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109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-520

======================================================================



 
 SCIENCE, STATE, JUSTICE, COMMERCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS 
                         BILL, FISCAL YEAR 2007

                                _______
                                

 June 22, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Wolf, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5672]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for Science, the Departments of State, Justice 
and Commerce, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2007.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT



                                                            Page Number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of Justice.............................     2
                                                                      9
Title II--Department of Commerce and Related Agencies......    34
                                                                     66
        Office of the United States Trade Representative...    34
                                                                     66
        International Trade Commission.....................    35
                                                                     69
        Department of Commerce.............................    35
                                                                     69
Title III--Science.........................................    54
                                                                     93
        Office of Science and Technology Policy............    54
                                                                     93
        National Aeronautics and Space Administration......    55
                                                                     94
        National Science Foundation........................    58
                                                                    100
Title IV--Department of State and Related Agency...........    61
                                                                    104
        Department of State................................    61
                                                                    104
        Broadcasting Board of Governors....................    73
                                                                    127
Title V--Related Agencies..................................    80
                                                                    131
        Antitrust Modernization Commission.................    80
                                                                    131
        Commission for the Preservation of America's 
            Heritage Abroad................................    80
                                                                    131
        Commission on Civil Rights.........................    80
                                                                    132
        Commission on International Religious Freedom......    81
                                                                    132
        Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe...    81
                                                                    133
        Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's 
            Republic of China..............................    82
                                                                    133
        Equal Employment Opportunity Commission............    82
                                                                    134
        Federal Communications Commission..................    83
                                                                    134
        Federal Trade Commission...........................    84
                                                                    136
        HELP Commission....................................    86
                                                                    136
        Legal Services Corporation.........................    86
                                                                    136
        Marine Mammal Commission...........................    87
                                                                    137
        Securities and Exchange Commission.................    87
                                                                    137
        Small Business Administration......................    89
                                                                    138
        State Justice Institute............................    93
                                                                    141
        United States-China Economic and Security Review 
            Commission.....................................    93
                                                                    142
        United States Institute of Peace...................    94
                                                                    142
Title VI--General Provisions...............................    94
                                                                    142
Title VII--Rescissions.....................................   108
                                                                    147

                Summary of Estimates and Recommendations

    The Committee recommends a total of $59,839,000,000 in 
discretionary budget authority for the departments and agencies 
funded in this bill. The recommendation is $136,893,000 above 
the request and $2,631,000,000 above the amount enacted for the 
current fiscal year. The Committee also recommends $354,000,000 
for mandatory programs funded within this bill.
    The following table provides a comparison of the new budget 
authority recommended in the accompanying bill with the amounts 
appropriated for fiscal year 2006, and the budget request for 
fiscal year 2007.

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FY 2006                                        Compared with
                                               Enacted       FY 2007                   -------------------------
                                              including      request    Recommendation    FY 2006      FY 2007
                                            supplementals                                 enacted      request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary*............................        57,208        59,702         59,839        +2,631         +137
Mandatory.................................           361           354            354            -7  ...........
    Total.................................        57,569        60,056         60,193        +2,624        +137
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*$1 billion of the increase in discretionary budget authority in the request and in the recommendation is the
  result of a $1 billion reduction in Security and Exchange Commission offsetting collections.

                         HIGHLIGHTS OF THE BILL

    Major initiatives and highlights contained in the 
recommendation follow:

                                         TITLE I.--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FY 2006                                        Compared with
                                               Enacted       FY 2007                   -------------------------
                                              including      request    Recommendation    FY 2006      FY 2007
                                            supplementals                                 enacted      request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary.............................        21,397        21,094         22,116          +719       +1,022
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$22.1 billion in discretionary funding for the Department 
of Justice, $724 million above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
$1.0 billion above the President's request;
    --$1.7 billion for the United States Attorneys;
    --$826 million for United States Marshals Service;
    --$6.0 billion for the Federal Bureau of Investigation;
    --$1.8 billion for the Drug Enforcement Administration; and
    --$2.6 billion to assist State and local law enforcement to 
fight crime, which is $1.1 billion above the request including: 
the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants program 
($368 million), the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program 
($405 million), juvenile justice and accountability programs 
($281 million), law enforcement technologies and interoperable 
communications ($100 million), the DNA backlog elimination 
program ($176 million), meth enforcement ($99 million), and 
violence against women prevention and prosecution programs 
($390 million).

                             TITLE II.--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FY 2006                                        Compared with
                                               Enacted       FY 2007                   -------------------------
                                              including      request    Recommendation    FY 2006      FY 2007
                                            supplementals                                 enacted      request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary.............................         6,583         6,288          5,964          -619         -324
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$1.77 billion for the Patent and Trademark Office;
    --$533.5 million for the international trade agencies;
    --$3.4 billion for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, including $882.3 million for the National 
Weather Service; and
    --$627 million for the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, including full funding for the American 
Competitiveness Initiative and $92 million for Manufacturing 
Extension Partnership Program.

                                               TITLE III.--SCIENCE
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FY 2006                                        Compared with
                                               Enacted       FY 2007                   -------------------------
                                              including      request    Recommendation    FY 2006      FY 2007
                                            supplementals                                 enacted      request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary.............................        22,183        22,818         22,734          +551          -83
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$16.7 billion for the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; and
    --$6.0 billion for the National Science Foundation, 
including full funding for the American Competitiveness 
Initiative.

                                TITLE IV.--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FY 2006                                        Compared with
                                               Enacted       FY 2007                   -------------------------
                                              including      Request    Recommendation    FY 2006      FY 2007
                                            supplementals                                 enacted      request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary.............................         9,433        10,049          9,658          +225         -391
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --A 2.2 percent increase over fiscal year 2006 for the 
basic operations of the Department, including supplemental 
appropriations;
    --Additional new positions to respond to high priority 
diplomatic requirements, including new positions for the Office 
of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization; and 
new positions for critical needs language training, including 
Arabic, Chinese (Cantonese and Mandarin), Dari, Pashto, Korean, 
and Farsi.
    --A total of $351 million specifically for public diplomacy 
programs to counter Anti-American sentiments around the world, 
and a total of $436 million to enhance efforts to engage 
foreign audiences through educational and cultural exchanges, 
especially with the Arab and Muslim world.
    --$1.7 billion for embassy security programs, an increase 
of $115 million over fiscal year 2006, including 50 new 
diplomatic security personnel. A total of $800.5 million is 
provided for an overseas capital security cost sharing program, 
including $671.1 million from the State Department, which will 
result in acceleration of the program to construct secure 
replacement facilities for American personnel serving overseas;
    --$1.15 billion for assessments for U.S. membership in the 
United Nations and other international organizations;
    --$1.35 billion for contributions for international 
peacekeeping activities, the full amount requested; and
    --$659 million for international broadcasting, including 
increases for radio and television broadcasting to the Middle 
East.

                                           TITLE V.--RELATED AGENCIES
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FY 2006                                        Compared with
                                               Enacted       FY 2007                   -------------------------
                                              including      request    Recommendation    FY 2006      FY 2007
                                            supplementals                                 enacted      request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary.............................         3,248         2,292          2,275          -973          -17
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$213 million for the Federal Trade Commission including 
the National Do-Not-Call program;
    --$901 million in total budget authority for the Securities 
and Exchange Commission to protect investors and combat 
corporate fraud; and
    --$643 million in total budget authority for the Small 
Business Administration, including $90 million for the Small 
Business Development Centers to conduct outreach to the 
Nation's small businesses and a record $17.5 billion 7(a) 
business loan program, as requested, to help small businesses 
access capital.

      Right-Sizing the United States Government Overseas Presence

    The Committee strongly supports interagency efforts to 
right-size the overseas presence of the United States 
Government. The Committee understands the definition of right-
sizing to be the systematic and thorough review of all overseas 
missions and staffing levels and the reallocation of resources 
to achieve a leaner, streamlined, more agile, and more secure 
U.S. Government presence abroad. The Committee expects agencies 
funded in this bill to cooperate fully with all interagency 
efforts to achieve effective right-sizing.
    The 1998 terrorist attacks on two U.S. Embassies in Africa 
highlighted security deficiencies in diplomatic facilities. 
Many U.S. personnel overseas continue to work in locations and 
facilities that do not meet security standards. The attacks on 
the American Embassies in Africa prompted the creation of the 
Overseas Presence Advisory Panel, which proposed significant 
recommendations regarding right-sizing that have subsequently 
been embraced by this Committee, and included in the 
President's Management Agenda. In addition, the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) has studied right-sizing the 
Nation's overseas presence. The GAO reports found that U.S. 
agencies' staffing projections for new embassy compounds are 
developed without a systematic approach or comprehensive right-
sizing analysis. In response, the GAO developed a framework of 
questions designed to link staffing levels to three critical 
elements of overseas diplomatic operations: (1) physical/
technical security of facilities and employees; (2) mission 
priorities and requirements; and (3) cost of operations. In 
light of continuing security vulnerability, the Committee 
intends to ensure that such a framework is established and 
followed.
    The Committee expects that the fiscal year 2008 budget 
request will continue to reflect the application of a right-
sizing methodology. Increases or expansions should be justified 
in terms of mission priorities both within the agency, and 
within the specific diplomatic mission, and should be, to the 
maximum extent possible, accompanied by offsetting decreases to 
maximize the allocation of scarce resources to emerging 
priorities. A proper plan should include a systematic analysis 
to bring about a reconfiguration of overseas staffing to the 
minimum level necessary to meet critical U.S. foreign policy 
goals. The Committee expects to receive this additional 
analysis prior to the establishment or expansion of any 
activities beyond those currently approved.

                  American Competitiveness Initiative

    America's advantage in science, math and technology is 
eroding. Our systems of basic scientific research and education 
are in crisis, while other countries are redoubling their 
efforts. The United States can remain the world's technological 
leader if it makes the commitment to do so. The growing 
innovation capacity of our economic competitors makes it 
increasingly important to make our own economy more flexible 
and responsive.
    The Committee is pleased that the Administration has heard 
the call of the Congress and identified the linkage between 
funding for science with maintaining our Nation's economic 
health and national security by including in its request 
funding for the American Competitiveness Initiative (ACI). The 
ACI supports bold investments in science and innovation, 
including investments in research and development, science 
education, and entrepreneurship. Over ten years, the 
Administration has proposed a total commitment of $50 billion, 
which will double the Federal investment in basic scientific 
research.
    The recommendations in this bill include $6 billion for the 
National Science Foundation, an increase of eight percent, and 
$627 million for the National Institute for Standards and 
Technology, an increase of 24 percent for core programs, to 
help keep America's economy strong by establishing the 
groundwork for the development of new technologies. The 
Committee believes there is no more important investment we can 
make to ensure the security and economic well-being of future 
generations of Americans.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    As in previous years, section 605 contains language 
concerning the reprogramming of funds between programs and 
activities.
    The Committee expects each department and agency to follow 
closely the reprogramming procedures listed below, which are 
similar to provisions that applied in statute during fiscal 
year 2006. These procedures apply to funds provided under this 
Act, or provided under previous Appropriations Acts that remain 
available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal year 2007, or 
provided from any accounts in the Treasury available to the 
agencies funded by this Act.
    The Committee expects that the Chairman of the 
Appropriations Subcommittee on Science, the Departments of 
State, Justice and Commerce, and Related Agencies will be 
notified by letter a minimum of 15 days prior to--
    (1) Reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or temporary, 
in excess of $750,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, between 
programs or activities. This provision is also applicable in 
cases where several activities are involved with each receiving 
less than $750,000. In addition, the Committee is to be 
notified of reprogramming actions which are less than these 
amounts if such actions would have the effect of committing the 
agency to significant funding requirements in future years.
    (2) Increasing funds or personnel by any means for any 
project or activity for which funds have been denied or 
restricted.
    (3) Creating new programs, offices, agencies or commissions 
or substantially augmenting existing programs, offices, 
agencies or commissions.
    (4) Relocating offices or employees.
    (5) Reorganizing offices, programs, or activities.
    In addition, the Committee expects any department or agency 
funded in the accompanying bill that is planning to conduct a 
reduction-in-force to notify the Committee by letter 30 days in 
advance of the date of the proposed personnel action.
    The Committee also expects that any items that are subject 
to interpretation will be reported.
    The Committee is concerned that, in some instances, the 
departments or agencies funded within this Appropriations Act 
are not adhering to the Committee's reprogramming policy and 
procedures that are set forth in this report and in section 605 
of the accompanying bill. The Committee expects that each 
department and agency funded in the bill will follow these 
notification policies precisely and will not reallocate 
resources or reorganize activities prior to submitting the 
required notifications to the Committee. The Committee has 
provided each of the departments, NASA and the Small Business 
Administration, with transfer authority, which is the same as 
the transfer authority provided in the fiscal year 2006 
Appropriations Acts. The Committee believes such authority, 
together with the traditional reprogramming policy, gives each 
department or agency the needed flexibility to respond to 
unanticipated circumstances and requirements, which may arise 
throughout the fiscal year.

           Relationship With Budget and Comptroller's Offices

    Through the years the Appropriations Committee has 
channeled most of its inquiries and requests for information 
and assistance through the budget offices or comptroller 
organizations of the various departments, agencies, and 
commissions. The Committee has often pointed out the natural 
affinity and relationship between these organizations and the 
Appropriations Committee that makes such a relationship 
imperative. The Committee reiterates its position that, while 
it reserves the right to call upon all organizations in the 
departments, agencies, and commissions for information and 
assistance, the primary contact between the Committee and these 
entities must be through the budget offices and comptroller 
organizations.
    The workload generated in the budget process is large and 
growing, and, therefore, a positive, responsive relationship 
between the Committee and the budget and/or comptroller offices 
is absolutely essential to the appropriations process to ensure 
that the information needs of the Committee are met in order to 
fulfill the Constitutional responsibilities of the Congress.

              Full Compliance With the Telework Directive

    Advances in information and computer technology, the 
development of the Internet, and the growth of wireless and 
digital products have given some Federal employees the ability 
to telework, or work anytime from almost any place. Management 
considerations, such as productive and satisfied workers; 
environmental considerations, such as reduced traffic 
congestion and improved air quality; and quality of life 
considerations, such as accommodating the short- or long-term 
health needs of employees, require the establishment of 
telework programs.
    Telecommuting provides Federal agencies with a viable 
option to ensure continuity of operations in the event of an 
emergency. Following Hurricane Katrina, lapses in the Federal 
government's performance could have been mitigated by 
telecommuting. The Committee is aware of businesses that were 
able to continue operations following Hurricane Katrina due to 
telecommuting programs already in place. By reducing automobile 
trips, telecommuting helps to reduce dependence on foreign oil 
and to reduce car emissions.
    In light of the benefits of telecommuting, the Committee 
remains concerned about the lack of progress being made by 
Federal agencies in this area. The Committee believes that 
agencies should be taking extensive measures to certify more 
Federal employees as eligible to telecommute.
    The Committee directs the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Small 
Business Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration and the National Science Foundation to provide a 
report to the Committee in no less than six months from 
enactment of this legislation detailing plans to increase the 
eligible number of telecommuters as well as what major 
obstacles exist.
    The bill includes a provision requiring that the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, the Small Business Administration, the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National 
Science Foundation certify that telecommuting opportunities 
have increased over the fiscal year 2006 levels. Language is 
repeated from fiscal year 2006 requiring that $5,000,000 be 
made available only after certification is made; requiring 
agencies to designate a Telework Coordinator. Previous public 
laws have required the departments and agencies to each 
establish a policy under which eligible employees may 
participate in telecommuting to the maximum extent possible 
without diminished performance.

                          Budget Presentation

    The Committee is supportive of budget and performance 
integration so that government programs can become more 
results-oriented. While the amount of performance data included 
in budget documents has increased, in many cases it has been at 
the expense of programmatic budget data and justifications that 
are critical to the work of the Committee. The Committee 
expects all Departments and agencies covered under this Act to 
consult with the Committee on this issue before submission of 
the fiscal year 2008 Budget Request and justification 
materials.
                     TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    Despite severe funding limitations faced by the Committee 
in fiscal year 2007, the recommendation for the Department of 
Justice reflects the Committee's overriding priority to ensure 
that Federal, State and local law enforcement entities have 
sufficient resources to combat terrorism while continuing to 
perform traditional law enforcement activities to prevent and 
investigate crimes. The recommendation reflects the Committee's 
commitment to combat terrorism, espionage, cybercrime, gang-
related crime, illegal drugs, and corporate fraud.
    The Committee recommends $22,347,225,000 in new budget 
authority in the accompanying bill for the Department of 
Justice for fiscal year 2007. This amount is $723,144,000 above 
the current year and $1,022,222,000 above the budget request. 
Of the total amount provided, $22,116,225,000 is derived from 
general purpose discretionary funds and $231,000,000 is scored 
as mandatory spending.
    Once again, the Committee is disappointed in the budget 
gimmicks included in the Administration's request including 
large new regulatory fees, proposed rescissions for the Federal 
Prison System and the United States Attorneys for programs in 
which the funds identified are not available, and irresponsible 
reductions to State and local law enforcement. The Committee 
hopes that future budget requests discontinue the use of 
disingenuous budget gimmicks and the Administration submits a 
more responsible budget proposal for the Department of Justice.
    The recommendation continues the Committee's commitment to 
Federal law enforcement efforts to combat terrorism and other 
crimes by fully funding the requests for United States 
Attorneys, United States Marshals Service, the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation (FBI), and the Federal Prison System, Salaries 
and Expenses account. In addition, the recommendation provides 
$15,000,000 above the budget request for the Drug Enforcement 
Administration (DEA) to combat drug trafficking in drugs such 
as methamphetamine. The recommendation proposes reductions to 
the request for other lower priority Department of Justice 
programs.
    Finally, the recommendation continues the Committee's 
commitment to supporting our nation's police and sheriffs' 
departments by providing an increase of $1,086,414,000 above 
the Administration's request for State and local law 
enforcement grants. As Federal law enforcement agencies 
continue to divert resources away from traditional crime 
fighting to strengthen their counterterrorism capabilities, a 
void is left that only State and local law enforcement are 
positioned to fill. In this context, the Committee finds the 
Administration's budget request, which proposes to reduce 
funding for State and local law enforcement assistance by more 
than 50 percent, to be woefully inadequate. In order to address 
State and local law enforcement requirements, the Committee 
recommends a total of $2,634,475,000 in new budget authority 
for crime fighting grant programs for fiscal year 2007.
    The recommendation provides increases above the request for 
the Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grants program 
(+$367,852,000), the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program 
(+$405,000,000), juvenile justice and accountability programs 
(+$92,138,000), meth hot spots (+$58,916,000), gang violence 
reduction (+$40,000,000) and law enforcement technologies and 
interoperability grants (+$100,000,000).
    Gangs.--According to FBI Congressional testimony on the 
fiscal year 2006 budget request, ``Gangs and other criminal 
enterprises, operating in the U.S. and throughout the world, 
pose increasing concerns for the international law enforcement 
and intelligence communities. Today, gangs are more violent, 
more organized, and more widespread than ever before. They pose 
one of the greatest threats to the safety and security of all 
Americans. The Department of Justice estimates there are 
approximately 30,000 gangs, with 800,000 members, impacting 
2,500 communities across the U.S. The innocent people in these 
communities face daily exposure to violence from criminal gangs 
trafficking in drugs and weapons and gangs fighting amongst 
themselves to control or extend their turf and their various 
criminal enterprises.'' Over the past several years, the 
Committee has provided the Department with increased resources 
to attack this problem. The Committee has provided funding 
increases to establish a National Gang Intelligence Center in 
the FBI, established additional FBI Safe Streets Task Forces 
and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Violent 
Crime Impact Teams, provided additional Assistant U.S. 
Attorneys and Criminal Division attorneys for gang 
prosecutions, and provided grants to State and local 
governments for enforcement and prevention efforts.
    In addition to continuing funding for previously approved 
Federal law enforcement programs, the recommendation includes 
an increase of $6,081,000 for 61 additional United States 
Attorneys positions, $20,000,000 for the Gang Resistance 
Education and Training program, and $40,000,000 for grants for 
communities to develop comprehensive gang prevention and 
enforcement programs in coordination with local United States 
Attorneys offices.
    The Committee appreciates that the Attorney General has 
directed the appointment of an Assistant U.S. Attorney in each 
judicial district to serve as an anti-gang coordinator to 
prepare comprehensive, district-wide strategies--in 
consultation with partners from Federal and local law 
enforcement, social services, and community and faith-based 
groups--to coordinate anti-gang activity across the board. 
However, the Committee is disappointed that the budget request 
proposes reductions in anti-gang programs including eliminating 
the Gang Resistance Education and Training program, eliminating 
grants for communities to develop comprehensive gang prevention 
and enforcement programs in coordination with local United 
States Attorneys offices, and reducing funding for the FBI's 
Safe Streets Task Forces. The recommendation restores funding 
for all of these programs and the Committee hopes that future 
budget requests will propose an appropriate level of resources 
to address gang violence.
    Child On-Line Protection.--The Committee commends the 
Department for the development of its Project Safe Childhood 
Initiative, which calls for U.S. Attorneys to work with 
Federal, State and local officials to develop local plans to 
address the growth of computer-facilitated sexual exploitation 
crimes committed against children. In order to support the 
Administration's efforts and reduce child exploitation, the 
recommendation funds the Department's request for 26 additional 
U.S. Attorney positions to increase Federal child exploitation 
prosecutions and fully funds the requested $1,984,000 for the 
continued development of a nationwide sex offender registry 
system that links State systems together. In addition, the 
recommendation provides $1,000,000 above the request for the 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, $5,000,000 
above the request for Internet Crimes Against Children Task 
Forces, and $5,000,000 above the request for the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation's Innocent Images program to increase law 
enforcement's ability to address these terrible crimes.
    The Committee commends the Department and the United States 
Marshals Service for Operation Falcon II, which led to the 
arrest of 1,102 fugitives wanted for committing sexual offenses 
and violent crimes against women, children and the elderly, as 
well as unregistered convicted sex offenders. The Committee 
encourages the United States Marshals Service to conduct 
similar operations in fiscal year 2007.
    Methamphetamine (meth).--According to the National 
Association of Counties, 58 percent of counties ranked meth as 
their number one drug problem, and it is estimated that there 
are 583,000 people currently using meth in the United States. 
However, the Administration's budget request proposes dramatic 
reductions to Department of Justice programs that assist 
Federal, State and local law enforcement in combating meth. The 
increases provided in the recommendation should allow the 
Department to take a leadership role in addressing this 
problem. While the Committee is hopeful that new Federal laws 
controlling meth precursor chemicals will dramatically reduce 
the number of small toxic labs operating in the country, the 
Committee understands that super labs operated by international 
drug trafficking organizations are supplying the majority of 
meth in America.
    In order to help Federal, State and local law enforcement 
address the meth epidemic, the recommendation provides 
$367,852,000 for the Justice Assistance Grants program, which 
the Administration proposed to eliminate; $99,000,000 for meth-
specific grants, which is the authorized level and $58,916,000 
above the budget request; $40,000,000 for Drug Court programs, 
which is $30,128,000 above the current year; $5,000,000 for 
State Prison Drug Treatment programs, which the Administration 
proposed to eliminate; and $15,000,000 above the request for 
DEA.

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $90,136,000 for General 
Administration, which is $32,730,000 below the current year and 
$25,369,000 below the request.
    This account supports the development of policy objectives 
and the overall management of the Department of Justice. The 
recommendation adopts the Administration's proposal to transfer 
$31,162,000 for the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review 
from this account to the newly authorized National Security 
Division. The Committee does not adopt the proposed transfer of 
$16,000,000 to this account to shutdown the National Drug 
Intelligence Center. The recommendation fully funds the Office 
of Privacy and Civil Liberties.
    Once again, the Committee is extremely disappointed with 
the amount of time it takes the Department to respond to 
hearing questions submitted for the record by Members of the 
Subcommittee. Many of these questions require factual responses 
and should not require multiple layers of review or require 
weeks, and often months, to submit. The Committee is concerned 
that this practice, has resulted in the needless withholding of 
budgetary and programmatic information that is necessary to the 
Committee's work. The Committee believes that the open sharing 
of information results in a more effective relationship between 
the branches of government and improves the quality of 
legislation.
    Budget Models.--In fiscal year 2005, the Committee directed 
the Department to report on the impact of hiring new 
investigative agents on the workload of other parts of the 
criminal justice system including U.S. Attorneys, U.S. 
Marshals, the Detention Trustee, and the Federal Prison System. 
The Committee appreciates the Department's efforts to complete 
the report and encourages the Administration to continue to 
develop these budget models. The Committee remains deeply 
concerned that the Administration does not consider the impact 
on the entire criminal justice system when it implements new 
law enforcement initiatives.
    General Services Administration (GSA) Rent.--The 
recommendation fully funds the request for GSA rent for the 
Department of Justice. However, the Committee notes that the 
budget request includes substantial GSA rent increases for 
several accounts including an 18 percent increase for General 
Administration, an 11 percent increase for Administrative 
Review and Appeals, a 12 percent increase for General Legal 
Activities, a 19 percent increase for the U.S. Trustee System 
Fund, a 21 percent increase for the U.S. Marshals Service, a 26 
percent increase for the Community Relations Service, a 10 
percent increase for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, a 27 
percent increase for the Drug Enforcement Administration, and a 
39 percent increase for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
Firearms and Explosives. The Committee has been unable to 
verify from either GSA or the Department why such significant 
increases are necessary or what the correct funding level 
should be for facilities costs. Therefore, before obligating or 
expending funds for these requested GSA rent increases, the 
Committee directs the Administration to submit a reprogramming 
in accordance with the procedures outline in section 605 
describing why increased payments are necessary, including a 
description of increases in facilities' operating charges and 
changes in the amount of space occupied.

                 JUSTICE INFORMATION SHARING TECHNOLOGY

    The recommendation provides $125,000,000 for this account, 
which is $50,007,000 below the request and $1,596,000 above the 
current year. This account provides funding for several 
Department of Justice information sharing programs including 
the following initiatives:
    Joint Automated Booking System (JABS).--JABS enables 
Federal law enforcement components to electronically share 
criminal arrest data, which improves criminal identification 
response times and avoids duplication of booking data entry.
    Justice Consolidated Office Network (JCON).--JCON is the 
standard office automation system upon which 16 Department of 
Justice components operate their mission-critical applications 
which allows attorneys and law enforcement officials the 
immediate ability to exchange all electronic data with and 
between components on a common platform.
    Law Enforcement Information Sharing Program (LEISP).--LEISP 
will implement the information technology tools needed to 
facilitate timely, appropriate and secure sharing of 
information across Federal, State and local law enforcement. 
Through LEISP, the Department will develop a comprehensive 
information sharing program that can help identify emerging 
threats and patterns, find relationships among individual 
groups, and provide useful tactical and strategic information 
to criminal and counterterrorism investigators. This effort 
includes the creation of national and regional data exchange 
databases to facilitate the sharing of information. The 
Committee expects the Department to work cooperatively with 
State and local law enforcement on this initiative. In 
addition, the Committee expects the Department to ensure that 
this program will facilitate the reporting, analysis and 
dissemination of intelligence related to organized retail 
theft.
    Litigation Case Management System.--Currently, the 
Department's litigating components' case management systems are 
highly decentralized and information is stored in numerous 
disconnected systems. This project will consolidate the 94 U.S. 
Attorneys Offices and seven headquarters litigating components 
into one web-based common case management system, reducing 
operating costs, and improving information sharing among law 
enforcement and Intelligence Community agencies.
    Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and Secure 
Communications.--PKI will provide the Department with enhanced 
information technology security services to allow classified 
information to be shared across the Department and with the 
Intelligence Community. The Committee expects the Department to 
allocate not less than $5,000,000 for this project.
    Federal Investigation Case Management System (FICMS).--The 
Committee understands that the Administration is working to 
create a common information technology case management 
architecture to facilitate information sharing across all 
Federal law enforcement agencies. The Committee directs that 
the Department's participation in this effort be managed by the 
Office of Chief Information Officer.
    Unified Financial Management System Program.--This program 
will improve the Department's management of its funding and 
address independent auditors concerns regarding the 
Department's current outdated financial systems.
    Department IT Investment Review Board (DIRB).--The 
Committee appreciates the efforts of the DIRB, which is chaired 
by the Deputy Attorney General, to improve oversight of the 
Department's new major information technology programs 
including the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) SENTINEL 
program. In order to ensure accountability in the Department's 
information technology programs and prevent a failure similar 
to the FBI's Virtual Case Files project, the recommendation 
includes new language under section 110. Before funding is 
spent on major information technology programs, the Deputy 
Attorney General and DIRB must certify to the Committees on 
Appropriations that appropriate program management and 
contractor oversight mechanisms are in place, and that each 
program is compatible with the Department's enterprise 
architecture.

      TACTICAL WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

    The Committee recommends $89,000,000 for this account, 
which is $149,000 above the current year and $217,000 below the 
request. The purpose of this account is to provide radios and 
wireless communications capabilities for Federal law 
enforcement and manage the Department's efforts to comply with 
the National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
narrowband mandates. This account funds component legacy 
network requirements, operations of the Wireless Management 
Office, and the acquisition of new equipment and services.
    In addition, this account funds the Integrated Wireless 
Network, which is a partnership between the Departments of 
Justice, Homeland Security and Treasury to modernize and 
enhance the existing stove-piped agency-specific radio systems 
that support Federal law enforcement, homeland security and 
disaster response. The Committee understands that a successful 
pilot has been implemented in Seattle, WA. During fiscal year 
2007, the program will be expanded further in the Northwest and 
will continue efforts in the Southwest. This program is 
critical to improve radio communication interoperability and 
agent safety.

                    ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APEALS

    The Committee recommends $229,152,000 for this account, 
which is $16,222,000 above the current year and $60,000 below 
the request.
    This appropriation supports the Executive Office of 
Immigration Review (EOIR), which includes the Board of 
Immigration Appeals, Immigration Judges, and Administrative Law 
Judges who decide through administrative hearings on the 
admission or exclusion of aliens seeking to enter the country, 
and the transportation and adjustment of status of aliens whose 
status has been challenged; and the Office of the Pardon 
Attorney, which receives, investigates and considers petitions 
for all forms of Executive clemency.
    The recommendation fully funds the request for EOIR of 
$226,883,000. This includes a program increase of $8,757,000 to 
meet additional caseload requirements as a result of increase 
immigration enforcement. Within the amount provided, the 
Committee directs the EOIR to establish courts at three 
additional locations based on EOIR's highest priority needs.
    In addition, the recommendation includes $2,269,000 for the 
Office of the Pardon Attorney.

                           DETENTION TRUSTEE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends total spending authority of 
$1,331,026,000 for the Federal Detention Trustee for fiscal 
year 2007, which is $124,634,000 above the level provided in 
fiscal year 2006 and $1,300,000 below the request. The 
recommendation includes increases for inflationary adjustments 
and for the anticipated daily cost of an increase in the number 
of Federal detainees housed in Federal, State, local, and 
private detention facilities. The recommendation includes the 
requested transfer of $27,935,000 associated with the cost of 
transporting prisoners. These funds were previously 
appropriated under the United States Marshals Service account.
    The Committee encourages the Department to continue to 
examine the entire Federal detention process from arrest to 
incarceration to find ways to contain costs. The Committee 
applauds the efforts of the Detention Trustee to develop the e-
Designate system and to identify additional systemic 
improvements to reduce the time from sentencing to commitment. 
The Committee expects this program to be extended to all 94 
judicial districts.
    The recommendation deletes language, as requested, 
regarding oversight of housing related to detention. Language 
is also deleted regarding the Detention Trustee's role in the 
Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $70,558,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $2,636,000 above the current 
year and equal to the request. The Committee appreciates the 
OIG's efforts to work closely with the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) on the development of their new case 
management system, SENTINEL. The Committee directs the OIG to 
continue this close relationship with the FBI and to provide 
regular updates to the Committee on the financial and 
programmatic status of SENTINEL.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $11,500,000 for the United States 
Parole Commission, which is $641,000 above the current year and 
$451,000 below the request.
    This Commission is an independent body within the 
Department of Justice that makes decisions regarding requests 
for parole of Federal offenders who committed an offense before 
November 1, 1987, and District of Columbia Code offenders who 
committed an offense before August 5, 2005. In addition, the 
Commission has jurisdiction over the conditions of supervision 
of District of Columbia Code offenders who committed an offense 
after August 5, 2005, and certain other offenders.

                            Legal Activities


            SALARIES AND EXPENSES, GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends a total of $668,739,000 for 
General Legal Activities, which is $15,234,000 above the 
current year and $15,585,000 below the request. As requested, 
the recommendation transfers 74 FTE and $13,372,000 from this 
account to the newly authorized National Security Division.
    This appropriation supports the Attorney General through 
the establishment of litigation policy, conduct of litigation, 
and various other legal responsibilities. The distribution of 
funding provided is as follows:

                        GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              2007
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Solicitor General....................................             $9,134
Tax Division.........................................             83,099
Criminal Division....................................            134,578
Civil Division.......................................            209,291
Environment and Natural Resources....................             93,913
Office of Legal Counsel..............................              6,069
Civil Rights Division................................            111,310
Interpol--USNCB......................................             20,812
Office of Dispute Resolution.........................                533
                                                      ------------------
    Total............................................            668,739
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Criminal Division.--The recommendation annualizes the 
$1,000,000 increase provided in fiscal year 2006 for gang 
investigations and the $1,000,000 increase provided in fiscal 
year 2006 to target, prosecute, and seize the assets of those 
who commit crimes against the youngest and most vulnerable 
members of society. In addition, the recommendation provides 
the requested increase of $218,000 for intellectual property 
rights crime enforcement.
    Within the level provided for the Criminal Division, 
$6,781,000 is provided for the Office of Special Investigations 
(OSI), which is $500,000 above the level requested. Funds are 
provided above the request to increase investigations into 
naturalized U.S. citizens who have committed human rights 
abuses, such as genocide or torture, outside of the United 
States.
    Civil Rights Division.--The recommendation fully funds the 
Civil Rights Division's efforts to combat human trafficking and 
the Committee expects the Department to continue submitting 
yearly updates regarding its efforts to address this horrific 
crime.
    Civil Division.--Within the level of funds provided for the 
Civil Division, the recommendation includes $46,237,000 for the 
Office of Immigration Litigation (OIL), which is equal to the 
request. The recommendation provides a program increase of 
$9,566,000 and 114 positions (86 attorneys) for OIL to address 
increased workload associated with enhanced immigration 
enforcement by the Department of Homeland Security.
    Within the level of funds provided for the Civil Division, 
not less than $250,000 shall be available to enforce 
subsections (a) and (b) of section 642 of the Illegal 
Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996.

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

    The Committee recommends $6,292,000 for the Vaccine Injury 
Compensation Trust Fund to cover the Department of Justice's 
expenses associated with litigating cases under the National 
Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. This amount is $40,000 
above the enacted level and $41,000 below the request. The 
Committee expects the Department to have procedures in place 
that ensure the integrity of Vaccine Injury Compensation 
matters, and that awards are made to vaccine-injured persons 
quickly, easily, and with certainty and generosity.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION

    The recommendation includes $66,970,000 for the National 
Security Division, as requested. This is a new litigating 
division authorized by the USA Patriot Improvement and 
Reauthorization Act of 2006. The National Security Division 
consolidates the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review, and 
the Counterterrorism and Counterespionage Sections of the 
Criminal Division into one litigating division focused solely 
on national security. The consolidation of these components 
into a new National Security Division is consistent with the 
recommendation of the Commission on the Intelligence 
Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass 
Destruction.
    Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) Unit.--The Foreign 
Agents Registration Act requires persons lobbying for foreign 
governments to register with the Justice Department and 
disclose their lobbying activities. The purpose of this Act is 
to insure that the American public and its lawmakers know the 
source of information or propaganda intended to sway public 
opinion, policy, and laws. The Committee understands the FARA 
unit is working to make its records available to the public on 
the Internet, which will dramatically increase the transparency 
to the public of companies who are lobbying for foreign 
governments. The Committee urges the National Security Division 
to complete this effort, as quickly as possible.

               SALARIES AND EXPENSES, ANTITRUST DIVISION

    The Committee recommendation includes $145,915,000 in 
budget authority for the Antitrust Division, $1,827,000 above 
the current year and $1,827,000 below the request. This 
appropriation is offset by $129,000,000 in pre-merger filing 
fee collections, resulting in a direct appropriation of 
$16,915,000.
    The Division acts on antitrust cases before the Supreme 
Court, represents the interests of the United States in cases 
brought under Federal antitrust laws, reviews decisions of 
regulatory commissions, and prepares and files amicus briefs. 
Appopriations for both the Division and the Federal Trade 
Commission are offset by Hart-Scott-Rodino Act pre-merger 
filing fee collections.

             SALARIES AND EXPENSES, UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

    The recommendation provides $1,664,400,000, for U.S. 
Attorneys, which is $84,835,000 above the enacted level and the 
same as the request. The recommendation does not adopt the 
Administration's proposal to rescind $27,000,000 from this 
appropriation associated with Project SeaHawk, a port security 
program.
    This appropriation supports the Executive Office of U.S. 
Attorneys and the 94 U.S. Attorney Offices, which serve as the 
principal litigators for the U.S. Government for criminal, 
civil, and debt collection matters.
    In addition to inflationary and other base funding 
adjustments, the recommendation includes the following program 
increases: $7,737,000 and 4 additional positions for 
counterterrorism investigations and prosecutions; $1,430,000 
for replacement and upgraded security equipment; $6,081,000 and 
61 additional positions for gang investigations and 
prosecutions; $842,000 and nine positions (five attorneys) for 
human trafficking investigations and prosecutions in Northern 
Virginia; and $2,625,000 and 26 additional positions for child 
exploitation and obscenity prosecutions. In addition, the 
recommendation provides a $4,490,000 increase to address U.S. 
Attorneys' highest priority needs including the prosecution of 
human traffickers referred to as ``coyotes'' and other criminal 
aliens, methamphetamine traffickers, and identity thieves. The 
Committee expects the Department to reallocate resources, if 
necessary, to address these priority areas in accordance with 
the reprogramming procedures outlined in section 605 of this 
Act.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

    The recommendation provides $223,447,000 for the U.S. 
Trustees Program (USTP), to be entirely funded from offsetting 
collections. The amount recommended is $11,783,000 above the 
current year and $12,669,000 below the request. The mission of 
the USTP is to promote integrity and efficiency in the nation's 
bankruptcy system by enforcing bankruptcy laws, and providing 
oversight of private trustees. The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention 
and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-8) provides 
the USTP with important new statutory tools to identify and 
civilly prosecute misconduct by debtors and others who misuse 
the bankruptcy system.

      SALARIES AND EXPENSES, FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

    The Committee recommends $1,431,000 for the Foreign Claims 
Settlement Commission, which is $128,000 above the enacted 
level and $128,000 below the request.
    The Commission settles claims of American citizens arising 
out of nationalization, expropriation, or other takings of 
their properties and interests by foreign governments.

                     United States Marshals Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $825,924,000 for the United States 
Marshals Service (USMS). The recommendation is equal to the 
request and $25,252,000 above the current year, including 
supplemental and construction funds.
    The recommendation adopts the requested transfer of 
$27,935,000 from this account to the Office of the Federal 
Detention Trustee account and merges the Construction account 
with the Salaries and Expenses account, as requested. In 
addition to inflationary and other base adjustments, the 
recommendation includes the following program changes: (1) a 
$4,612,000 increase and 37 additional positions for protection 
of the judicial process; (2) a $6,426,000 increase and 14 
additional positions for information technology improvements; 
(3) a $1,834,000 increase and 15 additional positions for 
improved financial management and oversight; (4) a $533,000 
increase and 5 additional positions for the Witness Security 
Program; (5) a $214,000 increase and 2 additional positions for 
the Marshals Service Tactical Operations Center--Special 
Operations Group; and (5) a decrease of $9,414,000 in requested 
program offsets.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

    The recommendation provides such sums as are necessary for 
Fees and Expenses of Witnesses account. This appropriation, 
which is considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes, 
provides for fees and expenses of witnesses who appear on 
behalf of the Government in cases in which the United States is 
a party, including fact and expert witnesses, mental competency 
examinations, and witness/informant protection. The 
Congressional Budget Office estimates this account will require 
$171,000,000 in new budget authority in fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee recommends bill language, which allows: (1) 
up to $1,000,000 for the purchase and maintenance of armored 
vehicles for prisoner transportation; (2) up to $9,000,000 for 
installation, operation, and upgrade of a secure automated 
network and secure telecommunications equipment; and (3) up to 
$10,000,000 for construction of protected witness safesites.

