H. Rept. 109-745 - 109th Congress (2005-2006)
January 02, 2007, As Reported by the Education and the Workforce Committee

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House Report 109-745 - REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES of the COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE During the 109TH CONGRESS




[House Report 109-745]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



109th Congress 
 2d Session             HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 Report
                                                                109-745
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                 Union Calendar No. 447



                        REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                       COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND

                             THE WORKFORCE

                               During the

                             109TH CONGRESS


<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>



January 2, 2007.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed


                COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE
                       One Hundred Ninth Congress

                                 ------                                
                  JOHN A. BOEHNER, Ohio, Chairman \2\
THOMAS E. PETRI, Wisconsin, Vice     GEORGE MILLER, California
    Chairman                         DALE E. KILDEE, Michigan
HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' McKEON,           MAJOR R. OWENS, New York
    California \3\                   DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
MICHAEL N. CASTLE, Delaware          ROBERT E. ANDREWS, New Jersey
SAM JOHNSON, Texas                   ROBERT C. SCOTT, Virginia
MARK E. SOUDER, Indiana \1\          LYNN C. WOOLSEY, California
CHARLIE NORWOOD, Georgia             RUBEN HINOJOSA, Texas
VERNON J. EHLERS, Michigan           CAROLYN McCARTHY, New York
JUDY BIGGERT, Illinois               JOHN F. TIERNEY, Massachusetts
TODD RUSSELL PLATTS, Pennsylvania    RON KIND, Wisconsin
PATRICK J. TIBERI, Ohio              DENNIS J. KUCINICH, Ohio
RIC KELLER, Florida                  DAVID WU, Oregon
TOM OSBORNE, Nebraska                RUSH D. HOLT, New Jersey
JOE WILSON, South Carolina           SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
JON C. PORTER, Nevada                BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota
JOHN KLINE, Minnesota                DANNY K. DAVIS, Illinois
MARILYN N. MUSGRAVE, Colorado        RAUL M. GRIJALVA, Arizona
BOB INGLIS, South Carolina           CHRIS VAN HOLLEN, Maryland
CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS, Washington   TIM RYAN, Ohio
KENNY MARCHANT, Texas                TIMOTHY H. BISHOP, New York
TOM PRICE, Georgia                   JOHN BARROW, Georgia \4\
LUIS G. FORTUNO, Puerto Rico
BOBBY JINDAL, Louisiana
CHARLES W. BOUSTANY, Jr., Louisiana
VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina
THELMA D. DRAKE, Virginia
JOHN R. ``RANDY'' KUHL, Jr., New 
    York
SHELLEY SEKULA GIBBS, Texas \5\
                    Paula Nowakowski, Staff Director
                (during Chairmanship of John A. Boehner)
                       Vic Klatt, Staff Director
           (during Chairmanship of Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon)

----------
\1\ Appointed February 2, 2005.
\2\ Resigned as Chairman February 8, 2006.
\3\ Appointed as Chairman February 16, 2006.
\4\ Resigned February 28, 2006.
\5\ Appointed November 15, 2006.


                         STANDING SUBCOMMITTEES

                                 ------                                

              Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness

          HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' McKEON, California, Chairman \1\
JON C. PORTER,Nevada, Vice Chairman  DALE E. KILDEE, Michigan
JOHN A. BOEHNER, Ohio \2\            DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
THOMAS E. PETRI, Wisconsin           CAROLYN McCARTHY, New York
MICHAEL N. CASTLE, Delaware          JOHN F. TIERNEY, Massachusetts
SAM JOHNSON, Texas                   RON KIND, Wisconsin
VERNON J. EHLERS, Michigan           DAVID WU, Oregon
PATRICK J. TIBERI, Ohio              RUSH D. HOLT, New Jersey
RIC KELLER, Florida \3\              BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota
TOM OSBORNE, Nebraska                CHRIS VAN HOLLEN, Maryland
BOB INGLIS, South Carolina           TIM RYAN, Ohio
CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS, Washington   ROBERT C. SCOTT, Virginia
TOM PRICE, Georgia                   SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
LUIS G. FORTUNO, Puerto Rico         TIMOTHY H. BISHOP, New York
CHARLES W. BOUSTANY, Lousiana        JOHN BARROW, Georgia \4\
VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina        MAJOR OWENS, New York
THELMA D. DRAKE, Virginia            GEORGE MILLER, California, ex 
JOHN R. ``RANDY'' KUHL, New York         officio
                                 ------                                

                    Subcommittee on Education Reform

                 MICHAEL N. CASTLE, Delaware, Chairman
TOM OSBORNE, Nebraska, Vice          LYNN C. WOOLSEY, California
    Chairman                         DANNY K. DAVIS, Illinois
MARK E. SOUDER, Indiana              RAUL M. GRIJALVA, Arizona
VERNON J. EHLERS, Michigan           ROBERT E. ANDREWS, New Jersey
JUDY BIGGERT, Illinois               ROBERT C. SCOTT, Virginia
TODD RUSSELL PLATTS, Pennsylvania    RUBEN HINOJOSA, Texas
RIC KELLER, Florida                  RON KIND, Wisconsin
JOE WILSON, South Carolina           DENNIS J. KUCINICH, Ohio
MARILYN N. MUSGRAVE, Colorado        SUSAN A. DAVIS, California
BOBBY JINDAL, Lousiana               GEORGE MILLER, California, ex 
JOHN R. ``RANDY'' KUHL, New York         officio
HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' McKEON, 
    California,
  ex officio
                                 ------                                

              Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations

                      SAM JOHNSON, Texas, Chairman
JOHN KLINE, Minnesota, Vice          ROBERT E. ANDREWS, New Jersey
    Chairman                         DALE E. KILDEE, Michigan
JOHN A. BOEHNER, Ohio \2\            DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' McKEON,           CAROLYN McCARTHY, New York
    California                       JOHN F. TIERNEY, Massachusetts
TODD RUSSELL PLATTS, Pennsylvania    DAVID WU, Oregon
PATRICK J. TIBERI, Ohio              RUSH D. HOLT, New Jersey
JOE WILSON, South Carolina           BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota
MARILYN N. MUSGRAVE, Colorado        RAUL M. GRIJALVA, Arizona
KENNY MARCHANT, Texas                GEORGE MILLER, California, ex 
BOBBY JINDAL, Louisiana                  officio
CHARLES W. BOUSTANY, Louisiana
VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina
                                 ------                                

                 Subcommittee on Workforce Protections

                   CHARLIE NORWOOD, Georgia, Chairman
JUDY BIGGERT, Illinois, Vice         MAJOR OWENS, New York
    Chairman                         DENNIS J. KUCINICH, Ohio
RIC KELLER, Florida                  LYNN C. WOOLSEY, California
JOHN KLINE, Minnesota                TIMOTHY H. BISHOP, New York
KENNY MARCHANT, Texas                JOHN BARROW, Georgia \4\
TOM PRICE, Georgia                   GEORGE MILLER, California, ex 
THELMA D. DRAKE, Virginia                officio
HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' McKEON, 
    California,
  ex officio
                                 ------                                

                    Subcommittee on Select Education

                   PATRICK J. TIBERI, Ohio, Chairman
CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS, Washington,  RUBEN HINOJOSA, Texas
  Vice Chairman                      DANNY K. DAVIS, Illinois
MARK E. SOUDER, Indiana              CHRIS VAN HOLLEN, Maryland
JON C. PORTER, Nevada                TIM RYAN, Ohio
BOB INGLIS, South Carolina           GEORGE MILLER, California, ex 
LUIS G. FORTUNO, Puerto Rico             officio
HOWARD P. ``BUCK'' McKEON, 
    California, ex officio

----------
\1\ Appointed as Chairman of the Full Committee on February 16, 2006.
\2\ Resigned February 8, 2006.
\3\ Appointed as Chairman of the Subcommittee on 21st Century 
Competitiveness March 1, 2006.
\4\ Resigned February 28, 2006.
                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                  Committee on Education and the Workforce,
                                   Washington, DC, January 2, 2007.
Hon. Karen L. Haas,
Clerk of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Haas: Pursuant to Rule XI, clause 1, paragraph (d) 
of the Rules of the U.S. House of Representatives, I am hereby 
transmitting the Activities Report of the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce for the 109th Congress. I 
circulated this report to all members of the Committee on 
December 21, 2006 and received no views before transmitting 
this report to the House today.
    This report summarizes the activities of the Committee and 
its subcommittees with respect to its legislative and oversight 
responsibilities.
            Sincerely,
                                 Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon,
                                                          Chairman.
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Introduction.....................................................    IX
1I. Summary of Activities..............................................
1A. Full Committee Accomplishments: Education Policy...................
1B. Full Committee Accomplishments: Workforce Policy...................
6C. Oversight Plan and Activities......................................
10II. Hearings Held by the Full Committee..............................
13III. Markups Held by the Full Committee..............................
14IV. Legislative Activities...........................................
15A. Legislation Enacted Into Law (Bills Referred to Committee)........
15B. Legislation Enacted Into Law (Bills Not Referred to Committee)....
18C. Legislation Passed the House (Bills Referred to Committee)........
20D. Legislation Passed the House in Another Measure...................
25E. Legislation Passed the House (Bills Not Referred to Committee)....
26F. Legislation With Filed Committee Reports..........................
28G. Legislation Ordered Reported From Full Committee..................
29H. Conference Reports Filed With Education and the Workforce Members 
        Appointed as Conferees.........................................
    30I. Conferences With Education and Workforce Members Appointed as 
        Conferees......................................................
30V. Committee on Education and the Workforce Statistics...............
31A. General Statistics on Referred Matters............................
31B. Not Referred Matters Containing Committee's Jurisdiction..........
                                                                     31
31I. Summary of Activities.............................................
31II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations.
36III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations.
37IV. Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations Statistics...........
                                                                     37
37I. Summary of Activities.............................................
37II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections.......
39III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections.......
39IV. Subcommittee on Workforce Protections Statistics.................
                                                                     39
40I. Summary of Activities.............................................
40II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness
43III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness
44IV. Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness Statistics..........
                                                                     44
44I. Summary of Activities.............................................
44II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Education Reform............
46III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Education Reform............
46IV. Subcommittee on Education Reform Statistics......................
                                                                     46
46I. Summary of Activities.............................................
46II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Select Education............
49III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Select Education............
50IV. Subcommittee on Select Education Statistics......................
                                                                     50
                              INTRODUCTION

    The Committee on Education and the Workforce, under the 
leadership of Chairmen John Boehner (R-OH) and Howard P. 
``Buck'' McKeon (R-CA)--who became full committee chair in 
February 2006 when Rep. Boehner became House Majority Leader, 
worked tirelessly with President George W. Bush during the 
109th Congress to maximize security and prosperity for American 
families in a changing economy.
    The Committee and its five subcommittees oversee education 
and workforce programs that affect and support hundreds of 
millions of Americans, from school teachers and small business 
operators to students and retirees. In a changing economy 
increasingly driven by technology, competition, and knowledge, 
the Education and the Workforce Committee worked during 2005 
and 2006 to build on vital reforms set in motion by President 
Bush during the previous Congress--pressing for constant 
improvement in education; modernization of outdated federal 
rules that stifle freedom and innovation; and secure access to 
health care, retirement security, and training for American 
workers.
    During the 109th Congress--working with President Bush, his 
administration, and other Members of the House--the Education 
and the Workforce Committee:
          
 Gave college students access to more 
        financial aid. To better reflect current student need, 
        Congress increased Stafford loan limits for first- and 
        second-year college students. These limits, last 
        adjusted in 1986 and 1992, respectively, are now set at 
        $3,500 for first-year students and $4,500 for second-
        year students. Congress also slashed--from as much as 
        four percent to one percent--loan fees so students can 
        keep more of what they borrow.
          
 Established new grant aid for low- and 
        middle-income college students. Congress established 
        Academic Competitiveness Grants to reward low-income, 
        high achieving high school students heading into 
        college. Congress also established SMART Grants to 
        reward low-income, high achieving students pursuing 
        degrees in math, science, and critical foreign 
        languages in their third and fourth years in college.
          
 Provided relief to students impacted by the 
        Gulf Coast hurricanes. Congress delivered significant 
        relief to rebuild the educational systems damaged as a 
        result of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as to 
        assist the schools that have enrolled displaced 
        students in the aftermath of the storms. Congressional 
        action provided funds to help damaged schools re-open; 
        reimbursed public, private, and charter schools that 
        have enrolled displaced students; and provided 
        assistance to colleges and universities in the damaged 
        region and those higher education institutions 
        enrolling displaced students.
          
 Continued a commitment to federal education 
        resources. Congress again committed unprecedented 
        levels of federal education dollars. In 2006, states 
        and local school districts received $23.3 billion in 
        federal funds to help implement the No Child Left 
        Behind Act (NCLB)--a one-third increase in funding 
        since President Bush signed NCLB into law. Title I aid 
        for disadvantaged students, the cornerstone of NCLB, 
        has increased forty-five percent since NCLB was signed 
        into law. For higher education, the commitment is just 
        as strong, providing some $90 billion in federal 
        resources provided to students in 2006--nearly triple 
        what it was just a decade ago. Included is an annual 
        $13 billion congressional commitment for low- and 
        middle-income students receiving Pell Grants.
          
 Made ``529'' college savings plans 
        permanent. Congress extended the features of highly-
        popular college savings plans--commonly referred to as 
        ``529 plans''--which had been set to expire in 2010. 
        These 529 college savings plans allow parents to invest 
        after-tax dollars in state-sponsored funds, and 
        earnings on the investment are free from federal taxes, 
        as are distributions when used to help pay for college.
          
 Repealed the ``single holder rule'' to 
        reduce student loan payments. Congress has repealed a 
        federal rule--known as the ``single-holder rule''--that 
        limited a consumer's ability to shop for the best deal 
        on student consolidation loans. As a result of the 
        repeal, borrowers will now have the ability to shop 
        around among lenders for the best terms and services, 
        while ensuring the original holder of their loans can 
        and must compete to retain the loan.
          
 Strengthened career and technical education 
        programs. Congress reauthorized the highly popular 
        Perkins Career and Technical Education program. The 
        renewal of the Perkins Act, which serves secondary and 
        postsecondary students, will help states better utilize 
        federal funds for secondary and postsecondary 
        vocational education programs; increase accountability 
        and emphasize student achievement; and strengthen 
        opportunities for coordination between secondary and 
        postsecondary career and technical education.
          
 Permanently expanded student loan relief for 
        high demand teachers. Building on efforts in recent 
        years to help schools recruit and retain highly 
        qualified teachers in key subjects, Congress has more 
        than tripled--from $5,000 to $17,500--the maximum 
        amount of loan relief for highly qualified math, 
        science, and special education teachers who commit to 
        teaching in high-need K-12 schools for five years.
          
 Demonstrated a continued commitment to high 
        student achievement. Nearly four years after the No 
        Child Left Behind Act became law, achievement gaps 
        between disadvantaged students and their peers are 
        narrowing and student achievement is at its highest 
        level in decades. However, some opponents of reform 
        still seek to weaken the law. To lay the foundation to 
        NCLB's reauthorization in 2007 and demonstrate a 
        commitment to the law's principles, the House Education 
        and the Workforce Committee has launched a new series 
        of hearings to study key aspects of NCLB. These 
        hearings have examined the successes and challenges of 
        the law's implementation in urban and suburban 
        districts; ways to increase awareness of key parental 
        choice options; and the impact of the law on students 
        with disabilities and limited English proficient 
        students.
          
 Exposed Senate Democrat attempts to provide 
        in-state tuition to illegals. The House Education and 
        the Workforce Committee held a hearing that examined--
        and exposed--a troubling provision in the Senate 
        Democrat immigration bill that would allow states to 
        provide in-state college tuition to illegal immigrants. 
        The Senate legislation--called ``misguided'' and 
        ``shockingly bad policy'' by witnesses during the 
        hearing--would repeal a 1996 law that prohibits states 
        from providing in-state tuition rates to illegal aliens 
        unless the state also offers the same benefit to all 
        U.S. citizens.
          
 Required that employers fully fund worker 
        pension plans. The 109th Congress enacted the most 
        significant reforms to worker pension laws in a 
        generation. Yesterday's outdated pension rules no 
        longer served the interests of today's workers who 
        count on their retirement savings being there for them 
        when they need it. Included in the reform law are 
        requirements that employers make more cash 
        contributions to their worker pension funds as well as 
        measures to close loopholes that allow underfunded 
        plans to skip pension payments.
          
 Protected America's miners. Though the 
        number of mining fatalities and injuries reached record 
        lows in 2005, tragedies at the Sago Mine in West 
        Virginia and others that followed in 2006 served to 
        bring the issue of mine health and safety into sharper 
        focus. The 109th Congress passed the first 
        comprehensive overhaul of mine safety laws in nearly a 
        generation, providing for better communications 
        technology; modernized safety practices inside U.S. 
        mines; and strengthening the enforcement of current 
        mine safety laws.
          
 Encouraged more savings in 401(k) retirement 
        plans. Studies show that many employees who have access 
        to employer-provided pension plans never enroll, and 
        their retirement savings suffer as a result. Congress 
        took steps to encourage employers to automatically 
        enroll workers in defined contribution pension plans, 
        such as the highly-popular 401(k) retirement plans. At 
        the same time, workers will retain the option to opt-
        out of the plans.
          
 Gave workers access to independent 
        retirement investment advice. Now more than ever, rank-
        and-file workers need access to high quality investment 
        advice to help steer them through today's maze of 
        investment options in their defined contribution 
        401(k)s. To respond, Congress updated a flawed law that 
        prohibited employers from providing rank-and-file 
        workers with access to a qualified, independent 
        investment adviser. At the same time, tough new 
        fiduciary and disclosure safeguards were established to 
        ensure that advice provided to employees is solely in 
        their best interests.
          
 Made permanent the ``Savers' Credit.'' 
        Facing a potential expiration at the end of 2006, 
        Congress permanently extended the retirement security-
        friendly ``Savers' Credit.'' This credit allows 
        eligible workers who make contributions to an 
        individual retirement account (IRA) or qualified 
        pension plan to receive a federal ``match'' in the form 
        of an income tax credit for the first $2,000 of annual 
        contributions, further bolstering retirement savings.
          
 Restricted anti-worker ``golden parachute'' 
        executive compensation agreements. Congress took the 
        unprecedented step of restricting an increasingly 
        common practice in which executives of companies in 
        financial difficulty were given lavish deferred 
        compensation arrangements--commonly called ``golden 
        parachutes''--while the retirement security of rank-
        and-file workers remained at risk.
          
