient authority to achieve many of these objectives 
through administrative action. The Committee encourages the 
Secretary to use existing authority under section 1705 of part 
G of title I, ESEA, to encourage eligible entities to use a 
portion of their funding to expand advanced placement offerings 
and participation in subjects related to math, science, and 
foreign language; to support professional development for 
advanced placement teachers; and to provide incentives to 
qualified teachers to teach advanced placement classes in core 
academic subjects, including math, science and foreign 
languages.

                 Safe Schools and Citizenship Education

    The bill includes $623,627,000 for safe schools and 
citizenship education programs. This amount is $105,891,000 
less than the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $357,000,000 
more than the budget request. This appropriation account 
includes programs authorized under parts of titles II, IV, and 
V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities: State grants

    The Committee bill includes $310,000,000 for the State 
grants program, $36,500,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level. 
The Administration did not request funding for this program. 
Eighty percent of the funds provided flows to state and local 
agencies and twenty percent goes to governors offices for such 
activities as youth drug prevention, violence prevention, and 
school safety and security.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities: National programs

    For the national programs under the Safe and Drug-Free 
Schools and Communities Act, the bill provides $196,992,000, 
$55,880,000 above the fiscal year 2006 amount and the same as 
the budget request. Under this program, the Secretary of 
Education administers a variety of activities to prevent the 
illegal use of drugs and violence among students at all 
educational levels, preschool through postsecondary. Within the 
amount provided, the Committee intends that the student drug 
testing pilot program be funded at a level of $15,000,000.
    In recognition of the facts that alcohol is the number one 
drug of choice among school aged youth and that research has 
shown that adolescents who use alcohol may remember 10 percent 
less of what they have learned than those who do not drink, 
this Committee expects the Department of Education to ensure 
that underage drinking prevention is included as a discrete and 
major priority in all substance abuse prevention programs 
funded under the National Programs portion of the Safe and Drug 
Free Schools and Communities program.

Alcohol abuse reduction

    The bill does not include funding for grants to reduce 
alcohol abuse, the same as the budget request and $32,409,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 level. This program awards 
competitive grants to school districts to develop and implement 
programs to reduce alcohol abuse in secondary schools. 
Districts may use their safe and drug-free schools State grants 
or their State Grants for Innovative Programs funding to 
support the activities funded under this program.

Mentoring programs

    The bill includes $19,000,000 for mentoring programs which 
provide competitive grants to school districts and community-
based organizations to promote mentoring programs for children 
with the greatest need. This is the same as the budget request 
and $29,814,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level. This funding 
would support the final year of a two-year phase-out of the 
program. Of the more than 4,200 mentoring programs nationwide, 
only about 6 percent receive mentoring grants from the 
Department. Only about one percent of the 3 million youths 
across the country who are in a formal, mentoring relationship 
do so by participating in a mentoring project that receives 
funds under this program.

Character education

    The bill includes $24,248,000 for character education, the 
same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request. 
This program provides support for the design and implementation 
of character education programs in elementary and secondary 
schools. Grantees may select the elements of character that 
will be taught, and must consider the views of parents and 
students to be served by the program.

Elementary and secondary school counseling

    The bill includes $22,000,000 for elementary and secondary 
school counseling, $12,650,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
level. The budget did not propose funding for this program. 
This program provides grants to school districts to enable them 
to establish or expand elementary school and secondary school 
counseling programs. Funding will support the continuation 
costs of ongoing programs. School counselors are primarily 
supported with non-Federal funds. In the 2005-2006 school year, 
grants under this program have paid the cost of only about 500 
counselors and other school mental health professionals 
nationally, which is one-half of one percent of the 
approximately 100,000 elementary and secondary school guidance 
counselors in the country.

Carol M. White physical education program

    The bill includes $26,387,000 for the physical education 
program, the same as the budget request and $46,287,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 level. Funding will support continuation 
costs for programs first funded in 2005 and 2006. This program 
provides grants to school districts and community-based 
organizations to help students make progress toward meeting 
State standards for physical education.

Civic education

    The bill includes $25,000,000 for civic education, 
$4,111,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 level. The budget 
request did not propose funding for this program. Program funds 
support the ``We the People'' and the Cooperative Education 
Exchange programs. ``We the People'' seeks to promote civic 
competence and responsibility among students. Cooperative 
Education Exchange provides support for education exchange 
activities in civics and economics between the United States 
and eligible countries in Central and Eastern Europe, the 
Commonwealth of Independent States, any country that was 
formerly a republic of the Soviet Union, the Republic of 
Ireland, the province of Northern Ireland and developing 
countries with a democratic form of government.
    The Center for Civic Education is the statutorily 
designated recipient of approximately 75 percent of all funds 
appropriated through the Civic Education program in any single 
year. The Center has also received funds from numerous 
foundations and an increasing number of state and local 
entities. The National Council on Economic Education is 
supported by numerous corporations and foundations.

                      English Language Acquisition

    The bill includes $669,007,000 for English language 
acquisition programs. This amount is the same as the budget 
request and $1,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 level. This 
program provides formula grants to States to serve limited 
English proficient students. Grants are based on each State's 
share of the national limited English proficient and recent 
immigrant student population. Funds under this account also 
support professional development to increase the pool of 
teachers prepared to serve limited English proficient students 
as well as evaluation activities.

                           Special Education

    The bill includes $11,753,013,000 for programs for children 
with disabilities authorized under the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This funding level is 
$55,511,000 above the budget request and $100,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 level.

State grants: grants to states

    The bill provides $10,733,107,000 for grants to states, 
$50,146,000 above the budget request and $150,146,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 level. Out of the total made available for 
school year 2007-2008, $4,708,907,000 is appropriated for 
fiscal year 2007 for obligation after July 1, 2007 and 
$6,024,200,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2008 for 
obligation on, or after, October 1, 2007.
    This program provides formula grants to assist the states 
in meeting the excess costs of providing special education and 
related services to children with disabilities. In order to be 
eligible for funds, states must make free appropriate public 
education available to all children with disabilities. Funds 
are distributed based on the amount that each state received 
from the fiscal year 1999 appropriation, and the numbers of 
children in the general population and who live in poverty in 
the age range for which each state mandates free appropriate 
public education for children with disabilities.
    The Committee includes language proposed in the budget 
request to limit the increase in the amount of funds required 
to be transferred to the Department of the Interior to the 
lesser of an amount equal to the amount transferred in 2006 
plus inflation or the percentage increase in the appropriation 
for the Grants to States program.

State grants: preschool grants

    The bill provides $380,751,000 for preschool grants, the 
same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request. 
This program provides grants to states on the basis of their 
proportionate share of the total number of children in the 
three through five age range and the number of these children 
living in poverty. These funds are provided in order to assist 
states to make a free appropriate public education available to 
all children with disabilities in the three through five age 
range.

State grants: grants for infants and families

    The bill provides $436,400,000 for grants for infants and 
families, the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the 
budget request. This formula grant program assists states in 
developing and implementing statewide systems of coordinated, 
comprehensive, multidisciplinary, interagency programs to make 
available early intervention services to all children with 
disabilities, aged birth through two, and their families.

IDEA national activities: state personnel development

    The bill does not include funding for state personnel 
development, the same as the Administration request and 
$50,146,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level. This program 
supports competitive grants to state educational agencies for 
reforming and improving their systems for personnel preparation 
and professional development in early intervention, education, 
and transition services. Awards are based on State personnel 
development plans provided by the states. No funds are provided 
in the bill because available unobligated balances from the 
2006 appropriation are sufficient to support 2007 awards. The 
Committee intends to resume funding personnel development 
grants in fiscal year 2008 when existing funds are depleted.

Special education--vocational rehabilitation transition initiative

    The bill does not include funding for a new program 
proposed by the Administration to develop systems for using 
secondary and postsecondary school and employment data for 
students with disabilities. The Administration requested 
$2,000,000 for this initiative.

IDEA national activities: technical assistance and dissemination

    The bill includes $48,903,000 for technical assistance and 
dissemination, the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. This program provides funding for 
technical assistance, model demonstration projects, information 
dissemination, and studies and evaluations through competitive 
awards that support efforts by state and local education 
agencies, institutions of higher education, and other entities 
to build state and local capacity to make systemic changes and 
improve results for children with disabilities.

IDEA national activities: personnel preparation

    The bill includes $89,720,000 for personnel preparation, 
which is the same as both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 level. This program supports competitive awards to 
help address State-identified needs for qualified personnel to 
work with children with disabilities, and to ensure that those 
personnel have the skills and knowledge they need to serve 
those children. Awards focus on addressing the need for 
personnel to serve low-incidence populations and leadership 
personnel.

IDEA national activities: parent information centers

    The bill includes $25,704,000 for parent information 
centers, the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the 
budget request. This program makes awards to parent 
organizations to support parent training and information 
centers, including community parent resource centers. These 
centers provide training and information to meet the needs of 
parents of children with disabilities living in the areas 
served by the centers, particularly underserved parents and 
parents of children who may be inappropriately identified. 
Technical assistance is also provided under this program for 
developing, assisting and coordinating centers receiving 
assistance under this program.

IDEA national activities: technology and media services

    The bill includes $38,428,000 for technology and media 
services, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$7,365,000 above the budget request. This program makes 
competitive awards to support the development, demonstration, 
and use of technology and educational media activities of 
educational value to children with disabilities.
    The bill includes $11,880,000 for Recording for the Blind 
and Dyslexic Inc. (RFB&D;), the same as the fiscal year 2006 
level. The Administration did not request funding for the 
program. These funds support continued production and 
circulation of recorded textbooks, increased outreach 
activities to print-disabled students and their teachers and 
accelerated use of digital technology. The Committee believes 
that the funds recommended will enable RFB&D; to expand its 
service to students with print disabilities and to continue the 
digital production and use of its extensive library of 
educational materials.

            Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research

    The bill includes $3,244,247,000 for rehabilitation 
services and disability research. This amount is $63,833,000 
above the budget request and $118,703,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 level. The programs in this account are authorized by the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Helen Keller National Center 
Act, and the Assistive Technology Act of 1998.

Vocational rehabilitation grants to States

    For vocational rehabilitation state grants, the bill 
includes $2,837,160,000, the same as the budget request and 
$116,968,000 above fiscal year 2006. This program supports 
basic vocational rehabilitation services through formula grants 
to the states. These grants support a wide range of services 
designed to help persons with physical and mental disabilities 
prepare for and engage in gainful employment to the extent of 
their capabilities. Emphasis is placed on providing vocational 
rehabilitation services to persons with the most significant 
disabilities.

Client assistance

    The bill includes $11,782,000 for the client assistance 
program, the same as both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 amount. A client assistance program is required in 
each state as a condition of receipt of a basic state grant. 
State formula grants are used to help persons with disabilities 
overcome problems with the service delivery system and improve 
their understanding of services available to them under the 
Rehabilitation Act.

Training

    For training personnel to provide rehabilitation services 
to persons with disabilities, the bill includes $38,438,000, 
the same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 
level. The program supports long-term and short-term training, 
in-service personnel training, and training of interpreters for 
deaf persons. Projects in a broad array of disciplines are 
funded to ensure that skilled personnel are available to serve 
the vocational needs of persons with disabilities.

Demonstration and training programs

    The bill includes $8,246,000 for demonstration and training 
programs, $1,735,000 above both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. These programs authorize discretionary 
awards on a competitive basis to public and private 
organizations to support demonstrations, direct services, and 
related activities for persons with disabilities.
    Within the amounts provided for vocational rehabilitation 
demonstration programs, the Committee includes funding for the 
following activities:

Advocating Change Together, St. Paul, MN, for a 
    disability rights training initiative...............        $150,000
Braille Institute of America, Los Angeles, CA, for 
    replacement of a vehicle to provide mobile services 
    to the visually impaired and/or for related services         100,000
Enable America, Inc., Tampa, FL for civic/citizenship 
    demonstration project for disabled adults...........         500,000
IndependenceFirst, Milwaukee, WI, for its assistive 
    technology program..................................          60,000
Jewish Vocational and Career Counseling Service, San 
    Francisco, CA, for a Transition Services Project to 
    provide vocational training and job placement for 
    youth and adults with disabilities..................         400,000
South Bay Workforce Investment Board, Hawthorne, CA, for 
    its Home Safety and Independence Program for 
    disabled individuals................................          75,000
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, for a 
    demonstration program in orthotics/prosthetics......         200,000
Vocational Guidance Services, Cleveland, OH, for 
    equipment and technology in order to increase 
    employment for persons with disabilities............         250,000

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers

    For programs serving migrant and seasonal farmworkers, the 
bill provides $2,279,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2006 level. The Administration did not request funding for the 
program. This program provides discretionary grants to make 
comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services available to 
migrant and seasonal farmworkers with vocational disabilities. 
Projects emphasize outreach activities, specialized bilingual 
rehabilitation counseling, and coordination of vocational 
rehabilitation services with services from other sources.

Recreational programs

    For recreational programs, the bill provides $2,518,000, 
the same as the fiscal year 2006 level. The Administration did 
not request funding for the program. This program provides 
individuals with recreation and related activities to aid in 
their employment, mobility, independence, socialization, and 
community integration. Discretionary grants are made on a 
competitive basis to states, public agencies, and nonprofit 
private organizations, including institutions of higher 
education.

Protection and advocacy of individual rights

    For protection and advocacy for persons with disabilities, 
the bill provides $16,489,000, the same as both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 level. Grants are awarded to 
entities that have the authority to pursue legal, 
administrative, and other appropriate remedies needed to 
protect and advocate the rights of persons with disabilities.

