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                                                       Calendar No. 170
109th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                    109-106

======================================================================



 
             DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2006

                                _______
                                

                 July 21, 2005.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

         Mr. Brownback, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                    [To accompany S. 1446]

    The Committee on Appropriations, to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 0000) making appropriations for the government of 
the District of Columbia and other activities chargeable in 
whole or in part against the revenues of said District for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes, 
reports the same to the Senate with amendments and recommends 
that the bill as amended do pass. deg.
    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1446) 
making appropriations for the government of the District of 
Columbia and other activities chargeable in whole or in part 
against the revenues of said District for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2006, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Amounts of new budget (obligational) authority for fiscal year 2006

Total of bill as reported to the Senate.................    $593,000,000
Amount of 2005 appropriations...........................     555,521,000
Amount of 2006 budget estimate..........................     573,000,000
Amount of House allowance...............................     603,397,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2005 appropriations.................................     +37,479,000
    2006 budget estimate................................     +19,603,000
    House allowance.....................................     -10,397,000


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of Bill..................................................     3
General Statement................................................     5
Federal Funds....................................................     8
General Provisions...............................................    41
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Sen- 
  ate............................................................    43
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................    43
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    44
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................    48

                            SUMMARY OF BILL

    The following discussion of the bill includes general 
information on initiatives and concerns of the Committee and an 
analysis of the total resources estimated to be available to 
the District of Columbia in the coming fiscal year.
    The Committee recommendation contains items funded by the 
House in a different bill, H.R. 3058. The Committee believes 
that it is appropriate to fund these items in this bill. For 
ease of comparison, the Committee report sets forth a ``House 
allowance'' as if these items had been contained in this bill. 
These items were contained in the Transportation, Treasury, the 
Judiciary, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2006 (H.R. 3058), as passed the House, but 
were not considered or contained in the Committee 
recommendation to the Senate on that bill.

                             Federal Funds

    The Committee considered requests from the President for 
Federal funds totaling $573,397,000 in budget authority for the 
District of Columbia appropriation. The Committee 
recommendation is $593,000,000 and is appropriated as follows: 
(1) $33,200,000 for D.C. resident tuition support; (2) 
$218,912,000 for the District of Columbia Courts; (3) 
$45,000,000 for Defender Services in the District of Columbia 
Courts; (4) $201,828,000 for the Court Services and Offender 
Supervision Agency for the District of Columbia; (5) 
$12,000,000 for security costs related to the presence of the 
Federal Government in the District of Columbia; (6) $1,000,000 
for transportation assistance; (7) $5,000,000 for the combined 
sewer overflow; (8) $16,500,000 for security, economic 
development, education and health projects; (9) $3,000,000 for 
support of the Anacostia Waterfront Initiative; (10) 
$40,000,000 for school improvement; (11) $2,000,000 for foster 
care improvements; (12) $5,200,000 for a new bioterrorism and 
forensics laboratory; (13) $500,000 for the National Guard 
Youth Challenge Program; (14) $3,000,000 for Marriage 
Development Accounts and marriage strengthening; (15) 
$2,000,000 for a Latino youth initiative; and (16) $3,000,000 
for prisoner reentrant housing.

                       District of Columbia Funds

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,700,158,000 in 
Distrct of Columbia operating funds for fiscal year 2006. This 
is the same level of funding requested by the District of 
Columbia.

                       Total Resources Available

    Based on recommendations in the bill, a total of 
$10,877,356,000 will be available to the District government 
during fiscal year 2006. Included in this figure are 
appropriations from local funds, Federal grants, Federal 
payments, and private and other funds. The financing of the 
appropriations from District funds are generated from revenues 
from various local taxes, fees, charges, and other collections 
received by the District government.