 Provided legal certainty for fast-growing 
        hybrid cash balance plans. Hybrid retirement plans, 
        such as increasingly popular cash balance plans, 
        combine the best features of both defined benefit and 
        defined contribution plans. Despite overwhelming 
        evidence demonstrating the benefits of hybrid plans, 
        the threat of liability for years created ongoing legal 
        uncertainty and undermined the retirement security of 
        American workers who rely on them. Congress took steps 
        to resolve the legal uncertainty surrounding cash 
        balance plans to ensure they remain a viable part of 
        the defined benefit system, while prohibiting employers 
        from reducing or cutting any vested benefits workers 
        have earned.
          
 Empowered workers and retirees with more 
        information about their pensions. Enron, WorldCom, and 
        other corporate implosions led many workers and 
        retirees to mistakenly believe their pension plans were 
        well funded, only to receive a shock when the plan was 
        terminated. Congress has required that workers and 
        retirees are given timely, accurate, and 
        straightforward information about the health of their 
        plans and, thus, their own financial future. Learning 
        lessons from the Enron-era scandals, Congress also took 
        steps to prohibit companies from forcing workers to 
        invest any of their own retirement savings in the stock 
        of the employer.
          
 Enhanced health services for our nation's 
        seniors. The Older Americans Act has transformed into 
        the first stop for seniors to identify home- and 
        community-based long-term care options, as well as 
        other supportive services that can help prevent or 
        delay expensive institutional care and generate 
        significant savings in federal entitlement programs. 
        Congress reauthorized the Older Americans Act in the 
        109th Congress to build on that progress by promoting 
        measures that reduce seniors' risk of injury, disease, 
        or disability; improving access to health care by 
        supporting resource centers in every community where 
        older Americans and their families can go for reliable 
        information about long-term care options, community 
        support services, and important health benefits such as 
        Medicare prescription drug coverage; and encouraging 
        states and communities to plan for an increasing number 
        of older Americans.
          
 Exposed Senate Democrat attempts to expand a 
        controversial federal mandate. The House Education and 
        the Workforce Committee held a hearing that examined--
        and exposed--a troubling provision in the Senate 
        Democrat immigration bill that would expand a federal 
        construction program mandate (under the controversial 
        Depression-era Davis-Bacon Act) to private sector 
        projects--including those led by small businesses--as 
        part of a new guest worker program. This expanded 
        mandate would force employers to pay foreign guest 
        workers more than American workers doing the same job 
        in the same city.


                                                 Union Calendar No. 447
109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-745

======================================================================



 
    REPORT ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION AND THE 
                               WORKFORCE

                                _______
                                

January 2, 2007.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. McKeon, from the Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             FULL COMMITTEE


                        I. Summary of Activities


          A. FULL COMMITTEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS: EDUCATION POLICY

    House Education and the Workforce Committee members devoted 
great energy and attention during the 109th Congress to the 
needs of American students and their parents. The 109th 
Congress saw action on several major education priorities, with 
Committee Republicans continuing to demand accountability in 
exchange for the significant federal investment in education. 
These include:
    Expanding College Access for Low- and Middle-Income 
Students. Republicans moved forward with a comprehensive 
overhaul of the Higher Education Act to reform and strengthen 
federal student aid and higher education programs, adding new 
benefits for student loan borrowers, greater accountability to 
empower consumers, and stronger protections for American 
taxpayers. The bill, the College Access and Opportunity Act 
(H.R. 609), refocused the law back to its original mission by 
expanding college access for low- and middle-income students. 
H.R. 609, authored by House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH) 
and Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman Howard P. 
``Buck'' McKeon (R-CA), was approved by the House on March 30, 
2006. Student loan reforms were also included in the Deficit 
Reduction Act (S. 1932), signed into law in February 2006, as 
part of Republican efforts to rein in out-of-control federal 
spending and demand greater efficiency and effectiveness from 
federal programs. The student loan reforms included in the 
College Access and Opportunity Act and Deficit Reduction Act 
provide strong protections for students and taxpayers alike.
    Examining Border Security and Immigration Enforcement on 
Behalf of U.S. Students. As Congress worked to send President 
Bush illegal immigration legislation that secures our borders 
and strengthens enforcement of immigration law, the Education 
and the Workforce Committee conducted a series of hearings 
examining the issue's impact on American students and workers. 
Specific to education, the Committee examined a troubling 
provision in the Senate Democrat immigration bill that would 
allow states to provide in-state college tuition to illegal 
immigrants. Moreover, the Committee heard varying perspectives 
on the topic of English as the official language. Some argued 
that a Senate Democrat bill would actually undermine, rather 
than promote, the use of the English language. That bill 
reaffirmed a Clinton-era executive order that allows illegals 
to request communication with the federal government in any 
language--and at taxpayer expense.
    Extending the Features of ``529'' College Savings Plans. 
Signed into law by President Bush on August 17, 2006, the 
Pension Protection Act (H.R. 4) represents the most 
comprehensive overhaul of traditional pension laws in more than 
a generation. In addition to its countless retirement security 
benefits, the new law also represents a significant victory on 
other fronts as well. Chief among them is the extension of 
features of college savings plans--commonly referred to as 
``529 plans''--which had been set to expire in 2010. College 
529 plans allow parents to invest after-tax dollars in state-
sponsored funds, and earnings on the investment are free from 
federal taxes, as are distributions when used to help pay for 
college. The Pension Protection Act preserves tax-free 
withdrawals from 529 plans and also allows parents to continue 
rolling over their college savings to a different state plan 
once a year without requiring a change in beneficiary. 
Moreover, the law extends parents options to invest in both a 
529 plan and a separate Coverdell Education Savings Account for 
the same beneficiary in the same year.
    Providing Relief to Students and Schools Impacted by the 
Gulf Coast Hurricanes. Committee Republicans offered 
significant assistance and relief to help the educational 
systems damaged as a result of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as 
well as to assist the schools that have enrolled displaced 
students in the aftermath of the storms. On December 19, 2005, 
the House approved the FY 2006 Department of Defense 
appropriations bill, which included significant hurricane 
education relief. The bill provided funds to help damaged 
schools reopen; reimbursed public, private, and charter schools 
that have enrolled displaced students; and provided assistance 
to colleges and universities in the damaged region and those 
higher education institutions enrolling displaced students. 
This relief effort was built upon by 2006 Republican 
initiatives providing even more flexibility on behalf of 
students, families, and schools.
    Continuing a Commitment to Education Resources for Reform. 
Central to congressional efforts on education has been the 
fundamental concept of reform--a principle that has been at the 
core of education-related legislation passed over the past 
several years, from education for students with disabilities to 
the landmark No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Coupled with 
these significant reform efforts has been an unprecedented 
commitment to provide more resources for education as well. For 
example, in Fiscal Year 2006, states and local school districts 
will receive $23.3 billion in federal funds this year to help 
implement NCLB. That is a one-third increase in federal 
elementary and secondary education funding since President Bush 
signed NCLB into law. Moreover, Title I aid for disadvantaged 
students, the cornerstone of NCLB, has increased forty-five 
percent since NCLB was signed into law. For higher education, 
the commitment is just as strong, with some $90 billion in 
federal resources heading to students this year alone. That's 
nearly triple what it was just a decade ago. Within that $90 
billion is a record $13 billion for Pell Grants for low- and 
middle-income students.
    Strengthening the Head Start Early Childhood Education 
Program. Republicans have expressed outrage over reports of 
financial abuse and mismanagement within the Head Start early 
childhood program, responding with decisive action to correct 
weaknesses in the program that have allowed abuse of taxpayer 
resources, and have not served disadvantaged children well. On 
September 22, 2005, the U.S. House of Representatives approved 
the School Readiness Act (H.R. 2123), a bill authored by 
Education Reform Subcommittee Chairman Mike Castle (R-DE), to 
introduce greater competition into the federal Head Start early 
childhood program and use it to strengthen school readiness; 
increase the role of states and local communities in Head 
Start; and protect children and taxpayers against the abuse and 
mismanagement of federal Head Start funds. The bill aimed to 
strengthen the academic components of Head Start to help ensure 
disadvantaged children are prepared to succeed in school.
    Updating and Improving Career and Technical Education. 
Continuing efforts to promote student achievement, President 
Bush signed legislation in August to add new reforms to the 
Perkins Career and Technical Education program, which serves 
secondary and postsecondary students, by increasing the focus 
on academic achievement and working to ease the transition from 
high school to postsecondary opportunities. Led by Education 
Reform Subcommittee Chairman Mike Castle (R-DE), Congress sent 
President Bush the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Improvement Act, which strengthens the Perkins 
program by helping states better utilize federal funds for 
secondary and postsecondary vocational education programs; 
increasing accountability and emphasizing student achievement; 
and strengthening opportunities for coordination between 
secondary and postsecondary career and technical education.
    Laying the Foundation for Renewing the No Child Left Behind 
Act. On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed the No Child 
Left Behind Act (NCLB) into law and ushered in a new era of 
accountability and achievement in America's schools. Nearly 
four years later, the success of the law and its emphasis on 
accountability are unmistakable; achievement gaps between 
disadvantaged students and their peers are narrowing, and 
student achievement is at its highest level in decades. In 
2006, the Education and the Workforce Committee launched a new 
series of hearings to study key aspects of the reform law and 
lay the foundation for the 2007 reauthorization of NCLB. These 
bipartisan hearings have examined the successes and challenges 
of the law's implementation in urban and suburban districts; 
ways to increase parental awareness of supplemental educational 
services and other parental choice options; the potential 
impact of incorporating growth models into NCLB's 
accountability demands; and the impact of the law on students 
with disabilities and limited English proficient students.
    Repealing the ``Single Holder Rule.'' In June 2006, 
Congress repealed a federal rule that limited consumers' 
ability to shop for the best deal on student consolidation 
loans. As a result of the repeal, borrowers will now have the 
ability to shop around with other lenders for the best terms 
and services, while ensuring the original holder of their loans 
can and must compete to retain the loan.
    Fighting Waste, Fraud, and Abuse in Federal Poverty 
Programs. The Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) program 
provides federal grants to states to help alleviate the effects 
of poverty. CSBG funds may be used for anti-poverty efforts 
such as helping individuals and families to find and retain 
employment, obtain housing, and access emergency food services. 
In the 109th Congress, Republicans worked to build upon 
improvements made during the last authorization of CSBG to 
promote increased quality and accountability in the community-
based anti-poverty programs. Republicans also have investigated 
potential mismanagement in these federal poverty programs. 
Former Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman and House 
Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH), Education Reform 
Subcommittee Chairman Mike Castle (R-DE), and subcommittee 
Vice-Chairman Tom Osborne (R-NE) in 2005 asked the independent 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) to look into the 
financial oversight structure of the CSBG program. The GAO 
report--delivered to the Committee in July 2006--confirms 
concerns about the effectiveness of that oversight structure 
and the possibility that fraud, abuse, or mismanagement could 
occur due to weaknesses in financial controls and program 
management, similar to documented mismanagement in local 
delivery of Head Start services.
    Expanding Options for Children Trapped in Underperforming 
Schools. The No Child Left Behind Act has provided parents with 
more options than ever before regarding their children's 
education. The law allows children attending underachieving 
schools to seek supplemental education services--such as after-
school tutoring--to assist them in making progress in the 
classroom. Some students may even have the opportunity to 
choose to attend a new public school as a result of No Child 
Left Behind's parental choice reforms. With substantial 
momentum on the side of parental choice advocates, in July 
2006, Committee Republicans--led by Rep. Sam Johnson (R-TX)--
introduced the America's Opportunity Scholarships for Kids Act 
to provide scholarships of up to $4,000 to low-income children 
in persistently underperforming schools to attend the private 
school of their choice. States, school districts, and non-
profit organizations would also be authorized to provide up to 
$3,000 to low-income students for intensive, sustained 
supplemental educational services if students don't want to 
attend a different school. This would include high-quality 
tutoring, after-school or summer school programs designed to 
help improve the student's academic achievement.
    Maintaining the Momentum of the D.C. Opportunity 
Scholarships Program. In 2004, Congress established the 
nation's first ever federally funded K-12 scholarship program, 
the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program. This program provides 
low-income students and families access to up to $7,500 to 
cover tuition, fees, and any transportation expenses at a 
private elementary or high school in Washington. Written by 
Congress, signed by a Republican President, and embraced by a 
Democrat mayor of the District of Columbia, this school choice 
program is making a real difference for about 1,800 students 
this year. But for some, in the 2006-2007 school year, their 
participation was placed at risk if Congress did not act. Due 
to very small increases in income or changes in family 
structure, some participating families found themselves 
ineligible for the scholarships they received for the program's 
initial two years. As part of broad tax legislation, Congress 
increased the income eligibility threshold for renewing 
scholarship families that entered the program in its first two 
academic years from 200 percent to 300 percent of the federal 
poverty level, allowing participating students to remain 
eligible to attend the schools that they have called home for 
two years.
    Supporting Quality Teachers, Increasing Loan Forgiveness, 
and Providing Recognition Pay. The No Child Left Behind Act 
calls for a highly qualified teacher in every public school 
classroom. To help meet that goal, Republicans proposed 
innovative ideas to support quality teachers, strengthen 
teacher training, and reward teacher performance. Congress 
continues to provide significant support for teacher quality 
enhancement under NCLB. In addition, through reauthorization of 
the Higher Education Act, Republicans: strengthened teacher 
training programs, providing a permanent increase in loan 
forgiveness to $17,500 for math, science, and special education 
teachers, as well as reading specialists, who teach in 
disadvantaged schools for five years; and established pay-for-
performance systems that will provide recognition pay to 
teachers and principals who demonstrate success in improving 
student achievement.
    Examining Educational Solutions to Address the Nation's 
Nursing Shortage. In 2005, Republicans sought to examine the 
broad range of factors contributing to a national nursing 
shortage, including how a lack of higher education faculty in 
the nursing field may be contributing to the problem. The 
Select Education Subcommittee held two field hearings, in 
Colorado and Nevada, two states facing severe nursing 
shortages, to explore strategies to increase the number of 
nursing faculty in order to eliminate the bottleneck in nursing 
education. Republicans also worked to address educational cost 
factors that contribute to the nursing shortage, making nurses 
eligible for up to $5,000 in student loan forgiveness for 
individuals in professions considered to be areas of national 
need.
    Preserving Native American languages. Within existing 
programs, Congress passed legislation in 2006--the Esther 
Martinez Native American Languages Preservation Act (H.R. 
4766)--to empower Native American tribes, organizations, 
colleges, and governing bodies as they seek to preserve Native 
languages and cultures. In many Native American communities, 
Native languages are disappearing at an alarming rate. It is 
estimated that only 20 indigenous languages will remain viable 
by the year 2050. The link between education, language, and 
culture is considered by many as paramount to preserving the 
identity of Native Americans. By encouraging a greater focus on 
Native language programs, Congress also has encouraged greater 
academic performance among Native American students.