           SALARIES AND EXPENSES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $9,882,000 for the Community 
Relations Service, which is $346,000 above the enacted level 
and $347,000 below the request. The Community Relations Service 
was established by Title X of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to 
provide assistance to communities in resolving disagreements 
arising from discriminatory practices.
    The Committee recommends bill language allowing the 
Attorney General to provide additional resources for the 
Community Relations Service, if emergent circumstances exist, 
through the transfer of funds from other Department of Justice 
programs, subject to the requirements of section 605 of this 
Act.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

    The Committee recommends $21,202,000 for the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund, which is $8,000 above the enacted level and 
$9,000 below the request.
    This account provides funds for additional investigative 
expenses of the FBI, DEA, ATF, and USMS, such as purchase of 
evidence and investigative expenses leading to seizure. Funds 
for these activities are provided from receipts in the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund resulting from the forfeiture of assets. 
Expenses related to the management and disposal of assets are 
also provided from receipts in the Assets Forfeiture Fund by a 
permanent indefinite appropriation.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

    The recommendation provides $498,457,000 for the Organized 
Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces (OCDETF) account. This 
program was created in 1982 to ensure a coordinated, multi-
agency approach to attacking and dismantling high-level drug 
enterprises. Through its nine regional task forces, this 
program utilizes the combined resources and expertise of its 
Federal agency members, in cooperation with State and local 
investigators and prosecutors, to target and destroy major drug 
trafficking and money laundering organizations.
    The recommendation fully funds the request for 
participating Department of Justice agencies. The 
recommendation does not transfer the High Intensity Drug 
Trafficking Areas program from the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy to this account, as proposed in the budget 
request.
    The recommendation provides the following amounts to 
reimburse agencies for their costs of participating in OCDETF 
task forces:

                         REIMBURSEMENT BY AGENCY
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Drug Enforcement Administration.........................        $197,451
Federal Bureau of Investigation.........................         136,945
United States Marshals Service..........................           8,452
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.....          11,392
United States Attorneys.................................         131,820
Criminal Division.......................................           2,701
Tax Division............................................             981
Administrative Office/Fusion Center.....................           8,715
                                                         ---------------
    Total...............................................         498,457
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $5,959,628,000 for the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) Salaries and Expenses account, 
which is $29,030,000 below the request and $259,059,000 above 
the current year.
    FBI Transformation.--The Committee appreciates the efforts 
of the Director and the men and women of the FBI to transform 
the agency from one whose primary mission was investigating 
crimes to one whose top priority is preventing terrorism. Since 
the September 11th attacks, the Committee has called upon the 
assistance of the Government Accountability Office (GAO), the 
National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA), the Justice 
Department Office of Inspector General (OIG), the Congressional 
Research Service (CRS), and the Committee's Surveys and 
Investigations staff to review FBI operations and make 
recommendations for improvement. The Committee appreciates the 
FBI's willingness to work with these organizations and expects 
the FBI to continue to work with these organizations during 
fiscal year 2007. The FBI is directed to continue to provide 
the Committee with quarterly updates on its transformation 
activities in fiscal year 2007.
    Chief Operating Officer.--The Committee believes that the 
FBI should create a Chief Operating Officer to manage the day-
to-day activities of the FBI, allowing the Director and the 
Deputy Director more time to focus on investigations and long-
term strategic management issues. The Committee encourages the 
FBI to create this position as soon as possible.
    Adjustments to Base.--The recommendation includes all 
requested adjustments to base except those outlined below. In 
addition, the recommendation includes requested transfers with 
the National Counterterrorism Center, the Office of the 
Director of National Intelligence, and the Drug Enforcement 
Administration.
    The recommendation rejects the Administration's proposal to 
non-recur the $5,000,000 increase provided in fiscal year 2006 
for additional Safe Streets Task Forces to combat gangs. The 
Committee remains concerned about the Administration's lack of 
commitment to provide the necessary resources to address gang 
violence.
    The recommendation rejects the Administration's proposal to 
non-recur the $5,000,000 increase provided in fiscal year 2006 
for intelligence training only to ask for a $5,000,000 program 
increase for the same purpose. This is a budget gimmick used to 
artificially inflate the amount of program increases requested 
for intelligence training without actually providing any 
additional resources. The Committee expects the Administration 
to discontinue the use of such disingenuous proposals in future 
budget requests.
    The recommendation also rejects the Administration's 
proposal to non-recur a $4,600,000 increase provided in fiscal 
year 2006 for the FBI's Sensitive But Unclassified Network 
(SBUNet). The Committee finds the Administration's proposal to 
reduce funding for this program bewildering and irresponsible. 
The Committee believes that access to the Internet and 
unclassified e-mail enhances employees' ability to obtain, 
share and disseminate information. The Committee understands 
that by the end of fiscal year 2006 most FBI employees will 
have access to a SBUNet account but that less that 20 percent 
of FBI employees will have Internet and unclassified e-mail on 
their desktop. The Committee directs the FBI to continue to 
expand employee access to SBUNet.
    In addition, the recommendation transfers $29,030,000 
requested in this account for alterations to create additional 
sensitive compartmented information facilities (SCIF) space to 
the Construction account. The Committee is puzzled that the 
Administration's budget request includes $29,030,000 for build-
out costs to expand SCIF space in this account and $33,191,000 
for the same purpose in the Construction account. The 
recommendation consolidates all of the funding provided for 
additional SCIF space into the Construction account in order to 
increase efficiency and accountability.
    Program Changes.--The recommendation provides the following 
program changes: (1) a $15,078,000 increase for intelligence 
infrastructure requirements; (2) a $16,009,000 increase and 57 
additional positions for intelligence operations and production 
enhancements; (3) a $1,000,000 increase for implementation of 
an intelligence officer certification program; (4) a $6,666,000 
increase for Law Enforcement Online to enhance information 
sharing to all levels of law enforcement; (5) a $24,700,000 
increase and 15 positions for enhanced counterterrorism 
response capabilities including $15,000,000 for a radiological 
evidence examination facility; (6) a $13,799,000 increase for 
additional headquarters space and facility infrastructure; (7) 
a $100,000,000 increase for SENTINEL, the FBI's new case 
management system; (8) a $10,000,000 increase and 2 positions 
for information technology infrastructure; (9) a $2,572,000 
increase and 1 position for information technology program 
management; (10) a $10,000,000 reduction for travel and 
conferences; (11) a $22,762,000 increase for Next Generation 
Integrated (NGI) Automated Fingerprint Identification System 
(IAFIS) and the integration of this system with the Department 
of Homeland Security's Automated Biometric Identification 
System (IDENT); (12) a $22,500,000 increase and 167 positions 
(100 agents) for field counterterrorism and counterintelligence 
investigations to address existing and emerging threats; (13) a 
$2,000,000 increase and 10 positions for the Center for 
Operational Innovation; (14) a $1,000,000 increase for 
organized retail theft enforcement; (15) a $2,000,000 increase 
for intellectual property rights enforcement; (16) a $1,448,000 
increase and 20 additional positions for headquarters 
administrative support in finance, budget, facilities, and 
human resources; (17) a $5,000,000 increase for the Innocent 
Images program; (18) a $5,000,000 increase for retention and 
recruitment programs; and (19) a $1,000,000 increase and 5 
additional agents for the Innocence Lost program.
    SENTINEL.--A new case management system for the FBI is 
critically needed to modernize and transform the FBI. The 
National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United 
States, the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the 
United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction, the OIG 
and NAPA have all identified the FBI's information technology 
capabilities as inadequate. Therefore, the recommendation 
includes $100,000,000, as requested, for SENTINEL, the FBI's 
new case management system. However, the Committee wants to 
ensure that the information technology failures that occurred 
in the FBI's last attempt to develop new case management system 
are not repeated.
    The Committee has been encouraged that the FBI has learned 
from its previous failures. In a study released last year, the 
Committee's Surveys and Investigations staff found that the FBI 
has strengthened its Office of the Chief Information Officer 
and has developed program management initiatives which should 
enable it to better manage and oversee its future information 
technology efforts. In March, the OIG released a report on 
SENTINEL stating that ``we believe the FBI has adequately 
planned for the project and this planning provides reasonable 
assurance that the FBI can successfully complete SENTINEL if 
the processes and controls are implemented as intended.''
    However, the Committee wants to ensure the program stays on 
track and directs the OIG to continue to work closely with FBI 
and to provide regular updates to the Committee on the 
financial and programmatic status of SENTINEL. In addition, the 
Committee includes section 110, which requires that before 
funding is spent on SENTINEL, the Deputy Attorney General and 
Department IT Investment Review Board certify to the Committees 
on Appropriations that appropriate program management and 
contractor oversight mechanisms are in place, and that SENTINEL 
is compatible with the Department's enterprise architecture.
    Center for Operational Innovation.--The recommendation 
includes a $2,000,000 increase and 10 positions to create a 
Center for Operational Innovation to research, develop, and 
prototype unconventional and novel methods to collect and 
analyze intelligence, and disrupt threats to national security. 
The Center shall be staffed with experts on intelligence 
operations from the FBI, other government agencies, the private 
sector, and academia.
    Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement.--The 
recommendation provides not less than $13,000,000 for 
intellectual property rights enforcement. Within the level of 
funds provided, the FBI is directed to increase the number of 
agents supporting U.S. Attorneys' Computer Hacking and 
Intellectual Property Rights units in the field, and increase 
the number of agents assigned to headquarters to support the 
Criminal Division's Computer Crime and Intellectual Property 
section and the National Intellectual Property Rights 
Coordination Center.
    Organized Retail Theft.--The Committee understands that 
organized retail theft is estimated to cause approximately $15 
billion in annual loses to the retail market. In order to 
address these crimes, the FBI established an Organized Retail 
Theft Initiative in 2003 to work with State and local law 
enforcement and corporate security entities to address these 
crimes. The Committee further understands that the FBI and the 
National Retail Federation have been working together to create 
an intelligence network to share and analyze organized retail 
theft intelligence. In addition to the resources already 
dedicated to the Organized Retail Theft Initiative, the 
recommendation includes a $1 million increase. The Committee 
also directs the FBI to ensure that the Law Enforcement Online 
program is maximizing the sharing of organized retail theft 
intelligence and analysis throughout law enforcement. In 
addition, the Committee directs the Department ensure the 
maximum sharing of intelligence and analysis of organized 
retail theft in the development of the N-DEx and R-DEx 
information sharing systems.
    Innocent Images.--The Innocent Images National Initiative 
is an intelligence-driven, proactive, multi-agency 
investigative operation to combat the proliferation of child 
pornography and child sexual exploitation facilitated by an 
online computer. The program provides centralized coordination 
and analysis of case information that by its very nature is 
national and international in scope, requiring unprecedented 
coordination with State, local, and international governments, 
and among FBI field offices and Legal Attaches. The 
recommendation provides an increase of $5,000,000 for the FBI's 
highest priority needs to address these horrific crimes.
    Innocence Lost.--According to some estimates, as many as 
17,000 victims are trafficked into the United States each year, 
many of which are women and children who are forced to work in 
the sex industry, and in prison-like facilities. In order to 
begin to address this issue, the FBI established 14 Innocence 
Lost task forces. The recommendation fully funds the continued 
needs of the 14 existing task forces and encourages the FBI to 
continue to expand its efforts to combat human trafficking, 
prostitution and sexual exploitation. In addition, the 
recommendation includes a $1,000,000 increase and 5 additional 
agents to establish a human trafficking task force in Northern 
Virginia.
    NGI-IAFIS and IDENT/IAFIS Interoperability.--The Committee 
supports the FBI's efforts to improve the speed and accuracy of 
IAFIS, expand the data available in the system, and improve its 
latent print capabilities. The Committee also supports the 
FBI's efforts to make the FBI's IAFIS system and Department of 
Homeland Security's IDENT system fully interoperable. The 
recommendation provides a $22,762,000 increase for these 
projects. In addition, the Committee directs the FBI to use not 
less than $48,376,000 from excess user fee collections for 
various Criminal Justice Information Services programs for 
these initiatives. The Committee expects the FBI to maintain 
the fees charged for non-criminal fingerprint checks at a level 
that will ensure that fee balances are available to continue to 
modernize IAFIS.
    National Name Check Program.--In fiscal year 2006, the 
Committee included language directing the FBI to conduct a fee 
review of background checks for United States Citizenship and 
Immigration Service (USCIS). The Committee understands that 
there remains a significant backlog in the processing of 
background checks for USCIS and other organizations. The 
Committee expects FBI to work with these agencies to ensure 
that sufficient resources are made available to eliminate the 
backlog as soon as possible. The Committee expects the FBI to 
set the name check fee at a level that adequately covers the 
cost to conduct requested background checks, eliminates the 
backlog and improves the efficiency of the information 
technology systems used to conduct the checks.
    Retention and Recruitment.--The recommendation includes 
$40,000,000 for retention and recruitment programs, which is a 
$5,000,000 increase above the current year. This funding is 
provided to expand retention and recruitment programs such as: 
retention, recruitment and relocation bonuses; creation of 
critical pay positions in areas such as intelligence analysts, 
agents, information technology experts and other specialized 
positions; and the University Education Program. The Committee 
directs the FBI to continue to work with NAPA during fiscal 
year 2007 to improve human resources management, including 
implementing an effective organizational structure, successful 
retention and recruitment programs, and successful leadership 
development programs.
    Training.--As the Committee has directed in previous years, 
analysts should have joint training with agents and personnel 
from other Intelligence Community agencies. The Committee 
expects the FBI to continue to expand the University Education 
Program, the Sabbatical Program, the Fellows Program and the 
use of the Foreign Service Institute.
    The recommendation does not adopt the Administration's 
proposal to permanently transfer 300 agents from the criminal 
program to counterterrorism. Counterterrorism is the FBI's 
highest priority and the Committee will continue to support the 
FBI's use of criminal agents on counterterrorism and 
counterintelligence matters as needed. The Committee believes 
that if additional counterterrorism agents are needed the 
Administration should request funding for these positions. The 
Committee's recommendation includes funding for 100 additional 
national security agents that were not requested.
    The Committee understands that mortgage fraud is a growing 
problem and expects the FBI to continue its efforts to address 
it.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommends $80,422,000 for the FBI's 
Construction account, which is $43,294,000 above the current 
year and $29,030,000 above the request.
    Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities (SCIFs).--
The recommendation includes $62,221,000 to expand available 
SCIF space for secure work environments, including all 
associated build-out costs. As discussed in the previous 
section, the recommendation moves $29,030,000 requested in the 
Salaries and Expenses account for this purpose to this account. 
The Committee is puzzled that the Administration's budget 
request includes $29,030,000 for alterations to expand SCIF 
space in the Salaries and Expenses account and $33,191,000 for 
the same purpose in this account. The recommendation 
consolidates all of the funding provided for additional SCIF 
space into the Construction account in order to increase 
efficiency and accountability. This additional space is 
critically needed to allow counterterrorism and 
counterintelligence agents and analysts to exchange sensitive 
information throughout the Intelligence Community.
    Center for Intelligence Training.--Most of the FBI 
Academy's facilities were designed in the late 1960s to 
accommodate small groups in a traditional classroom setting. 
However, given the FBI's growth and new mission requirements, 
the Academy's current facilities are inadequate to provide 
comprehensive intelligence training for agents and analysts. 
Therefore, the recommendation includes $6,311,000 for 
intelligence training facility enhancements.
    Critical Incident Response Group (CIRG) Space.--The 
recommendation provides $9,890,000 for the improvement of the 
CIRG facilities. With the significant growth in CIRG mission 
requirements and staff since September 11th, improvement to the 
current facilities is required.
    Central Records Complex.--The recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 for equipment and other necessary costs for the 
establishment of a modern state-of-the-art records management 
center. The Committee understands that consolidation of records 
and collocation of records management personnel will achieve 
business process efficiencies and personnel savings and will 
make more space available in the FBI headquarters building, 
allowing the FBI to reduce leased space in the Washington, D.C. 
metropolitan area, and making available needed space in the 
field as the number of FBI staff continues to increase.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$1,963,569,000 for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), 
of which $212,078,000 is derived from fees deposited in the 
Diversion Control Fund, resulting in a direct appropriation of 
$1,751,491,000. The recommended appropriation is $76,573,000 
above the enacted level including supplementals and $15,000,000 
above the request.
    In addition to providing inflationary and other costs to 
maintain the current operating level, the recommendation 
includes the following program increases: (1) $4,000,000 for 
the Foreign-deployed Advisory Support Teams (FAST) operating in 
Afghanistan; (2) $1,000,000 for international methamphetamine 
investigations; (3) $1,000,000 for Operation Panama Express; 
and (4) $11,981,000 and 57 positions for Intelligence Community 
support.
    Demand Reduction--Mobile Enforcement Teams (MET).--The 
recommendation includes $4,649,000 for the Demand Reduction 
program instead of eliminating the program as proposed in the 
budget request. The Committee is disappointed that the 
Administration continues to propose to eliminate this program 
that provides a law enforcement perspective to prevention 
groups and community coalitions at the national and local level 
in the development and assessment of anti-drug strategies and 
initiatives.
    The recommendation includes $37,746,000 for the MET 
program, which is $17,168,000 above the level requested. MET 
teams are deployed on a temporary basis to assist State and 
local law enforcement in areas that have been overrun with 
drug-related violent crime. The Committee is very disappointed 
that the Administration once again proposed a significant 
reduction to this program to reduce drug-related violence 
throughout the country.
    The Committee is discouraged that the Administration does 
not support the concept of Federal law enforcement working 
cooperatively with communities to address drug trafficking and 
abuse, and hopes that future budget requests will not continue 
to propose reductions to these important programs.
    Methamphetamine (meth).--According to the National 
Association of Counties, 58 percent of counties ranked meth as 
their number one drug problem and it is estimated that there 
are 583,000 people currently using meth. The Committee is 
hopeful that new Federal laws controlling meth precursor 
chemicals will dramatically reduce the number of small toxic 
labs operating in the country. However, the Committee 
understands that super labs operated by international drug 
trafficking organizations are supplying the majority of meth in 
America. The Committee is supportive of DEA's efforts to 
partner with the Mexican government to fight meth trafficking, 
including training Mexican law enforcement to establish meth 
enforcement teams, providing clandestine lab equipment to 
Mexican law enforcement, exchanging diversion control staff, 
and improving intelligence sharing. In addition, the Committee 
strongly supports the border task forces DEA has established to 
specifically focus on meth trafficking across the Southwest 
border, and DEA's partnership with the Customs and Border 
Protection Service to target suspicious cargo that could be 
related to meth production and trafficking. The recommendation 
includes $1,000,000 above the request to support DEA's efforts 
to combat international meth trafficking organizations.
    In addition, the recommendation provides $20,000,000 under 
the Office of Justice Programs for DEA to assist State and 
local law enforcement with proper removal and disposal of 
hazardous materials at clandestine meth labs, including funding 
for training, technical assistance, a container program, and 
purchase of equipment to adequately remove and store hazardous 
material.
    The Committee also supports DEA's effort to create a web 
site of the addresses of properties where meth labs or chemical 
dumpsites have been found. The web site will provide owners and 
renters with notice that a property may once have been used to 
produce meth and that there may be potential toxic hazards 
within the property.
    Furthermore, the Committee understands that the new 
clandestine lab training facility at the DEA Academy will be 
completed in the fall of 2007. This new facility, funded by the 
Committee in fiscal year 2005, will improve DEA's ability to 
train Federal, State, local and foreign law enforcement on the 
latest techniques in clandestine lab detection, enforcement and 
safety. Since 1998, DEA has trained approximately 10,500 law 
enforcement personnel to conduct investigations and safely 
dismantle seized meth labs.
    Diversion Control Fee Account.--The recommendation includes 
$212,078,000 for this account, which is $10,405,000 above the 
current year. In addition to inflationary and other base 
adjustments, the recommendation includes a program increase of 
$3,363,000 for 33 additional intelligence analysts.
    During 2004, an estimated 6 million Americans abused 
prescription drugs. The additional intelligence analysts funded 
in this recommendation will improve DEA's ability to dismantle 
organizations trafficking prescription drugs. In addition, the 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 for a prescription drug 
monitoring program under the Office of Justice Programs.
    The Committee remains disappointed in the Administration's 
lack of effort to comprehensively address prescription drug 
abuse, especially its continued resistance to allowing law 
enforcement to participate in the approval of labeling, 
promotion and risk management plans for new drugs to prevent 
another drug like OxyContin from being inappropriately 
marketed.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes a total of $980,128,000 for the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), 
which is $48,311,000 above the enacted level including 
supplements and equal to the budget request. The recommendation 
includes authority to collect $30,000,000 in explosives fees 
instead of $120,000,000 as proposed in the budget request.
    In addition to funding inflationary and other base 
adjustments, the recommendation includes a $16,000,000 increase 
to establish additional Violent Crime Impact Teams (VCITs). The 
Committee appreciates ATF's work to combat gang violence and 
expects ATF to continue these efforts.
    The Committee directs the ATF to submit a financial plan 
outlining the allocation of funding provided in this Act in 
accordance with the procedures outlined in section 605 of this 
Act. The financial plan shall describe the level of funding 
proposed to be used for the new ATF Headquarters building. In 
addition, the Committee directs that the financial plan provide 
sufficient funding for the effective operation of the National 
Integrated Ballistic Information Network.
    The Committee has heard reports that ATF has pursued 
license revocations and denials against firearms dealers based 
on violations that consist largely of recordkeeping errors of 
various types that are unlikely to impede tracing 
investigations or prosecution of individuals who use firearms 
in crime. The Committee encourages ATF to focus its efforts on 
cases where licensees commit serious, material violations of 
known legal duties. The Committee urges ATF to examine its 
regulations, forms and recordkeeping requirements to prevent 
inadvertent violations by licensees.
    The Committee understands that the Office of Inspector 
General (OIG) is planning a review of ATF's administration of 
the National Firearms Act and its management of the National 
Firearms Registration and Transfer Record. The Committee 
supports the OIG's plans to conduct this review.
    The Committee has heard concerns that ATF regulations on 
firearm possession by nonimmigrant aliens, combined with 
policies of other Federal agencies, creates unnecessary 
hardship for legitimate foreign sport shooters and hunters who 
wish to travel through the United States on the way to other 
destinations. The Committee expects ATF to work with other 
relevant agencies to devise a regulatory solution to this 
problem, consistent with legitimate security and border 
enforcement concerns.
    The Committee understands that during a disaster, ATF 
agents do not have authority to temporarily or permanently 
seize firearms in the possession of a person who is not 
prohibited under Federal or State law from possessing a 
firearm. The Committee expects ATF to continue to act only 
within existing authorities.
    The Committee recommends bill language similar to previous 
years and the budget request, that: (1) prohibits funding for 
consolidating or centralizing certain records; (2) prohibits 
funding to amend the definition of ``Curios or relics''; (3) 
prohibits funding for investigating or acting upon applications 
for relief from Federal firearms disabilities under 18 U.S.C. 
925(c); (4) makes funding available to investigate and act upon 
applications filed by corporations for relief from Federal 
firearms disabilities under section 18 U.S.C. 925(c); (5) 
prohibits funding to transfer the functions, missions or 
activities of the ATF to other agencies or Departments; (6) 
prohibits funds from being used to disclose certain firearms 
trace data; (7) prohibits funds to promulgate or implement any 
rule requiring a physical inventory of any business licensed 
under 18 U.S.C. 923; (8) prohibits funding to be used to 
electronically retrieve information gathered pursuant to 18 
U.S.C. 923(g)(4) by name or any personal identification code; 
and (9) prohibits funds to deny an application for a license 
under 18 U.S.C. 923 or renewal of such a license due to a lack 
of business activity, provided that the applicant is otherwise 
eligible to receive such a license and is eligible to report 
business income or to claim an income tax deduction for 
business expenses under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.

                         Federal Prison System


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends a fiscal year 2007 appropriation 
of $4,987,059,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Federal 
Prison System, which is the same as the request and 
$156,898,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
Administration's annual budget requests for the Federal Prison 
System. Recent requests have been predicated on unreasonable 
assumptions and rescissions of previously appropriated 
construction funds. The Committee believes that the fiscal year 
2007 proposal to rescind prison construction funds is short-
sighted since the inmate population is expected to steadily 
increase and over-crowding is anticipated to remain a 
significant problem. The Committee is concerned about the 
safety and morale of staff working in Federal prisons, and 
therefore believes that bringing additional bed space on-line 
in a timely manner is critical. The Committee encourages the 
Administration to look seriously at the needs of the Federal 
Prison System when it develops its future budget requests.
    Activation and Expansion of Prisons.--Within the amount 
provided, the Committee expects the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to 
activate the expanded and new facilities in Otisville, NY, and 
Pollock, LA. Activating constructed prison facilities remains a 
priority to the Committee.
    Contract Confinement/Intergovernmental Agreements.--The 
Bureau of Prisons is directed to continue to meet bedspace 
needs using State, local, and private existing and new prison 
capacity, as well as renew agreements with local governments 
housing Federal criminal aliens, if these facilities meet 
Bureau of Prisons' standards and a fair and reasonable price is 
offered.
    Drug Treatment Programs.--The Committee is aware that more 
than half of the Federal prison population is incarcerated 
because of illegal drug activity, and the Committee expects 
that the BOP will continue the transitional drug treatment 
program.
    Reimbursable Agreement.--The Committee understands that the 
Department of Justice continues to pursue an agreement with the 
Department of Homeland Security to reimburse BOP for the costs 
of criminal alien inmates awaiting deportation. The Committee 
encourages this action, which would be consistent with 
reimbursements that are made by States for their inmates who 
are housed in BOP facilities.
    Faith-based prisons.--The recommendation continues funding 
for eight faith-based prison programs. Within the recommended 
funding level, the Committee expects that these programs will 
be fully operational and that an evaluation of the results of 
these programs will be provided to the Committee within 180 
days of enactment of this Act.
    National Institute of Corrections (NIC).--To address 
deficiencies in corrections reporting identified by the U.S. 
Census Bureau, the Committee encourages the NIC to work with 
State corrections agencies to develop procedures and systems 
for collecting and maintaining corrections records.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts, which provides: (1) 
for the purchase of motor vehicles; (2) for the provision of 
technical advice to foreign governments; (3) for transfer of 
funds to the Health Resources and Services Administration; (4) 
for the Director to enter into contracts to furnish health 
care; (5) up to $6,000 for reception and representation 
expenses; (6) up to $20,000,000 for contract confinement 
expenses for the care and security of Cuban and Haitian 
entrants; and (7) for the Federal Prison System to accept 
donated property and services. The recommendation modifies the 
number of new and replacement automobile purchases and includes 
language, as requested, designating an amount to remain 
available for two fiscal years.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Committee recommends $88,961,000 for fiscal year 2007 
for the construction, modernization, maintenance, and repair of 
prison and detention facilities housing Federal inmates. This 
amount is the same as the fiscal year 2006 level, not including 
supplemental appropriations and $28,141,000 below the request 
for new budget authority. The recommendation does not include a 
proposed $142,000,000 rescission of funds previously 
appropriated for new prison construction. The net 
recommendation for this account is therefore $113,859,000 above 
the request.
    The Committee remains deeply troubled by claims that 
inmate-on-inmate and inmate-on-staff assaults are increasing. 
The Committee believes that overcrowding can be a significant 
contributing factor to this increase in violent activity, and, 
for this reason, rejects the proposal to rescind balances from 
prison construction funds.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts, which allows: (1) for 
planning, acquisition of sites, and construction of facilities; 
(2) for acquisition, remodeling, and equipping facilities by 
contract or force account; (3) up to $14,000,000 to construct 
inmate work areas; and (4) for use of prisoner labor.

   LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES, FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, 
                              INCORPORATED

    The Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses of $2,477,000 for Federal Prison Industries, 
Incorporated (FPI), for fiscal year 2007, which is $845,000 
below the amount designated for fiscal year 2006 and the same 
as the request. The Committee believes that those who are 
repaying their debts to society should be provided 
opportunities to prepare themselves to re-enter the community 
as functioning citizens. The Committee notes that, 
unfortunately, FPI's inmate employment has declined by 2,800 
since 2001, a 13 percent decrease. The Committee expects the 
Administration to continue to offer meaningful work 
opportunities to inmates while respecting the interests of 
small and medium-sized businesses.

                    Office on Violence Against Women


       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $390,296,000 to support grants 
under the Violence Against Women Act, which is $8,730,000 above 
the current year and $43,283,000 above the request. The request 
includes funding for certain Violence Against Women Prevention 
and Prosecution Programs under the Justice Assistance heading, 
but the recommendation continues to include all Violence 
Against Women Prevention and Prosecution Programs under this 
heading. The table below displays funding for programs 
recommended under this heading compared to the level of funds 
requested for the same activities under this heading and under 
the Justice Assistance account.

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  FY 2006      FY 2007        FY 2007
                                  enacted     request\1\  recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Violence Against Women
 Programs:
STOP Grants...................      184,916      172,990        174,500
    (National Institute of          (5,035)      (2,477)        (2,477)
     Justice--R&D;)............
    (Safe Start Program)......      (9,872)  ...........  ..............
    (Transitional Housing          (14,808)     (14,862)  ..............
     Assistance)..............
Transitional Housing            ...........  ...........         14,808
 Assistance...................
Grants to Encourage Arrest           62,269       55,147         63,075
 Policies.....................
Rural Domestic Violence              38,666       38,799         39,166
 Assistance Grants............
Violence on College Campuses..        8,938        8,969          9,054
Civil Legal Assistance........       38,719       45,774         42,000
Elder and Disabled Women......        4,482        4,459          4,540
Safe Haven Project............       13,717       13,766         13,894
Educ. & Training for Disabled         7,064        7,109          7,155
 Female Victims...............
Other Violence Against Women
 Programs:
CASA (Special Advocates)......       11,745       11,750         11,897
Training for Judicial                 2,258        2,263          2,287
 Personnel....................
Grants for Televised Testimony          973  ...........  ..............
Training Programs.............        4,895        4,918          4,958
Stalking Database.............        2,924        2,924          2,962
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total.................      381,566  ...........       390,296
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Some programs shown for display purposes only. They were included in
  the budget request but under other account headings.

    Funding included under this heading will continue to 
provide resources to expand units of law enforcement officers 
and prosecutors specifically targeting crimes against women, to 
develop and implement effective arrest and prosecution policies 
to prevent, identify and respond to violent crimes against 
women, and to provide much needed victim services including 
specialized domestic violence court advocates to obtain 
protection orders.
    In response to the authorization contained in The Violence 
Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 
2005 (Public Law 109-162), the Committee recommends an increase 
of $16,822,000 above the enacted level for the Services, 
Training, Officers, and Prosecutors (STOP) grant program. These 
grants are intended to support coordinated community responses 
to violent crimes against women.

                       Office of Justice Programs

    The recommendation includes $2,244,179,000 for the Office 
of Justice Programs (OJP), which is $1,043,131,000 above the 
request and $171,932,000 below the current year. The 
recommended amount includes $65,000,000 in mandatory 
appropriations for Public Safety Officers Benefits. Again this 
year, the budget request proposes merging all programs 
administered by OJP under the Justice Assistance heading. The 
Committee recommendation retains the account structure used in 
previous fiscal years and funds State and local law enforcement 
programs under different appropriation accounts.

                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends $215,575,000 for the Justice 
Assistance account, which is $14,679,000 below the enacted 
level and $818,377,000 below the request. The request proposed 
merging all OJP programs under this heading, and the 
Committee's recommendation retains the current year funding 
structure. The Justice Assistance program includes assistance 
to States and localities in the form of research, evaluation, 
and statistics; white collar crime; information sharing; 
missing children assistance; and Justice for All Act 
implementation, including victim notification. In addition, 
funding for the management and administration of all grants 
provided through OJP is provided under this heading. The table 
below compares the fiscal year 2007 recommendation to the 
fiscal year 2007 request for those programs recommended under 
this account heading.

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  FY 2006      FY 2007        FY 2007
            Program               enacted     request\1\  recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Institute of Justice.       54,298       56,241         55,000
Bureau of Justice Statistics..       34,553       59,812         36,000
Victim Assistance.............        8,885  ...........  ..............
Justice for All Act/Victim            1,974        9,960         10,960
 Notification.................
National White Collar Crime           8,885  ...........          8,000
 Center.......................
Regional Info. Sharing System.       39,719       39,676         39,676
Management and Administration.       34,553       10,466         10,466
Missing Children Program......       47,387       50,928         55,473
                               -----------------------------------------
    Total.....................      230,254  ...........       215,575
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Some programs shown for display purposes only because they were in
  the budget request but under other account headings.

    National Institute of Justice.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $55,000,000 for the National Institute 
of Justice (NIJ). In addition, NIJ will receive funding under 
the Byrne Discretionary program, the Violence Against Women 
Prevention and Prosecution program, and the DNA Initiative.
    NIJ is the Nation's primary source of research and 
development in the field of criminal justice. NIJ fosters 
innovation in law enforcement technologies and practices, 
investigates causes and patterns of crime, and informs the 
public of research and development findings. The Committee 
encourages NIJ to work with Federal law enforcement agencies in 
the development of law enforcement technologies to ensure 
coordination of research and development efforts.
    The recommendation continues the current year level of 
funding for the NIJ's National Law Enforcement and Corrections 
Technology Centers. The Committee supports the Border Research 
and Technology Center and recognizes the important technology 
assistance and technical information it has provided to 
Federal, State, and local law enforcement operations in the 
border region.
    Missing Children.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$55,473,000 for the Missing Children Program for fiscal year 
2007, which is $8,086,000 above the enacted level and 
$4,545,000 above the request. This program provides funds to 
combat crimes against children, particularly kidnapping and 
sexual exploitation.
    The recommendation includes an increase of $5,000,000 over 
the request and $6,060,000 over the current year for Internet 
Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Task Forces and $1,000,000 over 
the request and $1,113,000 over the current year for the 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) to 
increase efforts to prevent child on-line exploitation.
    The following table displays the Committee's funding 
recommendation for this program:

                        MISSING CHILDREN PROGRAM
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  FY 2006      FY 2007        FY 2007
                                  enacted      request    recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
NCMEC.........................       23,693       23,806         24,806
Jimmy Ryce Law Enforcement            2,962        2,976          2,976
 Training Center..............
ICAC..........................       14,315       15,375         20,375
AMBER Alert...................        4,936        4,960          4,960
Missing and Exploited Children        1,481        1,488          2,356
 Office.......................
Management and Administration.  ...........        1,928  ..............
Unallocated...................  ...........          395  ..............
                               -----------------------------------------
    Total.....................       47,387       50,928         55,473
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Regional Information Sharing System.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $39,676,000 for fiscal year 2007 for 
the Regional Information Sharing System (RISS), which is 
$43,000 below the enacted level and the same as the request.
    The RISS program maintains six regionally-based information 
sharing centers throughout the United States, which are 
connected electronically to form a nationwide network for the 
automated exchange of crime and terrorism information between 
Federal, State, and local agencies. The Committee is pleased 
with the Administration's efforts to integrate RISS with the 
Law Enforcement On-Line (LEO) program and other information 
sharing programs. The Committee directs the Department to 
ensure that other inter-state information sharing systems 
funded by OJP and COPS utilize existing communications 
infrastructure and are compatible with RISS and LEO.
    Justice for All Act/Victim Notification.--The 
recommendation includes a total of $10,960,000 for activities 
authorized by the Justice for All Act, Public Law 108-405, to 
increase enforcement of crime victims' rights, including 
support for the Statewide Automated Victim Information 
Notification (SAVIN) program.
    White Collar Crime Center.--The Committee recommends 
$8,000,000 for the National White Collar Crime Center, which is 
$885,000 below the enacted level and $8,000,000 above the 
request. This program provides training, technical assistance, 
and investigative support to State and local law enforcement to 
combat white-collar and economic crimes such as fraud and 
identity theft.
    Management and Administration.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $10,466,000 in direct appropriations 
for the management and administration of OJP programs, which is 
$24,087,000 below the enacted level and the same as the 
request. In addition, consistent with prior practice, 
reimbursable funding for management and administration costs 
will be made available from programs administered by OJP from 
the ``Community Oriented Policing Services'' account. Further, 
the Committee notes that remaining management and 
administration funding will be made available from the 
``Juvenile Justice Programs'' and the ``State and Local Law 
Enforcement Assistance'' accounts, and that these funds will be 
transferred to and merged with the ``Justice Assistance'' 
account.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee recommends a total of $1,103,492,000 for 
State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance programs. This 
amount is $1,103,492,000 above the request and $149,619,000 
below the enacted level. The Committee does not adopt the 
Administration's proposal to consolidate this appropriation 
under the Justice Assistance heading.
    The table below displays funding for programs recommended 
under this heading compared to the level of funding requested 
under the Justice Assistance account for the same activities.

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                      FY 2006         FY 2007         FY 2007
                                                                      enacted       request\1\    recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant.........................         411,159  ..............         558,077
    (Boys and Girls Clubs)......................................        (83,914)          59,512        (75,000)
    (National Institute of Justice).............................         (9,872)  ..............  ..............
    (Byrne Discretionary Grants)................................  ..............  ..............       (115,225)
State Criminal Alien Assistance.................................         399,827  ..............         405,000
Southwest Border Prosecutors....................................          29,617          29,757          30,000
Byrne Discretionary Grants......................................         189,255  ..............  ..............
Victims of Trafficking..........................................           9,872          21,488          21,488
State Prison Drug Treatment.....................................           9,872  ..............           5,000
Drug Courts.....................................................           9,872          69,186          40,000
Prescription Drug Monitoring....................................           7,404           9,919          10,000
Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution..........................          17,943           1,984          22,943
Capital Litigation..............................................             987          14,879           2,000
Cannabis Eradication............................................           4,936          10,713  ..............
Indian Assistance Programs......................................          21,719  ..............  ..............
Intelligence State and Local Training...........................           9,872  ..............           2,000
Missing Alzheimer's Patients....................................             840  ..............  ..............
Mentally Ill Offender Act.......................................           4,936  ..............           5,000
Sex Offender Registry...........................................  ..............           1,984           1,984
What Works......................................................  ..............             992  ..............
Emergency Supplemental..........................................         125,000  ..............  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
    Total.......................................................       1,253,111  ..............      1,103,492
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Some programs shown for display purposes only. They were in the budget request, but under other account
  headings.

    Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants Program.--
The Committee recommendation includes $558,077,000 for the 
Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants (JAG) program.
    Of the amount provided, $367,852,000 is for the JAG formula 
grant program authorized by the Violence Against Women and 
Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 
109-162). The recommendation for JAG formula grants is 
$367,852,000 above the budget request and $50,479,000 over the 
enacted level.
    Funding under this program is authorized for (a) law 
enforcement programs; (b) prosecution and court programs; (c) 
prevention and education programs; (d) corrections and 
community corrections programs; (e) drug treatment and 
enforcement programs; (f) planning, evaluation, and technology 
improvement programs; and (g) crime victim and witness programs 
(other than compensation). Funding is not available for (a) 
vehicles, vessels, or aircraft; (b) luxury items; (c) real 
estate; or (d) construction projects.
    The formula used for distributing funds under this program 
allocates 50 percent of funding based on population, and 50 
percent based on violent crime rates. The formula allocates 60 
percent of funding to States and 40 percent to units of local 
government.
    Of the amount provided, $75,000,000 is for Boys and Girls 
Clubs, which is $15,488,000 above the request. The Committee 
provides these funds to deter young people from entering gangs 
and participating in other criminal activities.
    Of the amount provided, $115,225,000 is for discretionary 
grants to help to improve the functioning of the criminal 
justice system with an emphasis on drugs, violent crime, and 
serious offenders. Grants shall be awarded for the same 
authorized purposes as the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice 
Assistance Grant program. Within the amounts provided, the 
Committee expects OJP to examine each of the following 
proposals, to provide grants if warranted, and to submit a 
report to the Committee on its intentions for each proposal:
     Virginia Attorney General's Office for law 
enforcement initiatives;
     Northern Shenandoah Valley Regional Drug Task 
Force;
     The Women's Center in Vienna, VA;
     Polaris Project;
     Northern Virginia Regional Gang Task Force;
     ChildSafeNet in Fairfax County, VA;
     Tahirih Justice Center in Falls Chirch, VA;
     William and Mary College's Courtroom 21 Project;
     Pre-release and post-incarceration services 
programs for Commonwealth of Virginia;
     Court programs in the Commonwealth of Virginia to 
combat drugs and drug related crime;
     Virginia State Police for Gang Education and 
Community Awareness Program;
     Virginia Community Policing Institute;
     Securing Emergency Resources Through Volunteer 
Efforts (SERVE) for a re-entry program;
     International Institute for Alcohol Awareness for 
law enforcement training on liquor law enforcement;
     National Association of Town Watch's National 
Night Out crime prevention program;
     National Citizens Crime Prevention Campaign;
     National Institute on State Policy on Trafficking 
of Women and Girls;
     Mothers Against Drunk Driving;
     Pegasus;
     Concordia Parish, LA, Police Jury;
     West Carroll Parish, LA, Sheriff's Office;
     Texas Border Sheriffs' Coalition;
     Texas Governor's Office for Operation Rio Grande;
     City of Houston, TX, Violent Criminal Gang 
Initiative;
     Southwest Texas law enforcement initiative;
     Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network;
     Operation Blue Ridge Thunder;
     Cook County, IL, Cold Case Homicide Unit;
     Yancey County, NC, Sheriff's Department;
     Tarleton State University for Rural Law 
Enforcement Information Technology and Anti-Terrorism Service 
Center;
     Coryell County, TX, Sheriff's Department;
     Grass Valley, CA, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Women's Center of Tarrant County, TX;
     Ohio State Patrol;
     Clark, Greene, Fayette, and Pickaway Counties, OH, 
for a law enforcement initiative;
     University of Central Oklahoma for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Training Demonstration Program for Oklahoma law 
enforcement officers;
     Enough is Enough;
     Moultrie County, GA, Police Department;
     Birmingham Family Services in Oakland County, MI;
     Michigan Jewish Institute for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     San Bernardino County and Riverside County, CA, 
Regional Fingerprint Identification Program;
     City of Redlands, CA, East Valley Justice 
Communications Center;
     Riverside County, CA, Web Wise Kids Program;
     San Bernardino County, CA, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     City of Redlands, CA, Crime Analysis System;
     Midwest Forensics Center at Iowa State University;
     Iowa State University for a cyber crime program;
     Drug Abuse Resistance Education;
     Parents Anonymous;
     Advanced Science and Technology Adjudication 
Resource Center;
     Operation UNITE for a drug enforcement, treatment 
and education program;
     London City, KY, Police Department;
     Criminal Information Sharing Alliance Network;
     Bannock, Bonneville, Madison, and Oneida Counties, 
ID, for a law enforcement initiative;
     New York State Center for Security Technologies;
     Warren County, NY, District Attorney's Office;
     Saratoga County, NY, District Attorney's Office;
     Phoenix House in Delaware County, NY;
     Center for Court Innovation;
     University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation 
Center;
     Drug Court Program in Chattanooga, TN;
     State Attorney Safe Schools Program, FL;
     National Forensic Science Technology Center in 
Largo, FL;
     St. Petersburg College for law enforcement 
training;
     Elder Justice Information Center at Stetson 
University College of Law;
     National Clearinghouse for Science and the Law at 
Stetson University College of Law;
     RUSH Task Force in Virginia;
     Davis County, UT, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Citizens Crime Watch of Florida;
     National Association of Court Management;
     Inner Harbor, GA, for Children and Families;
     Phoenix House, TX;
     Kane County, IL, for a mental health court;
     Carpentersville, IL, Community Response Team;
     City of Springfield, MO, law enforcement 
initiative;
     National Motor Vehicle Title Information System;
     Ascension Parish, LA, Law Enforcement Training 
Center;
     Will County, IL, Sheriff's Office for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Pasco County, FL, Sheriff's Office for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     National Institute of Justice's Cyberscience 
Laboratory in Rome, NY;
     Carroll County, NH, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Regional Crime Laboratory at Sam Houston State 
University;
     City of Denton, TX, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Midland County, MI, for a court program;
     Salt Lake County, UT, Sheriff's Office;
     Richmond, VA, Police Department for a law 
enforcement training program;
     Town of Culpeper and County of Culpeper, VA, for a 
law enforcement and gang violence prevention program;
     Page County, VA, for a law enforcement initiative;
     Cincinnati, OH, Police Department for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Laporte County, IN, Sheriff's Department;
     City of South Bend, IN, Police Department;
     City of High Point, NC, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     SEARCH Program;
     City of Chesapeake, VA, for gang suppression 
activities;
     Action in the Community Through Service in Prince 
William County, VA;
     Vienna, VA, Police Department;
     Annandale, VA, Christian Community for Action;
     Youth Crime Watch of America;
     Oldham County, KY, Sheriffs Office for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     HELP House in Philadelphia, PA;
     Greenville, PA, for a law enforcement initiative;
     Bucks County, PA, for a gang enforcement 
initiative;
     Indian River Community College for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     New York City, NY, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     City of Glendale, AZ, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Ventura County, CA, Sheriff's Office for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Hackettstown, NJ, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     All Kids Count;
     National Council of Juvenile Family Court Judges;
     City of Nacogdoches, TX, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Synergy Domestic Violence Program in Parkville, 
MO;
     American Prosecutors Research Institute;
     Minnesota CrimNet;
     Gang of One in Charlotte, NC;
     Richmond County, NC, for law enforcement 
equipment;
     City of Chandler, AZ, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Mesa, AZ, for a law enforcement initiative;
     Vincennes University Center for Applied Technology 
for a law enforcement initiative;
     Owen County, IN, for a law enforcement initiative;
     Vanderburgh County, IN, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     City of Greenville, SC, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     City of Oceanside, CA, for a gang prevention 
program;
     McLean County, IL, for a drug court program;
     Currituck, Duplin, and Tyrell, NC, for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Phoenix House in Westchester County, NY;
     Putnam County, NY, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     National Training Center in Sioux City, IA, for 
law enforcement training;
     Steuben County, NY, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Monroe County, NY, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Rural Justice Institute at Alfred University in 
Alfred, NY;
     Horizon House, OH;
     Atlantic County, NJ, and Cape May County, NJ, for 
a law enforcement initiative;
     Saline, Smith, Kearney and Meade Counties, KS, for 
a law enforcement initiative;
     Weld County, CO, Gang Task Force;
     Eastern Colorado Plains Drug Task Force;
     Crossroads Safehouse in Fort Collins, CO;
     Mecklenburg County, NC, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Schoolcraft College, MI, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Rutherford County, NC, for a drug interdiction 
program;
     SUNY-Canton for a law enforcement training 
program;
     Central Ohio Drug Enforcement Task Force;
     City of Henderson, NV, for law enforcement 
initiatives;
     Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department for law 
enforcement initiatives;
     Franklin County, OH, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Columbus, OH, for a law enforcement initiative;
     King County, WA, for law enforcement initiatives;
     Broward County, FL, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     University of Connecticut for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Dubois County, IN, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     City of Albuquerque, NM, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     San Carlos Apache Tribe, AZ, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Pinal County, AZ, Sheriff's Office;
     Delaware County Community College for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Chester, PA, for law enforcement initiatives;
     City of Abilene and Taylor County, TX, for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Lavonia, GA, Police Department for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     ACTION Project in San Joaquin Valley, CA;
     Buchanan, Jones, and Scott Counties, IA, for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Texas State University at San Marcos for a law 
enforcement initiative;
     Dona Ana County, NM, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     MISSING Program in Indiana;
     Smith County, MS, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Counties of Calhoun and Cleburne, AL, for drug and 
violent crime task forces;
     Talladega County, AL, for a drug task force;
     Judicial Education Reference, Information and 
Technical Transfer, MI;
     City of Westminster, CA, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Miami Partnership for Action in Communities Task 
Force for anti-gang initiatives;
     Law enforcement training activities in 
Hughesville, PA;
     Eastern Montgomery County, PA, for law enforcement 
training;
     A Child Is Missing, WI;
     City of Altoona, PA, Police Department;
     Providence House, NJ, for domestic violence 
programs;
     Howell, NJ, for a law enforcement initiative;
     National Center for Audio/Video Forensics, CO;
     Kern County, CA, for law enforcement activities;
     Bakersfield, CA, for gang violence activities;
     Columbus, OH, for an anti-gang initiative;
     Deschutes County, OR, drug court initiative;
     City of Streator, IL, for a law enforcement 
initiative;
     Hilton Head Island and Beaufort County, SC, for a 
law enforcement initiative;
     Phoenix House, Long Island, NY;
     Town of Amherst, NY, Police Department;
     Town of Greece, NY, Police Department;
     Noble County and DeKalb County, IN, for law 
enforcement initiatives;
     Greene County, MO, for law enforcement 
initiatives;
     Honolulu, HI, Youth Challenge Program;
     Greater Portland, ME, program for victims of 
violent crime;
     Camden County, NJ, Collaborative Drug Intervention 
Committees;
     California Western School of Law California 
Innocence Project;
     Los Angeles City/County, CA, (CLEAR) anti-gang 
program;
     Calhoun County, GA, Family Connection program for 
at-risk teenagers;
     Parents for Megan's Law, NY;
     Suffolk County, NY, Police Department Computer 
Crimes Section;
     Sac and Fox Tribal Police Force, IA;
     Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy;
     Ohio DOVE domestic violence program;
     United Way for Southeastern Michigan for 
recidivism reduction program;
     Davidson County, TN, Mental Health Court;
     Madison County, AL, for adult, juvenile, family 
drug court and mental health court;
     Madison, AL, Police Department for domestic 
violence program;
     Urban Criminal Justice Research and Training, MD;
     Alabama New Options program;
     F.A.I.T.H. Inc. to reduce recidivism, IL;
     IL New Beginning program;
     Neighborhood Re-entry Center, Chicago, IL;
     A Child is Missing, CT;
     New Haven, CT, Court Team;
     University of Connecticut research on crime 
prevention program;
     Collaborative Network Security Development, MI;
     Travis County, TX, Sheriff's Office program for 
at-risk youth;
     Duquesne/Carnegie Mellon University cyber crime 
project;
     Homestead Borough, PA, Police Department drug 
prevention programs;
     ALERRT Program;
     Johnson County, TX, Police;
     Johnson County, TX, Stop the Offender Program;
     Somervell County, TX, Police;
     East Palo Alto, CA, for a violence and gang 
prevention initiative;
     Ex-offenders program, PA;
     FDRC in PA;
     Philadelphia, PA, PSR Program to reduce violence 
in schools;
     San Diego County, CA, SAFE Task Force training;
     Illinois Comprehensive Domestic Violence Program;
     Los Angeles, CA, Community Policing Program;
     Phoenix Academy of LA for at-risk youth program;
     Children's Home Society of South Dakota;
     Prince George's County, MD, State Attorney Office 
for Rehabilitative Project;
     Prince George's County, MD, Victim Advocate 
program;
     Suffolk County, NY, District Attorney Office for 
Senior Abuse Unit;
     Chicago, IL, metropolitan domestic violence 
program;
     Chicago, IL, CAPS program for at-risk youth;
     Harris County, TX, Special Crime Task Force;
     East Stroudsburg, PA, Cyber Crime and Forensics 
Institute;
     Luzerne County, PA, Drug Court Program;
     Northwest, OH, program for at-risk youth;
     John Jay College Crime Prevention and Control 
Center;
     RI Family Court for Mental Health Court;
     Bridges to Success Transitional Project parolees 
program;
     Safe and Clean Detroit Initiative;
     Wayne County, MI, Jail Diversion Assistance 
Initiative;
     East Bay, CA, Community Law Center;
     Youth Uprising project for at-risk youth and young 
adults;
     NY Women's Justice Center;
     Rockland County, NY, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Westchester and Rockland County, NY, for crime 
prevention programs;
     Westchester County, NY, for criminal intelligence 
fusion center;
     Stoughton, MA, for Community Policing initiative;
     NY Education Outreach for at-risk youth and 
adults;
     The Doe Fund;
     Hispanic Counseling Center for Mental Health 
Domestic Violence Program;
     Seattle, WA, Police Department for at-risk youth 
programs;
     MA Tech Mission for at-risk youth programs;
     NY Domestic Violence Legal Connection;
     Unity House of Troy, NY, Victims of Domestic 
Violence progam;
     Solano County, CA, Probation Department;
     Fairmont State College program for law enforcement 
personnel computational tools;
     Glenville State College program for criminal 
justice and overcoming geographical challenges in support of 
law enforcement communications systems;
     National White Collar Crime Center;
     Salvation Army of Wheeling, WV, program for 
domestic violence;
     Steganography Analysis Research Center;
     West Liberty State College program for law 
enforcement technology commercialization and corrections 
training;
     West Virginia University programs for law 
enforcement biometric analysis systems and environments, public 
safety personnel protection system, and law enforcement 
information technology and analysis program
     Kansas City, KS, Police Department for the Victims 
Services Unit
     Wyandotte County, KS, Neighborhoods NOW program;
     John Jay College of Criminal Justice;
     Springfield, MA, for law enforcement equipment;
     Westfield, MA, law enforcement training program;
     WI Alliance for Children and Families;
     Berkshire, MA, for law enforcement training;
     Back on Track program for at-risk youth;
     CA Department of Justice crime scene response;
     San Francisco, CA, Ex-Offender Re-entry Services;
     STP for legal programs;
     Willmar, MN, for anti-gang programs;
     Native Americans into Law Program at the 
University of North Dakota;
     Phoenix House, NY;
     STRIVE program;
     Fairleigh Dickinson University Computer Forensics 
Laboratory;
     Asian Pacific Womens Center for domestic violence 
programs, CA;
     Bienestar programs for at-risk youth, CA;
     Resource Center on Workplace Violence, CA;
     Hennepin County, MN, Automated Criminal Charging 
Project;
     City of South Gate, CA;
     Anaheim, CA, Family Justice Center;
     Eastern Montgomery County, PA, for law enforcement 
training activities;
     Girls Incorporated for at-risk youth programs, VA;
     Citizens Advice Bureau, NY;
     CONNECT Domestic Violence Program, NY;
     Dominican Women's Development Center, NY;
     The Bronx Coalition, NY;
     Urban Justice Center, NY;
     Buffalo City, NY, domestic violence program;
     Arkansas Criminal Justice Institute for law 
enforcement training;
     Los Angeles, CA, Domestic Abuse Response Team;
     Lancaster County, SC, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement training;
     Mahoning County, OH, for anti-drug programs;
     Essex County, MA, Sheriff's Office for anti-drug 
programs;
     State of New Mexico Narcotics Section for anti-
drug programs;
     Maryland Regional Gang Initiative;
     Winston-Salem & Forsyth County, NC, for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Center Point, CA, for re-entry services;
     Washington County, OR, drug court;
     Plymouth County, MA, domestic violence program;
     Philadelphia, PA, domestic violence program;
     Ready4Work juvenile offender re-entry program; and
     Ouachita County, AR, Sheriff's Department.
    State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.--The 
recommendation provides $405,000,000 for the State Criminal 
Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) for reimbursement to States 
for the costs of incarceration of criminal aliens, which was 
again proposed for elimination in the budget request. The 
recommendation provides a $5,173,000 increase above the fiscal 
year 2006 level.
    Southwest Border Prosecutions.--The Committee recommends 
$30,000,000 to provide assistance to State and local law 
enforcement agencies (including prosecutors, probation 
officers, courts, and detention facilities) along the southwest 
border with the handling and processing of drug and alien cases 
referred from Federal arrests. The recommendation is $383,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 level.
    Victims of Trafficking.--The recommendation includes 
$21,488,000 to enhance State and local efforts to combat 
trafficking of persons, as authorized by section 204 of the 
Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005 
(Public Law 109-164), and to conduct comprehensive research and 
statistical review of sex trafficking and unlawful commercial 
sex acts in the United States, as authorized by section 201 of 
Public Law 109-164. The amount provided is $11,616,000 above 
the enacted level and the same as the request. The Committee 
encourages the Department of Justice to work with the 
Department of State and the Department of Health and Human 
Services to strengthen anti-trafficking training programs.
    State Prison Drug Treatment.--The recommendation includes 
$5,000,000 for state prison drug treatment programs, which is 
$5,000,000 over the request.
    Drug Courts.--The recommendation includes $40,000,000 for 
the drug court program, which is $30,128,000 above the current 
year.
    Harold Rogers Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.--The 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the Harold Rogers 
Prescription Drug Monitoring Program to assist States in 
building or enhancing prescription drug monitoring systems, 
facilitating the exchange of information among States, and 
providing technical assistance and training on establishing and 
operating effective prescription drug monitoring programs. The 
Committee expects that OJP will continue to work with the DEA 
to implement this program. This amount is $2,596,000 above the 
enacted level and $81,000 above the request.
    Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution.--The Committee's 
recommendation provides $22,943,000 to implement the Prison 
Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law 108-79). This amount 
is $5,000,000 above the enacted level and $20,959,000 above the 
request. The Committee is disappointed that the 
Administration's request significantly reduces funding for the 
program and fears that this action demonstrates a lack of 
commitment to fully implement the Prison Rape Elimination Act.
    The recommendation provides $14,768,000 for the collection 
of statistics, data and research; $1,000,000 for the National 
Institute of Corrections for a national clearinghouse, 
training, and education; $5,000,000 for grants to States to 
protect inmates and safeguard communities; and $2,175,000 to be 
transferred to the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission.
    The Committee understands that experts have conservatively 
estimated that at least 13 percent of the inmates in the United 
States have been sexually assaulted in prison and that many 
inmates have suffered repeated assaults. Under this estimate, 
nearly 200,000 inmates now incarcerated have been, or will be, 
the victims of prison rape. The total number of inmates who 
have been sexually assaulted in the past twenty years likely 
exceeds 1,000,000. The Committee understands that prison rape 
contributes to the spread of sexually-transmitted diseases, 
such as HIV and AIDS. The Committee also recognizes that 
mentally ill and juvenile inmates are particularly vulnerable 
to sexual victimization. The Committee further understands that 
most prison staff are not adequately trained or prepared to 
prevent, report, or treat inmate sexual assaults, and that 
prison rape often goes unreported. The Committee looks forward 
to the recommendations of the National Prison Rape Elimination 
Commission and the data collected by the Bureau of Justice 
Statistics (BJS) to further illuminate the problem and identify 
ways to improve the Nation's prison system. The Committee hopes 
that BJS will work to address the concerns raised by the Prison 
Rape Elimination Commission on the question order of the 2006 
National Inmate Survey of Sexual Assault so that the results 
will be consistent with the intent of the Congress and will 
fully display the prevalence of prison rape.
    Capital Litigation.--The recommendation includes $2,000,000 
for capital litigation improvement grants. This amount is 
$1,013,000 over the enacted level.
    Improving State and Local Law Enforcement Intelligence 
Capabilities.--The recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the 
implementation of the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing 
Plan and the efforts of the Global Justice Information Sharing 
Initiative. The Committee directs that this funding be used to 
support training for State and local law enforcement on the 
intelligence process, including planning, collection, analysis, 
dissemination and reevaluation. This program should continue to 
provide support for training in the use of intelligence as a 
tool in identifying pre-incident indicators. It should also 
include training to ensure that law enforcement officials are 
protecting individuals' privacy, civil rights, civil liberties, 
and constitutional rights while gathering intelligence. The 
Committee also expects these funds to be available to promote 
the use of information technology standards among law 
enforcement to ensure that that data can be exchanged across 
disparate information systems.
    Mentally-Ill Offenders.--The Committee is concerned about 
the effects of the criminal justice system on the mentally-ill. 
The recommendation includes $5,000,000 for grants authorized by 
the Mentally Ill Offender Act of 2004.
    Sex Offender Registry.--The recommendation includes 
$1,984,000, as requested, for the training and technical 
activities of the Comprehensive Sex Offender Management 
initiative as well as the implementation and maintenance of a 
national citizen access portal for public State sex offender 
registries.