                           GENERAL STATEMENT

    The Committee has included funding for three new Federal-
local initiatives in the District of Columbia. These include: 
(1) promoting and sustaining healthy marriages; (2) enhancing 
educational and health opportunities for Latino youth; and (3) 
reducing prisoner recidivism.
Promoting Healthy Marriages
    The Committee understands that most children born and 
raised in households where their biological parents are married 
are more financially and emotionally stable. As a way to assist 
low-income married couples to save money to pay for job 
training or education, buy a home or start their own business, 
the Committee is providing funds to establish ``Marriage 
Development Accounts'' [MDAs] in the District of Columbia. MDAs 
will be available to married couples who are citizens or legal 
residents of the District of Columbia whose Federal adjusted 
gross income does not exceed $50,000 and whose net worth is 
less than $10,000.
    Participating couples will have a high incentive to save 
because their contributions will be matched at a ratio of 3:1 
by the Federal Government and partnering private institutions. 
As a requirement of participation, couples will receive 
training that helps them repair their credit, set a budget and 
savings schedule, and manage their money.
    The Committee is also providing funds for pre-Marriage 
Development Accounts [pMDAs], which will be available to 
engaged couples, each of whom is 18 or older and whose combined 
adjusted gross income is less than $50,000 and whose total net 
worth is less than $10,000. These accounts will also be 
available to individuals aged 16-22 who are not married, do not 
have children, and whose family's adjusted gross income is less 
than $25,000 (single head of household) or $50,000 (married 
couple). pMDAs will give young people and couples who are about 
to be married the financial tools and life skills training to 
make positive choices and well-informed plans for the future. 
pMDAs will help engaged couples build a strong financial and 
emotional foundation to help foster successful and long-term 
marriages. pMDAs will also help low-income youths gain a 
longer-term perspective and provide incentives and training to 
make economically and emotionally sound life decisions.
    Recognizing the importance of grassroots support to ensure 
the success of these efforts, the Committee is directing that 
grantees use a portion of these funds to expand their network 
of service providers by partnering with local churches, faith-
based organizations, and non-profit organizations. These 
service providers will offer life skills training and marital 
and pre-marital counseling.
Enhancing Educational and Health Opportunities for Latino Children
    The Committee is concerned about the problems facing Latino 
youth in the District of Columbia. Latino youth make up more 
than 25 percent of the under-18 population in the District of 
Columbia, compared to 10 percent nationally. Many of these 
young people do not have adequate access to key services 
including health insurance, health care and appropriate 
education and job training. The Latino dropout rate in the 
District is estimated to be in the range of 50 percent. In 
addition, Latino families earned 54 percent less than the 
average District resident. This is significant because income 
level is a key factor in educational achievement. Educational 
disparities are especially acute with English Language Learners 
who constitute almost half of all Latino students nationally 
and a majority of Latino students in the District.
    The Committee is providing funding for a Latino Youth 
Initiative to help address some of these challenges. These 
resources will support the efforts of community-based 
organizations in providing direct and supportive services. The 
Committee has also provided funds for a D.C. Latino Education 
Director. The Director will have responsibility to coordinate 
with all relevant parties to ensure that Latino children have 
appropriate literacy curriculum and teaching. These partners 
include the District Government, DCPS, Charter Schools, Non-
Public Schools, and community-based organizations involved in 
serving Latino students.
    The Committee is also providing resources for a program to 
help some of the District's most troubled Latino youth: high 
school dropouts, former gang members, teen parents, and 
adjudicated youths. Resources provided will help youths obtain 
their GEDs and gain job skills in the construction industry. 
These youngsters will also be helping the community by building 
housing for homeless and low-income D.C. residents.
Reducing Prisoner Recidivism
    The Committee understands that every year 2,500 former 
prisoners return home to the District. These returning 
offenders are assigned to the Court Services and Offender 
Supervision Agency for release plan investigations during their 
parole or probation terms. Those who cannot identify a safe 
place to live are assigned to halfway houses where their stays 
are capped at 120 days.
    The Committee believes strongly that reducing the 
likelihood of homelessness for those exiting the halfway house 
system is critical to combating recidivism among returning 
prisoners. Therefore, the Committee has provided funds for 
incentives to encourage developers and non-profit organizations 
to set aside units for ex-offenders when the developer is 
rehabilitating or constructing new housing.
    The Committee also believes that mentors can help ex-
offenders better reintegrate into their communities by 
providing them with the emotional, psychological, spiritual, 
and motivational support they need. Mentors can help ex-
offenders find employment, make sure that they attend 
counseling sessions, and encourage them to reconcile with 
family members. Therefore, a portion of the funds provided by 
the Committee is for rental reimbursements for mentors who 
agree to live in the same housing development as the ex-
offenders.
Financial Condition of the District of Columbia
    The Committee commends the Mayor, the City Council, and the 
Chief Financial Officer of the District of Columbia in 
improving its bond rating from the junk bond status of the mid-
1990's to investment grade status since February 2001. The 
Committee notes that Wall Street bond rating agencies have 
upgraded the city's rating to A. This is particularly 
noteworthy, given that many other cities are now experiencing 
downgrading of their bond ratings. This accomplishment is due 
in large part to three factors: (1) consistent trends of 
increased financial reserves, (2) stringent budget monitoring 
and controls in the 3 fiscal years following elimination of the 
control board, and (3) growth in taxable assessed values.
    Despite the city's improved fiscal discipline, the 
Committee recognizes that the District is facing a fundamental 
fiscal imbalance between its revenues and its expenditures. 
This imbalance is estimated to be between $470,000,000 to 
$1,100,000,000 annually and, according to the Government 
Accountability Office [GAO], some reasons for this imbalance 
are the high cost of providing services in the city, as well as 
the city's inability to tax significant amounts of real estate 
which is Federal property. GAO notes that the city also faces 
financial management challenges, poor training and inadequate 
internal control systems that exacerbate the structural 
imbalance. According to GAO, the imbalance is ``largely beyond 
District officials' direct control.'' As the city uses its 
limited resources to provide basic services for its residents, 
it continues to defer investments in its infrastructure: roads, 
bridges, school buildings, etc.