          B. FULL COMMITTEE ACCOMPLISHMENTS: WORKFORCE POLICY

    In the 109th Congress, the House Education and the 
Workforce Committee continually worked to enhance security and 
opportunity for working families in the growing U.S. economy. 
From reforming the nation's outdated worker pension laws to 
strengthening job training opportunities for American workers, 
and from expanding access to health care to improving workplace 
safety, Committee Republicans continued to offer innovative 
solutions on behalf of American families. These include:
    Reforming and Strengthening America's Outdated Pension 
Laws. Financial troubles and pension terminations at several 
corporations underscored the need for fundamental reform of 
yesterday's outdated pension laws, and Congress acted. When 
worker pension plans are terminated as a result of yesterday's 
outdated laws and the financial burden is placed on the federal 
government, workers and taxpayers both stand to lose. 
Comprehensive reform of the American pension system was 
essential to ensure that millions of hard-working Americans who 
rely on these pension benefits can continue to count on them. 
Without comprehensive reform, more companies would have 
defaulted on their worker pension plans--increasing the 
likelihood of a multi-billion dollar taxpayer bailout--and more 
companies would have stopped providing defined benefit pension 
plans to their workers entirely.
    For years, the House Education and the Workforce Committee 
worked to fix outdated worker pension laws that present a 
danger to taxpayers, workers, and retirees. Comprehensive 
legislation passed by Congress and signed by President Bush 
includes tough new funding requirements to ensure employers 
adequately and consistently fund their pensions, gives workers 
meaningful information about the financial status of their 
benefits, and protects taxpayers from a possible multi-billion 
dollar bailout of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation 
(PBGC).
    Protecting America's Miners. Though the number of mining 
fatalities and injuries reached record lows in 2005, the 
tragedies at the Sago Mine in West Virginia and the others that 
followed in 2006 have served to bring the issue of mine health 
and safety into a sharper focus. Throughout 2006, the House 
Education and the Workforce Committee--led by Chairman Howard 
P. ``Buck'' McKeon (R-CA) and Workforce Protections 
Subcommittee Chairman Charlie Norwood (R-GA)--held a 
comprehensive series of hearings and briefings on mine safety. 
The Committee's oversight activities pointed toward a very 
clear need for better communications technology, modernized 
safety practices inside U.S. mines, and strengthening the 
enforcement of current mine safety laws--needs addressed 
comprehensively by the Mine Improvement and New Emergency 
Response (MINER) Act, which was passed in May 2006 by the 
Senate without opposition and introduced separately in the 
House by Rep. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) that same month. 
Following Senate passage of the MINER Act (S. 2803), Chairman 
McKeon struck a deal with Norwood, Capito, Rep. Harold Rogers 
(R-KY), members of the West Virginia and Kentucky delegations, 
and the House leadership to bring to the House floor the 
Senate-passed measure under an expedited process. The House 
overwhelmingly passed the bill and sent it to President Bush, 
who signed it into law.
    Examining Border Security and Immigration Enforcement on 
Behalf of U.S. Workers. As Congress worked to send President 
Bush legislation that secures the borders and strengthens 
enforcement of immigration law, the Education and the Workforce 
Committee launched a series of hearings to examine the issue's 
impact on American students and workers. Specific to the 
workforce, the Committee examined a troubling provision in the 
Senate Democrat immigration bill that would force employers to 
pay foreign guest workers more than American workers doing the 
same job in the same city. The Committee also studied the 
inherent need for reform in existing U.S. guest worker 
programs, as well as the need for a stronger, more workable 
employee verification system.
    Strengthening Job Training for American Workers. Committee 
Republicans agree with Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan 
Greenspan, who once testified before the Education and the 
Workforce Committee that strengthening worker training and 
education programs is critical to putting Americans back to 
work and creating high-wage American jobs. Through the 
Workforce Investment Act (WIA) system created in 1998, job 
seekers have access to job training services, counseling, and 
labor market information to help them get back on their feet. 
While the 1998 reforms have improved the overall job training 
system, areas of inefficiency and duplication remain.
    On March 2, 2005 the House approved the Job Training 
Improvement Act (H.R. 27), legislation sponsored by Committee 
Chairman Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon (R-CA) that would help job 
seekers access the resources and training they need to find 
good jobs. The bill would strengthen opportunities for 
Americans looking for work or looking to develop new skills to 
acquire better-paying jobs and streamline government 
bureaucracy in job training services. The bill also would 
protect the rights of faith-based service providers willing to 
participate in the job training system. Additionally, the bill 
incorporated stand-alone legislation, the Worker Reemployment 
Accounts Act (H.R. 26), introduced by Rep. Jon Porter (R-NV). 
Similar to a pilot project proposed by President Bush, the 
measure allows demonstration and pilot project funding under 
the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) to be used by states and 
local workforce investment boards to offer personal 
reemployment accounts (PRAs) of up to $3,000 to help unemployed 
Americans return to work quickly. With the funds from these 
accounts, unemployed workers may purchase a variety of 
employment-related services (such as job training, child care, 
transportation, career counseling, relocation services, and 
case management) to help them find a new job and reenter the 
workforce.
    Building on the Unprecedented Successes of the 1996 Welfare 
Reforms. One of the most successful social policies ever 
enacted, the 1996 welfare reforms have transformed the lives of 
millions of families and helped them achieve self-sufficiency. 
On October 20, 2005, the Education and the Workforce Committee 
passed the Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family Promotion 
Act (H.R. 240) to build upon the 1996 reforms. The measure, 
based on President Bush's reform blueprint, would strengthen 
work requirements under the Temporary Assistance for Needy 
Families (TANF) block grant program to help move more welfare 
recipients into productive jobs and boosts child care funding. 
The measure also would make significant improvements to the 
Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program and 
incorporate key elements of President Bush's Good Start, Grow 
Smart plan to improve early childhood education. Moreover, it 
would emphasize the quality of child care that welfare families 
receive while maximizing state flexibility.
    The Deficit Reduction Act (S. 1932)--signed into law by 
President Bush in February 2006--also extended the Temporary 
Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grant at the current 
funding level--$16.5 billion--through fiscal year 2010. TANF 
provides states with funding for a wide range of benefits and 
services to families with children, including cash welfare 
assistance. Just as importantly, the Deficit Reduction Act 
renews the intent of the 1996 statute by reinforcing work as 
the central requirement of the program.
    Expanding Worker Access to Quality Health Care. More than 
46 million Americans have no basic health insurance, and many 
of the newly uninsured are small business employees whose 
employers cannot afford to offer health care because of 
skyrocketing health insurance costs. Over the last several 
years, House Republicans and Democrats alike have supported 
legislation to improve access to health care for uninsured 
working families by creating association health plans (AHPs) 
that allow small businesses to join together to purchase health 
insurance at a lower cost. This legislation--the Small Business 
Health Fairness Act (H.R. 525)--was introduced by Employer-
Employee Relations Subcommittee Chairman Sam Johnson (R-TX) 
along with a host of bipartisan cosponsors. The House passed 
the bill on July 26, 2005, by a vote of 263-165, with the 
support of 36 Democrats. Small businesses and their workers 
deserve the chance to obtain high quality health insurance at 
an affordable price, and House Republicans will continue to 
push AHPs so uninsured working families can access quality 
health care.
    Enhancing Worker Safety and Fairness for Small Businesses. 
On July 12, 2005, the House passed four workers safety bills 
sponsored by Workforce Protections Subcommittee Chairman 
Charlie Norwood (R-GA) to improve worker safety by making it 
easier for employers to work voluntarily and proactively with 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to 
ensure workplaces are as safe and secure as possible. The 
measures ensure that OSHA enforcement efforts are fair for 
small businesses that make good faith efforts to comply with 
all health and safety laws. Workplace injuries and fatalities 
have declined significantly under the Bush Administration. 
Small businesses that make good faith efforts to comply with 
OSHA standards deserve to be treated fairly and have their day 
in court, and these commonsense bills will help ensure they 
receive that opportunity.
    Examining the Health of State and Local Pension Plans. 
Approximately 2,300 public employee pension plans with more 
than $2 trillion in assets cover some 15 million state and 
local government workers nationwide. Financial experts suggest 
that the largest state and local pension funds recently faced a 
funding gap of nearly $300 billion, with that gap possibly 
climbing as high as $700 billion. Unlike private pension plans, 
which are required by the recently enacted Pension Protection 
Act to reach a funding level of 100 percent, public pension 
plans are not held to the same federal standard. In August, the 
Employer-Employee Relations Subcommittee held a hearing at the 
Illinois State Capitol to examine the health of these 
underfunded plans. With an unfunded liability of $38 billion, 
the State of Illinois has the most underfunded pension system 
in the nation.
    Promoting U.S. Jobs in the Recreational Boating Industry. 
The Recreational Marine Employment Act (H.R. 940), introduced 
by Rep. Ric Keller (R-FL), would help restore U.S. jobs in the 
recreational boating industry that have been lost to foreign 
competition overseas. In 1984, Congress exempted employees in 
the recreational boating industry, specifically boats 65 feet 
and under, from the Longshore Act, which provides workers' 
compensation benefits to maritime workers who are injured in 
the course of their employment on navigable waters of the U.S. 
Over the past 20 years, however, there has been tremendous 
growth in the number of recreational boats that measure 65 feet 
or longer (more than 400,000 currently in the U.S.), so current 
law is outdated and arbitrarily requires that some U.S. 
employers provide two sets of insurance--both Longshore and 
state workers' compensation coverage. H.R. 940 would clarify 
that workers in the recreational marine industry are exempt 
from the Longshore Act, thus ensuring that employers aren't 
required to maintain duplicative insurance coverage while also 
maintaining all existing state remedies and workers' 
compensation protections. The Education and the Workforce 
Committee approved the bill on April 12, 2005.
    Examining the Crisis in Employer-Sponsored Retiree Health 
Benefits. The House Employer-Employee Relations Subcommittee 
held a hearing on April 28, 2005, to examine the impact of the 
Erie County federal court decision and whether it is 
jeopardizing retiree health benefits for millions of Americans. 
In 2000, a federal court ruled that employers may not 
coordinate health benefits for retirees who turn age 65 and 
take into account the additional benefits they receive from 
Medicare. The court's decision prompted serious concerns from 
lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who fear it will encourage 
employers to reduce or drop coverage altogether. The Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in April 2004 voted to 
move forward with a regulation to reverse the Erie County 
decision, a decision that is consistent with a letter sent to 
the EEOC by top committee members expressing bipartisan support 
for the regulation. The letter was signed by then-Education and 
the Workforce Committee Chairman John Boehner (R-OH), Employer-
Employee Relations Subcommittee Chairman Sam Johnson (R-TX), 
and Rep. Robert Andrews (D-NJ), the subcommittee's ranking 
Democrat. Before the regulation took final effect, a federal 
judge in March 2005 struck down the regulation in response to 
an AARP lawsuit. However, in September 2005, the federal judge 
reversed her March decision in light of recent Supreme Court 
case law.
    Examining State Mandates on Employer-Provided Health 
Benefits. On May 4, 2006, the Employer-Employee Relations 
Subcommittee, chaired by Rep. Sam Johnson (R-TX), heard a 
variety of concerns from industry leaders on the impact of 
state mandates on employer-provided health care coverage. 
During the past several months, the states of Maryland and 
Massachusetts have enacted laws that could significantly alter 
the way in which employers provide health benefits to their 
employees. With some 30 similar legislative efforts pending in 
state legislatures, the potential impact of these mandates on 
employers, workers, and the chief federal law governing health 
benefits--the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA)--
is an issue of increasing interest for many.
    Exploring the Need for Additional Protections of Workplace 
Religious Freedom. On November 10, 2005, the Subcommittee on 
Employer-Employee Relations held a hearing on the need for and 
impact of legislation such as the Workplace Religious Freedom 
Act (H.R. 1445), sponsored by Committee Member Rep. Mark Souder 
(R-IN). The Workplace Religious Freedom Act would amend the 
1964 Civil Rights Act by requiring employers to make an 
affirmative and bona fide effort to accommodate the religious 
practices of employees, unless doing so would create an undue 
hardship. Subcommittee Chairman Sam Johnson (R-TX) noted the 
issue, while of great importance and deep interest to Members 
on both sides of the aisle, must be seen in the context of how 
Congress should protect the rights of people of faith adhering 
to their beliefs in an increasingly diverse workplace while 
ensuring that businesses--often small businesses--are able to 
staff and run their operations in a productive manner while 
respecting all employees.
    Enhancing Services for Our Nation's Seniors. Initially 
established in 1965, the Older Americans Act has transformed 
into the first stop for seniors to identify home- and 
community-based long term care options, as well as other 
supportive services that can help prevent or delay expensive 
institutional care and generate significant savings in federal 
entitlement programs. Led by Select Education Subcommittee 
Chairman Pat Tiberi (R-OH), Congress has moved forward on a 
measure to build on that progress. Specifically, the bipartisan 
reauthorization of the Older Americans Act will promote 
measures that reduce seniors' risk of injury, disease, or 
disability; improve access to health care by supporting 
resource centers in every community where older Americans and 
their families can go for reliable information about long-term 
care options, community support services, and important health 
benefits such as Medicare prescription drug coverage; and 
encourage states and communities to plan for an increasing 
number of older Americans.

                    C. OVERSIGHT PLAN AND ACTIVITIES

    Pursuant to House rule XI, Clause 1, the following 
specifies the oversight plan activities and are discussed 
within the body of this report. Under House rule X 2(d)(1), 
each standing committee of the U.S. House of Representatives is 
required to formally adopt an oversight plan at the beginning 
of each session of Congress. Specifically, Rule X, 2(d)(1) 
states in part:

          ``Not later than February 15 of the first session of 
        a Congress, each standing committee of the House shall, 
        in a meeting that is open to the public and with a 
        quorum present, adopt its oversight plan for that 
        Congress. Such plan shall be submitted simultaneously 
        to the Committee on Government Reform and to the 
        Committee on House Administration.''

Under rule X of the Rules of the House, the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce (Committee) is vested with 
jurisdiction over issues dealing with students, education, 
workers, and workplace policy, including, but not limited to:
          1. Child labor.
          2. Gallaudet University and Howard University and 
        Hospital.
          3. Convict labor and the entry of goods made by 
        convicts into interstate commerce.
          4. Food programs for children in schools.
          5. Labor standards and statistics.
          6. Education or labor generally.
          7. Mediation and arbitration of labor disputes.
          8. Regulation or prevention of importation of foreign 
        laborers under contract.
          9. Workers' compensation.
          10. Vocational rehabilitation.
          11. Wages and hours of labor.
          12. Welfare of miners.
          13. Work incentive program.
    Accordingly, the Committee is responsible for overseeing 
approximately 24,000 federal employees and more than $125 
billion in annual spending. More importantly, the Education and 
the Workforce Committee has a dual mission: empowering parents 
and teachers to provide our students with the best education 
possible and giving American workers access to the tools and 
protections they need to meet the challenges and opportunities 
of the New Economy.

General Oversight Responsibilities

    According to House rule X, Clause 2(a):

          The various standing committees shall have general 
        oversight responsibilities as provided in paragraph (b) 
        in order to assist the House in--(1) its analysis, 
        appraisal, and evaluation of--
          (A) the application, administration, execution, and 
        effectiveness of Federal laws; and
          (B) conditions and circumstances that may indicate 
        the necessity or desirability of enacting new or 
        additional legislation; and
          (2) its formulation, consideration, and enactment of 
        changes in Federal laws, and of such additional 
        legislation as may be necessary or appropriate.
          (b)(1) In order to determine whether laws and 
        programs addressing subjects within the jurisdiction of 
        a committee are being implemented and carried out in 
        accordance with the intent of Congress and whether they 
        should be continued, curtailed, or eliminated, each 
        standing committee (other than the Committee on 
        Appropriations) shall review and study on a continuing 
        basis--
          (A) the application, administration, execution, and 
        effectiveness of laws and programs addressing subjects 
        within its jurisdiction;
          (B) the organization and operation of Federal 
        agencies and entities having responsibilities for the 
        administration and execution of laws and programs 
        addressing subjects within its jurisdiction.

Exercise of Oversight Responsibilities

    The Committee takes seriously its responsibility to conduct 
oversight and investigations.
    The Committee is therefore committed to ensuring that 
government agencies, departments and programs within in its 
jurisdiction:
          
 Focus on an appropriate federal mission;
          
 Work in an effective and efficient 
        manner; and
          
 Consistently follow Congressional intent 
        in their respective activities and operations.
    Accordingly and in keeping with the Rules of the House and 
the principles of oversight and investigations, the Committee 
has identified 6 major projects for the 108th Congress. These 
projects include:
    Improving Financial Management in Head Start Programs. 
Responding to troubling reports of financial mismanagement in 
many local Head Start programs, the Committee aimed a spotlight 
at these abuses, then crafted the School Readiness Act (H.R. 
2123), a measure to reauthorize and strengthen the Head Start 
early childhood education programs. This bill would require all 
Head Start grantees to publish an annual report detailing how 
money was spent, the sources from which funds were received, 
and how the agency has performed in terms of meeting the 
requirements of the law. An independent financial audit also 
will be required annually.
    Reducing Taxpayer Subsidies to College Lending Companies. 
Building on Republican efforts to protect students and 
taxpayers, excess lender subsidies known as ``floor income,'' 
any rate of return higher than the guaranteed minimum, have 
been eliminated by the Deficit Reduction Act (P.L. 109-171). In 
addition, the 9.5 percent minimum rate of return, which was 
previously available to some lenders but was closed off through 
Republican efforts in 2004, has been eliminated permanently and 
comprehensively.
    Safeguarding Privacy of U.S. College Students. The College 
Access and Opportunity Act (H.R. 609) would explicitly prohibit 
the creation of a Student Unit Database, as proposed by the 
U.S. Department of Education. Such a massive federal database 
would compile and maintain personally identifiable information 
about individual college students, including Social Security 
number, address, date of birth, attendance record, and 
financial information.
    Preventing Fraud and Abuse in Student Aid Programs. In 
order to ensure that the billions of taxpayer dollars invested 
annually in federal student aid programs are reaching those 
truly eligible for the aid, the Deficit Reduction Act (P.L. 
109-171) includes an IRS data match system. This system will 
verify financial aid information to make certain student 
financial aid is reaching those who need it the most, so 
federal funds are not wasted or misused.
    Evaluating Existing Federal Math and Science Programs. 
Before blindly throwing billions at scores of new federal math 
and science programs in the name of ``competitiveness,'' the 
Deficit Reduction Act (P.L. 109-171) established a body to 
identify, evaluate, and recommend ways to integrate more than 
200 federal math and science programs already on the books. A 
report submitted by this Academic Competitiveness Council will 
allow Congress to determine how to better coordinate these 
programs across the federal government, ensuring funds are 
being spent effectively and the programs themselves are 
operating efficiently.
    Investigating Potential Mismanagement in Federal Poverty 
Programs. Former Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman 
and current House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH), 
Education Reform Subcommittee Chairman Mike Castle (R-DE), and 
subcommittee Vice-Chairman Tom Osborne (R-NE) in 2005 asked the 
independent Government Accountability Office (GAO) to look into 
the financial oversight structure of the Community Services 
Block Grant (CSBG) program, a federally funded initiative to 
combat poverty in local communities. The GAO report--delivered 
to the Committee in July 2006--confirms concerns about the 
effectiveness of that oversight structure and the possibility 
that fraud, abuse, or mismanagement could occur due to 
weaknesses in financial controls and program management, 
similar to documented mismanagement in local delivery of Head 
Start services.
    Protecting Pension Plan Assets From Being Used for 
Political Purposes. In early 2005, former Education and the 
Workforce Committee Chairman and current House Majority Leader 
John Boehner (R-OH) and Employer-Employee Relations 
Subcommittee Chairman Sam Johnson (R-TX) urged the U.S. Labor 
Department to investigate reports of labor union leaders 
threatening to withdraw pension plan assets from firms that 
demonstrated support for Social Security policies of the Bush 
Administration. The Labor Department responded, saying that--
indeed--such practices likely violate the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act (ERISA) and cautioned labor leaders to 
ensure its affiliates nationwide were aware of this fact.

                II. Hearings Held by the Full Committee


109th Congress, First Session

    March 1, 2005--Hearing on ``Enforcement of Federal Anti-
Fraud Laws in For-Profit Education'' (109-2).
    March 2, 2005--Hearing on ``The Retirement Security Crisis: 
The Administration's Proposal for Pension Reform and its 
Implications for Workers and Taxpayers'' (109-3).
    April 5, 2005--Hearing on ``Financial Accountability in the 
Head Start Early Childhood Program'' (109-6).
    April 19, 2005--Hearing on ``College Access: Is Government 
Part of the Solution, or Part of the Problem?'' (109-8).
    April 26, 2005--Hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: 
Supplemental Tutoring for Children in Underachieving Schools'' 
(109-11).
    May 17, 2005--Hearing on ``High School Reform: Examining 
State and Local Efforts'' (109-16).
    June 15, 2005--Hearing on ``H.R. 2830, Pension Protection 
Act of 2005'' (109-22).
    September 29, 2005--Hearing on ``Closing the Achievement 
Gap in America's Schools: the No Child Left Behind Act'' (109-
25).
    November 16, 2005.--Hearing on ``U.S. Immigration Policy 
and Its Impact on the American Economy'' (109-27).

109th Congress, Second Session

    April 6, 2006--Hearing on ``Building America's 
Competitiveness: Examining What is Needed to Compete in a 
Global Economy'' (109-34).
    April 26, 2006--Hearing on ``Gulf Coast Recovery: Facing 
Challenges and Coming Back Stronger in Education'' (109-35).
    May 3, 2006--Hearing on ``Building American 
Competitiveness: Examining the Scope and Success of Existing 
Federal Math and Science Programs'' (109-39).
    May 18, 2006--Hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: How 
Innovative Educators Are Integrating Subject Matter to Improve 
Student Achievement'' (109-41).
    June 13, 2006--Hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: 
Disaggregating Student Achievement by Subgroups to Ensure All 
Students Are Learning (109-43).
    June 28, 2006--Hearing on ``The First Tee and Schools: 
Working to Build Character Education'' (109-45).
    July 12, 2006--Hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: Ensuring 
High Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient 
Students and Students with Disabilities'' (109-46).
    July 19, 2006--Hearing on ``Guest Worker Programs: Impact 
on the American Workforce and U.S. Immigration Policy'' (109-
47).
    July 27, 2006--Hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: Can 
Growth Models Ensure Improved Education for All Students'' 
(109-50).
    August 31, 2006--Field hearing on ``Recovery and 
Preservation of Native American Languages,'' in Albuquerque, 
New Mexico (109-55).
    September 1, 2006--Field hearing on ``Paying for College: 
Higher Education and the American Taxpayer,'' in Greeley, 
Colorado (109-56).
    September 21, 2006--Hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: How 
Can We Increase Parental Awareness of Supplemental Education 
Services?'' (109-57).
    December 15, 2006--Field Hearing on ``An Examination of the 
NCAA's Relationship with Member Institutions,'' in Champaign, 
Illinois (109-61).