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $570,545,000 for the 
Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program for fiscal 
year 2007, which is $98,355,000 above the current year and 
$468,449,000 above the request. The table below displays 
funding for programs recommended under this heading compared to 
the funding requested for the same activities under this 
heading and under the Justice Assistance account.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  FY 2006      FY 2007        FY 2007
            Program               enacted     request\1\  recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Training and Technical                3,949        3,997          3,997
 Assistance...................
Tribal Law Enforcement........       14,808       31,065         31,065
Methamphetamine Grants........       62,778       40,084         99,000
Law Enforcement Technologies        138,117  ...........        100,000
 and Interoperable
 Communications...............
Management and Administration.  ...........       26,950         26,950
Bullet-Proof Vests............       29,617        9,820         20,000
Criminal Records Upgrade......        9,872       39,180          4,873
DNA Initiative................      107,145      175,568        175,568
Paul Coverdell Forensic              18,264  ...........  ..............
 Science......................
Crime Identification                 28,407  ...........  ..............
 Technology Act...............
Project Safe Neighborhoods....       14,808       58,523         54,808
Anti-Gang Initiative..........       39,489       14,879       [40,000]
Weed and Seed Program.........  ...........       49,348         49,348
Offender Re-Entry.............        4,936       14,879          4,936
                               -----------------------------------------
    Total.....................      472,190  ...........       570,545
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Some programs shown for display purposes only. They were in the
  budget request but under other account headings.

    Tribal Law Enforcement.--The recommendation includes 
$31,065,000 for tribal law enforcement efforts, which is the 
same as the request. The recommendation combines funds in this 
heading with funds previously appropriated under State and 
Local Law Enforcement Assistance. These funds are intended to 
meet the most pressing needs of tribes, including law 
enforcement hiring, equipment, and training, court improvement 
projects, and alcohol and substance abuse reduction programs. 
Within the funds provided, tribal special enforcement agencies 
shall be eligible for funding.
    Methamphetamine Enforcement and Clean-Up.--The Committee 
recommends $99,000,000 for grants to address public safety and 
methamphetamine manufacturing, sale, and use in ``hot spots,'' 
including reimbursement of the Drug Enforcement Administration 
(DEA) for expenses related to the clean-up of methamphetamine 
clandestine labs. This amount is $36,222,000 above the enacted 
level and $58,916,000,000 above the request. The Committee is 
aware that the production, trafficking, and abuse of 
methamphetamine, an extremely destructive and addictive 
synthetic drug, continues to be a serious national problem.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee has included 
$20,000,000 to reimburse the DEA for assistance to State and 
local law enforcement for proper removal and disposal of 
hazardous materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs, 
including funds for training, technical assistance, a container 
program, and purchase of equipment.
    The Committee expects the COPS Program Office, in 
consultation with DEA, to examine each of the following 
proposals, to provide grants if warranted, and to submit a 
report to the Committee on its intentions for each proposal:
     Virginia State Police for the NW Virginia Regional 
and Harrisonburg Drug Task Forces to combat meth;
     Partnership for a Drug Free America;
     Louisiana Methamphetamine Task Force;
     Macon County, NC, Methamphetamine Initiative;
     Lamar County, AL, Sheriff's Office;
     Etowah County, AL, Commission for Drug Enforcement 
Unit;
     South Central Missouri Drug Task Force;
     Southeast Missouri Drug Task Force;
     Mineral Area, MO, Drug Task Force;
     Kentucky MethCheck;
     Anti-meth activities in Montana;
     Bradford County, PA, Sheriff's Office for a 
methamphetamine initiative;
     Tennessee Statewide Methamphetamine Task Force;
     Metro Drug Task Force, Kanawha County, WV;
     Polk County, FL, Sheriff's Office Methamphetamine 
Project;
     Hillsborough County, FL, Sheriff's Office for a 
methamphetamine initiative;
     Bibb County, AL, for a methamphetamine eradication 
program;
     Jefferson County, CO, Methamphetamine Response 
Collaborative;
     Arkansas Meth Hot Spots Initiative;
     Criminal Justice Institute, AR, for 
Methamphetamine Education and Training;
     TEMPEST for on-going anti-meth activities in PA;
     Pennsylvania Attorney General for anti-meth 
activities;
     Northern Kentucky Drug Strike Force;
     Bucks County, PA, for a methamphetamine 
initiative;
     Nebraska State Patrol for a methamphetamine 
initiative;
     Boys and Girls Home of Nebraska for anti-meth 
activities;
     Partnership Carson City, NV, Anti-Meth Coalition;
     Franklin County, MO, for an anti-methamphetamine 
initiative;
     State of Iowa for Community Meth Enforcement 
Teams;
     Daviess County, KY, for Regional Methamphetamine 
Eradication;
     Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drug 
Control;
     California Methamphetamine Strategy;
     Washington State University for methamphetamine 
research;
     Spokane County, WA, for anti-meth activities;
     Washington State Methamphetamine Initiative;
     Coconino County, AZ, for a methamphetamine 
initiative;
     State of New Mexico for anti-meth activities;
     Hillsdale County, MI, for a drug enforcement team;
     Sangamon County, IL, for anti-meth activities;
     Indiana Criminal Justice Institute;
     Integrating Systems Against Methamphetamine Abuse 
at the University of Nebraska;
     Pennyrile Narcotics Task Force, KY;
     Riverside County, CA, Drug Endangered Children;
     University of Nebraska for research on a 
methamphetamine vaccine;
     Crittenden County, AR, Sheriffs Office Narcotics 
Department;
     Second Judicial District, AR, Drug Task Force;
     Grady County, GA, Sheriffs Office Meth program;
     Multnomah County, OR, Comprehensive Stomp Out Meth 
Project;
     St. Louis County, MO, meth project;
     Franklin County, IL, Sheriff's Department to 
combat meth;
     Union County, IL, Sheriff's Department to combat 
meth;
     Colbert County, AL, Sheriffs Office;
     Madison-Morgan County, AL, Strategic Counter Drug 
Team;
     Morgan County, AL, Sheriff's Office special meth 
response team;
     Scottsboro, AL, Police Department;
     McMullen County, TX, for drug hot spots;
     14th Judicial District TN Drug and Violent Crime 
Taskforce;
     Lane County, OR, Methamphetamine Abatement 
Initiative;
     South Coast Interagency Narcotics Team (SCINT), 
OR;
     Tennessee 13th Judicial District for meth 
enforcement;
     Tennessee meth educational program;
     Lincoln County, OR, Methamphetamine Initiative;
     Marion County, OR, Kids First Initiative for 
children affected by meth addiction;
     Maine State Police to combat meth abuse;
     Solano County Sheriff's Office multi-
jurisdictional methamphetamine enforcement team (Cal-MMET), CA;
     Crystal meth campaign, NY;
     Northeast Law Enforcement Administrator's Council 
(NLEAC) to combat meth, MN;
     Northwest WI STOP Meth Project;
     White Earth Tribal Nation to combat meth, MN;
     Willmar, MN, meth education;
     Rural Methamphetamine Enforcement--North Dakota;
     Phoenix House, CA, adolescent meth drug treatment;
     Grand Junction, CO, Meth Drug Task Force;
     Missouri Meth Program;
     Jackson County, MS, Sheriff's Office to fight 
meth; and
     18th Judicial District, AR, meth initiative.
    Law Enforcement Technologies and Interoperable 
Communications Program.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$100,000,000 for continued development of technologies and 
automated systems to assist State and local law enforcement 
agencies in investigating, responding to and preventing crimes, 
and gathering and analyzing information, and for the continued 
development of interoperable communications systems for State 
and local law enforcement entities. The recommendation restores 
$100,000,000 above the request. The Committee recognizes the 
importance that sharing information among State and local law 
enforcement agencies can have in preventing crimes and in 
identifying and apprehending criminals. The Department of 
Justice shall continue the interoperable communications grant 
program to the maximum extent possible.
    In examining all grant applications under this program, the 
COPS Office is directed to ensure that proposals meet equipment 
standards adopted by the National Institute of Justice and the 
Bureau of Justice Assistance within the Office of Justice 
Programs and the Office of Law Enforcement Standards within the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee expects the COPS 
office to examine each of the following proposals, to provide 
grants if warranted, if each application complies with the 
direction provided above, and to submit a report to the 
Committee on its intentions for each proposal:
     Statewide records management system for Virginia 
law enforcement;
     Integrated Criminal Justice Information System for 
the State of Virginia;
     Law enforcement communications planning in the 
State of Virginia;
     Town of Basile, LA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Southside Virginia law enforcement agencies for 
law enforcement technologies;
     Lake County, IL, Integrated Criminal Justice 
Information System;
     Northwest Chicago, IL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Melbourne, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Northwest Shoals Community College, AL, for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Law enforcement technologies for the Middle Rio 
Grande Border Region of Texas;
     City of Jacksonville, FL, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Nevada County, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Placer County, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Grass Valley, CA, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Plumas County, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Morris County, NJ, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Sussex County, NJ, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Somerset County, NJ, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     West Essex Portion of Essex County, NJ, Police 
Department for law enforcement technologies;
     Greene County, OH, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Pima County, AZ, for law enforcement technologies;
     Cochise County, AZ, and City of Sierra, AZ, for 
law enforcement technologies;
     Long County, GA, Sheriff's Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Logan County, IL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Adams County, IL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Peoria County, IL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of San Bernardino, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Banning, CA, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Howard County, IA, Sheriff's Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Louisville, KY, Metro Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Stark County, OH, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Wayne County, OH, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Law enforcement initiatives in the State of 
Montana;
     Sedgwick County, KS, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Wichita, KS, Police Department for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Onondaga County, NY, for interoperable 
communications and law enforcement technologies;
     City of Syracuse, NY, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Chattanooga, TN, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     City of Oak Ridge, TN, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     City of Southaven, MS, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Como, MS, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Alcorn County, MS, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Stafford County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Weber County, UT, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Interoperable communications for South Carolina 
law enforcement;
     Jefferson County, WV, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Upshur County, WV, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Norman, OK, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Hialeah, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Klickitat County, WA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     North Central Texas Regional Interoperability 
Project;
     Kane County, IL, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Webb City, MO, law enforcement technologies;
     City of Ozark, MO, law enforcement technologies;
     Mt. Vernon, MO, law enforcement technologies;
     City of Norwalk, CT, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Georgetown Special Taxing District, CT, for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Stamford, CT, for law enforcement technologies;
     Anderson County, SC, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Montgomery County, TN, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Huntington County, IL, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     City of Corona, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Richmond, VA, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Automated Fingerprint Identification System for 
Delaware;
     Cincinnati, OH, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Automated Fingerprint Identification System for 
Cincinnati, OH;
     Midland, TX, for law enforcement technologies;
     State of Wyoming for law enforcement technologies;
     Chesterfield County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Suffolk, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Prince George County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Fairfax County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Prince William County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Fairfax City, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Lehigh Valley Regional Initiative, PA, for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Homestead, FL, for law enforcement technologies;
     City of Virginia Beach, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Norfolk, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Northampton County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Accomack County, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Hampton, VA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Dothan, AL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Florida Integrated Network for Data Exchange and 
Retrieval;
     South Plainfield, NJ, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Clark, NJ, for law enforcement technologies;
     Fanwood, NJ, for law enforcement technologies;
     Edison, NJ, for law enforcement technologies;
     Montgomery Township, NJ, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Springfield Township, NJ, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Bucks County, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Okeechobee County, FL, Sheriff's Department for 
law enforcement technologies;
     Lincoln, NE, for law enforcement technologies;
     Municipality of Arroyo, PR, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Municipality of Luquillo, PR, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Municipality of Manati, PR, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Municipality of Rio Grande, PR, for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Ponce Region, PR, for interoperable communications 
for law enforcement;
     Iredell County, NC, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     West Pikeland Township, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Huron County, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Center Township, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Ross Township, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Cities of Concord, Kannapolis, and Cabarrus 
County, NC, for law enforcement technologies;
     City of Tempe, AZ, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Terre Haute, IN, for law enforcement technologies;
     San Diego, CA, for law enforcement technologies;
     Sevier County, TN, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Tangipahoa Parish, LA, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Town of Canton, CT, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of New Britain, CT, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Town of Southbury, CT, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Rockland County, NY, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Osceola County, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Seminole County, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of St. Cloud, MN, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     Cape May County, NJ, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Cumberland County, NJ, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Calaveras County, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Technology enhancements for law enforcement 
agencies in Northwest Illinois;
     Putnam County, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Shelby Township, Sterling Heights, and Utica, MI, 
for law enforcement technologies;
     City of Chino, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Escambia County, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Larimer County, CO, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Shreveport, LA, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Palmdale, CA, for law enforcement technologies;
     Spokane, WA, Police Department for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Allegheny County, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Penn Township, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     LaPorte County, IN, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     South Bend, IN, for law enforcement technologies;
     City of Livermore, CA, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     San Joaquin County, CA, for interoperable 
communications for law enforcement;
     City of Morgan Hill, CA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Pierce County, WA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Town of Windham, CT, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Will County, IL, for law enforcement technologies;
     Lancaster County, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of York, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Beaumont, TX, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Fresno, CA, for law enforcement technologies;
     City of Rockford, AL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     City of Key West, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Neosho County, KS, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Whitemarsh Township, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Marion County, FL, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Town of Oyster Bay, NY, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     Somerdale, NJ, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Colton, CA, Police Department radio 
interoperability project;
     San Bernadino, CA, District Attorney for 
investigative upgrades;
     Green County, WI, Sheriff's Department for 
computer upgrade;
     Sun Prairie, WI, Police Department for an 
integrated records management system;
     Athens-Clarke County, GA, Police Department for 
law enforcement equipment;
     Richmond County, GA, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Barrington-Inverness, IL, Police Department for 
law enforcement communications;
     Lake Zurich, IL, Police Department for equipment;
     North Las Vegas, NV, Police Department for records 
management;
     Baxter County, AR, for law enforcement 
interoperable communications;
    Guam Police Department for equipment and continued 
development of technologies to improve forensics investigative 
capabilities;
     McAlestar, OK, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Alleghany, Craig, and Henry Counties, VA, for law 
enforcement technology upgrades;
     Lorain County, OH, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Baltimore County, MD, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment upgrades;
     Villa Julie College Forensic Studies;
     City of Stockton, CA, for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Stanislaus County and City of Modesto, CA, for law 
enforcement interoperable communications;
     City of Indianapolis, IN, for law enforcement 
technology;
     Woodford County, KY, for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Government of Virgin Islands for law enforcement 
communications technology;
     Claflin University Forensic DNA laboratory;
     Trident Technical College Forensics DNA 
laboratory;
     Ardmore, AL, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Decatur, AL, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Hartselle, AL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Huntsville, AL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Jackson County, AL, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Lauderdale County, AL, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Lawrence County, AL, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Madison County, AL, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Moulton, AL, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     North Courtland, AL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Rogersville, AL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Saint Florian, AL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Hillsborough, FL, for law enforcement training 
equipment;
     Roane County, TN, for law enforcement 
communications;
     San Diego, CA, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Tacoma, WA, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police 
Chiefs (WASPC) to implement ``30 Day DNA Stranger Rape 
Program'';
     Downriver Community Conference for law enforcement 
equipment, MI;
     Monroe County, MI, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Pittsburgh, PA, for law enforcement equipment;
     Grimes County, TX, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Waco City, TX, Police for law enforcement 
technology improvements;
     Chicago, IL, Police Department Citizen and Law 
Enforcement Analysis & Reporting project;
     Westchester County, NY, Criminal and Counter 
Terrorism Fusion Center;
     San Mateo County, CA, forensics lab;
     Cumberland County, NC, law enforcement 
communications
     Wake County, NC, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Litchfield, IL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     City of Memphis and Shelby County, TN, for law 
enforcement interoperable communications;
     Houston, TX, for law enforcement training & 
equipment;
     West Palm Beach, FL, Police Department for law 
enforcement technology;
     Oglala Sioux criminal justice equipment;
     Buffalo, NY, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Chautauqua County, NY, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Tompkins County, NY, for law enforcement 
communications equipment;
     Cameron County, TX, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Borough of Steelton, PA, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Saint Clair, PA, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Franklin Township, NJ, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Marlboro Township, NJ, Police Department;
     Township of Old Bridge, NJ, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Gladstone, OR, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Woodburn, OR, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Calvert County, MD, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Hyattsville, MD, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Laurel, MD, for law enforcement communications;
     Prince George's County, MD, for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Homewood, IL, for law enforcement communications;
     Matteson, IL, for law enforcement equipment;
     South Suburban Mayors and Managers Association for 
law enforcement equipment, IL;
     New Orleans, LA, Police for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Dallas, TX, for law enforcement equipment;
     Lucas County, OH, Sheriff's Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Toledo, OH, Sheriff's Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Middletown, RI, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Rhode Island State Police for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Tiverton, RI, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Woonsocket, RI, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Flint, MI, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Narragansett, RI, Police Department for law 
enforcement interoperable communications;
     Bellingham, WA, Police Department for law 
enforcement technology equipment;
     Sultan, WA, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Southington, CT, Police Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Macomb County, MI, for law enforcement 
interoperable communications;
     MI cities for law enforcement equipment;
     Brookfield, IL, Police Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Westchester & Rockland County, NY, for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Westchester & Rockland County, NY, for law 
enforcement communications equipment upgrades;
     Lauren's County, GA, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Tifton, GA, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Turner County, GA, Sheriff Office for law 
enforcement technology;
     Twiggs County, GA, Sheriff's Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Wilkinson County, GA, Sheriff's Office law 
enforcement equipment;
     City of South St. Paul, MN, Police Department for 
law enforcement communications;
     Holden, MA, Police for law enforcement equipment;
     Brunswick County, NC, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Law enforcement equipment, NC;
     North Carolina Forensic Science Education and 
Training Program;
     Haverhill, MA, Police Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Middlesex Community College for Regional 
Technology Training Law Enforcement Collaborative;
     Opa-Locka, FL, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Houma Police, LA, Police Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Lafourche, LA, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Solano County, CA, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Cities of Wheeling, Morgantown, Parkersburg, 
Fairmont, Weirton, Moundsville, and Clarksburg, WV, for law 
enforcement technology;
     Fayette, Greene, and Somerset Counties, PA, for 
law enforcement equipment;
     Southwestern, PA, for law enforcement 
technologies;
     St. Louis County, MN, for law enforcement 
communications;
     Bayfield County, WI, for law enforcement 
technology and equipment;
     Chippewa Valley, WI, for law enforcement 
technology and equipment;
     Oneida County, WI, for law enforcement 
interoperable communications;
     Franklin, MA, Regional Council of Governments for 
law enforcement communications;
     Corpus Christi, TX, for law enforcement 
interoperable communications;
     Passaic County, NJ, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Cities of Phoenix and Mesa, AZ, for law 
enforcement interoperable communications;
     Cary, NC, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Durham, NC, Police Department and Durham County, 
NC, Sheriff's office for law enforcement equipment;
     Raleigh, NC, for law enforcement interoperable 
communications;
     Wake County, NC, for law enforcement 
communications;
     ATI for law enforcement equipment;
     Cabell County, WV, for law enforcement 
interoperable communications;
     El Paso, TX, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Fort Lee, NJ, for law enforcement communications;
     Saddle Brook, NJ, Police Department for law 
enforcement interoperable communications;
     Los Angeles, CA, Central City for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Anoka County, MN, Criminal Justice Integration 
Hub;
     Hennepin County, MN, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Minneapolis, MN, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Garden Grove, CA, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Abington Township, PA, Police Department for law 
enforcement equipment;
     Whitemarsh Township, PA, Police Department for law 
enforcement technologies;
     Kenmore, NY, Police Department for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Lewiston, NY, Police Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Monroe County, NY, for law enforcement equipment;
     Auburn, WA, for law enforcement communications;
     Monterey Park, CA, for law enforcement 
interoperable communications;
     City of York, SC, for law enforcement technology;
     Rock Hill, SC, Police Department for law 
enforcement communications;
     Hayward, CA, for law enforcement equipment;
     CCE Central Dispatch Authority for law enforcement 
communications, MI;
     Michigan State Police for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Fairfield, CA, for law enforcement equipment;
     Essex County, MA, Sheriff's Office for law 
enforcement communications;
     Gaithersburg, MD, for law enforcement equipment;
     Lake County, IN, Sheriff's Department for 
interoperable communications;
     North Lake County, IN, for law enforcement 
equipment;
     Gardena, CA, for law enforcement equipment;
     Burbank, Culver City, Glendale, Montebello, and 
Torrance, CA, for law enforcement communications;
     Saginaw, MI, for law enforcement equipment;
     Prince George's County, MD, Police Department for 
law enforcement equipment; and
     Frio County, TX, Sheriff for law enforcement 
communication equipment.
    Bulletproof Vests.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$20,000,000 for continuation of the Bulletproof Vest program to 
assist State and local law enforcement in purchasing bullet and 
stab resistant vests. The Committee recommendation is 
$10,180,000 above the request to support this critical safety 
measure for the Nation's law enforcement officers.
    Criminal History Record Upgrades.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $4,873,000 for the Criminal Records 
Upgrade program. The goal of this program is to ensure that 
accurate records are available for use in law enforcement and 
to permit States to identify ineligible firearm purchasers, 
persons ineligible to hold positions involving children, the 
elderly, or the disabled, and persons subject to protective 
orders or wanted, arrested, or convicted of stalking and/or 
domestic violence. This program helps States build their 
infrastructure to connect to national record check systems both 
to supply information and to conduct the requisite checks.
    DNA Initiative.--The Committee recommendation is 
$175,568,000 for a DNA and forensics initiative, $68,423,000 
above the current year level and the same as the request.
    The recommendation fully funds the next investment to 
eliminate the DNA backlog in five years. The Committee 
recognizes that DNA technology will allow law enforcement to 
identify certain criminals quickly and accurately, solve 
additional crimes, especially violent crimes such as murder and 
rape, and identify persons mistakenly accused or convicted of 
crimes. Funds are available for the following activities: (1) 
reduce the backlog of DNA samples; (2) increase State and local 
lab capacity; (3) conduct research, development, 
demonstrations, and evaluations; (4) provide training and 
technical assistance; (5) identify missing persons and 
unidentified remains; and (6) test DNA after convictions. The 
Committee understands there is a critical need for advanced 
crime scene investigation training and education for local law 
enforcement personnel, and expects support to be given to 
forensic science crime scene investigation for State and local 
law enforcement, including funds for training, education, and 
technical assistance.
    Project Safe Neighborhoods/Anti-Gang Initiative.--The 
Committee recommends $54,808,000 to combat violent crime 
through Project Safe Neighborhoods with a focused effort on 
areas plagued by gangs. Of the amount provided, $40,000,000 
shall be for areas of the country experiencing high gang 
activity. The Committee appreciates and supports the Attorney 
General's efforts to strengthen Department-wide efforts to 
combat gang violence and the appointment of an Assistant U.S. 
Attorney in each judicial district as an anti-gang coordinator 
to prepare a comprehensive, district-wide strategy--in 
consultation with partners from Federal and local law 
enforcement, social services providers, and community and 
faith-based groups--to coordinate anti-gang activity. The 
recommendation includes $40,000,000 for grants to implement 
these strategies. The Committee directs that the remaining 
$14,808,000 provided for Project Safe Neighborhoods will be 
focused on the U.S. cities experiencing a high rate of violent 
and drug trafficking crime involving firearms.
    Offender Re-entry.--The Committee recommends $4,936,000 for 
the law enforcement costs related to establishing offender re-
entry programs, which is the same as the enacted level. 
Offender re-entry programs establish partnerships among 
institutional corrections, community corrections, faith-based 
organizations, social services programs, community policing 
groups, and civic leaders to prepare for the successful return 
of inmates to their home neighborhoods. The Committee expects 
that OJP will continue working in collaboration with the 
Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, Housing and 
Urban Development, and Education in the execution of this 
program.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$280,739,000 for Juvenile Justice Programs for fiscal year 
2007. The budget request proposes to fund juvenile justice 
programs under the Justice Assistance account. The Committee 
recommendation is $57,622,000 below the current year and 
$92,138,000 above the request for similar juvenile justice 
programs. The table below displays the Committee's 
recommendation compared to the levels requested under the 
Justice Assistance heading for the same programs.

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  FY 2006        2007         FY 2007
            Program               enacted     Request\1\  recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Part A--Management and                  703          706            706
 Administration...............
Part B--State Formula.........       78,978       93,187         75,000
Part C--Block Grants..........  ...........       33,452  ..............
 Part D--Research and           ...........       10,034  ..............
 Development..................
Part E--Demonstration Projects      104,674        6,547         59,872
Title V--Incentive Grants.....       64,171       32,004         65,000
Juvenile Mentoring............        9,872  ...........  ..............
Secure Our Schools Act........       14,808  ...........         14,808
Victims of Child Abuse               14,808       11,679         15,000
 Programs.....................
Juvenile Accountability Block        49,361  ...........         49,361
 Grant........................
Project Childsafe.............          987          992            992
                               -----------------------------------------
    Total.....................      338,361  ...........       280,739
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Some programs shown for display purposes only. They were in the
  budget request but under different account headings.

    Within the overall amounts recommended under Part E--
Demonstration Projects, OJP is directed to review the following 
proposals, provide a grant if warranted, and submit a report to 
the Committee on its intentions regarding:
     ChildSave;
     Learning for Life;
     Virginia Attorney General's Office for Class 
Action and other educational programs in Virginia Schools;
     National Character Education Foundation;
     World Vision;
     Eisenhower Foundation;
     Big Brothers/Big Sisters;
     Self-Reliance Foundation for an anti-gang program 
for at-risk youth;
     Law-Related Education;
     Virginia Child Advocacy Center, Rocky Mount, VA;
     Uhlich Children's Advantage Network;
     Girls and Boys Town USA;
     Pace Center for Girls, FL;
     I Have a Dream Foundation, 12th District of TX;
     A Child is Missing, 12th District of TX;
     Wingspan Eon Youth Program, AZ;
     Bethesda Home for Boys, GA;
     Oakland County, MI, for juvenile delinquency 
prevention programs;
     Brooklawn Child and Family Services, KY;
     Maryhurst, KY;
     Father Maloney's Boys Havens, KY;
     Buckhorn Children and Family Services, KY;
     ACA-NY for an anti-drinking campaign;
     Beaver Springs, PA, for an at-risk youth program;
     Northumberland County, PA, Children and Youth;
     Youthville Adoption and Trauma Resource Center, 
KS;
     Florida Venture Foundation Youthbuild Outreach;
     Douglas County, GA, at-risk youth programs;
     Kids Hope United, FL;
     Lighthouse Program, CT;
     Team Focus, Mobile, AL;
     City of Indio, CA, for a juvenile delinquency 
prevention program;
     An Achievable Dream in Newport News, VA;
     ENS Foundation, VA;
     At-risk youth program in Annandale, VA;
     Programs for at-risk youth in Fairfax County, VA;
     Child Abuse Center in Norfolk, VA;
     Pottstown, PA, Police Athletic League;
     Girls, Inc.;
     ACA-NY for an anti-gang initiative;
     The Marcus Institute in Atlanta, GA;
     Southwest Keys Program, TX;
     Youth Pre-Apprenticeship Program of Ohio;
     City of Las Vegas, NV, for a youth initiative;
     Mystic, CT, for an at-risk youth program;
     City Parks of New York for at-risk youth programs;
     OHEL for an at-risk youth and child abuse 
prevention programs, NJ;
     McDuffie County, GA, for an at-risk youth program;
     Minnesota Teen Challenge for at-risk youth 
programs;
     Check 'Em Out, NJ;
     Youth Helpline, NJ, for at-risk youth;
     The College of New Jersey for at-risk youth 
initiatives;
     Boysville, Inc., San Antonio, TX;
     Family and Child Services of Tulsa for at-risk 
youth;
     Youth skills initiative in Dayton, OH;
     EXCEL Program, GA, for at-risk youth;
     Anchorage, AK, for an at-risk youth program;
     Laurinburg, NC, for an at-risk youth program;
     Syracuse, NY, for gang prevention activities;
     Interventions for Juvenile Offenders in New York 
City and Nassau County, NY;
     Civic Justice Corps Project for at-risk youth, NJ;
     Delaware Valley Ready4Work juvenile re-entry 
program;
     City of Fontana, CA, for at-risk youth;
     Rialto, CA, Police Activities League;
    San Bernardino, CA, District Attorney Community Prosecutor 
Program to reduce youth violence;
     AAFAAC for at-risk youth, CA;
     South Los Angeles, CA, for at-risk youth;
     WII for at-risk teenagers in Los Angeles, CA;
     Las Vegas, NV, Anti-Gang Youth Initiative;
     Youth Entrepreneurial Training (YET) Program for 
at-risk youth in CA;
     Albany, GA, Communities in Schools program for at-
risk youth;
     Americus, GA, LEAP/Communities in Schools program 
for at-risk youth;
     Dougherty County, GA, Child Felony Program;
     Family Center of Columbus, GA, for at-risk youth;
     Quitman County, GA, Family Connection Project for 
at-risk youth;
     Rainbow program for at-risk youth, GA;
     Terrell County, GA, Family Connection program for 
at-risk youth;
     Thomasville, GA, Cultural Center program for at-
risk children;
     Creative Visions for at-risk youth in Polk County, 
IA;
     Iowa Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy 
(ODCP) for Drug Endangered Children Teams;
     Juvenile Justice Education Program Model Study, 
FL;
     Orange County, FL, for law enforcement equipment/
for at-risk youth;
     Akron, OH, program for at-risk youth;
     Boston Youth and Gang Strategic Crime Initiative;
     RFB&D; New England program for at-risk and 
incarcerated youth;
     Baltimore City, MD, for programs to prevent youth 
violence;
     A Better Way for at-risk youth, SC;
     Columbia, SC, Urban League for at-risk youth;
     Service Over Self for at-risk youth, SC;
     South Sumter, SC, Resource Center for at-risk 
youth;
     Team Focus for at-risk youth, SC;
     Wayne County, MI, for the Truancy Reduction 
Initiative;
     AL program for child victims of physical and 
sexual abuse;
     Child Abuse Program at National Children's 
Advocacy Center;
     AL Girls Inc. for at-risk youth programs;
     Baltimore, MD, TWIGS (To Work in Gaining Skills) 
Program for at-risk children;
     Alabama Juvenile Delinquency Prevention 
Initiative;
     Sankofa Safe Child Initiative for at-risk youth, 
IL;
     Tampa, FL, for delinquency prevention program for 
at-risk youth;
     Children's Initiative to target first-time 
juvenile, non-violent offenders, CA;
     Denver, CO, Road Home Program for at-risk youth;
     Mashpee Wampanoag Youth Program for at-risk youth, 
MA;
     AMISTAD program for at-risk youth, CT;
     Public Allies program for at-risk youth, CT;
     Washington State program for at-risk youth;
     Gwen's Girls program for at-risk youth, PA;
     Texas A&M; University youth re-entry program;
     Chicago, IL, ASM Program for at-risk youth;
     Butler Child Advocacy Center;
     Decatur, IL, mentoring program for at-risk youth;
     Martin Luther King Center for youth mentoring for 
at-risk youth, IL;
     Monterey County, CA, Street Violence and Anti-Gang 
Project;
     Philadelphia, PA, CORE for at-risk youth;
     San Antonio, TX, initiative for at-risk girls;
     Alief Drug Free program, TX;
     Newburgh, NY, Youth Violence and Gang Prevention 
Program;
     Dauphin County, PA, program for at-risk youth;
     New Jersey Educational Opportunity Fund Most At-
Risk Student program;
     San Jose, CA, BEST Program for at-risk youth;
     Family Service League of Suffolk County, NY, to 
address problems related to at-risk youth;
     Big Brothers of Rhode Island programs for at-risk 
youth;
     Cityyear, RI, programs for at-risk youth;
     Kidspeace, RI, programs for at-risk youth;
     Providence, RI, Juvenile Justice Program;
     United Way of Rhode Island programs for at-risk 
youth;
     Citizen and Youth Police Academies, MI;
     WI Stepping Stones Child Advocacy Center;
     The Mentoring Center program for young parolees, 
CA;
     GA Girls, Inc. programs for at-risk youth;
     GA Realizing the Dream project to mentor at-risk 
youth;
     San Jose, CA, for Youthful Offenders program;
     AMB educational programs for at-risk youth, NY;
     NY Young Women's program for at-risk youth;
     RTC NY for at-risk youth;
     Sandy City, UT, Police Department for at-risk 
youth programs;
     Sacramento, CA, Police Department Gang 
Intervention and Prevention Program;
     5 Towns Community Center for At-Risk Youth 
Development and Education Project, NY;
     Eastern Baptist Association for at-risk youth 
development initiative;
     Hagedorn Family Resource Center for prevention 
programs for at-risk children;
     Freeport Pride/Nassau County, NY, Probation 
Department, Family Division;
     Gateway, NY, at-risk youth outreach;
     Albany, NY, Police Athletic League;
     Albany, NY, Teen Challenge for at-risk youth drug 
prevention outreach;
     Office of the Queens County, NY, District Attorney 
Youth Violence Intervention and Prevention Initiative;
     South Queens, NY, for at-risk youth;
     Shields for Families for at-risk youth, CA;
     Children's Home of Wheeling, WV, for at risk youth 
program;
     Harmony House of Wheeling, WV, for at risk youth 
programs;
     Kaleidoscope Community Learning Center for at risk 
youth programs;
     The Shack Neighborhood House for at risk youth 
programs;
     Vision Appalachia for at risk youth program;
     Wheeling, WV, Florence Crittendon program for at 
risk youth;
     Rosalie Manor Community & Family Services 
mentoring program for at-risk youth, WI;
     At-risk youth programs in Alexandria, VA;
     Arlington, VA, Brigade programs for at-risk youth;
     Fairfax Partnership for at-risk youth, VA;
     Liberty's Promise services for at-risk youth, VA;
     Challenge Program for at-risk high school 
students, PA;
     Pomona Parents in Action Project for gang 
prevention program, CA;
     Phoenix House, MA, program for at-risk youth;
     One-on-One Connecting Cops & Kids, DC;
     Fitchburg, MA, Police Department for at-risk youth 
program;
     Franklin Community Action programs for at-risk 
youth, MA;
     Franklin, MA, Community Coalition for Teens for 
at-risk youth program;
     Gladys Allen Brigham Community Center programs to 
reduce youth violence, MA;
     Holyoke, MA, at-risk youth program;
     Adjudicated Youth Program at Texas A&M; Corpus 
Christi;
     Southwest Key Program for at-risk youth, TX;
     College for Teens program for at-risk youth, NJ;
     AZ Operation Quality Time program for at-risk 
youth;
     Project Avary for at-risk youth, CA;
     San Francisco, CA, District Attorney's office for 
programs to reduce youth violence;
     Sheriff's Youth Programs of Minnesota;
     ND I-SAFE program;
     Alianza Dominicana program for at-risk youth, NY;
     Armory Foundation programs for at-risk youth, NY;
     NY I Have A Dream Foundation program for at-risk 
youth;
     Police Athletic League of New Jersey;
     Eastlake, CA, Juvenile Law and Policy Center;
     LA Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA);
     Beloved Community Family Services for youth ex-
offenders or at-risk youth programs, IL;
     MN Folwell Neighborhood Association for at-risk 
youth programs;
     Willowbrook, CA, Youth Safety Program focusing on 
gang and violence prevention;
     Phoenix Academy of Orange County, CA for at-risk 
youth;
     City of Barre, VT, for at-risk youth programs;
     Rural VT at-risk youth crime prevention programs;
     Vermont Coalition of Teen Centers for at-risk 
youth programs;
     Vermont Development Center for at-risk youth crime 
prevention programs;
     Vermont youth crime prevention programs;
     IL Restorative Justice program for at-risk youth;
     Asian Youth Center of San Gabriel, CA, at-risk 
youth program;
     PMI education program for youth referred by 
juvenile domestic courts;
     Richmond, VA, at-risk youth programs;
     Southeastern Tidewater Opportunity Project for at-
risk youth, VA;
     Abraham House programs for at-risk youth, NY;
     Latino Pastoral Action Center programs for at-risk 
and high-risk youth, NY;
     Mary Mitchell Family and Youth Center for at-risk 
youth, NY;
     Mount Hope Project READY for at-risk youth, NY;
     Point Community Development Center programs for 
at-risk youth, NY;
     S & B united anti-gang and anti-drug program, NY;
     SF Inc., NY, anti-drug programs;
     South Bronx, NY, Community Center programs for at-
risk youth;
     Youth Ministries for Justice programs for at-risk 
youth, NY;
     Friends of Child Advocates of Los Angeles County, 
CA;
     Project Amiga in South El Monte, CA, for juvenile 
offenders program;
     Alameda County, CA, Child Protective Services;
     Bedford-Stuyvesant, NY, Teen Development program 
for at-risk youth;
     NY Technology Service Corps program for at-risk 
youth;
     Cleveland, OH, Eastside Ecumenical Consortium for 
at-risk youth program;
     Cleveland, OH, learning program for at-risk youth;
     Northeast Conference for Community and Justice 
Youth Diversity Program for at-risk youth, OH;
     Brooklyn, NY, Council program for at-risk youth;
     Brooklyn, NY/Red Hook Rise Police Athletic League;
     North Brooklyn, NY, Creative Development Center 
programs for at-risk youth;
     Edgewater Systems, IN, at-risk youth programs;
     Santa Monica, CA, programs for at-risk youth;
     NY Homes With a Heart program for at-risk youth;
     Town of Warwick, RI, at-risk youth program;
     Baltimore, MD, at-risk youth program;
     Bronx, NY, training program for at-risk youth;
     Gaithersburg, MD, Youth Center at-risk youth 
initiative;
     South Bronx, NY, at-risk youth programs;
     VIVA Initiative for at-risk youth, FL and NM;
     PA program for at-risk youth;
     Queens, NY, at-risk youth programs; and
     Pelham Parkway ARISE at-risk youth program, NY.
    Gang Prevention.--Within the level provided under Title V 
grants, the Committee includes $20,000,000, as authorized by 
Public Law 109-162, for OJP to administer a gang resistance and 
education program, known as GREAT. The GREAT program is a 
school-based, law enforcement officer-instructed classroom 
curriculum. The program's primary objective is prevention and 
is intended as an immunization against delinquency, youth 
violence, and gang membership. The Committee supports the work 
of this program as part of an integrated anti-gang strategy of 
prevention, enforcement, and interdiction.
    Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws.--In order to address the 
problem of alcohol abuse by minors and the accessibility of 
alcohol to minors, the Committee recommends $25,000,000 within 
the recommended level for Title V grants to assist States to 
develop comprehensive and coordinated initiatives to enforce 
State laws that prohibit the sale or consumption of alcoholic 
beverages to minors. This amount is $334,000 above the enacted 
level and $25,000,000 above the request.
    Secure Our Schools Act.--The recommendation includes 
$14,808,000 for expenses authorized by the Secure Our Schools 
Act (Public Law 106-386), such as metal detectors, locks, 
lighting and other deterrent measures; security assessments; 
security training of personnel and students; and coordination 
with local law enforcement. The recommendation is the same as 
the current year level.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee recommends a 
total of $15,000,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act (VOCA), which is $192,000 above 
the enacted level and $3,321,000 above the request. The 
Committee expects OJP to allocate the funds as described in the 
statement of managers accompanying the Department of Justice 
Appropriations Act, 2006.
    Juvenile Accountability Block Grants.--The recommendation 
provides $49,361,000 for the Juvenile Accountability Block 
Grants program, which is $49,361,000 above the request and the 
same as the current year level. The funds provided in this 
program are available for the following purposes:
          (1) Developing, implementing, and administering 
        graduated sanctions for juvenile offenders;
          (2) Building, expanding, renovating, or operating 
        temporary or permanent juvenile correction, detention, 
        or community corrections facilities;
          (3) Hiring juvenile court judges, probation officers, 
        and court-appointed defenders and special advocates, 
        and funding pretrial services (including mental health 
        screening and assessment) for juvenile offenders, to 
        promote the effective and expeditious administration of 
        the juvenile justice system;
          (4) Hiring additional prosecutors, so that more cases 
        involving violent juvenile offenders can be prosecuted 
        and case backlogs reduced;
          (5) Providing funding to enable prosecutors to 
        address drug, gang, and youth violence problems more 
        effectively and for technology, equipment, and training 
        to assist prosecutors in identifying and expediting the 
        prosecution of violent juvenile offenders;
          (6) Establishing and maintaining training programs 
        for law enforcement and other court personnel with 
        respect to preventing and controlling juvenile crime;
          (7) Establishing juvenile gun courts for the 
        prosecution and adjudication of juvenile firearms 
        offenders;
          (8) Establishing drug court programs for juvenile 
        offenders that provide continuing judicial supervision 
        over juvenile offenders with substance abuse problems 
        and the integrated administration of other sanctions 
        and services for such offenders;
          (9) Establishing and maintaining a system of juvenile 
        records designed to promote public safety;
          (10) Establishing and maintaining interagency 
        information-sharing programs that enable the juvenile 
        and criminal justice systems, schools, and social 
        services agencies to make more informed decisions 
        regarding the early identification, control, 
        supervision, and treatment of juveniles who repeatedly 
        commit serious delinquent or criminal acts;
          (11) Establishing and maintaining accountability-
        based programs designed to reduce recidivism among 
        juveniles who are referred by law enforcement personnel 
        or agencies;
          (12) Establishing and maintaining programs to conduct 
        risk and need assessments of juvenile offenders that 
        facilitate the effective early intervention and the 
        provision of comprehensive services, including mental 
        health screening and treatment and substance abuse 
        testing and treatment to such offenders;
          (13) Establishing and maintaining accountability-
        based programs that are designed to enhance school 
        safety;
          (14) Establishing and maintaining restorative justice 
        programs;
          (15) Establishing and maintaining programs to enable 
        juvenile courts and juvenile probation officers to be 
        more effective and efficient in holding juvenile 
        offenders accountable and reducing recidivism; or
          (16) Hiring detention and corrections personnel, and 
        establishing and maintaining training programs for such 
        personnel to improve facility practices and 
        programming.
    Media violence.--The Committee remains concerned about 
violent media and its effects on children and thanks the 
Department of Justice for its efforts to publicize potential 
harmful effects on children of media violence.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$73,828,000 for the Public Safety Officers Benefits program, 
the amount requested for these programs. The budget proposed to 
consolidate these programs under the Justice Assistance 
heading. The recommendation includes $65,000,000, which is the 
Congressional Budget Office's estimate for death benefits to 
eligible survivors of Federal, State, and local public safety 
officers whose death was the direct and proximate result of 
traumatic injury sustained in the line of duty. This program is 
considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes.
    The recommendation also includes $4,007,000 for the Public 
Safety Officers Educational Assistance Program and $4,821,000 
for disability benefits for fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee expects the Department of Justice to work 
swiftly toward full implementation of the Hometown Heroes 
Survivors Benefits Act.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee has included the following general provisions 
for the Department of Justice in this bill:
    Section 101 continues language, making up to $60,000 of the 
funds appropriated to the Department of Justice available to 
the Attorney General for reception and representation expenses, 
as requested.
    Section 102 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, prohibiting the use of funds to perform 
abortions in the Federal Prison System.
    Section 103 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, prohibiting the use of the funds in this 
bill to require any person to perform, or facilitate the 
performance of, an abortion.
    Section 104 provides language, included in previous 
Appropriations Acts, stating that nothing in the previous 
section removes the obligation of the Director of the Bureau of 
Prisons to provide escort services to female inmates who seek 
to obtain abortions outside a Federal facility.
    Section 105 provides requested language, modified from the 
previous year, allowing the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between any appropriation, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 106 provides for the extension of the Personnel 
Management Demonstration Project for certain positions of the 
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, as 
requested.
    Section 107 continues language prohibiting funds from being 
used to transport prisoners classified as a maximum or high 
security prisoner to a facility other than a prison or other 
facility certified by the Federal Bureau of Prisons as 
appropriately secure for housing such a prisoner.
    Section 108 continues language concerning the prohibition 
of certain prisoner amenities.
    Section 109 provides language regarding the application of 
reprogramming procedures for e-government initiatives.
    Section 110 provides new language prohibiting the use of 
funds for SENTINEL or other major new or enhanced information 
technology programs unless the Deputy Attorney General and the 
Department IT Investment Review Board certify to the Committees 
on Appropriations that the information technology program has 
appropriate contractor oversight mechanisms in place, and that 
the program is compatible with the enterprise architecture of 
the Department of Justice.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$5,963,786,000 in general purpose discretionary funds for the 
programs of the United States Trade Representative, the 
International Trade Commission and the Department of Commerce 
for fiscal year 2007, $619,184,000 below the current year level 
including supplemental appropriations, and $323,733,000 below 
the request.

