Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-524

======================================================================



 
       SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION FOR COMPETITIVENESS ACT

                                _______
                                

 June 22, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Boehlert, from the Committee on Science, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 5358]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 
5358) to authorize programs relating to science, mathematics, 
engineering, and technology education at the National Science 
Foundation and the Department of Energy Office of Science, and 
for other purposes, having considered the same, report 
favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill 
as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................9
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................9
  IV. Summary of Hearings............................................11
   V. Committee Actions..............................................12
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill, As Reported...........13
 VII. Section-By-Section Analysis (By Title and Section), As Reported14
VIII. Committee Views................................................18
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................21
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................22
  XI. Compliance with Public Law 104-4 (Unfunded Mandates)...........24
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............24
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........24
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................24
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................24
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................24
XVII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........24
XVIII.Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, As Reported..........24

 XIX. Committee Recommendations......................................36
  XX. Committee Correspondence.......................................37
 XXI. Proceedings of Full Committee Markup...........................39

                              I. Amendment

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Science and Mathematics Education for 
Competitiveness Act''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) The National Science Foundation has made significant and 
        valuable contributions to the improvement of K-12 and 
        undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics 
        education throughout its 56 year history.
          (2) The National Science Foundation shall continue to carry 
        out the functions described in section 3 of the National 
        Science Foundation Act of 1950 (42 U.S.C. 1862).

SEC. 3. ROBERT NOYCE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

  Section 10 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 
2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n-1) is amended--
          (1) by inserting ``Teacher'' after ``Noyce'' in the section 
        heading and each place it appears in the text;
          (2) in subsection (a)(1)--
                  (A) by striking ``to provide scholarships, stipends, 
                and programming designed''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``and to provide scholarships and 
                stipends to students participating in the program'' 
                after ``science teachers'';
          (3) in subsection (a)(3)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``encourage top college juniors and 
                seniors'' and inserting ``recruit and prepare 
                undergraduate students''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``qualified as'' after ``to 
                become'';
          (4) in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii)--
                  (A) by striking ``programs to help scholarship 
                recipients'' and inserting ``academic courses and early 
                field teaching experiences designed to prepare students 
                participating in the program'';
                  (B) by striking ``programs that will result in'' and 
                inserting ``such preparation as is necessary to meet 
                requirements for''; and
                  (C) by striking ``licensing; and'' and inserting 
                ``licensing;'';
          (5) in subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii)--
                  (A) by striking ``scholarship recipients'' and 
                inserting ``students participating in the program'';
                  (B) by striking ``enable the recipients'' and 
                inserting ``enable the students''; and
                  (C) by striking ``; or'' and inserting ``; and'';
          (6) in subsection (a)(3)(A) by inserting at the end the 
        following new clause:
                          ``(iv) providing summer internships for 
                        freshman and sophomore students participating 
                        in the program; or'';
          (7) in subsection (a)(3)(B)--
                  (A) by striking ``encourage'' and inserting ``recruit 
                and prepare''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``qualified as'' after ``to 
                become'';
          (8) by amending clause (ii) of subsection (a)(3)(B) to read 
        as follows:
                          ``(ii) offering academic courses and field 
                        teaching experiences designed to prepare 
                        stipend recipients to teach in elementary 
                        schools and secondary schools, including such 
                        preparation as necessary to meet requirements 
                        for teacher certification or licensing;'';
          (9) in subsection (a) by inserting at the end the following 
        new paragraph:
          ``(4) Eligibility requirement.--To be eligible for an award 
        under this section, an institution of higher education (or 
        consortia of such institutions) shall ensure that specific 
        faculty members and staff from the institution's mathematics, 
        science, or engineering departments and specific education 
        faculty are designated to carry out the development and 
        implementation of the program. An institution of higher 
        education may also include teacher leaders to participate in 
        developing the pedagogical content of the program and to 
        supervise students participating in the program in their field 
        teaching experiences. No institution of higher education shall 
        be eligible for an award unless faculty from the institution's 
        mathematics, science, or engineering departments are active 
        participants in the program.'';
          (10) in subsection (b)(1)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``scholarship or stipend'';
                  (B) by inserting ``and summer internships'' after 
                ``number of scholarships''; and
                  (C) by inserting ``the type of activities proposed 
                for the recruitment of students to the program,'' after 
                ``intends to award,'';
          (11) in subsection (b)(1)(B)--
                  (A) by striking ``scholarship or stipend''; and
                  (B) by striking ``; and'' and inserting ``, which may 
                include a description of any existing programs at the 
                applicant's institution that are targeted to the 
                education of science and mathematics teachers and the 
                number of teachers graduated annually from such 
                programs;'';
          (12) in subsection (b)(1), by striking subparagraph (C) and 
        inserting the following:
                  ``(C) a description of the academic courses and field 
                teaching experiences required under subsection 
                (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (B)(ii), including--
                          ``(i) a description of the undergraduate 
                        program that will enable a student to graduate 
                        in 4 years with a major in mathematics, 
                        science, or engineering and to obtain teacher 
                        certification or licensing;
                          ``(ii) a description of the field teaching 
                        experiences proposed; and
                          ``(iii) evidence of agreements between the 
                        applicant and the schools or school districts 
                        that are identified as the locations at which 
                        field teaching experiences will occur;
                  ``(D) a description of the programs required under 
                subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii) and (B)(iii), including 
                activities to assist new teachers in fulfilling their 
                service requirements under this section; and
                  ``(E) an identification of the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty and its 
                education faculty who will carry out the development 
                and implementation of the program as required under 
                subsection (a)(4).'';
          (13) in subsection (b)(2)--
                  (A) by redesignating subparagraphs (B), (C), (D), and 
                (E) as subparagraphs (C), (D), (E) and (F), 
                respectively; and
                  (B) by inserting after subparagraph (A) a new 
                subparagraph as follows:
                  ``(B) the extent to which the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty and its 
                education faculty have worked or will work 
                collaboratively to design new or revised curricula that 
                recognizes the specialized pedagogy required to teach 
                mathematics and science effectively in elementary and 
                secondary schools;'';
          (14) in subsection (c)(3)--
                  (A) by striking ``$7,500'' and inserting ``$10,000''; 
                and
                  (B) by striking ``of scholarship support'' and 
                inserting ``of scholarship support, unless the Director 
                establishes a policy by which part-time students may 
                receive additional years of support'';
          (15) in subsection (c)(4)--
                  (A) by inserting ``, with a maximum service 
                requirement of 4 years'' after ``was received''; and
                  (B) by striking ``Service required under this 
                paragraph shall be performed in a high-need local 
                educational agency.'';
          (16) in subsection (c), by adding at the end a new paragraph 
        as follows:
          ``(5) Exception.--The period of service obligation under 
        paragraph (4) is reduced by 1 year for scholarship recipients 
        whose service is performed in a high-need local educational 
        agency.'';
          (17) in subsection (d)(1), by striking ``to receive 
        certification or licensing to teach'' and inserting 
        ``established under subsection (a)(3)(B)'';
          (18) in subsection (d)(2), by inserting ``and professional 
        achievement'' after ``academic merit'';
          (19) in subsection (d)(3), by striking ``1 year'' and 
        inserting ``16 months'';
          (20) in subsection (d)(4), by striking ``for each year a 
        stipend was received'';
          (21) in subsection (g)(2)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``Treasurer of the United States,'' 
                and inserting ``Treasurer of the United States.''; and
                  (B) by striking ``multiplied by 2.''
          (22) in subsection (i)(3), by inserting ``or had a career 
        in'' after ``is working in''; and
          (23) by adding at the end the following:
  ``(j) Science and Mathematics Scholarship Gift Fund.--In accordance 
with section 11(f) of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950, the 
Director is authorized to accept donations from the private sector to 
support scholarships, stipends, or internships associated with programs 
under this section.
  ``(k) Assessment of Teacher Retention.--Not later than 4 years after 
the date of enactment of this subsection, the Director shall transmit 
to Congress a report on the effectiveness of the program carried out 
under this section regarding the retention of participants in the 
teaching profession beyond the service obligation required under this 
section.
  ``(l) Authorization of Appropriations.--Except as provided in 
subsection (m), there are authorized to be appropriated to the Director 
for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program--
          ``(1) $50,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, of which at least 
        $7,500,000 shall be used for capacity building activities 
        described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (iii) and (B)(ii) and 
        (iii);
          ``(2) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, of which at least 
        $10,500,000 shall be used for capacity building activities 
        described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (iii) and (B)(ii) and 
        (iii);
          ``(3) $90,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, of which at least 
        $13,500,000 shall be used for capacity building activities 
        described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (iii) and (B)(ii) and 
        (iii);
          ``(4) $110,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, of which at least 
        $16,500,000 shall be used for capacity building activities 
        described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (iii) and (B)(ii) and 
        (iii); and
          ``(5) $130,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, of which at least 
        $19,500,000 shall be used for capacity building activities 
        described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (iii) and (B)(ii) and 
        (iii).
  ``(m) Exception.--For any fiscal year for which the funding allocated 
for activities under this section is less than $50,000,000, the amount 
of funding available for capacity building activities described in 
paragraphs (1) through (5) of subsection (l) shall not exceed 15 
percent of the allocated funds.''.

SEC. 4. SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 
                    EDUCATION.

  (a) In General.--Section 9 of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n) is amended--
          (1) in the section heading by striking ``MATHEMATICS AND 
        SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS'' and inserting ``SCHOOL AND 
        UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 
        EDUCATION'';
          (2) in subsection (a)(2)--
                  (A) by striking ``(A)'';
                  (B) by striking subparagraph (B);
                  (C) by inserting ``, through 1 or more of its 
                departments in science, mathematics, or engineering,'' 
                after ``institution of higher education''; and
                  (D) by striking ``a State educational agency'' and 
                inserting ``education faculty from the participating 
                institution or institutions of higher education, a 
                State educational agency,'';
          (3) in subsection (a)(3)(B) by--
                  (A) inserting ``content-specific'' before 
                ``professional development programs'';
                  (B) inserting ``which are'' before ``designed''; and
                  (C) inserting ``and which may include teacher 
                training activities to prepare science and mathematics 
                teachers to teach Advanced Placement and International 
                Baccalaureate science and mathematics courses'' after 
                ``and science teachers'';
          (4) in subsection (a)(3)(C) by inserting ``and laboratory 
        experiences'' after ``technology'' and by inserting ``and 
        laboratory'' after ``provide technical'';
          (5) in subsection (a)(3)(E) by striking ``master teachers'' 
        and inserting ``teacher leaders'';
          (6) in subsection (a)(3)(I) by inserting ``including model 
        induction programs for teachers in their first 2 years of 
        teaching,'' after ``and science,'';
          (7) in subsection (a)(3)(K) by striking ``developing and 
        offering mathematics or science enrichment programs for 
        students, including after-school and summer programs;'' and 
        inserting ``developing educational programs and materials for 
        use in and conducting mathematics or science enrichment 
        programs for students, including after-school programs and 
        summer camps for students described in subsection (b)(2)(G);'';
          (8) in subsection (a)(4) by striking ``master teachers'' and 
        inserting ``teacher leaders'' in the paragraph heading and each 
        place it appears in the text;
          (9) in subsection (a) by inserting at the end the following:
          ``(8) Master's degree programs.--Activities carried out in 
        accordance with paragraph (3)(B) shall include the development 
        and offering of master's degree programs for in-service 
        mathematics and science teachers that will strengthen their 
        subject area knowledge and pedagogical skills. Grants provided 
        under this section may be used to develop and implement courses 
        of instruction for the master's degree programs, which may 
        involve online learning, and develop related educational 
        materials.
          ``(9) Mentors for advanced placement courses teachers and 
        students.--Partnerships carrying out activities to prepare 
        science and mathematics teachers to teach Advanced Placement 
        and International Baccalaureate science and mathematics courses 
        in accordance with paragraph (3)(B) shall encourage companies 
        employing scientists, mathematicians, or engineers to provide 
        mentors to teachers and students and provide for the 
        coordination of such mentoring activities.
          ``(10) Inventiveness.--Activities carried out in accordance 
        with paragraph (3)(H) may include the development and 
        dissemination of curriculum tools that will help foster 
        inventiveness and innovation.'';
          (10) in subsection (b)(2) by redesignating subparagraphs (E) 
        and (F) as subparagraphs (F) and (G), respectively, and 
        inserting after subparagraph (D) the following new 
        subparagraph:
                  ``(E) the extent to which the evaluation described in 
                paragraph (1)(E) will be independent and based on 
                objective measures;'';
          (11) in subsection (b)(3)(A) by striking ``and'' at the end;
          (12) in subsection (b)(3) by redesignating subparagraph (B) 
        as subparagraph (C) and inserting after subparagraph (A) the 
        following new subparagraph:
                  ``(B) give priority to applications that include 
                teacher training activities as the main focus of the 
                proposal; and'';
          (13) in subsection (b) by inserting at the end the following:
          ``(4)  minimum and maximum grant size.--A grant awarded under 
        this section shall be not less than $75,000 or greater than 
        $2,000,000 for any fiscal year.'';
          (14) in subsection (c)--
                  (A) by striking paragraph (2);
                  (B) by redesignating paragraphs (3), (4), and (5) as 
                paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively; and
                  (C) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following 
                new paragraphs:
          ``(2) Report on model projects.--The Director shall determine 
        which completed projects funded through the program under this 
        section should be seen as models to be replicated on a more 
        expansive basis at the State or national levels. Not later than 
        1 year after the date of enactment of this paragraph, the 
        Director shall transmit a report describing the results of this 
        study to the Committee on Science and the Committee on 
        Education and the Workforce of the House of Representatives and 
        to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and 
        the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the 
        Senate.
          ``(3) Report on evaluations.--Not later than 4 years after 
        the date of enactment of this paragraph, the Director shall 
        transmit a report summarizing the evaluations required under 
        subsection (b)(1)(E) of grants received under this program and 
        describing any changes to the program recommended as a result 
        of these evaluations to the Committee on Science and the 
        Committee on Education and the Workforce of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
        Transportation and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, 
        and Pensions of the Senate. Such report shall be made widely 
        available to the public.''; and
          (15) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
  ``(d) Definition.--In this section, the term `mathematics and science 
teacher' means a mathematics, science, or technology teacher at the 
elementary school or secondary school level.''.
  (b) Definitions.--Section 4 of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n note) is amended--
          (1) by amending paragraph (6) to read as follows:
          ``(6) Eligible nonprofit organization.--The term `eligible 
        nonprofit organization' means a nonprofit organization, such as 
        a museum or science center, involved in the preparation, 
        training, or certification of science and mathematics 
        teachers.'';
          (2) by amending paragraph (8) to read as follows:
          ``(8) High-need local educational agency.--The term `high-
        need local educational agency' means a local educational agency 
        that--
                  ``(A) is receiving grants under title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
                U.S.C. 6301 et seq) as a result of having within its 
                jurisdiction concentrations of children from low income 
                families; and
                  ``(B) is experiencing a shortage of highly qualified 
                teachers, as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary 
                and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801), 
                in the fields of science, mathematics, or 
                engineering.''; and
          (3) in paragraph (11) by striking ``master teacher'' and 
        inserting ``teacher leader'' in the paragraph heading and in 
        the text, and by striking ``master teachers'' and inserting 
        ``teacher leaders'' .
  (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Director of the National Science Foundation for the 
School and University Partnerships for Science and Mathematics 
Education program--
          (1) $63,000,000 for fiscal year 2007;
          (2) $73,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;
          (3) $83,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;
          (4) $93,000,000 for fiscal year 2010; and
          (5) $103,000,000 for fiscal year 2011.

SEC. 5. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS TALENT 
                    EXPANSION PROGRAM.

  (a) Amendments.--Section 8(7) of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``competitive, merit-
        based'' and all that follows through ``in recent years'' and 
        inserting ``competitive, merit-reviewed multiyear grants for 
        eligible applicants to improve undergraduate education in 
        science, mathematics, engineering and technology through--
                  ``(i) the creation of programs to increase the number 
                of students studying toward and completing associate's 
                or bachelor's degrees in science, mathematics, 
                engineering and technology, particularly in fields that 
                have faced declining enrollment in recent years; and
                  ``(ii) the creation of centers to develop 
                undergraduate curriculum, teaching methods for 
                undergraduate courses, and methods to better train 
                professors and teaching assistants who teach 
                undergraduate courses to increase the number of 
                students completing undergraduate courses in science, 
                mathematics, technology, and engineering, including the 
                number of nonmajors, and to improve student academic 
                achievement in those courses.
        Grants made under clause (ii) shall be awarded jointly through 
        the Education and Human Resources Directorate and at least 1 
        research directorate of the Foundation'';
          (2) in subparagraph (B) by striking ``under this paragraph'' 
        and inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)'';
          (3) in subparagraph (C)--
                  (A) by inserting ``(i)'' before ``The types of'';
                  (B) by redesignating clauses (i) through (vi) as 
                subclauses (I) through (VI), respectively;
                  (C) by striking ``under this paragraph'' and 
                inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)''; and
                  (D) by adding at the end the following new clause:
          ``(ii) The types of activities the Foundation may support 
        under subparagraph (A)(ii) include--
                  ``(I) creating model curricula and laboratory 
                programs;
                  ``(II) developing and demonstrating research-based 
                instructional methods and technologies;
                  ``(III) developing methods to train graduate students 
                and faculty to be more effective teachers of 
                undergraduates;
                  ``(IV) conducting programs to disseminate curricula, 
                instructional methods, or training methods to faculty 
                at the grantee institutions and at other institutions;
                  ``(V) conducting assessments of the effectiveness of 
                the Center at accomplishing the goals described in 
                subparagraph (A)(ii); and
                  ``(VI) conducting any other activities the Director 
                determines will accomplish the goals described in 
                subparagraph (A)(ii).'';
          (4) in subparagraph (D)(i), by striking ``under this 
        paragraph'' and inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)'';
          (5) in subparagraph (D)(ii), by striking ``under this 
        paragraph'' and inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)'';
          (6) after subparagraph (D)(iii), by adding the following new 
        clause:
          ``(iv) A grant under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be awarded 
        for 5 years, and the Director may extend such a grant for up to 
        2 additional 3 year periods.'';
          (7) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``under this paragraph'' 
        both places it appears and inserting ``under subparagraph 
        (A)(i)'';
          (8) by redesignating subparagraph (F) as subparagraph (J); 
        and
          (9) by inserting after subparagraph (E) the following new 
        subparagraphs:
          ``(F) Grants awarded under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be 
        carried out by a department or departments of science, 
        mathematics, or engineering at institutions of higher education 
        (or a consortia thereof), which may partner with education 
        faculty. Applications for awards under subparagraph (A)(ii) 
        shall be submitted to the Director at such time, in such 
        manner, and containing such information as the Director may 
        require. At a minimum, the application shall include--
                  ``(i) a description of the activities to be carried 
                out by the Center;
                  ``(ii) a plan for disseminating programs related to 
                the activities carried out by the Center to faculty at 
                the grantee institution and at other institutions;
                  ``(iii) an estimate of the number of faculty, 
                graduate students (if any), and undergraduate students 
                who will be affected by the activities carried out by 
                the Center; and
                  ``(iv) a plan for assessing the effectiveness of the 
                Center at accomplishing the goals described in 
                subparagraph (A)(ii).
          ``(G) in evaluating the applications submitted under 
        subparagraph (F), the Director shall consider, at a minimum--
                  ``(i) the ability of the applicant to effectively 
                carry out the proposed activities, including the 
                dissemination activities described in subparagraph 
                (C)(ii)(IV); and
                  ``(ii) the extent to which the faculty, staff, and 
                administrators of the applicant institution are 
                committed to improving undergraduate science, 
                mathematics, and engineering education.
          ``(H) In awarding grants under subparagraph (A)(ii), the 
        Director shall endeavor to ensure that a wide variety of 
        science, mathematics, and engineering fields and types of 
        institutions of higher education, including 2-year colleges, 
        are covered, and that--
                  ``(i) at least 1 Center is housed at a Doctoral/
                Research University as defined by the Carnegie 
                Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching; and
                  ``(ii) at least 1 Center is focused on improving 
                undergraduate education in an interdisciplinary area.
          ``(I) The Director shall convene an annual meeting of the 
        awardees under this paragraph to foster collaboration and to 
        disseminate the results of the Centers and the other activities 
        funded under this paragraph.''.
  (b) Report on Data Collection.--Not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, the Director shall transmit to Congress 
a report on how the Director is determining whether current grant 
recipients in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Talent Expansion Program are making satisfactory progress as required 
by section 8(7)(D)(ii) of the National Science Foundation Authorization 
Act of 2002 and what funding actions have been taken as a result of the 
Director's determinations.
  (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Director of the National Science Foundation for the 
program described in section 8(7) of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002--
          (1) $44,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, of which $4,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii);
          (2) $55,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii);
          (3) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii);
          (4) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii); and
          (5) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii).