                III. Markups Held by the Full Committee


109th Congress, First Session

    February 2, 2005--Organizational Meeting. The Committee 
Rules for the 109th Congress along with the Oversight Plan were 
adopted by voice vote. Subcommittee Assignments were announced.
    February 16, 17, 2005--H.R. 27, Job Training Improvement 
Act of 2005, was ordered favorably reported, as amended, by a 
vote of 26-20.
    March 9, 2005--H.R. 366, Vocational and Technical Education 
for the Future Act, was ordered favorably reported, as amended, 
by voice vote.
    March 16, 2005--H.R. 525, Small Business Health Fairness 
Act of 2005, was ordered favorably reported by a vote of 25-22.
    April 6, 2005--H.Res. 134 was ordered reported unfavorably 
by Unanimous Consent.
    April 13, 2005--H.R. 739, Occupational Safety and Health 
Small Business Day in Court Act, was ordered favorably reported 
by a vote of 27-19; H.R. 740, Occupational Safety and Health 
Review Commission Efficiency Act, was ordered favorably 
reported, as amended, by a vote of 27-19; H.R. 741, 
Occupational Safety and Health Independent Review of OSHA 
Citations Act, was ordered favorably reported, as amended, by a 
vote of 27-19; H.R. 742, Occupational Safety and Health Small 
Employer Access to Justice Act, was ordered favorably reported 
by a vote of 27-18; and H.R. 940, Recreational Marine 
Employment Act of 2005, was ordered favorably reported, as 
amended, by a vote of 27-18.
    May 18, 2005--H.R. 2123, School Readiness Act of 2005, was 
ordered favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 48-0.
    June 29, 30, 2005--H.R. 2830, Pension Protection Act of 
2005, was ordered favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 
27 ayes and 22 voting present.
    July 20, 21, 22, 2005--H.R. 609, College Access and 
Opportunity Act of 2005, was ordered favorably reported, as 
amended, by a vote of 27-20, 1 present.
    October 19, 20, 2005--Committee Print of Amendments to the 
Social Security Act and Welfare Reform regarding the 
Committee's instructions pursuant to H. Con. Res. 95, the 
Budget Resolution for Fiscal Year 2006, was approved, as 
amended, for transmittal to the Committee on the Budget by a 
vote of 23-20. H.R. 240, Personal Responsibility, Work, and 
Family Promotion Act of 2005, was ordered favorably reported, 
as amended, by a vote of 23-20.
    October 20, 2005--H. Res. 467, Requesting that the 
President transmit to the House of Representatives information 
in his possession relating to contracts for services or 
construction related to Hurricane Katrina recovery that relate 
to wages and benefits to be paid to workers, was ordered 
unfavorably reported by a vote of 25-20.
    October 26, 2005--Committee Print of Amendments to the 
Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) regarding the 
Committee's instructions pursuant to H. Con. Res. 95, the 
Budget Resolution for Fiscal Year 2006, was approved, as 
amended, for transmittal to the Committee on the Budget by 
voice vote. Committee Print of Amendments to the Higher 
Education Act regarding the Committee's instructions pursuant 
to H. Con. Res. 95, the Budget Resolution for Fiscal Year 2006, 
was approved, as amended, for transmittal to the Committee on 
the Budget.
    October 27, 2005--Committee Print of Family Education 
Reimbursement Act of 2005 regarding the Committee's 
instructions pursuant to H. Con. Res. 95, the Budget Resolution 
for Fiscal Year 2006, was not agreed to by a vote of 21-26.

109th Congress, Second Session

    May 17, 2006--H.R. 5293, Senior Independence Act of 2006 
was ordered favorably reported, as amended, by voice vote.

                       IV. Legislative Activities


     A. LEGISLATION ENACTED INTO LAW (BILLS REFERRED TO COMMITTEE)

    H.R. 4 (Public Law 109-280) Pension Protection Act of 2006. 
Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 6 (Public Law 109-58) Energy Policy Act of 2005. 
Sponsor: Rep. Barton, Joe.
    H.R. 240, Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family 
Promotion Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Pryce, Deborah. TANF 
Provisions were enacted in S. 1932, Deficit Reduction Act of 
2005 (Public Law 109-171).
    H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2006. 
Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A. Provisions of H.R. 609 were 
enacted in S. 1932 (Public Law 109-171), Title VIII, Subtitle 
A--Higher Education Provisions; Provisions of H.R. 609 (sec. 
425) were enacted in H.R. 4939 (Public Law 109-234) in section 
7015 (a) and (b).
    H.R. 758 (Public Law 109-420) To establish an interagency 
aerospace revitalization task force to develop a national 
strategy for aerospace workforce recruitment, training, and 
cultivation. Sponsor: Sponsor: Rep. Ehlers, Vernon J.
    H.R. 2132 (Public Law 109-78) To extend the waiver 
authority of the Secretary of Education with respect to student 
financial assistance during a war or other military operation 
or national emergency. Sponsor: Rep. Kline, John.
    H.R. 2829, Office of National Drug Control Policy 
Reauthorization Act of 2005. Provisions of H.R. 2829 in section 
6 were enacted in sec. 105 of H.R. 6344, Office of National 
Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2006 (Public Law 
number unavailable at time of this report).
    H.R. 2830, Pension Security and Transparency Act of 2005. 
Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A. Modified provisions were enacted 
in sec. 401 of H.R. 4, Pension Protection Act of 2006 (Public 
Law 109-280).
    H.R. 2831, Pension Preservation and Portability Act of 
2005. Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A. Modified provisions were 
enacted in H.R. 4, Pension Protection Act of 2006 (Public Law 
109-280).
    H.R. 2875, Public Lands Corps Healthy Forests Restoration 
Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Walden, Greg. H.R. 2875 was enacted 
in S. 1238 (Public Law 109-154).
    H.R. 2876, Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
2005. Sponsor: Rep. Green, Mark. Provisions of H.R. 2876 were 
enacted in H.R. 3402, Violence Against Women and Department of 
Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-162).
    H.R. 3169 (Public Law 109-66) Pell Grant Hurricane and 
Disaster Relief Act. Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric.
    H.R. 3668 (Public Law 109-67) Student Grant Hurricane and 
Disaster Relief Act. Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, Bobby.
    H.R. 3761 (Public Law 109-72) Flexibility for Displaced 
Workers Act. Sponsor: Rep. Boustany, Charles W., Jr.
    H.R. 3784 (Public Law 109-81) Higher Education Extension 
Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 3863 (Public Law 109-86) Natural Disaster Student Aid 
Fairness Act. Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, Bobby.
    H.R. 3864 (Public Law 109-82) Assistance for Individuals 
with Disabilities Affected by Hurricanes Katrina or Rita Act of 
2005. Sponsor: Rep. Boustany, Charles W., Jr.
    H.R. 3975, Hurricane Regulatory Relief Act of 2005. 
Provisions of H.R. 3975 were enacted in H.R. 2863 (Public Law 
109-148) Department of Defense, Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations to Address Hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico, and 
Pandemic Influenza Act, 2006 in Title IV, Subtitle A and B. 
Additionally, provisions of H.R. 3975 section 133(b) were 
enacted in S. 1932 (Public Law 109-171), Deficit Reduction Act 
of 2005 in section 8018(a)(3).
    H.R. 4525 (Public Law 109-150) Second Higher Education 
Extension Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 4579 (Public Law 109-151) Employee Retirement 
Preservation Act. Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 4766 (Public Law 109-394) Esther Martinez Native 
American Languages Preservation Act of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. 
Wilson, Heather
    H.R. 4793, To make available funds included in the Deficit 
Reduction Act of 2005 for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance 
Act of 1981 program for fiscal year 2006, and for other 
purposes. Sponsor: Rep. LaTourette, Steve C. H.R. 4793 was 
enacted in S. 2320 (Public Law 109-204).
    H.R. 4785, To make available funds included in the Deficit 
Reduction Act of 2005 for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance 
Act of 1981 program for fiscal year 2006, and for other 
purposes. Sponsor: Rep. DeLauro, Rosa L. H.R. 4785 was enacted 
in S. 2320 (Public Law 109-204).
    H.R. 4911 (Public Law 109-212) Higher Education Extension 
Act of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. McKeon, Howard P. (Buck).
    H.R. 4919, To extend the educational flexibility program 
under section 4 of the Education Flexibility Partnership Act of 
1999. Sponsor: Rep. Castle, Michael N. H.R. 4919 was enacted in 
S. 2363 (Public Law 109-211).
    H.R. 5354, Hurricane Relief Extension Act of 2006. Similar 
provisions were enacted in H.R. 4939 (Public Law 109-234).
    H.R. 5603 (Public Law 109-238) Second Higher Education 
Extension Act of 2006, Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric.
    H.R. 5837, YouthBuild Transfer Act. Sponsor: Rep. Castle, 
Michael N. H.R. 5837 was enacted in S. 3534 (Public Law 109-
281).
    H.R. 6031, September 11 Survivors Student Loan Relief Act. 
Sponsor: Rep. McCarthy, Carolyn. H.R. 6031 was enacted in H.R. 
6138, Third Higher Education Extension Act of 2006 (Public Law 
109-292).
    H.R. 6106 (Public Law 109-323) To extend the waiver 
authority for the Secretary of Education under title IV, 
section 105, of Public Law 109-148. Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, 
Bobby.
    H.R. 6138 (Public Law 109-292) Third Higher Education 
Extension Act of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric.
    H.R. 6197 (Public Law 109-365) Older Americans Act 
Amendments of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. Tiberi, Patrick J.
    H.R. 6326 (Public Law 109-368) To clarify the provision of 
nutrition services to older Americans. Sponsor: Rep. Tiberi, 
Patrick J.
    S. 136 (Public Law 109-131) A bill to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to provide supplemental funding and 
other services that are necessary to assist certain local 
school districts in the State of California in providing 
educational services for students attending schools located 
within Yosemite National Park, to authorize the Secretary of 
the Interior to adjust the boundaries of the Golden Gate 
National Recreation Area, to adjust the boundaries of Redwood 
National Park, and for other purposes. Sponsor: Sen. Feinstein, 
Dianne
    S. 335 (Public Law 109-143) A bill to reauthorize the 
Congressional Award Act. Sponsor: Sen. Lieberman, Joseph I.
    S. 2320 (Public Law 109-204) A bill to make available funds 
included in the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 for the Low-
Income Home Energy Assistance Program for fiscal year 2006, and 
for other purposes. Sponsor: Sen. Snowe, Olympia J.
    S. 2803 (Public Law 109-236) Mine Improvement and New 
Emergency Response Act of 2006. Sponsor: Sen. Enzi, Michael B.

   B. LEGISLATION ENACTED INTO LAW (BILLS NOT REFERRED TO COMMITTEE)

    H.R. 3 (Public Law 109-59) Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and 
Efficient Transportation Equity Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. 
Young, Don. Contains provisions in sections 1307, 1409, 1602, 
3013, 3019, 3031 and section 9003.
    H.R. 1160 (Public Law 109-4) Welfare Reform Extension Act 
of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Herger, Wally. Extends provisions within 
the committee's jurisdiction.
    H.R. 1815 (Public Law 109-163) National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006. Sponsor: Rep. Hunter, 
Duncan. Contains provisions in sections 537, 545, 571, 572, 
573, 574, 582 and section 848.
    H.R. 2863 (Public Law 109-148) Department of Defense, 
Emergency Supplemental Appropriations to Address Hurricanes in 
the Gulf of Mexico, and Pandemic Influenza Act, 2006. Sponsor: 
Rep. Young, C. W. Bill. Contains provisions in Title IV, 
Hurricane Education Recovery Act, Subtitle A, sections 102, 
104, 105, 107; Subtitle B, sections 206, 207, 208, and 209; 
Subtitle C, sections 301, 302 and 303. Provisions of H.R. 3975, 
Hurricane Regulatory Relief Act of 2005 were enacted in H.R. 
2863 (Public Law 109-148).
    H.R. 2876, Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
2005. Provisions in Title III, sections 301, 305 and Title IV, 
sec. 41402 were incorporated into H.R. 3402, Violence Against 
Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 
(Public Law 109-162).
    H.R. 3021 (Public Law 109-19) TANF Extension Act of 2005. 
Sponsor: Rep. Herger, Wally. Extends provisions in the 
committee's jurisdiction.
    H.R. 3402 (Public Law 109-162) Violence Against Women and 
Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005. Sponsor: 
Rep. Sensenbrenner, F. James, Jr. Contains provisions in the 
committee's jurisdiction in sections 112, 206, 304, 305 and 
701.
    H.R. 3672 (Public Law 109-68) TANF Emergency Response and 
Recovery Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. McCrery, Jim. Contains 
provisions relating to waiver of TANF penalities in Hurricane 
Damaged States.
    H.R. 4472 (Public Law 109-248) Adam Walsh Child Protection 
and Safety Act of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. Sensenbrenner, F. James, 
Jr. Contains provisions in the committee's jurisdiction in sec. 
603, Authorization for Big Brothers/Big Sisters and sec. 633, 
National Registry of Substantiated Cases of Child Abuse.
    H.R. 4635 (Public Law 109-161) TANF and Child Care 
Continuation Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Herger, Wally. Contains 
provisions to extend provisions under the committee's 
jurisdiction.
    H.R. 4939 (Public Law 109-234) Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and 
Hurricane Recovery, 2006. Sponsor: Rep. Lewis, Jerry. Contains 
provisions within the committee's jurisdiction in Title II, 
Further Hurricane Disaster Relief and Recovery, Chapter 6; 
Title VII, General Provisions and Technical Corrections, sec. 
7008 (mine safety MSHA inspectors). Provisions in section 425 
of H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2006 were 
enacted in section 7015(a) and (b) of H.R. 4939 (Public Law 
109-234). Similar provisions of H.R. 5354, Hurricane Relief 
Extension Act were enacted in H.R. 4939 (Public Law 109-234).
    H.R. 5122 (Public Law 109-364) John Warner National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007. Sponsor: Rep. Hunter, 
Duncan. Contains provisions in Subtitle H, Impact Aid and 
Defense Dependents Education System--sections 571, 572, 573, 
574, 575; and section 856, Contracting with Employers of 
Persons with Disabilities.
    H.R. 6111 (Public Law 109-432) An act to amend the Internal 
Revenue Code of 1986 to extend expiring provisions, and for 
other purposes. Contains provisions in sec. 115, Parity in 
Application of Certain Limits to Mental Health Benefits.
    H.R. 6344 (Public Law number unavailable at time of this 
report) Office of National Drug Control Policy Reauthorization 
Act of 2006. Contains provisions in the committee's 
jurisdiction in sect. 105, Budgetary Matters (c)(2)(C)(vi).
    S. 250 (Public Law 109-270) Carl D. Perkins Career and 
Technical Education Improvement Act of 2006. Sponsor: Sen. 
Enzi, Michael B. Contains provisions of H.R. 366, Vocational 
and Technical Education for the Future Act.
    S. 707 (Public Law 109-450) PREEMIE Act (Prematurity 
Research Expansion and Education for Mothers Who Deliver 
Infants Early Act). Contains provisions in the committee's 
jurisdiction in sec. 7, Effective Date of Certain Head Start 
Regulations.
    S. 843 (Public Law 109-416) Combating Autism Act of 2006. 
Contains provisions in section 399BB including Head Start Act, 
the Early Start Act, the Child Care and Development Act, the 
Individuals With Disabilities Act, the Child Nutrition Act, and 
the Rehabilitation Act.
    S. 1238 (Public Law 109-154) Public Lands Corps Healthy 
Forests Restoration Act of 2005. Sponsor: Sen. Feinstein, 
Dianne. Contains provisions of similar House companion bill, 
H.R. 2875).
    S. 1932 / H.R. 4241 (Public Law 109-171) Deficit Reduction 
Act of 2005. Sponsor: Sen. Gregg, Judd. Provisions of H.R. 240 
Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family Promotion Act of 2005 
were enacted in Title VII, Subtitle A--TANF; Provisions of H.R. 
609 College Access and Opportunity Act of 2006 were enacted in 
Title VIII, Subtitle A--Higher Education Provisions.; 
Provisions of H.R. 2830, Pension Security and Transparency Act 
of 2005 were enacted in sec. 8101, relating to single-employer 
and multi-employer premiums; Provisions in sec. 133(b) of H.R. 
3975, Hurricane Regulatory Relief Act of 2005 were enacted in 
S. 1932 (Public Law 109-171) sec. 8018(a)(3).
    S. 2363 (Public Law 109-211) A bill to extend the 
educational flexibility program under sec. 4 of the Education 
Flexibility Partnership Act of 1999. Sponsor: Sen. Burr, 
Richard. Contains provisions of similar House companion bill, 
H.R. 4919.
    S. 3534 (Public Law 109-281) YouthBuild Transfer Act. 
Sponsor: Sen. Enzi, Michael B.. Contains provisions of a 
similar House companion bill, H.R. 5837.