                  Trade and Infrastructure Development


                            RELATED AGENCIES


            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $46,207,000 for the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) for 
fiscal year 2007, which is $2,000,000 above the current year 
and $4,010,000 above the request.
    The Committee is concerned that the United States trade 
deficit with other nations continues to rise. In 2005, the 
United States imported $202 billion more in goods and services 
from the People's Republic of China (PRC) than the PRC imported 
in goods and services from the United States, an increase of 18 
percent from the current year. The Committee urges the USTR to 
take action to ensure countries, including the PRC, are 
fulfilling their commitments to the World Trade Organization 
(WTO), including the safeguards delineated under the Trade Act 
of 1974 to address the disruptions resulting from unbalanced 
trade with the PRC. Language is included designating $2,000,000 
for negotiating, monitoring, and enforcing trade agreements 
with the PRC, as requested.
    The Committee directs the US Trade Representative Office to 
submit a report by June 30, 2007 outlining the planned USTR's 
presence in China to meet the growing needs of U.S. companies 
doing business in China.
    Language is included requiring that all negotiations 
conducted within the World Trade Organization are consistent 
with the negotiating objectives contained in the Trade Act of 
2002.
    Inadequate Budget Requests.--The Committee notes that the 
budget requests for the last five fiscal years have been 
insufficient to meet the operational requirements of the 
Office. Given the expansive trade agenda of the United States, 
the Committee recommendation provides an additional $4,010,000 
or 9.5 percent over the request, and 4.5 percent over the 
current year to maintain current operations of the Office and 
to pay for the increased costs of ongoing and future trade 
negotiations and expanded enforcement efforts. The Committee 
expects the Administration to ensure resources requested in the 
fiscal year 2008 request are sufficient to cover the necessary 
operations of the USTR.
    Intellectual Property Rights (IPR).--Pirating and 
counterfeiting has grown to an estimated $200 billion a year 
problem and the theft of artistic and scientific creation is 
draining our economy. The Committee commends the USTR's efforts 
to conduct a comprehensive review of U.S.-China Trade Relations 
in its ``Entering A New Phase of Greater Accountability and 
Enforcement'' report dated February 2006. The Committee's 
recommendation supports many of the key action items outlined 
in the report, including expansion of USTR enforcement 
capability, expanding USTR capability to obtain and apply 
information on the PRC's trade regime, and expansion of trade 
policy and negotiating capacity in Beijing, China. The 
recommended resource level will also allow for increased 
coordination with other trading partners, increase focus on 
regulatory reform in the PRC, and strengthen U.S. Government 
interagency coordination. Specifically, the Committee has 
included $900,000 for the National Intellectual Property Law 
Enforcement Coordination Council under the Department of 
Commerce heading, and necessary funds for USTR to establish an 
IPR enforcement position in Beijing, China. In addition, under 
Title I of this Act, a program increase of $2,218,000 is 
included for IP investigations and prosecutions by the Justice 
Department.
    Although modest steps have been made to harness U.S. 
Government resources to tackle the problem of IPR piracy by our 
trading partners, the United States has not yet taken an 
intellectual property rights enforcement case to the WTO 
against its trading partners to stem the hemorrhaging of U.S. 
intellectual property. The Committee expects the USTR to use 
all necessary menas to enforce IPR agreements.
    Despite the Committee's inclusion of bill language 
establishing a position of Chief Negotiator for Intellectual 
Property Enforcement in prior years, the position remains 
vacant. The Committee expects the USTR to fill this 
immediately.
    Textiles.--The Committee is aware of concerns about the 
World Trade Organization negotiations concerning textiles and 
apparel. The Committee believes such negotiations should be 
consistent with negotiating objectives contained in the Trade 
Act of 2002 and directs the USTR to report to the Committee 
within 60 days of enactment of this Act, regarding adherence to 
these objectives. Bill language is included regarding this 
matter.
    Reporting Requirements.--The Committee continues its 
direction to the USTR to provide a report to the Committee 
detailing spending plans for all funding provided under this 
heading. This report should display personnel costs, travel 
expenses and overhead costs for the Washington, D.C., 
operation, overhead costs associated with USTR presence in 
Geneva, Switzerland, and the costs associated with ensuring 
greater transparency including the timely publication of 
reports and trade agreements. Further, this report should 
identify costs associated with each programmatic office as 
outlined in the 2005 organizational chart. This report and 
spending plan should be provided to the Committee no later than 
90 days after the enactment of this Act. Further, the Committee 
expects this plan to be updated to reflect the obligation of 
funds on a monthly basis, beginning with the second quarter of 
fiscal year 2007 and presented to the Committee on a monthly 
basis. The Committee reminds the USTR of the requirements, 
including reorganizations, as set forth under section 605 of 
this Act.
    It has been brought to the Committee's attention that the 
USTR may fare better in bringing trade dispute cases to the WTO 
by using additional support from private counsel. In-house 
expertise in long-term, complex WTO dispute cases is difficult 
to maintain in an ever-changing international trade climate. 
Outside counsel in countries such as China, Russia, and Brazil 
could assist with clarification of local laws and regulations, 
enforcement policies and practices, and market conditions. The 
Committee USTR is directed to report back to the Committee on 
the desirability of such a new authority.
    International Standards.--The Committee directs the USTR to 
ensure that U.S. business interests are fully represented in 
international standards negotiations. The Committee directs the 
USTR to collaborate with the Department of Commerce, including 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the 
State Department to reduce trade barriers to U.S. exports. The 
Committee continues its direction to the USTR to ensure U.S. 
standards are adopted in international negotiations.
    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) is 
responsible for developing and coordinating U.S. international 
trade, commodity, and direct investment policy, and overseeing 
negotiations on these topics with other countries. The head of 
USTR is the U.S. Trade Representative, a Cabinet member who 
serves as the President's principal trade advisor, negotiator, 
and spokesperson on trade issues.
    USTR is part of the Executive Office of the President. 
Through an interagency structure, USTR coordinates trade 
policy, resolves disagreements, and frames issues for 
presidential decision. USTR also serves as vice chairman of the 
Overseas Private Investment Corporation, is a non-voting member 
of the Export-Import Bank, and a member of the National 
Advisory Council on International Monetary and Financial 
Policies.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $62,575,000 for the International 
Trade Commission (ITC) for fiscal year 2007, which is $625,000 
above the amount provided in the current year and $1,625,000 
below the request.
    The Committee directs the Commission to provide a spending 
plan for all funding provided under this heading. Further, the 
Committee expects this plan to be updated to reflect the 
obligation of funds on a monthly basis, beginning with the 
second quarter of fiscal year 2007. The Committee reminds the 
Commission of the requirements set forth under section 605 of 
this Act.
    The International Trade Commission is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations; providing the Congress and the President with 
independent, expert technical advice to assist in the 
development and implementation of U.S. international trade 
policy; responding to the Congress and the President on various 
matters affecting international trade; maintaining the 
Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System of 
internationally accepted product nomenclature; providing 
technical assistance to eligible small businesses seeking 
remedies and benefits under the trade laws; and performing 
other specific statutory responsibilities ranging from research 
and analysis to quasi-judicial functions on trade-related 
matters.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommendation includes $424,782,000 in total 
resources for the programs of the International Trade 
Administration (ITA) for fiscal year 2007, which is $23,054,000 
above the current year level and $3,000,000 above the request. 
Of the amounts provided, $13,000,000 is to be derived from fee 
collections.
    The Committee understands the difficulties of attempting to 
balance both the positive and the negative effects of a free 
trade agenda. The Committee is steadfast in its support of 
America's trade policy to create growth and raise living 
standards around the globe, and in return to increase the 
benefits to U.S. workers, farmers, consumers, and businesses. 
The Committee is determined to ensure that the U.S. Government 
upholds its responsibility to enforce trade laws, particularly 
with China. If trading partners do not abide by the rules that 
are set in the global trading system, then U.S. firms are not 
competing on a level playing field. The ITA plays a critical 
role in creating economic opportunity for U.S. workers and 
firms by promoting international trade, opening foreign 
markets, ensuring compliance with trade laws and agreements, 
and supporting U.S. commercial interests at home and abroad. 
The United States government has an obligation to ensure that 
American companies are not forced to compete with foreign 
companies that are engaged in unfair trading practices.
    In light of the vital role ITA has in balancing the U.S. 
trade agenda, the Committee believes the fiscal year 2007 
request is insufficient to fund overseas ongoing operations. 
The U.S. has a historically high trade deficit with our trading 
partners, yet the current budget proposal would necessitate the 
closure of overseas offices that serve U.S. small- and medium-
sized companies in their efforts to compete in a global 
environment. The requested budget level requires the absorption 
of $12,300,000 for adjustments to base including exchange rate 
losses and other inflationary pay costs. The Committee has 
provided an additional $3,000,000 above the request to cover 
the costs of ongoing operations in overseas field offices. In 
addition, the recommendation does not include an additional 
$2,000,000 for increased exports of environmental technologies. 
The Committee believes that offsetting the impact to overseas 
offices is a higher priority for fiscal year 2007. Further, the 
recommendation includes $10,952,000 for the Capital Cost 
Sharing program.
    In the 2004 Appropriations Act, the Committee worked with 
the International Trade Administration to reorganize the agency 
to better respond to U.S. industry concerns. Prior to this 
reorganization, the agency had not reorganized in more than 20 
years, when the U.S. trade deficit was nominal. The Committee 
took this action after receiving numerous complaints from 
small- and medium-sized manufacturers and growers alleging that 
ITA actions, particularly with regard to the People's Republic 
of China (PRC), have been detrimental to American business 
interests. Nearly two years later, the Committee remains 
skeptical that the budget presentation captures the 
reorganization the Committee instructed the agency to 
undertake. Therefore, the Committee directs the Department of 
Commerce to conduct a comprehensive base review of the 
International Trade Administration's budget and report to the 
Committee no later than December 15, 2006, with a budget 
structure that reflects the current operations of the ITA.
    Import Administration.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $61,367,000 for the Import Administration (IA).
    The Committee expects the IA to move expeditiously to 
publish an enforcement policy on duty drawback and is directed 
to provide a report on the status of the policy, including the 
number and nature of the public comments received in response 
to the Federal Register notice. In the interim, the Committee 
reiterates language in the statement of the managers 
accompanying the FY 2006 Appropriations Act that the Department 
is expected to ensure that vigorous enforcement of the dumping 
law at least at the same level as our trading partners' is 
implemented.
    The Committee urges the IA to implement proactive trade 
enforcement activities, including textile safeguard actions 
with respect to China's World Trade Organization Accession 
Agreement, bilateral quotas on non-WTO members, and textile 
provisions of the U.S. preferential programs and agreements.
    Office of China Compliance.--In the FY 2004 Appropriations 
Act, the Committee included language requiring the ITA to 
create an Office of China Compliance to specifically focus on 
issues affecting small- and medium-sized businesses. The 
Committee includes language designating $3,000,000 for this 
Office. The Committee reminds the Department that this Office 
was created to specialize in anti-dumping (AD) cases involving 
China, with special attention on small- and medium-sized 
domestic businesses. The Committee understands that only 
fifteen percent of the analysts in this office have Chinese 
language skills. The Committee continues its direction that the 
Office should consist of experienced investigators, 
accountants, trade analysts, and technical experts to 
aggressively investigate AD cases. The Committee expects to be 
notified of any impediments to hiring or retaining this 
expertise.
    The Committee directs the Department to report to the 
Committee, no later than September 25, 2006, the number of new 
IA investigations for 2005 and planned for 2006.
    Policy and Negotiations.--The Committee continues its 
direction to the IA to analyze market trends in order to 
anticipate unfair trade practices and consult with foreign 
governments to pre-empt the requirement for an unfair trade 
case, whenever practicable. The Committee understands that to 
date the IA has yet to perform such a trend analysis. Further, 
the Committee continues its direction to the ITA to self-
initiate investigations, and report back to the Committee no 
later than September 25, 2006, on the number and descriptions 
of cases the Department has self-initiated.
    Tracking of Inquiries from Small- and Medium-sized 
Companies.--The Committee directs the Department to track all 
inquiries the Department has received from small- and medium-
sized businesses seeking assistance with enforcement of the AD 
laws against imports, including imports from China and India, 
and the resulting actions by the Department on such inquiries. 
The Committee expects the Department to report back to the 
Committee no later than September 25, 2006, on the Department's 
efforts.
    Office of Textiles.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$4,451,000 for the Office of Textiles, as requested.
    Market Access and Compliance.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $40,806,000 for this purpose. The Committee continues 
to support the efforts of the ITA to aggressively enforce trade 
agreements.
    Executive Direction/Administration.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $25,490,000 for the administrative and 
policy functions of ITA.
    In addition, language is included in the bill designating 
the amounts available for each unit within ITA. In addition, 
ITA is directed to submit to the Committee, not later than 60 
days after the enactment of this Act, a spending plan for all 
ITA units that incorporates any carryover balances from prior 
fiscal years. Further, beginning with the second quarter, the 
Committee expects this plan to be updated to reflect the 
obligation of funds on a monthly basis.
    United States and Foreign Commercial Service (US&FCS;).--The 
Committee recommendation includes $249,791,000 for the United 
States and Foreign Commercial Service. The recommendation 
includes $10,952,000 for the capital cost sharing program, as 
requested. The Committee recommendation has included an 
increase of $3,000,000 above the amount requested in the budget 
to cover adjustments to base for the overseas presence, 
including exchange rate losses, domestic and international 
price and pay increases. The Committee is disappointed that 
such costs were proposed to be absorbed by the U.S. and Foreign 
Commercial Service during a time of historic trade deficits. 
The Committee expects the Department to work aggressively to 
fulfill its mission to ``place primary emphasis on the 
promotion of goods and services from the United States, 
particularly small- and medium-sized enterprises, and on the 
protection of U.S. business interests abroad.''
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts to examine 
overseas and domestic staffing to address changes in the global 
marketplace and has provided sufficient resources to maintain 
the existing number of overseas offices. The Committee would 
entertain changes to the existing field office structure but 
reminds the Department that any such changes are subject to 
section 605 of this Act.
    Right-Sizing the Overseas Presence.--The Committee directs 
the ITA to provide a detailed report to the Committee on the 
right-sizing methodology followed to determine the appropriate 
size and location of the Bureau's overseas presence anticipated 
for the next five to ten years. The Committee expects priority 
regions of assistance to include in the most productive markets 
for our U.S. companies. The Committee expects this plan to be 
submitted to the Committee, no later than ninety days after the 
enactment of this Act.
    The Committee is supportive of the Asia-Pacific Partnership 
for Clean Development and Climate, announced on July 15, 2005, 
at an Association of South East Asia Nations (ASEAN) Regional 
Forum Meeting. However, the recommendation does not include 
specific funding to expand U.S. export promotion for cleaner 
energy technologies as this is a core function of the US&FCS;, 
and maintaining existing levels of overseas presence is a more 
urgent requirement for fiscal year 2007 funds.
    Trade Missions.--The Committee continues its direction that 
all trade missions involving Department of Commerce agencies 
must be initiated, coordinated and administered through the 
ITA.
    International Standards.--The Committee directs the 
Department to increase efforts to ensure that U.S. business 
interests are represented in international standards 
negotiations and to collaborate with NIST, the USTR, and the 
State Department on innovative ways to reduce trade barriers to 
U.S. business exports to ensure U.S. standards are adopted in 
international negotiations.
    Travel Expenditures.--The Committee directs the Department 
to increase the number of investigative teams traveling to 
China and India, the sources of most trade complaints, to 
verify documentation of information provided by foreign 
companies. The recommendation provides sufficient resources for 
this purpose and the Committee expects the Department to submit 
quarterly reports to the Committee regarding the ITA's travel 
expenditures, including separate breakouts of funding, number 
of trips, and the purposes of travel to both China and India.
    Capital Security Cost Sharing Program.--The Committee 
remains steadfast in its support of U.S. government-wide 
efforts to ensure personnel assigned overseas to American 
embassies and consulates. After the 1998 bombings of two U.S. 
embassies in East Africa, the U.S. Congress enacted the Secure 
Embassy Construction and Counterterrorism Act of 1999 to 
require the State Department to improve physical security 
overseas and replace embassies that did not meet certain 
security standards. To accelerate this effort, in 1999, the 
State Department launched a security upgrade and construction 
program to begin addressing requirements in more than 260 
embassies and consulates. In 2005, the Congress and the 
Administration codified the Capital Security Cost Sharing 
Program initiative to require all Federal agencies with staff 
overseas to contribute annually towards construction of the new 
facilities based on the number of positions and the type of 
space occupied. This initiative is a major component of the 
President's Management Agenda initiative on Right-sizing, as 
well as the Committee's significant focus to ensure that 
agencies assess the real cost of maintaining staff overseas, 
and adjust overseas staffing levels to the highest priority 
overseas programs. The Committee recommendation includes the 
full request for Capital Security Cost Sharing. Currently, the 
International Trade Administration has 181 offices in 80 
countries around the world. Bill language is included regarding 
this program under Title VI of this Act.
    The recommendation provides funding for an international 
competitiveness program, a rural export program, and two 
textile-related programs.
    Intellectual Property Rights Protection.--In addition, 
under Title I of this Act, a program increase of $2,218,000 is 
included for IP investigations and prosecutions for the Justice 
Department.
    Further, the Committee directs the Department, including 
ITA and USPTO, to establish programs both domestically and 
internationally to provide assistance to small businesses 
seeking to secure their rights abroad. The Committee continues 
to support the new Strategy Targeting Organized Piracy (STOP) 
initiative to target the billions of dollars in global trade in 
pirated and counterfeit goods that cheat American innovators 
and manufacturers and hurt the U.S. economy and endanger 
consumers worldwide. The Committee recommendation includes 
$900,000 for the National Intellectual Property Law Enforcement 
Coordination Council under the Salaries and Expenses, 
Departmental Management heading.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommendation includes a total operating 
level of $76,806,000 for the operations and administration of 
the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), which includes 
$62,039,000 for operations and administration and $14,767,000 
for national security related programs. The recommendation is 
$1,776,000 above the current year level and the same amount 
below the request.
    Overall, the Committee recommendation addresses the 
concerns identified in a number of oversight reports, including 
the Office of Inspector General reports, ``Improvements are 
Needed to Better Enforce Dual-Use Export Control Laws'' and 
``Deemed Export Controls may Not Stop the Transfer of Sensitive 
Technology to Foreign Nations in the U.S.'', and numerous 
United States Government Accountability Office reports. 
Further, the Committee notes that the BIS received accolades, 
in The Report to the President of the United States dated March 
31, 2005, from the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities 
of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction. The 
Committee directs BIS to report to the Committee on efforts to 
achieve the recommendations in these oversight reports not 
later than January 3, 2007.
    Concerns have been raised that the processing time required 
for export licenses may disadvantage U.S. businesses as they 
compete in the global market place. The recommendation will 
assist the BIS to process an increased licensing volume. The 
Committee expects the BIS to effectively manage the dual-use 
export control system by staying abreast of the rapid 
technological changes that shape goods and technologies. The 
Committee urges the BIS to maintain and develop dedicated 
expertise to systematically evaluate control lists, license 
applications, and other functions against the latest 
developments, and prepare for future developments.
    In addition, the Committee reminds the BIS of the 
requirements of section 605 of this Act.
    The Bureau of Industry and Security is responsible for 
protecting U.S. national security and economic interests by 
enhancing the efficiency of the export control system; ensuring 
U.S. industry complies with the Chemical Weapons Convention 
agreement and the Additional Protocol to the International 
Atomic Energy Safeguards Agreement; preventing illegal exports 
and identifying violators of export prohibitions and 
restrictions for prosecution; and enhancing the export and 
transit controls of nations seeking to improve their export 
control systems.

                  Economic Development Administration

    The recommendation includes $260,441,000 for the programs 
and administrative expenses of the Economic Development 
Administration (EDA) for fiscal year 2007, which is $66,726,000 
below the request, and $19,991,000 below the current year 
level. The Committee expects EDA to use all available carryover 
and prior year recoveries to the maximum extent possible.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

    The Committee provides $230,741,000 for the Economic 
Development Assistance program and the Trade Adjustment 
Assistance for Firms program. The Committee continues funding 
for the traditional programs of the EDA to provide needed 
assistance to communities struggling with long-term economic 
dislocation, as well as sudden and severe economic dislocation. 
Of the amounts provided, $139,649,000 is for Public Works and 
Economic Development, $44,222,000 is for Economic Adjustment 
Assistance, $26,000,000 is for planning, $8,000,000 is for 
technical assistance, including university centers, and 
$12,870,000 is for trade adjustment assistance.
    The Committee directs EDA to continue operations and 
funding of the planning grant program for existing and 
designated economic districts in a manner that is consistent 
with the current and ongoing practices, policies and existing 
rules and regulations.
    The Committee continues to expect EDA to assist communities 
impacted by economic dislocations related to coal industry 
downturns due to environmental concerns at no less than the 
fiscal year 2006 level.
    The Committee directs EDA to provide assistance to an 
applicant for planning under this account only if the applicant 
agrees to make available to the public on request their audited 
statements, annual budgets, and minutes of meetings and agrees 
to provide the public reasonable notice of, and an opportunity 
to attend, their meetings. The Committee further directs EDA to 
provide assistance to an applicant for planning under this 
account only after the applicant files appropriate Federal 
financial disclosure statements.
    The Committee continues to direct EDA to ensure that funds 
provided under this account are targeted to the most severely 
distressed areas, which, absent the assistance provided by the 
EDA, would have little or no access to resources for 
infrastructure development and capacity building. This puts the 
program on firm ground to carry out its purpose to provide the 
``seed capital'' to distressed areas to allow local communities 
to increase their ability to create new economic opportunities 
and jobs in accordance with local priorities.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $29,700,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the EDA, the same as the request, and 
$9,000 above the current year level. The Committee continues to 
direct the EDA to aggressively pursue all opportunities for 
reimbursement, deobligations and use of non-appropriated 
resources, including the care and protection of collateral 
accounts, to maximize the operating level.
    Although not specified in the Department's budget request, 
it is the understanding of the Committee that EDA is 
considering the closure of three of its six regional offices: 
Philadelphia, Austin, and Seattle. Regional offices are an 
important link between headquarters in its policymaking role 
and the Economic Development Representatives in the field. The 
Committee believes that these offices are an integral part of 
regional economic development and disagrees with such a plan, 
and therefore directs the EDA to maintain all six regional 
offices.
    In addition, the Committee reminds EDA of the requirements 
under section 605 of this Act regarding reorganization 
proposals.
    The recommendation retains language in the bill to provide 
the authority to use this appropriation to monitor projects 
approved under Title I of the Public Works Employment Act of 
1976, Title II of the Trade Act of 1974, and the Community 
Emergency Drought Relief Act of 1977.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommendation includes $29,641,000 for the 
Minority Business Development Agency for fiscal year 2007. The 
recommendation is the same as the request and the same as the 
current year level. The Committee recommendation assumes 
continuation of the Emerging Minority Business Leaders program 
at the fiscal year 2006 level.

                Economic and Information Infrastructure

    The Committee recommendation includes under this section 
the Department of Commerce agencies responsible for the 
nation's basic economic and technical information 
infrastructure, as well as the administrative functions to 
oversee the development of telecommunications policy.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $79,880,000, which is 
$602,000 above the current year and the same amount below the 
request, for the economic and statistical analysis programs of 
the Department of Commerce, including the Bureau of Economic 
Analysis (BEA), for fiscal year 2007. The Committee 
recommendation supports accurate and timely economic data on 
the changing global economy.
    The Committee recognizes the valuable role the Economic and 
Statistics Administration plays within the Department of 
Commerce by providing executive direction and oversight to the 
Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Census Bureau. The 
Committee intends that the funding level for the Economics and 
Statistics Administration in fiscal year 2007 will be 
sufficient to carry out its mission of providing key 
statistical information to the Executive and Legislative 
branches of the government.
    The Economic and Statistics Administration is responsible 
for the collection, tabulation and publication of a wide 
variety of economic, demographic and social statistics and 
provides support to the Secretary of Commerce and other 
Government officials in interpreting the state of the economy 
and in developing economic policy.

                          Bureau of the Census

    The Committee recommendation includes a total operating 
level of $874,159,000 for the Bureau of the Census, which is 
$4,000,000 below the request and $72,296,000 above the amount 
provided in fiscal year 2006.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $190,067,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Bureau of the Census for fiscal 
year 2007, which is $6,000,000 above the request, and 
$5,433,000 below the current year level. In addition to the 
discretionary appropriations, $20,000,000 is available in 
mandatory funding for the survey of program dynamics and the 
State children's health insurance program. The Committee 
recommendation prioritizes funding associated with the American 
Community Survey as well as the 2010 decennial census.
    The recommendation includes $144,603,000 for current 
economic statistics, $41,741,000 for current demographic 
statistics, and $3,723,000 for survey development and data 
services. Within the amount provided for current economic 
statistics, $28,094,000 is for foreign trade statistics, and 
$23,126,000 is for manufacturing statistics.
    Current survey and statistics.--Within the amounts provided 
for current surveys and statistics, $9,200,000 is included to 
design a new collection system on income and wealth dynamics of 
the country, which will replace the current Survey of Income 
and Program Participation (SIPP). Further, a total of 
$10,000,000 from mandatory funds would be available to 
disseminate data collected from the SIPP in support of 
measuring the impact of welfare provisions. The Committee 
directs the Bureau to work with stakeholders to re-engineer the 
SIPP to develop a more accurate and timely survey to capture 
the economic dynamics of the country. The Committee understands 
the importance of having high-quality policy-relevant data on 
the economic well-being of the U.S. population, such as is 
provided by SIPP. The data gathered by SIPP is important to 
statistical researchers. The Committee concurs with the Census 
Bureau's prioritization of funding for the 2010 decennial and 
the American Community Survey in fiscal year 2007, but concerns 
remain that a data gap may result from the re-engineering of 
the SIPP. Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes an 
additional $10,000,000 above the request to continue SIPP data 
collection while a new survey is designed. The Committee 
expects the Bureau to work expeditiously to re-engineer this 
survey to minimize any gaps in data.
    The Committee directs the Bureau to continue to streamline 
and prioritize programs to ensure the highest priority core 
activities are supported. The Committee expects the Bureau to 
be fully reimbursed for any non-core survey conducted for any 
other Federal agency or private organization.
    The Committee continues its direction regarding the 
production of monthly Export-Import and Trade Balance 
statistics on a North American Industry Classification System 
basis, and the Advanced Technology Trade Imports, Exports, and 
Net Balance by Country in the Bureau's monthly reports. The 
Committee understands that this information will not be 
seasonally adjusted. Further, the Committee expects the U.S. 
Trade in Advanced Technology Products to be presented in a more 
useable format for policymakers and the general public. This 
information should highlight the European Union, China, 
Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, India, 
and South Korea. In addition, the following Advanced Technology 
categories: biotechnology, life science, opto-electronics, 
information & communications, electronics, flexible 
manufacturing, advanced materials, aerospace, weapons, and 
nuclear technology should be continued.
    In addition, the Committee expects that key reports on 
manufacturing, general economic and foreign trade statistics, 
including current industrial reports, will be maintained and 
issued on a timely basis.
    The recommendation provides for the current statistical 
programs of the Bureau of the Census, which include measurement 
of the Nation's economy and the demographic characteristics of 
the population. These programs are intended to provide a broad 
base of economic, demographic, and social information used for 
decision-making by governments, private organizations, and 
individuals.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$694,092,000 for all periodic censuses and related programs in 
fiscal year 2007, which is $87,729,000 above the fiscal year 
2006 level and the same as the request.
    Re-engineered Design Process for the 2010 Short-Form Census 
Program.--The recommendation includes $258,328,000 for the 
short-form only Census in 2010, which is the same as the 
request, and $57,083,000 above the current year level. The 
Committee continues to support the Bureau's efforts to 
establish an early design and planning process to allow 
sufficient time to test the major elements of a simplified, 
streamlined short-form census. This new approach should allow 
the Census Bureau to fulfill important constitutional and legal 
mandates more accurately. Further, this new process should 
reduce the costs to the American taxpayer by nearly 
$2,000,000,000, instead of repeating the same process conducted 
in the 2000 census. The recommendation includes the following:

Decennial Census 2010:  [In thousands of dollars]
    Program Development and Management........................    $3,358
    Content, Questionnaires, and Products.....................    20,123
    Field Data Collection & Support...........................   113,188
    Automated Data Collection & Support.......................    75,420
    Design, Methodology, and Evaluation.......................    37,432
    Census Test and Dress Rehearsal...........................     8,807
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Total, Decennial Census 2010, Re-engineered Design 
          Process.............................................   258,328

    American Community Survey (ACS).--The Committee 
recommendation includes $179,765,000 for the American Community 
Survey, which is the same as the request, and $11,987,000 above 
the current year level. The Committee is steadfast in its 
support of the Census Bureau and the Administration's efforts 
to collect long-form data on an on-going basis rather than 
waiting for once-a-decade decennial long-form data. The 
recommendation includes the following:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Initial Mail Collection.......................................   $38,319
Telephone Non-Response Follow-up..............................    17,022
Personal Visit Non-Response Follow-up.........................    68,714
Puerto Rico...................................................     3,329
Group Quarters................................................     9,160
IT Infrastructure.............................................     5,216
Data Processing, Weighting & Review...........................    13,637
Data Dissemination............................................     7,875
Partnership and Outreach......................................     2,192
Project Management............................................     3,423
Methods Panel.................................................    10,878
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

    Total, American Community Survey..........................   179,765

    The Committee recommendation includes the full request for 
the methods panel, an increase of $3,379,000 above the current 
year level for a total of $10,878,000 for fiscal year 2007. The 
Committee expects the methods panel to ensure a more 
comprehensive and streamlined approach to multiple data 
collection techniques and to ensure that any change in the 
language of survey questions will maximize clarity in order to 
elicit correct responses.
    Master Address File (MAF)/Topologically Integrated 
Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER).--The Committee 
recommendation includes $73,674,000 for MAF/TIGER Re-
engineering, which is the same as the request, and $5,106,000 
below the current year level. The Committee supports efforts to 
enhance the MAF/TIGER to include street and address information 
from States, localities, and tribal governments. It is in the 
best interest of the Federal, State, local, and tribal 
communities to make all existing information available to the 
Census Bureau to result in the most accurate database. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of Commerce to take all 
available measures to reduce the requirement of payment for 
information currently available from certain governments. 
Further, the Secretary is directed to utilize global 
positioning system technology and aerial photography to update 
existing information only if these measures are shown to be a 
more cost effective alternative. The recommendation includes 
the following:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Geographic Partnership Programs...............................     5,686
Evaluations...................................................     5,686
Street Address Location Corrections & GPS.....................    53,289
Address Updating System.......................................     9,013
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

    Total, MAF/TIGER Re-Engineering...........................    73,674

    Non-Decennial Programs.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $182,325,000 for non-decennial periodic census 
programs, the same amount as in the request, and $23,765,000 
above the current year level.

Periodic Censuses:      [In thousands of dollars]
Other Periodic Programs:
    Economic Censuses.........................................   $82,438
    Census of Governments.....................................     7,755
        Subtotal, Economic Programs...........................    90,193
Demographic Statistics Programs:
    Intercensal Demographic Estimates.........................     9,885
    Demographic Survey Sample Design..........................    11,042
    Geographic Support........................................    40,210
    Data Processing Systems...................................    30,995
        Subtotal, Demographic Programs........................    92,132
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Total, Non-Decennial Programs.........................   182,325

    The recommendation supports the elimination of the Vehicle 
Inventory and Use Survey, as proposed in the budget request.
    Language is continued regarding changes to the race 
category for collection and dissemination purposes.
    Subgroup Enumeration.--The Committee commends the efforts 
of the Census Bureau to work with interested parties to ensure 
that necessary measures will be taken to ensure accuracy in 
enumerating Hispanic subgroups.
    The Committee appreciates the efforts of the Census Bureau 
to consider new options for reporting data reflecting all 
citizens of the United States, including Puerto Rico.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$17,837,000 for the National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration (NTIA) for fiscal year 2007, which is the same 
as the request and the same amount appropriated for the current 
year for the salaries and expenses account.
    NTIA is responsible for developing domestic and 
international telecommunications and information policy for the 
Executive Branch, ensuring the efficient and effective use of 
the Federal radio spectrum, and administering Federal programs 
that support telecommunications facilities for public 
broadcasting.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $17,837,000 for the 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation of the NTIA, which is the 
same as the request and the same amount appropriated in the 
current year. In addition, a total of $45,000,000 is available 
in mandatory appropriations under the Digital Television 
Transition and Public Safety Fund. The Fund includes 
$15,000,000 for digital to analog converter box grants, 
$15,000,000 for public safety interoperable communications 
grants, and $15,000,000 for New York City digital transition 
program assistance for fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee continues to direct the Administration to 
aggressively pursue all opportunities for reimbursement, 
deobligations, and use of non-appropriated resources, to 
maximize the operating level for NTIA mission purposes.
    The Committee recommendation and the request assume that at 
least an additional $35,116,000 will be available to the NTIA 
in fiscal year 2007 through reimbursements from other agencies 
for the costs of providing spectrum management, analysis and 
research services.

    PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, PLANNING AND CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommendation does not include a new 
appropriation for program management of existing planning and 
construction (PTFPC) grants for public television, radio, and 
non-broadcast facilities.
    The Committee notes that as of June 2005, 326 of the 353 
public television stations are now transmitting a digital 
signal. Only 27 stations are not yet broadcasting a digital 
signal, and PTFPC grants have funded the digital conversion of 
22 of those remaining stations. These broadcasting stations 
serve markets representing 95 percent of American households 
with television.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,771,000,000 for 
the United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) for fiscal 
year 2007, which is $87,914,000 above the current year level 
and the same as the request, to be derived from offsetting fee 
collections.
    The Committee includes language regarding the number of 
positions and full-time equivalents for the examination of 
trademarks and patent applications. Further, language is 
included designating the number of positions and full-time 
equivalents for the programmatic Office of General Counsel, 
which includes the Office of the General Counsel, Office of the 
Solicitor, Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, Patent Appeals and 
Interferences, General Law Office, and the Office of Enrollment 
and Discipline; and external affairs.
    Within the amount available, the Committee expects that the 
PTO will continue its relationships with the National 
Inventor's Hall of Fame and Inventure Place and with the 
International Intellectual Property Institute at no less than 
the levels in fiscal year 2006.
    The Committee reminds the PTO that any changes from the 
funding distribution provided in the bill and accompanying 
report, including carryover balances, are subject to the 
reprogramming procedures set forth in section 605 of this Act.
    In addition, PTO shall submit to the Committee, not later 
than three months after the enactment of this Act, a spending 
plan that incorporates any carryover balances from previous 
fiscal years and any changes to the patent or trademark fee 
structure. Further, this spending plan should be updated on a 
monthly basis and submitted to the Committees at the end of 
each month in fiscal year 2007.
    Telework.--The Committee commends PTO for its successful 
telework program. The Committee understands that by the end of 
May 2006, 220 trademark examining attorneys will be working 
from home, representing 80 percent of the total trademark 
examining corps. Further, the Committee lauds the efforts of 
the PTO to increase the number of teleworking patent examining 
professionals to 1,038 that are working from home one day per 
week. In addition, 255 patent examiners have relinquished their 
office space to work from home four days per week.
    The PTO is charged with administering the patent and 
trademark laws of the United States. PTO examines patent 
applications, grants patent protection for qualified 
inventions, and disseminates technological information 
disclosed in patents. The PTO also examines trademark 
applications and provides Federal registration to owners of 
qualified trademarks. The PTO advises the Office of the United 
States Trade Representative on enforcement issues in connection 
with free trade agreements and participates in consultations 
with numerous foreign governments on a broad range of issues 
related to the enforcement of intellectual property rights.

                         Science and Technology

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,019,167,000 in 
direct discretionary appropriations for the Science and 
Technology programs of the Department of Commerce, including 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which is 
$684,842,000 below the current year, and $242,785,000 below the 
request.