SEC. 6. INTEGRATIVE GRADUATE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH TRAINEESHIP 
                    PROGRAM.

  (a) Funding.--For each of the fiscal years 2007 through 2011, the 
Director of the National Science Foundation shall allocate at least 1.5 
percent of funds appropriated for Research and Related Activities to 
the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program.
  (b) Coordination.--The Director shall coordinate with Federal 
departments and agencies, as appropriate, to expand the 
interdisciplinary nature of the Integrative Graduate Education and 
Research Traineeship program.
  (c) Authority to Accept Funds From Other Agencies.--The Director is 
authorized to accept funds from other Federal departments and agencies 
to carry out the Integrative Graduate Education and Research 
Traineeship program.

SEC. 7. CENTERS FOR RESEARCH ON LEARNING AND EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT.

  The Director of the National Science Foundation shall continue to 
carry out the program of Centers for Research on Learning and Education 
Improvement as established in section 11 of the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n-2).

SEC. 8. UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

  The Director of the National Science Foundation shall continue to 
carry out programs in undergraduate education, including those 
authorized in section 17 of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n-6). Funding for these 
programs shall increase as funding for the National Science Foundation 
grows.

SEC. 9. EVALUATION OF PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE MASTERS.

  Not earlier than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Director of the National Science Foundation shall enter into an 
agreement with an appropriate party to assess the impact of the 
Professional Science Master's (PSM) degree at a variety of 
institutions, including the extent to which the degree is 
interdisciplinary and targeted to emerging fields, such as services 
sciences, the ability of graduates to obtain employment in industry 
relative to those who receive traditional science master's degrees, 
salary ranges for graduates relative to traditional science masters 
graduates, the extent to which the degree is terminal or graduates go 
on to continue their education, and the success of the degree in 
attracting traditionally underrepresented populations, including women 
and minorities. The results of such study, together with any 
recommendations for Federal support for Professional Science Master's 
programs, shall be transmitted to the Congress not later than 3 years 
after the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 10. REPORT ON BROADER IMPACTS CRITERION.

  Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Director of the National Science Foundation shall transmit to Congress 
a report on the impact of the broader impacts grant criterion used by 
the National Science Foundation. The report shall---
          (1) identify the criteria that each division and directorate 
        of the Foundation uses to evaluate the broader impacts aspects 
        of research proposals;
          (2) provide a breakdown of the types of activities by 
        division that awardees have proposed to carry out to meet the 
        broader impacts criterion;
          (3) provide any evaluations performed by the National Science 
        Foundation to assess the degree to which the broader impacts 
        aspects of research proposals were carried out and how 
        effective they have been at meeting the goals described in the 
        research proposals;
          (4) describe what national goals, such as improving 
        undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering education, 
        improving K-12 science and mathematics education, promoting 
        university-industry collaboration and technology transfer, and 
        broadening participation of underrepresented groups, the 
        broader impacts criterion is best suited to promote; and
          (5) describe what steps the National Science Foundation is 
        taking and should take to use the broader impacts criterion to 
        improve undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering 
        education.

SEC. 11. STUDY ON LABORATORY EQUIPMENT DONATIONS FOR SCHOOLS.

  Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Director of the National Science Foundation shall transmit a report to 
the Congress examining the extent to which institutions of higher 
education are donating used laboratory equipment to elementary and 
secondary schools. The Director, in consultation with the Secretary of 
Education, shall survey institutions of higher education to determine--
          (1) how often, how much, and what type of equipment is 
        donated;
          (2) what criteria or guidelines the institutions are using to 
        determine what types of equipment can be donated, what 
        condition the equipment should be in, and which schools receive 
        the equipment;
          (3) whether the institutions provide any support to, or 
        follow-up with the schools; and
          (4) how appropriate donations can be encouraged.

SEC. 12. ASSESSMENTS OF NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

  In conducting assessments of National Science Foundation education 
programs, the Director shall use assessment methods that allow 
Foundation programs to be compared to education programs supported by 
other Federal agencies.

SEC. 13. EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY.

  (a) Authorization of Education Programs.--The Secretary of Energy, 
acting through the Office of Science, shall carry out education 
programs and activities in fields related to the Office of Science's 
mission, which may include awarding scholarships or fellowships for 
study and research, providing research experiences at National 
Laboratories for undergraduates, and operating summer institutes to 
improve the content knowledge of science and mathematics teachers.
  (b) Inventory and Evaluation.--
          (1) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
        enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Energy shall transmit a 
        report to the Congress which shall contain--
                  (A) an inventory of existing education programs and 
                activities at the Department and at the National 
                Laboratories, which shall include a description of each 
                education program or activity supported by the 
                Department or the National Laboratories, a description 
                of the intended beneficiaries, and the amount of 
                Federal funding used to support it; and
                  (B) a schedule for conducting independent evaluations 
                of the education programs and activities identified 
                under subparagraph (A) to assess the impact of such 
                programs and activities on the intended beneficiaries 
                and the larger mission of the Office of Science that 
                shall result in all evaluations of the programs being 
                completed not later than 4 years after the date of 
                enactment of this Act.
          (2) Implementation of schedule.--The Secretary shall 
        implement the schedule provided under paragraph (1)(B) and 
        shall transmit each evaluation to the Congress as it is 
        completed, along with a description of any actions the 
        Secretary intends to take as a result of the evaluation.
  (c) National Laboratories.--The Secretary shall include the conduct 
of education programs at the National Laboratories and the results of 
any evaluations of such programs as a factor in the annual setting of 
the performance and other incentive fees for a National Laboratories 
management and operations contractor.

SEC. 14. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act--
          (1) the term ``institution of higher education'' has the 
        meaning given such term in section 101(a) of the Higher 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)); and
          (2) the term ``National Laboratory'' has the meaning given 
        the term ``nonmilitary energy laboratory'' in section 903(3) of 
        the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16182(3)).

                        II. Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of the bill is to strengthen and extend 
existing federal programs to improve U.S. science, mathematics, 
engineering, and technology education at all levels through 
developing and providing teacher training; attracting science, 
mathematics, and engineering majors to teaching; improving 
undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering courses; 
and expanding interdisciplinary graduate work. The programs 
authorized in this bill are run by the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE).

              III. Background and Need for the Legislation


SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION IN THE U.S.

    Over the past several years, a number of industry and 
policy organizations have released reports describing the 
critical role that science and technology play in U.S. economic 
competitiveness and recommending strengthening science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education at 
all levels--K-12, undergraduate, and graduate--to ensure that 
the U.S. has a technologically literate workforce for the 21st 
century. These recommendations have come from a wide variety of 
business and academic groups, as well as federal advisory 
panels; recent reports have been produced by the National 
Academy of Sciences (NAS), the Council on Competitiveness, the 
Association of American Universities (AAU), the President's 
Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, AeA (formerly 
the American Electronics Association), Business Roundtable, the 
Electronic Industries Alliance, the National Association of 
Manufacturers, and TechNet.

           K-12 SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION IN THE U.S.

    Without strong science and mathematics education at the K-
12 level, efforts to increase the number of Americans training 
for, and choosing careers in STEM fields will be severely 
handicapped. Many of the reports focused their recommendations 
on enhancing teacher training, for both pre-service and in-
service teachers. The NAS, in Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 
recommended attracting new science and mathematics teachers 
through the use of scholarships and bolstering the skills of 
the existing science and mathematics teaching corps through 
extensive professional development opportunities. AAU, in its 
National Defense Education and Innovation Initiative, 
emphasized the value of universities partnering with schools to 
provide teacher training and the need to develop training 
programs with a good balance between preparation in how to 
teach and preparation in the content area to be taught.

         UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE STEM EDUCATION IN THE U.S.

    Once students reach college and graduate school, even well 
prepared students are choosing not to major in, or are dropping 
out of STEM fields. Half of all students who begin in the 
physical or biological sciences and 60 percent of those in 
mathematics will drop out of these fields by their senior year, 
compared with the 30 percent drop out rate in the humanities 
and social sciences. The attrition rates are even higher for 
underrepresented minorities. In research for their book, 
Talking About Leaving: Why Undergraduates Leave the Sciences, 
the authors determined that the most common reasons offered for 
switching out of a science major included a lack or loss of 
interest in science, belief that another major was more 
interesting or offered a better education, poor science 
teaching, and an overwhelming curriculum. To increase the 
number of undergraduate students in STEM fields will require 
not only recruiting more students but also improving the 
quality of their education.
    In Rising Above The Gathering Storm, the NAS recommended 
expanding the scholarships and fellowships available to attract 
more U.S. students to STEM fields. Similarly, the Business 
Roundtable and other industry groups have recommended creating 
scholarships and loan forgiveness programs for students who 
pursue degrees in STEM fields and emphasize the need to improve 
recruitment and retention of STEM majors at undergraduate 
institutions. AAU called for strengthening the connection 
between research faculty and undergraduate students at 
universities, including expanding research opportunities to 
better engage students in STEM fields.
    At the graduate level, the emphasis in many reports is on 
ensuring that there is a sufficient quantity of students 
studying STEM fields in preparation for research and technical 
careers and that the type of graduate education that these 
students receive is appropriate preparation for research in 
emerging fields and careers in industry, academia, and 
government laboratories. In particular, AAU recommended 
broadening the scope of graduate education, including in 
interdisciplinary fields.

                        IV. Summary of Hearings

    On Thursday, July 21, 2005, the Committee on Science held a 
hearing to examine the relationship between federal science and 
engineering research and education investments and U.S. 
economic competitiveness. The witnesses were Mr. Nicholas 
Donofrio, Executive Vice President for Innovation and 
Technology at IBM Corporation; Mr. John Morgridge, Chairman of 
Cisco Systems, Incorporated, and part-time professor at 
Stanford University's Graduate School of Business; and Dr. 
William Brody, President of The Johns Hopkins University and 
co-chair of the Council on Competitiveness National Innovation 
Initiative. The witnesses emphasized that the educational 
system needed to provide students with a solid background 
science and engineering fields so that the U.S. has access to a 
technologically-literate workforce.
    On Thursday, October 20, 2005, the Committee on Science 
held a hearing to receive testimony on the report released by 
NAS on October 12 entitled Rising Above the Gathering Storm: 
Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic 
Future. The witnesses were Mr. Norman R. Augustine, retired 
Chairman and CEO of the Lockheed Martin Corporation (Mr. 
Augustine chaired the NAS committee that wrote the report); Dr. 
P. Roy Vagelos, retired Chairman and CEO of Merck & Co. (Dr. 
Vagelos served on the NAS committee that wrote the report), and 
Dr. William A. Wulf, Presidentof the National Academy of 
Engineering. The witnesses emphasized that solving the problems of 
global economic competition requires significant improvements in 
America's K-12 and higher education systems and that the U.S. ability 
to innovate depends on an educated workforce and a social climate that 
encourages students to pursue science and technology degrees.
    On Wednesday, March 15, 2006, the Research Subcommittee of 
the Committee on Science of the House of Representatives held a 
hearing to review undergraduate science, mathematics, and 
engineering education. Dr. Carl Wieman, distinguished professor 
of physics at the University of Colorado and Nobel Laureate in 
physics, emphasized the connection between high quality 
undergraduate instruction in science and mathematics and 
improvements in K-12 science and mathematics education. Dr. 
Elaine Seymour, the author of Talking About Leaving: Why 
Undergraduates Leave the Sciences, described the impact of poor 
science teaching at the undergraduate level. Dr. Daniel Goroff, 
Vice President and Dean of Faculty of Harvey Mudd College, Dr. 
John Burris, President of Beloit College, and Ms. Margaret 
Collins, Assistant Dean of Science, Business & Computer 
Technologies at Moraine Valley Community College, concurred 
with Dr. Wieman's and Dr. Seymour's remarks. They added that 
NSF support of undergraduate programs, including research 
programs for improving professors' quality of teaching, is 
essential to the enhancement of science and mathematics 
instruction at that level.
    On Thursday, March 30, 2006, the Committee on Science of 
the House of Representatives held a hearing to consider the 
role of Federal agencies in K-12 science and mathematics 
education. The hearing brought together five federal agencies 
to discuss their work in science and mathematics education at 
the K-12 level. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings 
argued that improving science and mathematics education is 
essential to maintaining America's global economic 
competitiveness, and said increased coordination among the 
agencies would improve federal education programs. NSF Director 
Arden Bement detailed NSF's expertise in the area of science 
and mathematics education in particular, noting that the 
competitive grant process and rigorous evaluations result in 
excellent programs that bolster science and mathematics 
education at all levels. Representatives from DOE, the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National 
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration also discussed 
their own agencies' programs, including opportunities for 
students and teachers to improve their knowledge science 
content.
    On Wednesday, May 3, 2006, the Committee on Science of the 
House of Representatives held a hearing to consider the role of 
the NSF in K-12 science and mathematics education. The hearing 
further explored the work of the NSF discussed in the March 30 
hearing from the points of view of education researchers and 
teachers. Dr. Dennis Bartels, Executive Director of the 
Exploratorium science museum in San Francisco, noted the 
essential role NSF plays in bridging the gap between 
educational research and usable classroom tools. Dr. Joe 
Heppert, Chair of the American Chemical Society Committee on 
Education, agreed and pointed out that NSF's strongest 
education programs are those that support teacher development 
through scholarships and training programs. Two teachers, Ms. 
Judy Snyder, mathematics teacher at Eastside High School in 
South Carolina and Ms. Becky Pringle, National Education 
Association Executive Board member and physical science teacher 
at Susquehanna Middle School in Pennsylvania, also testified 
that their participation in NSF education programs improved 
both their understanding of content and their teaching 
strategies. The witnesses all strongly supported NSF leadership 
in federal science and mathematics education programs.

                          V. Committee Actions

    On May 11, 2006, Representative John J.H. ``Joe'' Schwarz; 
Representative Sherwood Boehlert, Chairman of the Committee on 
Science; Representative Lamar S. Smith; Representative Ken 
Calvert, Chairman of the Space Subcommittee; Representative 
Vernon J. Ehlers, Chairman of the Environment, Technology, and 
Standards Subcommittee; Representative Judy Biggert, Chairman 
of the Energy Subcommittee; Representative Bob Inglis, Chairman 
of the Research Subcommittee; and Representative Michael T. 
McCaul introduced H.R. 5358, the Science and Mathematics 
Education for Competitiveness Act, a bill to reauthorize 
programs relating to STEM education at NSF and the DOE Office 
of Science, and for other purposes.
    The Full Committee on Science met on Wednesday, June 7, 
2006, to consider the bill.
     Mr. Schwarz, Mr. Boehlert, Mr. Gordon, and Ms. 
Hooley offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute to 
provide more specifics on the program element of the Robert 
Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program; expand allowable activities 
and prioritize teacher training in Student and University 
Partnerships for Science and Mathematics Education; integrate 
the centers on undergraduate science, mathematics, and 
engineering education into the Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP); 
and add sections on a study of university donation of 
laboratory equipment and on NSF assessment of education 
programs. The amendment was adopted by a voice vote.
     Ms. Matsui offered an amendment to gather 
information on whether participants in the Noyce Program 
continued in the teaching profession after their service 
requirement was completed. The amendment was adopted by a voice 
vote.
     Ms. Johnson offered an amendment to add a new 
section to the bill to establish a program at NSF to give 
grants to high-need local educational agencies to purchase lab 
equipment. A unanimous consent request to withdraw the 
amendment was agreed to.
    Mr. Gordon moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 5358, to the House with the recommendation that the 
bill do pass, and that the staff be instructed to make 
technical and conforming changes to the bill and prepare the 
legislative report and that the Chairman take all necessary 
steps to bring the bill before the House for consideration. 
With a quorum present, the motion was agreed to by a voice 
vote.

        VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill as Reported

     Strengthens and extends the Noyce Program at NSF 
by amending the National Science Foundation Authorization Act 
of 2002. (The Noyce Program provides funding to institutions of 
higher education to develop and implement programs that prepare 
STEM majors to become teachers as well as to provide 
scholarships to such students in exchange for teaching service 
after graduation.) Specifies some of the programs grantees must 
provide to prepare students for teaching, including providing 
field teaching experience.
     Strengthens and focuses the Math and Science 
Partnership Program at NSF by amending the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002. Renames the program as 
the ``School and University Partnership for Science and 
Mathematics Education Program.'' Requires the Director of NSF 
to give priority to applications that include teacher training 
activities as the main focus of the proposal. Establishes a 
minimum grant size of $75,000 per year and a maximum grant size 
of $2,000,000 per year. Requires the Director to transmit a 
report to Congress on which completed Math and Science 
Partnerships projects should be seen as models to be replicated 
on a more expansive basis at the State or national levels.
     Extends the authorization of, and expands NSF's 
STEP, which provides grants to colleges and universities to 
improve undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering 
education, by amending the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002. Enables NSF to fund the creation of 
centers at colleges and universities to develop new approaches 
to undergraduate education programs, and expands STEP beyond 
its initial focus of increasing the number of graduating STEM 
majors to include increasing the number of non-majors taking 
STEM courses.
     Ensures that funding increases proportionally to 
the overall NSF budget for the Integrative Graduate Education 
and Research Traineeship (IGERT), which supports graduate 
programs and students in interdisciplinary fields.
     Requires NSF to continue the programs on Centers 
for Research on Learning and Education Improvement and on 
undergraduate education as authorized in the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002.
     Requires the Director of NSF to arrange for an 
assessment of the impact of Professional Science Master's 
degree programs, to evaluate the NSF broader impact grant 
evaluation criterion, and to conduct a study on university 
donation of used laboratory equipment to schools. Requires NSF 
to use assessment methods that allow NSF programs to be 
compared to education programs supported by other Federal 
agencies.
     Authorizes the DOE Office of Science to conduct 
education programs, and requires DOE to inventory and evaluate 
its current and future education programs.