Projects with industry

    For projects with industry, the bill provides $19,538,000, 
the same as the fiscal year 2006 amount. The Administration did 
not request funding for the program. This program promotes 
greater participation of business and industry in the 
rehabilitation process. The program provides placement and job 
development services to assist persons with disabilities to 
prepare them for employment in the competitive labor market. 
Awards are made to a variety of agencies and organizations, 
including business and industrial corporations, rehabilitation 
facilities, labor organizations, trade associations, and 
foundations.

Supported employment state grants

    For supported employment state grants, the bill includes 
$29,700,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 level. 
The Administration did not request funding for the program. 
These formula grants assist states in developing collaborative 
programs with public agencies and nonprofit agencies for 
training and post-employment services leading to supported 
employment. In supported employment programs, persons with the 
most significant disabilities are given special supervision and 
assistance to enable them to work in an integrated setting.

Independent living: state grants

    For state grants for independent living, the bill includes 
$22,588,000. This amount is the same as both the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2006 level. This program supports formula 
grants to the states to provide services for independent living 
for persons with significant disabilities.

Independent living: centers

    For centers for independent living, the bill provides 
$74,638,000, which is the same as both the budget request and 
the fiscal year 2006 level. A population-based formula 
determines the total amount that is available for discretionary 
grants to centers in each state. These discretionary grants 
support a network of consumer-controlled, nonresidential, 
community-based private nonprofit centers that provide a wide 
range of services to help persons with significant disabilities 
live more independently in family and community settings. 
Centers provide information and referral services, independent 
living skills training, peer counseling, and individual and 
systems advocacy. Discretionary grants are made to private 
nonprofit organizations.

Independent living: services for older blind persons

    For independent living services for older blind 
individuals, the bill provides $32,895,000. This amount is the 
same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request. 
Funds are distributed to states according to a formula based on 
the population of individuals who are 55 or older, and grants 
support services for persons 55 years old or over whose severe 
visual impairment makes gainful employment extremely difficult 
to obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

Program improvement

    For program improvement activities, the bill provides 
$835,000, which is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level 
and the budget request. The program: (1) provides technical 
assistance and consultative services to public and non-profit 
private agencies and organizations; (2) provides short-term 
training and technical instruction; (3) conducts special 
demonstrations; (4) collects, prepares, publishes and 
disseminates educational or informational materials; and (5) 
carries out monitoring and conducts evaluations.

Evaluation

    The bill includes $1,473,000 for program evaluation, the 
same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. 
These funds are used to evaluate the impact and effectiveness 
of individual programs authorized under the Rehabilitation Act. 
Contracts are awarded on an annual basis for studies to be 
conducted by persons not immediately involved in the 
administration of the programs authorized by the Act.

Helen Keller National Center

    For the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth 
and Adults, the bill includes $8,511,000, the same as both the 
fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request. These funds are 
used for the operation of a national center that provides 
intensive services for deaf-blind individuals and their 
families at Sands Point, New York and a network of 10 regional 
offices that provide referral, counseling and transition 
services, and technical assistance to service providers.

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    The bill includes $106,705,000 for the National Institute 
on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the same as both the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. The Institute 
supports research, demonstration and training activities that 
are designed to maximize the employment and integration into 
society of individuals with disabilities of all ages.

Assistive technology

    For assistive technology activities, the bill provides 
$30,452,000, the same as the fiscal year 2006 amount and 
$8,063,000 above the budget request. Technology assistance 
activities are authorized under the Assistive Technology Act of 
1998. This Act authorizes population-based formula grants to 
the states to assist them in supporting alternative financing 
programs and assistive technology device demonstrations, loan, 
and reutilization programs. In addition, protection and 
advocacy services related to assistive technology and national 
technical assistance activities are supported. Of the funds 
provided, $25,058,000 is for the state grant program, 
$4,341,000 is for the protection and advocacy program, and 
$1,053,000 is for national activities. Consistent with the 
authorizing statute, the Committee does not provide separate 
funding for the alternative financing program. Instead, funds 
provided for alternative financing in 2006 are included in the 
2007 state grant program, which is increased by an amount that 
is equal to the 2006 funding for alternative financing. The 
Committee encourages the states to use these additional funds 
to create or expand state alternative financing programs under 
their state grant program.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities


                 AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND

    The bill provides $18,000,000 for the American Printing 
House for the Blind, an increase of $428,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and $427,000 above the budget request. 
This appropriation subsidizes the production of educational 
materials for legally blind persons enrolled in pre-college 
programs. The Printing House, which is chartered by the State 
of Kentucky, manufactures and maintains an inventory of 
educational materials in accessible formats that is distributed 
free of charge to schools and states based on the number of 
blind students in each state. The Printing House also conducts 
research and field activities to inform educators about the 
availability of materials and how to use them.

               NATIONAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF

    The bill provides $57,000,000 for the National Technical 
Institute for the Deaf (NTID), an increase of $859,000 above 
the fiscal year 2006 amount and $1,651,000 over the request. 
The NTID was established by Congress in 1965 to provide a 
residential facility for postsecondary technical training and 
education for deaf persons with the purpose of promoting the 
employment of these individuals. The Institute also conducts 
applied research and provides training in various aspects of 
deafness. The Secretary of Education administers these 
activities through a contract with the Rochester Institute of 
Technology in Rochester, New York.

                          GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY

    The bill provides $110,500,000 for Gallaudet University, an 
increase of $3,502,000 above the fiscal year 2006 appropriation 
and $2,902,000 over the budget request. The Committee does not 
provide the $600,000 requested by the Administration for 
evaluation and has concerns about the validity of the PART 
review conducted by the Office of Management and Budget in 2005 
that rated Gallaudet ``ineffective.'' Gallaudet is a private, 
non-profit educational institution Federally-chartered in 1864 
providing elementary, secondary, undergraduate, and continuing 
education for deaf persons. In addition, the University offers 
graduate programs in fields related to deafness for deaf and 
hearing students, conducts research on deafness, and provides 
public service programs for deaf persons.

                     Vocational and Adult Education

    The bill includes $1,925,858,000 for vocational and adult 
education programs. This amount is $66,301,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 level and $1,346,306,000 above the budget request. 
This appropriation account includes vocational education 
programs authorized by the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and 
Applied Technology Education Act. The account also includes 
adult education programs originally authorized by the Adult 
Education Act and reauthorized under the Workforce Investment 
Act of 1998.

Vocational education basic grants

    The bill includes $1,182,388,000 for basic grants to states 
under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education 
Act of 1998, which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 amount. 
The budget request proposed to eliminate this program and move 
the funds into a high school reform proposal. Out of the total 
for basic grants to states made available for school year 2007-
2008, $391,388,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2007 for 
obligation after July 1, 2007 and $791,000,000 is appropriated 
for fiscal year 2008 for obligation on, or after, October 1, 
2007.
    State grants support a variety of vocational education 
programs developed in accordance with the state plan. The Act 
concentrates Federal resources on institutions with high 
concentrations of low-income students. The populations assisted 
by Basic Grants range from secondary students in pre-vocational 
courses to adults who need retraining to adapt to changing 
technological and labor markets.
    The Committee believes that funding provided for this 
program should be dedicated to activities that ensure secondary 
and postsecondary students are prepared with the requisite 
skills and knowledge to succeed in today's globally competitive 
economy. The Committee urges states to utilize the 
accountability data collected under the program as a means to 
monitor success in achieving this goal. Further, the Committee 
expects states to direct the use of these funds to programs 
where there is a clear labor market demand.

Tech-prep

    The bill includes $104,754,000 for tech-prep, the same as 
the fiscal year 2006 level. The budget request did not propose 
separate line item funding for this program. This appropriation 
includes activities under title II of the Carl D. Perkins 
Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998. The tech-prep 
education program provides planning and demonstration grants to 
consortia of local educational agencies and postsecondary 
institutions to develop and operate model technical education 
programs. These programs begin in high school and provide 
students with the mathematical, science, communications and 
technological skills needed to enter a 2-year associate degree 
or 2-year certificate program in a given occupational field, 
and to make a successful transition into further postsecondary 
education or begin their careers. The purpose of tech-prep is 
to develop structural links between secondary and postsecondary 
institutions that integrate academic and vocational education 
and better prepare students to make the transition from school 
to careers.

National programs

    For national programs, the Committee provides $9,164,000, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2006 level. The 
Administration did not request separate funding for this 
program. This authority supports the conduct and dissemination 
of research in vocational education, and includes support for 
the National Centers for Research and Dissemination in Career 
and Technical Education and other discretionary research.

State programs for adult education

    For state grants, the Committee provides $563,975,000, 
which is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the 
budget request. State formula grants support programs to enable 
all adults to acquire basic literacy skills, to enable those 
who so desire to complete a secondary education, and to make 
available to adults the means to become more employable, 
productive, and responsible citizens.
    Grants are provided on a formula basis to states under the 
Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. The formula provides 
an initial allotment of $250,000 for each state and $100,000 to 
each outlying area, with additional allotments distributed on 
the basis of population aged 16 through 60 who are without a 
high school diploma or equivalent who are not enrolled in 
secondary school.
    States may use 12.5 percent of their allotments for state 
leadership activities and may use an additional 5 percent or 
$65,000 for state administration. States and localities must 
give priority to adult education and literacy activities that 
are built on a strong foundation of research on effective 
practices and that effectively employ technology. Funds are 
provided on a forward-funded basis. The Committee bill retains 
language in the 2006 bill that guarantees a portion of the 
funding will be used to provide civics education services to 
new immigrants.

National Programs--national leadership activities

    The Committee provides $9,005,000 for national leadership 
activities. This amount is the same as both the fiscal year 
2006 level and the budget request. Through applied research, 
development, dissemination, evaluation, and program improvement 
activities, this program assists state efforts to improve the 
quality of adult education. The funds support such projects as 
evaluations on the status and effectiveness of adult education 
programs, national and international adult literacy surveys, 
and technical assistance on using technology to improve 
instruction and administration that show promise of 
contributing to the improvement and expansion of adult 
education.

National Institute for Literacy

    For the National Institute for Literacy, the bill provides 
$6,572,000, which is the same as both the fiscal year 2006 
level and the budget request. The Institute supports research 
and development projects, tracks progress made toward national 
literacy goals, supports research fellowships, disseminates 
information through a national clearinghouse, and coordinates 
literacy information data from national and state sources.
    The Committee commends the National Institute for Literacy 
(NIFL) and the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL) in 
its role as convener of the National Early Literacy Panel 
(NELP). The NELP report will be the centerpiece for 
scientifically-based research in early literacy. As the 
National Reading Panel examined reading for children in 
kindergarten through grade 3, this effort will guide the 
evolution of early literacy programs which reach younger 
children--from birth to age 5. Once the final report of the 
NELP is published, the Secretary is encouraged to review its 
findings in consultation with NIFL and NCFL toward the goal of 
informing the Federal government's work in early literacy 
through programs providing services to this age cohort, 
including Head Start and child care.

Smaller learning communities

    The bill includes $50,000,000 for the smaller learning 
communities program, $43,531,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
level. The Administration did not request funding for this 
program. As in past years, the bill specifies that these funds 
shall be used only for activities related to the redesign of 
large high schools enrolling 1,000 or more students. Since 
2000, nearly $1,000,000,000 in non-Federal funds has been 
invested in this reform effort. Many of the eligible schools 
have not chosen to create smaller learning communities, which 
may indicate that the program has already reached its maximum 
growth.
    The Committee directs that the Department consult with the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to the 
release of program guidance for the fiscal years 2006 and 2007 
smaller learning communities grant competition. The Committee 
direct that a greater share of the five percent set-aside for 
national activities be used to support direct technical 
assistance to grantees through regional laboratories, 
university-based organizations, and other entities with 
expertise in high school reform, and direct that the Department 
submit to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations an 
operating plan outlining the planned use of the set-aside prior 
to the obligation of these funds. Further, the Committee 
strongly encourages the Department to enter into a jointly 
funded program with a private or public foundation with 
expertise in designing and implementing small schools in order 
to further leverage the Federal investment in smaller learning 
communities.

State grants for incarcerated youth offenders

    The bill does not include funding for state grants for 
incarcerated youth offenders, the same as the budget request 
and $22,770,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level. This program 
makes grants to state correctional agencies to assist and 
encourage incarcerated youths to acquire functional literacy 
skills and life and job skills. The Committee provides 
$49,797,000 to the Delinquent and Neglect program, which is a 
similar program for State educational agencies to provide 
educational services in juvenile and adult detention 
facilities.