                       Technology Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $2,000,000 for necessary 
expenses of the Under Secretary for Technology Policy, which is 
$515,000 above the request and $3,923,000 below the current 
year level.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

    The recommendation includes $627,000,000 for the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for fiscal year 
2007, which is $118,037,000 below the current year and 
$45,668,000 above the request.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $467,002,000 for 
NIST's scientific and technical core programs, which is 
$72,240,000 above the current year and the same as the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes $395,002,000 to 
support the full base operating costs for core NIST programs, 
including the continuation of a critical infrastructure program 
at the fiscal year 2006 level. In addition, the Committee 
recommendation includes new investments of $72,000,000 to 
support the American Competitiveness Initiative, focusing on 
physical science research and standards development that will 
foster innovation. Specifically, funding is recommended for the 
following activities: (1) enhancing NIST's national research 
facilities (+$30,000,000), including support for the Center for 
Nanoscale Science and Technology and the Center for Neutron 
Research; (2) furthering the work of NIST's laboratories and 
technical programs (+$28,000,000), including support for 
developing a robust hydrogen economy to reduce the Nation's 
dependence on foreign sources of energy, creating manufacturing 
innovation through supply chain integration, building the 
infrastructure for innovation through quantum information 
science developments, furthering structural safety from 
hurricanes, fires, and earthquakes, and developing next 
generation materials; and (3) opening markets for American 
workers and exporters through development of international 
standards and innovation (+$14,000,000), including support for 
developments in measurement science and enhancements in 
bioimaging, cybersecurity, and biometric identification 
technologies.
    The Committee continues to support efforts to ensure that 
United States business interests are represented in 
international standards negotiations, and also expects that 
NIST will collaborate with the Office of the United States 
Trade Representative and the Department of State on innovative 
ways to reduce trade barriers to United States exports by 
ensuring that United States standards are adopted in 
international negotiations.
    The Committee recommends that NIST continue to work with 
its Federal partners to develop, implement, and publish the 
results of a Project 25 conformity assessment program for first 
responder communications equipment.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

    The Committee recommendation includes $92,000,000, which is 
$91,624,000 below the current year and $45,668,000 above the 
request, and is provided solely for the Hollings Manufacturing 
Extension Partnerships (MEP) Program. The Committee adopts the 
President's request to terminate funding for the Advanced 
Technology Program.
    MEP is a collaborative partnership program that provides 
United States manufacturers with access to technologies, 
resources, and expertise through a network of manufacturing 
extension centers. Federal support for the MEP program, 
combined with State and private sector funding, is intended to 
translate into more jobs, more tax revenue, more exports, and a 
more secure supply source of consumer and defense goods. 
Because the Committee recognizes the value of the continuation 
of these valuable partnerships, the recommendation doubles the 
Administration's request for the MEP program.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $67,998,000 for 
construction and major renovations of NIST campuses at Boulder, 
CO, and Gaithersburg, MD, and at other facilities. This account 
supports the construction, maintenance, and repair of NIST 
facilities to meet the Nation's measurement and research needs.
    The recommendation fully supports the requested program 
increases of $32,100,000 in support of the American 
Competitiveness Initiative, including funds for the following: 
$10,100,000 for renovations of Boulder facilities; $10,000,000 
for safety, capacity, maintenance and major repairs; and 
$12,000,000 for the NIST Center for Neutron Research.
    The Committee directs NIST to submit quarterly reports to 
the Committee on the progress of all construction projects 
during fiscal year 2007.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$3,390,167,000 in discretionary appropriations for the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is a 
decrease of $508,282,000 below the current year level not 
including supplemental amounts, and $288,968,000 below the 
request. Detailed recommendations for NOAA's individual 
appropriations accounts are contained in the following 
paragraphs.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES

                     [INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS]

    The Committee recommendation includes a total program level 
of $2,466,464,000 under this account for the coastal, 
fisheries, marine, weather, satellite and other programs of the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This total 
funding level includes $2,375,464,000 in direct appropriations, 
a transfer of $77,000,000 from balances in the ``Promote and 
Develop Fishery Products and Research Pertaining to American 
Fisheries'' account, a transfer of $3,000,000 from the Coastal 
Zone Management Fund, and $11,000,000 in deobligated balances 
from prior year appropriations. The direct appropriation of 
$2,375,464,000 is $352,466,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level 
not including supplemental amounts, and $212,379,000 below the 
request.
    Language is included prohibiting the application of any 
general administrative charge against assigned activities under 
NOAA. Language is also included limiting the amount available 
for NOAA corporate services administrative overhead, and the 
amount available for transfer to the Department of Commerce 
Working Capital Fund. The Committee notes that line office 
personnel and overhead costs are funded from the totals 
provided for each respective line office. Funding for common 
corporate services and for a payment to the Department's 
Working Capital Fund has been provided directly on separate 
line items in the Program Support budget.
    The following narrative descriptions and tables identify 
the specific activities and funding levels included in this 
Act:
    National Ocean Service (NOS).--The recommendation provides 
$315,140,000 for NOS operations, research and facilities. The 
recommendation includes $112,300,000 for base Navigation 
Services activities, including $29,000,000 to address the 
hydrographic survey backlog detailed in the National Survey 
Plan. The Committee expects NOAA to propose a distribution of 
the $22,000,000 recommended for Geodesy programs through the 
reprogramming process detailed under section 605 of this Act. 
Within this amount, the Committee encourages NOAA to consider 
the continuation of funding for high-priority State geodesy and 
height modernization initiatives. The amount provided for Tide 
and Current Data includes funding to continue support for the 
Great Lakes Water Observation Network.
    The recommendation includes $26,000,000 for Coral Reef 
programs, including the continuation of program activities in 
Florida and Puerto Rico. The amount provided for Response and 
Restoration includes up to $7,000,000 for requested Pribilof 
Island cleanup activities. The Committee is pleased by NOAA's 
response and restoration efforts on Vieques Island, Puerto 
Rico, and expects NOAA to continue to provide assistance, as 
needed, to the Departments of Defense and the Interior and the 
Environmental Protection Agency in carrying out cleanup 
responsibilities. The Committee also expects NOAA to continue 
to provide funds for the aquatic resources environmental 
initiative and encourages the continuation of funding for a 
marine wildlife database.
    National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).--The 
recommendation provides $539,100,000 for NMFS operations, 
research and facilities. The recommendation for Protected 
Species Research and Management includes $56,000,000 for 
Pacific Salmon, a continuation of the fiscal year 2006 level. 
The Committee expects NOAA to complete its Coho salmon recovery 
plan for the Klamath River as required by law as soon as 
possible. Also the Committee urges NOAA to work with local 
entities in the Scott and Shasta river basins to implement 
restoration projects, as soon as possible with minimal 
overhead. Further, the Committee encourages the Secretary of 
Commerce to make his determination regarding a fishery failure 
declaration for the Klamath River as soon as practicable.
    Within the base funding provided for fisheries research, 
the Committee expects NOAA to increase funding for Antarctic 
Research and to allocate funding to the highest priority 
research activities related to the following continuing 
activities: horseshoe crab research, bluefin tuna tagging, 
bluefish/striped bass research, the Virginia trawl survey, 
shark research, California cooperative oceanic fisheries 
investigation and California marine fisheries replenishment 
research. The recommended funding level to expand stock 
assessments includes funding for continuation of a West Coast 
in-season harvest data collection system. The recommendation 
continues funding for Chesapeake Bay Studies. Within the amount 
provided for Sustainable Habitat Management, the recommendation 
continues funding for the highest priority activities related 
the following continuing programs: oyster restoration, the non-
native oyster Chesapeake Bay program, and blue crab research. 
Within the amount provided for Fisheries Habitat Restoration, 
the Committee expects NOAA to continue funding for Bronx River 
Restoration.
    The Committee directs NOAA to assess the safety concerns 
about the Southwest Fisheries Science Center and pursue a 
formal budget request, if warranted, in a timely manner.
    Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR).--The recommendation 
includes $328,486,000 for OAR operations, research and 
facilities. The recommendation includes $184,000,000 for 
Climate Research, which is $2,849,000 above the request. The 
recommendation includes $130,000,000 for a consolidated 
competitive climate research program for the Climate Program 
Office, an increase of $4,288,000 above the request. Within 
this amount, the Committee encourages NOAA to implement a new 
competitive national program for partnerships in coastal and 
ocean observing. This funding will focus on creating a 
federation of regional observing systems to accelerate the 
achievement of an integrated ocean observing system. Within the 
amount available under OAR, the Committee encourages NOAA to 
continue Arctic research activities and support planning 
activities related to the upcoming International Polar Year.
    The recommendation for Weather and Air Quality Research 
includes funding, as requested, for tornado severe storm 
research/phased array radar.
    The recommendation for Ocean, Coastal and Great Lakes 
Research continues funding for Great Lakes Research 
Laboratories; provides $52,000,000 for the National Sea Grant 
College Program; and provides $16,000,000 to continue research 
activities associated with ocean exploration and undersea 
research. Additional funding for educational programs 
associated with ocean exploration and undersea research is 
included under the recommendation for Program Support. The 
Committee notes that constraints on discretionary spending have 
resulted in reductions in appropriations for ocean exploration. 
The Committee therefore directs NOAA to develop a strategy for 
transitioning discoveries to the private sector, and to 
transmit this strategy to the Committee by January 31, 2007. A 
strong, direct link between ocean exploration and economic 
development could enable the program to leverage corporate 
support to fill behind declining appropriations. The amount 
provided for Invasive Species and Other Partnership Programs 
continues funding for aquatic ecosystems programs, ballast 
water treatment, satellite data application research, and the 
development of sensors to enhance the measurement of carbon 
dioxide in seawater. The Committee directs NOAA to conduct an 
annual inventory of the mercury levels in each of the Great 
Lakes, with details on the trend and source in the water levels 
and aquatic life, by July 31st of the following year.
    The recommendation includes $12,900,000 for High 
Performance Computing, the full amount requested and an 
increase of $6,458,000 above the fiscal year 2006 base level.
    National Weather Service (NWS).--The recommendation 
provides $781,913,000 for National Weather Service operations, 
research and facilities, including an increase of $2,500,000 
above the request for local warnings and forecasts base 
activities. The Committee continues to believe that renaming 
the National Weather Service could lead to confusion among 
users of long-standing programs and services with substantial 
name recognition, and strongly encourages NOAA against such 
action.
    The recommendation for Local Warnings and Forecasts 
includes $20,415,000, the full requested amount, to strengthen 
the U.S. tsunami warning network. The recommendation for Local 
Warnings and Forecasts also includes $5,000,000 for the Space 
Environment Center; continues funding for Alaska tsunami 
warning observations and the hurricane mitigation cooperative 
research initiative; and continues funding for air quality 
forecasting programs including $1,750,000 to establish air 
quality and meteorological monitoring equipment throughout the 
Shenandoah Valley and utilize computer modeling software and 
data processing hardware to gather, analyze and disseminate 
real-time and predictive information to local decision makers, 
research programs, and the general public. Within the amount 
provided for Advanced Hydrological Prediction Services, the 
Committee expects that NOAA will continue to support critical 
upgrades to the Susquehanna River Flood Forecasting and Warning 
System.
    The Committee notes that, of the approximately 500 coastal 
communities determined to be at high risk of tsunami, only 25 
communities have been recognized by NWS as TsunamiReady. The 
Committee expects NOAA to evaluate the TsunamiReady program to 
determine why participation is low, and make any necessary 
corrections to eliminate barriers to participation. The 
Committee expects NOAA to continue to work with each at-risk 
coastal community to ensure that emergency officials understand 
potential tsunami hazards and are prepared to take necessary 
actions. In addition, the Committee directs NOAA to develop 
comprehensive risk-based strategic plans for all tsunami 
programs, including metrics for measuring progress toward 
achieving program goals.
    National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information 
Service (NESDIS).--The recommendation provides $145,250,000 for 
NESDIS operations, research and facilities. The recommendation 
for Data Centers and Information Services includes funding for 
environmental data archiving, access and assessment activities.
    Program Support.--The recommendation provides $356,575,000 
for Program Support, including $183,775,000 for corporate 
services, $21,000,000 for facilities, $125,300,000 for marine 
and aviation operations, and $26,500,000 for education 
programs. The recommendation continues language prohibiting the 
charging of line office program budgets for costs of corporate 
services.
    The recommendation for Education Programs consolidates 
funding for a number of continuing activities and a general 
education fund. The Committee expects that this funding level 
will support the following activities: JASON; continuing bay 
and watershed education programs; Chesapeake Bay interpretive 
buoys; Education Partnership Program/Minority Serving 
Institutions; education activities related to ocean exploration 
and undersea research; and the Virginia Science and Engineering 
Outreach program. In addition, the recommendation includes 
language, as requested, regarding two NOAA educational 
scholarship programs. The Committee expects that these two 
continuing programs will be funded from the amount provided for 
Education Programs.

       NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE--OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Navigation Services:
    Mapping & Charting..................................          39,300
    Address Survey Backlog/Contracts....................          29,000
    Geodesy.............................................          22,000
    Tide & Current Data.................................          22,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Navigation Services......................         112,300
                                                         ===============
Ocean Resources Conservation and Assessment:
    Coastal Services....................................          10,000
    Coral Reefs.........................................          26,000
    Response and Restoration............................          22,600
    National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science..........          21,740
    Extramural Oceanic and Coastal Research & Science...          12,000
                                                         ===============
        Total, Ocean Resources Conserv. & Assess........          92,340
                                                         ---------------
Ocean and Coastal Management:
    CZM Grants..........................................          55,000
    CZMA Program Administration.........................           6,000
    Non-Point Pollution.................................           1,500
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System..........          16,000
    Marine Sanctuary Program............................          32,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Ocean and Coastal Management.............         110,500
                                                         ===============
        Total, National Ocean Service--ORF..............         315,140
------------------------------------------------------------------------


 NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE--OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Protected Species Research and Management...............         108,000
Fisheries Research & Management:
    Research and Management Programs....................         138,000
    Salmon Management Activities........................          24,000
    Expand Stock Assessments--Improve Data Collection...          25,000
    Fish Statistics.....................................          12,800
    Fisheries Information Networks......................          20,000
    Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions.........          25,000
    Survey and Monitoring Projects......................          10,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Fisheries Research & Management..........         254,800
                                                         ===============
Other Activities Supporting Fisheries:
    Chesapeake Bay Studies..............................           3,000
    Cooperative Research................................           9,000
    Antarctic Research..................................           1,500
    Alaska Research.....................................          20,000
    Information Analyses and Dissemination..............          17,500
    National Environmental Policy Act...................           7,900
    Facilities Maintenance..............................           3,900
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Other Activities.........................          62,800
                                                         ===============
Habitat Conservation and Restoration:
    Sustainable Habitat Management & Conservation.......          18,000
    Fisheries Habitat Restoration.......................          22,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Habitat Conservation and Restoration.....          40,000
                                                         ===============
Enforcement and Observers:
    Enforcement and Surveillance........................          50,000
    Observers and Training..............................          23,500
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Enforcement and Observers................          73,500
                                                         ===============
        Total, National Marine Fisheries Service--ORF...         539,100
------------------------------------------------------------------------


  OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH--OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes.....................          47,000
    Climate Operations, Data & Information..............           7,000
    Competitive Research Program........................         130,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Climate Research.........................         184,000
                                                         ===============
Weather & Air Quality Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes.....................          36,000
    Tornado/Severe Storm Research/Phased Array Radar....           3,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Weather & Air Quality Research...........          39,000
                                                         ===============
Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes.....................          19,000
    Undersea Research and Ocean Exploration.............          16,000
    National Sea Grant College Program..................          52,000
    Invasive Species and Other Partnership Programs.....           5,586
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Research.          92,586
                                                         ===============
High Performance Computing Initiatives..................          12,900
                                                         ===============
        Total, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research--ORF....         328,486
------------------------------------------------------------------------


      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE--OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Operations and Research:
    Local Warnings and Forecasts........................         614,957
    Advanced Hydrological Prediction Services...........           6,037
    Aviation Weather....................................           4,653
    WFO Maintenance.....................................           7,316
    Weather Radio Transmitters..........................           2,297
    Central Forecast Guidance...........................          51,063
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Operations and Research..................         686,323
                                                         ===============
Systems Operation & Maintenance (O&M;):
    NEXRAD..............................................          43,759
    ASOS................................................           8,716
    AWIPS...............................................          37,603
    NWSTG Backup--CIP...................................           5,512
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Systems Operation & Maintenance..........          95,590
                                                         ===============
        Total, National Weather Service--ORF............         781,913
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA AND INFORMATION SERVICE--
                   OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems:
    Satellite Command and Control.......................          43,750
    Product Processing and Distribution.................          27,100
    Product Development, Readiness & Application........          24,600
    Space Commercialization, Licensing & Enforcement....           1,800
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Environmental Satellite Observing Systems          97,250
                                                         ===============
NOAA's Data Centers & Information Services..............          48,000
                                                         ===============
        Total, NESDIS--ORF..............................         145,250
------------------------------------------------------------------------


          PROGRAM SUPPORT--OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Services:
    Under Secretary & Associate Offices.................          26,550
    Consolidated Corporate Administrative Costs.........         111,900
    Payment to DOC Working Capital Fund.................          34,425
    CAMS................................................           9,900
    Information Technology Security.....................           1,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Corporate Services.......................         183,775
                                                         ===============
NOAA Education Programs.................................          26,500
                                                         ===============
Facilities:
    NOAA Facilities Management & Construction...........          17,000
    Environmental Compliance & Safety...................           4,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Facilities...............................          21,000
                                                         ===============
Marine and Aviation Operations:
    Marine Services.....................................          90,300
    Fleet Planning and Maintenance......................          16,000
    Aviation Operations.................................          19,000
                                                         ---------------
        Total, Office of Marine & Aviation Operations...         125,300
                                                         ===============
        Total, Program Support--ORF.....................         356,575
------------------------------------------------------------------------

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION

    The recommendation includes $996,703,000 for the 
Procurement, Acquisition and Construction account, which is 
$113,216,000 below the current year level not including 
supplemental amounts, and $27,764,000 below the request. The 
recommendation assumes that an additional $2,000,000 will be 
available from prior year deobligations, resulting in a total 
program level of $998,703,000. The recommendation includes 
language making any use of deobligated funds provided under 
this heading in previous years subject to the reprogramming 
procedures set forth in section 605 of this Act.
    National Weather Service (NWS).--The recommendation 
includes $100,420,000 for National Weather Service acquisition 
and construction, which is $2,000,000 above the request. The 
recommendation includes requested funding for four remaining 
Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoy 
spares to complete the acceleration of the deployment of a 
national tsunami warning system. The recommendation also 
restores a proposed reduction of $2,000,000 in the radiosonde 
network replacement program.
    National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information 
Service (NESDIS).--The recommendation includes $884,304,000 for 
NESDIS acquisition and construction, which is the same amount 
as the request. The recommendation provides the requested 
increase of $113,442,000 for the R-Series, the next generation 
of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). 
This funding will be used for systems acquisition, continued 
efforts on satellite instruments, and the program office in 
support of an initial GOES-R launch date in 2012.
    The recommendation also provides the full requested 
increase of $20,278,000 for National Polar-orbiting Operational 
Environmental Satellite Systems (NPOESS). The Committee 
recommendation does not constitute an endorsement of future 
funding requests for the full costs of a reconstituted NPOESS 
program. The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2007 funding 
requirements for NPOESS remain unchanged despite the recently 
concluded Nunn-McCurdy recertification process, under which the 
total program costs are slated to increase by at least 
$3,700,000,000. The Committee is gravely concerned with the 
technical and financial program management failures, which have 
resulted in dramatic cost increases, and placed at risk the 
nation's ability to collect critical weather forecasting and 
climate data. The Committee understands that the recertified 
NPOESS program will consist of four satellites instead of six 
as originally planned; will have an initial launch of 2013 
instead of 2010; and will include at least five fewer sensor 
instruments than originally planned. In light of such program 
setbacks, NOAA must justify whether the reconstituted program 
merits such a dramatic increase in future appropriations. The 
Committee expects NOAA and the other NPOESS agencies to 
cooperate fully with the Committee, and other Committees with 
jurisdiction over the NPOESS program, in reviewing the results 
of the Nunn-McCurdy certification. Congress will need detailed 
information to ensure that the new cost and schedule estimates 
for NPOESS are realistic.
    None of the funds provided for NPOESS for fiscal year 2007 
shall be obligated or expended until the Committee receives a 
fiscal year 2007 spending plan through the reprogramming 
process set forth in section 605 of this Act, accompanied by a 
full multi-year program justification. Further, the Committee 
expects that NOAA will immediately implement all recommended 
management improvements, and that the renegotiation of the 
contract for NPOESS will take into account the recommendations 
of the Government Accountability Office and the Inspector 
General of the Department of Commerce.
    Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO).--The 
recommendation includes $3,600,000 for OMAO, to cover expected 
temporary berthing and calibration costs associated with the 
delivery of NOAA's second fisheries survey vessel. The amount 
recommended also includes funding for NOAA to test and 
demonstrate scientific applications of hydrographic data.
    The following table identifies the specific activities and 
funding levels included in this Act:

                 PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION & CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research Supercomputing/CCRI (OAR)......................          10,379
Weather and Climate Systems Acquisition (NWS)...........          68,611
Construction (NWS)......................................          31,809
Satellite Systems Acquisition--Geostationary (NESDIS)...         439,607
Satellite Systems Acquisition--POES (NESDIS)............          89,906
Satellite Systems Acquisition--NPOESS (NESDIS)..........         337,870
NPOESS--Preparatory Data Exploitation (NESDIS)..........           4,455
EOS & Advanced Polar Data Systems (NESDIS)..............             990
CIP--Single Point of Failure (NESDIS)...................           2,772
Comprehensive Large Array Data Stewardship (NESDIS).....           6,476
Construction (NESDIS)...................................           2,228
Marine Services (OMAO)..................................           3,600
                                                         ===============
        Total PAC.......................................         998,703
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY

    The recommendation includes $20,000,000 for conservation 
and habitat restoration and recovery grants for endangered and 
threatened Pacific salmon populations, which is $46,638,000 
below the current year and $46,825,000 below the request. The 
recommendation includes language, similar to the request, that 
(1) lists eligible State and tribal grantees under the program; 
(2) defines the allowable uses of funds under this account; (3) 
requires that funds disbursed to States be subject to a 
matching requirement; and (4) requires that non-Federal 
contributions must be used in direct support of this program in 
order to fulfill the matching requirement. The Committee 
expects that any guidelines established by the Secretary of 
Commerce to allocate funding under this account will restrict 
the use of funding under this account to projects necessary for 
restoration of populations that are listed as endangered or 
threatened or identified as at-risk to be so listed, projects 
that maintain populations necessary for exercise of tribal 
treaty fishing rights or native subsistence fishing, or 
projects to conserve Pacific coastal salmon and steelhead 
habitat. NOAA shall report to the Committee within 60 days of 
the enactment of this Act on the distribution of funding to 
States and tribes under this heading.
    The Committee notes that from fiscal year 2000 through 
fiscal year 2006, over $1,250,000,000 has been appropriated for 
NOAA Pacific Salmon programs, including $591,125,000 for 
recovery grants to States and tribes. The Committee 
recommendation for fiscal year 2007 includes a total of 
$100,000,000 for NOAA Pacific Salmon programs, consisting of 
$56,000,000 in NMFS Protected Species funding, $24,000,000 in 
NMFS Salmon Management funding, and the $20,000,000 included 
under this heading for recovery grants to States and tribes.

                      COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The recommendation includes requested language allowing not 
to exceed $3,000,000 collected pursuant to the Coastal Zone 
Management Act to be transferred to the ``Operations, Research 
and Facilities'' account to offset the costs of implementing 
that Act.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The recommendation includes language under this heading 
appropriating $287,000 for the subsidy costs of direct 
fisheries loans. Language is included designating a total 
principal amount of direct loans of $5,000,000 for Individual 
Fishing Quota loans, and $59,000,000 for traditional direct 
loans.

                                 Other


             SALARIES AND EXPENSES, DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    The Committee recommendation includes $52,760,000 for costs 
of managing the Department of Commerce, $4,239,000 below the 
request and $5,900,000 above the current year level. The 
Committee recommendation includes bill language designating 
$5,900,000 for the blast mitigation windows, as proposed, and 
$990,000 for the National Intellectual Property Law Enforcement 
Coordination Council, as proposed under a separate heading. The 
Committee has denied, without prejudice, the requested increase 
of $18,000,000 for the renovation and modernization of the 
Herbert C. Hoover Building due to the Committee's austere 
funding constraints.
    This appropriation provides for the Office of the Secretary 
and for staff offices of the Department, which assist in the 
formulation of policy, management, and administration.
    Office Relocations.--The Committee continues to direct the 
Department to submit quarterly reports providing details of all 
office moves, openings, reductions and closings, and the costs 
associated with all moves. The Committee reminds the Department 
of the requirements to submit reprogramming notifications under 
section 605 of the Act before implementing office relocations.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee includes $22,531,000 for the Inspector 
General for fiscal year 2007, which is $64,000 above the 
current year level and the same as the request.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the Department of Commerce:
    Section 201 of the bill making Department of Commerce funds 
available for advanced payments only upon certification of 
officials designated by the Secretary that such payments are 
considered to be in the public interest;
    Section 202 making appropriations for the Department for 
Salaries and Expenses available for hire of passenger motor 
vehicles, and for services, uniforms and allowances as 
authorized by law;
    Section 203 providing the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce appropriation accounts and 
requiring notification to the Committee of certain actions;
    Section 204 providing that any costs incurred by the 
Department in response to funding reductions shall be absorbed 
within the total budgetary resources available to the 
Department and shall not be subject to the reprogramming 
limitations set forth in this Act;
    Section 205 regarding the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship 
Program;
    Section 206 regarding the Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship 
Program; and
    Section 207 requiring that any funding used to implement E-
Government Initiatives shall be subject to section 605 of this 
Act.

                           TITLE III--SCIENCE

    The funds recommended by the Committee in Title III of the 
accompanying bill support the development of national science 
policy, as well as the operational, research, and education 
activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
and the National Science Foundation.
    The recommendation in this title totals $22,734,381,000, 
which is $901,108,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 
2006 not including supplemental amounts, and $83,227,000 below 
the budget request.

                Office of Science and Technology Policy

    The recommendation includes $5,369,000 for the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy, which is $124,000 below the 
current year funding level and the same as the request. The 
Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) was created 
under the National Science and Technology Policy, Organization, 
and Priorities Act of 1976. OSTP advises the President on 
science and technology policies and coordinates research and 
development programs for the Federal Government.
    The Committee recommendation includes language directing 
the establishment of an Ethics Advisory Group (EAG) for the 
National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), focused on questions 
of human dignity. The EAG shall be composed of non-Federal 
experts unaffiliated with the nanotechnology industry; shall 
develop ethical guidelines for Federal nanotechnology research 
across all agencies funded by the NNI; and shall address 
fundamental questions of human dignity in addition to other 
ethical, legal, and social issues.
    In establishing the EAG within the NNI, the Committee 
directs the OSTP to ensure that the ethical implications of 
nanotechnology, as distinct from the legal, social, or 
environmental implications, are thoroughly and specifically 
examined. The EAG shall focus on: (1) generating robust, 
balanced ethical discussions with particular attention not only 
to questions of equity and access but also to fundamental 
questions of human dignity including the potential use of 
nanotechnology in enhancing human intelligence and performance; 
(2) developing ethical guidelines that set practical boundaries 
within which the U.S. nanotechnology program can flourish; and 
(3) developing a process whereby these ethical guidelines can 
inform the research funded through the NNI and shape funding 
decisions. By February 1, 2007, OSTP shall report to the 
Committee on the status of the establishment of the EAG and its 
activities. By July 1, 2007, the EAG shall provide the 
Committee with a report on its progress.
    The recommendation also includes language establishing a 
reporting requirement on the improvement of science education 
in the United States. The Committee expects OSTP to work to 
improve coordination and communication among science agencies 
to ensure that education programs are effective and 
complementary, and not duplicative. The OSTP shall report to 
the Committee by March 31, 2007, on any actions planned or 
taken in response to any findings or recommendations of the 
National Science and Technology Council or the new interagency 
Academic Competitiveness Council.
    The Committee recognizes that research efforts on new 
technologies such as nanotechnology and biofuels are and should 
continue to be coordinated across Federal departments. Rapid 
advancements in such fields should be closely monitored with 
regard to new job skills and specialized training required by 
the workforce, academic curriculum changes, new job 
classifications, and consumer safety initiatives. The Committee 
urges the Office of Science and Technology Policy to make 
recommendations for ensuring that such new requirements and 
related funding needs are brought to the attention of the 
Congress and the Executive branch.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    The Committee recommends a total of $16,709,000,000 for the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, which is 
$83,227,000 below the request, and an increase of $462,386,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 level not including emergency 
supplemental funding.
    The recommendation includes funds to support NASA's new 
vision and mission for space exploration, while supporting 
requested funds for the continued operation of the Space 
Shuttle. The Committee is very concerned about the need to 
maintain the nation's leadership in science and technology. To 
this end, the Committee has provided additional funding above 
the request for aeronautics research and science programs. The 
recommendation makes modest changes to NASA's request to 
achieve a balance between exploration and NASA's other core 
mission programs.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding under the 
same account structure as in fiscal year 2006 and proposed in 
the President's budget request. After several recent changes in 
the account and budget structure, the Committee believes that 
maintaining stability in this structure will improve NASA 
budgeting and financial management, as well as provide more 
transparency to improve Congressional oversight. To further 
improve transparency of resource allocation, the recommendation 
includes language designating funding by theme in both of 
NASA's major appropriations accounts. The recommendation 
continues to provide funding for the Space Shuttle and 
International Space Station in the Exploration Capabilities 
account. The recommendation includes new language, similar to 
language in the bill under the Departments of Justice, Commerce 
and State, establishing limitations and procedures for the 
transfer of funds among appropriation accounts. The Committee 
also notes that the reprogramming procedures outlined in 
section 605 of this Act apply to the reallocation of funds over 
a specified amount among budget programs, projects and 
activities, including the reallocation of funding made 
available in previous fiscal years. The Committee is concerned 
about the process of setting NASA priorities through 
significant funding shifts in the operating plan rather than 
through the regular appropriations process. The guidance 
provided in the bill and report for fiscal year 2007 provides a 
clear base funding level. The Committee must be notified of any 
deviations that meet the criteria established in section 605. 
None of the funds provided under this heading shall be for non-
NASA construction projects.
    With respect to the agency's workforce, the Committee is 
concerned with the budgetary impact of maintaining employment 
levels in excess of what is needed to accomplish NASA's 
mission. The Committee expects NASA to undertake the necessary 
workforce planning to correct what NASA refers to as 
``uncovered capacity''. The Committee supports NASA's efforts 
to develop and maintain a world-class workforce.
    The Committee remains concerned that NASA television is an 
asset that is significantly underutilized and could be used as 
a centerpiece in helping to excite the next generation of 
explorers in science. The Committee understands that the 
current year budget for NASA television is $14,000,000, an 
amount which exceeds the annual budget of the State of 
Mississippi for public television. NASA must take advantage of 
its television resources to inform and excite the public. The 
Committee encourages NASA to work with private sector partners 
to find innovative ways to incorporate the success of its web 
portal into its television activities and create a 
comprehensive multimedia experience for the American public.

                  SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS AND EXPLORATION

    NASA's Science, Aeronautics and Exploration (SAE) account 
provides funding for the Science, Exploration Systems, and 
Aeronautics Research Mission Directorates, and for Education 
programs and Cross-Agency Support programs. The SAE 
appropriation includes both the direct and the indirect costs 
supporting the Mission Directorates and Education Program, and 
provides for all of the research; development; operations; 
salaries and related expenses; design, repair, rehabilitation, 
and modification of facilities and construction of new 
facilities; maintenance and operation of facilities; and other 
general and administrative activities supporting SAE programs.
    The Committee recommends $10,482,000,000 for science, 
aeronautics and exploration, an increase of $845,273,000 above 
the fiscal year 2006 enacted level and $41,805,000 below the 
request.
    Science.--The recommendation includes a total of 
$5,404,800,000 for the Science Mission Directorate, an increase 
of $75,000,000 above the request. Increases above the request 
include: $50,000,000 for research and analysis; $15,000,000 to 
initiate planning for an orbiter/lander mission to Europa; and 
$10,000,000 for Terrestrial Planet Finder for continued 
technology development.
    The Committee expects that the increase provided for 
research and analysis will be allocated in an equitable fashion 
among all themes of the Science Mission Directorate: Solar 
System Exploration, the Universe, and the Earth-Sun System. The 
Committee is concerned about the damage to our nation's 
research institutions that can result from the abrupt and 
unexpected termination of peer-reviewed scientific research 
grants. The Committee expects that NASA will avoid such actions 
in the future, to the extent possible. When negotiating terms 
of university research grants, NASA should include close-out 
provisions that retain adequate flexibility for the agency, 
while at the same time providing sufficient mechanisms for 
minimizing adverse impacts on university educational and 
research programs.
    The National Academy of Sciences, Solar System Exploration 
Decadal Survey of planetary scientists concluded that the 
highest priority of the scientific community is an orbiter/
lander mission to Jupiter's moon, Europa. One of NASA's highest 
priorities is to search for life on other planets, and the 
Decadal Survey of planetary scientists determined that Europa 
has the highest probability of supporting life in our Solar 
System because of the confirmed presence of a planet-wide ocean 
of liquid salt water coupled with significant ocean bottom heat 
energy created by tidal flexing. The chemical and heat energy 
created by mid-ocean volcanic vents on the bottom of Earth's 
oceans have created communities of living organisms that thrive 
in absolute darkness in conditions nearly identical to the 
conditions that exist on the bottom of Europa's salt water 
oceans. For these reasons, in last year's conference report, 
the Congress directed NASA to begin planning for this mission, 
and to incorporate it into NASA's fiscal year 2007 budget 
request. The recommendation includes $15,000,000 for NASA to 
study and plan for a new start for the single most important 
outer planetary mission of the Decadal Survey. The Committee 
urges NASA to incorporate additional funding for a Europa 
mission as part of its fiscal year 2008 budget request. The 
Committee expects that NASA would implement this new start 
utilizing a purely peer review process that capitalizes on 
proven capabilities to plan, design and execute complex outer 
planetary missions.
    The recommendation provides funding for the continuation of 
the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF). TPF will study all aspects 
of planets outside our solar system to find earthlike planets 
and study those planets' ability to maintain life.
    The Committee supports NASA's efforts to plan for the 
extension of the life of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and 
maintains that the HST servicing mission should be one of 
NASA's top near-term priorities. The recommendation provides 
requested funding for the HST servicing mission; however, these 
funds should not be used to de-orbit HST.
    The recommendation includes the requested level of 
$98,500,000 for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). This 
mission will permit a dramatic leap in our understanding of 
many processes in astrophysics and is a key mission in NASA's 
search for Earth-like planets and life. Technologies being 
developed for SIM are also critical to the next generation of 
space-based telescopes.
    The recommendation includes the requested level of 
$700,200,000 for Mars Exploration to ensure the continued 
successful implementation of Phoenix in 2007, Mars Science Lab 
in 2009, Scout in 2011 and the Mars orbiter in 2013 as well as 
the early technology work for later missions and operations of 
ongoing missions.
    The Committee believes that NASA's scientific successes and 
discoveries depend upon a well-balanced mission portfolio of 
large, medium, and small-sized missions. Reductions from 
planned rates of growth in Science funding appear to have 
fallen disproportionately on smaller missions such as the 
competitively-run Explorer Program, which is one of NASA's most 
important programs addressing critical scientific questions. 
Within the funding level provided, the Committee encourages 
NASA to consider a restoration of funding to smaller missions 
and to fund already-competed missions to the extent possible.
    The Committee understands that NASA is in the process of 
reviewing the future course of action on the Stratospheric 
Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). The Committee 
encourages NASA to propose a reallocation of funding through 
the regular reprogramming process should this review result in 
a continuation of the program.
    The recommendation includes $443,100,000, as requested for 
the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The Committee 
understands that the JWST has been reaffirmed by a special 
Science Assessment Team as the astronomy community's number one 
priority for the coming decade, and is planned for a 2013 
launch.
    A critical factor that will affect the future missions NASA 
can initiate is the availability of power sources for probes 
that cannot rely on solar energy because they are traveling too 
far from, or too close to, the Sun. An Europa mission and the 
Solar Probe are examples. Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are 
required for these spacecraft. For the past several years, 
Russia has been supplying the plutonium-238 (Pu-238) needed for 
U.S. RPSs because U.S. supplies are depleted. Now, Russia's own 
supplies are running dry. In addition, NASA has curtailed a 
major part of its technology development for advanced RPS 
devices. Therefore, NASA, in consultation with the Department 
of Energy and other appropriate agencies, shall submit a report 
to the Committee no later than August 31, 2007 on these issues. 
The report shall address the status of U.S. development of 
advanced RPS devices; a detailed explanation of what steps are 
being taken to ensure an adequate supply of plutonium-238 for 
spacecraft missions; and an indication of how many RPSs, of 
what design and capabilities, will be available for use, and 
when, to permit effective planning for future missions.
    Exploration Systems.--The recommendation includes a total 
of $3,827,600,000 for Exploration Systems. The recommendation 
includes the requested funding levels for the Crew Exploration 
Vehicle, the Crew Launch Vehicle, and International Space 
Station Cargo Crew Services. The recommendation reduces funding 
for Constellation Systems program support activities by 
$16,000,000.
    The recommendation includes $239,300,000 for Exploration 
Technology Development. The Committee expects NASA to enter 
into an arrangement with the National Research Council for an 
independent assessment of NASA's restructured Exploration 
Technology Development program to determine how well the 
program is aligned with the stated objectives of the Vision for 
Space Exploration, identify any gaps, and assess the quality of 
the research. This assessment shall be provided to the 
Committee within one year after the enactment of this Act.
    The recommendation includes $252,700,000 for Robotic Lunar 
Exploration, an increase of $118,400,000 over the current year 
level. The Committee recognizes the importance of a robotic 
lunar lander mission in preparing for future human exploration 
of the Moon, and therefore supports the continuing work of the 
Lunar Precursor and Robotic Program Office for the development 
of the robotic lunar project.
    The Committee encourages NASA to allocate additional 
funding, if possible, via the reprogramming process, for basic 
and applied microgravity life and physical sciences, including 
the maintenance of a meaningful program of peer-reviewed 
ground-based research. The Committee further encourages NASA to 
establish an external advisory panel to guide research 
priorities relative to microgravity life and physical sciences 
consistent with the recommendations of the National Academies.
    Aeronautics Research.--The recommendation includes 
$824,400,000 for Aeronautics Research, an increase of 
$100,000,000 above the request. The restoration of funds 
reflects the Committee's concern about the direction NASA has 
taken in downsizing and restructuring its Aeronautics Research 
program. While the United States is reducing its Federal 
investment in aeronautics research our competitors are 
increasing their aeronautics research and development budgets 
and making competitiveness their number one priority. While the 
Committee strongly supports the President's new vision for 
robotic and manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, 
it is imperative that we not forget the importance of 
aeronautics research to our domestic economy. The Committee 
notes that NASA is in the process of developing a National 
Aeronautics Policy to be delivered to the Congress in the fall 
of 2006.
    The Committee expects NASA to provide a report within sixty 
days of the enactment of this Act on its response to the 
findings and recommendations of the National Research Council's 
Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics, including whether it 
intends to implement all of the Survey's recommendations, and 
if not, NASA's rationale for choosing not to implement a given 
recommendation. The report should also include a timetable for 
implementing the Survey's recommendations.
    Cross-Agency Support Programs.--The recommendation includes 
$425,200,000 for Cross-Agency Support Programs. The recommended 
funding level includes $153,300,000 for Education Programs, and 
$32,200,000 for Shared Capabilities. The reduction below the 
request is a general reduction to support functions and 
institutional investments funded through general and 
administrative charges. The Committee expects that this 
reduction will be spread back to program activities throughout 
this account proportionally.
    Within the amount provided for education, the Committee 
strongly encourages NASA to continue long-standing educational 
collaborations with partner institutions to promote the public 
understanding of NASA's missions, support the development of 
the science and technology workforce needed for the 21st 
century, and to support NASA's strategic directions. The 
Committee also encourages NASA to allocate funding above the 
request for the Space Grant and the Experimental Program to 
Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR). The Committee expects 
NASA to issue its request for proposals for EPSCoR funds within 
90 days of the enactment of this Act.
    Within the amount provided for corporate general and 
administrative charges, the Committee expects NASA to allocate 
at least the amount in the budget request for an Independent 
Verification and Validation facility.

                        EXPLORATION CAPABILITIES

    NASA's Exploration Capabilities (EC) account provides 
funding for the Space Operations Mission Directorate. The Space 
Operations Mission Directorate includes the International Space 
Station (ISS), the Space Shuttle Program, and Space and Flight 
Support. The EC appropriation includes both the direct and the 
indirect costs supporting the Space Operations Mission 
Directorate, and provides for all of the research; development; 
operations; salaries and related expenses; design, repair, 
rehabilitation, and modification of facilities and construction 
of new facilities; maintenance and operation of facilities; and 
other general and administrative activities supporting the EC 
programs.
    The Committee recommends $6,193,500,000 for exploration 
capabilities, a decrease of $41,422,000 below the budget 
request and $384,401,000 below the fiscal year 2006 base 
enacted level. The recommendation includes a decrease of 
$33,400,000 below the request for the International Space 
Station (ISS). The Committee believes that this small reduction 
is appropriate given the uncertainties surrounding the nature 
and scope of the science to be conducted on the ISS. The 
recommendation assumes that this reduction will be taken from 
the amount requested for Multi-User Systems and Support. The 
remaining portion of the reduction below the request is a 
general reduction to support functions and institutional 
investments funded through general and administrative charges. 
The Committee expects that this reduction will be spread back 
to program activities throughout this account proportionally.
    In order to ensure that the ISS will be used effectively to 
test technologies in support of exploration, the Committee 
directs NASA to enter into an arrangement with the National 
Research Council for an independent assessment of how the ISS 
can best be used as a technology testbed in support of the 
stated objectives of the Vision for Space Exploration. The 
assessment should evaluate NASA's plans, identify any gaps, and 
determine the time required to achieve stated objectives under 
the planned funding profile for ISS testbed activities. This 
assessment shall be provided to the Committee within one year 
after the enactment of this Act. In addition, the Committee 
directs NASA to provide a plan to the Committee by March 31, 
2007 for utilizing the ISS for fundamental materials science 
research.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Inspector General Act of 1978 established the Office of 
Inspector General. The Office is responsible for providing 
agency-wide audit and investigative functions to identify and 
correct management and administrative deficiencies that create 
conditions for existing or potential instances of fraud, waste, 
and mismanagement.
    The Committee recommends $33,500,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, the same as the budget request and 
$1,514,000 above the fiscal year 2006 enacted level.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The recommendation includes four administrative provisions. 
The first provision allows for funds to remain available until 
expended when an activity has been initiated for the 
construction of facilities. The second provision makes all 
amounts appropriated for construction of facilities available 
until September 30, 2009. The third provision allows funds for 
authorized prizes to remain available without fiscal year 
limitation. The final provision governs transfers between NASA 
appropriation accounts, and mandates that any transfer pursuant 
to this provision shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds.

                      National Science Foundation

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$6,020,012,000 for the National Science Foundation (NSF), which 
is $438,846,000 above the current year funding level and the 
same as the request.
    Established in 1950, the National Science Foundation's 
primary purpose is to develop and implement a national policy 
on science, and support and promote basic research and 
education in the sciences.
    The Committee reminds NSF of the reprogramming guidelines 
in section 605 of this Act. It is the intent of the Committee 
that the reprogramming requirements described in section 605 
shall also apply to all balances of funds carried over into 
fiscal year 2007 by NSF. Detailed recommendations for NSF's 
individual appropriations accounts are contained in the 
following paragraphs.

                    RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommends a total of $4,665,950,000 for 
Research and Related Activities. The recommendation is 
$334,467,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as 
the request.
    The Committee strongly supports the increased funding for 
basic scientific research proposed in the President's American 
Competitiveness Initiative for fiscal year 2007. The increase 
provided for fiscal year 2007 is intended as the first year of 
a ten-year doubling of the Federal investment in innovation-
enabling research supporting high-leverage fields of physical 
science and engineering.
    The recommendation does not include specific funding 
allocations for each directorate or for individual programs and 
activities. If there are any deviations from the allocations 
proposed in the President's budget request that meet the 
criteria established in section 605, the Committee shall be 
notified accordingly.
    The recommendation includes language providing up to 
$485,000,000 for Polar research and operations support, as 
requested. The recommendation continues the appropriation of 
funding to NSF for the procurement of polar icebreaking 
services related to NSF's mission. The Committee expects the 
NSF to continue to reimburse the Coast Guard for icebreaking 
services related to NSF's mission in fiscal year 2007. The 
appropriation of this funding to NSF does not transfer to NSF 
the responsibility for maintenance and long-term modernization 
costs of the Coast Guard icebreaking fleet, as such action 
would irresponsibly jeopardize the nation's primary source of 
funding for critical basic scientific research. While using 
Coast Guard capabilities may be necessary to meet fiscal year 
2007 requirements, the Committee expects NSF to continue 
efforts in pursuit of alternative, more economical, icebreaking 
solutions for 2007 and beyond. The Committee directs NSF to 
pursue the most cost-effective means of obtaining icebreaking 
services in the Antarctic for the 2006-2007 season, including, 
but not limited to, reimbursing the Coast Guard on a mutually 
agreed upon basis for the operations and maintenance of the 
U.S. polar icebreaking fleet. The Committee also strongly 
encourages NSF to continue to study and develop alternative and 
innovative means of meeting the logistics requirements of 
maintaining permanent research stations in Antarctica.
    The recommendation includes language that allows funds 
provided in this account to be available for innovation 
inducement prizes. The concept of inducement awards to 
encourage broad involvement in solving a specifically stated 
scientific problem has been a catalyst for scientific 
advancement since at least the early 18th century. The 
Committee expects NSF to continue work begun in fiscal year 
2006 with the National Academies to craft a prize or categories 
of prizes that would be of an appropriate scale and to develop 
the rules and conditions for awarding such prizes, and report 
back to the Committee on plans to initiate a prize program in 
fiscal year 2007. The Committee strongly encourages NSF to use 
this mechanism, particularly in programs that specifically 
emphasize innovation, to focus on high risk/high payoff 
research projects. The recommendation also includes language 
clarifying that the NSF has the authority to accept donations 
for specific prize competitions. The Committee strongly 
encourages NSF to leverage private sector involvement in a 
prize program.
    The Committee commends NSF for its Silicon Nanonelectronics 
and Beyond program and its partnership with the Nanoelectronics 
Research Initiative, which involves the sponsorship of research 
in the areas of information technology and electronics. The 
Committee encourages NSF to continue its support for such 
research in fiscal year 2007.

          MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommends a total of $237,250,000 for the 
major research equipment and facilities construction account 
for fiscal year 2007, an increase of $46,369,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 funding level and $3,000,000 below the 
request. This account provides funding for the construction of 
major research facilities that provide unique capabilities at 
the cutting edge of science and engineering.
    The Committee recommendation includes requested funding for 
five continuing projects, as follows: $47,890,000 for Atacama 
Large Millimeter Array (ALMA); $27,400,000 for EarthScope; 
$28,650,000 for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory; $42,880,000 
for the Scientific Ocean Drilling Vessel; and $9,130,000 for 
South Pole Station Modernization. In addition, the 
recommendation includes initial funding for three new project 
starts, as follows: $56,000,000 for the Alaska Region Research 
Vessel; $13,500,000 for the Ocean Observatories Initiative; and 
$11,800,000 for the National Ecological Observatory Network. 
The recommendation does not include $3,000,000 requested to 
reimburse the Judgment Fund of the U.S. Treasury.
    The Committee is aware that the NSF has recently completed 
a detailed re-examination of the ALMA project. The United 
States' cost for completing the new baseline is estimated to be 
45 percent higher than originally projected. Although a part of 
the increase is due to rising labor and material costs, some of 
these new liabilities are the result of management problems, in 
particular, the lack of partner integration and centralized 
decision making that can potentially cause cost growth. While 
the recommendation includes the full request for the ALMA 
project for 2007, the NSF is directed to submit a report to the 
Committee by October 1, 2006, on how it intends to correct the 
overall management and project issues. In the event that there 
are additional ALMA funding requirements in fiscal year 2007, 
the Committee expects NSF to submit a reprogramming of funds 
from lower priorities or new starts in accordance with the 
procedures set forth in section 605 of this Act.