  VII. Section-by-Section Analysis (by Title and Section), as Reported


                          SEC. 1. SHORT TITLE

    ``Science and Mathematics Education for Competitiveness 
Act''

                            SEC. 2. FINDINGS

    Finds that NSF has made significant and valuable 
contributions to the improvement of K-12 and undergraduate STEM 
education and that it should continue to carry out education 
programs.

            SEC. 3. ROBERT NOYCE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

    Amends Section 10 of The National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002, which established the Noyce Program. 
Under the Noyce Program, NSF provides grants to institutions of 
higher education to encourage top STEM majors to become 
teachers. The grants are used both to develop programs to 
prepare students for teaching and to provide to students who 
commit to teach for two years at the elementary or secondary 
school level in return for each year of scholarship aid. H.R. 
5358 amends the law by specifying some of the programs grantees 
must provide to prepare students for teaching, including 
providing field teaching experience, and by making those 
programs available to students beginning in their freshman year 
(even though the scholarships are still available only to 
juniors and seniors, summer internships may be provided to 
freshmen and sophomores participating in the program). Also 
amends the law to specify that both faculty from STEM 
departments and education faculty must be involved in the 
program. Also amends the law to increase the minimum 
scholarship from $7,500 per year to $10,000; to allow 
additional years of scholarship support for part-time students; 
to cap the post-graduation service requirement at four years; 
to extend stipend support for professionals in STEM fields 
returning to schools for a teaching degree to 16 months from 
one year to align the support with the length of a typical 
program; and to allow the Director of NSF to accept donations 
from the private sector to support scholarships, stipends, or 
internships associated with this program. Also amends the law 
to allow teaching service to occur in any local educational 
agency (rather than only in high-need areas), but to reduce the 
period of service obligation by one year for those scholarship 
recipients whose service is performed in a high-need local 
educational agency. Requires NSF, four years after the date of 
enactment, to transmit to Congress a report on whether 
participants in the program continue to teach after their 
service obligation is completed. Authorizes appropriations for 
the program of $50,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, $70,000,000 
for fiscal year 2008, $90,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, 
$110,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, and $130,000,000 for fiscal 
year 2011, and sets aside specific portions of those 
authorizations for the programmatic (as opposed to scholarship) 
portions of the Noyce Program.

SEC. 4. SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 
                               EDUCATION

    Amends Section 9 of The National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002, to strengthen the Math and Science 
Partnerships program at NSF, which provides grants to 
institutions of higher education (or to eligible nonprofit 
organizations) to partner with local educational agencies to 
improve elementary and secondary mathematics and science 
instruction. Amends the law to clarify that faculty from STEM 
departments must be the lead participants from the institutions 
of higher education and clarify that education faculty may 
participate in the Partnerships. Amends the law to 
explicitlyinclude as allowable activities developing model induction 
programs and conducting training to teach Advanced Placement and 
International Baccalaureate (AP/IB) science and mathematics courses, 
encouraging STEM professionals to act as mentors for AP/IB students and 
teachers, and providing science enrichment programs, including after-
school programs and summer camps for female and minority students. Also 
amends the law to explicitly allow teacher training activities to 
include the development and offering of master's degree programs for 
in-service mathematics and science teachers that will strengthen their 
subject area knowledge and pedagogical skills. Amends the law to 
require the Director of NSF to give priority to applications that 
include teacher training activities as the main focus of the proposal 
and to establish that the grant size should be between $75,000 and 
$2,000,000 per year. Amends the law to require the Director, within a 
year of the enactment of the Act, to transmit a report to Congress on 
which completed Math and Science Partnerships projects should be seen 
as models to be replicated on a more expansive basis at the State or 
national levels, and, within four years, to transmit a report to 
Congress summarizing the evaluations each Partnership is required to 
conduct of its projects and describing any changes to the overall 
program recommended as a result of these evaluations. Authorizes 
appropriations for the program of $63,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, 
$73,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, $83,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, 
$93,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, and $103,000,000 for fiscal year 
2011.

   SEC. 5. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS TALENT 
                           EXPANSION PROGRAM

    Amends Section 8(7) of The National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002, which established at NSF STEP, which 
provides grants to institutions of higher education to improve 
undergraduate education. Amends the law to authorize NSF, as 
part of STEP, to award grants on a competitive, merit-reviewed 
basis to institutions of higher education to create Centers to 
improve undergraduate education through the development and 
dissemination of undergraduate curriculum and teaching methods, 
and the development and dissemination of training programs for 
faculty and graduate students who teach undergraduates. 
Requires that grants for Centers be made jointly through the 
NSF Education and Human Resources Directorate and at least one 
research directorate for periods up to five years, with two 
possible extensions of no more than three years each. Also 
requires the Director of NSF, within 180 days, to transmit to 
Congress a report on how the Director is determining whether 
current STEP grant recipients are making satisfactory progress 
toward targets they have set for increasing the number of STEM 
majors at their institutions and what actions the Director has 
taken to ensure that funding is continued only to those making 
satisfactory progress. Authorizes appropriations for STEP of 
$44,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, of which $4,000,000 shall be 
for the Centers authorized by this Act; $55,000,000 for fiscal 
year 2008, of which $10,000,000 shall be for the Centers; 
$60,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2009 through 2011, of 
which $10,000,000 each year shall be for the Centers.

SEC. 6. INTEGRATIVE GRADUATE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH TRAINEESHIP PROGRAM

    Requires that the Director of NSF allocate at least 1.5 
percent of funds appropriated for Research and Related 
Activities to the IGERT Program. Requires that the Director 
coordinate with Federal agencies to expand the 
interdisciplinary nature of the program, and allows the 
Director to accept funds from those agencies to carry out the 
program. (The IGERT program awards grants to institutions of 
higher education to develop interdisciplinary graduate programs 
and to provide tuition and stipends for graduate students in 
those programs.)

   SEC. 7. CENTERS FOR RESEARCH ON LEARNING AND EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT

    Requires the Director of NSF to continue the program on 
Centers for Research on Learning and Education Improvement as 
established in section 11 of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002.

                SEC. 8. UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

    Requires the Director of NSF to continue to carry out 
programs in undergraduate education, including those authorized 
in section 17 of the National Science Foundation Authorization 
Act of 2002. Funding for these programs shall increase as 
funding for NSF grows.

           SEC. 9. EVALUATION OF PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE MASTERS

    Requires the Director of NSF to arrange for an assessment 
of the impact of Professional Science Master's degree programs 
at a variety of institutions. Requires that the report be 
submitted to Congress within three years of the enactment of 
this Act and include information on the interdisciplinary 
nature of the degree, the employment and salary prospects of 
degree recipients compared with those of traditional science 
master's graduates, the extent to which Professional Science 
Master's graduates continue their education, and the 
effectiveness of the degree at attracting populations 
traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields. (Professional 
Science Master's degree programs consist of two years of 
training in an emerging or interdisciplinary technological 
area. Many include internships and training in business and 
communications.)

              SEC. 10. REPORT ON BROADER IMPACTS CRITERION

    Requires the Director of NSF to submit to Congress within 
one year of the enactment of this Act a report that evaluates 
the results of the use of the broader impacts criterion by NSF. 
(NSF grant proposals are evaluated for their ``intellectual 
merit'' and ``broader impact,'' which includes the benefits of 
the activity to society at large.) Requires the report to 
identify how NSF evaluates proposals based on the broader 
impacts criterion, to categorize the types of broader impacts 
enumerated by grant applicants, to include any evaluations 
performed by NSF of the implementation of broader impacts 
aspects of research proposals, to describe which overarching 
national goals the broader impactscriterion is best suited to 
promote, and to describe what steps NSF should take to use the broader 
impacts criterion to improve undergraduate science, mathematics, and 
engineering education.

      SEC. 11. STUDY ON LABORATORY EQUIPMENT DONATIONS FOR SCHOOLS

    Requires the Director of NSF, within one year of the 
enactment of this Act, to transmit to Congress a report on the 
extent to which universities are donating used laboratory 
equipment to elementary and secondary schools and how 
appropriate donations can be encouraged.

 SEC. 12. ASSESSMENTS OF NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION EDUCATION PROGRAMS

    Requires the Director of NSF, in conducting assessments of 
NSF education programs, to use assessment methods that allow 
NSF programs to be compared to education programs supported by 
other Federal agencies.

        SEC. 13. EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Authorizes education programs at DOE, through the Office of 
Science, in fields related to the Office's mission, including 
activities such as offering scholarships or fellowships for 
study or research, research experiences for undergraduates, and 
summer institutes for improving teacher content knowledge in 
science and mathematics. Requires the Secretary of Energy to 
submit a report not later than one year after the enactment of 
this Act that includes an inventory of existing education 
programs at DOE and the civilian National Laboratories and 
requires independent evaluations of those programs to be 
conducted within four years of the enactment of this act. 
Requires DOE to include the results of evaluations of 
educational programs run by the civilian National Laboratories 
as a factor when setting performance and incentive fees for 
those National Laboratory management and operations 
contractors.

                          SEC. 14. DEFINITIONS

    Defines ``Institution of Higher Education'' and ``National 
Laboratory'' for this Act.

                         VIII. Committee Views


           NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ROLE IN STEM EDUCATION

    Science and mathematics education is a cornerstone of the 
historic mission of NSF. The National Science Foundation Act of 
1950, which established NSF, directed NSF to support and 
strengthen science and mathematics education programs at all 
levels. NSF has accumulated a 50-year record of accomplishment 
in developing highly successful science and mathematics 
education programs, which are strongly supported by the 
education community. The Committee believes that it is vitally 
important that NSF continue to carry out its mission to improve 
K-12 and undergraduate education in science and math. NSF's 
peer review system, its connections with higher education, and 
its prestige give it a unique role in improving science and 
mathematics education that cannot be duplicated by any other 
federal agency.

                    RISING ABOVE THE GATHERING STORM

    The NAS report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, stresses 
the importance of improving K-12 education in the U.S., but 
also emphasizes the need for increasing the number of 
undergraduate and graduate students studying and choosing 
careers in STEM fields. The Committee endorses the NAS's focus 
on the link between a technologically-educated population and 
the U.S. ability to innovate and remain competitive, and this 
Act implements key education-related recommendations of Rising 
Above the Gathering Storm. The Act strengthens and expands 
existing programs, primarily at NSF, to enhance federal STEM 
education efforts, and creates no new programs.

               SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS EDUCATION IN K-12

Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program

    The Committee recognizes that the preparation and retention 
of excellent K-12 science and mathematics teachers is essential 
to improving science and mathematics education in the United 
States. The Act includes provisions for recruiting, training, 
and retaining teachers to ensure that schools have access to a 
pool of talented, qualified, and committed science and 
mathematics teachers.
    The Committee strongly believes that strong STEM content 
knowledge and excellent pedagogical skills are both necessary 
for success as a K-12 science and mathematics teacher. This Act 
expands the program element of the Noyce program to support and 
encourage the transformation of how K-12 science and 
mathematics teachers are educated in this country. In addition 
to providing scholarships to juniors and seniors, colleges and 
universities receiving Noyce grants will be required to offer a 
program that provides instruction (which may begin as early as 
freshman year) and early field teaching experiences, including 
interactions with teacher leaders and coursework developed by 
STEM and education faculty, to allow participants in the 
program both to graduate with STEM degrees and to meet 
requirements for teacher certification or licensing. The 
Committee also believes that the colleges and universities 
should develop and implement induction programs to support 
graduates of the program in their first few years of teaching 
in order to improve the retention of Noyce program graduates in 
the teaching profession. The Committee also believes that 
collaboration between STEM and education faculty is critical 
for the success of these programs. The Committee applauds the 
work of University of Texas at Austin on its UTeach program, 
which is a successful model of the type of teacher education 
and support program the Committee wishes to encourage.
    The Committee believes that to maximize the impact of the 
teacher training programs supported through the Noyce Program, 
institutions receiving grants should make strong efforts to 
inform potential program participants about the program and the 
scholarships. NSF should support such recruitment efforts and 
use annual conferences of participants as opportunities to 
share best practices in recruitment as well as in other program 
components, such as coursework, mentoring, and field teaching 
experiences.
    The NAS in Rising Above the Gathering Storm calls for 
federal programs to support recruiting 10,000 new science and 
mathematics teachers every year, and the appropriations 
authorized in this Act put the Noyce program on track to reach 
that level of effort in 2016.
    The Committee expects NSF to do far more to publicize and 
promote participation by institutions of higher education in 
the Noyce Program, especially among schools that are more known 
for their rigorous STEM programs than they are for teacher 
preparation.

School and University Partnerships for Science and Mathematics 
        Education

    The updates contained in the Act to the existing 
Mathematics and Science Partnership program at NSF, now renamed 
the School and University Partnerships for Science and 
Mathematics Education program, reflect the recommendations the 
Committee has received from education experts who have 
encouraged a stronger focus on teacher training, especially in 
STEM content. The changes also address recommendations in this 
area by the NAS in Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 
particularly on providing master's degree programs for in-
service teachers and training programs to prepare teachers to 
teach AP/IB science and mathematics courses. The Committee 
strongly believes that grant applications which focus on 
teacher training should be given strong priority by NSF. 
Additionally, the Committee is concerned about the extremely 
high attrition rates for new science and mathematics teachers 
and believes that the development and use of teacher induction 
programs, which provide content instruction, mentoring, 
professional development, and other support to teachers in the 
first few years of their career, should be supported in order 
to help improve teacher retention.
    Also, because of the importance of content training, the 
Act requires that the principal investigator for a Partnership 
grant be a science, mathematics, or engineering faculty member 
at the grantee institution. To improve the focus of the 
Partnership program, the Act requires that grants fall within 
the limits of $75,000 to $2,000,000 per year. By limiting grant 
size, the Committee hopes that proposed projects will focus on 
targeted approaches to improving science and mathematics 
education and thus allow clear evaluation of the effectiveness 
of each project.
    In adding language allowing the development and 
dissemination of curriculum tools that will help foster 
inventiveness and innovation, the Committee recognizes the 
value of innovation in U.S. competitiveness and the economic 
benefits that the U.S. gains by being a culture that encourages 
and rewards innovation. To support and cultivate the next 
generation of inventive scientists and engineers, teachers 
should have access to curriculum tools that include activities 
such as open-ended problem solving; hands-on and ``how things 
work'' exercises; projects that emphasize creativity, design 
and teamwork; and lessons to raise the stature of inventors and 
invention in the eyes of young people.

  SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION AT THE 
                          UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL

    Undergraduate education is the first step toward a career 
in teaching and in other science, engineering, or mathematics 
fields; it is the primary source of education and training for 
technical workers; and, it is often the last time non-majors 
will take a class in science and mathematics. The Committee 
believes that NSF, due to its close relationship with 
institutions of higher education and its expertise and 
experience in education at all levels, has a critical role to 
play in improving undergraduate STEM education for majors and 
non-majors, especially future teachers. No other Federal agency 
has a clear responsibility for undergraduate STEM education.
    The Act expands NSF's STEP to fund the creation of centers 
at colleges and universities to develop new approaches to 
undergraduate STEM education programs. The Committee intends 
that these centers focus not only on improving undergraduate 
teaching and courses at their own institutions, but also on 
developing and disseminating innovative curricula, laboratory 
experiences, and teaching and training methods that can be used 
throughout the country.
    The Committee is also concerned that in running STEP, NSF 
has not seriously enforced the statutory requirement that an 
applicant set a numerical goal for increasing the number of 
STEM majors and that grantees be evaluated, in part, on the 
basis of whether they are meeting the numerical goals contained 
in their applications. The Committee expects STEP to be carried 
out pursuant to statute. This Act requires a report to Congress 
to ensure that NSF gathers data on majors at STEP institutions.
    To ensure the widest possible impact of STEP grants, the 
Committee expects NSF to provide grantees with opportunities to 
discuss best practices for recruiting students into programs 
run by STEP grantees.
    In addition to STEP, NSF currently carries out a range of 
other programs designed to improve undergraduate STEM 
education, and the Committee strongly supports the continuation 
of these activities, especially the Course, Curriculum, and 
Laboratory Improvement program.

  SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION AT THE 
                             GRADUATE LEVEL

    NSF continues to be the primary source of support for 
graduate students in many STEM fields. The Committee is 
particularly supportive of the IGERT Program because it not 
only provides support for graduate students but also 
facilitates the development of new graduate programs that reach 
across traditional disciplinary boundaries and may include 
internships and mentoring in industrial, national laboratory, 
academic, or other settings.
    The Committee encourages NSF's ongoing efforts to 
collaborate with other agencies in support of the IGERT 
program. In particular, the Committee encourages NSF and DOE to 
work together to support projects that enable graduate 
education in advanced energy technology research and 
development, including projects that involve partnerships 
between schools, departments or programs of engineering and 
schools, departments or programs of design, architecture, and 
city, regional or urban planning.

                 PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE MASTER'S PROGRAMS

    The Committee applauds the efforts by the Sloan Foundation 
and the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) to support the 
development of Professional Science Master's programs. The 
Committee is aware of CGS plans to evaluate data related to 
graduates of these programs and expects NSF and CGS to work 
together to ensure that evaluation and assessment efforts are 
not duplicated in producing the study required under this act.

            EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS

    In 2006, Congress created the interagency Academic 
Competitiveness Council, which was formed to evaluate the 
effectiveness of STEM education programs and improve 
interagency coordination of these programs. The Committee 
encourages NSF and DOE, in assessing their education programs 
as required by this Act, to use methodologies that allow 
comparison of the impact and outcomes of the NSF and DOE 
programs to the effectiveness of education programs conducted 
at other federal agencies.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science prior to the filing of this report and 
is included in Section X of this report pursuant to House Rule 
XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 5358 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
5358 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                                     June 22, 2006.
Hon. Sherwood L. Boehlert
Chairman, Committee on Science, House of Representatives, Washington, 
        DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 5358, the Science 
and Mathematics Education for Competitiveness Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Deborah Reis.
            Sincerely,
                                          Donald B. Marron,
                                                   Acting Director.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 5358--Science and Mathematics Education for Competitiveness Act

    Summary: H.R. 5358 would reauthorize certain programs 
carried out by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The bill 
would direct the NSF to continue funding for its division of 
undergraduate education and would specifically authorize 
appropriations for three grant or scholarship programs carried 
out by that division. In addition, the bill would direct the 
NSF to continue operating its centers for research on learning 
and education improvement and to allocate at least 1.5 percent 
of amounts appropriated for research and related activities 
each year to the integrative graduate education and research 
traineeship program (IGERT). Assuming appropriation of the 
specified and estimated amounts, CBO estimates that 
implementing H.R. 5358 would cost $131 million in fiscal year 
2007 and $1.7 million over the 2007-2011 period. (An additional 
$500 million would be spent after 2011.)
    The bill also would authorize the NSF to accept and use 
donations to support scholarships and other payments to 
students under the Robert Noyes teacher scholarship program. 
CBO estimates that providing this authority would have no 
effect on federal revenues (or spending of those revenues) 
because the agency already has similar authority under current 
law. Enacting this legislation would not affect other direct 
spending or revenues.
    H.R. 5358 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA); 
any costs to state, local, or tribal governments would result 
from complying with conditions of federal assistance.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 5358 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 250 
(general science, space, and technology).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
                                                                   2006    2007    2008    2009    2010    2011
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending Under Current Law for NSF Science and Mathematics
 Education Programs:
    Budget Authority a..........................................     295       0       0       0       0       0
    Estimated Outlays...........................................     281     218      86      28       6       0
Proposed Changes:
    Robert Noyce Scholarship Program:
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      50      70      90     110     130
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0      11      38      61      84     105
    Science and Mathematics Education Partnerships:
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      63      73      83      93     103
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0      14      44      64      79      90
    STEM Talent Expansion Program:
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      44      55      60      60      60
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0      10      32      47      56      59
    Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship
     Program:
        Estimated Authorization Level...........................       0      66      67      69      70      71
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0      15      45      59      67      69
    Centers for Research on Learning and Education Improvement:
        Estimated Authorization Level...........................       0      26      26      27      27      28
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       6      17      23      26      27
    Other Undergraduate Education Programs:
        Estimated Authorization Level...........................       0     116     118     120     122     125
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0      75     102     116     121     123
        Total Proposed Changes:
            Estimated Authorization Level.......................       0     365     410     449     483     516
            Estimated Outlays...................................       0     131     278     370     433     473
    Spending Under H.R. 5358 for NSF Science and Mathematics
     Education Programs:
        Authorization Level a...................................     295     365     410     449     483     516
        Estimated Outlays.......................................     281     348     365     397     440     473
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
a The 2006 level is the amount appropriated for that year for the NSF programs that would be reauthorized by
  H.R. 5358.
Notes: STEM = Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Components may not sum to totals because of
  rounding.