     C. LEGISLATION PASSED THE HOUSE (BILLS REFERRED TO COMMITTEE)

    H. Con. Res. 36, Expressing the continued support of 
Congress for equal access of military recruiters to 
institutions of higher education. Sponsor: Rep. Rogers, Mike D.
    H. Con. Res. 45, Recognizing the benefits and importance of 
school-based music education, and for other purposes. Sponsor: 
Rep. Cooper, Jim.
    H. Con. Res. 47, Commending the establishment in College 
Point, New York, of the first free, public kindergarten in the 
United States. Sponsor: Rep. Crowley, Joseph.
    H. Con. Res. 126, Expressing the condolences and deepest 
sympathies of the Congress in the aftermath of the recent 
school shooting at Red Lake High School in Red Lake, Minnesota. 
Sponsor: Rep. Peterson, Collin C.
    H. Con. Res. 163, Honoring the Sigma Chi Fraternity on the 
occasion of its 150th Anniversary. Sponsor: Rep. Gerlach, Jim.
    H. Con. Res. 288, Recognizing the 30th anniversary of the 
enactment of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 
1975 and reaffirming support for the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act so that all children with 
disabilities have access to a free appropriate public education 
in the least restrictive environment. Sponsor: Rep. Castle, 
Michael N.
    H. Con. Res. 300, Paying tribute to Shirley Horn in 
recognition of her many achievements and contributions to the 
world of jazz and American culture. Sponsor: Rep. Conyers, 
John, Jr.
    H. Con. Res. 331, Honoring the sacrifice and courage of the 
16 coal miners killed in various mine disasters in West 
Virginia, and recognizing the rescue crews for their 
outstanding efforts in the aftermath of the tragedies. Sponsor: 
Rep. Capito, Shelley Moore.
    H. Con. Res. 343, Recognizing the 50th anniversary of the 
Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities. Sponsor: 
Rep. Boehlert, Sherwood.
    H. Con. Res. 354, Expressing the continued support of 
Congress for requiring an institution of higher education to 
provide military recruiters with access to the institution's 
campus and students at least equal in quality and scope to that 
which is provided to any other employer in order to be eligible 
for the receipt of certain Federal funds. Sponsor: Rep. Pombo, 
Richard W.
    H. Con. Res. 355, Recognizing the benefits and importance 
of school-based music education, and for other purposes. 
Sponsor: Rep. Cooper, Jim.
    H. Con. Res. 384, Recognizing and honoring the 100th 
anniversary of the founding of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Incorporated, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity 
established for African Americans. Sponsor: Rep. Hinchey, 
Maurice D.
    H. Con. Res. 421, Expressing the sense of Congress and 
support for Greater Opportunities for Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Mathematics (GO-STEM) programs. Sponsor: Rep. 
Price, Tom.
    H. Con. Res. 438, Expressing the sense of the Congress that 
continuation of the welfare reforms provided for in the 
Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act 
of 1996 should remain a priority. Sponsor: Rep. Shaw, E. Clay, 
Jr.
    H. Con. Res. 478, Supporting the goals and ideals of 
``Lights On Afterschool!'', a national celebration of after-
school programs. Sponsor: Rep. Lowey, Nita M.
    H. Con. Res. 484, Commending the New York Institute for 
Special Education for providing excellent education for 
students with blindness and visual disabilities for 175 years, 
and for broadening its mission to provide the same quality 
education to students with emotional and learning disabilities. 
Sponsor: Rep. Crowley, Joseph.
    H.J. Res. 66, Supporting the goals and ideals of ``Lights 
on Afterschool!'' a national celebration of after-school 
programs. Sponsor: Rep. Lowey, Nita M.
    H. Res. 23, Honoring the contributions of Catholic schools. 
Sponsor: Rep. Kennedy, Mark R.
    H. Res. 46, Supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Mentoring Month. Sponsor: Rep. Osborne, Tom.
    H. Res. 122, Expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives regarding the study of languages and supporting 
the designation of a Year of Languages. Sponsor: Rep. Holt, 
Rush D.
    H. Res. 207, Recognizing the 100th anniversary of FarmHouse 
Fraternity, Inc. Sponsor: Rep. Hulshof, Kenny C.
    H. Res. 216, To honor the late playwright Arthur Miller and 
the University of Michigan for its intention of building a 
theatre in his name. Sponsor: Rep. Schwarz, John J.H. ``Joe''.
    H. Res. 218, Congratulating charter schools and their 
students, parents, teachers, and administrators across the 
United States for their ongoing contributions to education, and 
for other purposes. Sponsor: Rep. Porter, Jon C.
    H. Res. 295, Expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives supporting the establishment of September as 
Campus Fire Safety Month, and for other purposes. Sponsor: Rep. 
Jones, Stephanie Tubbs.
    H. Res. 302, Recognizing and commending the continuing 
dedication and commitment of employers of the members of the 
National Guard and the other reserve components who have been 
mobilized during the Global War on Terrorism and in defense of 
the United States. Sponsor: Rep. Pombo, Richard W.
    H. Res. 318, Supporting responsible fatherhood, promoting 
marriage, and encouraging greater involvement of fathers in the 
lives of their children, especially on Father's Day. Sponsor: 
Rep. Sullivan, John.
    H. Res. 484, Supporting efforts to promote greater 
awareness of effective runaway youth prevention programs and 
the need for safe and productive alternatives, resources, and 
supports for homeless youth. Sponsor: Rep. Porter, Jon C.
    H. Res. 576, Asserting that Hamas and other terrorist 
organizations should not participate in elections held by the 
Palestinian Authority, and for other purposes. Sponsor: Rep. 
Cantor, Eric.
    H. Res. 657, Honoring the contributions of Catholic 
schools. Sponsor: Rep. Kennedy, Mark R.
    H. Res. 660, Supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Mentoring Month. Sponsor: Rep. Osborne, Tom.
    H. Res. 668, Celebrating the 40th anniversary of Texas 
Western's 1966 NCAA Basketball Championship and recognizing the 
groundbreaking impact of the title game victory on diversity in 
sports and civil rights in America. Sponsor: Rep. Reyes, 
Silvestre.
    H. Res. 677, Recognizing the creation of the NASCAR-
Historically Black Colleges and Universities Consortium. 
Sponsor: Rep. Rogers, Mike D. (AL).
    H. Res. 680, Recognizing Dr. I. King Jordan for his 
contributions to Gallaudet University and the deaf and hard of 
hearing community. Sponsor: Rep. Kind, Ron.
    H. Res. 699, Supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Entrepreneurship Week and encouraging the implementation of 
entrepreneurship education programs in elementary and secondary 
schools and institutions of higher education through the United 
States. Sponsor: Rep. Price, David E.
    H. Res. 751, Recognizing the cultural and educational 
contributions of American Ballet Theatre throughout its 65 
years of service as ``America's National Ballet Company''. 
Sponsor: Rep. Maloney, Carolyn B.
    H. Res. 781, Congratulating charter schools and their 
students, parents, teachers, and administrators across the 
United States for their ongoing contributions to education, and 
for other purposes. Sponsor: Rep. Porter, Jon C.
    H. Res. 808, Expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives in support of the goals of National One-Stop 
Month. Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric.
    H. Res. 874, Recognizing and honoring older Americans. 
Sponsor: Rep. Gonzalez, Charles A.
    H. Res. 875, Congratulating Spelman College on the occasion 
of its 125th anniversary. Sponsor: Rep. Lewis, John.
    H. Res. 928, Expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that a National Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities Week should be established. Sponsor: Rep. Johnson, 
Eddie Bernice.
    H. Res. 1009, Supporting efforts to promote greater public 
awareness of effective runaway youth prevention programs and 
the need for safe and productive alternatives, resources, and 
supports for homeless youth and youth in other high-risk 
situations. Sponsor: Rep. Porter, Jon C.
    H.R. 4, Pension Protection Act of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. 
Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 6, To ensure jobs for our future with secure, 
affordable, and reliable energy. Sponsor: Rep. Barton, Joe.
    H.R. 27, To enhance the workforce investment system of the 
Nation by strengthening one-stop career centers, providing for 
more effective governance arrangements, promoting access to a 
more comprehensive array of employment, training, and related 
services, establishing a targeted approach to serving youth, 
and improving performance accountability, and for other 
purposes. Sponsor: Rep. McKeon, Howard P. (Buck).
    H.R. 366, To amend the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and 
Technical Education Act of 1998 to strengthen and improve 
programs under that Act. Sponsor: Rep. Castle, Michael N.
    H.R. 525, To amend title I of the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act of 1974 to improve access and choice for 
entrepreneurs with small businesses with respect to medical 
care for their employees. Sponsor: Rep. Johnson, Sam.
    H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2006. 
Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 739, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for adjudicative flexibility with regard to 
the filing of a notice of contest by an employer following the 
issuance of a citation or proposed assessment of a penalty by 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, to provide 
for greater efficiency at the Occupational Safety and Health 
Review Commission, to provide for judicial deference to 
conclusions of law determined by the Occupational Safety and 
Health Review Commission with respect to an order issued by the 
Commission, and to provide for the award of attorneys' fees and 
costs to small employers when such employers prevail in 
litigation prompted by the issuance of a citation by the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Sponsor: Rep. 
Norwood, Charlie.
    H.R. 740, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for greater efficiency at the Occupational 
Safety and Health Review Commission. Sponsor: Rep. Norwood, 
Charlie.
    H.R. 741, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for judicial deference to conclusions of law 
determined by the Occupational Safety and Health Review 
Commission with respect to an order issued by the Commission. 
Sponsor: Rep. Norwood, Charlie.
    H.R. 742, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for the award of attorneys' fees and costs 
to small employers when such employers prevail in litigation 
prompted by the issuance of a citation by the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration. Sponsor: Rep. Norwood, 
Charlie.
    H.R. 758, To establish an interagency aerospace 
revitalization task force to develop a national strategy for 
aerospace workforce recruitment, training, and cultivation. 
Sponsor: Rep. Ehlers, Vernon J.
    H.R. 856, Federal Youth Coordination Act. Sponsor: Rep. 
Osborne, Tom.
    H.R. 1790, Child Medication Safety Act of 2005. Sponsor: 
Rep. Kline, John.
    H.R. 2123, School Readiness Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. 
Castle, Michael N.
    H.R. 2132, To extend the waiver authority of the Secretary 
of Education with respect to student financial assistance 
during a war or other military operation or national emergency. 
Sponsor: Rep. Kline, John.
    H.R. 2829, Office of National Drug Control Policy 
Reauthorization Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Souder, Mark E.
    H.R. 2830, Pension Security and Transparency Act of 2005. 
Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 3169, Pell Grant Hurricane and Disaster Relief Act. 
Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric.
    H.R. 3668, Student Grant Hurricane and Disaster Relief Act. 
Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, Bobby
    H.R. 3761, Flexibility for Displaced Workers Act. Sponsor: 
Rep. Boustany, Charles W., Jr.
    H.R. 3784, Higher Education Extension Act of 2005. Sponsor: 
Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 3863, Natural Disaster Student Aid Fairness Act. 
Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, Bobby.
    H.R. 3864, Assistance for Individuals With Disabilities 
Affected by Hurricanes Katrina or Rita Act of 2005. Sponsor: 
Rep. Boustany, Charles W., Jr.
    H.R. 3975, Hurricane Regulatory Relief Act of 2005. 
Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, Bobby.
    H.R. 4437, Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal 
Immigration Control Act of 2005. Sponsor: Rep. Sensenbrenner, 
F. James, Jr.
    H.R. 4525, Second Higher Education Extension Act of 2005; 
Sponsor: Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 4579, Employee Retirement Preservation Act; Sponsor: 
Rep. Boehner, John A.
    H.R. 4766, Esther Martinez Native American Languages 
Preservation Act of 2006 Sponsor: Rep. Wilson, Heather.
    H.R. 4911, Higher Education Extension Act of 2006. Sponsor: 
Rep. McKeon, Howard P. (Buck).
    H.R. 5293, Senior Independence Act of 2006. Sponsor: Rep. 
Tiberi, Patrick J.
    H.R. 5295, Student and Teacher Safety Act of 2006. Sponsor: 
Rep. Davis, Geoff.
    H.R. 5354, Hurricane Relief Extension Act of 2006. Sponsor: 
Rep. Boustany, Charles W., Jr.
    H.R. 5603, Second Higher Education Extension Act of 2006. 
Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric.
    H.R. 5970, Estate Tax and Extension of Tax Relief Act of 
2006. Sponsor: Rep. Thomas, William M.
    H.R. 6106, To extend the waiver authority for the Secretary 
of Education under title IV, section 105, of Public Law 109-
148. Sponsor: Rep. Jindal, Bobby.
    H.R. 6138, Third Higher Education Extension Act of 2006. 
Sponsor: Rep. Keller, Ric .
    H.R. 6197, Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006. Sponsor: 
Rep. Tiberi, Patrick J.
    H.R. 6206, Truman Scholarship Fund Modernization Act. 
Sponsor: Rep. English, Phil.
    H.R. 6326, To clarify the provision of nutrition services 
to older Americans. Sponsor: Rep. Tiberi, Patrick J.
    S. 136, A bill to authorize the Secretary of the Interior 
to provide supplemental funding and other services that are 
necessary to assist certain local school districts in the State 
of California in providing educational services for students 
attending schools located within Yosemite National Park, to 
authorize the Secretary of the Interior to adjust the 
boundaries of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, to 
adjust the boundaries of Redwood National Park, and for other 
purposes. Sponsor: Sen. Feinstein, Dianne.
    S. 335, A bill to reauthorize the Congressional Award Act. 
Sponsor: Sen. Lieberman, Joseph I.
    S. 2320, A bill to make available funds included in the 
Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 for the Low-Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program for fiscal year 2006, and for other 
purposes. Sponsor: Sen. Snowe, Olympia J.
    S. 2803, Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 
2006. Sponsor: Sen. Enzi, Michael B.

           D. LEGISLATION PASSED THE HOUSE IN ANOTHER MEASURE

    H.R. 26, Worker Reemployment Accounts Act of 2005. 
Provisions passed the House in H.R. 27, Job Training 
Improvement Act of 2005.
    H.R. 240, Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family 
Promotion Act of 2005. Provisions passed the House in H.R. 
4241, Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (Title II, Subtitle A).
    H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2006. 
Provisions in Title IV, Part B, sections 101(A)(B), 421, 422, 
424(b), 426, 427, 428 and Part G, sections 482, 485, 487 and 
sec. 485(D) passed the House in H.R. 4241, Deficit Reduction 
Act of 2005 in Title II, Subtitle B, Part I--Higher Education, 
sections 2112, 2113, 2114, 2116(c), 2117(e), 2120, 2121, 2123, 
2128, 2130, and 2131.
    H.R. 740, Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission 
Efficiency Act of 2005. The text of H.R. 740 as passed the 
House was added to the engrossment of H.R. 739.
    H.R. 741, Occupational Safety and Health Independent Review 
of OSHA Citations Act of 2005. The text of H.R. 741 as passed 
the House was added to the engrossment of H.R. 739.
    H.R. 742, Occupational Safety and Health Small Employer 
Access to Justice Act of 2005. The text of H.R. 742 as passed 
the House was added to the engrossment of H.R. 739.
    H.R. 2132, To extend the waiver authority of the Secretary 
of Education with respect to student financial assistance 
during a war or other military operation or national emergency 
(HEROES) passed the House in Subtitle I--Sec. 571 of H.R. 1815, 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006.
    H.R. 2829, Office of National Drug Control Policy 
Reauthorization Act of 2005 sec. 6(c)(e)(2) passed House in 
section 105, Budgetary Matters of H.R. 6344, Office of National 
Drug Control Policy Reauthorization Act of 2006.
    H.R. 2830, Pension Security and Transparency Act of 2005. 
Modified provisions passed the House in sec. 401 of H.R. 4, 
Pension Protection Act of 2006; and sec. 2201 of H.R. 4241, 
Deficit Reduction Act of 2005.
    H.R. 2831, Pension Preservation and Portability Act of 
2005. Modified provisions passed the House in H.R. 2830, 
Pension Security and Transparency Act of 2005; Further modified 
version of these provisions passed the House in H.R. 4, Pension 
Protection Act of 2006.
    The following bills had provisions that passed the House in 
H.R 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2006:
    H.R. 132, No Financial Aid for Sex Offenders Act;
    H.R. 508, Fed Up Higher Education Technical Amendments Act 
of 2005;
    H.R. 509, International Studies in Higher Education Act of 
2005;
    H.R. 510, Graduate Opportunities in Higher Education Act of 
2005;
    H.R. 511, Pell Grants Plus Act;
    H.R. 670, Teacher Recruitment and Retention Act of 2005;
    H.R. 761, Next Generation Hispanic-Serving Institutions 
Act;
    H.R. 1156, Gifted and Talented Education Enhancement Act of 
2005;
    H.R. 1522, Teacher and Nurse Support Act of 2005;
    H.R. 2637, Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know Act of 2005.
    H.R. 3975, Hurricane Regulatory Relief Act of 2005. 
Provisions of H.R. 3975 passed the House in H.R. 4241, Deficit 
Reduction Act of 2005, section 2029; Title II, Subtitle B, Part 
2--Higher Education Relief, sections 2142, 2148, 2149, 2150 
2151.
    H.R. 4793, To make available funds included in the Deficit 
Reduction Act of 2005 for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance 
Act of 1981 program for fiscal year 2006, and for other 
purposes passed House in S. 2320.
    H.R. 4785, To make available funds included in the Deficit 
Reduction Act of 2005 for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance 
Act of 1981 program for fiscal year 2006, and for other 
purposes passed House in S. 2320.
    H.R. 4919, To extend the educational flexibility program 
under section 4 of the Education Flexibility Partnership Act of 
1999 passed the House in S. 2363.
    H.R. 5837, Youth Build Transfer Act passed the House in S. 
3534.
    H.R. 6031, September 11 Survivors Student Loan Relief Act 
passed the House in H.R. 6138, Third Higher Education Extension 
Act of 2006.
    S. 2875, Public Lands Corps Healthy Forests Restoration Act 
of 2005 passed the House in S. 1238.

   E. LEGISLATION PASSED THE HOUSE (BILLS NOT REFERRED TO COMMITTEE)

    H.R. 3, Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users. The House passed 
bill contains provisions under the committee's jurisdiction in 
sections 1602 and 1605, relating to State Infrastructure Banks.
    H.R. 282, Iran Freedom Support Act. The House passed bill 
contains provisions under the committee's jurisdiction in 
section 206 (c) and (d), relating to pension plans.
    H.R. 1160, Welfare Reform Extension Act of 2005. Contains 
provisions to extend programs under the committee's 
jurisdiction.
    H.R. 1815/S. 1042, National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2006. Contains provisions in the House passed bill 
under the committee's jurisdiction (Assistance to Local 
Educational Agencies for Defense Dependents Education--sec. 
561, 562, 563; Extension of Waiver Authority of Secretary of 
Education With Respect to Student Financial Assistance During a 
War or Other National Emergency--sec. 571; and Statement of 
Policy and Report Relating to Contracting with Employers of 
Persons With Disabilities--sec. 815).
    H.R. 3021, TANF Extension Act of 2005. Contains provisions 
to extend programs under the committee's jurisdiction.
    H.R. 3672, TANF Emergency Response and Recovery Act of 
2005. Contains provisions within the committee's jurisdiction 
in section 7--relating to waiver of TANF penalties in Hurricane 
Damaged States.
    H.R. 4241, Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Provisions of 
H.R. 240, Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family Promotion 
Act of 2005 passed the House in Title II, Subtitle A of H.R. 
4241; Provisions of H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity 
Act of 2006 passed the House in Title II, Subtitle B, Part 1 of 
H.R. 4241; Modified provisions of H.R. 2830, Pension Security 
and Transparency Act of 2005 passed the House in section 2201 
of H.R. 4241; Provisions of H.R. 3975, Hurricane Regulatory 
Relief Act of 2005 passed the House in Title II, Subtitle B, 
Part 2--Higher Education Relief of H.R. 4241. H.R. 4472, Adam 
Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006. Contains 
provisions in the committee's jurisdiction.
    H.R. 4635, TANF and Child Care Continuation Act of 2005. 
Contains provisions to extend programs under the committee's 
jurisdiction.
    H.R. 4761, Deep Ocean Energy Resources Act of 2006. 
Contains provisions within the committee's jurisdiction 
relating to mining and petroleum schools, education funding, 
post-secondary scholarships, career technical and vocational 
education, minority-serving higher education institutions; and 
math and science programs.
    H.R. 5122, John Warner National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2007. The House passed bill contains provisions 
in Subtitle II--Assistance to Local Education Agencies for 
Defense Dependents Education, sections 571 and 572.
    H.R. 6111, To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to 
provide that the Tax Court may review claims for equitable 
innocent spouse relief and to suspend the running on the period 
of limitations while such claims are pending. Provisions 
included in sec. 115, Parity in Application of Certain Limits 
to Mental Health Benefits.
    H.R. 6344, Office of National Drug Control Policy 
Reauthorization Act of 2006 contains provisions under the 
committee's jurisdiction in sec. 105(c)(2)(C)(vi) (H.R. 2829 is 
a similar House companion bill).
    S. 250, Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education 
Improvement Act of 2006. The House struck all after the 
enacting clause and inserted the provisions of a similar 
measure H.R. 366, Vocational and Technical Education for the 
Future Act.
    S. 707, PREEMIE Act (Prematurity Research Expansion and 
Education for Mothers Who Deliver Infants Early Act). Contains 
provisions in sec. 7, Effective Date of Head Start Regulations.
    S. 843, Combating Autism Act of 2006. Contains provisions 
in section 399BB including the Head Start Act, the Early Start 
Act, the Child Care and Development Act, the Individuals with 
Disabilities Act, the Child Nutrition Act, and the 
Rehabilitation Act.
    S. 1238, Public Lands Corps Healthy Forests Restoration Act 
of 2005. (H.R. 2875 is a similar House companion bill).
    S. 2363, A bill to extend the educational flexibility 
program under section 4 of the Education Flexibility 
Partnership Act of 1999. (H.R. 4919 is a similar House 
companion bill).
    H. Con. Res. 95, Establishing the congressional budget for 
the United States Government for fiscal year 2006, revising 
appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal year 2005, and setting 
forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2007 
through 2010. Contains committee instructions pursuant to 
section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act.
    H. Res. 133, Providing amounts from the applicable accounts 
of the House of Representatives for continuing expenses of 
standing and select committees of the House from April 1, 2005, 
through April 30, 2005.
    H. Res. 224, Providing for the expenses of certain 
committees of the House of Representatives in the One Hundred 
Ninth Congress.