                     EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

    The Committee recommendation includes $832,432,000 in this 
account, which is $35,739,000 above the current year level and 
$16,212,000 above the request. In light of the challenges 
facing the nation in improving math and science educational 
participation and achievement, the Committee believes that the 
American Competitiveness Initiative must not only bolster the 
NSF's basic research activities, but also its education 
programs. The most critical need in this regard is to improve 
K-12 and undergraduate education in science and math.
    The recommendation includes $21,000,000 for the Robert 
Noyce Scholarship Program, an increase of $11,000,000 above the 
request. The Noyce Program provides scholarships to math and 
science majors in return for a commitment to teaching. 
Improving undergraduate education is a key to increasing the 
American technological workforce, improving overall science 
literacy, and strengthening K-12 math and science education. 
The recommendation also includes an increase of $5,000,000 
above the request for the Experimental Program to Stimulate 
Competitive Research (EPSCoR), for a total program level of 
$105,000,000.
    The Committee recommendation also includes: $25,000,000 for 
Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeships; 
$46,000,000 for Math and Science Partnerships; $46,500,000 for 
Advanced Technology Education; $26,500,000 for STEM Talent 
Expansion Program; $107,000,000 for Discovery Research K-12; 
$30,000,000 for Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
Undergraduate Program; and $40,000,000 for Louis Stokes 
Alliances for Minority Participation.
    The Foundation's Education and Human Resources activities 
are designed to encourage the entrance of talented students 
into science and technology careers, to improve the 
undergraduate science and engineering education environment, to 
assist in providing all pre-college students with a level of 
education in mathematics, science, and technology that reflects 
the needs of the nation and is the highest quality attained 
anywhere in the world, and to extend greater research 
opportunities to under-represented segments of the scientific 
and engineering communities.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $268,610,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses, which is an increase of $21,803,000 above the current 
year level and $13,212,000 below the request. Of the amount 
provided, $11,000,000 is intended to cover built-in personnel 
and general operating adjustments for fiscal year 2007. The 
Salaries and Expenses activity provides for the operation, 
support and management, and direction of all NSF programs and 
activities and includes necessary funds that develop, manage, 
and coordinate Foundation programs.
    The Committee directs the NSF to submit a specific 
organizational allocation of any new positions funded under 
this heading within 30 days after the enactment of this Act.

                  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,910,000 for the 
operations of the National Science Board, which is $39,000 
below the current year level and the same as the request. The 
Committee strongly endorses the role of the National Science 
Board to conduct independent science policy analyses and 
oversight of the National Science Foundation.
    The National Science Board, established in 1950, 
establishes policies and assesses the quality, relevance and 
performance of the National Science Foundation's awards and 
capital investments. In addition, the Board provides advice to 
the President and the Congress on matters of science and 
engineering policy.
    Although many reports have raised alarm and documented 
potential solutions to the crisis in K-12 science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education, an action agenda 
focused on implementation is lacking. The Committee fully 
supports and encourages the National Science Board's creation 
of a new Commission on 21st Century Education in STEM. This 
Commission will develop a national action plan to address known 
K-12 problems; propose practical and affordable solutions; act 
as a catalyst for concerted action by the appropriate Federal 
agencies; and identify the explicit role of NSF in the context 
of the larger, national education system. The Board shall keep 
the Committee apprised of the Commission's progress, and 
deliver a final national action plan in mid-2007.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,860,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General, which is $507,000 above the 
current year level and the same as the request.
    This account supports the National Science Foundation's 
audit and investigation functions to identify and correct 
management and administrative deficiencies that could lead to 
fraud, waste, and abuse.

            TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY


                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

    The Committee's fiscal year 2007 recommendation for the 
Department of State strongly supports ongoing efforts to 
strengthen diplomatic, embassy and border security, and to 
institutionalize management reforms. The Committee recommends a 
total of $9,124,170,000 for fiscal year 2007 for the Department 
of State. This amount is $378,269,000 below the budget request 
and $203,629,000 above the amount appropriated for fiscal year 
2007. Of the total amount provided, $8,999,170,000 is derived 
from general-purpose discretionary funds and $125,000,000 is 
scored as mandatory spending.
    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$6,576,526,000 for the discretionary appropriations accounts 
under Administration of Foreign Affairs; $2,286,645,000 for the 
accounts under International Organizations; $67,928,000 for 
International Commissions; and $68,071,000 for Other 
activities. The Committee's recommended priorities for the 
Department of State are detailed in the following paragraphs.

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs


                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $4,505,084,000 for the Diplomatic 
and Consular Programs account, including $795,170,000 to 
continue funding for worldwide security upgrades, and 
$351,000,000 for public diplomacy international information 
programs.
    This appropriation provides for the formulation and 
execution of United States foreign policy, including the 
conduct of diplomatic and consular relations with foreign 
countries, diplomatic relations with international 
organizations, and related activities. This account includes 
funding for the regional, program, and operations bureaus and 
offices of the Department of State and the Foreign Service.
    The recommendation represents a decrease of $146,789,000 
below the request, and an increase of $185,350,000 above the 
current year, including supplemental amounts. Within this 
total, the recommendation of $795,170,000 for worldwide 
security upgrades is $114,454,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
level and the same amount as requested. Security funding 
increases are described under the ``Worldwide Security 
Upgrades'' section below:
    Staffing Increases.--The Committee endorses the 
Department's proposal to augment and shift personnel resources 
to high-priority diplomatic requirements, including new 
positions for expanded emphasis on India, China, Brazil, Egypt, 
Indonesia, and South Africa; new positions for the Office of 
the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization; and new 
positions for critical needs language training, including 
Arabic, Chinese (Cantonese and Mandarin), Dari, Pashto, Korean, 
and Farsi.
    Since 2001, the Committee has provided increases under the 
diplomatic and consular positions totaling 2,254 new positions 
above attrition for the State Department, an increase of 15.3 
percent.
    Worldwide Security Upgrades.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $795,170,000, the full amount requested under 
Diplomatic and Consular Programs, for the costs of worldwide 
security upgrades, an increase of $114,454,000 above the 
current year level. The recommendation includes $681,839,000 
for ongoing security activities, including guard services, 
physical security equipment, armored vehicles, chemical/
biological program, personnel, training, and wireless 
communications; $42,846,000 to continue the perimeter/compound 
security initiative; and $70,485,000 in security staffing 
program increases, including $35,019,000 for Afghanistan 
security. The recommendation will provide an increase of 50 
positions and $30,485,000, including 35 Special Agents and 15 
security engineering and technical support personnel. Including 
the 50 new positions provided in 2007, the Committee has 
provided 784 new positions for a total of 1,295, an increase of 
153.4 percent since 2001.
    Public Diplomacy Programs.--In 1999, the United States 
Information Agency (USIA) programs were merged within the 
Department of State. At that time, the position of Under 
Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs was 
established. Since then, the Committee has prioritized public 
diplomacy programs and has included language, designating 
amounts specifically for public diplomacy efforts. For fiscal 
year 2007, the recommendation provides $351,000,000 for Public 
Diplomacy programs under this account, an increase of 
$21,266,000 above the current year. Within the amounts 
provided, $268,059,000 is for the regional bureaus, $62,661,000 
is for the Bureau of International Information Programs, and 
$20,280,000 is for the functional bureaus/other support costs 
and payments.
    The need to strengthen our public diplomacy continues to 
gain urgency as we see alarming public opinion polls and 
foreign media content relating to the war on terrorism and the 
war in Iraq that reveal profound anti-American sentiments, and 
often a rejection of our policies. The need for expanded 
efforts is primarily, but not exclusively, in the Arab and 
Muslim world.
    The Committee commends the recent efforts of the Department 
to transform the Department's public diplomacy programs and 
institutionalize reforms. The Committee supports encouraging 
members of the State Department to speak on the record; 
integrating public diplomacy into policy; strengthening the 
public diplomacy specialty; recognizing public diplomacy skills 
as criteria for promotion for all Foreign Service; and 
implementing a rigorous evaluation process of all public 
diplomacy programs.
    Further, the Committee commends the recent steps taken to 
increase efforts to counter disinformation and deliberate 
misinformation by monitoring hostile media and providing U.S. 
spokespersons and foreign media with factual information to 
respond to and to counter, malicious propaganda about the 
United States. The Department has greatly expanded U.S. media 
presence in Arab and regional media, and the number of media 
interviews by the Department in Arabic has increased more than 
four times over the number prior to 2005. The Committee 
strongly urges the Department to continue to improve U.S. 
efforts to communicate with the Arab and Muslim world in local 
languages.
    The Committee is concerned by negative perceptions about 
the U.S. among foreign publics. More must be done to understand 
the sources of such perceptions. The Committee commends the 
efforts of the Department to enlist external expertise to 
better understand what actions the United States Government 
(USG), non-profit organizations, the business community, civic 
society and other actors should take to improve the perception 
of the U.S. among foreign publics; actions the USG and others 
can take to direct young, educated people in the Muslim world 
away from extremism and violence; how public diplomacy can best 
contribute to effecting real change in the Middle East; and how 
to increase the recognition of America as the world's leading 
donor of food, technology, and financial aid.
    The Committee continues to believe that separately 
identifying public diplomacy resources will facilitate the 
Committee's ability to monitor funding levels and trends for 
these activities. The amount identified for public diplomacy 
programs includes the costs of personnel and programs 
throughout the Department. The Committee expects the Department 
to identify any impediments to optimal performance of public 
diplomacy programs and propose any necessary changes, including 
organizational changes, through the reprogramming process. The 
recommendation for public diplomacy will support the 
continuation of programs in the Arab and Muslim world, which 
have been expanded since fiscal year 2002. The Committee 
directs the Department to provide quarterly reports to the 
Committee, beginning three months after the enactment of this 
Act, on the steps taken to increase efforts to counter anti-
American sentiments around the world.
    The Committee considers United States Government-sponsored 
international broadcasting to be an essential component of 
public diplomacy. The Committee expects the State Department to 
assist the Broadcasting Board of Governors in ensuring that 
U.S. broadcasting programs provide a balanced and comprehensive 
presentation of U.S. policy. Since September 11, 2001, the 
Committee has made significant investments to expand 
international broadcasting efforts, primarily in the Arab and 
Muslim world.
    Intelligence and Research.--The Committee recommendation 
includes a total of $52,359,000, an increase of $1,000,000 and 
5 positions above the requested level of funding for the Bureau 
of Intelligence and Research to focus on preventing terrorism, 
resolving regional conflicts, preventing and curtailing the 
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and anticipating 
and responding to humanitarian crises. The Committee expects 
the Office to expand its survey programs in Arabic and Muslim-
majorities countries.
    Border Security Program.--The recommendation includes 
$1,128,769,000 for the Department's Border Security program, 
$682,969,000 is funded through collection of Machine Readable 
Visa (MRV) fees, $120,000,000 is funded through the collection 
of the Western Hemisphere Travel Surcharge, $31,800,000 is 
funded through Fraud Prevention fees, and $294,000,000 is to be 
funded through the Enhanced Border Security Program Fees and 
Visa Fraud Fees. The total amount is an increase of $93,794,000 
above the fiscal year 2006 program level. This funding level 
includes a program increase of 135 new positions for a total 
position base of 2,939 positions by the end of fiscal year 
2007, an increase of 42.7 percent above attrition since 2001. 
The Committee understands these new positions are needed to 
handle the increased domestic passport workload as well as 
changes in the visa process, including more extensive 
interviewing of applicants and the implementation of biometric 
collection. The Committee directs the Department to continue 
its bimonthly reporting on MRV fee revenue as specified in the 
conference report accompanying the fiscal year 2003 
Supplemental Appropriations Act (Public Law 108-11), and begin 
reporting on Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative fee revenue 
as provided through the Passport Security Enhancement Act of 
2005 (Public Law 109-167).
    The Committee urges the Department to continue to work on 
an interagency basis to strengthen the visa process to make it 
an effective anti-terrorism tool, while avoiding the creation 
of unnecessary barriers or delays to legitimate travel to the 
United States.
    Fingerprint Technology Standards.--In a December 2004 
report, the Inspector General of the Department of Justice 
concluded that the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security, 
and State had not agreed on a uniform fingerprint technology 
standard nor had they agreed on how to develop a fully 
interoperable system that provides law enforcement agencies 
with readily and easily available access to Homeland Security 
records. Recently, the Committee was informed that a uniform 
10-fingerprint technology standard has been adopted. The 
Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 to be derived 
from fee collections for a pilot study. The Committee expects 
the State Department to work with the Departments of Justice 
and Homeland Security to implement expeditiously a fully 
interoperable system to share Homeland Security records.
    Interagency Task Force.--The recommendation continues base 
funding for costs associated with the operation of a U.S. 
Government interagency task force to monitor the United Nations 
headquarters renovation project.
    Minority Recruitment and Hiring.--The Department is 
directed to continue base funding for the educational 
partnership with Hostos Community College and Columbia 
University. This program supports the Department's ongoing 
efforts to increase minority hiring and diversity by 
facilitating the preparation of non-traditional and minority 
students for careers in the Foreign Service and the State 
Department. The Committee also expects the Department to 
continue base funding for an ongoing partnership with Howard 
University in support of the Department's efforts to enhance 
the diversity of the U.S. diplomatic corps by increasing the 
number of underrepresented minorities in foreign relations and 
international affairs careers. These resources are to continue 
and expand the successful collaborative partnership between the 
Department and Howard University to recruit and prepare 
students from various institutions with large minority 
populations for positions in the U.S. Foreign Service.
    Overseas Schools.--The Committee commends the consolidated 
Overseas Schools Assistance Program for its accomplishments in 
enhancing educational opportunities for children of American 
families living overseas. This program fulfills a two-fold 
purpose of providing a quality American-style education for 
children of U.S. citizens assigned overseas and demonstrating 
the best practices in American education to children of other 
countries and local educators. In addition, the Committee 
commends the continuing contribution of the Overseas Schools 
Advisory Council and its annual Program of Educational 
Assistance that helps to provide educational excellence to 
American overseas schools. The Council also promotes financial 
and in-kind support to these schools from U.S. businesses and 
foundations, as well as participation in support activities of 
these schools by American firms' employees and their spouses 
stationed abroad.
    Tibet.--A number of provisions in the Tibetan Policy Act 
fall under the jurisdiction of the Department of State 
including provisions concerning establishment of a U.S. 
presence in Lhasa; Tibetan language training and requirements 
for Foreign Service officers; promotion of advocacy on 
religious freedom in Tibet; necessary support for the Office of 
the Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues; and the need to 
raise inter-departmental awareness of the provisions of this 
legislation. The Committee urges the relevant bureaus and 
offices within the Department to ensure the full implementation 
of the Tibetan Policy Act.
    In view of the Department of State's report to the 
Committee on implementation of the Tibetan Policy Act of 2002, 
the Committee recognizes the important role played by the 
Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues in implementing this 
Act. To this end, the Committee recommendation continues 
$1,000,000 for salaries and expenses for an office to support 
the Coordinator in carrying out the broad responsibilities 
detailed in Section 621(d) of PL 107-228, as well as for 
convening coordinating meetings for appropriate United States 
Government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and 
representatives of the Tibetan leadership. The Committee 
expects that the office will consist of approximately three 
professional full-time staff and such support staff as may be 
needed, in addition to the Special Coordinator.
    Stabilization and Reconstruction.--The Committee strongly 
supports the work of the Office of the Coordinator for 
Reconstruction and Stabilization. The Committee understands 
that this office will be the central entity to plan and 
coordinate United States Government civilian activities in pre- 
and post-conflict environments, and to coordinate the U.S. 
government reaction to complex contingencies. Further, the 
Committee understands that this office would improve 
operational response time in the areas of reconstruction, 
stabilization, and humanitarian assistance. The recommendation 
supports new positions for the Office.
    Trafficking in Persons.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned about the serious problem of international 
trafficking in persons. The Committee recommendation increases 
the staff level of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking 
in Persons. The Committee expects the Department to increase 
the number of personnel dedicated to the efforts of the Office 
by five in 2007. The Committee expects this Office to further 
strengthen the annual reporting process and those of the 
Department-led Senior Policy Operating Group to coordinate 
interagency activities to implement the Trafficking Victims 
Prevention Act of 2000. The recommendation assumes continuation 
of grant programs regarding trafficking in persons.
    The Committee shares the view of the TIP Office that demand 
reduction activities are critical components of successful 
anti-trafficking campaigns and that equal weight should be 
given to anti-supply and anti-demand efforts in anti-
trafficking campaigns. Further, the Committee believes that a 
Special Watch List placement is intended to serve as a short-
term designation for countries, during which those countries 
either achieve significant reform or receive Tier III status. 
Strong grounds exist for not designating countries for the 
Special Watch List for more than one year, and the Committee 
believes that consecutive Special Watch List designations 
should be limited to extreme cases.
    Environment.--The Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean 
Development and Climate promises to accelerate the development 
and deployment of clean energy technologies. The Partnership 
should advance the goal of enhancing energy security, reducing 
harmful air pollution, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions 
intensity in the context of sustained economic growth. The 
Committee supports Department efforts to expand the 
Partnership.
    Exports.--It has been brought to the Committee's attention 
that the policy of the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls 
for the export of small arms lacks clarity. The competitiveness 
of U.S. manufacturers in the international marketplace is 
disadvantaged with unclear export policies. The Committee urges 
the Department to clarify such policies.
    International Cooperative Administrative Support Services 
system (ICASS).--The ICASS system was intended to empower all 
U.S. government agencies located at an overseas post to more 
efficiently and economically provide administrative support 
services. The Committee expects that all overseas posts adopt 
the ICASS system.
    International Religious Freedom.--The recommendation 
continues funding for the Office of International Religious 
Freedom in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor. The 
Committee continues to support the integration of religious 
freedom into United States foreign policy. The Committee 
expects the Office to develop and implement comprehensive 
strategies to promote religious liberty, and to assist in the 
preparation of the Human Rights Reports and the annual Report 
on International Religious Freedom. The Committee also expects 
the Office, in consultation with the Commission on 
International Religious Freedom, to work to further incorporate 
religious freedom themes in the Department's public diplomacy 
programs. In addition, the Committee expects the Department to 
continue to integrate the internationally recognized right to 
freedom of religion into Foreign Service Officer training at 
all levels. The Director of the National Foreign Affairs 
Training Center should work with the Ambassador at Large for 
International Religious Freedom and the U.S. Commission on 
International Religious Freedom on incorporating international 
religious freedom issues, including materials, curriculum, and 
innovative ways to integrate religious freedom issues into the 
training modules.
    Web Posting of U.S. Human Rights Reports.--One way of 
sharing American values is to highlight our belief in the 
importance of human rights around the world. To further this 
effort, the Committee supports the posting of the U.S. Country 
Reports on Human Rights Practices, the Annual Report on 
International Religious Freedom, and the Trafficking in Persons 
Report on all U.S. Embassy websites. The Committee commends 
many of the U.S. embassies that have translated these reports 
into the official languages of the host countries. 
Unfortunately, a few embassies have not complied with prior 
committee direction to make these reports available. Therefore, 
the Committee expects to be notified by January 31, 2007, of 
any U.S. Embassy not in compliance with the Committee's 
direction to post in English as well as in the official 
language of host country.
    Right-Sizing the U.S. Government Presence Overseas.--The 
Committee continues to define right-sizing as the 
reconfiguration of overseas U.S. Government staff to the number 
necessary to achieve U.S. foreign policy goals. The Committee 
is convinced, and agrees with the recommendation of the 
Overseas Presence Advisory Panel, that rationalizing staffing 
and operations abroad has the potential for significant 
budgetary savings. It costs two to three times as much to 
maintain an employee outside of the United States as it does 
within the United States. The notion of right-sizing as a 
desirable means to improve security and gain efficiencies 
implies that the current number of overseas staff in some 
locations is greater than the minimum number necessary, and 
that the presence of a number greater than the minimum number 
presents an unnecessary and unacceptable financial and security 
burden. Given the security requirements for the U.S. mission in 
Iraq, the Committee strongly urges the Department to use the 
most stringent criteria for determining staffing levels. As 
part of the overall right-sizing function, the Committee 
encourages the Department to review the ICASS system and fully 
explore how ICASS can contribute to rightsizing efforts. The 
Committee has outlined its concern regarding the right sizing 
of the U.S. government presence overseas in report language 
since fiscal year 2001 and has included bill language 
designating funding for the Office of Right Sizing the United 
States Government Overseas Presence since fiscal year 2004. The 
Committee remains frustrated by the lack of progress in meeting 
the intended results. Recognizing the difficulties inherent in 
changing world situations and conditions in specific host 
countries requiring movement of mission objectives, 
nevertheless, the Department has instances of overly optimistic 
staffing projections that have not been realized. These 
projections have led to new facilities with vacancies at the 
same time the Department is seeking ambitious growth in nearby 
posts. With increased security concerns and decreasing budgets, 
the Committee is steadfast in its belief that a more rigorous 
approach is necessary.
    Victims of Terrorism Compensation.--The Committee directs 
the Administration, including the State Department, to produce 
a comprehensive legislative proposal to the Committees of 
jurisdiction to provide just and equitable compensation for all 
victims of international terrorism and their surviving family 
members, including U.S. foreign service, military, foreign 
service nationals, and civil servants. The Committee expects 
this proposal to be presented to the Congress within 60 days of 
enactment of this Act.
    Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Enforcement.--Experts 
report that pirating and counterfeiting has grown to an 
estimated $200 billion a year problem and the theft of artistic 
and scientific creation is draining our economy. The Committee 
notes the United States has not yet taken an intellectual 
property rights enforcement case against its trading partners 
to stem the hemorrhaging of U.S. intellectual property. The 
embassies in key markets, including China, Russia, and Brazil 
should conduct market surveys to determine methodologies/
benchmarks for measuring levels of piracy and counterfeiting, 
and to conduct market research to determine the actual levels 
of piracy/counterfeiting. The Committee expects the Department 
to work closely with industry and to work with economist/market 
research firms, as practicable.
    Some of China's IPR problems are attributable to rogue 
provinces and localities that do not adhere to IPR directives 
of the central government. The U.S. government including the 
State Department and the United States Trade Representative's 
Office should develop expertise on the situation in key 
provinces, and increase dialogue with officials in those 
provinces to enable the implementation of IPR commitments.
    The Committee has included language in the bill, similar to 
language in prior years, which: (1) permits not to exceed 
$4,000,000 to be transferred to the Emergencies in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service account for emergency 
evacuations and terrorism rewards; (2) provides $1,513,000 in 
fees collected from other Executive Branch agencies and 
$490,000 from reserves for lease or use of facilities at the 
International Center Complex, as authorized by law; (3) 
provides not to exceed $15,000 from reimbursements, surcharges, 
and fees for use of Blair House facilities in accordance with 
the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956; (4) 
requires notification of Congress before processing licenses 
for the export of satellites to China; and (5) makes not to 
exceed $6,000,000 in fee collections available until expended 
for various activities.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND

    The Committee recommends $58,143,000 for the Capital 
Investment Fund.
    In addition, the budget request estimates that $207,643,000 
in expedited passport fees will be used to support the 
information technology modernization effort, for a total fiscal 
year 2007 spending availability of $265,786,000.
    The entire amount available under this heading, including 
fees, will support investments in new information technologies 
and infrastructure to improve the efficiency of Department 
operations.
    Since 2001, the Committee has invested more than 
$1,470,000,000 in the Department's global information 
technology infrastructure to enable rapid and reliable 
communication between Washington and the more than 300 
locations worldwide, while maintaining the highest possible 
standards of security of government information. The Committee 
expects the Department to maintain and protect this investment.
    The Committee is concerned regarding the recent program 
setbacks in regard to the State Messaging and Archive Retrieval 
Toolset initiative. This initiative was designed to integrate 
all Department systems through which people exchange 
information, including the outmoded telegram system. This 
single web-based system would have advanced the goals of the 
Foreign Affairs Systems Integration project, which received 
funding in previous years, namely enhancing the ability of 
employees to communicate across agency and geographic 
boundaries. The Committee is concerned that in such a funding 
and security environment, greater oversight must be provided to 
the State Department's IT infrastructure investment. In 
addition, the recommendation includes $7,139,000 for public key 
infrastructure requirements, to maintain secure interagency 
communications.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $32,508,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), which is the same as the request, and 
$2,862,000 above the current year level. The Inspector General 
conducts oversight of the State Department and the Broadcasting 
Board of Governors. The Committee continues to highlight the 
requirement for OIG oversight of the Department's efforts to 
implement worldwide security upgrades.
    The Committee recommendation includes language, as in 
previous years, waiving the statutory requirement that every 
post be inspected every five years, in order to provide greater 
flexibility to the Inspector General to use resources in the 
most critical areas.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS

    The bill includes a total of $436,275,000 for the 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs of the Department of 
State. This amount is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
level, and $38,013,000 below the budget request.
    Funding provided under this heading supports international 
educational and cultural exchange programs, including the 
Fulbright student and scholar exchanges and the International 
Visitors Program, as well as related staff and administrative 
costs. To the maximum extent possible, the Committee urges that 
the following exchange programs be supported: the Congress-
Bundestag youth exchange program; the disability exchange 
clearinghouse; foreign study grants for U.S. undergraduates; 
Future leaders exchange programs; Teaching Excellence Awards 
and Partnerships in Education; Educational advising in Eurasia; 
Muskie Graduate and Ph.D. Fellowships; Youth Exchange and 
Excellence Award programs; the Junior Faculty Development 
program; educational advising and counseling; citizen exchange 
programs; inter-parliamentary exchanges; youth science 
leadership exchanges; American overseas research centers; 
international forum on democracy; university consortium; 
Mitchell Scholarships; and exchanges with Tibet, the South 
Pacific, and Timor Leste. Regarding the Congress-Bundestag 
Program, the Committee intends that the amount provided will 
support 380 exchanges in fiscal year 2007, the same level as in 
fiscal year 2006.
    Regarding Fulbright exchanges with Tibet, the Committee 
expects that sufficient resources will be allocated to provide 
for 25 Tibetan scholars for the academic year. The Committee 
continues to support artistic and cultural exchange of persons 
programs as an important component of foreign policy. Within 
the levels provided, sufficient funds should be made available 
to continue such exchanges. Further, the Bureau of Educational 
and Cultural Affairs is expected to work with the Bureau of 
Consular Affairs to minimize unnecessary barriers or delays to 
legitimate travel to the United States for the purpose of such 
exchanges.
    The Committee recommendation continues the same level of 
funding for the Ngwang Choepel Fellows program as provided in 
the Committee-approved 2006 spending plan.
    The Committee recommendation continues enhanced support for 
programs to engage Arab and Muslim audiences through 
educational and cultural exchanges as the highest programmatic 
priority under this account. The Committee expects the 
Department to allocate adequate funding to continue and expand 
Fulbright Exchanges (including American Studies), English 
Language Programs (including English Language Fellows), 
International Visitor programs, and Values/Religious Tolerance 
programs (including cultural exchanges) for these audiences.
    The Committee remains supportive of efforts to expand 
programming to the Arab and Muslim world, including efforts to 
target promising individuals not naturally drawn to Western 
sources of information, who live outside the capital cities and 
do not attend elite institutions. The Committee does not 
eliminate funding for the Partnership for Learning 
Undergraduate Studies program. The micro-scholarship program is 
one such way to reach this audience by providing English 
language training to non-elite audiences, with the hope that 
learning English will open a window to the English-speaking 
world, helping to dispel misinformation and misunderstandings 
that can breed resentment of the United States and its 
citizens.
    The Committee supports exchange programs for foreign 
visitors and students on religious freedom, the relationship 
between religion and the state, and the role of religion in 
civil society. The Department of State is urged to expand 
existing religious freedom programs and consider new 
initiatives in its Educational and Cultural Exchange programs. 
The Department should consult with the U.S. Commission on 
International Religious Freedom on specific countries in 
regards to tailored programs for visitors and students from 
those countries.
    Thousands of young Americans, including high school 
students, travel abroad to study. The families of these 
students often have difficulty determining the merits of 
private exchange programs. The Committee expects the Department 
to increase awareness of the resources available to assist 
families in the selection of exchange programs.
    The Committee recommendation includes a limitation of not 
to exceed $2,000,000 on the use of fees or other payments 
received from or in connection with English teaching, 
educational advising and counseling, and exchange visitor 
programs as authorized by law.
    The Committee expects that a proposal for the programmatic 
and geographic distribution of available resources (including 
unobligated balances and recoveries) will be submitted through 
the normal reprogramming process within 60 days from the date 
of enactment of this Act. The Committee expects that the 
overall funding distribution will conform to the programmatic 
and geographical guidance above.

                       REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES

    The Committee recommends $8,175,000 for representation 
allowances authorized by section 905 of the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980. This amount is the same amount available in fiscal 
year 2006 and $26,000 below the budget request. These funds are 
used to reimburse Foreign Service Officers for expenditures 
incurred in their official capacities abroad in establishing 
and maintaining relations with officials of foreign governments 
and appropriate members of local communities. The Department 
shall submit a quarterly report to the Committee containing 
detailed information on the allotment and expenditure of this 
appropriation.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS

    The Committee recommends a total of $9,270,000 for the 
Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials account. This is 
$18,000 below the request and the same amount available in 
fiscal year 2006.
    This account reimburses local governments and communities 
for the extraordinary costs incurred in providing protection 
for international organizations, foreign missions and 
officials, and foreign dignitaries under certain circumstances. 
The Committee believes that local jurisdictions incurring such 
costs must submit a certified billing for such costs in 
accordance with program regulations. The Committee also 
believes that, in those instances where a local jurisdiction 
will realize a financial benefit from a visit by a foreign 
dignitary through increased tax revenues, such circumstances 
should be taken into account by the Department in assessing the 
need for reimbursement under this program. The Committee 
expects the Department to treat such submissions diligently and 
provide reimbursement to local jurisdictions on a timely basis 
if claims are fully justified.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE

    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$1,505,020,000 for Embassy Security, Construction, and 
Maintenance. This amount is $15,294,000 above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2006 (excluding supplemental 
rescission) and $34,509,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation designates $899,368,000 as available only for 
priority worldwide security upgrades, acquisition, and 
construction, the full amount requested for such activities. 
The recommendation includes $605,652,000 for non-security 
related costs, which is $14,500,000 above the amount provided 
in fiscal year 2006 and $34,509,000 below the budget request.
    This account provides funds to manage U.S. Government real 
property overseas and maintain Government-owned and long-term 
leased properties at approximately 260 posts, and to lease 
office and functional facilities and residential units, not 
only for the Department of State, but also for all U.S. 
employees overseas.
    The Committee recognizes the Bureau of Overseas Buildings 
Operations on becoming the first Federal agency to achieve 
``green'' status on the President's Management Agenda scorecard 
for the Federal Real Property Asset Management Initiative.
    Worldwide Security Upgrades.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $899,368,000 for security projects, the full amount 
requested and an increase of $794,000 over the fiscal year 2006 
level, to continue the capital security program of constructing 
new secure replacement facilities for the Department's most 
vulnerable embassies and consulates and providing additional 
security measures and upgrades. The Committee expects that 
projects undertaken under this program will address the 
security of the highest priority facilities. In previous fiscal 
years, the Department has proposed to reprogram funds under 
this activity for projects that do not address top priority 
security vulnerabilities and for projects that will not result, 
when complete, in a facility that meets existing security 
standards. The Committee expects that worldwide security funds 
will be used only for projects that meet these specifications. 
The Committee recommendation will support the construction of 
an estimated ten new embassy compounds, and the acquisition of 
a number of secure sites for future embassy compound 
construction.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $83,988,000, the 
amount requested, to continue the compound security upgrade 
program. The Committee understands that this program includes 
the installation of forced entry/ballistic resistant roof 
hatches, vault doors and power-assisted vehicle barriers, and 
other similar measures. The Committee expects that this funding 
will also provide physical security improvements to residential 
compounds and other locations where American citizens gather. 
Priority should be given to residential and compound security. 
The Committee continues its expectation for proactive action to 
anticipate new emerging security threats.
    The Committee expects that a proposed spending plan for the 
entire amount of available resources for worldwide security 
upgrades will be submitted through the normal reprogramming 
process within 60 days of the date of enactment of this Act. 
The Department shall notify the Committee immediately if there 
are any facilities that the Department believes face serious 
security risks.
    The Committee continues to support the Capital Security 
Cost Sharing Program. Under this program, all agencies that 
have staff overseas under Chief of Mission authority pay a fair 
share of urgent, security-driven capital projects undertaken to 
replace embassies and consulates at the most vulnerable posts. 
The goals of this program are twofold. First, the program 
accelerates the replacement of unsafe, unsecured and outdated 
diplomatic facilities that are used overseas by U.S. Government 
agencies. This is planned as a 14-year, $17,500,000,000 program 
to replace 150 vulnerable embassy and consulate facilities with 
new compounds that fully comply with statutory security 
requirements. Second, the program will create incentives within 
all government departments and agencies to scrutinize and 
``right-size'' their overseas presence to avoid unnecessary 
costs and security risks. Each agency with staff overseas under 
Chief of Mission authority has, built into their fiscal year 
2007 budget request, an annual contribution towards 
construction of new secure diplomatic facilities based on the 
number of positions overseas and the type of space occupied. 
These contributions do not take the place of State Department 
contributions, which are also growing, but create a larger, 
shared funding pool to accelerate replacement.
    The recommendation assumes a total program level of 
$1,223,276,000 in fiscal year 2007 for Capital Security 
Construction, including $800,599,000 under this account, 
$60,000,000 from other reimbursements, and $362,717,000 from 
non-State agencies, based on positions worldwide. Of this 
total, the additional amount generated by the Capital Security 
Cost Sharing program is $1,036,873,000; which consists of 
$674,156,000 from the State Department that is included in the 
recommendation under this account, and $362,717,000 from non-
state agencies. The Committee understands that there is an 
anticipated five-year phase-in period for the program, wherein 
the total Government-wide amount grows from $1,036,873,000 in 
fiscal year 2007 to $1,400,000,000, then remains at that level 
for the next 7 years. The Committee further understands that 
the program will include agency involvement in setting 
priorities and in other aspects of the development of new 
embassy compounds. The Committee believes that the 
establishment of strong interagency coordination and 
cooperation will be critical to achievement of program goals 
and encourages the Department and the Administration to ensure 
that the management of this program is inclusive, cooperative 
and transparent.
    The Committee recommendation provides $605,652,000 for 
operations and maintenance activities, which is $34,509,000 
below the request, and $14,500,000 above the current year 
level. The Committee notes that the requested amount included 
$49,009,000 in program increases. The Committee recommendation 
also includes $10,808,000 for headquarters operations. The 
Committee directs the Department to prioritize requested 
funding increases and to specifically identify amounts above 
current services in a comprehensive spending plan to be 
submitted no later than 60 days after enactment of this Act.
    Assets Management.--The budget request designates 
$92,265,000 in assets management funds planned for obligation 
in fiscal year 2007. The Committee expects that these funds 
will be used for opportunity purchases to replace uneconomical 
leases and for other priority capital acquisition purposes. In 
addition, as in previous years, the Committee expects that 
assets management funds will continue to be allocated in part 
to security construction needs. Any use of these or additional 
assets management funds in fiscal year 2007 is subject to 
reprogramming. In addition, with respect to the requirement 
that a reprogramming for any major new start be submitted, the 
Committee understands that requirement to mean that any 
rehabilitation or construction projects involving an 
ambassador's residence will be subject to the requirement. In 
addition to regular reporting provided to the Committee on 
acquisition and disposal of overseas property, the Department 
shall submit a report to the Committee by November 6, 2006, 
listing all properties disposed of, or in process for disposal, 
along with associated actual or anticipated proceeds of sale, 
at posts which have had funding approved for the construction 
of a new secure compound in, or after, fiscal year 1999.
    The recommendation continues language carried in the bill 
in previous years that prohibits funds from being used for 
acquisition of furniture and furnishings and generators for 
other departments and agencies.
    The Committee commends the Bureau of Overseas Buildings 
Operations (OBO) for continuing its internal management 
innovations to increase performance and accountability, to 
streamline operations, and to control costs. Recognizing that 
the increased complexity of a growing program of construction, 
real estate, operations/maintenance, and planning activities 
requires greater technological and information systems 
integration, the Committee encourages OBO to pursue development 
of integrated building management systems. Such technology 
upgrades to integrate disparate legacy systems will protect the 
large and continuing investment of taxpayer resources in 
overseas properties and those who occupy them. The Committee 
has provided sufficient resources to support this effort.
    The Committee expects that new embassy projects advanced by 
the Department will have been properly planned and right-sized, 
with regional considerations, projecting anticipated needs and 
requirements by the date submitted to Congress. In rare 
circumstances where global conditions dictate a significant 
change in requirements after Congress has approved funding for 
a specific project, the Department should be proactive in 
informing Congress and requesting any additional funding 
without risking execution of projects already approved.
    Right-Sizing the U.S. Government Overseas Presence.--The 
Committee directs the Office of Overseas Buildings Operation to 
work closely with the Office on Right-Sizing the U.S. 
Government Overseas Presence to ensure that projected staffing 
levels for new embassy compounds are prepared in a disciplined 
and realistic manner and that these estimates become a basis 
for determining the size, configuration and budget of new 
embassy compound construction projects. In addition, the 
Committee notes several instances of requests made to the 
Committee for new embassies predicated upon vacating 
dysfunctional and insecure facilities currently occupied, or 
upon the need to move to new capital cities, where the 
Department has not abided by its original commitment to vacate 
or limit the residual presence in formerly occupied posts and 
properties. The justification for all facilities projects 
funded under this account must include a full explanation of 
regional efficiency and security planning, and related staffing 
assumptions. Such projects will not be approved for funding 
absent evidence of the application of a uniform right-sizing 
methodology.
    Beijing Embassy.--The Committee anticipates the 
construction of the Beijing New Embassy Compound (NEC) to be 
completed on time and on budget with occupancy scheduled for 
Spring of 2008. With the 2008 Summer Olympics scheduled to be 
held in Beijing, China, the Committee expects the Department to 
maintain existing facilities in Beijing through this time 
period. At that time, the Committee shall receive an update on 
the planned decommissioning of the currently occupied buildings 
to achieve the best value for the government.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $4,940,000 to enable the Secretary 
of State to meet unforeseen emergencies arising in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service. This amount is $4,932,000 
below the fiscal year 2006 appropriation, excluding 
supplemental appropriations, and the same as the request. In 
addition, the Committee expects carryover balances to be 
available for obligation in fiscal year 2007. Funding provided 
in this account is available until expended.
    The Committee has included a provision in the bill that 
permits up to $1,000,000 to be transferred from this account to 
the Repatriation Loans Program account, as requested in the 
budget. This provision will ensure an adequate level of 
resources for loans to American citizens through the 
Repatriation Loans Program account should that account require 
additional funds in fiscal year 2007 due to an unanticipated 
increase in the number of loans.
    This appropriation provides resources for the Department of 
State to meet emergency requirements in the conduct of foreign 
affairs. The Committee recommendation provides funds for: (1) 
travel and subsistence expenses for relocation of American 
employees of the United States Government and their families 
from troubled areas to the United States and/or safe-haven 
posts; (2) allowances granted to State Department employees and 
their dependents evacuated to the United States for the 
convenience of the Government; and (3) payment of rewards for 
information concerning terrorist activities.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommendation includes $695,000 for the 
subsidy cost of repatriation loans and $590,000 for 
administrative costs of the program as authorized by 22 U.S.C. 
2671, which is $17,000 below the amount available in fiscal 
year 2006 and the same as the budget request.
    This account provides emergency loans to assist destitute 
Americans abroad who have no other source of funds to return to 
the United States.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN

    The Committee recommends $15,826,000 for the appropriation 
entitled ``Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan''. The 
recommended level is $3,673,000 below the fiscal year 2006 
appropriated level and the same as the request. The 
recommendation, combined with $3,763,000 derived from visa fee 
revenues, will continue the amount available in the current 
year. The Institute is authorized to collect Machine Readable 
Visa fees, as well as reimbursements from agencies and user 
fees from trade show exhibitors.
    The Committee expects that the American Institute in Taiwan 
(AIT) will cover anticipated operating expenses in fiscal year 
2007 through a combination of appropriations and visa fee 
revenues. The Committee expects the Department to submit by 
November 1, 2006, an AIT spending plan for fiscal year 2007, 
indicating the total amount of estimated fee collections, the 
amount of such fee collections allocated for operating 
expenses, and the total amount planned for operating expenses 
from all funding sources.
    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the American Institute in Taiwan and 
authorizes funds to be appropriated to the Secretary of State 
to carry out the provisions of the Act. The Institute 
administers programs in the areas of economic and commercial 
services, cultural affairs, travel services, and logistics. The 
Department of State contracts with the American Institute in 
Taiwan to carry out these activities.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

    The Committee recommends $125,000,000 for the appropriation 
entitled ``Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
Disability Fund''. This amount is the full budget request and 
$6,700,000 below the amount appropriated for fiscal year 2006. 
The amount provided in the Committee recommendation is required 
to amortize the unfunded liability in the system, as documented 
by the annual evaluation of Fund balances.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
budget scorekeeping purposes, is authorized by the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980, which provides for an appropriation to the 
Fund in 30 equal annual installments of the amount required for 
the unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries, or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed. The Retirement Fund is maintained through 
contributions made by participants, matching government 
contributions, special government contributions (including this 
account), interest on investments, and voluntary contributions.