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that H.R. 
5358 will be enacted during fiscal year 2006 and that the 
entire amounts specified by the bill or estimated to be 
necessary will be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2007 
through 2011. Estimated outlays are based on historical 
patterns for the authorized programs.
    H.R. 5358 would specifically authorize the appropriation of 
about $1.1 billion over the 2007-2011 period for three 
educational grant programs carried out by NSF's division of 
undergraduate education. CBO estimates that the bill also would 
authorize the appropriation of an additional $1.1 billion over 
that period for grants by directing the agency to continue to 
carry out other graduate and undergraduate grant programs. This 
estimate is based on appropriations in recent years for these 
activities, adjusted annually for anticipated inflation. 
Assuming appropriation of these amounts, CBO estimates that 
carrying out H.R. 5358 would cost $131 million in 2007 and 
about $1.7 billion over the 2007-2011 period.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 5358 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA. The bill would authorize activities and grant 
funds that would benefit institutions of higher education. Any 
costs they might incur would result from complying with 
conditions of federal assistance.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Deborah Reis; Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Lisa Ramirez-Branum; 
Impact on the Private Sector: Craig Cammarata.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine; Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

        XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4 (Unfunded Mandates)

    H.R. 5358 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The Committee on Science's oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House rule XIII, the goals of 
H.R. 5358 are to update the activities and extend the 
authorization for the Noyce Program at NSF; update the 
activities of the Mathematics and Science Partnership program 
at NSF; authorize specific program activities at NSF and DOE; 
and conduct studies of Broader Impacts Criterion, K-12 school 
laboratory equipment, and professional science master's 
programs to improve the quality of STEM education.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 5358.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 5358 does not establish nor authorize the 
establishment of any advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 5358 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

      XVII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

      XVIII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2002

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act:
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          [(6) Eligible nonprofit organization.--The term 
        ``eligible nonprofit organization'' means a nonprofit 
        research institute, or a nonprofit professional 
        association, with demonstrated experience and 
        effectiveness in mathematics or science education as 
        determined by the Director.]
          (6) Eligible nonprofit organization.--The term 
        ``eligible nonprofit organization'' means a nonprofit 
        organization, such as a museum or science center, 
        involved in the preparation, training, or certification 
        of science and mathematics teachers.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          [(8) High-need local educational agency.--The term 
        ``high-need local educational agency'' means a local 
        educational agency that meets one or more of the 
        following criteria:
                  [(A) It has at least one school in which 50 
                percent or more of the enrolled students are 
                eligible for participation in the free and 
                reduced price lunch program established by the 
                Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act 
                (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.).
                  [(B) It has at least one school in which--
                          [(i) more than 34 percent of the 
                        academic classroom teachers at the 
                        secondary level (across all academic 
                        subjects) do not have an undergraduate 
                        degree with a major or minor in, or a 
                        graduate degree in, the academic field 
                        in which they teach the largest 
                        percentage of their classes; or
                          [(ii) more than 34 percent of the 
                        teachers in two of the academic 
                        departments do not have an 
                        undergraduate degree with a major or 
                        minor in, or a graduate degree in, the 
                        academic field in which they teach the 
                        largest percentage of their classes.
                  [(C) It has at least one school whose teacher 
                attrition rate has been 15 percent or more over 
                the last three school years.]
          (8) High-need local educational agency.--The term 
        ``high-need local educational agency'' means a local 
        educational agency that--
                  (A) is receiving grants under title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
                (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq) as a result of having 
                within its jurisdiction concentrations of 
                children from low income families; and
                  (B) is experiencing a shortage of highly 
                qualified teachers, as defined in section 9101 
                of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
                of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801), in the fields of 
                science, mathematics, or engineering.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (11) [Master teacher] Teacher leader.--The term 
        ``[master teacher] teacher leader'' means a mathematics 
        or science teacher who works to improve the instruction 
        of mathematics or science in kindergarten through grade 
        12 through--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (E) providing professional development, 
                including for the purposes of training other 
                [master teachers] teacher leaders, to 
                mathematics and science teachers.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 8. SPECIFIC PROGRAM AUTHORIZATIONS.

  From amounts authorized to be appropriated under section 5, 
the Director shall carry out the Foundation's research and 
education programs, including the following initiatives in 
accordance with this section:
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (7) Science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
        talent expansion program.--(A) A program of 
        [competitive, merit-based, multi-year grants for 
        eligible applicants to increase the number of students 
        studying toward and completing associate's or 
        bachelor's degrees in science, mathematics, 
        engineering, and technology, particularly in fields 
        that have faced declining enrollment in recent years] 
        competitive, merit-reviewed multiyear grants for 
        eligible applicants to improve undergraduate education 
        in science, mathematics, engineering and technology 
        through--
                  (i) the creation of programs to increase the 
                number of students studying toward and 
                completing associate's or bachelor's degrees in 
                science, mathematics, engineering and 
                technology, particularly in fields that have 
                faced declining enrollment in recent years; and
                  (ii) the creation of centers to develop 
                undergraduate curriculum, teaching methods for 
                undergraduate courses, and methods to better 
                train professors and teaching assistants who 
                teach undergraduate courses to increase the 
                number of students completing undergraduate 
                courses in science, mathematics, technology, 
                and engineering, including the number of 
                nonmajors, and to improve student academic 
                achievement in those courses.
        Grants made under clause (ii) shall be awarded jointly 
        through the Education and Human Resources Directorate 
        and at least 1 research directorate of the Foundation.
          (B) In selecting projects [under this paragraph] 
        under subparagraph (A)(i), the Director shall strive to 
        increase the number of students studying toward and 
        completing baccalaureate degrees, concentrations, or 
        certificates in science, mathematics, engineering, or 
        technology who are individuals identified in section 33 
        or 34 of the Science and Engineering Equal 
        Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b).
          (C)(i) The types of projects the Foundation may 
        support under [this paragraph] subparagraph (A)(i) 
        include those that promote high quality--
                  [(i)] (I) interdisciplinary teaching;
                  [(ii)] (II) undergraduate-conducted research;
                  [(iii)] (III) mentor relationships for 
                students;
                  [(iv)] (IV) bridge programs that enable 
                students at community colleges to matriculate 
                directly into baccalaureate science, 
                mathematics, engineering, or technology 
                programs;
                  [(v)] (V) internships carried out in 
                partnership with industry; and
                  [(vi)] (VI) innovative uses of digital 
                technologies, particularly at institutions of 
                higher education that serve high numbers or 
                percentages of economically disadvantaged 
                students.
          (ii) The types of activities the Foundation may 
        support under subparagraph (A)(ii) include--
                  (I) creating model curricula and laboratory 
                programs;
                  (II) developing and demonstrating research-
                based instructional methods and technologies;
                  (III) developing methods to train graduate 
                students and faculty to be more effective 
                teachers of undergraduates;
                  (IV) conducting programs to disseminate 
                curricula, instructional methods, or training 
                methods to faculty at the grantee institutions 
                and at other institutions;
                  (V) conducting assessments of the 
                effectiveness of the Center at accomplishing 
                the goals described in subparagraph (A)(ii); 
                and
                  (VI) conducting any other activities the 
                Director determines will accomplish the goals 
                described in subparagraph (A)(ii).
          (D)(i) In order to receive a grant under [this 
        paragraph] subparagraph (A)(i), an eligible applicant 
        shall establish targets to increase the number of 
        students studying toward and completing associate's or 
        bachelor's degrees in science, mathematics, 
        engineering, or technology.
          (ii) A grant under [this paragraph] subparagraph 
        (A)(i) shall be awarded for a period of 5 years, with 
        the final 2 years of funding contingent on the 
        Director's determination that satisfactory progress has 
        been made by the grantee toward meeting the targets 
        established under clause (i).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (iv) A grant under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be 
        awarded for 5 years, and the Director may extend such a 
        grant for up to 2 additional 3 year periods.
          (E) For each grant awarded under [this paragraph] 
        subparagraph (A)(i) to an institution of higher 
        education, at least 1 principal investigator shall be 
        in a position of administrative leadership at the 
        institution of higher education, and at least 1 
        principal investigator shall be a faculty member from 
        an academic department included in the work of the 
        project. For each grant awarded to a consortium or 
        partnership, at each institution of higher education 
        participating in the consortium or partnership, at 
        least 1 of the individuals responsible for carrying out 
        activities authorized under [this paragraph] 
        subparagraph (A)(i) at that institution shall be in a 
        position of administrative leadership at the 
        institution, and at least 1 shall be a faculty member 
        from an academic department included in the work of the 
        project at that institution.
          (F) Grants awarded under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall 
        be carried out by a department or departments of 
        science, mathematics, or engineering at institutions of 
        higher education (or a consortia thereof), which may 
        partner with education faculty. Applications for awards 
        under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be submitted to the 
        Director at such time, in such manner, and containing 
        such information as the Director may require. At a 
        minimum, the application shall include--
                  (i) a description of the activities to be 
                carried out by the Center;
                  (ii) a plan for disseminating programs 
                related to the activities carried out by the 
                Center to faculty at the grantee institution 
                and at other institutions;
                  (iii) an estimate of the number of faculty, 
                graduate students (if any), and undergraduate 
                students who will be affected by the activities 
                carried out by the Center; and
                  (iv) a plan for assessing the effectiveness 
                of the Center at accomplishing the goals 
                described in subparagraph (A)(ii).
          (G) in evaluating the applications submitted under 
        subparagraph (F), the Director shall consider, at a 
        minimum--
                  (i) the ability of the applicant to 
                effectively carry out the proposed activities, 
                including the dissemination activities 
                described in subparagraph (C)(ii)(IV); and
                  (ii) the extent to which the faculty, staff, 
                and administrators of the applicant institution 
                are committed to improving undergraduate 
                science, mathematics, and engineering 
                education.
          (H) In awarding grants under subparagraph (A)(ii), 
        the Director shall endeavor to ensure that a wide 
        variety of science, mathematics, and engineering fields 
        and types of institutions of higher education, 
        including 2-year colleges, are covered, and that--
                  (i) at least 1 Center is housed at a 
                Doctoral/Research University as defined by the 
                Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of 
                Teaching; and
                  (ii) at least 1 Center is focused on 
                improving undergraduate education in an 
                interdisciplinary area.
          (I) The Director shall convene an annual meeting of 
        the awardees under this paragraph to foster 
        collaboration and to disseminate the results of the 
        Centers and the other activities funded under this 
        paragraph.
          [(F)] (J) In this paragraph, the term ``eligible 
        applicant'' means--
                  (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 9. [MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS] SCHOOL AND 
                    UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 
                    EDUCATION.

  (a) Program Authorized.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Partnerships.--[(A)] In order to be eligible to 
        receive a grant under this subsection, an institution 
        of higher education, through 1 or more of its 
        departments in science, mathematics, or engineering, or 
        eligible nonprofit organization (or consortium of such 
        institutions or organizations) shall enter into a 
        partnership with one or more local educational agencies 
        that may also include [a State educational agency] 
        education faculty from the participating institution or 
        institutions of higher education, a State educational 
        agency, or one or more businesses.
          [(B) A participating institution of higher education 
        shall include mathematics, science, or engineering 
        departments in the programs carried out through a 
        partnership under this paragraph.]
          (3) Uses of funds.--Grants awarded under this 
        subsection shall be used for activities that draw upon 
        the expertise of the partners to improve elementary or 
        secondary education in mathematics or science and that 
        are consistent with State mathematics and science 
        student academic achievement standards, including--
                  (A) * * *
                  (B) offering content-specific professional 
                development programs, including summer or 
                academic year institutes or workshops, which 
                are designed to strengthen the capabilities of 
                mathematics and science teachers and which may 
                include teacher training activities to prepare 
                science and mathematics teachers to teach 
                Advanced Placement and International 
                Baccalaureate science and mathematics courses;
                  (C) offering innovative preservice and 
                inservice programs that instruct teachers on 
                using technology and laboratory experiences 
                more effectively in teaching mathematics and 
                science, including programs that recruit and 
                train undergraduate and graduate students to 
                provide technical and laboratory support to 
                teachers;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (E) developing a cadre of [master teachers] 
                teacher leaders who will promote reform and 
                improvement in schools;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (I) developing initiatives to increase and 
                sustain the number, quality, and diversity of 
                prekindergarten through grade 12 teachers of 
                mathematics and science, including model 
                induction programs for teachers in their first 
                2 years of teaching, especially in underserved 
                areas;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (K) [developing and offering mathematics or 
                science enrichment programs for students, 
                including after-school and summer programs;] 
                developing educational programs and materials 
                for use in and conducting mathematics or 
                science enrichment programs for students, 
                including after-school programs and summer 
                camps for students described in subsection 
                (b)(2)(G);

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) [Master teachers] Teacher leaders.--Activities 
        carried out in accordance with paragraph (3)(E) shall--
                  (A) emphasize the training of [master 
                teachers] teacher leaders who will improve the 
                instruction of mathematics or science in 
                kindergarten through grade 12;
                  (B) include training in both content and 
                pedagogy; and
                  (C) provide training only to teachers who 
                will be granted sufficient nonclassroom time to 
                serve as [master teachers] teacher leaders, as 
                demonstrated by assurances their employing 
                school has provided to the Director, in such 
                time and such manner as the Director may 
                require.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (8) Master's degree programs.--Activities carried out 
        in accordance with paragraph (3)(B) shall include the 
        development and offering of master's degree programs 
        for in-service mathematics and science teachers that 
        will strengthen their subject area knowledge and 
        pedagogical skills. Grants provided under this section 
        may be used to develop and implement courses of 
        instruction for the master's degree programs, which may 
        involve online learning, and develop related 
        educational materials.
          (9) Mentors for advanced placement courses teachers 
        and students.--Partnerships carrying out activities to 
        prepare science and mathematics teachers to teach 
        Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate 
        science and mathematics courses in accordance with 
        paragraph (3)(B) shall encourage companies employing 
        scientists, mathematicians, or engineers to provide 
        mentors to teachers and students and provide for the 
        coordination of such mentoring activities.
          (10) Inventiveness.--Activities carried out in 
        accordance with paragraph (3)(H) may include the 
        development and dissemination of curriculum tools that 
        will help foster inventiveness and innovation.
  (b) Selection Process.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Review of applications.--In evaluating the 
        applications submitted under paragraph (1), the 
        Director shall consider, at a minimum--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (E) the extent to which the evaluation 
                described in paragraph (1)(E) will be 
                independent and based on objective measures;
                  [(E)] (F) the likelihood that the partnership 
                will demonstrate activities that can be widely 
                implemented as part of larger scale reform 
                efforts; and
                  [(F)] (G) the extent to which the activities 
                will encourage the interest of individuals 
                identified in section 33 or 34 of the Science 
                and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 
                U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b) in mathematics, science, 
                engineering, and technology and will help 
                prepare such individuals to pursue 
                postsecondary studies in these fields.
          (3) Awards.--In awarding grants under this section, 
        the Director shall--
                  (A) give priority to applications in which 
                the partnership includes a high-need local 
                educational agency or a high-need local 
                educational agency in which at least one school 
                does not make adequate yearly progress, as 
                determined pursuant to part A of title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
                (20 U.S.C. 6311 et seq.); [and]
                  (B) give priority to applications that 
                include teacher training activities as the main 
                focus of the proposal; and
                  [(B)] (C) ensure that, to the extent 
                practicable, a substantial number of the 
                partnerships funded under this section include 
                businesses.
          (4)  minimum and maximum grant size.--A grant awarded 
        under this section shall be not less than $75,000 or 
        greater than $2,000,000 for any fiscal year.
  (c) Accountability and Dissemination.--
          (1) * * *
          [(2) Dissemination of results.--(A) The results of 
        the evaluation required under paragraph (1) shall be 
        made available to the public and shall be provided to 
        the Committee on Science of the House of 
        Representatives, the Committee on Commerce, Science, 
        and Transportation of the Senate, and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.
          [(B) Materials developed under the program 
        established under subsection (a) that are demonstrated 
        to be effective shall be made widely available to the 
        public.]
          (2) Report on model projects.--The Director shall 
        determine which completed projects funded through the 
        program under this section should be seen as models to 
        be replicated on a more expansive basis at the State or 
        national levels. Not later than 1 year after the date 
        of enactment of this paragraph, the Director shall 
        transmit a report describing the results of this study 
        to the Committee on Science and the Committee on 
        Education and the Workforce of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, 
        Science, and Transportation and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.
          (3) Report on evaluations.--Not later than 4 years 
        after the date of enactment of this paragraph, the 
        Director shall transmit a report summarizing the 
        evaluations required under subsection (b)(1)(E) of 
        grants received under this program and describing any 
        changes to the program recommended as a result of these 
        evaluations to the Committee on Science and the 
        Committee on Education and the Workforce of the House 
        of Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, 
        Science, and Transportation and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate. 
        Such report shall be made widely available to the 
        public.
          [(3)] (4) Annual meeting.--The Director, in 
        consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall 
        convene an annual meeting of the partnerships 
        participating under this section to foster greater 
        national collaboration.
          [(4)] (5) Report on coordination.--The Director, in 
        consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall 
        provide an annual report to the Committee on Science of 
        the House of Representatives, the Committee on 
        Education and the Workforce of the House of 
        Representatives, the Committee on Commerce, Science, 
        and Transportation of the Senate, and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate 
        describing how the program authorized under this 
        section has been and will be coordinated with the 
        program authorized under part B of title II of the 
        Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
        U.S.C. 6601 et seq.). The report under this paragraph 
        shall be submitted along with the President's annual 
        budget request.
          [(5)] (6) Technical assistance.--At the request of an 
        eligible partnership or a State educational agency, the 
        Director shall provide the partnership or agency with 
        technical assistance in meeting any requirements of 
        this section, including providing advice from experts 
        on how to develop--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (d) Definition.--In this section, the term ``mathematics and 
science teacher'' means a mathematics, science, or technology 
teacher at the elementary school or secondary school level.