                      Student Financial Assistance

    The Committee recommends $14,890,745,000 for student 
financial assistance programs, a reduction of $36,230,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $479,745,000 above the 
budget request.
    Pell grants.--The Committee recommendation increases the 
maximum Pell Grant to $4,150, which is $100 above both the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2006 amount. The Committee 
recommends $13,009,000,000 in new budget authority for the Pell 
Grant program, $349,287,000 above the request and $36,230,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. Pell Grants provide 
portable education vouchers to postsecondary students who may 
use them at any of over 6,000 eligible schools.
    Federal supplemental educational opportunity grants 
(SEOG).--The Committee recommends $770,933,000 for SEOG, the 
same as the request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. The 
SEOG program provides grants through postsecondary institutions 
to qualified students who demonstrate exceptional financial 
need. Institutions have broad flexibility within the 
eligibility criteria for awarding these grants with the 
exception that priority must be given to Pell Grant recipients.
    Work-study.--The Committee recommends $980,354,000 for the 
work-study program, the same as the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the budget request. Funding for this program 
is provided through institutions to students who work part-time 
to meet the cost of education. Institutions receive funding 
according to a statutory formula and may allocate it for job 
location and job development centers.
    Perkins loans cancellations.--The Committee recommends 
$65,471,000 for federal Perkins loans cancellations, 
$65,471,000 above the budget request and the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation. The Federal Government reimburses 
institutional Perkins revolving loan funds for loan 
cancellations permitted under Federal law. Loans may be 
cancelled when the borrower pursues a career in 1 of 12 
statutorily-designated professions including corrections, 
medical technical work, and Peace Corps or VISTA service.
    Leveraging educational assistance partnership (LEAP).--The 
Committee recommends $64,987,000 for the LEAP program, the same 
as the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $64,987,000 above the 
budget request. LEAP provides dollar-for-dollar matching funds 
to states as an incentive for providing need-based grant and 
work study assistance to eligible postsecondary students. 
Federally supported grants and job earnings are limited to 
$5,000 per award year for full-time students. By law, each 
state's allocation is based on its relative share of the total 
national population of students eligible to participate in the 
programs, except that no state is to receive less than it 
received in 1979. If LEAP amounts are below this level, each 
state is allocated an amount proportional to the amount of 
funds it received in 1979. If a state does not use all of its 
allocation, the excess funds are distributed to other states in 
the same proportion as the original distribution. States must, 
at a minimum, match LEAP grants dollar for dollar with state 
funds provided through direct state appropriations for this 
purpose.

                       Student Aid Administration

    The bill includes $713,720,000 for the Student Aid 
Administration account. The Committee recommendation is 
$594,920,000 above the fiscal year 2006 discretionary 
appropriation and $20,000,000 below the request. Section 8015 
of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-171) shifted 
mandatory funding formerly available through Section 458 of the 
Higher Education Act to discretionary funding. The Federal 
Student Aid Office and the Office of Postsecondary Education 
have primary responsibility for administering Federal student 
financial assistance programs.

                            Higher Education

    The Committee recommends $1,964,203,000 for higher 
education programs, an increase of $13,150,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and $855,492,000 above the budget 
request.
    Strengthening institutions.--The Committee recommends 
$79,535,000 for the regular strengthening institutions program, 
the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. 
This program provides general operating subsidies to 
institutions with low average educational and general 
expenditures per student and significant percentages of low-
income students. Awards may be used for faculty and academic 
program development, management, joint use of libraries and 
laboratories, acquisition of equipment, and student services.
    Strengthening Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs).--The 
Committee recommends $94,914,000 for the Hispanic-serving 
institutions program, the same as the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. The HSI program provides operating 
subsidies to schools that serve at least 25 percent Hispanic 
students of whom at least half are low-income students.
    The Committee is concerned about the acute shortage of 
Hispanics earning advanced degrees, and supports legislative 
efforts in the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act to 
expand graduate opportunities for Hispanic students. Therefore, 
the Committee encourages the Department to submit a budget 
request for HSI graduate programs in the event that such a 
program is authorized under Title V of the Higher Education 
Act.
    Strengthening historically black colleges and 
universities.--The Committee recommends $238,095,000 for 
strengthening historically black colleges and universities 
(HBCUs), the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation. This program provides operating subsidies 
to accredited, legally authorized HBCUs established prior to 
1964 whose principal mission is the education of black 
Americans. Funds may be used to support both programs and 
management and are distributed through a formula grant based on 
the enrollment of Pell Grant recipients, number of graduates, 
and the number of graduates entering graduate or professional 
schools in which blacks are underrepresented. The minimum grant 
is $500,000.
    Strengthening historically black graduate institutions.--
The Committee recommends $57,915,000 for the strengthening 
historically black graduate institutions program, the same as 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. The 
program provides 5-year grants to 18 post-secondary 
institutions that are specified in section 326(e)(1) of the 
Higher Education Act. Awards may be used for building 
endowments as well as the same purposes for which the 
strengthening HBCU grants may be used.
    Strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving 
institutions.--The Committee recommends $9,200,000 for 
strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving 
institutions, $2,585,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    Strengthening tribally controlled colleges and 
universities.--The Committee recommends $23,570,000 for the 
strengthening tribally controlled colleges and universities 
program, the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation.

International education and foreign languages studies

    Domestic programs.--The Committee recommends $91,541,000 
for the domestic activities of the international education and 
foreign languages studies programs, the same as the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation and $1,000,000 below the budget request. The 
program assists graduate and undergraduate foreign language and 
area studies programs and students at institutions of 
postsecondary education. Programs include national resource 
centers, foreign language and area studies fellowships, 
undergraduate international studies and foreign language 
programs, international research and studies projects, business 
and international education projects, international business 
education centers, language resource centers, American overseas 
research centers, and technological innovation and cooperation 
for foreign information access. In general, the Secretary has 
discretion to allocate funding among these various activities. 
The Committee recommendation does not include funding to 
develop a centralized distance education clearinghouse of 
online language training materials, as proposed in the budget 
request.
    Overseas programs.--The Committee recommends $12,610,000 
for the overseas programs in international education and 
foreign language studies authorized under the Mutual 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, popularly known 
as the Fulbright-Hays Act. The Committee recommendation is the 
same as the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation. Funding for these programs support group 
projects abroad, faculty research abroad, special bilateral 
projects, and doctoral dissertation research abroad.
    Institute for International Public Policy.--The Committee 
recommends $1,600,000 for the Institute for International 
Public Policy, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation. This program provides a grant to an 
eligible recipient to operate the Institute through sub-
grantees chosen among minority serving institutions.
    Fund for the improvement of postsecondary education.--The 
Committee recommends $90,115,000 for the Fund for the 
Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), $68,126,000 
above the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation. FIPSE awards grants and contracts to a variety 
of postsecondary institutions and other organizations to 
improve the quality and delivery of postsecondary education. 
Within the amounts provided for FIPSE, the Committee includes 
funding for the following:

Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega, AL for 
    the Alabama Interpreter Training program............        $100,000
Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL for the Health 
    Careers Awareness program...........................         100,000
Albany State University, Albany, GA, in partnership with 
    Darton College, for an initiative to increase the 
    success of minority males and nontraditional 
    students in postsecondary education.................         300,000
Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute, Albuquerque, 
    NM for a training program in captioning.............         200,000
Alfred State College, Alfred, NY for the Court Reporting 
    School..............................................         200,000
Anoka-Ramsey Community College, Coon Rapids, MN for the 
    implementation of a biomedical device manufacturing 
    curriculum..........................................         100,000
Antioch University McGregor, Yellow Springs, OH for 
    technology equipment................................         250,000
Azusa Pacific University, Azusa, CA to establish a 
    nursing program.....................................         500,000
Bakersfield College, Bakersfield, CA, for nurse training 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
Ball State University, Muncie, IN for the Center for 
    School Innovation...................................         200,000
Bates Technical College, Tacoma, WA, for equipment and 
    technology..........................................         450,000
Bellevue Community College, Bellevue, WA for the 
    Building Safer Information Technology Environments 
    program to develop educational and training 
    resources in risk management for information 
    technology..........................................         100,000
Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN, for an 
    engineering technology center.......................         350,000
Bemidji State University, Bemidji, MN, for development 
    of a baccalaureate nursing program..................         350,000
Bennett College for Women, Greensboro, NC, for 
    technology improvements and professional development         350,000
Bevill State Community College, Sumiton, AL for 
    technology upgrades.................................         490,000
Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Winchester, 
    KY, for equipment and technology....................         300,000
Brevard Community College, Cocoa, FL for 
    telecommunications equipment........................         750,000
Broward Community College, Broward County, FL, for an 
    education and training program in emergency 
    preparedness and response...........................         350,000
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA for a campus 
    technology initiative...............................         250,000
Buena Vista University, Storm Lake, IA for curriculum 
    development.........................................         480,000
Butler County Community College, El Dorado, KS for 
    technical training..................................         200,000
Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute, 
    Hudson, NC for the Teacher Training Center..........         150,000
California Community College System, Sacramento, CA, for 
    a biophotonics program at Merced Community College..         300,000
California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CA for the 
    National Center for the Advancement of Animation, 
    including purchase of equipment.....................         220,000
California State University Channel Islands, Camarillo, 
    CA, for an accelerated nursing degree program.......         100,000
California State University, Bakersfield, Department of 
    Nursing, Bakersfield, CA for nurse training 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
California State University-Fullerton Institute of 
    Gerontology/Ruby Gerontology Center, Fullerton, CA 
    for technology upgrades.............................         250,000
Campbell University, Buies Creek, NC, for its School of 
    Pharmacy............................................         400,000
Cazenovia College, Cazenovia, NY for equipment for the 
    Enhanced Art & Design Instruction Building..........         350,000
Center for Rural Development, Somerset, KY for equipment 
    purchases for the CenterNET2 Project................         500,000
Central Arizona College, Coolidge, AZ for a bilingual 
    nurse education program, including purchase of 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
Central Florida Community College, Ocala, FL for campus 
    technology upgrades.................................         300,000
Central Florida Community College, Ocala, FL for the 
    Equine Studies program..............................         200,000
Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte, NC for 
    curriculum development at the Center for Integrated 
    Emergency Response Training.........................         250,000
Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA for 
    laboratory equipment................................         350,000
Cerritos College Foundation, Norwalk, CA, for its 
    Project HOPE academic assistance and college 
    preparation program.................................         205,000
Chadron State College, Chadron, NE for student 
    recruitment and retention...........................          70,000
Charleston Southern University, North Charleston, SC for 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
Chemeketa Community College, Salem, OR, for personnel, 
    curricula and equipment for a horticulture program..         265,000
City College of New York, NY, for the Charles B. Rangel 
    Center for Public Service to prepare individuals for 
    careers in public service, which may include 
    establishing an endowment, library and archives for 
    such center.........................................       3,000,000
Clark State Community College, Springfield, OH for the 
    Connecting Our Students to the Future Project.......         250,000
Clayton College and State University, Morrow, GA, for 
    development of a Master of Arts in Archive degree 
    program, which may include student scholarships and 
    community outreach..................................         300,000
Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, OH for expansion 
    of programs.........................................          50,000
Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC for equipment at 
    its science center..................................         300,000
College of Lake County, Grayslake, IL to develop and 
    implement English as a Second Language instructional 
    classes.............................................         350,000
College of Southern Idaho, Twin Falls, ID for the Pro-
    Tech program........................................         600,000
College of Staten Island, Staten Island, NY for 
    technology upgrades.................................         300,000
Community College of Allegheny County, PA for technical 
    education programs..................................         850,000
Community College of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA 
    for the Allied Healthcare Institute, including 
    purchase of equipment...............................         175,000
Connecticut State University, Hartford, CT, for a 
    project to enhance teacher workforce diversity, 
    recruitment and retention...........................         500,000
Consensus Organizing Center, San Diego, CA, for its Step 
    Up college preparation initiative...................         100,000
Cuyamaca College, El Cajon, CA for equipment............         350,000
Defiance College, Defiance, OH for the McMaster Citizen-
    Leader program......................................         100,000
Delaware County Community College, Media, PA for 
    purchase of equipment...............................         250,000
Delaware Valley College, Doylestown, PA for equipment at 
    the Samuel P. Mandell Science Center................         400,000
Denver Rescue Mission, Denver, CO for the Literacy and 
    Education Center....................................         100,000
Des Moines Area Community College, Ankeny, IA for the 
    Story County Career Academy Consortium Project, 
    including equipment.................................         400,000
Des Moines Area Community College, IA, for equipment and 
    technology..........................................         200,000
DeSales University, Center Valley, PA for technology 
    upgrades............................................         400,000
Dowling College, Oakdale, NY, for development of 
    curricula and a training program in the field of 
    unmanned aerial vehicles............................         200,000
Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie, NY for 
    instrument flight training programs, including 
    purchase of equipment...............................         100,000
Dyersburg State Community College, Dyersburg, TN, for an 
    online enrollment and information system initiative.         300,000
Eckerd College, St. Petersburg, FL for technology 
    enhancements........................................         200,000
Edison Community College at Charlotte, Punta Gorda, FL 
    for nursing programs................................         100,000
Elms College, Chicopee, MA, for equipment and technology 
    for nursing and science programs....................         150,000
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott, AZ for 
    technology upgrades.................................         100,000
Erie Community College, Buffalo, NY, for a program in 
    real time writing and captioning, which may include 
    student scholarships................................         175,000
Estrella Mountain Community College, Avondale, AZ, for 
    its science and math pathways initiative, which may 
    include student scholarships........................         150,000
Everett Community College, Everett, WA, to plan, develop 
    and implement one or more Early College High 
    Schools, in conjunction with Whatcom Community 
    College, Skagit Valley College and Northwest Indian 
    College.............................................         150,000
Florida Campus Compact, Tallahassee, FL, for a project 
    to enhance service learning on college campuses 
    throughout Florida..................................         350,000
Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, AL for 
    technology upgrades.................................         500,000
Gateway Community and Technical College, Ft. Mitchell, 
    KY for purchase of equipment at the Center for 
    Advanced Manufacturing Competitiveness..............         250,000
Gateway Community College, New Haven, CT, for 
    radiography and radiation therapy programs..........         130,000
Grossmont College, El Cajon, CA for forensic sciences 
    for the purchase of equipment.......................         206,000
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology, 
    Harrisburg, PA, for instructional programs, which 
    may include equipment and technology................         400,000
Heinz C. Prechter Bipolar Research Fund, University of 
    Michigan Depression Center, Ann Arbor, MI for the 
    Postsecondary Education Campus Support Project......         400,000
Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center, Hickory, 
    NC for technology upgrades..........................         100,000
Hillsborough Community College, Plant City, FL for 
    equipment...........................................         200,000
Hiram College, Hiram, OH for curriculum development and 
    equipment for the Carbon Conversion Initiative......         300,000
Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY, for equipment, 
    technology and technology training..................         300,000
Holy Family University, Philadelphia, PA, for nurse 
    education programs..................................         150,000
Hood College, Frederick, MD for bioinformatics programs.         250,000
Houston Community College, Houston, TX, for a project to 
    enhance the quality of instruction in business 
    management and entrepreneurship, which may include 
    equipment and technology............................          50,000
Houston Community College, Houston, TX, for development 
    of an emergency medical technician certificate 
    program.............................................         350,000
Huntington Junior College, WV, for an initiative to 
    recruit and train students in closed captioning.....         250,000
I KNOW I CAN, Columbus, OH for a student recruitment and 
    retention initiative................................         100,000
Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID for a master's 
    degree program in dental hygiene, including purchase 
    of equipment........................................         400,000
Illinois State University, Normal, IL, for Chicago 
    teacher education pipeline programs in partnership 
    with the Chicago Public Schools and City Colleges of 
    Chicago.............................................         100,000
Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, Fort 
    Wayne, IN for the Northeast Indiana Science 
    Education Network...................................         100,000
Interamerican University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 
    for development of a bilingual cultural competency 
    program.............................................         150,000
Iowa Valley Community College Education and Training 
    Center, Marshalltown, IA for continuing education 
    and job training....................................         175,000
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Bloomington, IN 
    for the Center for Mathematics and Science..........         500,000
Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana, Bloomington, IN 
    for the Early College/Middle College initiative.....       1,000,000
Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL for the 
    early childhood education and child care program....         200,000
Jacksonville University, Jacksonville, FL for the 
    accelerated nursing development program.............         150,000
James Rumsey Technical Institute, Martinsburg, WV for 
    the Automotive Technology Program, including 
    purchase of equipment...............................         100,000
Jefferson College, Jefferson County, MO, for equipment 
    and technology......................................          40,000
Joliet Junior College, Joliet, IL for the Integrated 
    Systems Technology program..........................         700,000
Kent State University, Kent, OH for education programs 
    for scientists collaborating at the Oak Clinic for 
    Multiple Sclerosis..................................         200,000
Kent State University, Kent, OH for the GED Scholars 
    program.............................................         100,000
Keuka College, Keuka Park, NY for technology upgrades...         240,000
Kirkwood Community College, Cedar Rapids, IA to 
    establish a program in environmental health, safety 
    and security........................................         150,000
La Sierra University, Riverside, CA for equipment for 
    its chemistry and biochemistry laboratories.........         250,000
Lake City Community College, Lake City, FL for the 21st 
    century mathematics initiative......................         175,000
Lakeshore Technical College Bilingual Captioning/
    Judicial Reporting Initiative, Cleveland, WI to 
    train real time writers and captioners..............         250,000
Laredo Community College, Laredo, TX for technology 
    upgrades and programs at Zaffirini Library..........         100,000
Lawrence Technological University, Southfield, MI, for 
    upgrades to the university wireless network.........         200,000
Lewis and Clark Community College, Godfrey, IL, for its 
    National Great Rivers Research and Education Center.         450,000
Lincoln College, Lincoln, IL for the Lincoln Barat 
    Teacher Training Initiative.........................         100,000
Lincoln Memorial University College of Osteopathic 
    Medicine, Harrogate, TN for curriculum development..         500,000
Livingstone College, Salisbury, NC, for teacher 
    training, and for science and math academic services 
    and mentoring for minority students.................         200,000
Lorain County Community College, Elyria, OH, for its 
    Learning Technology Center..........................         300,000
Loyola University Center for Public Service, Chicago, IL 
    for equipment and programming.......................         500,000
Lycoming College, Williamsport, PA for campus technology 
    upgrades............................................         400,000
MacMurray College, Jacksonville, IL for technology 
    upgrades............................................         300,000
Madisonville Community College, Madisonville, KY for 
    curriculum development and equipment at the Kentucky 
    Coal Academy in conjunction with Henderson Community 
    College, Henderson, KY..............................         200,000
Madonna University Project LEARN, Livonia, MI for a 
    disaster relief and recovery program................         150,000
Maricopa County Community College, Phoenix, AZ, for the 
    Bilingual Nursing Program at Gateway Community 
    College.............................................         300,000
Marymount Manhattan College, New York, NY, for a 
    minority teacher recruitment initiative.............         300,000
McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA for the 
    Louisiana Academy for Innovative Teaching and 
    Learning............................................         200,000
Mercer University, Macon, GA for equipment for the 
    Critical Personnel Development Program..............         200,000
Mesa Community College, Mesa, AZ for nursing 
    recertification curriculum..........................         125,000
Mesa Community College, Mesa, AZ for the Enfermeras En 
    Escalera program....................................         175,000
Michigan Jewish Institute, Bloomfield, MI for curriculum 
    development.........................................         100,000
MidAmerica Nazarene University, Olathe, KS for teacher 
    training programs...................................         150,000
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN, for 
    equipment and personnel for biotechnology training 
    initiatives.........................................         440,000
Midland College Advanced Technology Center, Midland, TX 
    for the purchase of equipment and campus-wide 
    network infrastructure upgrades.....................         150,000
Mid-South Community College, West Memphis, AR, for the 
    Crossroads Coalition higher education initiative....         400,000
Mira Costa College, Oceanside, CA for a nursing 
    education program, including the purchase of 
    equipment...........................................         150,000
Missouri Southern State University, Joplin, MO for 
    communications equipment............................         320,000
Missouri State University-Springfield, Springfield, MO 
    for equipment and programs at the Missouri Virtual 
    School..............................................         250,000
Missouri State University-West Plains, West Plains, MO 
    for technology upgrades and programming at the 
    Academic Support Center.............................         300,000
Monroe Community College, Rochester, NY for a special 
    needs preparedness training program.................         450,000
Monroe Community College, Rochester, NY for the Advanced 
    Technology Training Systems Program, including 
    purchase of equipment...............................         200,000
Morehead State University, Morehead, KY for the 
    Institute for Regional Analysis and Public Policy...         300,000
Murray State University, Murray, KY for equipment for 
    the Animal Health Technology Program................         350,000
Naugatuck Valley Community College, Waterbury, CT, for 
    equipment and technology for its nursing program and 
    laboratories........................................         100,000
Nazareth College, Rochester, NY for equipment and 
    technology upgrades for the Math/Science Teacher 
    Enhancement project.................................         250,000
Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln, NE for forensic 
    science programs, including equipment...............         150,000
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV for the Accelerated 
    Nursing Program.....................................         400,000
New College of Florida, Sarasota, FL for the Public 
    Archaeology Laboratory, including the purchase of 
    equipment...........................................         225,000
New Hampshire Community Technical College, Manchester, 
    NH for the pharmacy technician program, including 
    the purchase of equipment...........................         100,000
New York State Education and Research Network, Troy, NY, 
    for expansion of a statewide fiber optic network to 
    Binghamton to serve the State University of New York 
    at Binghamton and create an entry point for the 
    Southern Tier.......................................         300,000
New York University, New York, NY, for the John Brademas 
    Center for the Study of Congress, which may include 
    student scholarships and an endowment...............         750,000
Niagara County Community College, Sanborn, NY for 
    laboratory equipment................................         300,000
North Arkansas College, Harrison, AR for technology 
    enhancements........................................         350,000
North Carolina Center for Engineering Technologies, 
    Hickory, NC for engineering, applied science and 
    management education programs.......................         150,000
North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC, for a 
    biomanufacturing training program...................         240,000
North Central College, Naperville, IL for the Community 
    Connections Program.................................         100,000
North Dakota State College of Science, Wahpeton, ND, for 
    a Center for Nanoscience Technology Training........         300,000
North Florida Community College, Madison, FL for the 
    registered nursing program..........................         125,000
North Shore Community College, Danvers, MA, for 
    curricula, programming and equipment................         100,000
Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, for its 
    Vibration and Acoustics Center......................         175,000
Northern Kentucky University Research Foundation, 
    Highland Heights, KY for the purchase of equipment..         150,000
Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI, for an 
    international education initiative, which may 
    include student scholarships........................         200,000
Northwest Shoals Community College, Phil Campbell 
    Campus, Phil Campbell, AL for technology upgrades...         500,000
Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, for 
    its nursing education program.......................         200,000
Oakland Community College, Bloomfield Hills, MI, for 
    international education programs....................         350,000
Oakwood College, Huntsville, AL, for its business school 
    preparation initiative..............................          50,000
Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus, OH for the School for 
    Computational Science...............................         200,000
Owens Community College, Perrysburg Township, OH for 
    Third Frontier Network and Emergency Preparedness 
    Training & Equipment Initiative.....................         100,000
Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR, for equipment and 
    technology for its health professions campus........         100,000
Palm Beach Community College, Palm Beach County, FL, for 
    equipment and technology............................         250,000
Paula and Anthony Rich Center for the Study and 
    Treatment of Autism, Youngstown, OH, for distance 
    learning technology and programs....................         350,000
Peru State College, Peru, NE for the Adopt A High School 
    Program.............................................         400,000
Pittsburg State University College of Technology, 
    Pittsburg, KS for equipment.........................         250,000
Polk Community College Small Business Training 
    Consortium (SBTC), Lakeland, FL to promote workforce 
    development for small and medium business in Polk 
    County, FL..........................................         200,000
Portland State University, OR, for equipment and 
    technology for its Science Research and Training 
    Center..............................................         125,000
Prince George's Community College, Largo, MD, for 
    technology upgrades.................................         100,000
Radford University, Radford, VA, for a study of the 
    feasibility of establishing a graduate program in 
    optometry and/or dentistry..........................         250,000
Redlands Community College, El Reno, OK for nursing 
    curriculum..........................................         150,000
Regis University, Henderson, NV for the Nevada Distance 
    Learning Teacher Certification initiative, including 
    purchase of equipment...............................         100,000
Rhode Island College, Providence, RI, for development of 
    Portuguese and Lusophone Studies Program............         200,000
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ for 
    curriculum development at Aviation Research and 
    Technology Park.....................................         350,000
Richmond Community College, Hamlet, NC for equipment and 
    programs at the Richmond Industrial Training Center.         200,000
Riverside Community College, Riverside, CA for 
    curriculum development for the Fast-Track to the ADN 
    program.............................................         300,000
Rose State College, Midwest City, OK for technology 
    upgrades to the Atkinson Heritage Center............         150,000
Round Rock Higher Education Center, Round Rock, TX for 
    the Closing the Gaps program to increase graduates 
    in education, science and math......................         500,000
Rutgers University School of Law, Camden, NJ, for 
    student scholarships and loan repayment, internships 
    and public interest programming.....................         550,000
Saginaw Valley State University, Saginaw, MI for 
    curriculum development at the Crisis Management 
    Intervention Center.................................         100,000
Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA, for equipment 
    and technology for its library and information 
    commons initiative..................................         850,000
Sarasota County Technical Institute, Sarasota, FL for a 
    training program in captioning and CART 
    (Communications Access Realtime Translation) 
    services............................................         100,000
Seminole State College, Seminole, OK for technology 
    equipment...........................................         500,000
Shawnee State University, Portsmouth, OH for purchase of 
    equipment at the Motion Capture Facility............         350,000
South Florida Community College, Avon Park, FL for 
    laboratory equipment................................         300,000
South Suburban College, South Holland, IL, for equipment 
    and technology for its allied health and nursing 
    programs............................................         175,000
Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant, OK, for 
    materials, equipment and technology.................         300,000
Southern University at New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for 
    its Louisiana Minority Institution Partnership in 
    Science initiative..................................         350,000
Sparks College, Shelbyville, IL for a closed captioner 
    training program....................................         200,000
St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, NY for 
    science equipment...................................         425,000
St. Cloud State University, St. Cloud, MN for the 
    Science Initiative of Central Minnesota for 
    curriculum development..............................         400,000
St. Francis University, Loretto, PA, for an associates 
    degree program in nursing, which may include 
    technology and equipment............................         150,000
St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL for the 
    Orthotics and Prosthetics Bachelor's Degree program.         500,000
State University of New York at Geneseo, NY for 
    equipment...........................................         300,000
State University of New York, College of Environmental 
    Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY for technology 
    infrastructure equipment............................         200,000
Sun Area Career & Technology Center, New Berlin, PA for 
    the purchase of equipment...........................         100,000
Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA to purchase lab 
    equipment for a science facility....................         750,000
Sweetwater Education Foundation, Chula Vista, CA, for 
    its Compact for Success program, which may include 
    student scholarships................................         300,000
Texas College, Tyler, TX for the Regional Center for 
    Career Development..................................         100,000
Texas State Technical College, Waco, TX, for equipment 
    for education and training programs.................         350,000
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for the Center for 
    the Study of Addiction and Recovery.................         350,000
Tohono O?Odham Community College, Sells, AZ, for 
    equipment and technology for its multi-purpose 
    learning center, laboratory and library complex.....         150,000
Trident Technical College, North Charleston, SC for 
    nursing programs, including purchase of equipment...         100,000
Trinity University, San Antonio, TX for equipment and 
    programs at the Educators Technology Teaching 
    Laboratory..........................................         200,000
Truckee Meadows Community College, Reno, NV for a 
    collaborative K-16 math and science program.........         150,000
University of Arkansas Fort Smith, Fort Smith, AR to 
    conduct a study about the feasibility of creating a 
    national center of excellence in information 
    technology..........................................         100,000
University of California, Riverside, Palm Desert, CA 
    campus for computer lab equipment...................         250,000
University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR, for a 
    technology training and instruction initiative, 
    which may include equipment.........................         350,000
University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL for the Lou 
    Frey Institute of Politics..........................         250,000
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH for the Teacher 
    Quality Partnership.................................         250,000
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH for the Teacher 
    Quality Partnership project.........................         100,000
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL for equipment for 
    the Norman Hall project.............................         300,000
University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HA, for the American 
    Samoa Community College marine science laboratory, 
    administered by the University of Hawaii Sea Grant 
    College Program.....................................         300,000
University of Kansas Center for Research, Lawrence, 
    Kansas, for a high-speed communications network, 
    which may include personnel, equipment and 
    technology..........................................         400,000
University of Montevallo, Montevallo, AL for the Teacher 
    Leadership Initiative for School Improvement........         420,000
University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, 
    NC, for an assistive technology center to develop 
    equipment and techniques to improve educational and 
    employment opportunities for students with 
    disabilities........................................         300,000
University of North Texas, Denton, TX for equipment at 
    the Center for Advanced Scientific Computing and 
    Modeling............................................         150,000
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL for graduate 
    training in orthotics and prosthetics...............         550,000
University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN, for the 
    Interprofessional Center for Counseling and Legal 
    Services in Minneapolis.............................         225,000
University of Texas at El Paso, TX, for development of 
    curricula, courses and materials for its Center of 
    Excellence in Border Security and Defense Systems 
    Research............................................         250,000
University of the Incarnate Word Feik School of 
    Pharmacy, San Antonio, TX for equipment and programs         100,000
University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK for the Center for 
    Information Security, including purchase of 
    equipment...........................................         250,000
University of Virginia Center for Politics, 
    Charlottesville, VA for the Youth Leadership 
    Initiative..........................................       1,025,000
University of Wisconsin-Baraboo, WI, for equipment and 
    technology for its Living and Learning Center.......         150,000
University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, WI, for equipment 
    and technology......................................         150,000
Utah Valley State College Center for the Study of 
    Ethics, Orem, UT for the Democracy and Justice 
    Project.............................................         150,000
Utica College, Utica, NY for the Convergence Media 
    Center, including equipment.........................         300,000
Vanguard University, Costa Mesa, CA for equipment and 
    technology upgrades for the teacher training program         250,000
Venango Technology Center, Oil City, PA for purchase of 
    equipment...........................................         100,000
Ventura Community College, Ventura, CA for the Online 
    Science Laboratory for the Visually Impaired........         150,000
Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA for the 
    homeland security scholars program..................         150,000
Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA to establish a 
    program in diplomacy and international economics....         300,000
Waldorf College, Forest City, IA for science equipment 
    for bachelors degree program........................         120,000
Wallace Community College, Dothan, AL for technology 
    upgrades............................................         200,000
Washington Education Foundation, Issaquah, WA, for the 
    Leadership 1000 Scholarship Program.................         530,000
Webster University Community Music School, St. Louis, MO 
    for purchase of equipment...........................         200,000
Webster University, St. Louis, MO, for nursing and 
    biological sciences education programs, which may 
    include student financial assistance................         410,000
Western Illinois University, Moline, IL, for a counselor 
    education program...................................         100,000
Western Piedmont Community College Allied Health 
    Program, Morganton, NC for equipment................         250,000
Westminster College, Fulton, MO for curriculum 
    development at the Bill Emerson Institute for 
    Leadership and Service..............................         100,000
Wichita State University, Wichita, KS for engineering 
    programs............................................         400,000
Widener University, Exton, PA for the Academy for 
    Learning in Retirement..............................         300,000
Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and 
    Universities (WAICU) to support continued 
    implementation of the WAICU Collaboration Project...         600,000
Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH for technology 
    upgrades............................................         300,000