                      International Organizations


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

    The recommendation includes a total of $1,151,318,000 for 
payment of obligations of United States membership in 
international organizations as authorized by conventions, 
treaties, or specific Acts of Congress for fiscal year 2007. 
This amount is $117,205,000 below the request, and the same 
amount available in fiscal year 2006.
    The amount provided in the bill is intended to pay 
assessments for membership in international organizations, 
including the United Nations (U.N.). Funding in the bill is 
consistent with the U.S. policy of zero nominal growth for the 
United Nations budget.
    In addition, the amount provides funding for assessments 
for membership in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and 
the related North Atlantic Assembly, International War Crimes 
Tribunals for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia, the 
Organization of American States, the International Atomic 
Energy Agency, and the Pan American Health Organization.
    Estimates of the amount required to cover fiscal year 2007 
assessments have varied based on the most recent foreign 
currency exchange rates for the dollar, which has fluctuated 
since the budget request was formulated. The Committee expects 
that these exchange rate fluctuations may result in losses. The 
Department may propose to offset these by transfers from other 
accounts, or deferring some activities included in the request 
that do not require funding in fiscal year 2007.
    Reassessment of U.S. Membership in International 
Organizations.--The Committee notes, with approval, the 
Department's actions to formally withdraw from certain 
international organizations where continued U.S. participation 
was determined to be a low priority in the context of overall 
U.S. national interests. The Committee continues to support the 
comprehensive reassessment of U.S. membership in each of the 45 
international organizations for which funding is requested 
under this account, and to insist that the Department take the 
necessary measures to operate within the amount of funds 
provided under this account.
    The Committee expects the Department to take immediate 
action to evaluate and prioritize United States participation 
in, and funding for, international organizations. In a climate 
of limited resources the Committee continues to insist that the 
Department live within appropriated amounts, prioritize as 
necessary among organizations according to policy goals, take 
steps as necessary to withdraw from lower priority 
organizations, and refrain from entering into new commitments.
    China's U.N. Assessment Rate.--China's real gross domestic 
product (GDP) is growing exponentially. Real GDP growth for 
China is estimated at 9.5 percent for 2005. Yet, China's U.N. 
assessment rate remains at two-percent. The Committee commends 
the efforts of the Department to work to ensure equity in the 
assessment rates. Further, the Committee directs the Department 
to report to the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this 
Act, as to whether the current assessment formula should be 
revised.
    Reform and Budget Discipline.--The Committee continues to 
insist on reform and budget discipline as a priority for all of 
the international organizations, including the development of 
processes to evaluate, prioritize and terminate programs. The 
Committee believes that the onus is on each international 
organization and the State Department representatives to those 
organizations, to reduce overall budgets and eliminate 
duplicative activities, excessive administrative costs, and 
inefficient operations.
    The Committee continues to insist on improving 
accountability in the U.N. organizations. Reform of the United 
Nations must be a top priority for the State Department in 
fiscal year 2007. The U.S. effort must address a wide range of 
activities, such as management reform, personnel reform, and 
budget and program prioritization.
    U.N. Regular Budget.--The Committee strongly supports the 
United States policy of zero nominal growth budgets for 
international organizations. Toward this end, the Committee 
expects the Department to insist on the evaluation and 
prioritization of ongoing U.N. programs and activities, so that 
in the event of unanticipated requirements budget offsets may 
be taken from activities and programs that have already been 
determined to be lower-priority by the organization. The 
Committee continues its direction to find appropriate offsets 
to accommodate such increases within a zero nominal growth 
budget. The United Nations Regular Budget biennium 2006-2007 
budget totals $3,798,912,500, of which the United States is 
assessed 22 percent.
    Language is included to require that any proposal that 
would result in the 2006-2007 U.N. biennial budget exceeding 
the budget level of $3,798,912,500 for 2006-2007 be 
communicated to the Committee in advance of the formal 
notification, consideration, and adoption of such a proposal in 
the General Assembly. The Committee expects the Secretary to 
notify the Committee in advance of any United Nations action to 
increase funding for any United Nations program without 
identifying an offsetting decrease elsewhere in the United 
Nations budget.
    Overall, the Committee requires more detailed information 
prior to the United States agreeing to such increases without 
identifying offsetting decreases and management reforms. 
Further, the State Department must actively pursue a 
streamlined budget that reflects the true priorities of the 
organization, without duplicative and ineffective programs.
    Americans Working in the United Nations.--The Committee 
directs the Department to increase the number of qualified 
Americans employed by the United Nations and international 
organizations. The Committee recognizes that Americans provide 
many skills that can contribute to making the U.N. more 
efficient, effective and more accountable. The Committee 
remains dismayed that the representation of Americans in U.N. 
posts subject to geographic distribution has remained 
relatively flat since 2001.
    North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).--The Committee 
notes, with approval, the efforts of the Department and the 
U.S. delegation to establish a cap on the cost of the NATO 
Headquarters project, and the existence of an agreement between 
the Department of Defense and the Department of State as to the 
allocation of costs of the U.S. contribution to the project. To 
date, the Committee has provided $35,000,000 for the NATO 
Headquarters project. The Committee continues its direction to 
the Department to control the costs of this facility and to 
ensure the facility meets the necessary security requirements. 
The Department shall keep the Committee apprised of progress on 
this matter.
    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).--The Committee 
notes, with approval, the IAEA's efforts to increase safeguards 
efforts to provide essential assurance that nuclear materials 
used in peaceful nuclear programs are not diverted and misused 
for nuclear explosive purposes or by terrorists. The Committee 
recommendation includes full requested funding for the U.S. 
assessment for IAEA in fiscal year 2007.
    Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).-- The Committee 
continues to support the work done by the Pan American Health 
Organization (PAHO). PAHO has taken the lead in health issues, 
including pandemic flu preparation, border health concerns, 
traffic fatalities, emerging diseases, and other health issues 
that have an impact on citizens of the United States and all 
citizens of the Americas. The potential outbreak of a pandemic 
flu highlights the regional importance of PAHO to the United 
States. The Committee recommendation includes full requested 
funding for the U.S. assessment for PAHO in fiscal year 2007.
    The Committee understands that the Department and the 
Administration are making good progress in working with UNESCO 
on areas of joint priority, including education and literacy, 
teacher training particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, clean 
water, natural disaster preparedness, including tsunami warning 
systems, civic education particularly in the Broader Middle 
East and North African countries, and press freedom and 
supports providing the necessary resources to assure continued 
progress in carrying out worthwhile programs in these areas. 
The Committee assumes that within the funding provided, 
sufficient resources will be provided for the U.S. assessment 
for UNESCO.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,135,327,000 for 
United States payments for Contributions for International 
Peacekeeping Activities for fiscal year 2007, which is the same 
as the amount requested in the budget and $113,052,000 above 
the fiscal year 2006 level.
    Disturbing allegations of sex abuse of minors by U.N. 
peacekeepers and civilian personnel have led to significant 
reform in the planning and conduct of peacekeeping missions. 
The Committee strongly urges the Administration, including the 
State Department, to continue to pursue the recommendations 
contained in the Prince Zeid report, including personal 
accountability, and improvements in the systems of justice in 
troop contributing countries as a means to restore confidence 
in peacekeeping missions. Further, the Committee directs the 
U.S. to work to ensure adequate training is provided to 
peacekeeping personnel prior to deployment.
    The Committee remains concerned about the continuing lack 
of progress in resolving the dispute over the Western Sahara, 
despite an enormous investment of funds in the U.N. Mission for 
the Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) peacekeeping 
mission. The Committee urges the Department to work to 
encourage a negotiated settlement to the dispute and bring to 
an end the costly U.N. peacekeeping presence associated with a 
referendum settlement program that has failed to materialize 
over the past decade and that the Secretary General and his 
Personal Envoy abandoned as unworkable four years ago.
    The establishment of several large, complex missions over 
the past few years has tested the capacity of the U.N. to plan 
and manage such operations successfully. The Brahimi report 
addressed many deficiencies in U.N. peacekeeping efforts, 
including problems in doctrine, strategy, decision-making, 
planning, deployment, support, and information technology. The 
Committee continues to support efforts to improve the 
performance and efficiency of U.N. peacekeeping missions 
through structural and procedural reforms. The Committee also 
supports efforts to better limit and focus the goals of such 
missions, and to set specific benchmarks for performance and 
mission termination.
    The Committee continues to support the efforts of the 
U.N.'s Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) to identify 
waste, fraud and abuse, including sexual abuse, in peacekeeping 
operations, and to recommend specific reforms to ensure that 
such practices are brought to an end. The Committee directs the 
Department to provide the necessary support to ensure that OIOS 
oversight is systematically brought to bear on every U.N. 
peacekeeping mission, including through the presence of 
resident auditors. The Committee directs the Department to 
request a performance report on the efforts of this Office to 
root out the causes of such waste, fraud and abuse.
    The bill retains language carried in previous years 
requiring 15-day advance notice of any new or expanded mission, 
together with a statement of cost, duration, exit strategy, 
national interest, and source of funds to pay the cost. In 
addition, continues language requiring an additional 
notification that the United Nations has taken appropriate 
measures to prevent United Nations' employees, contractor 
personnel, and peacekeeping forces serving in any United 
Nations peacekeeping mission from trafficking in persons, 
exploiting victims of trafficking, or committing acts of 
illegal sexual exploitation and to hold accountable any such 
individuals who engage in any such acts while participating in 
the peacekeeping mission.
    The bill also retains language requiring certification that 
American manufacturers and suppliers are provided equal 
procurement opportunities, and language making a portion of 
appropriations under this account available for two fiscal 
years.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO

    The bill includes a total of $37,690,000 for the 
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and 
Mexico (IBWC). This amount is $4,815,000 above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2006 and $4,000,000 above the total 
budget request for fiscal year 2007. The total amount provided 
includes $28,453,000 for Salaries and Expenses and $9,237,000 
for construction. The recommendation includes language 
authorizing not to exceed $6,000 for representation expenses, 
as requested.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation for the Salaries and Expenses 
account is $28,453,000, which is $810,000 above the amount 
available in fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget 
request. The amount recommended by the Committee provides 
additional resources for requested wage and price increases. 
The Committee notes that fluctuations in the Commission's 
operations and maintenance budgets can result in unanticipated 
cost savings. Should the Commission experience such savings, 
the Commission will have the ability to propose, through the 
section 605 reprogramming process, the use of surplus funds for 
items not included in the Committee recommendation.

                              CONSTRUCTION

    The Committee recommendation for IBWC construction provides 
$9,237,000, which is $4,005,000 above the amount available in 
fiscal year 2006 and $4,000,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation provides funding for ongoing projects as 
follows: Boundary-wide construction--$850,000; Water Quantity 
Program--$7,387,000, including funding above the request for 
the Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Project; and Water Quality 
Program--$1,000,000. The Committee expects that carryover 
funding may be available to supplement fiscal year 2007 
appropriations. Any allocation of funding, including carryover 
funding, shall be subject to reprogramming procedures set forth 
in section 605 of this Act.

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $9,587,000 to fund the 
U.S. share of expenses of the International Boundary 
Commission, the International Joint Commission, United States 
and Canada, and the Border Environment Cooperation Commission 
for fiscal year 2007. This amount is $324,000 below the amount 
available in fiscal year 2006 and the same as the budget 
request. Of the amounts provided, $1,285,000 is for the 
International Boundary Commission, $6,127,000 is for the 
International Joint Commission and $2,175,000 for the Border 
Environment Cooperation Commission, as requested to improve the 
health and environmental conditions for the U.S.-Mexico border 
region.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS

    The Committee recommends a total of $20,651,000 to fund the 
U.S. share of the expenses of international fisheries 
commissions or related organizations, as well as the travel 
expenses of the United States commissioners. This amount is 
$3,043,000 below the amount available in fiscal year 2006 and 
the same as the budget request. The Committee expects the Great 
Lakes Fishery Commission funding level to continue at the same 
level provided in the 2006 spending plan approved by the 
Committee.
    The Committee expects the Department to take immediate 
action to evaluate and prioritize United States participation 
in, and funding for, international fisheries commissions. In a 
climate of limited resources the Committee continues to insist 
that the Department live within appropriated amounts, 
prioritize as necessary among commissions according to policy 
goals, take steps as necessary to withdraw from lower priority 
commissions, and refrain from entering into new commitments.
    The Committee directs the Department to submit a proposed 
spending plan for the total amount provided under this heading 
no later than 60 days after the enactment of this Act.

                                 Other


                     PAYMENT TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $13,821,000 
for payment to the Asia Foundation for fiscal year 2007, which 
is the same as the current year level, and $3,821,000 above the 
request. The Committee continues to support Foundation programs 
on human rights, higher education, democratic governance, 
ethnic harmony, religious tolerance and legal/judicial reform 
in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Indonesia. Further, the Committee 
supports the efforts of Foundation programs in Cambodia.
    The Asia Foundation is a private, nonprofit institution, 
established to stimulate Asian democratic development and 
assist the peoples of Asian countries to shape their own 
destinies.

               Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue

    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2007 of interest and earnings from the Center for Middle 
Eastern-Western Dialogue, expected to total $375,000.

                 EISENHOWER EXCHANGE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2007 of interest and earnings from the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund, expected to total $500,000. The 
Committee recognizes the important and unique role of 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships in the U.S. Government's 
worldwide public diplomacy effort. The Committee has urged the 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, Incorporated (EEF) to fashion 
its exchange programs to reflect the priority within all public 
diplomacy programs of building mutual understanding with Arab 
and Muslim populations worldwide. In this regard, the Committee 
continues to expect that the selection of foreign and United 
States fellows will reflect this priority. In addition, the 
Committee supports a nation-wide, merit-based recruitment and 
selection process for United States Fellows. The Committee 
expects EEF and the Department to submit a report to the 
Committee by November 30, 2006, describing its achievements in 
these areas.
    The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990 authorized a 
permanent endowment for the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program to increase educational opportunities for young leaders 
in preparation for and enhancement of their professional 
careers and to advance peace through international 
understanding. The Act established the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund in the United States Treasury for 
these purposes. A total of $7,500,000 has been provided to 
establish a permanent endowment for the program, from which the 
appropriation of interest and earnings is provided to 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, Incorporated.

                    ISRAELI ARAB SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends language in the accompanying bill 
that will appropriate for fiscal year 2007 interest and 
earnings of the Israeli Arab Scholarship Endowment Fund, 
expected to total $375,000. A permanent endowment of $4,978,500 
for the Fund was established in fiscal year 1992 with funds 
made available to the United States Information Agency under 
section 556(b) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990, as amended. The 
income from the endowment is to be used for a program of 
scholarships for Israeli Arabs to attend institutions of higher 
education in the United States.

                            EAST-WEST CENTER

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for this 
account, $15,994,000 below the current year, and $9,000,000 
below the request.
    The Committee recommendation provides a significantly 
reduced funding level for the Center's direct sole-source grant 
from the Federal government. The Committee notes that the 
Center can solicit contributions and can compete for other 
Federal grants to support its research and training activities. 
The Center started receiving a direct grant from the Federal 
government in fiscal year 1961.

                    NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for the National 
Endowment for Democracy (NED) for fiscal year 2007, $24,042,000 
below the amount provided in fiscal year 2006 and $30,000,000 
below the budget request.
    The NED is a private, non-profit corporation established to 
encourage and strengthen the development of democratic 
institutions and processes internationally through private-
sector initiatives, training, and other activities, including 
those which promote pluralism, democratic governance, civic 
education, human rights, and respect for the rule of law. The 
NED provides funding for projects which are determined to be in 
the national interest of the United States and which are 
administered by private organizations and groups.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors

    The Committee recommendation includes $658,903,000 for the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors, $13,000,000 below the request 
and $14,893,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level. The 
appropriation accounts under this heading provide operational 
funding for the United States non-military, international 
broadcasting programs--including the Voice of America (VOA), 
Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), Radio Free Asia 
(RFA), Radio and Television Marti, Middle East Television, 
including Radio Sawa--and the associated facilities, 
engineering and support activities.

                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes $651,279,000 to carry 
out United States International Broadcasting Operations for 
fiscal year 2007, which is a decrease of $2,338,000 below the 
request, and $18,022,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level. This 
account funds the operating and engineering costs of Voice of 
America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia, and 
the Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). The recommendation 
also includes funding for Broadcasting to Cuba under this 
account. In the request, this funding was proposed under a 
separate account. The Committee places a priority on 
broadcasting to China and broadcasting in languages that are 
important in the context of the global war on terror.
    Arabic Broadcasting.--The United States continues to face 
an enormous challenge to provide the people of Arab and Muslim 
countries with accurate information about U.S. policies and 
values. The Committee continues to support efforts to expand 
the audience of listeners and viewers in the Arab and Muslim 
world. The Committee recommendation includes $89,366,000 for 
television and radio broadcasting in Arabic, including Middle 
East Television and Radio Sawa. The increased level of 
resources would provide for expanded news capability to 24 
hours, including breaking news. The Committee provided initial 
start-up costs for a television program stream specifically 
tailored for the Iraqi audience in Public Law 108-106. 
Developing quality news and entertainment programs in the 
Arabic language should to the maximum extent possible involve 
the creative talents of the private and not-for-profit sectors. 
The Committee continues its direction to the Board to integrate 
new approaches in developing programming, to more effectively 
engage key audiences.
    Language Service Review and Research.--The Committee 
continues to support the Board's efforts to objectively and 
systematically review and evaluate the performance, results, 
and priority of every U.S. Government-sponsored international 
broadcasting language service and to propose corresponding 
reallocations of funds. The Committee endorses this process as 
a means to improve broadcast quality and meet emerging program 
priorities within limited resources. The Committee expects that 
the Board will establish comprehensive performance measures and 
improve coordination of programming streams across component 
organizations, including the grantee organizations. The 
Committee continues to direct the Board to ensure that foreign 
policy implications are given full consideration before 
adopting language service review recommendations. The Committee 
expects the Board to submit a comprehensive report on Language 
Service Review results and corresponding reallocations of 
funds, as appropriate. The Committee anticipates that the 
continuing language service review effort will result in the 
dedication of additional resources to emerging priority 
programs, through the normal reprogramming process.
    Anti-jamming efforts.--The Committee continues to support 
initiatives by the BBG to defeat jamming and reach a wider 
audience for Radio Free Asia and Voice of America broadcasts to 
China, Tibet, Vietnam, and North Korea. The Committee is aware 
that new technologies may allow the VOA and RFA to more 
effectively defeat jamming efforts. The Committee encourages 
the Board to evaluate the usefulness of these technologies. The 
Committee expects the BBG to expand such efforts in fiscal year 
2007. Further, the Committee supports efforts to counter 
Internet censorship imposed by China and Iran.
    The Committee remains concerned about a potential blurring 
of the distinction between the international broadcasting 
conducted by the Broadcasting Board of Governors and that 
conducted by the Defense Department. While the Committee 
continues to strongly support all necessary efforts to provide 
for national security, close collaboration with the Defense 
Department may foster misunderstanding among foreign audiences 
as to the principles and goals of BBG broadcasting. Within 
sixty days of enactment of this Act, the BBG shall report fully 
to the Committee on the nature and duration of any cooperative 
efforts with the Defense Department over the last year. In 
addition, the BBG shall notify Congress in writing of any 
projects or programs to be undertaken with the Defense 
Department within seven days of the beginning of such 
activities. Both reports should include a description of 
services provided and any financial arrangements between the 
entities.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the 
principal broadcasting entities as follows:
    Voice of America (VOA).--The Committee recommendation 
provides $172,897,000 for VOA. The Committee recommendation 
restores proposed reductions to VOA broadcasts and radio, as 
well as Worldwide English. The Committee recommendation 
includes $6,071,000 for the Worldwide English Division, an 
increase of $1,048,000 above the request.
    The Committee continues to support the creative efforts of 
VOA broadcasting to the continent of Africa. The Committee 
notes that forty-five percent of VOA's listenership is in 
Africa and expects VOA to create radio formats to ensure 
information is available to young audiences. Nearly 45 million 
listeners have access to VOA's objective, balanced and accurate 
news. VOA fills the information void with daily targeted and 
credible coverage of sub-Saharan Africa often not available 
from any other media. The Committee supports the use of radio 
broadcasts as a component of sustained HIV/AIDS prevention 
efforts undertaken by many African governments, African 
countries, humanitarian organizations, and U.S. assistance 
programs. VOA's Africa Division continues to incorporate 
thousands of broadcasts about HIV/AIDS into its regular 
programming for broadcasting to Africa. The Committee 
recommendation does not include funding for VOA to assume 
budget responsibility for a popular USAID program for Zimbabwe.
    The Committee supports broadcasting to respond to the 
crackdown on press freedom by the government of Venezuela, but 
the Committee questions the viability of locating an affiliate 
to carry new programming. Therefore, the recommendation does 
not include funding for this effort, but the Committee would 
entertain a reprogramming of funds for this purpose should 
affiliate commitments be secured.
    The recommendation includes $1,900,000 for broadcasting to 
North Korea in accordance with the North Korea Human Rights Act 
of 2004 (Public Law 108-333), as proposed.
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (REF/RL).--The Committee 
recommendation provides $75,319,000 for RFE/RL. Within these 
amounts, $3,814,000 is for Radio Farda, $3,664,000 is for Radio 
Free Afghanistan, $1,903,000 is for Radio Free Iraq, and 
$995,000 is for broadcasting in Romanian to Moldova, as 
proposed. Further, $8,545,000 is recommended for broadcasting 
services in Russian, and $2,391,000 is for broadcasting 
services in Ukrainian. A total of $4,077,000 is provided for 
the news and current affairs function. The Committee commends 
RFE/RL for developing programming in Avar, Chechen, and 
Circassian, and for expanding broadcasting to the Northern 
Caucasus. The Committee recognizes the continuing importance of 
broadcasting objective, uncensored information to the isolated 
minorities of the Northern Caucasus in their native languages 
and has provided the full request for these efforts.
    Broadcasting to Cuba.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $36,102,000 for radio and television broadcasting to 
Cuba. The Committee recommendation continues funding for 
aircraft dedicated to transmitting Radio and TV Marti 
programming. In addition, the recommendation includes 
$2,700,000 to improve transmission capabilities via aerostat 
for broadcasting TV Marti.
    Radio Free Asia (RFA).--The Committee recommendation 
includes $30,985,000 for RFA. The Committee strongly supports 
increased broadcasting efforts to China, Tibet, Burma, Vietnam, 
North Korea, Laos, and Cambodia. Increased funding is provided 
for broadcasting to North Korea to pursue objectives outlined 
in the North Korea Human Rights Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-
333).
    The recommendation includes funding for RFA to continue 
daily Uyghur broadcasts.
    The Committee encourages the Board to increase the number 
of broadcast hours of the Cantonese service. The Committee 
expects the BBG to reprogram funds, if necessary, to achieve 
such an increase.
    The Committee urges the Broadcasting Board of Governors to 
focus programming on the promotion of religious freedom and 
human rights. The BBG should work with the U.S. Commission on 
International Religious Freedom on the scope and content of 
programming that will instruct and inform on the merits of 
religious freedom as part of a civil society.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes $7,624,000 in new 
budget authority for broadcasting capital improvements, 
$3,129,000 below the current year level, and $10,662,000 below 
the request. The recommendation will provide for the 
continuation of base costs for maintenance, improvements, 
replacements and repairs, digital production capability 
development, and security upgrades at transmitting stations 
overseas. The recommendation does not include $9,800,000 
requested increase for the capital costs associated with 
upgrading the VOA television studios.

       General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agency

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the Department of State.
    Section 401 of the bill permits funds appropriated in this 
title for the Department of State to be available for 
allowances and differentials as authorized by subchapter 59 of 
Title 5 of the United States Code; for services as authorized 
by 5 U.S.C. 3109; and for hire of passenger transportation 
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 1343(b).
    Section 402 of the bill permits up to five percent of any 
State Department appropriation to be transferred to another 
State Department appropriation, but no program can be increased 
by more than ten percent, and provides the same authority to 
Broadcasting Board of Governors programs. In addition, the 
language provides that any transfer pursuant to this subsection 
shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 605 
of the accompanying bill and shall not be available for 
obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the 
procedures set forth in that section.
    Section 403 of the bill prohibits the use of funds by the 
Department of State or the Broadcasting Board of Governors to 
provide assistance to the Palestinian Broadcasting Corporation. 
The Committee recommendation does not include training that 
supports accurate and responsible broadcasting among the types 
of assistance prohibited. The Committee agrees the neither the 
Department of State, not the BBG, shall provide any assistance 
to the PBC that could support restrictions of press freedoms of 
the broadcasting of inaccurate, inflammatory messages. The 
Committee expects the Department and the BBG to submit a report 
to the Committee before December 15, 2006, detailing any 
programs or activities involving the PBC in fiscal year 2007, 
and any plans for such programs in fiscal year 2008.
    Section 404 of the bill clarifies the responsibilities of 
the Senior Policy Operating Group on Trafficking in Persons. 
The Committee understands that the Operating Group is 
coordinating agency activities outlined in the Trafficking 
Victims Reauthorization Act of 2005. The Committee expects that 
all anti-trafficking policies, grants and grant policies are 
defined by this Act. The Operating Group is, and was intended 
to serve as, the forum for interagency coordination of anti-
trafficking policies, even as final decisions regarding any 
such policies are necessarily vested with the President and the 
senior officials who comprise the Task Force. The Committee 
understands that the Senior Operating Group and its chair have 
successfully performed the coordinating functions assigned to 
them.
    Section 405 of the bill prohibits the use of funds for any 
United Nations peacekeeping mission that involves U.S. Armed 
Forces under the command or operational control of a foreign 
national unless the President certifies that the involvement is 
in the national interest.
    Section 406 of the bill prohibits the use of funds to 
expand the U.S. diplomatic presence in Vietnam beyond the level 
in effect July 11, 1995, unless the President makes a 
certification that several conditions have been met regarding 
Vietnam's cooperation with the United States on POW/MIA issues.
    Section 407 of the bill extends the prohibition on the use 
of funds to issue a visa to any alien involved in extrajudicial 
and political killings in Haiti, including exemption and 
reporting requirements.
    Section 408 of the bill concerns Capital Cost Sharing.
    Section 409 of the bill concerns ceilings and earmarks of 
funding.
    Section 410 of the bill includes new language requiring 
that any funding used to implement E-Government Initiatives 
shall be subject to section 605 of this Act.
    Section 411 of the bill includes new language concerning 
the Department's rewards program.

                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES


                   Antitrust Modernization Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation provides $462,000 for the Antitrust 
Modernization Commission, which is $695,000 below the fiscal 
year 2006 level and same as the request. The Commission, 
authorized by Public Law 107-273, is examining whether 
antitrust laws need to be modernized, and is identifying and 
studying related antitrust issues. The recommendation 
represents the final appropriation for the Commission and 
provides the remainder of the $4,000,000 authorized. The 
Commission will conclude its work in June 2007.

      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $493,000 for the Commission for 
the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the request. 
The recommendation will allow the Commission to fund its 
administrative expenses through appropriated funds while 
relying on other sources of funding for actual purchase and 
restoration of property.
    The Commission protects and preserves endangered cultural 
sites in Eastern and Central Europe important to the heritage 
of U.S. citizens, including cemeteries, monuments, and historic 
buildings. One of its primary tasks is to obtain protection and 
preservation assurances from the governments of the region.

                       Commission on Civil Rights


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $8,933,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights, which is $376,000 
below the request and the same as the fiscal year 2006 level.
    The Commission was established by the Civil Rights Act of 
1957 and is directed by eight part-time commissioners. The 
Commission was created to protect the civil rights of people 
within the United States and was intended to be an independent, 
bipartisan, fact-finding agency. The Commission investigates 
charges of citizens being deprived of voting and other civil 
rights and collects, studies, and disseminates information on 
the impact of Federal laws and policies on civil rights.
    Although the Commission has made some progress in 
correcting its management deficiencies, the Committee remains 
concerned about the Commission's operations. The Commission 
continues to be plagued by mismanagement. The Committee expects 
a report no later than January 31, 2007, describing proposed 
structural and management changes for the Commission that will 
generate more efficient operations, including potential cost 
savings, without jeopardizing the mission of the agency.
    The Committee has received several reports from the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), all of which outline 
various deficiencies at the Commission. The most recent GAO 
report, dated May 2006, revealed that the Commission is now 
also grappling with leadership accountability issues, lack of 
policies with respect to report objectivity, and is neither 
correctly nor effectively using State advisory committees. The 
Committee reinforces the importance of following the GAO's 
guidance and encourages the Commission to act quickly to fix 
remaining management problems in addition to addressing its 
accountability issues, putting in place necessary report 
objectivity policies and correctly and effectively using State 
advisory committees.
    The Committee recommends language, as included in previous 
years, which provides: (1) a limitation of four full-time 
positions under schedule C of the Excepted Service, exclusive 
of one special assistant for each Commissioner, and (2) a 
prohibition against reimbursing Commissioners for more than 75 
billable days, with the exception of the chairperson, who is 
permitted 125 billable days. The Committee encourages the 
Commission to enlist outside assistance, as necessary, to 
correct the Commission's serious management problems.

             Commission on International Religious Freedom


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $3,000,000 for the Commission 
on International Religious Freedom, which is $258,000 below the 
fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the request. The 
Committee recommendation includes funding to allow the 
Commission to increase data development, hearings, analysis of 
policy, outreach and overall operations required to fulfill the 
Commission's mandated responsibilities.
    The Committee commends the Commission on its efforts to 
promote international religious freedom in consultation with 
the Department of State, independent human rights groups, and 
other non-governmental organizations, religious leaders, 
academics, policy experts, the Intelligence Community, and 
government agencies. The Committee urges the Commission and the 
State Department to continue to work on developing an Index on 
Religious Freedom that may be used to assess progress on 
relevant issues within regions and specific countries. The 
State Department's Report on Trafficking in Persons may provide 
a useful model for assessing and tracking efforts to promote 
religious freedom worldwide.
    The Commission, established pursuant to the International 
Religious Freedom Act of 1998, conducts independent reviews and 
reporting of facts and circumstances of violations of religious 
freedom abroad and recommends options for United States 
policies with respect to foreign countries engaging in or 
tolerating violations of religious freedom.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $2,110,000 for the Commission 
on Security and Cooperation in Europe, which is $106,000 above 
the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the request. The 
Commission was established in 1976 to monitor compliance with 
the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in 
Europe, with particular regard to provisions dealing with 
humanitarian affairs.
    The Committee recognizes the leadership of the Commission 
in promoting human rights, democracy, and the rule of law in 
the 55 participating States of the Organization for Security 
and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the 
Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of 
China, which is $124,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
the same as the request.
    The Committee commends the Commission for its ongoing 
efforts to monitor China's compliance with international human 
rights agreements and standards. The Committee supports 
continued development of the Political Prisoner Database 
project in accordance with Section 302(b) of Public Law 106-286 
and expects the Commission to provide a status report to the 
Committee on related plans and activities by August 1, 2007. 
This database will significantly heighten international 
awareness regarding the plight of political prisoners in China.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $322,807,000 for the salaries 
and expenses of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 
(EEOC) for fiscal year 2007. This amount is $4,191,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 level and the same as the request.
    The recommendation continues language prohibiting the 
Commission from taking action to implement any workforce 
repositioning, restructuring, or reorganization unless the 
Committee has been notified in advance of such proposals, in 
accordance with the reprogramming procedures under section 605 
of this Act. EEOC shall continue to submit quarterly status 
reports on projected and actual spending levels, by function, 
and shall highlight any changes resulting from repositioning 
activities.
    The Committee understands that the EEOC intends to continue 
restructuring by next focusing on its headquarters. The 
Commission is directed to submit to the Committee, prior to 
implementation of any headquarters repositioning, 
restructuring, or reorganization plan, a comprehensive analysis 
of current staffing levels by department and the full impact 
the repositioning plan will have on all core services, 
including the number of staff to be redeployed to the field. 
The Committee directs the Commission to make the filling of 
frontline field vacancies its highest priority.
    The Committee notes its concerns with the National Contact 
Center (NCC). For the past two years, the Commission has 
operated the NCC as a pilot project. It is the understanding of 
the Committee that in its evaluation, the Inspector General's 
Office found numerous problems with the NCC. The Committee 
expects the Commission to utilize the guidance as provided by 
the Inspector General's findings.
    The bill includes language providing $28,000,000 for 
payments to State and local Fair Employment Practices Agencies 
(FEPAs). The bill also includes language similar to that 
included in previous Appropriations Acts allowing non-monetary 
awards to private citizens and up to $2,500 for official 
reception and representation expenses.

                   Federal Communications Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill includes total budget authority of $294,261,000 
for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) for fiscal year 2007, of which $293,261,000 is 
to be derived from offsetting collections, resulting in a 
direct appropriation of $1,000,000. The operating level for 
fiscal year 2007 is $4,503,000 above the current year and 
$8,281,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language, 
similar to that included in previous Appropriations Acts, which 
allows: (1) up to $4,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses; (2) purchase of uniforms and 
acquisition of vehicles; (3) special counsel fees; (4) 
collection of $293,261,000 in section 9 fees; (5) the sum 
appropriated to be reduced as section 9 fees are collected; and 
(6) fees in excess of $293,261,000 to be available in fiscal 
year 2008. A new provision is also included, which prohibits 
obligation of any offsetting collections made available prior 
to October 1, 2007.
    The mission of the Federal Communications Commission is to 
implement the Communications Act of 1934 in a manner that 
promotes competition, innovation, and deregulation in the 
communications industry and the availability of high quality 
communications services for all Americans.
    The Committee appreciates the recent changes in budget 
reporting by the FCC, including modifications to the budget 
structure in the fiscal year 2007 request and the spending plan 
submitted for fiscal year 2006. This transparency in budgeting 
is helpful, and the Committee again directs the FCC to submit a 
spending plan within 30 days of enactment of this Act. This 
spending plan shall serve as the basis for all reprogramming 
notifications. In addition, the Committee expects FCC to 
include the same level of detail in its fiscal year 2008 
request. Furthermore, the Committee reminds the FCC of the 
reprogramming requirements contained in section 605 of the Act, 
identifying the procedures for notifying the Committee of 
changes to the budgetary and organizational plans of the 
Commission.
    While the Committee is pleased that the Commission 
voluntarily examined its travel practices and modified its 
procedures for accepting payments from non-governmental 
sources, the Committee continues to have concerns about FCC 
employees accepting travel payments from entities that have 
business concerns regulated by the Commission. The Committee 
notes that the FCC intends to extend its policy prohibiting 
non-government-sponsored travel to all FCC employees. Within 
the recommended funding level, the Committee expects that the 
FCC will entirely eliminate any travel payments from outside 
sources.
    The recommendation includes a $3,000,000 transfer from the 
Universal Service Fund (USF) for additional audits and 
oversight activities. The Committee is troubled by the problems 
uncovered in the USF program and expects the FCC to make 
working with the Universal Service Administrative Company to 
fight grantee waste, fraud, and abuse a high priority.
    In light of recent FCC reports on cable choice systems and 
their effects on consumers, the Committee expects the FCC to 
subnit, as soon as possible and no later than 180 days after 
enactment of this Act, a report describing the Commission's 
plans for further research and action on the topic.
    The Committee strongly urges the FCC to act expeditiously 
upon the complaint filed under section 616 of the 
Communications Act regarding Washington Nationals baseball.
    The recommendation includes a provision carried in previous 
Appropriations Acts, and in the request, limiting the funds 
available to administer the spectrum auctions program. The 
Committee expects the FCC to continue to refine its cost 
accounting system so that all costs, including auction costs, 
can be clearly distinguished by activity.

                        Federal Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$213,079,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Trade 
Commission for fiscal year 2007, which is $3,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2006 level and $9,921,000 below the request. 
Collections from Hart-Scott-Rodino premerger filing fees and 
Do-Not-Call list fees partially offset the appropriation 
requirement for this account.
    The mission of the Commission is to enforce a variety of 
Federal antitrust and consumer protection laws. Under these 
laws, the Commission seeks to ensure that the nation's markets 
are competitive, function vigorously and efficiently, and are 
free from undue governmental and private restrictions. The 
Commission also seeks to improve the operation of the 
marketplace by eliminating deceptive and unfair practices. 
Appropriations for both the Antitrust Division of the 
Department of Justice and the Commission are partially financed 
with Hart-Scott-Rodino Act pre-merger filing fees.
    The Committee urges the Federal Trade Commission to work 
with companies that extend credit to consumers to ensure that 
it is readily apparent to those individuals that they have the 
ability to ``opt-out'' of receiving unsolicited financial 
information when they complete the necessary forms for an 
application for credit.
    The recommendation continues current bill language 
prohibiting the use of funds to implement or enforce portions 
of section 43 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and section 
151 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvements 
Act of 1991.
    The recommendation also includes bill language that: (1) 
allows for purchase of uniforms, hire of motor vehicles and 
contracts for collection services; (2) allows up to $2,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses; (3) allows for 
the collection of fees; (4) allows for the sum appropriated to 
be reduced as fees are collected; and (5) allows funding to be 
available until expended.

                            HELP Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $1,250,000 for the HELP 
Commission to carry out its authorized purposes, which is 
$1,250,000 above the current year level and $250,000 above the 
request. Language is included extending the due date of a 
certain report.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    The recommendation includes $313,860,000 for the payment to 
the Legal Services Corporation (LSC). This amount is 
$12,718,000 below the fiscal year 2006 level and $3,000,000 
above the request. This amount includes: (1) $296,990,000 for 
grants to basic field programs and required independent audits; 
(2) $2,970,000 for the Office of Inspector General; (3) 
$12,661,000 for Corporation management and administration; and 
(4) $1,239,000 for client self-help and information technology.
    The Legal Services Corporation is a private, nonprofit 
corporation that provides low-income individuals with access to 
legal assistance and information concerning civil legal 
problems. Created in 1974, the Legal Services Corporation is 
charged by Congress to provide assistance to those who would 
otherwise be unable to afford adequate legal counsel.
    The Committee expects LSC management to work cooperatively 
with the Office of Inspector General to identify grantee fraud 
and abuse and agency inefficiencies, and then take corrective 
action where warranted.
    Because of LSC's unique status as a private, non-profit 
corporation, in many cases, the agency is not required to 
adhere to Federal laws governing employment, travel, and other 
administrative processes. The Committee expects LSC to 
carefully review all of its operating procedures to determine 
if they are, in fact, in line with other Federal agencies. If 
discrepancies emerge during this review, the Committee expects 
LSC to proactively make modifications to its procedures. A 
report on the findings of this review, as well as any 
modifications proposed, shall be submitted to the Committee no 
later than February 1, 2007.

          ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

    The Committee recommendation includes bill language to 
continue similar statutory requirements and restrictions 
contained in previous Appropriations Acts. Language is deleted 
regarding the distribution of funds.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the necessary 
expenses of the Marine Mammal Commission, which is $883,000 
below the current year level and $133,000 below the request.
    The Marine Mammal Commission and its Committee of 
Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals are charged with 
maintaining an overview of and providing advice on domestic and 
international actions to further the policies and provisions of 
the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The Commission provides 
objective, science-based advice to the Congress and the 
executive branch on issues related to the protection of marine 
mammals.
    The Committee expects the Commission to continue to 
prioritize activities related to minimizing the direct and 
indirect effects of chemical contaminants, marine debris, 
noise, and other forms of ocean pollution on marine mammals and 
other marine organisms.

                   Securities and Exchange Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $900,517,000 for the 
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including 
$880,517,000 from new fee collections and $20,000,000 from 
prior year balances. This total funding level is $12,400,000 
above the operating level in fiscal year 2006 and $4,329,000 
below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes bill language, 
similar to that included in previous Appropriations Acts, 
which: (1) allows for the rental of space; (2) makes up to 
$3,000 available for official reception and representation 
expenses; (3) makes up to $10,000 available for a permanent 
secretariat for the International Organization of Securities 
Commissions; and (4) makes up to $100,000 available for 
expenses of meetings and consultations with foreign 
governmental and regulatory officials.
    The primary mission of the SEC is to protect investors and 
maintain the integrity of the securities markets. This includes 
ensuring full disclosure of financial information, regulating 
the nation's securities markets, and preventing fraud and 
malpractice in the securities and financial markets.
    Since 2002, the Committee has supported the SEC's 
significantly increased staffing levels in order to protect 
investors and implement the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The Committee 
now understands that the SEC is in a solid position to execute 
its mission within the authorized staffing levels. Therefore, 
the Committee supports the SEC's request to begin to enhance 
its information technology investments to better serve American 
investors.
    The Committee is pleased with the SEC's recent improvements 
to facilities management and is pleased that previous financial 
concerns about the facilities in Boston, MA; New York, NY; and 
Washington, DC; have been resolved.
    The Committee remains concerned that American investors may 
be unwittingly investing in companies with ties to countries 
that sponsor terrorism or are linked to human rights 
violations. The Committee believes that a company's association 
with sponsors of terrorism and human rights abuses, no matter 
how large or small, can have a materially adverse result on a 
public company's operations, financial condition, earnings, and 
stock prices, all of which can negatively affect the value of 
an investment. In order to protect American investors' savings 
and to disclose these business relationships to investors, an 
Office of Global Security Risk was established within the 
Division of Corporation Finance. The Committee expects the work 
of the Office to remain a high priority during fiscal year 2007 
and directs the SEC to continue to submit quarterly reports on 
its activities.
    The Committee supports allowing the agency flexibility to 
manage its resources in an efficient manner and expects that, 
within 30 days of enactment of this Act, the SEC shall submit 
an initial spending plan by division/office describing 
personnel and non-personnel planned expenditures. This spending 
plan shall then serve as the basis for all future reprogramming 
notifications, in accordance with section 605 of this Act.
    The Committee urges the SEC to establish a small business 
ombudsman to address the unique challenges small public 
companies face in implementing the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, to 
include working with the Public Company Accounting Oversight 
Board (PCAOB) to develop appropriate auditing guidelines.

                     Small Business Administration

    The recommendation provides a total of $642,792,000 for the 
five appropriations accounts of the Small Business 
Administration (SBA). This amount is $3,791,000 above the 
budget request and $965,774,000 below the amount appropriated 
in fiscal year 2006 including $1,158,000,000 in supplemental 
appropriations provided in response to hurricane emergency 
declarations. Detailed guidance for the five SBA appropriations 
accounts is contained in the following paragraphs.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $303,550,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the SBA, which is $5,481,000 below the current year 
and the same as the request.
    Of the amount provided under this heading, $182,560,000 is 
for operating expenses of the SBA. In addition, a total of 
$132,616,000 from other SBA accounts may be transferred to and 
merged with the salaries and expenses account for indirect 
operating costs. This amount consists of $123,706,000 from the 
Business Loans Program Account and $8,910,000 from the Disaster 
Loans Program Account for administrative expenses related to 
those accounts. The Committee also anticipates that SBA will 
have an additional $6,830,000 in fee receipts and $9,692,000 in 
reimbursable amounts from other agencies available for 
operating expenses. This will result in a total availability of 
$331,698,000 for the operating expenses of the SBA, which is an 
increase of $1,366,000.
    The Committee recommendation for salaries and expenses 
includes a total of $119,990,000 for non-credit initiatives as 
follows:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Veterans Programs.............................................      $750
Small Business Development Centers............................    90,000
SCORE.........................................................     5,000
Women's Business Centers......................................    12,500
Women's Business Council......................................       750
Drug Free Workplace...........................................       990
Microloan Technical Assistance................................    10,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

    Total, non-credit initiatives.............................   119,990

    The SBA shall not reduce these noncredit programs to fund 
operating costs. In addition, the Committee directs the SBA to 
support no less than the fiscal year 2006 level of funding for 
the HUBZone Contracting Program; the National Ombudsman; Native 
American Outreach; the Office of Advocacy, including support 
for the Advocacy Database; international trade programs; and 
the defense transition program. The Committee also expects the 
SBA to continue to enhance opportunities for small businesses 
to partner with the manufacturing sector.
    The recommendation includes $1,000,000, which may be 
transferred to the Business Loans Program Account, for subsidy 
costs of direct loans.
    The Committee is aware that there are certain rural areas 
that are underutilized business areas, but are excluded from 
HUBZone designation based on the current program authorization. 
The Committee encourages the SBA to continue to examine ways to 
incorporate these areas into any future revisions of the Small 
Business Act.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee expects the Small 
Business Administration (SBA) to provide a resource center in 
the Crystal City area of Arlington County, VA, to provide 
financial, technical, and contracting support for small 
businesses that are affected by the closure of a military 
facility due to the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) 
process, including assistance from and collaboration with local 
Small Business Development Centers, Women's Business Centers, 
and SCORE counselors.
    The Committee recommendation includes requested language 
authorizing $3,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses as well as language authorizing the SBA to charge fees 
to cover the cost of publications and certain loan program 
activities. Requested language is also included that allows 
these fee collections to be credited to the salaries and 
expenses account to be available for carrying out these 
purposes without further appropriations. The recommendation 
includes language making e-government expenditures subject to 
the reprogramming procedures in section 605 of the Act. The 
recommendation also includes new language making $500,000 
available for the National Veterans Business Development 
Corporation.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $13,722,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General of the SBA, which is the same as the amount 
appropriated in fiscal year 2006, excluding supplemental 
appropriations. The Committee understands that these resources 
will be used to meet the Office of Inspector General's 
statutory requirements and investigate waste, fraud, and abuse 
related to recent disasters.

                 SURETY BOND GUARANTEES REVOLVING FUND

    The Committee recommends a total of $2,824,000 for the 
Surety Bond Guarantees Revolving Fund, which is $146,000 below 
the request and the same as the current year level. The 
Committee notes that the Surety Bond program is not covered by 
the Federal Credit Reform Act, and that SBA requests an 
appropriation only when projections show that the reserves need 
to be replenished to cover estimated future liabilities. The 
amount provided should be sufficient to address anticipated 
costs.

                     BUSINESS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends a total of $123,706,000 under this 
account for administrative expenses related to business loan 
programs, which is $1,283,000 below the current year and 
$2,430,000 below the request. The amount provided for 
administrative expenses may be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for SBA salaries and expenses to cover the 
common overhead expenses associated with business loans.
    The SBA Business Loan Program serves as an important source 
of capital for America's small businesses. The recommendation 
designates a $17,500,000,000 business loan program level, which 
is the same as the request. The President's request and the 
Committee's recommendation assume that the 7(a) business loan 
program can continue to operate without an appropriation for 
subsidy costs. The Committee believes that operating this 
program at zero subsidy is beneficial for the long-term 
sustainability of this program.
    The recommendation also supports the Small Business 
Investment Company (SBIC) and 504 loan programs with no subsidy 
appropriation. The recommendation includes a $7,500,000,000 
program level for the 504 certified development company 
program, which is $1,500,000,000 above the fiscal year 2006 
level and the same as the request.
    In addition, the recommendation includes a $12,000,000,000 
program level for the Secondary Market Guarantee Program. This 
reflects the inclusion of this program under the Federal Credit 
Reform Act. The subsidy rate is zero; therefore, no 
appropriation is required.

                     DISASTER LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends a total of $198,990,000 for the 
Disaster Loans Program Account for loan subsidies and 
associated administrative expenses, which is $954,010,000 below 
the current year including emergency supplemental 
appropriations and the same as the request. The Committee 
recommendation includes $85,140,000 for the subsidy costs of 
disaster loans, which, when combined with estimated recoveries 
and anticipated carry-over balances, will provide for a five-
year average lending level.
    The Committee recommendation includes $113,850,000 for 
administrative expenses to carry out the program, which may be 
transferred to and merged with appropriations for salaries and 
expenses. The recommendation includes language specifying that, 
of the amount provided for administrative expenses, 
$104,445,000 is for the direct administrative expenses of loan 
making and loan servicing, and $8,910,000 is for indirect 
administrative expenses. The recommendation also includes 
language requiring that any amount in excess of $8,910,000 
transferred to the salaries and expenses account for indirect 
administrative expenses shall be subject to reprogramming 
requirements, as detailed under section 605 of this Act. In 
addition, the recommendation retains language transferring 
$495,000 of the amount provided for administrative expenses to 
the Office of Inspector General for audits and reviews of the 
disaster loan portfolio.
    As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, the 
Congress is required to appropriate an amount sufficient to 
cover the subsidy costs associated with all direct loan 
obligations and loan guarantee commitments made in fiscal year 
2007, as well as the administrative expenses of the loan 
programs.
    The Committee expects the SBA to continue to work with the 
National Academy of Public Administration to identify ways to 
improve the disaster loan program.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for the State Justice 
Institute (SJI) for fiscal year 2007, which is $1,455,000 below 
the fiscal year 2006 appropriation and $2,000,000 above the 
request.
    The SJI is a private, non-governmental organization that 
awards grants to improve the administration of justice in State 
courts. Although SJI is currently authorized in Public Law 108-
372 through 2008, the Administration's budget request has 
proposed the elimination of Federal funding for SJI.
    The Committee commends SJI for continuing to work with the 
Office of Justice Programs (OJP) on issues involving State 
courts and encourages SJI to continue to seek funds from OJP 
grant programs. The Committee also applauds SJI for its recent 
successes in obtaining dollar-for-dollar matching funds for 
grants awarded. The Committee expects this goal to remain in 
place during fiscal year 2007.

      United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,000,000 for the 
necessary expenses of the United States-China Economic and 
Security Review Commission in fiscal year 2007, including not 
more than $5,000 for the purpose of official representation. 
This amount is $1,038,000 above the fiscal year 2006 level and 
the same as the request. The recommendation includes language, 
modified from the request, regarding the responsibilities of 
the Commission. The Committee commends the Commission for its 
efforts to monitor the evolving U.S.-China relationship.

                    United States Institute of Peace


                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The recommendation includes $26,979,000 for the United 
States Institute of Peace, which is $4,915,000 above the fiscal 
year 2006 level, and the same amount as the budget request. The 
recommended funding level supports programs related to 
resolving conflicts in the Arab and Muslim World. The Committee 
commends the Institute for establishing the Iraq Study Group. 
The recommendation includes funding to continue Institute 
programs and activities related to Iraq.