SEC. 10. ROBERT NOYCE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

  (a) Scholarship Program.--
          (1) In general.--The Director shall carry out a 
        program to award grants to institutions of higher 
        education (or consortia of such institutions) [to 
        provide scholarships, stipends, and programming 
        designed] to recruit and train mathematics and science 
        teachers and to provide scholarships and stipends to 
        students participating in the program. Such program 
        shall be known as the ``Robert Noyce Teacher 
        Scholarship Program''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Use of grants.--Grants provided under this 
        section shall be used by institutions of higher 
        education or consortia--
                  (A) to develop and implement a program to 
                [encourage top college juniors and seniors] 
                recruit and prepare undergraduate students 
                majoring in mathematics, science, and 
                engineering at the grantee's institution to 
                become qualified as mathematics and science 
                teachers, through--
                          (i) administering scholarships in 
                        accordance with subsection (c);
                          (ii) offering [programs to help 
                        scholarship recipients] academic 
                        courses and early field teaching 
                        experiences designed to prepare 
                        students participating in the program 
                        to teach in elementary schools and 
                        secondary schools, including [programs 
                        that will result in] such preparation 
                        as is necessary to meet requirements 
                        for teacher certification or 
                        [licensing; and] licensing;
                          (iii) offering programs to 
                        [scholarship recipients] students 
                        participating in the program, both 
                        before and after they receive their 
                        baccalaureate degree, to [enable the 
                        recipients] enable the students to 
                        become better mathematics and science 
                        teachers, to fulfill the service 
                        requirements of this section, and to 
                        exchange ideas with others in their 
                        fields; [or] and
                          (iv) providing summer internships for 
                        freshman and sophomore students 
                        participating in the program; or
                  (B) to develop and implement a program to 
                [encourage] recruit and prepare science, 
                mathematics, or engineering professionals to 
                become qualified as mathematics and science 
                teachers, through--
                          (i) administering stipends in 
                        accordance with subsection (d);
                          [(ii) offering programs to help 
                        stipend recipients obtain teacher 
                        certification or licensing; and]
                          (ii) offering academic courses and 
                        field teaching experiences designed to 
                        prepare stipend recipients to teach in 
                        elementary schools and secondary 
                        schools, including such preparation as 
                        necessary to meet requirements for 
                        teacher certification or licensing;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) Eligibility requirement.--To be eligible for an 
        award under this section, an institution of higher 
        education (or consortia of such institutions) shall 
        ensure that specific faculty members and staff from the 
        institution's mathematics, science, or engineering 
        departments and specific education faculty are 
        designated to carry out the development and 
        implementation of the program. An institution of higher 
        education may also include teacher leaders to 
        participate in developing the pedagogical content of 
        the program and to supervise students participating in 
        the program in their field teaching experiences. No 
        institution of higher education shall be eligible for 
        an award unless faculty from the institution's 
        mathematics, science, or engineering departments are 
        active participants in the program.
  (b) Selection Process.--
          (1) Application.--An institution of higher education 
        or consortium seeking funding under this section shall 
        submit an application to the Director at such time, in 
        such manner, and containing such information as the 
        Director may require. The application shall include, at 
        a minimum--
                  (A) a description of the [scholarship or 
                stipend] program that the applicant intends to 
                operate, including the number of scholarships 
                and summer internships or the size and number 
                of stipends the applicant intends to award, the 
                type of activities proposed for the recruitment 
                of students to the program, and the selection 
                process that will be used in awarding the 
                scholarships or stipends;
                  (B) evidence that the applicant has the 
                capability to administer the [scholarship or 
                stipend] program in accordance with the 
                provisions of this section[; and], which may 
                include a description of any existing programs 
                at the applicant's institution that are 
                targeted to the education of science and 
                mathematics teachers and the number of teachers 
                graduated annually from such programs;
                  [(C) a description of the programming that 
                will be offered to scholarship or stipend 
                recipients during and after their matriculation 
                in the program for which the scholarship or 
                stipend is received.]
                  (C) a description of the academic courses and 
                field teaching experiences required under 
                subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (B)(ii), 
                including--
                          (i) a description of the 
                        undergraduate program that will enable 
                        a student to graduate in 4 years with a 
                        major in mathematics, science, or 
                        engineering and to obtain teacher 
                        certification or licensing;
                          (ii) a description of the field 
                        teaching experiences proposed; and
                          (iii) evidence of agreements between 
                        the applicant and the schools or school 
                        districts that are identified as the 
                        locations at which field teaching 
                        experiences will occur;
                  (D) a description of the programs required 
                under subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii) and (B)(iii), 
                including activities to assist new teachers in 
                fulfilling their service requirements under 
                this section; and
                  (E) an identification of the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty 
                and its education faculty who will carry out 
                the development and implementation of the 
                program as required under subsection (a)(4).
          (2) Review of applications.--In evaluating the 
        applications submitted under paragraph (1), the 
        Director shall consider, at a minimum--
                  (A) * * *
                  (B) the extent to which the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty 
                and its education faculty have worked or will 
                work collaboratively to design new or revised 
                curricula that recognizes the specialized 
                pedagogy required to teach mathematics and 
                science effectively in elementary and secondary 
                schools;
                  [(B)] (C) the extent to which the applicant 
                is committed to making the program a central 
                organizational focus;
                  [(C)] (D) the degree to which the proposed 
                programming will enable scholarship or stipend 
                recipients to become successful mathematics and 
                science teachers;
                  [(D)] (E) the number and quality of the 
                students that will be served by the program; 
                and
                  [(E)] (F) the ability of the applicant to 
                recruit students who would otherwise not pursue 
                a career in teaching.
  (c) Scholarship Requirements.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Amount.--The Director shall establish for each 
        year the amount to be awarded for scholarships under 
        this section for that year, which shall be not less 
        than [$7,500] $10,000 per year, except that no 
        individual shall receive for any year more than the 
        cost of attendance at that individual's institution. 
        Individuals may receive a maximum of 2 years [of 
        scholarship support] of scholarship support, unless the 
        Director establishes a policy by which part-time 
        students may receive additional years of support.
          (4) Service obligation.--If an individual receives a 
        scholarship, that individual shall be required to 
        complete, within 6 years after graduation from the 
        baccalaureate degree program for which the scholarship 
        was awarded, 2 years of service as a mathematics or 
        science teacher for each year a scholarship was 
        received, with a maximum service requirement of 4 
        years. [Service required under this paragraph shall be 
        performed in a high-need local educational agency.]
          (5) Exception.--The period of service obligation 
        under paragraph (4) is reduced by 1 year for 
        scholarship recipients whose service is performed in a 
        high-need local educational agency.
  (d) Stipends.--
          (1) In general.--Stipends under this section shall be 
        available only to mathematics, science, and engineering 
        professionals who, while receiving the stipend, are 
        enrolled in a program [to receive certification or 
        licensing to teach] established under subsection 
        (a)(3)(B).
          (2) Selection.--Individuals shall be selected to 
        receive stipends under this section primarily on the 
        basis of academic merit and professional achievement, 
        with consideration given to financial need and to the 
        goal of promoting the participation of individuals 
        identified in section 33 or 34 of the Science and 
        Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 
        1885b).
          (3) Duration.--Individuals may receive a maximum of 
        [1 year] 16 months of stipend support.
          (4) Service obligation.--If an individual receives a 
        stipend under this section, that individual shall be 
        required to complete, within 6 years after graduation 
        from the program for which the stipend was awarded, 2 
        years of service as a mathematics or science teacher 
        [for each year a stipend was received]. Service 
        required under this paragraph shall be performed in a 
        high-need local educational agency.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (g) Failure to Complete Service Obligation.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Amount of repayment.--(A) If a circumstance 
        described in paragraph (1) occurs before the completion 
        of one year of a service obligation under this section, 
        the United States shall be entitled to recover from the 
        individual, within one year after the date of the 
        occurrence of such circumstance, an amount equal to--
                  (i) the total amount of awards received by 
                such individual under this section; plus
                  (ii) the interest on the amounts of such 
                awards which would be payable if at the time 
                the awards were received they were loans 
                bearing interest at the maximum legal 
                prevailing rate, as determined by the 
                [Treasurer of the United States,]
        [multiplied by 2.] Treasurer of the United States.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (i) Definitions.--In this section--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) the term ``mathematics, science, or engineering 
        professional'' means a person who holds a 
        baccalaureate, masters, or doctoral degree in science, 
        mathematics, or engineering and is working in or had a 
        career in that field or a related area;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (j) Science and Mathematics Scholarship Gift Fund.--In 
accordance with section 11(f) of the National Science 
Foundation Act of 1950, the Director is authorized to accept 
donations from the private sector to support scholarships, 
stipends, or internships associated with programs under this 
section.
  (k) Assessment of Teacher Retention.--Not later than 4 years 
after the date of enactment of this subsection, the Director 
shall transmit to Congress a report on the effectiveness of the 
program carried out under this section regarding the retention 
of participants in the teaching profession beyond the service 
obligation required under this section.
  (l) Authorization of Appropriations.--Except as provided in 
subsection (m), there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program--
          (1) $50,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, of which at 
        least $7,500,000 shall be used for capacity building 
        activities described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and 
        (iii) and (B)(ii) and (iii);
          (2) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, of which at 
        least $10,500,000 shall be used for capacity building 
        activities described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and 
        (iii) and (B)(ii) and (iii);
          (3) $90,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, of which at 
        least $13,500,000 shall be used for capacity building 
        activities described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and 
        (iii) and (B)(ii) and (iii);
          (4) $110,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, of which at 
        least $16,500,000 shall be used for capacity building 
        activities described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and 
        (iii) and (B)(ii) and (iii); and
          (5) $130,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, of which at 
        least $19,500,000 shall be used for capacity building 
        activities described in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and 
        (iii) and (B)(ii) and (iii).
  (m) Exception.--For any fiscal year for which the funding 
allocated for activities under this section is less than 
$50,000,000, the amount of funding available for capacity 
building activities described in paragraphs (1) through (5) of 
subsection (l) shall not exceed 15 percent of the allocated 
funds.

                     XIX. Committee Recommendations

    On June 7, 2006, a quorum being present, the Committee on 
Science favorably reported H.R. 5358, the Science and 
Mathematics Education for Competitiveness Act, as amended, by a 
voice vote and recommended its enactment.




XXI: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 5358, SCIENCE AND 
             MATHEMATICS EDUCATION FOR COMPETITIVENESS ACT

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7, 2006

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 2:39 p.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Sherwood L. 
Boehlert [Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Boehlert. I want to welcome everyone here for this 
markup on three important and bipartisan bills. The Committee 
on Science will come to order, as I started to say.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science meets to 
consider H.R. 5136, the National Integrated Drought Information 
System Act of 2006; H.R. 5358, the Science and Mathematics 
Education for Competitiveness Act; and H.R. 5356, the Research 
for Competitiveness Act.
    I ask unanimous consent for the authority to recess the 
Committee at any point during consideration of these matters, 
and without objection, it is so ordered.
    We will now proceed with the markup beginning with opening 
statements. I will go first, followed by my distinguished 
colleague and partner in this venture, Mr. Gordon.
    I am going to make all my general comments on today's bills 
now, and not speak on the bills later on. Since we have to 
squeeze in a lot of business this afternoon between Floor 
votes, and according to the report from the Floor, we can 
expect a series of votes some time in the 4:00 to 4:15 
timeframe.
    As usual with this committee, these bills reflect a lot of 
bipartisan work to solve real problems in practical ways.
    Our first bill today will be a measure to improve drought 
forecasting and monitoring, introduced by Mr. Hall. I 
appreciate Mr. Hall bringing this matter to our attention.
    Drought may seem like something that is easy to detect, but 
hard to do anything about; but that turns out to be wrong on 
both counts. It is tricky to figure out when a drought is 
developing, but if one knows, one can take many steps to alter 
water usage to mitigate drought's often severe economic 
consequences. So we need to pay more attention to this costly 
phenomenon, and Mr. Hall's bill, building on existing federal 
efforts, will enable us to improve drought forecasting and 
monitoring, which will save billions, with a ``B,'' billions of 
dollars. So, I expect this bill to move smoothly today, and on 
the House Floor. We will have one manager's amendment today, to 
reduce the authorization levels, to make that progress to the 
Floor a little easier.
    The other two bills we will take up today are the 
Committee's long-awaited innovation package.
    Our goal here is to take action on the recommendations of 
the National Academy of Sciences, the Council on 
Competitiveness, AEA, the Business Roundtable, the National 
Association of Manufacturers, and others, who have been calling 
for the U.S. to shore up its competitiveness by focusing more 
attention and more dollars on research and education.
    These calls were really music to our ears, because we have 
been issuing the same entreaties ourselves on this committee 
for a number of years, and especially in the last couple of 
years, as the challenge to future U.S. competitiveness has 
never become clearer.
    But we didn't want to answer those calls with a laundry 
list of new programs of dubious value, that would be unlikely 
to ever get funded. It might give us a lot of satisfaction and 
some fancy press releases, but that is not what this committee 
is about. We are about results. Indeed, we looked around to see 
what is working right now, or what has worked in the recent 
past, and then, we extended or expanded or built on those 
successful programs, and the result is a focused, bipartisan 
measure that should be able to move swiftly through the House.
    This measure is an intelligent middle ground between those 
who want to create scores of new, untested, expensive programs, 
and those who argue that all that is necessary is to increase 
overall funding for basic research, and leave everything else 
to chance. If we are to remain competitive, then we have to 
bolster key programs at the National Science Foundation, 
especially focused on K-12 and undergraduate education, and it 
is the prerogative of the Congress to do that.
    I want to thank Dr. Schwarz and Mr. McCaul, two active 
freshmen on this committee with a deep understanding of these 
issues, for introducing these bills.
    And I want to thank Mr. Gordon and the Members on both 
sides of the aisle, who worked with us on developing the final 
versions of these bills that are in the amendments in the 
nature of a substitute, including Dr. Ehlers and Ms. Biggert 
and Mr. Calvert, Ms. Jackson Lee and Mr. Green, and Mr. Honda. 
You get the idea of how we operate. Fingerprints of Members on 
both sides of the aisle are all over these bills, and that is 
the way it should be.
    The Schwarz bill focuses on education programs at the 
National Science Foundation, which runs programs that are 
critical to improving math and science education at all levels. 
The bill includes enhancing and extending the Noyce Scholarship 
program, one of my pet projects, to attract and better train 
science and math teachers. We also give renewed emphasis to the 
Math and Science Partnership program, now renamed the School 
and University Partnership Program.
    And we underscore NSF's role in the sometimes neglected, 
but critical area of undergraduate education. We also give 
clear authority to the Department of Energy for education 
programs, and we require an inventory and an evaluation of 
those programs.
    In Mr. McCaul's bill, we bolster research by ensuring that 
both NSF and DOE, we will set aside funding for young 
researchers, who are likely to perform the most creative and 
pathbreaking work. And we revive and idea from the 1980s, to 
try to get industry interested in these young academic 
researchers and in their long-term, basic research.
    I would add that both of these bills, and the underlying 
2002 NSF Act, direct that the programs in these bills, among 
other things, help bring more individuals from under-
represented groups into science, math, and engineering, and 
that is a goal that many Members of this committee have been 
very active in pursuing.
    So, we are taking action today, as we promised when we 
heard from the leaders of the National Academies Gathering 
Storm panel last year. We are setting a realistic agenda to 
increase U.S. investment in research and education in carefully 
targeted ways.
    I look forward to moving this legislation today, and to 
continuing efforts to see it signed into law this year. And I 
will continue to work with the appropriators to see that they 
provide the funding called for in the American Competitiveness 
Initiative and in these bills.
    Now, it is my privilege to turn to my partner in this 
venture, the distinguished gentleman from Tennessee, Mr. 
Gordon.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Boehlert follows:]
          Prepared Statement of Chairman Sherwood L. Boehlert
    I want to welcome everyone here for this markup on three important 
and bipartisan bills. I'm going to make all my general comments on 
today's bills now and not speak on the bills later, since we have to 
squeeze in a lot of business this afternoon between Floor votes.
    As usual with this committee, these bills reflect a lot of 
bipartisan work to solve real problems in practical ways.
    Our first bill today will be a measure to improve drought 
forecasting and monitoring, introduced by Mr. Hall. I appreciate Mr. 
Hall bringing this matter to our attention.
    Drought may seem like something that is easy to detect but hard to 
do anything about. But that turns out to be wrong on both counts. It's 
tricky to figure out when a drought is developing, but if one knows, 
one can take many steps to alter water usage to mitigate drought's 
often severe economic consequences. So we need to pay more attention to 
this costly phenomenon, and Mr. Hall's bill, building on existing 
federal efforts, will enable us to improve drought forecasting and 
monitoring, which will save billions of dollars. So I expect this bill 
to move smoothly today and on the House Floor.
    We will have one manager's amendment today to reduce the 
authorization levels to make that progress to the Floor a little 
easier.
    The other two bills we will take up today are the Committee's long 
awaited innovation package.
    Our goal here is to take action on the recommendations of the 
National Academy of Sciences, the Council on Competitiveness, AEA, the 
Business Roundtable, the National Association of Manufacturers and 
others who have been calling for the U.S. to shore up its 
competitiveness by focusing more attention and more dollars on research 
and education.
    These calls were really music to our ears because we've been 
issuing the same entreaties ourselves for years, and especially in the 
last couple of years as the challenge to future U.S. competitiveness 
has become ever clearer.
    But we didn't want to answer these calls with a laundry list of new 
programs of dubious value that would be unlikely to ever get funded. 
Instead, we looked around to see what is working right now or what has 
worked in the recent past, and then we extended or expanded or built on 
those successful programs. And the result is a focused, bipartisan 
measure that should be able to move swiftly through the House.
    This measure is an intelligent middle-ground between those who want 
to create scores of new, untested, expensive programs and those who 
argue that all that's necessary is to increase overall funding for 
basic research and leave everything else to chance. If we are to remain 
competitive, then we have to bolster key programs at the National 
Science Foundation (NSF), especially programs focused on K-12 and 
undergraduate education, and it's the prerogative of the Congress to do 
that.
    I want to thank Mr. Schwarz and Mr. McCaul, two active freshmen on 
this committee with a deep understanding of these issues, for 
introducing these bills.
    And I want to thank Mr. Gordon and the Members on both sides of the 
aisle who worked with us on developing the final versions of these 
bills that are in the amendments in the nature of a substitute, 
including Mr. Ehlers, Ms. Biggert, Mr. Calvert, Ms. Jackson Lee, Mr. 
Green and Mr. Honda.
    The Schwarz bill focuses on education programs at the National 
Science Foundation (NSF), which runs programs that are critical to 
improving math and science education at all levels. The bill includes 
enhancing and extending the Noyce Scholarship program, one of my pet 
projects, to attract and train better science and math teachers. We 
also give renewed emphasis to the Math and Science Partnership program, 
now renamed the School and University Partnership Program.
    And we underscore NSF's role in the sometimes neglected, but 
critical area of undergraduate education. We also give clear authority 
to the Department of Energy (DOE) for education programs, and we 
require an inventory and evaluation of those programs.
    In Mr. McCaul's bill, we bolster research by ensuring that both NSF 
and DOE we will set aside funding for young researchers, who are likely 
to perform the most creative and pathbreaking work. And we revive an 
idea from the 1980s to try to get industry interested in these young 
academic researchers and in their long-term, basic research.
    I would add that both these bills, and the underlying 2002 NSF Act, 
direct that the programs in these bills, among other things, help bring 
more individuals from under-represented into science, math and 
engineering.
    So we're taking action today as we promised when we heard from the 
leaders of the National Academy's Gathering Storm panel last year. We 
are setting a realistic agenda to increase U.S. investment in research 
and education in carefully targeted ways.
    I look forward to moving this legislation today, and to continuing 
efforts to see it signed into law this year. And I will continue to 
work with the appropriators to see that they provide the funding called 
for in the American Competitiveness Initiative and in these bills.