                          DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

                             Federal Funds

    A total of $593,000,000 in Federal funds are estimated to 
be available to the District government, the District of 
Columbia Courts, the District of Columbia Court Services and 
Offender Supervision Agency, and other D.C. entities. A total 
of $2,117,972,000 in Federal funds will be received by the 
District government from the various Federal grant programs. In 
addition, the District of Columbia receives Federal 
reimbursements from such programs as Medicaid and Medicare.
    The following table summarizes the various Federal funds 
estimated to be available to the District government during 
fiscal year 2006:

                              FEDERAL FUNDS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                         Item                             2006 estimate
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal Payment for Resident Tuition Support..........            33,200
Federal Payment for Emergency Planning and Security               12,000
 Costs................................................
Federal Payment to the District of Columbia Courts....           218,912
Federal Payment for Defender Services.................            45,000
Federal Payment to the Court Services and Offender               201,388
 Supervision Agency...................................
Federal Payment to the District of Columbia Water and              5,000
 Sewer Authority......................................
Federal Payment for the Anacostia Waterfront                       3,000
 Initiative...........................................
Federal Payment to the Criminal Justice Coordinating               1,300
 Council..............................................
Federal Payment for Transportation Assistance.........             1,000
Federal Payment for Foster Care and Adoption                       2,000
 Improvements.........................................
Federal Payment to the Chief Financial Officer........            16,500
Federal Payment for National Guard Youth..............               500
Federal Payment for a Forensics Lab...................             5,200
Federal Payment for School Improvement................            40,000
Federal Payment for Marriage Development and                       3,000
 Improvement..........................................
Federal Payment for a Latino Youth Initiative.........             2,000
Federal Payment for Prisoner Reentrant Housing........             3,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Federal funds in bill....................           593,000
Federal Grants........................................         2,117,972
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Federal Funds............................         2,118,565
------------------------------------------------------------------------

   FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA RESIDENT TUITION SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2005....................................     $25,395,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................      33,200,000
House allowance.........................................      33,200,000
Committee recommendation................................      33,200,000