              F. LEGISLATION WITH FILED COMMITTEE REPORTS

109th Congress, First Session

    H. Res. 134, Requesting the President to transmit to the 
House of Representatives certain information relating to plan 
assets and liabilities of single-employer pension plans (House 
Report 109-34).
    H. Res. 467, Requesting that the President transmit to the 
House of Representatives information in his possession relating 
to contracts for services or construction related to Hurricane 
Katrina recovery that relate to wages and benefits to be paid 
to workers (House Report 109-258).
    H.R. 27, To enhance the workforce investment system of the 
Nation by strengthening one-stop career centers, providing for 
more effective governance arrangements, promoting access to a 
more comprehensive array of employment, training, and related 
services, establishing a targeted approach to serving youth, 
and improving performance accountability, and for other 
purposes (House Report 109-9, Pt. 1 and 2).
    H.R. 366, To amend the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and 
Technical Education Act of 1998 to strengthen and improve 
programs under that Act (House Report 109-25).
    H.R. 525, To amend title I of the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act of 1974 to improve access and choice for 
entrepreneurs with small businesses with respect to medical 
care for their employees (House Report 109-41).
    H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2005 (House 
Report 109-231).
    H.R. 739, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for adjudicative flexibility with regard to 
the filing of a notice of contest by an employer following the 
issuance of a citation or proposed assessment of a penalty by 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (House Report 
109-46).
    H.R. 740, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for greater efficiency at the Occupational 
Safety and Health Review Commission (House Report 109-47).
    H.R. 741, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for judicial deference to conclusions of law 
determined by the Occupational Safety and Health Review 
Commission with respect to an order issued by the Commission 
(House Report 109-50).
    H.R. 742, To amend the Occupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 to provide for the award of attorneys' fees and costs 
to small employers when such employers prevail in litigation 
prompted by the issuance of a citation by the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration (House Report 109-61, Pt. 1).
    H.R. 940, To amend the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
Compensation Act to clarify the exemption for recreational 
vessel support employees, and for other purposes (House Report 
109-161).
    H.R. 2123, To reauthorize the Head Start Act to improve the 
school readiness of disadvantaged children, and for other 
purposes (House Report 109-136).
    H.R. 2830, Pension Protection Act of 2005 (House Report 
109-232 Part 1).

109th Congress, Second Session

    H.R. 5293, Senior Independence Act of 2006 (House Report 
109-493).

          G. LEGISLATION ORDERED REPORTED FROM FULL COMMITTEE

109th Congress, First Session

    H.R. 27, Job Training Improvement Act of 2005, was ordered 
favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 26-20.
    H.R. 240, Personal Responsibility, Work, and Family 
Promotion Act of 2005, was ordered favorably reported, as 
amended, by a vote of 23-20.
    Committee Print of Amendments to the Social Security Act 
and Welfare Reform regarding the Committee's instructions 
pursuant to H. Con. Res. 95, the Budget Resolution for Fiscal 
Year 2006, was approved, as amended, for transmittal to the 
Committee on the Budget by a vote of 23-20.
    H.R. 366, Vocational and Technical Education for the Future 
Act, was ordered favorably reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    H.R. 525, Small Business Health Fairness Act of 2005, was 
ordered favorably reported by a vote of 25-22.
    H. Res. 134, Requesting the President to transmit to the 
House of Representatives certain information relating to plan 
assets and liabilities of single-employer pension plans, was 
ordered reported unfavorably by unanimous consent.
    H. Res. 467, Requesting that the President transmit to the 
House of Representatives information in his possession relating 
to contracts for services or construction related to Hurricane 
Katrina recovery that relate to wages and benefits to be paid 
to workers, was ordered unfavorably reported by a vote of 25-
20.
    H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity Act of 2005, was 
ordered favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 27-20, 1 
present.
    Committee Print of Amendments to the Higher Education Act 
regarding the Committee's instructions pursuant to H. Con. Res. 
95, the Budget Resolution for Fiscal Year 2006, was approved, 
as amended, for transmittal to the Committee on the Budget.
    H.R. 739, Occupational Safety and Health Small Business Day 
in Court Act, was ordered favorably reported by a vote of 27-
19.
    H.R. 740, Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission 
Efficiency Act, was ordered favorably reported, as amended, by 
a vote of 27-19.
    H.R. 741, Occupational Safety and Health Independent Review 
of OSHA Citations Act, was ordered favorably reported, as 
amended, by a vote of 27-19.
    H.R. 742, Occupational Safety and Health Small Employer 
Access to Justice Act, was ordered favorably reported by a vote 
of 27-18.
    H.R. 940, Recreational Marine Employment Act of 2005, was 
ordered favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 27-18.
    H.R. 2123, School Readiness Act of 2005, was ordered 
favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 48-0.
    H.R. 2830, Pension Protection Act of 2005, was ordered 
favorably reported, as amended, by a vote of 27 ayes and 22 
voting present.
    Committee Print of Amendments to the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act (ERISA) regarding the Committee's 
instructions pursuant to H. Con. Res. 95, the Budget Resolution 
for Fiscal Year 2006, was approved, as amended, for transmittal 
to the Committee on the Budget by voice vote.
    Committee Print of Family Education Reimbursement Act of 
2005 regarding the Committee's instructions pursuant to H. Con. 
Res. 95, the Budget Resolution for Fiscal Year 2006, was not 
agreed to by a vote of 21-26.

109th Congress, Second Session

    H.R. 5293, Senior Independence Act of 2006, was ordered 
favorably reported, as amended, by voice vote.

 H. CONFERENCE REPORTS FILED WITH EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE MEMBERS 
                         APPOINTED AS CONFEREES

109th Congress, First Session

    H.R. 3, SAFETEA-LU or Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and 
Efficient Transportation Equity Act of 2005 (House Report 109-
203).
    H.R. 6,* Energy Policy Act of 2005 (House Report 109-190).
    H.R. 1815, National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2006 (House Report 109-360).
    S. 1932/H.R. 4241, Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (House 
Report 109-362).

109th Congress, Second Session

    S. 250/H.R. 366,* Vocational and Technical Education for 
the Future Act (House Report 109-597).
    H.R. 5122, National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2007 (House Report 109-702).
    * Bills referred to committee.

   I. CONFERENCES WITH EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE MEMBERS APPOINTED AS 
                               CONFEREES

    H.R. 3--SAFETEA-LU or Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and 
Efficient Transportation Equity Act of 2005. Conferees 
appointed 5/26/2005 for consideration of secs. 1118, 1605, 
1809, 3018, and 3030 of the House bill, and secs. 1304, 1819, 
6013, 6031, 6038, and 7603 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Kline, Keller, and 
Barrow.
    H.R. 6*--Energy Policy Act of 2005. Conferees appointed 7/
14/2005 for consideration of secs. 121, 632, 640, 2206, and 
2209 of the House bill, and secs. 625, 1103, 1104, and 1106 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Norwood, Johnson, Sam, and Kind.
    H.R. 1815--National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2006. Conferees appointed 12/16/2005 for consideration of 
secs. 561-563, 571, and 815 of the House bill, and secs. 581-
584 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Castle, Wilson (SC), and Holt.
    H.R. 4241/S. 1932--Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Conferees 
appointed 12/16/05 for consideration of title VII of the Senate 
bill and title II and subtitle C of title III of the House 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: Boehner, 
McKeon, and Miller, George.
    H.R. 2830*--Pension Protection Act of 2005. Conferees 
appointed 3/8/2006 for consideration of the House bill and the 
Senate amendment thereto, and modifications committed to 
conference: McKeon, Johnson, Sam, Kline, Tiberi, Miller, 
George, Payne, and Andrews.
    H.R. 366*/S. 250--Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Improvement Act of 2006. Conferees appointed 7/12/06 
for consideration of the Senate bill and the House amendment 
thereto: McKeon, Castle, Souder, Osborne, Musgrave, Miller, 
George, Woolsey, and Kind.
    H.R. 5122--Conferees appointed 9/7/06 for consideration of 
secs. 571 and 572 of the House bill, and secs. 571, 572, 1081, 
and 1104 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
to conference: McKeon, Kline, and Miller.
    * Bills referred to committee.

         V. Committee on Education and the Workforce Statistics


               A. GENERAL STATISTICS ON REFERRED MATTERS

Total Number of Bills and Resolutions Referred....................   738
Total Number of Hearings..........................................    62
    Total Number of Hearings Held by the Full Committee...........    22
Total Number of Field Hearings....................................    13
    Total Number of Field Hearings Held by the Full Committee.....     3
Total Number of Markup Sessions...................................    26
Total Number of Full Committee Markup Sessions....................    18
Total Number of Measures Ordered Reported by the Full Committee...    19
Total Number of Filed Reports.....................................    21
    Total Number of Committee Reports.............................    14
    Total Number of Filed Conference Reports......................     6
    Report on the Activities of the Committee for the 109th 
      Congress....................................................     1
Total Number of Conferences with Committee Members Appointed 
    Conferees.....................................................     7
Total Number of Bills and Resolutions Passed the House............    84
Total Number of Bills Passed the House in Another Measure.........    27
Total Number of Bills Enacted Into Law............................    37

      B. NOT REFERRED MATTERS CONTAINING COMMITTEE'S JURISDICTION

Total Number of Not Referred Bills That Passed the House..........    22
Total Number of Not Referred Bills Enacted Into Law...............    21

              SUBCOMMITTEE ON EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE RELATIONS


                        I. Summary of Activities

    Members of the House Education and the Workforce Employer-
Employee Relations (EER) Subcommittee, led by Chairman Sam 
Johnson (R-TX), worked successfully with President George W. 
Bush during the 109th Congress to modernize outdated federal 
pension and labor laws to help working families meet the 
challenges and opportunities of the modern economy.
    Pension reform and worker retirement security were key 
issues for the EER Subcommittee during the 109th Congress 
because of the continuing decline of the defined benefit 
pension system--a decline that is putting current and future 
retiree pension benefits at risk--and also because of ongoing 
fallout from the 2002 corporate collapses at employers such as 
Enron and WorldCom.
    The following is a summary of the subcommittee's chief 
accomplishment in the 109th Congress: an overhaul of private 
pension laws on behalf of workers, retirees, and taxpayers.

      PROTECTING WORKER PENSIONS AND ENHANCING RETIREMENT SECURITY

    On July 28, 2006, the House passed the Pension Protection 
Act (H.R. 4), legislation that reflects the bipartisan 
agreement struck by House and Senate negotiators to reform 
outdated worker pension laws. President Bush signed the measure 
into law in August.
    The pension laws on the books today were written for a 
1970s economy with a 1970s workforce. Times have changed, but 
as the EER Subcommittee and the full Education and the 
Workforce Committee discovered after years of hearings and 
legislative action, these laws have not. The Pension Protection 
Act aims to reform broken pension rules that no longer serve 
the interests of workers who count on their retirement savings 
being there for them when they need it. For example, the 
Pension Protection Act includes tough new funding requirements 
to ensure employers adequately and consistently fund their 
pension plans, provide workers with meaningful disclosure about 
the financial status of their benefits, and protect taxpayers 
from a possible multi-billion dollar bailout of the federal 
Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC).
    Specifically, the law has seven major areas of reform. 
These include:

1. Reforming Outdated Single-Employer Defined Benefit Pension Laws

    H.R. 4 ensures employers and unions fund their pension 
promises to workers by:
          
 Providing a permanent interest rate phased 
        on a modified ``yield curve'' for employers to more 
        accurately measure current pension liabilities as they 
        come due;
          
 Requiring employers to make sufficient 
        contributions to plans in order to meet a 100 percent 
        funding target and erase funding shortfalls over seven 
        years;
          
 Prohibiting employers from using credit 
        balances if their plans are funded at less than 80 
        percent;
          
 Triggering accelerated contributions for 
        ``at-risk'' plans. A plan is deemed at-risk if it fails 
        to meet one of two tests. First, it would be deemed at-
        risk if it falls below 70 percent funded status using 
        the worse-case scenario assumptions (i.e., employers 
        cannot count credit balances and must assume employees 
        take the most expense benefits and retire at the 
        earliest possible date). If an employer does not meet 
        this test, it can forgo at-risk status only if it is 80 
        percent funded using standard assumptions (this test 
        would be phased in over three years, starting at 65 
        percent in 2008 and rising to 70 percent in 2009, 75 
        percent in 2010, and 80 percent in 2011). If a company 
        meets one of the two tests, it would avoid the at-risk 
        designation; however it would still be required to make 
        up its overall funding shortfall over seven years like 
        any other underfunded plan;
          
 Reducing the smoothing of interest rates to 
        two years (instead of five for assets and four for 
        liabilities under current law) to improve funding 
        accuracy and protect plans against market and funding 
        volatility;
          
 Permitting employers to make additional 
        maximum deductible contributions of up to 150 percent 
        of current liability;
          
 Prohibiting employers and union leaders from 
        increasing benefits if a plan is less than 80 percent 
        funded, unless the benefits are paid for immediately;
          
 Prohibiting further benefit accruals for 
        lump sum distributions or shutdown benefits from plans 
        funded at less than 60 percent. Once a plan is above 60 
        percent, the employer and the union then decide how to 
        credit past service accruals;
          
 Restricting the use of deferred executive 
        compensation arrangements for employers with severely 
        underfunded plans;
          
 Permanently establishing an employer-paid 
        termination premium of $1,250 per participant if a plan 
        sponsor terminates its employee pension plan upon 
        entering bankruptcy. The plan sponsor would pay the 
        premium after a company emerges from bankruptcy;
          
 Giving airlines that opt for a ``hard 
        freeze'' of their pension plans an additional 10 years 
        to meet their funding obligations and avoid defaulting 
        on their plans and turning these obligations over to 
        the PBGC. An employer-paid termination premium of 
        $2,500 per plan participant also must be paid by these 
        airlines if they terminate their employee pension plan 
        upon entering bankruptcy. The plan sponsor would pay 
        the premium after a company emerges from bankruptcy; 
        and
          
 Giving airlines that opt for a ``soft 
        freeze'' of their pension plans an additional three 
        years to meet their funding obligations and avoid 
        defaulting on their plans and turning these obligations 
        over to the PBGC. An employer-paid termination premium 
        of $2,500 per plan participant also must be paid by 
        these airlines if they terminate their employee pension 
        plan upon entering bankruptcy. The plan sponsor would 
        pay the premium after a company emerges from 
        bankruptcy. For these airlines, the bill also extends 
        the deficit reduction contribution relief--that was 
        included in the 2004 Pension Funding Equity Act--
        through 2007.

2. Reforming the Multiemployer Pension System on Behalf of Workers

    H.R. 4 strengthens the multiemployer pension system to 
ensure these plans are better funded by:
          
 Identifying underfunded multiemployer 
        pension plans and establishing quantifiable benchmarks 
        for measuring a plan's funding improvement;
          
 Providing new notice requirements for 
        underfunded plans;
          
 Changing the amortization schedule for any 
        plan benefit amendments from 30 years to 15 years;
          
 Increasing the maximum deductible limit to 
        140 percent of current liability, providing additional 
        funding flexibility for plans each year;
          
 Requiring plan trustees to improve the 
        health of the plan by one-third within 10 years if a 
        plan is less than 80 percent funded or will hit a 
        funding deficiency within seven years;
          
 Prohibiting benefit increases if the 
        increase causes the plan to fall below 65 percent 
        funded status; and
          
 Establishing new funding standards and 
        possible benefit restrictions for multiemployer plans 
        that are funded at less than 65 percent.

3. Establishing Legal Certainty for Hybrid Pension Plans

    H.R. 4 ensures hybrid pension plans--such as cash balance 
plans--remain a viable part of the defined benefit system by:
          
 Ending the legal uncertainty surrounding 
        cash balance pension plans and ensuring they remain a 
        viable retirement security option for workers and 
        employers; and
          
 Establishing a simple age discrimination 
        standard for all defined benefit plans that clarifies 
        current law with respect to age discrimination 
        requirements under ERISA on a prospective basis.

4. Providing Workers With Meaningful Retirement Security Protections

H.R. 4 strengthens retirement security safeguards to preserve workers' 
        and retirees' peace of mind by:

          
 Requiring both single and multiemployer 
        plans to include more detailed and specific information 
        on their Form 5500 filings, the equivalent of a pension 
        plan's federal tax return;
          
 Enhancing Form 4010 disclosure requirements 
        and making all Form 4010 information filed with the 
        PBGC available to the public, except for sensitive 
        corporate proprietary information;
          
 Establishing an 80 percent, at-risk 
        threshold that determines whether plans pose a threat 
        to the PBGC and therefore file 4010 information;
          
 Requiring both single and multiemployer 
        pension plans to notify workers and retirees of the 
        funded status of their plan within 120 days after the 
        close of the plan year;
          
 Giving employers the option of allowing 
        workers to sell their company stock three years after 
        receiving it in their 401(k) plan;
          
 Prohibiting companies from forcing employees 
        to invest any of their own retirement savings 
        contributions in the stock of the employer;
          
 Making clear that companies have a fiduciary 
        responsibility for workers' savings during ``blackout'' 
        periods, when workers are temporarily barred from 
        making changes to their 401(k) investments; and
          
 Requiring companies to give workers 
        quarterly benefit statements that include information 
        about accounts, including the value of their assets, 
        their rights to diversify, and the importance of 
        maintaining a diversified portfolio.