    [The prepared statement of Mr. Ehlers follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Vernon J. Ehlers
    There are many ways we can foster innovation and competition at the 
national level, but the most critical is the support of education in 
science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. I am pleased 
that today's bills artfully address this area by focusing on programs 
that maximize innovation and educational opportunities. By addressing 
teacher training, graduate interdisciplinary studies, and research in 
areas that bridge scientific fields, these bills combine to provide a 
comprehensive alliance putting us on the right track to remain 
competitive in today's global economy. NSF education programs play a 
strong role in promoting our economic competitiveness and national 
security and I am glad that my colleagues on the Committee recognize 
that this treasure trove of knowledge the Foundation represents should 
not be overlooked. The bills also demonstrate a strong commitment 
toward fundamental research, and place an emphasis on the promise of 
young research professors.
    I look forward to working with my colleagues and the scientific 
community to advance this important legislation. I believe that both 
bills align with the mission of bolstering American Competitiveness, 
and will support them strongly when they are considered by the whole 
House.

    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member.
    I am happy that the Republican leadership has finally put together 
a package of legislation in response to the President's call for 
increased national competitiveness in science, technology, engineering 
and math.
    This initiative underscores the recommendations of several 
important reports, including the report called Rising Above the 
Gathering Storm, released last year by the National Academy of 
Sciences.
    A nation lacking science and math competitiveness is a nation 
lacking a future of prosperity. Advances in medicine, engineering and 
technology have touched every aspect of our lives.
    The bills up for consideration today focus on particular weaknesses 
in our national scientific enterprise.
    The enhancement of early career awards for investigators in the 
physical sciences will be important in maintaining our national 
pipeline of talent.
    Support of high-risk, high-reward research projects pertinent to 
industry are designed to spur innovation.
    Cross-disciplinary research is an important sector, and it is good 
to encourage collaboration between life sciences and the physical 
sciences.
    As always, the NASA workforce is deserving of the Committee's 
support, especially when it comes to programs to strengthen that 
workforce.
    Moreover, Mr. Chairman, the provisions in H.R. 5358 are likewise 
good ideas to enhance math and science education at all levels.
    Programs such as the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship provide 
strong support to math and science teachers, particularly as they enter 
the final years of their training. Research has shown that these years 
are critical for retention of teachers, and so it is good to provide 
support at this critical point in their education.
    Advanced degree programs for teachers such as those specified in 
the School and University Partnerships for Science and Math Education 
provision, are also important to keep educators on the cutting edge of 
their course material.
    H.R. 5358 contains many creative provisions to support math and 
science teachers from the beginning of their training throughout their 
careers.
    I believe this support is critical to enhancing students' views of 
math and science. Students need to see mentors who have passion for the 
subject material.
    One particular concern of mine is regarding our nation's people of 
color. Minorities, with the exception of students at historically Black 
colleges and universities, are not pursuing careers in science, 
technology, engineering and math at the same rate of their peers.
    My hope was to see a much greater emphasis on programs supporting 
ethnic minorities. Although I commend the efforts of the National 
Science Foundation, Department of Energy and other organizations that 
support research in the physical sciences, the problem is clearly far 
from being resolved.
    This issue, of minority participation in math and science careers, 
is one I would like to see this committee address much more intently in 
the future.
    As former Chair of the Research Subcommittee, I support this 
committee's efforts to enhance programs in the name of national 
competitiveness.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back.

    Chairman Boehlert. We will now consider H.R. 5356, the 
Research for Competitiveness Act. I recognize Mr. Gordon for 
his remarks.
    Mr. Gordon. Mr. Chairman, I think we are moving along well.
    Let me just say once again, I think this is a good bill. I 
think it would have been better if we had added the ARPA-E 
recommendations from the ``Rising Above the Gathering Storm'' 
bill that myself and most Members here have co-sponsored.
    Just to, once again, remind people, so that it stays on 
your radar, so hopefully, we will have a chance to deal with 
this later, but the Department of Defense had a little agency 
called DARPA, and we are familiar with that. It is in the 
advanced research area. They developed the Internet. They 
developed stealth technology, and a number of other important 
technologies. What we would like to see, and again, following 
on the recommendations of the report, is that within the 
Department of Energy, we set up a similar type of advanced 
research agency, that we look around, you know, the country, 
and we determine the eight or ten, for them to determine the 
eight or ten best technologies, where we could have some 
breakthrough with energy and alternative energies, that we 
bring the National Labs, the private sector, the universities 
together, really hunker down, focus on these, like they have 
done in DARPA, and see if we can't have some breakthroughs.
    And again, I will not make it as an amendment, but I raise 
it as an issue, so that we can hopefully talk about this more 
at a later date.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Gordon follows:]
            Prepared Statement of Representative Bart Gordon
    Today, the Committee will consider legislative proposals for 
improving the future competitiveness of the Nation.
    The Manager's amendments to H.R. 5356 and H.R. 5358, which I have 
co-sponsored, meld provisions from the majority's bills and my 
bipartisan bills, H.R. 4434 and H.R. 4596.
    I want to thank the Chairman and other Members of the Majority for 
working with me to improve both the scope and funding levels authorized 
in the manager's amendments so that they are more in-line with the 
recommendations of the recent report from the National Academy of 
Sciences, Rising Above the Gathering Storm.
    The resulting legislation focuses specifically on improving science 
and math education and on strengthening basic research.
    The markup vehicles now implement a number of the key 
recommendations of the Gathering Storm report, recommendations which 
represent a consensus for action from a distinguished panel 
representing business, academic, and education leaders.
    Last year, I introduced three bills based on the Rising Storm 
panel's recommendations that were in the Science Committee's 
jurisdiction, and I had hoped to see early action by Congress in 
implementing them.
    With the general uncertainty about our country's future economic 
prospects, we need to act promptly. At a recent ETS Subcommittee 
hearing with NIST's three Nobel Prize winners, all three agreed that we 
need to increase our investment in basic research and to improve K-12 
science and math education.
    The Gathering Storm report states that ``laying the foundation for 
a scientifically literate workforce begins with developing outstanding 
K-12 teachers in science and mathematics.''
    I believe the report got it exactly right and has identified 
teachers as the first priority.
    Therefore, I am pleased that the markup vehicle for H.R. 5358 will 
implement the top priority of the Academies' report, which is to put in 
place effective teacher training programs for new and in-service 
science and math teachers.
    The proposed modifications to the Noyce scholarship program will 
transform it into much more than a scholarship program. It will spur 
reform to change the way colleges and universities educate new science 
and math teachers. Teachers who emerge from the program will combine 
deep knowledge of their subject with expertise in the most effective 
practices for teaching science or math.
    The new teachers will also receive mentoring and support during the 
critical early years of their teaching careers, when teacher attrition 
is known to be high.
    Finally, the program is authorized at a level that would enable it 
to meet the goal of producing 10,000 highly qualified science and math 
teachers each year within the President's goal of doubling the NSF 
budget.
    In short, the manager's amendment now implements the highest 
priority of the Rising Storm report. In addition, the NSF's major K-12 
education program involving partnerships between universities and 
school systems is strengthened by the manager's amendment. Emphasis is 
placed on professional development opportunities for practicing 
teachers, including support for Master's degree programs and teacher 
institutes.
    While I am largely satisfied with these bills, I am disappointed 
that the Science Committee is being a follower and not a leader on the 
critical issue of innovation. We are following the action of Senate 
committees to move legislation, and the bills before us today were only 
recently introduced.
    In addition, we are taking a timid approach by not addressing all 
of the Gathering Storm report's recommendations within the Committee's 
jurisdiction.
    We are not taking up ARPA-E legislation to help meet the Nation's 
critical energy needs, and we are not authorizing the NSF and DOE 
Office of Science funding increases called for in both the President's 
American Competitiveness Initiative and in the National Academy's 
report. As the authorizing committee for these agencies, we are ducking 
our responsibilities if we do not act.
    So while the bills before us today are a good start, they do not 
represent a comprehensive approach. I hope the Committee will soon act 
to provide the missing pieces.
    Mr. Chairman, I yield back my time.

    Chairman Boehlert. Moving right along, we will now consider 
H.R. 5358, the Science and Mathematics Education for 
Competitiveness Act. I recognize Mr. Gordon for any remarks 
that he might care to make.
    Mr. Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I will submit my eloquent remarks for the record, but I 
want to talk to the Committee just a moment about these bills 
that are coming up.
    Once again, as usual, and I will start with the good news, 
I support the Chairman in these bills. I think they are good 
bills. We could, you know, I think maybe make them better, but 
these are good bills.
    I am disappointed that we are getting started a little bit 
late with this. The authorizers are going to deal with this 
issue next week, and as a practical matter, we can--or rather, 
the appropriators--and we need to give them some instructions 
on this very important issue.
    And now, what I would like to do, if I could, just for a 
minute or so, I would like to sort of declare a political free 
zone here. The California election is over. No one--well, I 
don't want to say no one, a couple of folks on the Committee 
have serious races, but really, most folks don't, and Dr. 
Schwarz, if it wouldn't hurt you, I would go down and endorse 
you in your primary. We don't have a new Member who has brought 
more to the Committee than you have, and I thank you for that.
    Chairman Boehlert. Without objection, so ordered. Unanimous 
consent.
    Mr. Gordon. Happy to do that. Would be happy to do that.
    But you know, these are very important issues. You are 
probably tired of hearing me talk about my daughter, but my 
daughter is graduating from pre-K tomorrow, and I am very 
concerned, sincerely concerned, about the kind of 
competitiveness that she is going to, and her generation, is 
going to find when they enter the workforce. And you don't have 
to wait ten years or twelve years. It is going to be before 
that.
    We really have, I think, a crisis brewing, and I don't want 
to, you know, I don't want to overdo it. In the '50s, we had 
Sputnik, that we thought, you know, was going to change the 
world, and that we were in trouble, and we were a great nation, 
and we came back together. In the seventies, once again, we 
thought we--this competitiveness was going to get us with the 
rising oil prices, but as a great nation, we came together. And 
I think that we have a chance to do that again, but this is a 
very serious problem, and we have a chance on the Science 
Committee, I think, to make a real contribution, but we need to 
do it right, and let me say that, and I will preface this, so 
you will know why.
    President Clinton introduced something called direct 
lending, where he had student loans go directly through the 
Department of Education. I thought he was wrong. I thought the 
Department of Education had more than they could handle, and 
that they would wind up screwing it up, and I fought him on 
that, and we have both programs, or at least we stopped them 
from taking the private sector out, and having just direct 
lending.
    I say that because President Bush now is proposing, with 
much of this legislation, to run it through the Department of 
Education. That is a mistake, and this committee has over and 
over said it is a mistake. The Chairman and I are going to sign 
a letter to the appropriators saying that is a mistake, but we 
need to do more than just vote these things today, touch base, 
and go home.
    We really need to work this with the appropriators, and we 
need to deal with this, because we have a lucky situation, in 
that there is going to be some additional funds that are going 
to be put in this competitiveness agenda, and it is going to be 
hard to go back and get these funds again later. We cannot 
screw this up, because they are going to say, well, you had 
your chance, and we are going to go somewhere else.
    And let me tell you what I am talking about. Everybody that 
came before this committee that testified for us said that when 
it comes to science and education, it starts with teachers, and 
that is what we have got to deal with. Everyone except for the 
Secretary of Education, and again, she had a parochial 
interest, and she seems to be doing better than most of them 
have done. But everybody else says it starts with the teacher.
    Yet, the President's proposal puts 70 percent of the money 
into math curriculum, nothing for science, only math 
curriculum, and then, the other 30 percent goes into AP 
courses. Well, you can't have AP courses if you don't have AP 
teachers, and so, it is very important, I think, that we talk 
with the appropriators, and get this thing right. If we follow 
along the route that he is proposing, it is contrary to 
everything that this committee has done over the last few years 
on a bipartisan basis.
    At the same time they are putting the money in the 
Department of Education for this curriculum, the National 
Science Foundation, that for fifty years, has been trying to 
educate teachers, and doing a good job, they are being cut by 
50 percent over this last three years. And so, this is not a 
partisan issue. This is, you know, a Science Committee, this is 
a competitiveness issue, and we really need to take this 
opportunity to do more than vote for this bill and then go 
home. We need to talk with the appropriators. We need to get 
this thing right, and I hope that we can do that again.
    I know that the Chairman and I will be signing a letter, 
but we need to do more than that, and I hope that all of you 
will take the chance to talk with the appropriators, and 
explain that we want to do this thing the right way. It is not 
a partisan issue. It is an issue about competitiveness for this 
country, and we need to get it right.
    And thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you, Mr. Gordon.
    I thank you for your passion, for your commitment, and I 
thank you for saying, suggesting at the outset that this be a 
nonpartisan zone, and we just concentrate on what is best for 
the Nation and our future.
    And I just signed the letter you are referring to, but let 
me tell you something. Bart Gordon and I, as partners on the 
Science Committee, do more than just sign letters. We have been 
working right along with the appropriators. We don't have to 
pass some bill here today to initiate action, in terms of 
dealing with the appropriators. We have been dealing with them 
right along, not just last week, not just last month, not just 
last year, but for several years. Together, we have gone to 
them. Individually, we have gone to them. And we have focused 
on the importance of science and math education for the future 
of this nation, and we have said, quite frankly, if you leave 
it just to the professionals in the Department of Education, 
shame on you.
    The National Science Foundation has a vital role to play, 
and we have emphasized that role, and when there was an effort 
to take away the Science and Math Partnership from the National 
Science Foundation, the response they got from this committee, 
on a bipartisan basis, was quite simple. Like hell. We wouldn't 
stand for it, and they didn't do it.
    So, it didn't take a report from the National Academy of 
Science, an excellent report, entitled ``Rising Above the 
Gathering Storm,'' to get our collective attention within this 
room. We have been on this subject for some time, but that 
aided us in getting the attention of others, who don't have a 
day to day responsibility in this subject arena. And now, when 
we talk to them, when Mr. Gordon talks to his people, when I 
talk to our people, when we interact with each other, we are 
now getting people who are paying attention to this very 
important subject.
    So, I couldn't appreciate more the sentiment behind Mr. 
Gordon's remarks. And quite honestly, I couldn't appreciate 
more the determined effort that he has demonstrated to let 
partisanship check it at the door. I have decided not to run 
for re-election. I came here 42 years ago as a starry-eyed 
young staffer. It is time for me to go. But one of the reasons 
that I used in the makeup of my decision was partisanship has 
reared its ugly head on Capitol Hill for too long, too 
consistently, and tolerance for another point of view has been 
notably absent. Fortunately, that is not in this committee, so 
I thank you very much.
    Now, we will consider the bill. I ask unanimous consent 
that the bill is considered as read and open to amendment at 
any point, and that the Members proceed with the amendments in 
the order of the roster. Without objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
in the nature of a substitute by the very distinguished 
gentleman from Michigan, who is enjoying bipartisan support on 
this committee today, Dr. Schwarz. I ask unanimous consent that 
the amendment in the nature of a substitute be treated as 
original text for purposes of amendment under the five minute 
rule, and without objection, that is so ordered.
    The Clerk will report.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 5358, offered by Mr. Schwarz 
of Michigan.
    Chairman Boehlert. Ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the full amendment. Without objection, so 
ordered.
    I recognize Dr. Schwarz for five minutes.
    Mr. Schwarz. Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to introduce this 
amendment in the nature of a substitute, which is the end 
result of many hours of hard work on the part of Members and 
staff on both sides of the aisle. I especially want to thank 
Chairman Boehlert, Ranking Member Gordon, Dr. Ehlers, Mr. 
Green, Mr. Honda, Ms. Jackson Lee, and Mr. Baird and their 
staff, for their hard work and thoughtful comments, that have 
contributed to the many improvements in this amendment. Like 
the original bill, this substitute represents a critical step 
for our country's education system in science, mathematics, 
engineering, and other technology.
    This substitute includes nearly all the language from the 
original bill, while bringing in many provisions suggested by 
Democratic and Republican Members of the Committee. I am proud 
to say that working together, we have drafted legislation that 
creates no new programs, but rather, strengthens and expands 
existing programs that have a proven track record of success.
    This substitute bolsters important programs dedicated to 
preparing science, technology, engineering, and math teachers, 
originally authorized in the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002.
    It expands the Robert Noyce Scholarship program. Robert 
Noyce was the founder of Fairchild Semiconductor, one of the 
founders of Intel, and one of the discoverers of the integrated 
circuit or microchip. He died in 1990. It expands the Noyce 
Scholarship program to include four years of instruction and 
field work opportunities for participants, which will help 
attract science, math, technology, and engineering majors to 
consider teaching careers early on. It also prioritizes 
programs focusing on teacher training, including preparation 
for teaching advanced placement courses, and developing 
Master's degrees programs under the School and University 
Partnerships for Science and Mathematics Education program, 
formerly known as Math and Science Partnerships program. The 
substitute also authorizes enrichment activities such as summer 
camps and classroom laboratory experiences to better engage 
students in science, math, technology, and engineering fields.
    Undergraduate programs also receive additional attention in 
this substitute. It combines the new Centers for Undergraduate 
Education into the pre-existing Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Mathematic Talent Expansion program at the 
NSF, furthering that program's goal of increasing the pool of 
undergraduate students pursuing science, math, technology, and 
engineering degrees. It also requires the continuation of 
existing undergraduate education programs at the Foundation.
    The substitute clarifies a few items in the original bill, 
in the 2002 Act. It reasserts the importance of the Centers for 
Research and Learning and Education Improvement established in 
the 2002 Act. It also clarifies that the section on Department 
of Energy education programs in the original bill refers only 
to programs within that Department's Office of Science.
    Finally, on the request of Members of both sides of the 
aisle, this substitute strengthens the assessment of programs 
in order to ensure that the National Science Foundation is 
maintaining its historically strong standards of excellence for 
the programs and its funds. The substitute requires the 
Foundation to assess its programs in a way that allows for 
comparisons to other federal programs, aiding both the 
Foundation and other agencies in the design and implementation 
of education programs that expand science technology, 
engineering, and math education programs, and opportunities for 
students at all levels.
    And with that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Schwarz follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative John J.H. Schwarz
    I am pleased to introduce this amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, which is the end result of many hours of hard work on the 
part of Members and staff on both sides of the aisle. I especially want 
to thank Chairman Boehlert, Ranking Member Gordon, Chairman Ehlers, Mr. 
Green, Mr. Honda, Ms. Jackson Lee, and Mr. Baird and their staff for 
their hard work and thoughtful comments that have contributed to the 
many improvements in this amendment. Like the original bill, this 
substitute represents a critical step for our country's education 
system in science, mathematics, engineering, and other technology.
    This substitute includes nearly all the language from the original 
bill, while bringing in many provisions suggested by Democratic and 
Republican Members of the Committee. I am proud to say that, working 
together, we have drafted legislation that creates no new programs but, 
rather, strengthens and expands existing programs that have a proven 
track record of success.
    This substitute bolsters important programs dedicated to preparing 
science, technology, engineering, and math teachers originally 
authorized in the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 
2002. It expands the Robert Noyce Scholarship program to include four 
years of instruction and field work opportunities for participants, 
which will help attract science, math, technology, and engineering 
majors to consider teaching careers early on. Robert Noyce was co-
founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel, and he is credited as one 
of the inventors of the integrated circuit or microchip. He died in 
1990. It also prioritizes programs focusing on teacher training, 
including preparation for teaching advanced placement courses and 
developing Master's degrees programs under the School and University 
Partnerships for Science and Mathematics Education program, formerly 
known as the Math and Science Partnerships program. The substitute also 
authorizes enrichment activities, such as summer camps and classroom 
laboratory experiences, to better engage students in science, math, 
technology, and engineering fields.
    Undergraduate programs also receive additional attention in this 
substitute. It combines the new centers for undergraduate education 
into the preexisting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematic 
Talent Expansion Program at the National Science Foundation, furthering 
that program's goal of increasing the pool of undergraduate students 
pursuing science, math, technology, and engineering degrees. It also 
requires the continuation of existing undergraduate education programs 
at the Foundation.
    The substitute also clarifies a few items in the original bill and 
the 2002 Act. It reasserts the importance of the Centers for Research 
on Learning and Education Improvement established in the 2002 Act. It 
also clarifies that the section on Department of Energy education 
programs in the original bill refers only to programs within the Office 
of Science.
    Finally, on the request of Members from both sides of the aisle, 
this substitute strengthens the assessment of programs in order to 
ensure that the National Science Foundation is maintaining its 
historically strong standards of excellence for the programs it funds. 
The substitute requires the Foundation to assess its programs in a way 
that allows for comparisons to other federal programs, aiding both the 
Foundation and other agencies in the design and implementation of 
education programs that expand science, technology, engineering, and 
math educational opportunities for students at all levels.