    Minority science and engineering improvement.--The 
Committee recommends $8,730,000 for the minority science and 
engineering improvement program (MSEIP), the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and the budget request. The MSEIP 
program awards grants to improve mathematics, science, and 
engineering programs at institutions serving primarily minority 
students and to increase the number of minority students who 
pursue advanced degrees and careers in those fields.
    Tribally controlled postsecondary vocational and technical 
institutions.--The Committee recommends $7,366,000 for grants 
for tribally controlled postsecondary vocational and technical 
institutions, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 amount. This program provides grants for the 
operation and improvement of training programs to ensure 
continuation and expansion of vocational training opportunities 
for Indian youth.
    TRIO.--The Committee recommends $828,178,000 for the TRIO 
programs, $448,078,000 above the budget request and the same as 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. The TRIO programs provide a 
variety of outreach and support services to encourage low-
income, potential first-generation college students to enter 
and complete college. Discretionary grants of up to four or 
five years are awarded competitively to institutions of higher 
education and other agencies. At least two-thirds of the 
eligible participants in TRIO must be low-income, first-
generation college students.
    GEAR UP.--The Committee recommends $303,423,000 for the 
GEAR UP program, the same as last year's level and $303,423,000 
above the budget request. GEAR UP provides grants to states and 
partnerships of low-income middle and high schools, 
institutions of higher education and community organizations to 
target entire grades of students and give them the skills and 
encouragement to successfully pursue postsecondary education. 
The Committee encourages the Department to give favorable 
consideration in any competitions for GEAR UP funding to 
partnerships that, in addition to providing early intervention 
services, guarantee college scholarships to GEAR UP students.
    Byrd scholarships.--The bill does not include funding for 
the Byrd scholarships program, the same as the budget request 
and $40,590,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. The 
Byrd scholarship program provides formula grants to States to 
award $1,500 scholarships to students who demonstrate academic 
excellence in high school.
    Javits fellowships.--The Committee recommends $9,699,000 
for the Javits fellowship program, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. Under the 
Javits program, institutions receive Federal support to make 
fellowship awards to students pursuing doctoral study in the 
arts, humanities, and social sciences.
    Graduate assistance in areas of national need program.--The 
Committee recommends $30,067,000 for the graduate assistance in 
areas of national need (GAANN) program, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. The GAANN 
program awards grants to institutions of higher education to 
provide fellowships to economically disadvantaged students who 
have demonstrated academic excellence and who are pursuing 
graduate education in designated areas of national need.
    The Committee is pleased that the Secretary included 
nursing as an area of national need in its fiscal year 2006 
program announcement for GAANN. Given the magnitude of the 
nursing shortage, this is an appropriate step in establishing a 
priority for a nursing program that focuses on the preparation 
of nurse scholars at the PhD level for educational leadership 
roles. The Committee encourages the Secretary to include 
nursing as an area of national need until such time as an 
adequate supply of nurses is prepared to enter the workforce.
    Teacher quality enhancement grants.--The Committee 
recommends $59,895,000 for teacher quality enhancement grants, 
$59,895,000 above the budget request and the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation. Teacher quality enhancement grants 
have three components: state grants, partnership grants and 
recruitment grants. By statute, state and partnership grants 
each receive 45 percent of the appropriation, and recruitment 
grants receive 10 percent.
    Under the state grant component, states apply to receive up 
to three years of funding to improve the quality of their 
teaching force through promoting reform activities such as 
teacher licensing and certification, accountability for high 
quality teacher preparation and professional development and 
recruiting teachers for high-need schools. States must match 50 
percent of the federal award.
    Under the partnership component, partnerships apply to 
receive a five-year grant to strengthen the capacity of K-12 
educators in designing and implementing effective teacher 
education programs, and by increasing collaboration among these 
practitioners and departments of arts and sciences and schools 
of education at institutions of higher education. Partnerships 
must match 25 percent of the federal grant in the first year, 
35 percent in the second year, and 50 percent for the remaining 
years.
    The recruitment component supports the efforts to reduce 
shortages of qualified teachers in high-need school districts. 
States or partnerships may apply to receive these grants.
    Child care access means parents in school.--The Committee 
recommends $15,810,000 for child care access means parents in 
school program, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation. Under this program, institutions may 
receive discretionary grants of up to four years to support or 
establish a campus-based childcare program primarily serving 
the needs of low-income students enrolled at the institution. 
Priority is given to childcare programs that leverage 
significant local or institutional resources and utilize a 
sliding fee scale. Grants can only be used to supplement 
childcare services or start new programs.
    Advancing America through foreign language partnerships.--
The Committee recommends no funding for the advancing America 
through foreign language partnerships program, for which 
$24,000,000 was proposed in the budget request.
    Demonstration projects to ensure quality higher education 
for students with disabilities.--The Committee does not 
recommend funding for demonstration projects in disabilities, 
the same as the budget request. The program was funded at 
$6,875,000 in fiscal year 2006. This program provides 
discretionary grants for three years to support model 
demonstration projects that provide technical assistance and 
professional development activities for faculty and 
administrators in institutions of higher education in order to 
provide students with disabilities a high-quality postsecondary 
education. A number of models have now been developed and are 
being disseminated to other institutions. Furthermore, this 
activity is eligible under the Fund for the Improvement of 
Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) program.
    Underground railroad program.--The Committee does not 
recommend funding for the underground railroad program, which 
is the same as the budget request. This program was funded at 
$1,980,000 in fiscal year 2006. The underground railroad 
program provides grants to non-profit institutions to research, 
display, interpret and collect artifacts relating to the 
history of the underground railroad.
    GPRA data/HEA program evaluation.--The Committee recommends 
$970,000 for program evaluation and development of data 
required under the Government Performance and Results Act for 
Higher Education programs administered by the Department. This 
is the same as the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
budget request. The Committee understands that for many higher 
education programs, baseline and performance indicator data are 
sparse, nonexistent or difficult to collect. Funding under this 
activity will support the Department in developing high-quality 
data as required under the Government Performance and Results 
Act.
    Olympic Scholarships.--The bill includes $970,000 for 
Olympic Scholarships, the same as the fiscal year 2006 level 
and $970,000 above the budget request. This program provides 
financial assistance to athletes who are training at the U.S. 
Olympic Education Center or one of the U.S. Olympic Training 
Centers and who are pursuing a postsecondary education at an 
institution of higher education.
    Thurgood Marshall legal education opportunity program.--The 
bill does not include funding for the Thurgood Marshall legal 
education opportunity program, the same as the budget request. 
The program was funded at $2,946,000 in fiscal year 2006. This 
program provides low-income, minority and disadvantaged college 
students with the information, preparation and financial 
assistance needed to gain access to and complete law school 
study.

                           Howard University

    The Committee recommends $237,392,000 for Howard 
University, the same as the budget request and $1,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation. The bill includes a minimum of 
$3,600,000 for the endowment, which is $74,000 above the 
current level and the same as the budget request.
    Howard University is a ``Research I'' university located in 
the District of Columbia. Direct appropriations for Howard 
University are authorized by 20 U.S.C. 123, originally enacted 
in 1867. Howard University provides undergraduate liberal arts, 
graduate and professional instruction to approximately 11,000 
students from all 50 States. Masters degrees are offered in 
over 55 fields and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 26 fields.

         College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans Program

    The Committee recommends $486,000 for the Federal 
administration of the college housing and academic facilities 
loan (CHAFL) program, the Higher Educational Facilities Loans 
program and the College Housing Loans program, the same as the 
budget request and $81,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation.

Historically Black College and University Capital and Financing Program

    Federal administration.--The Committee recommends $190,000 
for the administration of the historically black college and 
university capital financing program authorized under part D of 
title III of the Higher Education Act, the same as the budget 
request and $18,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation. 
The program is intended to make capital available for repair 
and renovation of facilities at historically black colleges and 
universities. In exceptional circumstances, capital provided 
under the program can be used for construction or acquisition 
of facilities.
    Bond subsidies.--Under the HBCU capital program, a private, 
for-profit ``designated bonding authority'' issues construction 
bonds to raise capital for loans to historically black colleges 
and universities for construction projects. The Department 
provides insurance for these bonds, guaranteeing full payment 
of principal and interest to bond holders. Federally insured 
bonds and unpaid interest are limited by statute to 
$357,000,000. The letter of credit limitation establishes the 
total amount of bonds which can be issued by the designated 
bonding authority. The credit limitation must be explicitly 
stated in an appropriation Act according to the authorizing 
legislation.

                    Institute of Education Sciences

    The bill includes $534,916,000 for the Institute of 
Education Sciences. This amount is $19,552,000 below the budget 
request, and $17,448,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level. This 
account supports education research, statistics, and assessment 
activities.

Research

    This bill includes $162,552,000 for educational research, 
the same as fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request. The 
Institute of Education Sciences supports research, development 
and national dissemination activities that are aimed at 
expanding fundamental knowledge of education and promoting the 
use of research and development findings in the design of 
efforts to improve education.

Statistics

    This bill includes $93,022,000 for the activities of the 
National Center for Education Statistics, exclusive of the 
National Assessment of Educational Progress. This amount is the 
same as the budget request and $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 level. The funding increase would support a new secondary 
longitudinal study beginning with an eighth grade cohort. This 
study will provide important information about dropout rates.
    Statistics activities are authorized under the Education 
Sciences Reform Act of 2002, title I of P.L. 107-279. The 
Center collects, analyzes, and reports statistics on all levels 
of education in the United States. Activities are carried out 
directly and through grants and contracts. Major publications 
include ``The Condition of Education'' and ``Digest of 
Education Statistics.'' Other products include projections of 
enrollments, teacher supply and demand, and educational 
expenditures. Technical assistance to state and local education 
agencies and postsecondary institutions is provided.

Regional educational laboratories

    The Committee has included $65,470,000 for the regional 
educational laboratories, which is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2006 level and the budget request. The regional 
educational laboratories help states and education 
practitioners implement the requirements contained in the NCLB. 
This assistance includes product development, applied research, 
technical assistance and professional development.

Research in special education

    The bill includes $71,840,000 for research in special 
education, the same as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the 
budget request. This program supports competitive awards to 
produce and advance the use of knowledge to improve services 
and results for children with disabilities. The program focuses 
on producing new knowledge, integrating research and practice 
and improving the use of knowledge.