5. Providing Workers With Access to High-Quality Investment Advice

    H.R. 4 provides--for the first time ever--voluntary, 
professional investment advice to workers by:
          
 Permitting qualified ``fiduciary advisers'' 
        to offer face-to-face, personally-tailored investment 
        advice to help employees manage their 401(k) and other 
        retirement options;
          
 Requiring tough fiduciary and disclosure 
        safeguards to ensure that advice provided to employees 
        is solely in their best interest;
          
 Requiring fiduciary advisers for employer-
        sponsored plans [such as 401(k)s] to base their 
        recommendations on a computer model that is certified 
        and audited by an independent party; and
          
 Requiring fiduciary advisers for non-
        employer sponsored plans [such as IRAs] to charge a 
        flat rate fee for one year (with no computer model). 
        During that time, the U.S. Department of Labor, in 
        consultation with Treasury, will study whether a 
        computer model exists to tailor professional investment 
        advice to an individual's own unique needs based on 
        personal and subjective criteria about their financial 
        and family circumstances, taking into account the full 
        range of investment options available to IRAs, 
        including equities and bonds. If they cannot certify 
        that such a model exists, then the advisers would be 
        free to provide advice free from the prohibited 
        transaction exemption as long as they certify in 
        writing that the company has adopted written policies 
        and procedures which ensure that the investment advice 
        provided is in the employee's best interest.

6. Modernizing Defined Contribution Laws to Encourage Retirement 
        Savings

    H.R. 4 makes significant reforms to ensure Americans have 
more opportunities than ever to save for their retirement by:
          
 Encouraging employers to automatically 
        enroll workers in defined contribution pension plans, 
        while giving workers the option to opt-out of the 
        plans;
          
 Making permanent the individual retirement 
        account (IRA) and pension provisions enacted under 2001 
        tax cut legislation. The 2001 law increased annual 
        contribution limits for IRAs and qualified pension 
        plans, created additional ``catch-up'' contributions 
        for individuals age 50 and older, and created 
        incentives for small employers to offer pension plans. 
        These reforms--initially enacted in 2001--are scheduled 
        to expire in 2010;
          
 Extending permanently indexing to inflation 
        the ``Savers'' Credit,'' which is set to expire after 
        December 31, 2006. This credit allows eligible 
        individuals who make contributions to an IRA or 
        qualified pension plan to receive a federal ``match'' 
        in the form of an income tax credit for the first 
        $2,000 of annual contributions;
          
 Giving taxpayers the option of ``split tax 
        refunds,'' in which they may choose to deposit a 
        portion of their federal tax refund directly into an 
        IRA;
          
 Waiving a 10-percent early IRA distribution 
        penalty for military reservists and national guardsmen 
        who are called to active duty for at least 180 days. 
        Withdrawn amounts may be repaid to the IRA or pension 
        plan within two years of the distribution without 
        regard to the annual contribution limits;
          
 Waiving the 10-percent early distribution 
        penalty for public safety employees who participate in 
        governmental pension plans with a Deferred Retirement 
        Option Plan (DROP) benefit feature;
          
 Allowing tax-free rollovers from the IRA or 
        pension of a deceased individual to an IRA or pension 
        of a designated beneficiary. Under current law, such 
        transfers are tax-free only if made to the account of a 
        spouse; and
          
 Allowing disabled individuals to contribute 
        to an IRA even if they do not have earned income.

7. Ensuring Affordability of Health Care and Long-Term Care

    H.R. 4 takes important steps to help workers and retirees 
combat rising costs of health insurance by:
          
 Encouraging the development of combination 
        insurance products, which provide consumers with 
        various insurance protections in a single product while 
        also providing a saving feature. Combination products 
        may be more attractive to consumers and less expensive.
    The Pension Protection Act will reassure workers and 
retirees who rely on pension benefits, provide certainty for 
employers who offer them, and protect taxpayers who could be 
called upon to fund a bailout of the Pension Benefit Guaranty 
Corporation. This type of overhaul had been a long time coming 
for the EER subcommittee, and with the President's signature, 
workers, retirees, and taxpayers alike have seen a major 
victory.

  II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations


109th Congress, First Session

    April 28, 2005--Hearing on ``Challenges to Employee Efforts 
to Preserve Retiree Health Care Benefits'' (109-12).
    May 17, 2005--Hearing on ``Examining Pay-For-Performance 
Measurers and Other Trends in Employer-Sponsored Health Care'' 
(109-17).
    November 10, 2005--Hearing on ``H.R. 1445, Workplace 
Religious Freedom Act of 2005'' (109-26).

109th Congress, Second Session

    May 4, 2006--Hearing on ``Examining the Impact of State 
Mandates on Employer-Provided Health Insurance'' (109-40).
    July 20, 2006--Hearing on ``H.R. 16, Tribal Labor Relations 
Restoration Act of 2005'' (109-48).
    July 31, 2006--Field hearing on ``Immigration: Enforcing 
Employee Work Eligibility Laws and Implementing a Stronger 
Employment Verification System,'' in Plano, Texas (109-51).
    August 30, 2006--Field hearing on ``Examining the 
Retirement Security of State and Local Government Employees,'' 
in Springfield, Illinois (109-54).
    September 28, 2006--Hearing on ``Examining Whether 
Combining Guards and Other Employees in Bargaining Units Would 
Weaken National Security'' (109-60).

  III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations


109th Congress

    June 22, 2005--H.R. 2830, Pension Protection Act of 2005 
was ordered favorably reported, as amended, to the Full 
Committee by voice vote.

       IV. Subcommittee on Employer-Employee Relations Statistics

Total Number of Bills and Resolutions Referred to Subcommittee....   140
Total Number of Hearings..........................................     8
    Field.........................................................     2
Total Number of Subcommittee Markup Sessions......................     1
Total Number of Bills Reported From Subcommittee..................     1

                 SUBCOMMITTEE ON WORKFORCE PROTECTIONS


                        I. Summary of Activities

    The Workforce Protections Subcommittee, chaired by Rep. 
Charlie Norwood (R-GA), devoted significant energy and 
attention during the 109th Congress to the needs of American 
workers and their families. The Subcommittee focused particular 
attention on the priority of improving worker safety, 
particularly workers in U.S. mines. That effort ended with the 
first comprehensive mine safety reforms in a generation.
    Following the tragic January 2006 accident at the Sago Mine 
in West Virginia and the others that occurred since then, the 
Education and the Workforce Committee actively sought to 
discover meaningful facts about the tragedies and how to 
prevent them in the future.
    A week after the Sago Mine tragedy, the Committee 
facilitated a bipartisan briefing by Department of Labor 
officials, who detailed the events that occurred, the Mine 
Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) response, and how its 
investigation would proceed. This was the first Department of 
Labor briefing on the tragedy held on Capitol Hill. Additional 
briefings with MSHA staff have continued throughout the 
accident investigations.
    In January, former chairman of the committee and current 
House Majority Leader John Boehner (R-OH), Workforce 
Protections Subcommittee chair Charlie Norwood (R-GA), and Rep. 
Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) wrote to Secretary of Labor Elaine 
Chao, urging her to immediately reverse a Labor Department 
policy that barred public access to factual information under 
the Freedom of Information Act, such as inspector notes, until 
a mine safety case had been closed. On January 30, the Labor 
Department reversed its policy.
    Seeking to harness the power of technology to help bolster 
mine safety in the future, the Committee staff facilitated 
meetings with manufacturers of mine safety devices, including 
mine refuge chambers, to learn about the uses and limitations 
of safety technology. These meetings continued throughout 2006.
    On March 1, 2006, the Committee held the first in a series 
of hearings on mine safety. This oversight hearing served to 
provide a general overview of mine health and safety 
regulations, from the perspective of federal regulators, 
representatives of the mining industry, and those who work in 
mines. Another hearing followed later in the month, during 
which House Members from both parties had an opportunity to 
share their unique perspectives on mine safety. Notably, all 
three Members of the West Virginia delegation to the U.S. House 
testified at the hearing. Simultaneously, thorough briefings 
from federal mine health and safety officials continued to 
complement the information gathered at these oversight 
hearings.
    The Committee's oversight activities pointed toward a very 
clear need for better communications technology, modernized 
safety practices inside U.S. mines, and strengthening the 
enforcement of current mine safety laws--needs addressed 
comprehensively by the Mine Improvement and New Emergency 
Response (MINER) Act, which was passed in May 2006 by the 
Senate without opposition and introduced separately in the 
House by Rep. Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) that same month.
    Following Senate passage of the MINER Act (S. 2803), 
Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman McKeon struck a 
deal with Norwood, Capito, Rep. Harold Rogers (R-KY), members 
of the West Virginia and Kentucky delegations, and the House 
leadership to bring to the House floor the Senate-passed 
measure under an expedited process. S. 2803 represents the 
first meaningful reforms to mine health and safety law in a 
generation. Below is a brief summary of the measure's key 
components: modernized safety practices; enhanced 
communications technology; and strengthening current mine 
safety laws.

Modernized Safety Practices

    The MINER Act aims to:
          
 Make certain mines develop and continuously 
        update a written emergency response plan and require 
        each mine's plan to be continuously reviewed, updated, 
        and re-certified by the Mine Safety and Health 
        Administration (MSHA) every six months;
          
 Double the amount of oxygen available to 
        individual miners and require mine operators to store 
        extra oxygen packs along escape routes and to perform 
        periodic checks on the devices;
          
 Require strengthened seals for abandoned 
        sections of mines;
          
 Launch a competitive grant program for new 
        mine safety technology to be administered by the 
        National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health 
        (NIOSH); and
          
 Start an interagency working group to 
        provide a formal means of sharing non-classified 
        technology that would have applicability to mine 
        safety.

Enhanced Communications Technology

    The MINER Act aims to:
          
 Establish wireless two-way communications 
        and an electronic tracking system within three years, 
        permitting those on the surface to locate persons 
        trapped underground.

Strengthening Current Mine Safety Laws

    The MINER Act aims to:
          
 Ensure that all mine operators notify MSHA 
        of all incidents or accidents which pose a reasonable 
        risk of death within 15 minutes and set a civil penalty 
        of $5,000 to $60,000 for mine operators who fail to do 
        so;
          
 Raise the criminal penalty cap to $250,000 
        for first offenses and $500,000 for second offenses, as 
        well as increase the maximum civil penalty for flagrant 
        violations to $220,000; and
          
 Give MSHA the power to shut down a mine in 
        cases where the mine has refused to pay a final order 
        MSHA penalty.
    Throughout the 109th Congress, the Workforce Protections 
Subcommittee remained dedicated to discovering meaningful facts 
about this the 2006 mine tragedies and the safety of American 
mines overall. Advancing broad, comprehensive legislation to 
President Bush's desk was among the panel's most significant 
accomplishments in years.

     II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections


109th Congress, First Session

    May 12, 2005--Hearing on ``Examining Voluntary Employer 
Compliance Programs that Improve Occupational Safety and 
Health'' (109-15).
    May 26, 2005--Hearing on ``H.R. 2561, Improving Access to 
Workers' Compensation for Injured Federal Workers Act, and H.R. 
697, Federal Firefighters Fairness Act of 2005'' (109-20).

109th Congress, Second Session

    March 1, 2006--Hearing on ``Evaluating Health and Safety 
Regulations in the American Mining Industry'' (109-31).
    March 16, 2006--Hearing on ``Mine Safety and Health: A 
Congressional Perspective'' (109-32).
    April 27, 2006--Hearing on ``Examining the Use of Non-
Consensus Standards in Workplace Health and Safety'' (109-36).
    June 14, 2006--Hearing on ``Addressing Concerns about the 
U.S. Department of Labor's Use of Non-Consensus Standards in 
Workplace Health and Safety'' (109-44).
    August 14, 2006--Field hearing on ``Immigration: Economic 
Impact on American Workers and Their Wages,'' in Gainesville, 
Georgia (109-52).

     III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections


109th Congress

    March 10, 2005--H.R. 940, Recreational Marine Employment 
Act of 2005 was ordered favorably reported to the Full 
Committee by a vote of 6-5.

          IV. Subcommittee on Workforce Protections Statistics

Total Number of Bills and Resolutions Referred to Subcommittee....   109
Total Number of Hearings..........................................     7
    Field.........................................................     1
Total Number of Subcommittee Markup Sessions......................     1
Total Number of Bills Reported From Subcommittee..................     1

              SUBCOMMITTEE ON 21ST CENTURY COMPETITIVENESS


                        I. Summary of Activities

    In the 109th Congress, the Subcommittee on 21st Century 
Competitiveness undertook a bold agenda for education reform to 
help bolster American competitiveness and encourage constant 
improvement in education.
    The subcommittee, chaired in the 109th Congress by Rep. 
Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon (R-CA) and Rep. Ric Keller (R-FL), 
has jurisdiction over the Higher Education Act, America's job 
training system under the Workforce Investment Act, welfare 
reform legislation, and many other federal laws that play a 
vital role in helping to equip Americans with the tools to 
compete and prosper in the 21st Century economy.
    The following is a summary of the subcommittee's chief 
accomplishment in the 109th Congress: the reauthorization of 
the Higher Education Act (HEA), part of which took place 
through the fiscal year 2006 budget reconciliation process.

Expanding College Access and Ensuring Student Aid Programs Serve the 
        Needs of Students First

    Runaway entitlement spending is a threat to every American, 
from students and families to workers and retirees. In the 
109th Congress and prior, the 21st Century Competitiveness 
Subcommittee worked to rein in spending and reform outdated 
entitlement programs that aren't meeting the needs of those 
they are supposed to serve. Key components of that effort are 
reforms to student loan programs that improve program 
efficiency and effectiveness.
    The Deficit Reduction Act (P.L. 109-171), enacted in 
February 2006, reauthorized mandatory spending programs under 
the Higher Education Act by including protections for taxpayers 
coupled with key benefits for students. The measure generated 
billions in savings and directed resources to expand college 
access. Among the chief reforms of the legislation are:
    Improving program efficiency by reducing lender subsidies. 
Excess lender subsidies known as ``floor income,'' any rate of 
return higher than the guaranteed minimum, have been 
eliminated, and federal insurance against defaulted loans has 
been reduced by one percent to shift a greater share of risk to 
private sector loan providers. Building on Republican efforts 
to protect students and taxpayers, the 9.5 percent minimum rate 
of return, which was previously available to some lenders but 
was closed off through Republican efforts in 2004, has been 
eliminated permanently and comprehensively while offering 
limited flexibility for small non-profit student aid providers 
to phase out the subsidies without jeopardizing student 
benefits.
    Increasing loan limits to give students access to more 
financial aid. Loan limits for first-year students were last 
adjusted in 1986, and for second-year students in 1992. To 
better reflect current student need, first-year student limits 
have increased from $2,625 to $3,500 and second-year student 
limits have increased from $3,500 to $4,500. However, aggregate 
undergraduate borrowing limits remained unchanged at $23,000, 
ensuring students are not saddled with unnecessarily high debt 
loads. Graduate unsubsidized annual borrowing limits also 
increased from $10,000 to $12,000.
    Reducing loan fees so students can keep more of what they 
borrow. Total loan fees have been reduced from up to four 
percent today to just one percent on all student loans.
    Retaining scheduled interest rates for students and 
graduates. Student loan interest rates were set at 6.8 percent 
beginning on July 1, 2006, maintaining current law and 
reflecting bipartisan agreements developed in years prior with 
student groups.
    Providing new loan opportunities for graduate students. 
Graduate students are now, for the first time ever, able to 
access PLUS loans, which allow borrowing up to the cost of 
attendance to provide a new source to help finance graduate 
study.
    Ending conflicts of interest in the `school as lender' 
program. In the very narrow program in which schools can also 
act as lenders, the potential for a conflict of interest arises 
when schools making loans stand to benefit financially from 
increases in student debt. No new schools are permitted to 
enter this arrangement, and to protect student interests, 
additional restrictions are applied to schools already 
participating to ensure proceeds are directed to need based 
aid.
    Preventing fraud and abuse in federal student aid. An IRS 
data match system to verify financial aid information has been 
established to ensure student financial aid is reaching 
students who need it the most and funds are not being wasted or 
misused.
    Clarifying federal student aid rules on drug-related 
offenses. The measure clarified current federal law prohibiting 
students from receiving federal grant, work, or loan assistance 
if they have been convicted of an offense under federal or 
state law involving the possession or sale of a controlled 
substance. Consistent with congressional intent when the 
provisions were first established in 1998, the law clearly will 
apply to students who are currently enrolled, receiving federal 
Title IV aid, and convicted of the offense.
    Increasing grant aid for students studying math and 
science. Grant aid has been established under the Deficit 
Reduction Act to reward low-income, high achieving college 
students in their first and second years, as well as low-
income, high achieving students pursuing degrees in math, 
science, and critical foreign languages in their third and 
fourth years.
    Permanently expanding student loan relief for high demand 
teachers. Building on efforts in recent years to help schools 
recruit and retain highly qualified teachers in key subjects, 
Congress has more than tripled the amount of loan relief for 
highly qualified math, science, and special education teachers 
who commit to teaching in high-need K-12 schools for five 
years. The expanded loan relief first enacted in 2004 has been 
made permanent, with maximum loan forgiveness for such teachers 
increased from $5,000 to $17,500.
    Easing financial burdens on active duty soldiers. The 
measure allows active duty members of the military to receive 
loan deferment--meaning payments are not required and interest 
will not accrue--when serving the nation.
    Giving students greater flexibility to take advantage of 
distance education. Current federal rules on schools limit the 
number of students who can be enrolled in distance education 
and the number of courses an eligible institution may offer via 
distance education. To ensure the higher education system can 
take advantage of technological advancements that create new 
opportunities for students, the so-called ``50 percent rule'' 
restricting instruction by telecommunications has been 
repealed. Financial rules, administrative capability rules, and 
accreditation safeguards remain in place to prevent fraud and 
abuse.
    In addition to these reforms enacted into law, the 
subcommittee also advanced to the House legislation to 
reauthorize the discretionary programs within the Higher 
Education Act. This legislation--passed by the House in March 
2006--aimed to restore the Act to its original mission of 
providing access to college for low- and middle-income 
students. Following are some of the key reforms of this 
legislation, the College Access and Opportunity Act (H.R. 609):

Strengthening Pell Grants, Student Aid, Student Access, and Minority 
        Serving Institutions

    The College Access and Opportunity Act aimed to:
          
 Provide extra Pell Grant aid for high-
        achieving first and second-year students.
          