    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you very much, Dr. Schwarz, for 
that excellent summation. Is there anyone else who would care 
to speak on this?
    Mr. Honda.
    Mr. Honda. Thank you, Mr. Chair, and thank you for 
recognizing me, and I will be brief.
    I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you and 
your staff for working with me to include language about what I 
have been calling teaching innovation in the manager's 
amendment. The language would allow NSF to use funding for the 
development and dissemination of curriculum materials that will 
help foster inventiveness and innovation, and to research the 
process of innovation, and the teaching of inventiveness.
    I think, then, as we strive to train new scientists, 
engineers, and teachers to maintain global competitiveness in 
science and technology, we must realize that we cannot just 
train them in the same old way we have used in the past. We 
need to introduce them to new fields, teach them to be 
interdisciplinary, and ensure that they are taught the 
creativity and technical skills of highly inventive and 
innovative people.
    Data on patent awards shows that in especially innovative, 
high-tech companies, the cutting edge work has really been 
driven by a few highly innovative scientists and engineers. We 
need to figure out how these people do it, and teach others 
those skills, and that is what my language does. I am not the 
only one who thinks this. Leading experts made similar 
recommendations in the MIT-Lemelson program report called 
Invention, and many high-tech CEOs have told me the same thing, 
and have endorsed my stand-alone bill, from which this language 
is adapted, the Inventive Act of 2006 and H.R. 5477.
    So, again, Mr. Chairman, I thank you for working with my 
staff and myself to include this in the manager's amendment, 
and for putting these bills together that we can support, and I 
want to also thank you for your last comment, and really 
personally recognize you for your great leadership in the years 
that I have been here.
    And I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Honda follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Michael M. Honda
    Mr. Chairman, thank you for recognizing me, and I'll be brief.
    I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you and your staff 
for working with me to include language about what I've been calling 
``teaching innovation'' in the manager's amendment.
    The language would allow NSF to use funding for the development and 
dissemination of curriculum materials that will help foster 
inventiveness and innovation, and to research the process of innovation 
and the teaching of inventiveness.
    I think that as we strive to train new scientists, engineers, and 
teachers to maintain global competitiveness in science and technology, 
we must realize that we cannot just train them in the same old way we 
have used in the past.
    We need to introduce them to new fields, teach them to be 
interdisciplinary, and ensure that they are taught the creativity and 
thinking skills of highly inventive and innovative people.
    Data on patent awards shows that in especially innovative high-tech 
companies, the cutting edge work has really been driven by a few highly 
innovative scientists and engineers. We need to figure out how these 
people ``do it'' and teach others those skills. That's what my language 
does.
    I'm not the only one who thinks this--leading experts made similar 
recommendations in the MIT-Lemelson Program report ``Invention,'' and 
many high-tech CEOs have told me the same thing and have endorsed my 
stand-alone bill from which this language is adapted, the INVENT Act, 
H.R. 5477.
    So again, I thank the Chairman for working with me to include this 
in the manager's amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you very much. I really appreciate 
those comments. Mr. Rohrabacher.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    And while I hate to be the skunk at the lawn party again, I 
will have to oppose this love feast of bipartisanship, both on 
philosophical and practical grounds.
    Mr. Chairman, let me just note that the goal of having 
better and more science and mathematics teachers, as far as I 
am concerned, is a noble goal, and I want to make sure the 
Chairman--make sure I am addressing the Chairman.
    Chairman Boehlert. The Chairman is always attentive to the 
distinguished gentleman from California.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    As I was saying, the goal of achieving more math and 
science teachers is certainly a laudable goal. I would have to 
say that whether that goal should be the priority for all of 
our local schools throughout the United States is something 
they should decide, and I have just spent the morning talking 
to educators from my district who are totally upset with the 
outcome of the No Child Left Behind Program. The No Child Left 
Behind Program was also something that sounded very laudatory, 
and ended up with more direction from Washington, D.C. about 
education and what was going on in the local area, and they are 
bemoaning that control and that loss of leeway that they have, 
and the loss of control that they have had locally because of 
the No Child Left Behind program.
    This will, again, further the--set things in a direction we 
would like to see it, but perhaps that is not their priority, 
and perhaps there are other ways to achieve this goal, if it is 
their priority. This would offer a certain expenditure of 
federal money, and I certainly laud the fact that the 
scholarship program within this bill demands a two for one 
service requirement for each person who gets a scholarship.
    Chairman Boehlert. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Yes, I would.
    Chairman Boehlert. I couldn't agree more that the local 
schools should decide whether or not they want to hire a 
capable science teacher. That is their decision to make. What 
we want to make sure is they have some choices in the 
marketplace, and that capable science teachers are trained, and 
we have found that offering these incentives to students going 
to college majoring in science, math, and engineering, serve as 
a vehicle to carry them from college, without heavy loan 
obligation, into the classroom, teaching our youngsters. That 
is what we want.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Reclaiming my time. Just to note, there 
are ways to do this through the marketplace, without 
necessarily having a federal program directed by bureaucrats, 
whether they are at the Department of Education, or whether 
they are at NASA, or whether at the National Science 
Foundation. I don't care where the public employees are, where 
their desk is located. They are still parts of a Washington 
bureaucracy that will eventually have the same type of attitude 
that Washington bureaucrats have towards local educators in the 
No Child Left Behind program.
    The way that local schools can attract, through the 
marketplace, as many science and mathematics teachers as are 
necessary to meet their standards is very easy, and it won't 
cost any money, in terms of any more money. It is just simply 
permitting science and mathematics teachers to receive higher 
compensation from their pay, for their pay, than do people who 
teach basket-weaving and physical education. But that is not 
the case in so many schools throughout the country, where we 
have highly structured, and I might say a union environment, 
which actually undermines the teaching of educational courses 
that we now know are necessary for our country in science and 
mathematics. No one wants to touch that issue, because we know 
those unions who are demanding that basket-weaving teachers 
earn the same as mathematics teachers and science teachers, 
have a great sway politically, and that is unfortunately one of 
the issues we can't handle here in this building.
    But what we can do is make sure that we just don't 
substitute government control from Washington, D.C., and 
direction from Washington, D.C., for an inability of people to 
try to handle those issues locally. For example, summer schools 
may--and summer camps may be a very good thing. This should not 
be a decision made, something that we try to pressure people to 
do from the Federal Government. This should be made--a decision 
made totally by local people.
    Furthermore, what I find in this bill is--basically, it is 
aimed at teachers. That is correct, and as I say, I think there 
are plenty of trained mathematicians and scientists who will go 
in that direction of teaching, if they were offered higher pay, 
but it doesn't really do anything, in terms directly for the 
students. There are, for example, many members of the 
scientific and engineering organizations who would love to 
share enthusiasm and their knowledge for math and science and 
engineering to kids in K-12, and that is where we really need 
to make our mark. We need to make sure that younger people who 
get interested in science and mathematics, that is where our 
future depends on, and there is nothing in this that affects 
those kids. What it affects are teachers, and what we are going 
to do is get away--we are going to teach teachers, rather than 
attracting those people who already have the skills in, because 
we are not willing to look at that union issue, as I suggested.
    I would, again, suggest to my friends and colleagues that 
although this is very laudable, this is a very, very laudable 
goal, education is something our country depends upon, 
certainly science and mathematics education, but just like the 
No Child Left Behind, there is no excuse for us to be expanding 
the arena of the Federal Government into the decisions of local 
education. After all, the money all comes from the local area 
anyway. We are just taxing the money away, and giving it back 
as we think it should be structured. That doesn't make any 
sense to me, and I will oppose the bill, although I applaud all 
of you for your very good motives.
    Chairman Boehlert. We thank the gentleman for his applause 
for the noble objectives of this very worthy bill, and we thank 
him for his always interesting observations with his 
intervention.
    And now, any further comments?
    Mr. Gordon. Well, I will just real quickly ask to strike 
the last word.
    Chairman Boehlert. The gentleman is recognized.
    Mr. Gordon. As usual, my friend from California has an 
opinion, and whether you agree with the opinion or not agree 
with the opinion, it really is not on mark with this bill.
    I mean, I think what we are trying to accomplish--what he 
wants to accomplish, you know, God bless him, go forward and 
try to do what you can where you can, but that is not what this 
bill is about. The fact of the matter is that, if you want to 
say the private sector has not worked in this area--right now, 
two-thirds, approximately two-thirds of the math and science 
teachers in this country have neither a major or a certificate 
to teach that subject, and that has been isolated as the number 
one problem. It is hard to inspire someone, it is hard to teach 
someone, if you don't fully understand, you know, the subject.
    This gives us an opportunity to put more of those teachers 
with that background in the market, so that those communities 
can bring them in, and probably even more importantly, what it 
will do is, it will go to those existing teachers, allow them 
to upgrade their credentials. So, again, the problems, concerns 
that you mention, you are consistent in mentioning them, but it 
is inconsistent with this particular bill.
    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you very much, Mr. Gordon. Is 
there any further discussion on that?
    Mr. Green. Yes, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Boehlert. Who seeks recognition? Mr. Green.
    Mr. Green. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I move to strike the last 
word.
    Chairman Boehlert. The gentleman is recognized.
    Mr. Green. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, first, I 
would like to thank you and the Ranking Member, for your 
leadership on this most important piece of legislation, to 
implement many of the Augustine recommendations for global 
competitiveness.
    I would like to thank all of the staff persons who have 
worked tirelessly to draft this legislation. It is most 
meaningful, and I believe that this amendment will do a lot to 
clarify some of our positions. Most especially, I would like to 
commend this committee's spirit of bipartisanship, 
notwithstanding recent comments, and the efforts put forth to 
accommodate my interests in providing additional opportunities 
for under-represented persons in math and in science.
    Following last month's hearing regarding the National 
Science Foundation's role in providing math and science 
education, I introduced H.R. 5458. This legislation authorizes 
a National Science Foundation Competitive Grant program, which 
would assist institutions of learning and other science and 
math-oriented nonprofit organizations, with the creation and/or 
expansion of science and math summer camps specifically 
targeted towards inner city, underprivileged children. Although 
the text provided in the substitute amendment does not contain 
all of the language that I included in H.R. 5458, I appreciate 
the spirit of the compromise provision, which authorizes the 
development of educational programs and materials for use to 
conduct both after-school and summer camp enrichment programs 
in math and science for under-represented students.
    I also want to commend the Chair and Ranking Member for 
their efforts to include several additional provisions other 
than my own, which aim to increase the diversity among the STEM 
professions. Some of the progressive provisions included are 
the National Science Foundation, the NSF, must consider 
academic merit, financial need, and the promotion of 
participation by women, minorities, and individuals with 
disabilities in awarding the Noyce Scholarships. I think that 
is progress. STEM professionals who receive a stipend to become 
certified as teachers must carry out their teaching payback 
period in high need schools. I believe that is progress. The 
teaching payback period for scholarship recipients is reduced 
by one year if they elect to teach in a high need school. I 
think that is progress.
    The NSF must consider the extent to which activities 
proposed will encourage the interests of women, minorities, and 
individuals with disabilities in STEM fields. I believe that is 
progress. The NSF must give priority to applications from 
partnerships that include a high need local education agency in 
making awards. That is progress. Under the STEM Talent 
Expansion program, proposed language specifically states that 
NSF must strive to increase the number of STEM graduates who 
are women, minorities, and individuals with disabilities. This 
is progress.
    Mr. Chairman, when Albert Einstein was a child, he was 
considered a slow learner, not the genius destined for 
greatness that he is remembered as today. This legislation 
gives us a greater chance, not only to leave no child behind, 
but also to reveal the hidden talents of the next genius child 
waiting to make a difference if given the opportunity.
    I thank the Chairman and Ranking Member for the hard work 
and leadership that they have given us, in helping us to move 
forward with the Augustine recommendations to improve our STEM 
endeavors. And----
    Mr. Gordon. Will the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Green.--my colleagues will--yes, I yield.
    Mr. Gordon. Let me just quickly say that I appreciate you 
bringing these issues before us, and that I am pleased that the 
Chairman accepted them into this bill. Every witness that came 
before us, it was consistent that to improve our 
competitiveness, we had to improve our math and science skills, 
and everyone said that women and minorities were under-
represented, and the best way to get bang for your buck was to 
work in those areas, and I think that your amendments are going 
to help us have a better bill, and a more competitive nation. 
Thank you.
    Mr. Green. I reclaim my time, Mr. Chairman, and would close 
by simply saying I greatly appreciate the bipartisan effort 
that was put forth, Mr. Chairman, and I look forward to 
continuing this type of effort.
    I came here to work with everybody, and I appreciate it 
when the hand of friendship is extended so that we can work 
together, and I thank you.
    I yield back.
    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you very much, Mr. Green.
    The Chair recognizes Ms. Matsui for--are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment? The Clerk will read the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 5358, offered by Ms. Matsui of 
California.
    Chairman Boehlert. Without objection, I ask unanimous 
consent to dispense with the reading. Without objection, so 
ordered.
    The gentlelady is recognized for five minutes to explain 
her amendment.
    Ms. Matsui. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member 
Gordon, for your leadership on this issue that is so important 
to our nation's future. It is a pleasure to consider these 
critical challenges on my first markup today.
    Upgrading the math and science capabilities of our 
students, teachers, schools, and colleges has long been a 
priority for me. I am glad to be on the Committee to 
participate in the support and debate. The redesigned and 
expanded Noyce Teacher's Scholarship program contained in this 
bill is intended to create thousands of new math and science 
teachers each year.
    My amendment directs NSF to report to Congress on how many 
of those teachers are staying in the profession beyond the 
service commitment required by the Noyce program. I believe 
this is a logical question to ask, particularly since teacher 
retention is one of the program's objectives. This provision 
will allow Congress and this committee to have measurable 
results, so that we can go back to our constituents and say 
this was money well spent, because to maintain our leadership 
in math and science, we need teachers who devote their 
professional career to teaching these subjects, not just a few 
years out of college.
    This amendment will allow us to see how successful these 
programs are in producing such truly committed individuals. I 
hope my colleagues will be able to support this amendment, and 
thank you very much.
    I yield back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Boehlert. I want to thank Ms. Matsui for her 
amendment. Didn't take you long to get actively engaged. I 
mean, just a couple of months on the Committee, and already, 
you are coming forward with something that demands our 
thoughtful consideration. The Chair has given it just that, and 
he is pleased to support the amendment.
    Is there any further discussion on the amendment? If no, 
the answer--the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the amendment is 
agreed to.
    The third amendment on the roster is offered by the 
gentlelady from Texas, Ms. Johnson. Are you ready to proceed 
with your amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. Yes.
    Chairman Boehlert. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 5358, offered by Ms. Johnson 
of Texas.
    Chairman Boehlert. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    The gentlelady is recognized for five minutes to explain 
the amendment.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and our 
Ranking Member.
    Increasing our national competitiveness begins in the 
classroom. In order to educate, train, and produce a generation 
of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians, we 
have to start early. Students must be shown from a young age 
that science and math are a fun. An important part of having a 
meaningful educational experience is access to resources.
    Science and math classrooms are not as fun, unless those 
classrooms are well equipped to capture kids' imaginations. 
Microscopes, computers, projectors, animals for dissection are 
all key items that link math and science education to students' 
sense of practicality. Kids need to see how these subjects 
apply to everyday life. That vision often begins in the high 
school laboratory.
    Mr. Chairman, my colleague, Ruben Hinojosa, has developed a 
clever strategy to get science laboratory equipment to high 
schools, and I must tell you that we explored other committees. 
The fundamental aspect of that provision has been formed into a 
proposal for a demonstration grant that is before the 
Committee's consideration. The amendment targets secondary 
schools in high need areas. This definition refers to schools 
located in impoverished areas, rural, urban, and suburban. High 
schools may apply for grants through the National Science 
Foundation to enhance their math and science labs.
    Applicants must demonstrate a partnership with a 
university, industry, or a nonprofit organization, a national 
laboratory, or another entity. The provision, totaling a mere 
$3 million for up to ten such partnerships is meant as a 
demonstration project. I will note that the partners must agree 
to pay two thirds of the total cost for each grant proposal, 
while the National Science Foundation will pay one third of the 
cost. Universities, colleges, technology companies, and other 
scientific and engineering groups are rich with opportunities. 
This amendment provides a mechanism for schools to reach out 
for those opportunities, and form partnerships in the 
community. The ultimate goal, of course, is to open lines of 
communication between these partners, and enhance our math and 
science classrooms. Only there can the hearts of future 
scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians be 
captivated.
    Mr. Chairman, I know that you object to this for two 
reasons. One, you felt like this was the wrong venue. Two, it 
was submitted late, and you are right. Fourteen years I have 
been on this committee, and my story has been the same, to try 
to make sure that we are competitive in the future, by making 
sure that all of our young people have an opportunity to 
prepare for it.
    Congresswoman Connie Morella and I sponsored legislation 
and created a national advisory group to attempt to attract 
more minorities and women to the field, and we had very 
esteemed people from around the country. The Chair was from my 
district, the President of TXU, that was very interested in 
what we were doing. We know there is a need, and the need is 
great. This was late coming, because we explored other areas, 
and I have heard the same reason for not putting it in the 
Department of Education as I have heard here earlier.
    What I want to say, Mr. Chairman. I am not going to ask for 
a vote. This is supported bipartisanly. I am going to pull the 
amendment down, and ask you to help us get some attention in 
this area, perhaps even in conference.
    Mr. Chairman, it has come the time when we have got to 
focus on where the needs are, to get these young people 
prepared for the future. This is not a lot of money, and I 
believe that it will be useful.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member.
    Increasing our national competitiveness begins in the classroom. In 
order to educate, train, and produce a generation of scientists, 
technologists, engineers and mathematicians, we must start early.
    Students must be shown, from a young age, that science and math are 
fun. An important part of having a meaningful education experience is 
access to resources.
    Science and math classrooms are not very fun unless those 
classrooms are well-equipped to captivate kids' imaginations. 
Microscopes, computers, projectors, animals for dissection are all key 
items that link math and science education to students' sense of 
practicality.
    Kids need to see how these subjects apply to everyday life. That 
vision often begins in the high school laboratory.
    Mr. Chairman, my colleague, Ruben Hinojosa, has developed a 
provision to get science laboratory equipment into high school 
classrooms. The fundamental aspects of that provision have been formed 
into a proposal for a demonstration grant that is before the 
Committee's consideration.
    The amendment targets secondary schools in ``high need'' areas. 
This definition refers schools located in impoverished areas--rural, 
urban or suburban.
    High schools may apply for grants, through National Science 
Foundation, to enhance their math and science labs. Applicants must 
demonstrate a partnership with a university and industry, nonprofit 
organization, national laboratory, or other entity.
    The provision, totaling a mere $3 million for up to ten such 
partnerships, is meant as a demonstration project. I will note that the 
partners must agree to pay two-thirds of the total cost for each grant 
proposal, while the National Science Foundation would pay one-third.
    Universities, colleges, technology companies, and other scientific 
and engineering groups are rich with opportunities. This amendment 
provides a mechanism for schools to reach out for these opportunities.
    The ultimate goal is to open the lines of communication between 
these partners and enhance our math and science classrooms. Only there 
can the hearts of future scientists, technologists, engineers and 
mathematicians be captivated.
    Mr. Chairman, I will note the letter sent by Congressman Reyes and 
over fifty other Members of Congress requesting a greater emphasis on 
women and under-represented minorities in science.
    My amendment is also supported by the American Chemical Society, 
the National Science Teachers Association and the American Council on 
Education. All have sent you letters in the name of this cause.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for the opportunity to speak on this 
amendment. I yield back.