Special education studies and evaluations

    The bill includes $9,900,000 for special education studies 
and evaluations, the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2006 level. This program awards competitive grants, 
contracts and cooperative agreements to assess the 
implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education 
Act and the effectiveness of state and local efforts to provide 
special education and early intervention programs and services 
to infants, toddlers, and children with disabilities.

Statewide data systems

    The bill includes $35,000,000 for statewide data systems 
development, $19,552,000 below the budget request and 
$10,448,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level. This program 
awards grants, on a competitive basis, to state educational 
agencies to enable such agencies to design, develop, and 
implement statewide, longitudinal data systems to efficiently 
and accurately manage, analyze, disaggregate, and use 
individual student data consistent with the No Child Left 
Behind Act.

Assessment

    This bill includes $97,132,000 for the National Assessment 
of Educational Progress, the same as the budget request, and 
$4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level. The Assessment is 
authorized under section 303 of the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress Authorization Act, and is the only 
nationally representative survey of educational ability and 
achievement of American students. The primary goal of the 
Assessment is to determine and report the status and trends of 
the knowledge and skills of students, subject by subject. 
Subject areas assessed in the past have included reading, 
writing, mathematics, science, and history, as well as 
citizenship, literature, art, and music. The Assessment is 
operated by contractors through competitive awards made by the 
National Center for Education Statistics; a National Assessment 
Governing Board formulates the policy guidelines for the 
program. Within the amounts provided, $5,037,000 is for the 
National Assessment Governing Board, which is the same as both 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2006 level. The 
$4,000,000 increase is intended to support the beginning work 
on implementing in 2009 state level assessments at the 12th 
grade level.
    The Committee encourages the Department of begin planning 
aggressively in 2007 for the grade 8 arts assessment. In 
addition, the Committee urges the Department to include funding 
in its fiscal year 2008 request for the National Center for 
Education Statistics Fast Response Survey on arts education in 
public elementary and secondary schools.

                        Departmental Management

    The bill includes $567,782,000 for departmental management 
(salaries and expenses) at the Department of Education. This 
amount is $17,511,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$4,195,000 below the budget request. These activities are 
authorized by the Department of Education Organization Act, 
P.L. 96-88, and include costs associated with the management 
and operations of the Department as well as separate costs 
associated with the Office for Civil Rights and the Office of 
the Inspector General.

                         PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

    The bill includes $423,916,000 for program administration. 
This amount is $12,766,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$2,050,000 below the budget request. These funds support the 
staff and other costs of administering programs and activities 
at the Department. Items include personnel compensation and 
health, retirement and other benefits as well as travel, rent, 
telephones, utilities, postage fees, data processing, printing, 
equipment, supplies, technology training, consultants and other 
contractual services. The bill includes language requested by 
the Administration making $2,500,000 of the total funding 
provided available until expended for building alterations and 
related expenses for the move of Department staff to the Mary 
E. Switzer building in Washington, D.C. This is $2,050,000 
below the amount requested by the Administration.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

    The bill includes $92,866,000 for the salaries and expenses 
of the Office for Civil Rights. This amount is $2,255,000 above 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request. This Office is responsible for enforcing laws that 
prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national 
origin, sex, disability, membership in a patriotic society, and 
age in all programs and institutions that receive funds from 
the Department. These laws extend to 50 state educational 
agencies, 16,000 local educational agencies, 3,500 institutions 
of higher education, as well as to proprietary schools, state 
rehabilitation agencies, libraries, and other institutions 
receiving Federal funds.
    The Committee supports the tremendous strides for women 
made possible through title IX of the Education Amendments of 
1972, but is concerned about any possible unintended 
consequences from its enforcement. The Committee has heard 
complaints that some schools have chosen to eliminate teams as 
a mechanism to gain title IX compliance. The Committee requests 
the Department to report by February 1, 2007 on its activities 
to educate school administrators on the full scope of 
compliance strategies and its efforts to clarify that 
compliance does not require the elimination of teams or 
limitation of male participation in athletic programs.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The bill includes $51,000,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General. This amount is $2,490,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and $2,145,000 below the budget 
request. This office has authority to inquire into all program 
and administrative activities of the Department as well as into 
related activities of grant and contract recipients. It 
conducts audits and investigations to determine compliance with 
applicable laws and regulations, to check alleged fraud and 
abuse, efficiency of operations, and effectiveness of results.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 301. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used for the 
transportation of students or teachers in order to overcome 
racial imbalances or to carry out a plan of racial 
desegregation.
    Sec. 302. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used to require the 
transportation of any student to a school other than the school 
which is nearest the student's home in order to comply with 
title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    Sec. 303. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds under this Act from being used to prevent the 
implementation of programs of voluntary prayer and meditation 
in public schools.
    Sec. 304. The Committee continues and amends a provision 
that allows up to one percent of any discretionary funds 
appropriated for the Department of Education to be transferred 
between appropriations accounts, provided that no appropriation 
is increased by more than three percent by any such transfer.
    Sec. 305. The Committee recommends new language to preclude 
funds made available in this Act to the Department of Education 
in contravention of section 505 of the Illegal Immigration 
Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES


 Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled

    The bill provides $4,995,000 for the Committee for Purchase 
From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. This is 
$373,000 above the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same 
as the budget request.
    The Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or 
Severely Disabled was established by the Wagner-O'Day Act of 
1938 as amended. Its primary objective is to increase the 
employment opportunities for people who are blind or have other 
severe disabilities and, whenever possible, to prepare them to 
engage in competitive employment.

             Corporation for National and Community Service

    The Corporation for National and Community Service was 
established by the National and Community Service Trust Act of 
1993 to enhance opportunities for national and community 
service and provide national service educational awards. The 
Corporation makes grants to States, institutions of higher 
education, public and private nonprofit organizations, and 
others to create service opportunities for a wide variety of 
individuals through full-time national and community service 
programs.

                  DOMESTIC VOLUNTEER SERVICE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $313,050,000 for the Domestic 
Volunteer Service Programs that are administered by the 
Corporation for National and Community Service, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $8,000 below the 
budget request.
    VISTA.--The Committee recommends $95,464,000 for the 
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) program, which is 
$2,188,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the 
budget request. The VISTA program supports individuals who 
recruit volunteers and organize community volunteer activities 
but who do not provide direct volunteer services.
    National Senior Volunteer Corps.--The Committee recommends 
a total of $217,586,000 for the National Senior Volunteer 
Corps, the same as the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and 
$6,000 below the budget request. Within the amount provided, 
the Committee recommends the following:

Foster Grandparents Program.............................    $110,937,000
Senior Companion Program................................      46,964,000
Retired Senior Volunteer Program........................      59,685,000

    In addition, the Committee continues language that 
prohibits CNCS from providing stipends or other monetary 
incentives to volunteers or volunteer coordinators whose 
incomes exceed 125 percent of the national poverty level.

      NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS, OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $437,457,000 for National and 
Community Service Programs operating expenses, including the 
Trust. This is $77,429,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and $25,682,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation includes the following program levels:

AmeriCorps grants.......................................    $218,060,000
National Service Trust..................................     124,720,000
Learn and Serve.........................................      34,155,000
National Civilian Community Corps.......................      26,730,000
Innovation and Demonstration............................       3,966,000
Evaluation..............................................       2,460,000
State Commissions.......................................      12,516,000
Points of Light Foundation..............................       9,900,000
America's Promise.......................................       4,950,000

    AmeriCorps grants.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$218,060,000 for AmeriCorps grants, which is $46,765,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $40,899,000 below the 
request. The Committee is concerned with the high levels of 
carry-over balances that the Corporation has accumulated over 
the past several fiscal years. According to budget appendices 
and reports published by OMB, the Corporation has carried over 
an average of $102,200,000 per fiscal year for the last ten 
fiscal years. While high carry-over balances are understandable 
early in a program's development, routine high balances appear 
to demonstrate that the Corporation has received significantly 
more funding than programs under the National and Community 
Service Act can absorb on an annual basis. For fiscal year 
2006, the budget appendix indicates that the Corporation 
expects to carry $40,000,000 into fiscal year 2007. In fact, 
the Corporation's budget justification maintains that ``States 
have requested less than [a] full formula allocation for 
several years in a row.'' This circumstance is not unique, as 
the justification identifies eight other AmeriCorps grant 
programs in which appropriated funds have exceeded need. 
Accordingly, the Committee recommendation reduces funding for 
AmeriCorps grants by $40,899,000 below the budget request for 
fiscal year 2007, with reductions to the request distributed as 
follows:

Formula grants to states................................    -$20,000,000
Competitive grants to states............................     -13,000,000
Direct national competitive grants to non-profits.......      -4,500,000
Education award program.................................      -3,399,000

    Given that the fiscal year 2007 justification indicates 
that ``demand for EAP grant funds was lower than expected in 
fiscal year 2005,'' the Committee does not believe the 
requested increase of $3,399,000, or 42 percent, is warranted.
    National Service Trust.--The Committee recommends 
$124,720,000 for the National Service Trust, $13,880,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request. The Committee commends the Corporation for its plan to 
shift funding from unfilled slots awarded in prior years in 
order to cover the needs of the Trust in fiscal year 2007.
    Learn and Serve.--The Committee recommends $34,155,000 for 
the Learn and Serve America program, which is the same as the 
budget request and $2,970,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation.
    National Civilian Community Corps.--The Committee 
recommends $26,730,000 for the National Civilian Community 
Corps, which is 21,780,000 above the request and the same as 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation.
    Innovation, Demonstration and Assistance.--The Committee 
recommends $3,966,000 for Innovation, Demonstration and 
Assistance programs, which is $12,315,000 below the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation and $5,063,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation denies funding for all activities 
other than disability grants on the grounds that these 
activities were either one-time expenditures in fiscal year 
2006 or should be carried out through other appropriate 
programs run by the Corporation.
    Evaluation.--The Committee recommends $2,460,000 for 
evaluation programs, which is $1,500,000 below both the fiscal 
year 2006 level and the budget request. The Committee denies 
funding for the Longitudinal Study of AmeriCorps Members and 
the Volunteering in the United States projects. The Committee 
supports evaluation efforts aimed at improving the 
Corporation's management and the programs it offers, and has 
provided funding for both.
    State Commissions.--The Committee recommends $12,516,000 
for state commission administrative grants, the same as the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the budget request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $67,483,000 for salaries and 
expenses associated with the administrative activities of the 
Corporation. This is the $1,400,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and $2,832,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee approves funding for consolidation of CNCS 
administrative functions.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $4,950,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, which is $990,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
level and the same as the budget request. The Committee directs 
the Inspector General to continue to review the Corporation's 
management of the National Service Trust.
    The Office of Inspector General is authorized by the 
Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended. This Office provides 
an independent assessment of all Corporation operations and 
programs, including those of the Volunteers in Service to 
America and the National Senior Service Corps, through audits, 
investigations, and other proactive projects.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Sec. 401. The Committee recommendation continues language 
regarding qualified student loans eligible for education 
awards.
    Sec. 402. The Committee recommendation continues language 
regarding the availability of funds for the placement of 
volunteers with disabilities.
    Sec. 403. The Committee recommendation continues language 
directing the Inspector General to levy sanctions in accordance 
with standard Inspector General audit resolution procedures, 
which include, but are not limited to, debarment of any grantee 
found to be in violation of AmeriCorps' program requirements, 
including using grant or program funds to lobby the Congress.
    Sec. 404. The Committee recommendation continues language 
that requires the Corporation to ensure that significant 
changes to program requirements or policy are made only through 
public notice and comment rulemaking.
    Sec. 405. The Committee recommendation includes language 
prohibiting the Corporation from making education awards in 
excess of the maximum Pell grant.