 Provide year-round Pell Grant aid for 
        students attending school throughout the year, and 
        encourage students to make progress toward degree 
        completion.
          
 Remove an incentive for colleges to raise 
        tuition by repealing Pell Grant ``tuition 
        sensitivity.''
          
 Simplify the financial aid process for needy 
        students and families.
          
 Strengthen federal college access programs 
        (TRIO and GEAR UP).
          
 Strengthen minority serving institutions.

Reducing Red Tape for Students and Graduates

    The College Access and Opportunity Act aimed to:
          
 Allow consumers to shop for the best deals 
        on consolidation loans by eliminating the ``single-
        holder'' rule.
          
 Protect borrowers' credit history by 
        requiring lenders to report to all national credit 
        bureaus.
          
 Improve repayment options for borrowers 
        having trouble.
          
 Provide additional consumer protection 
        information to borrowers regarding consolidation loans.

Removing barriers for non-traditional students

    The College Access and Opportunity Act aimed to:
          
 Protect low-income and non-traditional 
        students by ensuring student aid isn't jeopardized by 
        burdensome ``90/10'' rule.
          
 Ensure fair recognition for institutions of 
        higher education.
          
 Remove barriers that may prevent home-
        schooled students from pursuing higher education.

Empowering consumers through ``sunshine'' in college costs and 
        accreditation

    The College Access and Opportunity Act aimed to:
          
 Give consumers more information about what 
        they're getting for their money.
          
 Shine a spotlight on excessive tuition 
        hikes.
          
 Make accrediting agencies more accountable 
        by making information more public.
          
 Make transfer of credit policies public.

Other features

    The College Access and Opportunity Act aimed to:
          
 Protect students' rights and personal 
        privacy.
          
 Create opportunities for graduate study that 
        will improve K-12 education.
          
 Strengthen international and foreign 
        language studies programs for the post-9/11 era.
          
 Improve teacher training by increasing 
        accountability.
          
 Strengthen higher education opportunities 
        for military personnel.
          
 Promote financial and economic literacy.
          
 Reduce red tape for schools.
          
 Expand loan relief for nurses, educators, 
        and other professionals in areas of national need.
          
 Strengthen U.S. competitiveness through math 
        and science programs.
          
 Repeal duplicative, expired, and/or 
        unnecessary programs.
    Today, the federal government is investing tens of billions 
of dollars annually in direct aid to students, and additional 
hundreds of millions of dollars are provided to colleges and 
universities. Yet many of these resources are no longer focused 
on expanding access for students, the purpose for which the Act 
was established four decades ago. And troubling cost increases, 
year after year, have made it clear that colleges and 
universities must remain accountable to students and parents, 
the consumers of higher education. This was a message of the 
21st Century Competitiveness Subcommittee in the 109th Congress 
and will remain a core message for Committee Republicans for 
years to come.

 II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness


109th Congress, First Session

    March 15, 2005--Hearing on ``Welfare Reform: 
Reauthorization of Work and Child Care'' (109-4).
    March 17, 2005--Hearing on ``Tracking International 
Students in Higher Education: A Progress Report'' (Jointly with 
the Subcommittee on Select Education) (109-5).
    May 5, 2005--Hearing on ``College Credit Mobility: Can 
Transfer of Credit Policies Be Improved?'' (109-14).
    May 19, 2005--Hearing on ``Challenges to American 
Competitiveness in Math and Science'' (109-18).

109th Congress, Second Session

    May 23, 2006--Hearing on ``Paying for College: Innovative 
Private-Sector Proposals to Complement Record Federal 
Investment in Student Aid'' (109-42).
    September 26, 2006--Hearing on ``The Internet and the 
College Campus: How the Entertainment Industry and Higher 
Education are Working to Combat Illegal Piracy'' (109-58).

 III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness


109th Congress

    February 9, 2005--H.R. 27, Job Training Improvement Act of 
2005 was ordered favorably reported, as amended, to the Full 
Committee by a vote of 18-15.
    July 13, 14, 2005--H.R. 609, College Access and Opportunity 
Act of 2005 was ordered favorably reported, as amended, to the 
Full Committee by a vote of 18-15.

IV. Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness Statistics

Total Number of Bills and Resolution Referred to Subcommittee.....   239
Total Number of Hearings..........................................     6
    Field.........................................................     0
Total Number of Subcommittee Markup Sessions......................     3
Total Number of Bills Reported From Subcommittee..................     2

                    SUBCOMMITTEE ON EDUCATION REFORM


                        I. Summary of Activities

    In the 109th Congress, the Subcommittee on Education Reform 
held hearings and approved legislation to strengthen early 
childhood education, help states and local communities improve 
career and technical education, and build upon the 
implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act. Chaired by Rep. 
Mike Castle (R-DE), the panel has jurisdiction broadly over 
education programs from preschool to the high school level, 
including the No Child Left Behind Act, special education, 
preschool programs including the Head Start Act, school lunch 
and child nutrition programs, vocational and technical 
education, and anti-poverty programs.
    The following is a summary of the subcommittee's chief 
accomplishment in the 109th Congress: the enactment of 
legislation to strengthen and reauthorize career and technical 
education programs.
    By an overwhelming bipartisan vote of 399-1, the U.S. House 
of Representatives in July 2006 approved the Carl D. Perkins 
Career and Technical Education Improvement Act (S. 250) 
conference report, legislation to strengthen career and 
technical education and improve educational opportunities for 
students. The measure--which initially passed the Education 
Reform Subcommittee in 2005--reauthorized the Perkins career 
education program.
    The conference report was a culmination of a bipartisan 
effort to increase academic rigor in our career and technical 
programs and to ensure students have the skills necessary to 
enter the workforce or to continue to an institution of higher 
learning. It continues both the State Grant program, which 
infuses additional integration of academic and technical 
courses, as well as the Tech Prep program, which importantly 
focuses on articulation between secondary and postsecondary 
institutions.
    Under the Perkins program, states and local communities 
help prepare youth and adults for the future by building their 
academic and technical skills. The programs equip students with 
the knowledge to proceed with postsecondary education or pursue 
other postsecondary opportunities. Each year, millions of 
students enrich their secondary and postsecondary educational 
opportunities through participation in career and technical 
education, and this legislation fulfilled a commitment to 
improving the performance-levels of those students.
    Also included in the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Improvement Act were measures that will ensure 
academic courses for career and technical students are rigorous 
and challenging. It also supports student achievement in core 
academic subjects, as defined by the No Child Left Behind Act, 
and emphasizes math and science education that incorporates the 
use of technology.
    Each year, millions of students participate in career and 
technical education. Nearly all students--about 97 percent--
leave public high school having taken some career and technical 
education, with nearly half of all high school students and 
about one-third of college students involved in career and 
technical programs as a major part of their studies.
    Highlights of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Improvement Act include:

Emphasizing Student Academic and Career-Technical Achievement

          
 Focusing on academics;
          
 Strengthening the transition from secondary 
        to postsecondary education; and
          
 Enhancing Career and Technical Programs of 
        Study.

Improving Accountability

          
 Helping states and local communities improve 
        opportunities for students;
          
 Focusing on success at the local level;
          
 Allowing states and local communities to 
        reward local performance; and
          
 Encouraging equitable participation for 
        students.

Ensuring Effective Use of Federal Funding

          
 Increasing flexibility for states; and
          
 Maintaining local control.

Enhancing Professional Development for Teachers

          
 Recognizing the importance of teachers in 
        improving academic achievement; and
          
 Ensuring teachers have access to quality 
        professional development.
    The Perkins program represents one of the largest federal 
investments in U.S. high schools and is a key component of 
secondary and postsecondary education systems. Through this 
reauthorization of the programs, Congress aimed to strengthen 
the Perkins program by helping states better utilize federal 
funds for secondary and postsecondary vocational education 
programs, increasing accountability and emphasizing student 
achievement, and strengthening opportunities for coordination 
between secondary and postsecondary career and technical 
education.

       II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Education Reform


109th Congress, First Session

    February 15, 2005--Hearing on ``H.R. 366, the Vocational 
and Technical Education for the Future Act'' (109-1).
    April 14, 2005--Hearing on ``The Best of Head Start: 
Learning From Model Programs'' (109-7).
    April 21, 2005--Hearing on ``Early Childhood Education: 
Improvement Through Integration'' (109-9).
    June 9, 2005--Hearing on ``The Role of Non-Profit 
Organization in State and Local High School Reform Efforts'' 
(109-21).
    June 28, 2005--Hearing on ``How the Private Sector is 
Helping States and Communities Improve High School Education'' 
(109-23).
    November 17, 2005--Hearing on ``Combating Methamphetamines 
Through Prevention and Education'' (109-28).

109th Congress, Second Session

    July 26, 2006--Hearing on ``Examining Views on English as 
the Official Language'' (109-49).
    August 28, 2006--Field hearing on ``No Child Left Behind: 
Successes and Challenges of Implementation in Urban and 
Suburban Schools,'' in Chicago, Illinois (109-53).
    September 27, 2006--Hearing on ``Perspectives on Early 
Childhood Home Visitation Programs'' (109-59).

       III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Education Reform


109th Congress

    May 11, 2005--H.R. 2123, School Readiness Act of 2005 was 
ordered favorably reported, as amended, by voice vote.

            IV. Subcommittee on Education Reform Statistics

Total Number of Bills and Resolutions Referred to Subcommittee....   207
Total Number of Hearings..........................................     9
    Field.........................................................     1
Total Number of Subcommittee Markup Sessions......................     1
Total Number of Bills Reported From Subcommittee..................     1

                    SUBCOMMITTEE ON SELECT EDUCATION


                        I. Summary of Activities

    In the 109th Congress, the Subcommittee on Select 
Education--chaired by Rep. Pat Tiberi (R-OH)--held numerous 
hearings and approved several important pieces of legislation 
to strengthen higher education and maintain strong oversight 
over the financial management at the U.S. Department of 
Education. The panel's most significant accomplishment, 
however, was the enactment of legislation to reform and 
reauthorize the Older Americans Act.
    The Older Americans Act, initially established to govern a 
wide array of social services for elderly Americans, has 
transformed into the first stop for older Americans to identify 
home- and community-based long term care options, as well as 
programs and services for which they may be eligible.
    Today, supporting the needs of older Americans is as 
important as ever. It is estimated that more than 36 million 
people in the United States are over the age of 65, making it 
the fastest growing age group in the country. According to the 
Census Bureau, by the year 2050, persons over age 65 will reach 
nearly 90 million and comprise almost a quarter of the total 
U.S. population. This trend makes a reauthorization of the 
Older Americans Act all the more important.
    With an aging population, additional reforms are needed to 
ensure the quality and effectiveness of federal programs aimed 
at assisting the elderly. That is why in the 109th Congress, 
the Select Education Subcommittee worked to enhance services 
that can improve the quality of life for aging Americans 
through the bipartisan Senior Independence Act (H.R. 5293), 
legislation to strengthen and renew the Older Americans Act. 
Subsequent legislation, the Older Americans Act Amendments of 
2006 (H.R. 6197), represents a bipartisan, bicameral agreement 
to reauthorize the Act and was passed by the House on September 
28, 2006.
    In crafting the bipartisan Senior Independence Act, the 
Select Education Subcommittee, led by Chairman Tiberi and 
Ranking Democrat Ruben Hinojosa (D-TX) held a series of 
hearings both inside and outside the Washington Beltway to 
better understand the impact Older Americans Act programs have 
on older Americans.
    H.R. 5293 and H.R. 6197 promote the key principles of 
President Bush's Choices for Independence plan, which 
emphasizes consumer choice, access to reliable information, and 
health promotion. Following are some key reforms of the 
legislation:
    The Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006 aim to promote 
home and community-based supports to help older individuals 
avoid institutional care by:
          
 Coordinating Administration on Aging and 
        Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to support 
        community-based efforts to assist low-income and 
        limited-English speaking populations with enrollment in 
        the Medicare prescription drug program;
          
 Launching Aging and Disabilities Resource 
        Centers in all 50 states and Puerto Rico to create a 
        single point of access to the range of services 
        available to seniors, including home and community-
        based long-term care options and the new Medicare 
        prescription drug program;
          
 Including the principles of President Bush's 
        Choices for Independence proposal--consumer choice, 
        access to information, and health promotion;
          
 Providing home and community-based services 
        that support older individuals at risk for 
        institutional placement with activities of daily 
        living;
          
 Encouraging comprehensive, coordinated 
        systems at federal, state, and local levels for 
        streamlining access to program benefits;
          
 Increasing the use of technology and web-
        based decision support tools to assist consumers with 
        learning about and access or enroll in benefits and 
        programs for which they may be eligible;
          
 Identifying cost-effective strategies to 
        improve state systems of long-term care; and
          
 Promoting the use of programs that can help 
        older people reduce their risk of disease, disability, 
        and injury.
    The Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006 aim to 
strengthen health and nutrition initiatives by:
          
 Promoting evidence-based programs to assist 
        older individuals and their family caregivers in 
        learning about and making behavioral changes to reduce 
        the risk of injury, disease, and disability among older 
        individuals;
          
 Ensuring health promotion programs are 
        evidence-based and broadening the definition of disease 
        prevention and health promotion to include diabetes, 
        falls prevention, improved nutrition, and physical 
        activity;
          
 Updating nutrition provisions consistent 
        with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans 
        and the Food Guide Pyramid;
          
 Recognizing the important role of dietitians 
        and other nutrition professionals in meal planning, 
        nutrition education, and nutrition screening, 
        counseling, and assessment;
          
 Emphasizing the critical link between 
        nutrition and the prevention of chronic disease;
          
 Supporting efforts to reduce obesity among 
        the elderly; and
          
 Allowing local meal programs the option to 
        offer seniors a multivitamin-mineral supplement when 
        accompanied by a meal.
    The Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006 aim to improve 
educational and volunteer services by:
          
 Supporting program access for individuals 
        with limited English proficiency;
          
 Promoting financial literacy for older 
        Americans; and
          
 Enhancing coordination among senior 
        volunteer programs, including those authorized by the 
        Corporation for National Service.
    The Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006 aim to increase 
Federal, state, and local coordination by:
          
 Supporting efforts of area agencies on aging 
        to identify how programs, policies, and services can be 
        improved to meet the needs of the changing population 
        of older individuals within a planning and service 
        area;
          
 Assisting states and local communities with 
        emergency preparedness; and
          
 Encouraging local agencies on aging to work 
        with city and county officials, state agencies, and 
        other community entities to develop plans for housing, 
        transportation, public safety, and recreation.
    The Older Americans Act Amendments of 2006 aim to safeguard 
employment-based training for older Americans by:
          
 Maintaining the program's dual purpose of 
        community service and employment-based job training;
          
 Allowing public or private nonprofit 
        agencies and organizations to compete for national 
        grants, which is consistent with current law;
          
 Retaining the age of 55 for program 
        eligibility (consistent with current law), but 
        requiring grantees to first serve those with the 
        greatest need, including individuals over the age of 
        65.
          
 Requiring grantees to report performance on 
        serving those with the greatest need;
          
 Clarifying the use of Senior Community 
        Service Employment Program (SCSEP) funds;
          
 Strengthening opportunities for business 
        sector partnerships;
          
 Providing greater flexibility for SCSEP 
        grantees and allow for more funds to be available for 
        other supportive services such as on-the-job training 
        and literacy training;
          
 Requiring grantees to have an average time 
        limit for participation not to exceed 2 years and 
        limiting individual participation to not more than 4 
        years;
          
 Moving from 20 to 30 percent unsubsidized 
        employment by phasing in a 2 percent increase over the 
        next 5 years and requiring the Secretary of Labor to 
        provide technical assistance to meet the new targets; 
        and
          
 Stipulating that the Secretary of Labor may 
        renew a grant under title V for each of two succeeding 
        years after the initial three-year grant award provided 
        that the grantee has met or exceeded all negotiated 
        levels of performance.
    The changing needs of older Americans require that Congress 
thoughtfully proceed with the reauthorization of the Older 
Americans Act this year. The Select Education Subcommittee 
worked in the 109th Congress to make the necessary reforms to 
make the most of the federal investment in programs to assist 
older Americans, while ensuring that the growing senior 
population is served by the same quality programs established 
by the 1965 law.

       II. Hearings Held by the Subcommittee on Select Education


109th Congress, First Session

    March 17, 2005--Hearing on ``Tracking International 
Students in Higher Education: A Progress Report'' (Jointly with 
the Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness) (109-5).
    April 22, 2005--Field hearing on ``International Education 
and Foreign Language Studies in Higher Education,'' in 
Columbus, Ohio. (109-10).
    May 2, 2005--Field hearing on ``Expanding Opportunities for 
Graduate Study at Hispanic Serving Institutions,'' in Edinburg, 
Texas. (109-13).
    May 24, 2005--Hearing on ``An Examination of the Older 
Americans Act'' (109-19).
    July 12, 2005--Hearing on ``Coordination Among Federal 
Youth Development Programs'' (109-24).
    November 30, 2005--Field Hearing on ``How the Lack of 
Higher Education Faculty Contributes to America's Nursing 
Shortage, Part I,'' in Greeley, Colorado (109-29).
    December 2, 2005--Field Hearing on ``How the Lack of Higher 
Education Faculty Contributes to America's Nursing Shortage, 
Part II,'' in Henderson, Nevada (109-30).

109th Congress, Second Session

    April 3, 2006--Field hearing on ``The Older Americans Act: 
Strengthening Communities to Support the Next Generation of 
Older Americans,'' in Edinburg, Texas (109-33).
    April 28, 2006--Field hearing on ``The Older Americans Act: 
Improving Quality of Life for Aging Americans,'' in 
Westerville, Ohio (109-37).
    May 2, 2006--Hearing on ``Senior Independence Act of 2006'' 
(109-38).

       III. Markups Held by the Subcommittee on Select Education


109th Congress, First Session

    June 16, 2005--H.R. 509, International Studies in Higher 
Education Act of 2005 was ordered favorably reported, as 
amended, to the Full Committee by voice vote. H.R. 510, 
Graduate Opportunities in Higher Education Act of 2005 was 
ordered favorably reported, as amended, to the Full Committee 
by voice vote.

109th Congress, Second Session

    May 10, 2006--H.R. 5293, Senior Independence Act of 2006 
was ordered favorably reported, as amended, to the Full 
Committee by voice vote.

            IV. Subcommittee on Select Education Statistics

Total Number of Bills and Resolutions Referred to Subcommittee....    70
Total Number of Hearings..........................................    10
    Field.........................................................     6
Total Number of Subcommittee Markup Sessions......................     2
Total Number of Bills Reported From Subcommittee..................     3