    Chairman Boehlert. I want to thank the gentlelady for 
raising the issue, and she performs a very valuable service for 
us all by almost forcing us to pay attention to the subject at 
hand.
    There is a compelling need, and I will be glad to work with 
the gentlelady in trying to find the best way to address that 
need, and I won't just slough it off, but I don't think, in my 
heart of hearts, that the National Science Foundation is the 
appropriate vehicle to carry forward this program. They have 
got a lot on their plate, and they do it exceptionally well. 
One thing that we don't want to add to it is getting into a 
grant program like this, where that is not really their forte.
    But that doesn't eliminate the need that you have so 
correctly identified, so I will be glad to work with the 
gentlelady in partnership, as we try to find some vehicle to 
carry forward with what we both agree needs to be carried 
forward.
    And is the gentlelady asking for unanimous consent to 
withdraw her amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. Yes, I ask for unanimous consent to withdraw 
it, and to say, Mr. Chairman, that the National Foundation is 
probably the only source of scientific money in the government 
that has not been challenged for how they use it.
    Chairman Boehlert. I thank the gentlelady.
    Ms. Johnson. And whether they use it effectively.
    Chairman Boehlert. Without objection, her unanimous consent 
request is so ordered.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Boehlert. Ms. Biggert, do you seek the Chair's 
attention?
    Ms. Biggert. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I move to strike the last 
word.
    Chairman Boehlert. Well, you have the Chair's attention.
    Ms. Biggert. Thank you.
    Chairman Boehlert. And you are recognized.
    Ms. Biggert. Thank you. Mr. Chairman, I would just like to 
ask that a statement be submitted for the record, and it is 
about adding section 12, and thanking you for the opportunity 
to have that in the bill. And I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Biggert follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Judy Biggert
    Thank you Mr. Chairman.
    I want to take this opportunity to thank you and Mr. Schwarz for 
working with me on a provision that is now Section 12 of this bill.
    This section would require the NSF, when evaluating the educational 
programs created in this bill, to use assessment methods that would 
allow the effectiveness of these programs to be compared to the 
effectiveness of science, math, and engineering education programs 
supported by other federal agencies.
    As part of the Deficit Reduction Act, Congress created an Academic 
Competitiveness Council. Chaired by the Secretary of Education and 
consisting of officials from other federal agencies responsible for 
managing programs to promote math and science, the Council is charged 
with identifying all such programs and determining their effectiveness. 
More specifically, the Council is charged with identifying areas where 
programs overlapped or are duplicative, and was asked to recommend ways 
to efficiently integrate and coordinate such programs.
    A major purpose of this Council is to develop a ``measuring stick'' 
that can be used to evaluate programs that promote math and science 
education across the federal agencies.
    As a Member of the Education and Workforce Committee, I attended a 
hearing at the beginning of May at which the Assistant Secretary of 
Education for Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development provided an 
update on the development of this ``measuring stick.''
    Granted, it's not yet complete.
    And once it is complete, the Science Committee and the Education 
and Workforce Committee should examine it closely to ensure that it is 
an appropriate evaluation tool and accomplishes what Congress intended.
    For this committee to effectively exercise its oversight 
responsibilities, we need to be able to compare programs across 
agencies.
    That's why this provision is just plain common sense, and I thank 
the Chairman and Mr. Schwarz, the bill sponsor, for including it in the 
substitute.
    I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Boehlert. Without objection, so ordered.
    Are there any other amendments to the substitute? Dr. 
Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. Mr. Chairman, I strike the last word.
    Chairman Boehlert. The gentleman is recognized.
    Mr. Ehlers. I want to speak to the general issue. I will 
not be offering an amendment, but I certainly want to thank 
you, Mr. Chairman, for your work on this.
    As you know, I spent the better part of twenty years of my 
professional career working on this, and my entire 
Congressional career working on improving math and science 
education, and I deeply appreciate your efforts, and those of 
Dr. Schwarz, in putting this bill together, and presenting it 
to us. It is a big step forward, and certainly is in accord 
with the President's American Competitiveness Initiative, but 
not only that, it is good for the kids, and something that is 
very badly needed, and I just wanted to thank you and everyone 
else on this committee involved with that, and particularly, 
Dr. Schwarz, who has been--whom I served with in the Michigan 
Senate. He did yeoman work there. He is continuing to do yeoman 
work here, and I deeply appreciate your efforts.
    Thank you very much. I yield back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Boehlert. I thank the gentleman. Who seeks 
recognition? Mr. Costa.
    Mr. Costa. Yes, I move to strike the last word, Mr. 
Chairman. I don't have an amendment on the measure, but I do 
want to comment on the effort.
    I do concur with my colleagues, to commend you and their 
efforts, and our Ranking Member, to develop, and continue the 
bipartisan tradition, which I think is very important as 
legislators, to do the work that we are sent here to do.
    The problem that Congressman Schwarz and others are trying 
to address, I think, is laudable here. My own experiences in 
schools in the Central Valley of California is to take 
advantage of the funds that have been made available, and the 
desire to train science and math teachers fund that we 
obviously have to refocus our efforts on.
    Part of the problem, I think, has touched upon the point 
that you have raised as to the letter that you are going to 
provide to the appropriators, the authorization, very, I think, 
helpful in expanding and enhancing the efforts, but frankly, 
what we have found in our area of California is that the grants 
tend to be too small, and limited in number, in terms of 
getting to where it is most needed. And frankly, I applaud the 
fact that you are both going to send the letter to the 
appropriators. I am not so sure that frankly, the whole 
committee, or those who are in concurrence, should be signing a 
letter to the appropriators, because unless we are able to get 
this money where it is most needed, I am afraid that the effort 
that we would like to--the ultimate results we would like to 
see achieved will be lacking.
    So, I concur with measure. I intend to support it, but I do 
think that the goal really is to make sure that the 
appropriators understand the seriousness of the effort.
    I yield the balance of my time.
    Chairman Boehlert. I thank the gentleman for that.
    If there are no other amendments, the vote occurs on the 
amendment in the nature of a substitute. All in favor, say aye. 
Aye. The nos, no. The yeas have it, and the amendment is agreed 
to.
    Are there any other amendments? Hearing none, the vote is 
on the bill, H.R. 5358, the Science and Mathematics Education 
for Competitiveness Act, as amended. All those in favor, say 
aye. Aye. Opposed, no. In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes 
have it.
    I recognize Mr. Gordon to offer an amendment.
    Mr. Gordon. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee 
favorably report H.R. 5358, as amended, to the House, with the 
recommendation that the bill, as amended, do pass.
    Furthermore, I move that the staff be instructed to prepare 
the legislative report, and make necessary technical and 
conforming changes, that the Chairman take all necessary steps 
to bring the bill before the House for consideration.
    Chairman Boehlert. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill, as amended, favorably.
    Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye. 
Aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the bill is favorably 
reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table.
    Mr. Gordon. Mr. Chairman, may I note that this was--well, 
it wasn't unanimous, but it was all but one voted for this, so 
that as we talk to the appropriators, we could say----
    Mr. Rohrabacher. You could move to make it unanimous, and I 
wouldn't object.
    Mr. Gordon. Well, then, I will move to make this unanimous.
    Chairman Boehlert. All in favor, say aye. Aye. No, aye. The 
gentleman's motion has passed. The spirit of cooperation.
    I move that Members have two subsequent calendar days in 
which to submit supplemental, minority, or additional views on 
the measure. I move, pursuant to Clause 1 of Rule 22 of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives that the Committee 
authorize the Chairman to offer such motions as may be 
necessary in the House to adopt and pass H.R. 5358, the Science 
and Mathematics Education for Competitiveness Act, as amended. 
Without objection, so ordered.
    I want to thank all the Members for their attendance, not 
just today, but for their active participation in the important 
deliberations of this committee.
    This concludes our markup.
    [Whereupon, at 3:53 p.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


         H.R 5358, Section-by-Section Summary, Amendment Roster






                Section-by-Section Summary of H.R. 5358,
       Science and Mathematics Education for Competitiveness Act
SEC. 1.  SHORT TITLE

    ``Science and Mathematics Education for Competitiveness Act.''

SEC. 2.  FINDINGS

    Finds that the National Science Foundation has made significant and 
valuable contributions to the improvement of K-12 and undergraduate 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education and that it 
should continue to carry out education programs.

SEC. 3.  ROBERT NOYCE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

    Amends Section 10 of the National Science Foundation Authorization 
Act of 2002, which established the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship 
Program. Under the Noyce Program, the National Science Foundation (NSF) 
provides grants to institutions of higher education to encourage top 
science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) majors to 
become teachers. The grants are used both to develop programs to 
prepare students for teaching and to provide to students who commit to 
teach for two years at the elementary or secondary school level in 
return for each year of scholarship aid. H.R. 5358 amends the law by 
specifying some of the programs grantees must provide to prepare 
students for teaching, including providing field teaching experience, 
and by making those programs available to students beginning in their 
freshman year (even though the scholarships are still available only to 
juniors and seniors). Also amends the law to specify that both faculty 
from STEM departments and education faculty must be involved in the 
program. Also amends the law to increase the minimum scholarship from 
$7,500 per year to $10,000; to allow additional years of scholarship 
support for part-time students; to cap the post-graduation service 
requirement at four years; to extend stipend support for professionals 
in STEM fields returning to schools for a teaching degree to 16 months 
from one year to align the support with the length of a typical 
program; and to allow the Director to accept donations from the private 
sector to support scholarships, stipends, or internships associated 
with this program. Also amends the law to allow teaching service to 
occur in any local educational agency (rather than only in high-need 
areas), but to reduce the period of service obligation by one year for 
those scholarship recipients whose service is performed in a high-need 
local educational agency. Authorizes appropriations for the program of 
$50,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, 
$90,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, $110,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, 
and $130,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, and sets aside specific portions 
of those authorizations for the programmatic (as opposed to 
scholarship) portions of the Noyce Program.

SEC. 4.  SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY PARTNERSHIPS FOR SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 
EDUCATION

    Amends Section 9 of the National Science Foundation Authorization 
Act of 2002, to strengthen the Math and Science Partnerships program at 
NSF, which provides grants to institutions of higher education (or to 
eligible nonprofit organizations) to partner with local educational 
agencies to improve elementary and secondary mathematics and science 
instruction. Amends the law to clarify that faculty from STEM 
departments must be the lead participants from the institutions of 
higher education and clarify that education faculty may participate in 
the Partnerships. Amends the law to explicitly include as allowable 
activities developing model induction programs and conducting training 
to teach Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate science and 
mathematics courses. Also amends the law to explicitly allow teacher 
training activities to include the development and offering of Master's 
degree programs for in-service mathematics and science teachers that 
will strengthen their subject area knowledge and pedagogical skills. 
Amends the law to require the Director of NSF to give priority to 
applications that include teacher training activities as the main focus 
of the proposal and to establish that the grant size should be between 
$75,000 and $2,000,000 per year. Amends the law to require the 
Director, within a year of the enactment of the Act, to transmit a 
report to Congress on which completed Math and Science Partnerships 
projects should be seen as models to be replicated on a more expansive 
basis at the State or national levels, and, within four years, to 
transmit a report to Congress summarizing the evaluations each 
Partnership is required to conduct of its projects and describing any 
changes to the overall program recommended as a result of these 
evaluations. Authorizes appropriations for the program of $63,000,000 
for fiscal year 2007, $73,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, $83,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2009, $93,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, and $103,000,000 
for fiscal year 2011.

SEC. 5.  SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS TALENT 
EXPANSION PROGRAM

    Amends Section 8(7) of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002, which established at NSF the Science, 
Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program 
(STEP), which provides grants to institutions of higher education to 
improve undergraduate education. Amends the law to authorize NSF, as 
part of STEP, to award grants on a competitive, merit-reviewed basis to 
institutions of higher education to create Centers to improve 
undergraduate education through the development and dissemination of 
undergraduate curriculum and teaching methods, and the development and 
dissemination of training programs for faculty and graduate students 
who teach undergraduates. Requires that grants for Centers be made 
jointly through the NSF Education and Human Resources Directorate and 
at least one research directorate for periods up to five years, with 
two possible extensions of no more than three years each. Also requires 
the Director of NSF, within 180 days, to transmit to Congress a report 
on how the Director is determining whether current STEP grant 
recipients are making satisfactory progress toward targets they have 
set for increasing the number of STEM majors at their institutions and 
what actions the Director has taken to ensure that funding is continued 
only to those making satisfactory progress. Authorizes appropriations 
for STEP of $44,000,000 for fiscal year 2007, of which $4,000,000 shall 
be for the Centers authorized by this Act; $55,000,000 for fiscal year 
2008, of which $10,000,000 shall be for the Centers; $60,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 2009 through 2011, of which $10,000,000 each 
year shall be for the Centers.

SEC. 6.  INTEGRATIVE GRADUATE EDUCATION AND RESEARCH TRAINEESHIP 
PROGRAM

    Requires that the Director allocate at least 1.5 percent of funds 
appropriated for Research and Related Activities to the Integrative 
Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Program. Requires 
that the Director coordinate with federal agencies to expand the 
interdisciplinary nature of the program, and allows the Director to 
accept funds from those agencies to carry out the program. (The IGERT 
program awards grants to institutions of higher education to develop 
interdisciplinary graduate programs and to provide tuition and stipends 
for graduate students in those programs.)

SEC. 7.  CENTERS FOR RESEARCH ON LEARNING AND EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT

    Requires the Director to continue the program on Centers for 
Research on Learning and Education Improvement as established in 
section 11 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 
2002.

SEC. 8.  UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

    Requires the Director to continue to carry out programs in 
undergraduate education, including those authorized in section 17 of 
the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2002. Funding for 
these programs shall increase as funding for the National Science 
Foundation grows.

SEC. 9.  EVALUATION OF PROFESSIONAL SCIENCE MASTERS

    Requires the Director to arrange for an assessment of the impact of 
Professional Science Master's (PSM) degree programs at a variety of 
institutions. Requires that the report be submitted to Congress within 
three years of the enactment of this Act and include information on the 
interdisciplinary nature of the degree, the employment and salary 
prospects of degree recipients compared with those of traditional 
science Master's graduates, the extent to which PSM graduates continue 
their education, and the effectiveness of the degree at attracting 
populations traditionally under-represented in science, technology, 
engineering, and math fields. (Professional Science Masters programs 
consist of two years of training in an emerging or interdisciplinary 
technological area. Many include internships and training in business 
and communications.)

SEC. 10.  REPORT ON BROADER IMPACTS CRITERION

    Requires the Director of NSF to submit to Congress within one year 
of the enactment of this Act a report that evaluates the results of the 
use of the broader impacts criterion by NSF. (NSF grant proposals are 
evaluated for their ``intellectual merit'' and ``broader impact,'' 
which includes the benefits of the activity to society at large.) 
Requires the report to identify how NSF evaluates proposals based on 
the broader impacts criterion, to categorize the types of broader 
impacts enumerated by grant applicants, to include any evaluations 
performed by NSF of the implementation of broader impacts aspects of 
research proposals, to describe which overarching national goals the 
broader impacts criterion is best suited to promote, and to describe 
what steps NSF should take to use the broader impacts criterion to 
improve undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering education.

SEC. 11.  STUDY ON LABORATORY EQUIPMENT DONATIONS FOR SCHOOLS

    Requires the Director, within one year of the enactment of this 
Act, to transmit to Congress a report on the extent to which 
universities are donating used laboratory equipment to elementary and 
secondary schools and how appropriate donations can be encouraged.

SEC. 12.  ASSESSMENTS OF NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION EDUCATION PROGRAMS

    Requires the Director, in conducting assessments of NSF education 
programs, to use assessment methods that allow Foundation programs to 
be compared to education programs supported by other federal agencies.

SEC. 13.  EDUCATION PROGRAMS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Authorizes education programs at the Department of Energy, through 
the Office of Science, in fields related to the Office's mission, 
including activities such as offering scholarships or fellowships for 
study or research, research experiences for undergraduates, and summer 
institutes for improving teacher content knowledge in science and 
mathematics. Requires the Secretary of Energy to submit a report not 
later than one year after the enactment of this Act that includes an 
inventory of existing education programs at the Department and the 
civilian National Laboratories and requires independent evaluations of 
those programs to be conducted within four years of the enactment of 
this act. Requires the Department to include the results of evaluations 
of educational programs run by the civilian National Laboratories as a 
factor when setting performance and incentive fees for those National 
Laboratory management and operations contractors.

SEC. 14.  DEFINITIONS

    Defines ``Institution of Higher Education'' and ``National 
Laboratory'' for this Act.