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

    The Committee concurs with the budget request to provide no 
advance funding for fiscal year 2009 for the Corporation for 
Public Broadcasting (CPB). The Committee can no longer afford 
to provide public broadcasting with the preferential treatment 
associated with receiving a budget two years in advance while 
critical programs like elementary and secondary education, 
housing for extremely low-income families, including the 
elderly and disabled, homeland security, veterans medical care 
and biomedical research are required to compete with other 
priorities on an annual basis. Furthermore, the Committee 
cannot responsibly commit fiscal year 2009 resources given the 
difficulty in predicting the budget climate two years in 
advance.
    The Committee recommendation includes authority for CPB to 
spend up to $38,000,000 in previously appropriated fiscal year 
2007 funds for digital conversion activities and up to 
$36,000,000 for the satellite interconnection system. 
    The CPB ombudsmen were established to ensure that all 
recipients of CPB funding strictly adhere to the standard of 
objectivity and balance in all programs or series of programs 
of a controversial nature. Review by the ombudsmen of 
substantive complaints is a key means of assuring programming 
meets that standard. The Committee expects the ombudsmen will 
ensure that recipients of CPB funding comply with this policy.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service

    The bill provides $42,842,000 for the Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service (FMCS), an increase of $241,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request.
    The FMCS attempts to prevent and minimize labor-management 
disputes having a significant impact on interstate commerce or 
national defense, except in the railroad and airline 
industries. The agency convenes boards of inquiry appointed by 
the President in emergency disputes and conducts dispute 
mediation, preventive mediation, and arbitration. In addition, 
the Service offers alternative dispute resolution services and 
training to other Federal agencies to reduce litigation costs 
and speed Federal administrative proceedings.
    The bill also includes provisions first enacted in the 
fiscal year 1996 Appropriations Act granting the agency the 
authority to accept gifts and to charge fees for certain 
services.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission

    The bill provides $7,731,000 for the Federal Mine Safety 
and Health Review Commission. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2006 appropriation and $155,000 above the budget request.
    The Commission is responsible for reviewing the enforcement 
activities of the Secretary of Labor under the Federal Mine 
Safety and Health Act. The Commission's administrative law 
judges hear and decide cases initiated by the Secretary of 
Labor, mine operators, or miners. The five-member Commission 
hears appeals from administrative law judge decisions, rules on 
petitions for discretionary review, and may direct, of its own 
initiative, review of cases that present unusual questions of 
law.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services

    For the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), 
the Committee recommends $280,415,000. This is $33,271,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $18,175,000 more 
than the budget request. The Institute makes state formula 
grants for library services and discretionary national grants 
for joint library and museum projects.
    For library services, the Committee concurs with the budget 
request and recommends $171,500,000 for state grants, 
$3,675,000 for library services to Native Americans and Native 
Hawaiians, $12,930,000 for national leadership grants, and 
$25,000,000 for the Laura Bush 21st century librarian program 
for the recruitment and education of librarians.
    For museum services, the Committee concurs with the budget 
request and recommends $17,978,000 for museums for America, 
$3,000,000 for 21st Museum Professionals, $500,000 for museum 
assessment, $3,000,000 for conservation project support, 
$820,000 for conservation assessment, $8,500,000 for national 
leadership grants for museums, and $920,000 for Native American 
and Native Hawaiian museum services.
    For museum grants for African American history and culture, 
the Committee concurs with the budget request and recommends 
$1,500,000.
    For program administration, the Committee concurs with the 
budget request and recommends $12,917,000.
    The Committee is aware of the proposal to consolidate NCLIS 
and IMLS in fiscal year 2008. The Committee recognizes the 
important mission of both agencies and encourages them to 
foster a streamlined, combined agency by the close of fiscal 
year 2007.
    Within the funds provided for the Institute of Museum and 
Library Services, the Committee includes funding for the 
following items:

Aerospace Museum of California Foundation, Inc., 
    McClellan, CA for a new interactive exhibit.........        $500,000
African American Museum of Philadelphia, PA, for 
    exhibits, education programs and outreach...........         100,000
American Airpower Museum, Farmingdale, NY, for exhibits 
    and education programs..............................         300,000
American Jazz Museum, Kansas City, MO, for exhibits, 
    education programs, and an archival project.........         200,000
American West Heritage Center, Wellsville, UT for the 
    Lifelong Learning Initiative........................         275,000
America's Black Holocaust Museum, Milwaukee, WI, for 
    exhibits and education programs, which may include 
    acquisition of interactive media center kiosks......          75,000
Antiquarian & Landmarks Society of Connecticut, 
    Hartford, CT for educational outreach programs at 
    the Nathan Hale Homestead...........................         150,000
Apple Creek Historical Society, Apple Creek, OH for 
    equipment for the Community Learning Center.........          50,000
Aviation and Military Museum of Louisiana, Monroe, LA 
    for equipment and display cases.....................         130,000
Blank Park Zoo, Des Moines, IA, for exhibits, 
    programming and equipment...........................         250,000
Brazos Valley African American Museum, Bryan, TX, for 
    exhibits, education programs and/or operations......          75,000
Capital City Development Corporation, Boise, ID for 
    expansion and development of a permanent 
    agricultural program and exhibition at the Discovery 
    Center of Idaho.....................................         150,000
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA, for an archive 
    and traveling photojournalism exhibit...............         250,000
Children's Museum of Manhattan, New York, NY, for 
    exhibits and education programs.....................         200,000
Children's Museum of the East End, Bridgehampton, NY, 
    for exhibits........................................         125,000
Children's Museums of Portsmouth Virginia, Portsmouth, 
    VA, for exhibits and education programs.............          75,000
Cincinnati Museum Center, Cincinnati, OH for website 
    development.........................................         500,000
City of Amory, MS for the Amory Regional Museum for 
    collection care and digitalization..................         300,000
City of Azusa Library, Azusa, CA, for library materials 
    and equipment.......................................         150,000
City of Estacada Library, Estacada, OR, for technology 
    and equipment.......................................          50,000
City of Fort Myers, FL for the Edison & Ford Winter 
    Estates.............................................         200,000
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH for technology...          50,000
Connecticut Historical Society Museum, Hartford, CT, for 
    interactive school programs at the Old State House..         100,000
Contra Costa County Library, Martinez, CA, for library 
    services and its Technology for Teens in Transition 
    volunteer mentor program at the Juvenile Hall 
    Library.............................................         100,000
Daphne Library Expansion, Daphne, AL for computers, 
    books and other library materials...................         180,000
Discovery Center, Boise, ID for educational exhibits and 
    programs............................................         350,000
Discovery Museum, Bridgeport, CT for programming........         100,000
Downey City Library, Downey, CA, for the purchase of 
    books...............................................          50,000
Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, NY for teacher 
    training and support for a visual thinking 
    strategies art education program....................         225,000
Florida Holocaust Museum, St. Petersburg, FL to support 
    ongoing museum operations, educational programming, 
    outreach, and collection preservation and 
    conservation........................................         500,000
George and Eleanor McGovern Library, Dakota Wesleyan 
    University, Mitchell, SD, for cataloging, preparing, 
    and archiving documents and artifacts relating to 
    the public service of Senator Francis Case and 
    Senator George McGovern.............................          50,000
George Washington University, Washington, D.C., for The 
    Eleanor Roosevelt Papers Project....................         150,000
Georgetown Visitation Monastery, Washington, DC for 
    digitization and technology.........................         100,000
Harbor Heritage Society, Cleveland, OH for exhibits at 
    the William G. Mather Maritime Museum...............          50,000
Health Care Foundation of Mississippi, Tupelo, MS for a 
    Children's Health Science Center....................         300,000
Heckscher Museum of Art, Huntington, NY, for 
    digitalization of collections and related activities         100,000
Historic Hudson Valley, Tarrytown, NY, for education 
    programs at Philipsburg Manor.......................         250,000
Historic Yellow Springs, Inc., Chester Springs, PA for 
    technology upgrades.................................          25,000
History Makers, Chicago, IL, for digitization of an oral 
    history archive of interviews with African Americans         100,000
History Museum of East Otter Tail County, Perham, MN, 
    for its In Their Own Words exhibit..................         150,000
Holbrook Public Library, Holbrook, MA, for equipment and 
    technology..........................................         100,000
Irwindale Public Library, Irwindale, CA, for a computer 
    system to preserve historic materials...............          30,000
Louisiana Art and Science Museum, Baton Rouge, LA for 
    equipment, outreach and software development........         250,000
Martinsburg Public Library, Martinsburg, WV for computer 
    and technology equipment............................          50,000
Massie Heritage Center, Savannah, GA for restoration of 
    exhibits and equipment upgrades.....................         950,000
Massillon Museum, Massillon, OH for technology and 
    digitization of collections.........................          50,000
Mauna Kea Astronomy Education Center, Hilo, HI, for 
    exhibits and education programs.....................         250,000
McKinley Museum, Canton, OH for exhibits................          50,000
Miami University, Oxford, OH for digitization...........          30,000
Michigan's Own Military and Space Museum, Frankenmuth, 
    MI, for preservation and display of collections, and 
    for operating expenses..............................         200,000
Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO, for its math 
    and science education project.......................         300,000
Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ for development of the 
    Interactive Educational Workshop Center exhibit.....         500,000
Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL, for its 
    Science in Your World exhibit.......................         300,000
Museum of Science and Technology, Syracuse, NY for 
    exhibits and operations.............................         500,000
National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library, Cedar Rapids, 
    IA for upgrade of permanent collection..............          80,000
National Museum of Industrial History, Bethlehem, PA for 
    program development.................................         125,000
North Carolina Zoological Park, Ashboro, NC for exhibits         200,000
Oklahoma City, OK National Memorial Foundation for 
    community education & outreach programs at the 
    Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum..............         300,000
Old Stone House of Brooklyn, Inc., NY, for education 
    programs............................................          50,000
Onondaga County, NY Public Library for technology and 
    communications infrastructure upgrades..............         250,000
Oregon Zoo, Portland, OR, for interpretive panels, 
    displays and furnishings for exhibits...............         125,000
Orem Public Library, Orem, UT for technology upgrades...         200,000
Overton County Library, TN, for collections, technology 
    and education programs..............................         300,000
Pennsylvania State Police Historical and Educational 
    Museum, Hershey, PA, for exhibits, education 
    programs, and operating support.....................         100,000
Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, for its National 
    Summer Teacher Institute............................         100,000
Pico Rivera Library, Pico Rivera, CA, for books and 
    materials, equipment and furnishings................         100,000
Ralph Mark Gilbert Civil Rights Museum, Savannah, GA for 
    exhibits and curriculum.............................         500,000
ReadNet Foundation, New York, NY for a literacy 
    initiative in Erie and Niagara Counties, NY.........         100,000
Rhode Island Holocaust Museum, Providence, RI, for 
    exhibits and education programs.....................         200,000
Rockwall Library, Rockwall, TX for books and other 
    library materials...................................         100,000
Rust College, Holly Springs, MS for the digitalization 
    of collections and equipment for the Leontyne Price 
    Library.............................................         500,000
Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, State University of New 
    York at New Paltz, NY, for exhibits and programs....          50,000
San Bernardino County Museum, San Bernardino, CA for new 
    exhibits, care of collection, and new learning 
    programs............................................         200,000
Sci-Quest, the North Alabama Science Center, Huntsville, 
    AL, for science and mathematics education programs 
    and outreach activities.............................         250,000
Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, IL, for exhibits, and for its 
    community outreach and mentoring initiative.........         500,000
Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles, CA, for exhibits 
    and education programs..............................         250,000
South Florida Science Museum, West Palm Beach, FL for 
    the Dekelboum Science Center........................         300,000
Stark County Park District, Canton, OH, for exhibits at 
    the Canalway Learning Center........................          50,000
Taft Museum of Art, Cinncinnati, OH for exhibitions and 
    outreach............................................         200,000
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for Virtual Vietnam 
    Archive.............................................         650,000
Tillamook County Library, Tillamook, OR, for equipment 
    and technology......................................         150,000
Tubman African American Museum, Macon, GA, for museum 
    and education services..............................         450,000
University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA, for the James R. 
    Slater Museum of Natural History for collections, 
    education programs and outreach.....................         250,000
Veterans Research Center, Waterloo, IA for new exhibits.         250,000
Virginia War Memorial Educational Foundation, Inc., 
    Richmond, VA for four educational materials segments         200,000
Yolo County Library, Woodland, CA, for an after school 
    assistance and literacy program at the Arthur F. 
    Turner West Sacramento Branch Library...............          50,000
Young at Art Children's Museum, Davie, Florida, for its 
    Global Village project..............................         100,000
Zoo New England, Boston, MA, for its Living Classrooms 
    initiative..........................................         150,000

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission

    The Committee recommends $10,457,000 for the Medicare 
Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), an increase of $391,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the 
budget request. MedPAC advises Congress on payment and other 
policy issues affecting the Medicare program and on 
implications of changes in health care delivery and in the 
market for health care services on the Medicare program.

        National Commission on Libraries and Information Science

    The Committee recommends $983,000 for the National 
Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS). This 
is the same as the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
budget request.
    The Commission advises the Executive and Legislative 
branches, and other public and private organizations on 
national library and information policies and plans.
    The Committee is aware of the proposal to consolidate the 
Commission and the Institute of Museum and Library Services in 
fiscal year 2008. The Committee recognizes the important 
mission of NCLIS and encourages active planning by both 
agencies to foster a streamlined, combined agency by the close 
of fiscal year 2007.

                     National Council on Disability

    The bill provides $3,180,000 for the National Council on 
Disability (NCD). This is $67,000 above as the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and $408,000 above the budget request.
    The Council monitors implementation of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act and makes recommendations to the President, 
the Congress, the Rehabilitation Services Administration, and 
the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation 
Research on public policy issues of concern to individuals with 
disabilities.

                     National Labor Relations Board

    The bill provides $249,789,000 for the National Labor 
Relations Board (NLRB). This is $44,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    The NLRB receives, investigates, and prosecutes unfair 
labor practice charges filed by businesses, labor unions, and 
individuals. It also schedules and conducts representation 
elections. The five-member Board considers cases in which an 
administrative law judge decisions are appealed.

                        National Mediation Board

    The bill provides $11,749,000 for the National Mediation 
Board (NMB). This is $237,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    The NMB mediates labor disputes between employees and 
railroad and airline carriers subject to the Railway Labor Act. 
The Board also resolves representation disputes involving labor 
organizations seeking to represent railroad or airline 
employees.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission

    The bill provides $10,510,000 for the Occupational Safety 
and Health Review Commission, $105,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 appropriation and $164,000 above the budget request.
    The Commission adjudicates contested citations issues by 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration against 
employers for violations of safety and health standards. The 
Commission's administrative law judges settle and decide cases 
at the initial level of review. The agency's three appointed 
Commissioners also review cases, issue rulings on complicated 
issues, and may direct review of any decision by an 
administrative law judge.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                         DUAL BENEFITS ACCOUNT

    The bill provides $88,000,000 for dual benefits, a decrease 
of $8,030,000 below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the 
same as the budget request.
    These funds are used to pay dual benefits to those retirees 
receiving both railroad retirement and social security 
benefits. The bill includes a provision permitting a portion of 
these funds to be derived from income tax receipts on dual 
benefits as authorized by law. The Railroad Retirement Board 
estimates that approximately $6,000,000 may be derived in this 
manner.

           FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACCOUNT

    The bill provides $150,000 for the interest earned on 
unnegotiated checks, the same as the fiscal year 2006 
appropriation and the budget request.