                      TITLE VI--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments and agencies funded in the accompanying 
bill.
    Section 601 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
Act from being used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by the Congress.
    Section 602 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
Act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless explicitly provided.
    Section 603 provides that the expenditure of any 
appropriation contained in the Act for any consulting service 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection, except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive Order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 604 provides that if any provision of the Act or 
the application of such provision to any person or circumstance 
shall be held invalid, the remainder of the Act and the 
application of such provisions to persons or circumstances 
other than those to which it is held invalid shall not be 
affected.
    Section 605 provides for the Committee's policy concerning 
the reprogramming of funds. Section 605(a) prohibits the 
reprogramming of funds which: (1) creates new programs; (2) 
eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) increases funds 
or personnel by any means for any project or activity for which 
funds have been denied or restricted; (4) relocates offices or 
employees; (5) reorganizes or renames offices; (6) reorganizes 
programs, or activities; or (7) contracts out or privatizes any 
function or activity presently performed by Federal employees 
unless the Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress 
are notified 15 days in advance. Section 605(b) prohibits a 
reprogramming of funds in excess of $750,000 or 10 percent, 
whichever is less, that: (1) augments existing programs, 
projects or activities; (2) reduces by 10 percent funding for 
any existing program, project, or activity, or numbers of 
personnel by 10 percent as approved by Congress; or (3) results 
from any general savings, including savings from a reduction in 
personnel, which would result in a change in existing programs, 
activities, or projects as approved by Congress unless the 
Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress are 
notified 15 days in advance. The Committee has again included 
carryover funds under the requirements of section 605 to 
clarify that agencies must follow reprogramming procedures with 
respect to carryover funds.
    Section 606, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits funds from being used to implement, administer, or 
enforce any guidelines of the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission covering harassment based on religion similar to 
proposed guidelines published by the EEOC in October 1993.
    Section 607 provides that if it is determined that any 
person intentionally affixes a ``Made in America'' label to any 
product that was not made in America that person shall not be 
eligible to receive any contract or subcontract with funds made 
available in this Act.
    Section 608, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
requires quarterly reporting to Congress of unobligated 
balances that were received during any previous fiscal year.
    Section 609 provides that any closing or downsizing costs 
incurred by a department or agency funded under this Act 
resulting from funding reductions in the Act shall be absorbed 
within the budgetary resources available to the Department or 
agency, and provides transfer authority between appropriation 
accounts to carry out the provision, subject to reprogramming 
procedures.
    Section 610, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits funds made available in this Act from being used to 
promote the sale or export of tobacco or tobacco products or to 
seek the reduction or removal of foreign restrictions on the 
marketing of tobacco products, provided that such restrictions 
are applied equally to all tobacco products or tobacco products 
of the same type. This provision is not intended to impact 
routine international trade services provided to all U.S. 
citizens, including the processing of applications to establish 
foreign trade zones.
    Section 611 prohibits funds made available in this Act from 
being used to implement a Federal user fee for background 
checks conducted pursuant to the Brady Handgun Control Act of 
1993, or to implement a background check system that does not 
require and result in the destruction of certain information 
within 24 hours.
    Section 612, modified from fiscal year 2006 and the 
request, delays the obligations of any receipts deposited into 
the Crime Victims Fund in excess of $625,000,000 until October 
1, 2007. This language is continued to ensure a stable source 
of funds will remain available for the program, despite 
inconsistent levels of criminal fines deposited annually into 
the fund. Requested language rescinding the remaining balances 
in the Crime Victims Fund is not included.
    Section 613 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against or denigrate the 
religious beliefs of students participating in such programs.
    Section 614, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits the transfer of funds in the Act to any department or 
agency of the United States Government, except for transfers 
made under authorities provided in this, or any other 
appropriations Act.
    Section 615, modified from the current year and proposed 
for deletion in the budget request, requires the Departments of 
Commerce, Justice, and State, the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, the 
Securities and Exchange Commission and the Small Business 
Administration to certify that telecommuting opportunities have 
increased over the previous fiscal year. This section also 
designates funding to be available only after such 
certification is provided.
    Section 616 provides that funds provided for the National 
Science Foundation for E-Government Initiatives shall be 
subject to the procedures set forth in section 605 of this Act.
    Section 617, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
requires the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and 
Explosives to include specific language in any release of 
tracing study data that makes clear that trace data cannot be 
used to draw broad conclusions about firearms-related crime.
    Section 618 prohibits the use of funds to process patents 
of human organisms. The Committee concurs with the intent of 
this provision as expressed in the colloquy between the 
provision's sponsor in the House and the Ranking Minority 
Member of the House Committee on Appropriations as occurred on 
July 22, 2003, with respect to any existing patents on stem 
cells.
    Section 619, proposed for deletion, prohibits the use of 
funds in this Act to be used to support or justify torture by 
any official or contract employee of the United States 
Government.
    Section 620 provides for initiatives related to small 
business development and entrepreneurship, including 
programmatic and construction activities, to be awarded as 
follows:
     $350,000 for the National Center for Community 
Renewal;
     $675,000 for the Institute for Advanced Learning 
and Research for a business development initiative;
     $250,000 for the New College Institute to support 
economic development and small business development, including 
necessary renovation and equipment costs;
     $100,000 for the Manufacturing Enhancement Center 
to enhance the effectiveness of small manufacturers, including 
necessary construction, renovation, and equipment costs;
     $500,000 for the Hickory, NC, Manufacturing Center 
for a workforce development program;
     $1,000,000 for the International Trade and Small 
Business Institute;
     $1,500,000 for the Illinois Institute for 
Technology to examine and assess advancements in 
biotechnologies;
     $200,000 for Calhoun Community College, AL, for a 
workforce development project;
     $600,000 for Wittenberg University to expand 
business education;
     $250,000 for Rural Business and Resource Center in 
Seminole, Oklahoma;
     $200,000 for Darton College for business 
development initiatives;
     $250,000 for the Innovation Center in Peoria, 
Illinois, including necessary construction costs;
     $250,000 for Marshalltown Community College for a 
rural entrepreunership incubator, including necessary 
construction costs;
     $200,000 for the Oil Region Alliance of Business, 
Industry and Tourism;
     $200,000 for Jefferson County, PA, for a business 
development initiative, including necessary construction costs;
     $25,000 for Clarion County, PA, for a business 
development initiative;
     $1,000,000 for Southern and Eastern Kentucky 
Tourism Development Association;
     $250,000 for Southeast Kentucky Economic 
Development Corporation;
     $250,000 for Montana World Trade Center;
     $500,000 for Siena College for a historical and 
tourism development initiative;
     $250,000 for Wayne County, NY, Industrial Park for 
a business development initiative;
     $250,000 for the Enterprise Center, TN;
     $750,000 for Fairplex Trade and Conference Center;
     $150,000 for the University of Notre Dame for an 
entrepreneurship and business promotion initiative;
     $150,000 for Thomas More College, KY, for a 
workforce development program;
     $150,000 for Delaware Valley College for a 
research and innovation incubator, including necessary 
construction costs;
     $150,000 for University of Southern Indiana Center 
for Applied Research and Development;
     $150,000 for the Adelante Development Center for a 
comprehensive employment and job creation program;
     $150,000 for Carnegie Mellon University for a 
community-based demonstration project;
     $150,000 for Illinois State University for a small 
business incubator;
     $100,000 for Richard Stockton College for a small 
and minority-owned business development project;
     $100,000 for a workforce development program in 
the upstate of South Carolina;
     $100,000 for the International Trade Center in 
Myrtle Beach, SC;
     $250,000 for Rochester, NY, Tooling and Machining 
Association for a workforce development program;
     $100,000 for Lakewood, NJ, for a business 
development initiative;
     $300,000 for Rockford Area Ventures Small Business 
Incubator and Technology Commercialization Center;
     $200,000 for Rock Valley College, IL, for a 
workforce development program;
     $300,000 for the Bronx Council for marketing of 
local business arts initiatives;
     $150,000 for the Arthur Avenue Retail Market for 
local business requirements and improvements;
     $50,000 for the South East Bronx Community 
Organization for improvements and their low income community 
and business program;
     $50,000 for the Out-of-Doors program in the Bronx 
to continue community development efforts;
     $250,000 for the Bronx On-Water learning program 
for improvements to facilitate their training and skills 
development program;
     $50,000 for a Bronx River workforce development, 
training, and apprenticeship program;
     $100,000 to HOGAR, Inc. for an economic and 
community development program for elderly and special needs 
persons in the Bronx;
     $200,000 for Promesa Systems Inc. for improvements 
associated with service;
     $50,000 for Presbyterian Senior Services for 
economic and community development programs for the elderly;
     $50,000 for the Thorpe Family Residence in Bronx, 
NY for economic and community development family residential 
services program;
     $100,000 for the National Latino Data Center to 
provide business information to local businesses, researchers 
and communities;
     $50,000 for World Vision's Bronx Storehouse for 
community services;
     $950,000 for Hudson-Alpha Institute to support the 
continued development of the small biotechnology business 
community in Huntsville, Alabama;
     $500,000 for Johnson and Wales University of Rhode 
Island for a Latino business program;
     $100,000 for Rhode Island College for a workforce 
literacy program;
     $950,000 for American Cities Foundation for its 
economic development initiative;
     $400,000 for the Wisconsin Procurement Initiative;
     $500,000 for the JARI Workforce Development 
Program and Small Business Technology Center;
     $800,000 for JARI for a regional business 
incubator;
     $400,000 for a Hispanic information network for 
small business development and financial literacy for Spanish 
speaking audiences in New York;
     $100,000 for Cypress Hills Local Development 
Corporation for the Reach Project to provide financial literacy 
and technical assistance to the community;
     $300,000 for the Institute for Entrepreneurship, 
Small Business Development and Global Logistics at California 
State University at Dominguez Hills, CA;
     $900,000 for Fairmont State University for a small 
business development initiative;
     $400,000 for Grafton, WV for a small and 
microenterprise business development program; and
     $300,000 for West Virginia University for a small 
business and workforce training program.
    Section 621, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
designates funds from the Departments and agencies in this Act 
for the purpose of implementing the Capital Security Cost-
Sharing program.
    Section 622, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits the use of funds in this Act to require certain 
export licenses.
    Section 623, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits the use of funds in this Act to deny certain import 
applications regarding ``curios or relics'' firearms, parts, or 
ammunition. This provision was included in the fiscal year 2006 
Appropriations Act. The Committee is disappointed that the 
Departments of State and Justice have not implemented this 
provision as Congress intended and expects the Administration 
to resolve this issue as quickly as possible.
    Section 624, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits the use of funds to include certain language in trade 
agreements.
    Section 625, proposed for deletion in the budget request, 
prohibits the use of funds in this Act to pay expenses for any 
United States delegation to a United Nations agency or 
commission if such agency or commission is chaired or presided 
over by a country that has repeatedly provided support for acts 
of international terrorism.
    Section 626 prohibits funds in this Act for certain 
diplomatic activities until the President certifies that Libya 
has taken certain actions with regard to victims of terrorist 
acts.
    Section 627 prohibits funds in this Act in contravention of 
law and executive order regarding energy efficiency of Federal 
buildings.
    Section 628 prohibits funds in this Act to enter into a 
basing rights agreement between the United States and Iraq.

                         TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS


                         Department of Justice


                   VIOLENT CRIME REDUCTION TRUST FUND

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $8,000,000 of 
unobligated balances in this account.

                         General Administration


               TELECOMMUNICATIONS CARRIER COMPLIANCE FUND

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $39,000,000 of 
unobligated balances in this account.

                            Legal Activities


                         Assets Forfeiture Fund


                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $152,787,000 
from unobligated balances in this account. The budget request 
proposed a rescission of $120,000,000.

                      Offfice of Justice Programs


               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $127,500,000 of 
the unobligated prior year balances in this account, as 
requested. This rescission shall not apply to funds available 
for the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, Prison Rape 
Prevention and Prosecution Programs, the Byrne Discretionary 
program or victims of trafficking programs.

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $127,500,000 of 
unobligated prior year balances in this account, as requested. 
This rescission shall not apply to funds available for gang, 
meth or technology programs.

                         Department of Commerce


            EMERGENCY STEEL GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $38,607,000 of 
unobligated balances in this account instead of $48,607,000 as 
proposed in the budget request.

                          Department of State


         Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund


                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $10,000,000 of 
available balances in this account.

                            RELATED AGENCIES


                     Small Business Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $6,100,000 for 
this account, as requested.

                     BUSINESS LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $5,000,000 for 
this account, as requested.

                     DISASTER LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                              (RESCISSION)

    The recommendation includes a rescission of $3,700,000 for 
this account, as requested.

              House of Representatives Report Requirements

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

                        Constitutional Authority

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives states that:

          Each report of a committee on a bill or joint 
        resolution of a public character shall include a 
        statement citing the specific powers granted to the 
        Congress in the Constitution to enact the law proposed 
        by the bill or joint resolution.

    The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to 
report this legislation from Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States of America, which 
states:

          No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
        consequence of Appropriations made by law. * * *

    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives in developing 
funding recommendations.

               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill, which directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities which require annual authorization 
or additional legislation, which to date has not been enacted.
    The bill includes provisions which place limitations on the 
use of funds in the bill or change existing limitations and 
which might, under some circumstances, be construed as changing 
the application of existing law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years, which are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill also provides that a number of appropriations 
shall remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal 
year. While these provisions are not specifically authorized 
for all of the items, it is deemed desirable to include such 
language for certain programs in order to provide for orderly 
administration and the effective use of funds.
    Language is included under a number of accounts in which 
appropriations are offset by collections that specifies the 
level of offsetting collections to be credited to the account 
and in certain cases makes collections in excess of the level 
available in the following fiscal year.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has designated 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
programs and has adjusted some designations.
    Language is deleted for items that were one-time 
requirements in fiscal year 2006.
    Language is included making changes to citations of 
authorizations.
    Throughout the bill, several General Provisions carried in 
the fiscal year 2006 bill for one-time requirements are deleted 
and several others contain technical modifications.
    Those additional changes in the fiscal year 2007 bill, 
which might be interpreted as changing existing law, are as 
follows:
    Under General Administration, language is modified 
regarding the availability of funds.
    Under Tactical Wireless Communications for Federal Law 
Enforcement, the name of the account is modified and language 
regarding the Integrated Wireless Network in included.
    Under Detention Trustee, language is included transferring 
unobligated balances available from prior years from the funds 
appropriated under the heading ``Federal Prisoner Detention'' 
shall be transferred to this account. Language designating 
prior year balances is also modified.
    Under National Security Division, language is included 
regarding this new litigating division.
    Under Antitrust Division, language is modified regarding 
offsetting collections.
    Under United States Marshals Service, language is included 
regarding the renovation of certain space and language is 
modified designating funding for certain equipment.
    Under Fees and Expenses of Witnesses, language is included 
regarding expenses for foreign counsel.
    Under the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is modified concerning the purchase of motor 
vehicles. Language is modified designating funding for official 
reception and representation.
    Under the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Construction, 
language is modified making funding available for a records 
management facility.
    Under the Drug Enforcement Administration, language is 
modified concerning the purchase of motor vehicles.
    Under the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and 
Explosives, language is modified regarding the use of certain 
data and the citation of authority. Language is included 
authorizing $30,000,000 in fee collections.
    Under Federal Prison System, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is included regarding the purchase of motor vehicles.
    Under Violence Against Women Prevention and Prosecution 
Programs, language is modified updating the citation of 
authorities.
    Under Justice Assistance, language is modified updating the 
citation of authorities.
    Under State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance, language 
is modified regarding the citation of authorities and language 
is included for a sex offender registry.
    Under Community Oriented Policing Services, language is 
modified regarding the citation of authorities. Language is 
modified regarding Indian tribes, Project Safe Neighborhoods, 
DNA analysis, Office of Weed and Seed Strategies, and the use 
of prior year balances.
    Under the Juvenile Justice account, language is modified 
regarding the citation of authorities.
    Under the Public Safety Officers Benefits account, language 
is modified regarding the citation of authorities.
    In section 105, language is modified regarding the transfer 
of funds to or from the Federal Prison System.
    In section 106, language is modified regarding a Personnel 
Management Demonstration Project.
    In section 109, language is included regarding the 
application of reprogramming requirements to certain 
initiatives.
    In section 110, language is included regarding the 
obligation of funds for major Department of Justice information 
technology programs.
    Under United States Trade Representative, language is 
modified concerning the availability of funds.
    Under International Trade Administration, language 
designating funding for certain activities is modified. 
Language designating funding available through fee collections 
is modified.
    Under Bureau of the Census, language is included 
designating funding for certain programs and language is 
included regarding a certain facility.
    Under Public Telecommunications Facilities, Planning and 
Construction, language is modified regarding the administration 
of grants.
    Under United States Patent and Trademark Office, language 
is included regarding certain authorities and language is 
modified designating funding and positions for certain 
activities.
    Under Technology Administration, language is modified 
regarding an office name.
    Under National Institutes of Standards and Technology, 
language is modified regarding the transfer of certain amounts 
to the working capital fund.
    Under National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
Operations, Research, and Facilities, language is modified 
designating funding for certain activities. Language is 
modified designating funding available by transfer and from 
recovery of prior year obligations. Language is included 
regarding education activities.
    Under Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery, language is included 
describing uses of funds under this account.
    Under Coastal Zone Management Fund, language is included 
transferring balances to the Operations, Research and 
Facilities account.
    Under Departmental Management, language is modified 
designating funding for certain activities.
    In section 203, language is modified regarding Department 
of Commerce transfer of funds authorities.
    In section 205, language is included regarding the Ernest 
F. Hollings Scholarship Program.
    In section 206, language is included regarding the Dr. 
Nancy Foster Scholarship Program.
    In section 207, language is included regarding the 
application of reprogramming requirements to certain 
initiatives.
    Under Office of Science and Technology Policy, language is 
included regarding improving science and math education and 
establishing an Ethics Advisory Group for the National 
Nanotechnology Initiative.
    Under National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Science, Aeronautics and Exploration, language is included 
designating funds for certain activities, and establishing 
reprogramming procedures.
    Under National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Exploration Capabilities, language is included designating 
funds for certain activities and establishing reprogramming 
procedures.
    Under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Administrative Provisions, language is included regarding 
prizes and the transfer of funds between appropriations.
    Under the National Science Foundation, Research and Related 
Activities, language is modified regarding inducement prizes, 
and designating funding for Polar research.
    Under Diplomatic and Consular Programs, language is 
modified designating funding and positions for certain 
programs.
    Under International Organizations, Contributions to 
International Organizations, language is modified requiring 
that the United Nations remain within its biennial budget.
    Under Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust 
Fund, language is included making interest and earnings 
available.
    Under International Broadcasting Operation, language is 
modified regarding the availability of funds.
    In section 404, includes new language modifying the 
citation of authorities for the Senior Policy Operating Group 
on Trafficking in Persons.
    In section 410, includes language regarding Department of 
State reprogramming procedures.
    In section 411, includes language regarding the Department 
of State rewards program.
    Under the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, modifies 
language regarding payments to State and local agencies.
    Under the Federal Communications Commission, language is 
included regarding the transfer of funds from the Universal 
Service Fund.
    Under the Legal Services Corporation, language is modified 
regarding the allocation of funding.
    Under Securities and Exchange Commission, language is 
modified regarding prior year balances.
    Under Small Business Administration, Salaries and Expenses, 
language is modified regarding fee collections.
    Under Business Loans Program Account, Direct Loan Subsidy 
modified language regarding the citation of authorities.
    Under Disaster Loans Program Account, language is modified 
regarding the citation of authorities and the allocation of 
funds.
    Under the United States-China Economic and Security Review 
Commission, language is included regarding printing, 
compensation and other issues.
    In section 609, includes language regarding certain 
transfers of funds.
    In section 612, includes modified language regarding the 
Crime Victims Fund.
    In section 615, includes modified language regarding 
telework.
    In section 616, requires that any funds used by the 
National Science Foundation to implement certain initiatives 
shall be subject to section 605 of this Act.
    In section 620, includes modified language regarding small 
business development and entrepreneurship programs.
    In section 621, includes modifies language designation 
funding for the Capital Security Cost Sharing program.
    Under Title VII, includes rescissions from the Violent 
Crime Reduction Trust Fund; the Telecommunications Carrier 
Compliance Fund; the Assets Forfeiture Fund; State and Local 
Law Enforcement Assistance; Community Oriented Policing 
Services; Emergency Steel Guaranteed Loan Program Account; 
Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund; Small 
Business Administration, Salaries and Expenses, Business Loans 
Program Account, and Disaster Loans Program Account.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Appropriations
                                                     Last year of  Authorization   in last year   Appropriations
                  Agency/Program                    authorization      level            of         in this bill
                                                                                   authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Justice:
    Administrative Review and Appeals.............           2007        224,937        229,152         229,152
    Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund........           1992          4,058          2,500           6,292
    Foreign Claims Settlement Commission..........           2007          1,321          1,431           1,431
    Construction of Witness Safesites.............           2007          8,000         10,000          10,000
    Federal Bureau of Investigation...............           2007      5,991,686      6,040,050       6,040,050
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and                2007        960,558        980,128         980,128
     Explosives...................................
Violence Against Women Prevention and Prosecution
 Programs:
    Training for Judicial Personnel...............           2005          2,300          1,925           2,287
Office of Justice Programs:
    Justice Assistance:
        National Institute of Justice.............           1995         33,000         59,879          55,000
        Bureau of Justice Statistics..............           1995         33,000         32,335          36,000
        Regional Information Sharing System.......           2003        100,000         29,000          39,676
        White Collar Crime Center.................  .............  .............  ..............          8,000
    State and Local Law Enforcement:
        Byrne Justice Assistance Discretionary      .............  .............  ..............        115,225
         Grants...................................
        Boys and Girls Clubs......................           2005         80,000         85,000          75,000
        Southwest Border Prosecutors..............  .............  .............  ..............         30,000
        Intelligence State and Local Training.....  .............  .............  ..............          2,000
        Sex Offender Registry.....................  .............  .............  ..............          1,984
        Prescription Drug Monitoring..............  .............  .............  ..............         10,000
    Community Oriented Policing:
        Training and Technical Assistance.........  .............  .............  ..............          3,997
        Project Safe Neighborhoods................  .............  .............  ..............         54,808
        Offender Reentry..........................           2005         16,000         10,000           4,936
    Juvenile Justice:
        Tribal Youth..............................  .............  .............  ..............         10,000
        Alcohol Prevention........................  .............  .............  ..............         25,000
        Victims of Child Abuse Act................           2005         20,000         15,000          15,000
        Project Childsafe.........................  .............  .............  ..............            992
Office of the United States Trade Representative..           2004         33,108         41,552          46,207
International Trade Commission....................           2004         57,240         61,700          62,575
Department of Commerce\1\:
    International Trade Administration............           1996      such sums        248,726         424,782
    Bureau of Industry and Security...............           2001      such sums         64,711          76,806
    National Telecommunications and Information              1993         19,400         17,900          17,837
     Administration...............................
    National Institute of Standards and                      1993        393,500        279,007         627,000
     Technology, Technology Administration........
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric                      various  .............  ..............      3,387,167
     Administration...............................
National Aeronautics and Space Administration\2\..           2007     17,932,000     16,709,000      16,709,000
National Science Foundation\3\....................           2007      9,839,262      6,020,012       6,020,012
Department of State:
    Administration of Foreign Affairs.............           2003      5,190,390      5,874,914       6,701,526
    International Organizations...................           2003      1,617,359      1,672,000       2,286,645
    International Commissions.....................           2003         66,385         64,130          67,928
    Other State...................................           2003         72,000         69,986          64,625
Broadcasting Board of Governors...................           2003        644,486        599,560         658,903
United States Commission on Civil Rights..........           1995          9,500          9,096           8,933
Commission on International Religious Freedom.....           2003          3,000          3,000           3,000
Federal Communications Commission.................           1991      such sums        115,794         294,261
Federal Trade Commission..........................           1998        111,000        106,500         213,079
Legal Services Corporation........................           1980      such sums        300,000         313,860
Marine Mammal Commission..........................           1999          1,750          1,890           2,000
Securities and Exchange Commission................           2003        776,000        716,350         880,517
Small Business Administration.....................           2006      such sums      1,608,566         642,792
US Institute of Peace\4\..........................           2003      such sums         16,256         26,979
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Programs under the Department of Commerce are funded pursuant to a number of expiring authorizing statutes.
  The statutes address a number of projects that do not directly correspond to the account structure in this
  Act.
\2\The National Aeronautics and Space Administration appropriations are authorized for fiscal year 2007.
  However, the amounts were authorized under a different account structure than included in this bill.
\3\FY 2007 authorization levels for the National Science Foundation are contingent upon a determination by
  Congress that the National Science Foundation has made progress toward certain management goals. Congress has
  not yet made such determinations.
\4\The Higher Education Amendments Act of 1998, for 1999 plus 4 years.

                 Comparison With the Budget Resolution

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, which requires that the report accompanying a bill 
providing new budget authority contain a statement detailing 
how that authority compares with the reports submitted under 
section 302 of the Act for the most recently agreed to 
concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal year from 
the Committee's section 302(a) allocation.

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 Section
                                                 302(b)      Recommended
                                               allocation   in this bill
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget Authority:
    Mandatory...............................           354           354
    Discretionary...........................        59,839        59,839
                                             ---------------------------
      Total Budget Authority................        60,193        60,193
                                             ===========================
Outlays:
    Mandatory...............................           365           365
    Discretionary...........................        62,143        62,124
                                             ---------------------------
      Total Outlays.........................        62,508        62,489
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Five-Year Outlay Projections

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill:

Fiscal year 2007 outlays

                        [In millions of dollars]

Budget Authority:
    Outlays:............................................          60,193
    2007................................................          38,890
    2008................................................          14,514
    2009................................................           4,553
    2010................................................           2,169
    2011 and future years...............................           1,054

               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the financial assistance to 
State and local governments is as follows:

                                                                Millions
FY 2007 new budget authority............................          $1,342
FY 2007 outlays resulting therefrom.....................             104

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

       SECTION 11 OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ACT OF 1950


                    GENERAL AUTHORITY OF FOUNDATION

  Sec. 11. The Foundation shall have the authority, within the 
limits of available appropriations, to do all things necessary 
to carry out the provisions of this Act, including, but without 
being limited thereto, the authority--
          (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (f) to receive and use funds donated by others, if 
        such funds are donated without restriction other than 
        that they be used in furtherance of one or more of the 
        general purposes of the Foundation, except that funds 
        may be donated for specific prize competitions;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2005

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



DIVISION B--DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, 
AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2005

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



General Provisions--Department of Commerce

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 214. Establishment of the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship 
Program. (a) Establishment.--The Administrator of the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall establish and 
administer the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program. Under 
the program, and subject to subsection (f), the Administrator 
shall award scholarships in oceanic and atmospheric science, 
research, technology, and education to be known as Ernest F. 
Hollings Scholarships.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(f) Funding.--Of the total amount appropriated for fiscal 
year 2005 and annually hereafter to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the Administrator shall make 
available for the Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship program one-
tenth of 1 percent of such appropriations.]
  (f) Funding.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
carry out the provisions of this section, up to $4,000,000 
annually.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


           SECTION 318 OF THE NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARIES ACT

SEC. 318. DR. NANCY FOSTER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

  (a) Establishment.--The Secretary shall establish and 
administer through the National Ocean Service the Dr. Nancy 
Foster Scholarship Program. Under the program, and subject to 
subsection (e), the Secretary shall award graduate education 
scholarships in oceanography, marine biology or maritime 
archeology, to be known as Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarships.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(e) Funding.--Of the amount available each fiscal year to 
carry out this title, the Secretary shall award 1 percent as 
Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarships.]
  (e) Funding.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Secretary of Commerce up to $500,000 annually, to carry out the 
provisions of this section.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


    SECTION 210 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001

  [Sec. 210. (a) The Secretary of Commerce shall establish and 
administer through the National Ocean Service the Dr. Nancy 
Foster Scholarship Program. Under the program, the Secretary 
shall award graduate education scholarships in marine biology, 
oceanography, or maritime archaeology, including the curation, 
preservation, and display of maritime artifacts, to be known as 
``Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarships''.
  [(b) The purpose of the Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship Program 
is to recognize outstanding scholarship in marine biology, 
oceanography, or maritime archaeology, particularly by women 
and members of minority groups, and encourage independent 
graduate level research in such fields of study.
  [(c) Each Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship award--
          [(1) shall be used to support a candidate's graduate 
        studies in marine biology, oceanography, or maritime 
        archaeology at a sponsoring institution; and
          [(2) shall be made available to individual candidates 
        in accordance with guidelines issued by the Secretary.
  [(d) The amount of each Dr. Nancy Foster Scholarship shall be 
provided directly to each recipient selected by the Secretary 
upon receipt of certification that the recipient will adhere to 
a specific and detailed plan of study and research approved by 
the sponsoring institution.
  [(e) The Secretary shall make 1 percent of the amount 
appropriated each fiscal year to carry out the National Marine 
Sanctuaries Act (46 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.) available for Dr. 
Nancy Foster Scholarships.
  [(f) Repayment of the award shall be made to the Secretary in 
the case of fraud or noncompliance.]
                              ----------                              


    SECTION 36 OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT BASIC AUTHORITIES ACT OF 1956

SEC. 36. DEPARTMENT OF STATE REWARDS PROGRAM.

  (a) * * *
  (b) Rewards Authorized.--In the sole discretion of the 
Secretary (except as provided in subsection (c)(2)) and in 
consultation, as appropriate, with the Attorney General, the 
Secretary may pay a reward to any individual or to an officer 
or employee of a foreign government in accordance with 
subsection (f)(2) who furnishes information leading to--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(f) Ineligibility.--An officer] (f) Ineligibility._
          (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), 
        an officer or employee of any entity of Federal, State, 
        or local government or of a foreign government who, 
        while in the performance of his or her official duties, 
        furnishes information described in subsection (b) shall 
        not be eligible for a reward under this section.
          (2) Exception in certain circumstances.--The 
        Secretary may pay a reward to an officer or employee of 
        a foreign government (or any entity thereof) who, while 
        in the performance of his or her official duties, 
        furnishes information described in such subsection, if 
        the Secretary determines that such payment satisfies 
        the following conditions:
                  (A) Such payment is appropriate in light of 
                the exceptional or high-profile nature of the 
                information furnished pursuant to such 
                subsection.
                  (B) Such payment may aid in furnishing 
                further information described in such 
                subsection.
                  (C) Such payment is formally requested by 
                such agency.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                          HELP COMMISSION ACT

  Sec. 637. (a) This section may be cited as the ``HELP 
Commission Act''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (f)(1) Not later than 2 years and 3 months after the members 
of the Commission are appointed under subsection (d)(1), the 
Commission shall submit a report to the President, the 
Secretary of State, the Committee on Appropriations and the 
Committee on International Relations of the House of 
Representatives, and the Committee on Appropriations and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, setting forth its 
findings and recommendations under section (c)(2).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


SECTION 1238 OF THE FLOYD D. SPENCE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT 
                          FOR FISCAL YEAR 2001

SEC. 1238. UNITED STATES-CHINA SECURITY REVIEW COMMISSION.

  (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Duties.--
          (1) Annual report.--Not later than [June] November 1 
        each year (beginning in 2002), the Commission shall 
        submit to Congress a report, in both unclassified and 
        classified form, regarding the national security 
        implications and impact of the bilateral trade and 
        economic relationship between the United States and the 
        People's Republic of China. The report shall include a 
        full analysis, along with conclusions and 
        recommendations for legislative and administrative 
        actions, if any, of the national security implications 
        for the United States of the trade and current balances 
        with the People's Republic of China in goods and 
        services, financial transactions, and technology 
        transfers. The Commission shall also take into account 
        patterns of trade and transfers through third countries 
        to the extent practicable.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(g) Applicability of FACA.--The provisions of the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall apply to the 
activities of the Commission.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, language is included transferring 
unexpended balances as follows:
    Under Detention Trustee, language is included transferring 
unobligated balances available from prior years from the funds 
appropriated under the heading ``Federal Prisoner Detention'' 
shall be transferred to this account.
    Under Coastal Zone Management Fund, language is included 
transferring balances to the Operations, Research and 
Facilities account.
    Under Department of Commerce General Provisions, language 
is included making funds available for transfer for certain 
purposes.
    Under the Federal Communications Commission, language is 
included regarding the transfer of funds from the Universal 
Service Fund.
    Under Title VI General Provisions, language is included 
making funds available for transfer for certain purposes.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

Department of Justice, Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
    Fund................................................      $8,000,000
Department of Justice, Telecommunications Carrier 
    Compliance Fund.....................................      39,000,000
Department of Justice, Assets Forfeiture Fund...........     152,787,000
Department of Justice, State and Local Law Enforcement 
    Assistance..........................................     127,500,000
Department of Justice, Community Oriented Policing 
    Services............................................     127,500,000
Department of Commerce, Emergency Steel Guaranteed Loan 
    Program Account.....................................      38,607,000
Department of State, Center for Middle Eastern-Western 
    Dialogue Trust Fund.................................      10,000,000
Small Business Administration, Salaries and Expenses....       6,100,000
Small Business Administration, Business Loans Program 
    Account.............................................       5,000,000
Small Business Administration, Disaster Loans Program 
    Account.............................................       3,700,000


      Comparative Statement of New Budget (Obligational) Authority

    The following table provides a detailed summary, for each 
Department and agency, comparing the amounts recommended in the 
bill with fiscal year 2006 enacted amounts and budget estimates 
presented for fiscal year 2007:



      ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF REPRESENTATIVES OBEY, HOYER AND MOLLOHAN

    Representatives Obey, Hoyer and Mollohan offered an 
amendment in full committee to increase the hourly minimum wage 
from $5.15 to $5.85 on January 1, 2007; $6.55 on January 1, 
2008, and $7.25 on January 1, 2009. It was the same amendment 
that the committee approved and included in the Labor-Health 
and Human Services-Education appropriations bill. When it 
became clear that the Republican Leadership would not allow 
that bill and the wage increase to receive a vote on the House 
floor, Democrats moved to offer the amendment again on this 
bill. This time, the amendment was defeated on a straight 
party-line vote of 28-34.
    The need to increase the minimum wage is clear. According 
to the most recent poverty statistics, there are 3.7 million 
workers who worked full-time, year-round, and still lived in 
poverty. During the 1960s and 1970s, the annual earnings of a 
full-time, year-round worker earning the minimum wage were 
roughly equal to the poverty level for a family of three. To 
reach the poverty level for a family of three in 2006 
($16,600), a full-time, year-round worker would need to earn 
$7.98 an hour--$2.83 more than the current minimum wage. 
Americans who work full-time, year-round should not live in 
poverty.
    The minimum wage increase of $2.10 per hour over 24 months 
in this bill would directly benefit about 7 million low-wage 
workers, according to the Economic Policy Institute, and its 
spillover effects would benefit an additional 8 million 
workers. Moreover, this increase would benefit poor workers who 
need it most: 54 percent of the gains from the proposed $2.10 
hourly increase would go to working households in the bottom 40 
percent of the income scale.
    Giving Americans a raise by increasing the minimum wage 
does not harm economic growth. Since 1997, 20 states and D.C. 
have enacted minimum wage rates above the $5.15 Federal level. 
Employment growth in those states disproves predictions that 
increasing the minimum wage would make small business employers 
less inclined to hire. In fact, small business employment 
between 1997 and 2003 grew more in states with a higher minimum 
wage than in Federal minimum wage states (9.4 percent versus 
6.6 percent).
    The last increase in the federal minimum wage was signed 
into law nearly a decade ago by President Clinton. Since the 
wage has remained stagnant, it now equals only 31 percent of 
the average hourly wage of American workers--the lowest level 
since 1949. The House recently agreed to legislation that would 
provide the ninth cost-of-living increase for Members of 
Congress since the current level of the minimum wage took 
effect. Isn't it time to vote on an increase in the minimum 
wage?

                                   Dave Obey.
                                   Alan B. Mollohan.
                                   Steny Hoyer.

ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE DAVID OBEY AND THE HONORABLE ALAN B. 
                                MOLLOHAN

    The President's request for Science, State, Justice and 
Commerce FY 2007 programs yields ground in the fight against 
crime, backs away from the supporting economically distressed 
communities, retreats from investments in cutting edge 
innovations, and abrogates our responsibility to ensure equal 
justice under the law. This bill improves on the 
Administration's budget, and Chairman Wolf, a man of principle 
and passion, deserves credit for those improvements. 
Nonetheless, the President's failures do not excuse Congress 
from its obligation to adopt a responsible budget resolution 
that enables us to adequately address these critical issues.

           THE PRESIDENT'S BUDGET AND THE CHALLENGES WE FACE

    State and Local Law Enforcement: Despite the subcommittee 
restoring $1.1 billion above the request, this bill provides 
$2.3 billion in assistance to state and local law enforcement, 
a reduction of $200 million compared to last year and $2.2 
billion compared to 2001. Each year, President Bush's budget 
has proposed to cut funding for formula grants and assistance 
to: prevent and prosecute gang activities; combat 
methamphetamine; equip our police with bulletproof vests and 
interoperable communications; reduce recidivism; and, encourage 
effective crime prevention techniques for at-risk youth. Each 
year, the Committee struggles to restore these cuts. And each 
year, assistance to State and local law enforcement declines.

                                            [In billions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                FY2001   FY2002   FY2003   FY2004   FY2005   FY2006     FY2007
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Enacted:.....................................     $4.4     $4.0     $3.5     $3.0     $2.8     $2.5     $2.3 (H)
Request:.....................................              $3.5     $2.7     $2.3     $1.6     $1.5      $1.2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Last year, violent crime rose by the largest percentage 
since 1991. Murders increased 4.8 percent--the largest increase 
in 15 years according to FBI statistics. This is the first 
increase in violent crime since 2001.
    When violent crime is on the rise and local police face 
additional homeland security demands, this is no time to cut 
assistance to our State and local law enforcement.
    Economic Development Administration: The story is the same 
with the Economic Development Administration (EDA). Every year, 
the level provided is a little less than the year before. This 
year, the Chairman's mark provides $261 million for EDA. This 
is $66 million below the request of $327 million and $19 
million below the 2006 enacted level. Since 2001, EDA support 
for communities with high unemployment and low incomes has been 
cut by $179 million--more than 40 percent.
    Even in good economic times, many communities in America 
have been left behind. Today, with the economy failing to 
provide new jobs and increased wages, EDA efforts that spur 
public and private investments in commercial and industrial 
jobs are needed more than ever. EDA's efforts have created more 
than four million new jobs since its inception and leveraged in 
excess of $130 billion in private sector investment.
    NASA science and education: While the primary Moon-Mars 
account rose by 30 percent, science funding increased only 1.5 
percent, a cut after adjusting for inflation of 1.9 percent. 
The FY06 budget estimated the FY07 science account to be $5.9 
billion. Instead, the request was a little more than $5.3 
billion--a reduction of $600 million. These cuts have been 
forced by funding increases for the Moon-Mars initiative and 
the continued costs of the space shuttle and the International 
Space Station. They have forced numerous science missions to be 
``deferred'' or cancelled outright. These missions expand our 
knowledge of the universe and our planet.
    Until this year, NASA had made significant investments in 
science. And that investment resulted in incredible missions of 
discovery. For examples, these investments brought us: the Mars 
Rovers; the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which is sending us 
high resolution images of the Martian surface; and, the 
Cassini/Huygens mission which may have found evidence of water 
on one of Saturn's moons.
    These missions are exciting and are inspiring to the next 
generation of scientists and engineers. The Explorer Program, 
one of the programs targeted for reduction, is one of the few 
competitively run NASA programs that engages universities, 
industry, and other partners to explore the most cutting edge 
scientific discoveries in all aspects of astronomy and 
astrophysics. Designed to provide relatively cheap and fast 
access to space, these low-budget spacecraft are often 
developed and managed by university groups. Cuts to this 
program will end a generation of young people entering this 
field and possibly ending American domination of space science.
    The President's request also cuts NASA education by 14 
percent, $25 million, from compared to two years ago--from 
$178.9 million to $153.3 million. NASA's education programs 
capitalize on the excitement of NASA's discoveries and missions 
to inspire future generations of space scientists. At a time 
when the President is proposing to double the physical sciences 
in NSF, NIST, and DOE and we are all focusing on the importance 
of science education, cutting NASA science education simply 
makes no sense.
    Legal Services Corporation: This year's bill provides $313 
million for Legal Services Corporation (LSC), $12.7 million 
below the enacted level and $87 million below the high water 
mark in 1996. LSC helps ensure that every American, regardless 
of income, receives equal access to justice.
    LSC's budget declined precipitously in 1996, from $400 
million to $278 million, then slowly but steadily rose to $338 
million in 2003. Since 2003, budget cuts and increasing costs 
have caused LSC to close 16 field offices, hire 100 fewer 
attorneys and 240 fewer paralegals. As a result, the number of 
cases handled by LSC declined by 30,000 even as the demand for 
legal services has increased. Since 2003, the eligible 
population has grown by 3 million Americans. We cannot continue 
to cut LSC and uphold the principle of the Pledge of Allegiance 
to provide justice for all.

           THE MOLLOHAN AMENDMENT--THE DEMOCRATIC ALTERNATIVE

    On eight of the other annual appropriations bills, 
Democrats have offered amendments that provided for additional 
investments in a range of domestic priorities offset by asking 
people making more than $1 million a year to get by with a 
slightly smaller tax cut thanthe Republicans would provide. 
These amendments were fiscally responsible and consistent with the 
Democratic alternative budget.
    During consideration of this Science-State-Justice-Commerce 
bill, Representative Mollohan offered such an amendment. The 
Mollohan amendment would:
           Support state and local law enforcement 
        grants by providing an additional $312 million to reach 
        the full authorization level of $900 million;
           Assist economically distressed communities 
        by providing an additional $65 million, which is $46 
        million above last year;
           Ensure assistance to those most in need is 
        most effective by providing an additional $13 million 
        for the Survey of Income and Program Participation 
        (SIPP);
           Help ensure equal justice by providing an 
        additional $92 million for the Legal Services 
        Corporation (LSC), an increase that brings LSC to its 
        1995 high-water mark funding level;
           Provide a range of assistance to small 
        businesses by providing an additional $20 million to 
        the Small Business Administration's microloan program; 
        and,
           Bolster science and education programs at 
        NASA by $100 million to reverse the trend of damaging 
        cuts in this area.
    To be clear, the Mollohan amendment-as with all of the 
Democratic budget alternative amendments offered in committee--
would not increase the deficit. These amendments are fully 
offset by providing people making more than $1 million a year 
with a slightly smaller tax cut than Republicans would provide 
in their budget. In keeping with the Democratic alternative, 
the Mollohan amendment was offset by shrinking the average tax 
break for people making more than $1 million a year by 1.45 
percent--from $114,172 to $112,515--a reduction of $1,657.
    The bottom line is: $59.8 billion is not enough for all the 
programs we have discussed and numerous others we have not 
mentioned, including funding for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, life sciences funding at NASA and 
biology funding at National Science Foundation.

                             EXPLOSIVES TAX

    The bill contains a $30 million tax on explosives users. 
The President proposed a $120 million tax as he did last year. 
This tax is unacceptable. We hope and expect that the 
legislative provision that imposes the burdensome tax will be 
eliminated from this bill.

                            OTHER AMENDMENTS

    Permanent Bases in Iraq The Committee accepted a Democratic 
amendment offered by Representative Obey that prohibits the use 
of funds to enter into military basing rights agreements 
between the United States and Iraq. In effect, this provision 
bars the establishment of permanent U.S. bases in that country. 
This provision is meant to send a clear, unequivocal message to 
the Iraqi people and to the world that the United States will 
not indefinitely occupy Iraq.
    Congress missed the opportunity to signal its opposition to 
permanent bases in the recently approved FY 2006 Iraq 
supplement emergency supplemental. Despite both the House and 
the Senate including a ban on permanent basing in their 
respective bills, the conference committee just two weeks ago 
jettisoned the provision. We hope that the prohibition inserted 
in this bill will last longer than it did in the FY 2006 
supplemental.
    Leal Services Corporation. We are disappointed the 
Committee rejected, by a vote of 27-32, a Democratic amendment 
offered by Representative Obey to add $25 million to LSC to 
restore funding to the 2003 spending level, the recent high-
water mark.
    Survey of Income and Program Participation: Both the 
President's budget and the Chairman's mark eliminated funding 
for the Census Bureau's current Survey of Income and Program 
Participation (SIPP), which analyzes the impact of state and 
federal government programs on the well-being of American 
families. The data it gathers are essential to ensure the 
effectiveness of a range of federal, state, and local 
assistance for the most vulnerable in America. Eliminating the 
survey would leave gaps in the data until a new survey is 
designed and implemented, leaving policymakers in the dark at a 
time when Congress is considering changes to Social Security 
and Medicaid.
    While we agree that the Census Bureau has made the 
decennial census its top priority, we cannot imagine that a 
survey measuring poverty and the participation of transfer 
payments should be a low priority. In fact, as government 
dollars become scarcer, we need the information provided by the 
SIPP to understand whether those resources are being 
effectively allocated and truly helping Americans in need. As 
such, we are pleased that the Committee accepted a Democratic 
amendment offered by Representative Serrano providing an 
additional $13 million to continue the SIPP.
    SBA Microloans: Both the President's budget and the 
Chairman's mark would eliminate the Small Business 
Administration's Microloan program, which is the largest 
federal program solely dedicated to supporting the credit needs 
of very small businesses and self-employed entrepreneurs.
    The Microloan program is essential because it serves small 
businesses that would not typically fund a loan from financial 
institutions and would not qualify under the SBA's 7(a) loan 
program. Many do not meet traditional credit screening 
requirements or lack the business training necessary to access 
affordable capital. The Microloan program provides the funds 
and training these entrepreneurs need to get their new 
businesses off the ground.
    The Committee accepted an amendment providing $10 million 
in technical assistance and $1 million of budget authority that 
will provide roughly $9 million in lending authority for the 
Microloan program. We believe that this amount is wholly 
inadequate and hope that additional funding can be provided as 
the bill moves forward.

                               CONCLUSION

    Chairman Wolf has a difficult job balancing a diverse 
portfolio of important programs in a tough budgetary climate. 
After House Republicans adopted an unrealistic budget 
resolution this past spring, this bill and the 10 other annual 
appropriations bills the Committee has now reported are bound 
to come up short, and they have in ways large and small.
    That budget resolution, which accepted the President's 
overall target for discretionary spending, didn't make this 
bill's failings a possibility; that budget made this bill's 
shortcomings a certainty.

                                   Dave Obey.
                                   Alan B. Mollohan.