                      LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATION

    The bill provides a consolidated limitation of $103,518,000 
on the expenditure of railroad retirement and railroad 
unemployment trust funds for administrative expenses of the 
Railroad Retirement Board, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request. The bill includes a provision from the fiscal year 
1999 Appropriations Act prohibiting the transfer of resources 
formerly identified in a Memorandum of Understanding from the 
RRB to the Inspector General.
    The Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) administers 
comprehensive retirement-survivor and unemployment-sickness 
insurance benefit programs for railroad workers and their 
families. This account limits the amount of funds in the 
railroad retirement and railroad unemployment insurance trust 
funds that may be used by the RRB for administrative expenses. 
The Committee prohibits funds from the railroad retirement 
trust fund from being spent on any charges over and above the 
actual cost of administering the trust fund, including 
commercial rental rates.
    The bill includes language (Sec. 516) limiting the 
availability of funds to the Railroad Retirement Board to enter 
into an arrangement with a nongovernmental financial 
institution to serve as disbursing agent for benefits payable 
under the Railroad Retirement Act of 1974.
    The Committee is aware of a proposal to consolidate the 
financial statements and audit of the National Railroad 
Retirement Investment Trust with the financial statements and 
audit of the Railroad Retirement Board. The Committee notes 
that the Railroad Retirement and Survivors' Improvement Act of 
2001 mandates that the Trust functions independently from the 
Railroad Retirement Board. Further, the Act specifically 
requires a separate audit of the Trust by a nongovernmental 
auditor, and requires that the results of this audit be 
included in the Trust's Annual Management Report to Congress. 
The Committee expects that the Trust be administered and 
audited solely in conformance with the Act of 2001.

             LIMITATION ON THE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The bill provides authority to expend $7,606,000 from the 
railroad retirement and railroad unemployment insurance trust 
funds for the Office of Inspector General, an increase of 
$482,000 above the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and the same 
as the budget request. This account provides funding for the 
Inspector General to conduct and supervise audits and 
investigations of programs and operations of the Board.
    The Committee compliments the work of the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Railroad Retirement Board for their 
work in obtaining information on actual collections, offsets, 
and funds put to better use as required in House Report 105-
635. This information is of great use to the Committee and the 
Committee understands the difficulty encountered by the OIG in 
obtaining it. The Committee expects that the Office of 
Inspector General will continue to report the information to 
it.

                     Social Security Administration


                PAYMENTS TO SOCIAL SECURITY TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee recommends $27,756,000 for mandatory payments 
necessary to compensate the Old Age and Survivors Insurance 
(OASI) and Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Funds for special 
payments to certain uninsured persons (for which no payroll tax 
is received), costs incurred for administration of pension 
reform activities and interest lost on the value of benefit 
checks issued but not negotiated. This is $7,286,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This appropriation restores the trust funds to the 
position they would have been in had they not borne these costs 
properly charged to the general funds.

                  SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $29,065,000,000 for the 
Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. This is 
$304,174,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and 
$60,000,000 less than the budget request. The Committee also 
provides $16,810,000,000 in advance funding for the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2008 as requested.

Beneficiary services

    The Committee concurs with the budget request to use the 
carryover funding to cover estimated obligations in fiscal year 
2007 for beneficiary services. Therefore, the Committee has 
recommended no new budget authority for this program. In fiscal 
year 2006, $52,000,000 was provided for this program. These 
funds are made available to reimburse State vocational 
rehabilitation services agencies for successful rehabilitation 
of SSI recipients.

Research and demonstration

    Within the appropriation for SSI, the Committee recommends 
$27,000,000 for research and demonstration activities conducted 
under section 1110 of the Social Security Act. This is the same 
as both the fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request.

Administration

    Within the appropriation for SSI, the Committee recommends 
$2,944,000,000 for payment to the Social Security trust funds 
for SSI's share of the base administrative expenses of the 
Social Security Administration (SSA). This is $211,000,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and $60,000,000 less 
than the budget request.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses for SSA of $9,175,000,000 to be funded from the Social 
Security and Medicare trust funds. This is $186,394,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2006 funding level and the same as the 
budget request.

Social Security Advisory Board

    The Committee recommends that not less than $2,000,000 
within the limitation on administrative expenses be available 
for the Social Security Advisory Board, the same as both the 
fiscal year 2006 level and the budget request.

User fees

    In addition to other amounts provided in the bill, the 
Committee recommends an additional limitation of $118,000,000 
for administrative activities funded from user fees. This is 
$2,000,000 less than the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as 
the budget request.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $94,411,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General (OIG), $2,935,000 more than the fiscal year 
2006 funding level and $1,589,000 less than the budget request. 
The bill also provides authority to expend $67,976,000 from the 
Social Security trust funds for activities conducted by the 
Inspector General, $2,270,000 more than the fiscal year 2006 
funding level and $1,024,000 less than the budget request.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 501. The Committee continues a provision to allow the 
Secretaries of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education 
to transfer unexpended balances of prior appropriations to 
accounts corresponding to current appropriations to be used for 
the same purpose and for the same periods of time for which 
they were originally appropriated.
    Sec. 502. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the obligation of funds beyond the current fiscal year unless 
expressly so provided.
    Sec. 503. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
appropriated funds to be used to support or defeat legislation 
pending before the Congress or any State legislature, except in 
presentation to the Congress or any State legislature itself.
    Sec. 504. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
amount available for official reception and representation 
expenses for the Secretaries of Labor and Education, the 
Director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and 
the Chairman of the National Mediation Board.
    Sec. 505. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
funds to be used to carry out a needle distribution program.
    Sec. 506. The Committee continues a provision to require 
grantees receiving Federal funds to clearly state the 
percentage of the total cost of the program or project that 
will be financed with Federal money.
    Sec. 507. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
appropriated funds to be used for any abortion.
    Sec. 508. The Committee continues a provision to provide 
exceptions for Sec. 507 and adds a limitation prohibiting funds 
from the bill to be made available to a Federal, State or local 
government or program if they discriminate against 
institutional or individual health care entities if they do not 
provide, pay for, or refer for abortions.
    Sec. 509. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds in the Act concerning research involving human 
embryos. However, this language should not be construed to 
limit federal support for research involving human embryonic 
stem cells listed on an NIH registry and carried out in 
accordance with policy outlined by the President.
    Sec. 510. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds for any activity that promotes the 
legalization of any drug or substance included in schedule I of 
the schedules of controlled substances.
    Sec. 511. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds to promulgate or adopt any final standard 
providing for a unique health identifier until legislation is 
enacted specifically approving the standard.
    Sec. 512. The Committee continues a provision related to 
annual reports to the Secretary of Labor.
    Sec. 513. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits the transfer of funds from this Act except by 
authority provided in this Act or another appropriation Act.
    Sec. 514. The Committee includes a provision to limit funds 
in the bill for public libraries to those libraries that comply 
with the requirements of the Children's Internet Protection 
Act.
    Sec. 515. The Committee includes a provision to limit 
technology funds in the bill for elementary and secondary 
schools to those schools that comply with the requirements of 
the Children's Internet Protection Act.
    Sec. 516. The Committee includes language limiting the 
availability of funds to the Railroad Retirement Board to enter 
into an arrangement with a nongovernmental financial 
institution to serve as disbursing agent for benefits payable 
under the Railroad Retirement Act of 1974.
    Sec. 517. The Committee maintains a provision clarifying 
the procedures for reprogramming of funds. The Committee notes 
that this provision is consistent with reprogramming language 
included in other bills within the Committee's jurisdiction.
    Sec. 518. The Committee continues a provision pertaining to 
appointments to a scientific advisory committee.
    Sec. 519. The Act includes language requesting each 
Department and related agency to submit an operating plan 
within 45 days of enactment, detailing any reprogramming of 
funds which result in a different funding allocation than that 
in the fiscal year 2007 Act, the accompanying detailed table or 
budget request.
    Sec. 520. The Act includes language prohibiting the 
reprogramming or transfer of funds to the ``E-Gov'' Initiative 
without an approved reprogramming request from the Committees 
on Appropriations in the House and Senate.
    Sec. 521. The Act includes language requiring prior 
approval of Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) analyses and 
studies.
    Sec. 522. The Act includes language requiring the 
development of traditional Congressional Justifications. Fiscal 
year 2008 budget submissions shall not contain performance or 
performance integration information and shall not include 
Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) information or 
results. This information shall be submitted in separate 
documents.
    Sec. 523. The Committee includes a provision prohibiting 
use of funds in contravention of the energy efficiency 
performance goals and reporting requirements for Federal 
buildings contained in two statutes and an executive order.
    Sec. 524. The Committee recommends new language precluding 
funds made available by this Act from being used by the Social 
Security Administration to administer benefit payments under a 
totalization arrangement that would be inconsistent with 
existing law.
    Sec. 525. The Committee recommends new language amending 
existing law to establish a new minimum wage.

                        CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee on Appropriations bases 
its authority to report this legislation on clause 7 of section 
9 of article I of the U.S. Constitution, which states:

          No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
        consequence of Appropriations made by law * * *.

                   COMPARISON WITH BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, following is an explanation of 
compliance with section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, detailing how the new budget authority 
provided by the accompanying bill compares with the report 
submitted under section 302 of the Act for the most recently 
agreed to concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal 
year. This information follows:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  302(b) allocation             This bill
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Budget                    Budget
                                                               Authority     Outlays     Authority     Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary...............................................     $141,930     $145,631     $141,930     $145,488
Mandatory...................................................      444,429      445,140      444,429      445,140
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    In accordance with the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 
the following information was provided to the Committee by the 
Congressional Budget Office:

                         FIVE-YEAR PROJECTIONS

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill:

[In millions of dollars]

Outlays:
    2007......................................................  $503,660
    2008......................................................    61,748
    2009......................................................    14,319
    2010......................................................     2,913
    2011 and beyond...........................................       518

          FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    Pursuant to section 308(a)(1)(C) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:

[In millions of dollars]

New budget authority..........................................  $267,808
Fiscal year 2007 outlays resulting therefrom..................   230,247

                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfers of funds recommended in the 
accompanying bill.
    The table shows, by Department and agency, the 
appropriations affected by such transfers.

                                 APPROPRIATION TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Account from which
  Account to which transfer is made             Amount              transfer is made              Amount
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:                                            Department of Labor:
    Special Benefits.................  (\1\)                    Postal Service and       (\1\)
                                                                 various agencies.
    Various Agencies.................  (\1\)                    Energy Employees         (\1\)
                                                                 Occupational Illness
                                                                 Compensation Fund.
    Employment Standards               $33,578,000............  Black Lung Disability    $33,578,000
     Administration--Salaries and                                Trust Fund.
     Expenses.
    Departmental Management--Salaries  25,255,000.............  Black Lung Disability    25,255,000
     and Expenses.                                               Trust Fund.
    Office of Inspector General......  346,000................  Black Lung Disability    346,000
                                                                 Trust Fund.
    Employment Benefits Security       7,000,000..............  Pension Benefits         7,000,000
     Administration, Salary and                                  Guaranty Corporation.
     Expenses.
Department of Health and Human                                  Department of Health
 Services:                                                       and Human Services:
    National Institutes of Health:                              National Institutes of
                                                                 Health:
        Various institutes and         up to 3%...............  Various institutes and   up to 3%
         centers for AIDS.                                       centers for AIDS.
        Various institutes and         amount det'd to be AIDS  Office of AIDS Research  amount det'd to be AIDS
         centers for AIDS.
        Various institutes and         up to 1%...............  Various institutes and   up to 1%
         centers.                                                centers.
Related Agencies:
    National Service Trust...........  124,720,000............  Corp. for National and   124,720,000
                                                                 Community Service.
    National Service Trust...........  (\1\)                    Corp. for National and   (\1\)
                                                                 Community Service.
    Social Security Administration:
        Office of Inspector General..  67,976,000.............  Federal Old-Age and      67,976,000
                                                                 Survivors Insurance
                                                                 Trust Fund and Federal
                                                                 Disability Insurance
                                                                 Trust Fund.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Such sums

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets and 
existing law in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

           SECTION 6 OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938

                             minimum wages

    Sec. 6. (a) Every employer shall pay to each of his 
employees who in any workweek is engaged in commerce or in the 
production of goods for commerce, or is employed in an 
enterprise engaged in commerce or in the production of goods 
for commerce, wages at the following rates:
            (1) except as otherwise provided in this section, 
        not less than $4.25 an hour during the period ending on 
        September 30, 1996, not less than $4.75 an hour during 
        the year beginning on October 1, 1996, [and] not less 
        than $5.15 an hour beginning September 1, 1997, not 
        less than $5.85 an hour beginning on January 1, 2007, 
        not less than $6.55 an hour beginning on January 1, 
        2008, and not less than $7.25 an hour beginning on 
        January 1, 2009;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                   RESCISSIONS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL

                        Account                              Amount

Department of Labor, Training and Employment Service..     -$325,000,000


                 Changes in Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill which may directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    The bill provides that appropriations shall remain 
available for more than one year for some programs for which 
the basic authorizing legislation does not so authorize such 
extended availability.
    In various places in the bill, an earmark of funds within 
appropriation accounts may not track the authorization language 
with the level of specificity required under clause 2 of rule 
XXI.
    In several instances, the bill provides advance 
appropriations for fiscal year 2008 for programs for which such 
advances are not authorized by law. Various pleonasms in the 
bill may violate clause 2.

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


                    Training and Employment Services

    Language prohibiting the use of funds from any other 
appropriation to provide meal services at or for Job Corps 
centers.

     State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations

    Language allowing the use of funds for amortization 
payments to states which had independent retirement plans in 
their state employment service agencies prior to 1980.
    Language allowin