    The Committee recommends $33,200,000 in Federal funds for 
the District of Columbia Tuition Assistance Program, an 
increase of $7,805,000 over the fiscal year 2005 enacted level 
and the same as the President's budget request. On November 12, 
1999, Public Law 106-98, the District of Columbia College 
Access Act of 1999, was signed into law. The Act established 
the Tuition Assistance Program, a grant program under the 
direction of the Mayor of the District of Columbia, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Education.
    Under the Act, grants are awarded to District residents for 
undergraduate education within 3 years of graduating or 
obtaining a graduate equivalent degree. The applicant must be a 
District resident for 12 consecutive months before the academic 
year of the award. Grants pay the difference between in-State 
and out-of-State tuition at public universities, with a cap of 
$10,000 per student per school year, and a total cap of 
$50,000. Grants may also be used for tuition at private 
colleges in the metropolitan area and at any private 
historically black college or university, with a cap of $2,500 
per student per year, and a total cap of $12,500. In addition, 
the District of Columbia College Access Improvement Act of 2001 
(Public Law 107-157) expanded the Tuition Assistance Program to 
individuals who enroll in an institution of higher education 
more than 3 years after graduating from a secondary school and 
to individuals who attend private, historically black colleges 
and universities nationwide.
    Every year since the inception of the tuition assistance 
grant program, the Federal Government has provided sufficient 
funds to allow all eligible participants to attend out-of-State 
colleges and universities at the in-State tuition rate. The 
Committee is pleased to note that 55 percent of all 
participants are the first members of their families to attend 
college and that 75 percent of students surveyed at one of the 
largest schools in the city said that the program influenced 
their decision to pursue post-secondary education. Clearly, the 
program is working well and more and more District students are 
gaining the opportunity to attend colleges and universities of 
their choice.
    The Committee recognizes that this program has enabled many 
District of Columbia residents to pursue post-secondary 
educational opportunities. The program is unique to the 
District in providing a similar opportunity to the state-level 
university system in all states. The Committee notes this 
year's budget request of $33,200,000 represents over a 30 
percent increase over fiscal year 2005 funding, which itself 
represented a 50 percent boost over the fiscal year 2004 level. 
The Committee understands that the District has used reserve 
funds to fund the program in fiscal year 2005 and appears to 
have reduced the extensive carryover fund balance that raised 
concerns in previous budgets.
    The Committee is concerned that the significant annual 
funding increases in a brief 2-year span signal that program 
costs have the potential of growing well beyond the level at 
which future Federal funding may be available and sustainable. 
To address this concern, the Committee directs the Mayor and 
the District's State Education Office officials to work closely 
with its Senate and House authorizing and appropriations 
Committees to immediately take steps to institute effective 
cost containment measures and regularly report to Congress 
about the effects of these efforts. The Committee further 
directs the District to fully explore non-Federal sources of 
additional funds to augment the Federal investment to meet 
program needs.

           FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA COURTS

Appropriations, 2005....................................    $189,274,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................     221,693,000
House allowance.........................................     221,693,000
Committee recommendation................................     218,912,000

    The Committee recommends $218,912,000 for the D.C. Courts. 
This is $29,638,000 more than the fiscal year 2005 enacted 
level and $2,781,000 below the President's budget request. As 
part of the District of Columbia Revitalization Act of 1997, 
the Federal Government began to finance the D.C. Courts. This 
includes funding for the operations of the D.C. Court of 
Appeals, Superior Court, and the Court System. By law, the 
annual budget includes estimates of the expenditures for the 
operations of the Courts prepared by the Joint Committee on 
Judicial Administration and the President's recommendation for 
funding the Courts' operations.

Court Operations

    The Committee recommends $138,183,000 for the Courts' 
operations, an increase of $3,584,000 over the fiscal year 2005 
enacted level and the same as the President's request.

Court Capital Expenditures

    The Committee recommends $80,729,000 for capital 
improvements, a total of $2,781,000 below the President's 
budget request and $24,528,000 above the fiscal year 2005 
level.
    The increased funds for capital expenditures will allow the 
Courts to continue to renovate, improve, and expand court 
facilities. The Committee recognizes that the relocation of the 
Court of Appeals from its existing location in the Moultrie 
Courthouse to the Old Courthouse at 451 Indiana Avenue is a 
critical step towards meeting the space needs of the D.C. Court 
of Appeals and providing critical additional space for Superior 
Court operations, including the newly formed Family Court in 
the Moultrie Building. The Committee understands that the 
readaptation of the Old Courthouse for modern day use as a 
functional courthouse includes the restoration of this national 
historic landmark, expansion of the courthouse, and 
construction of an underground parking garage west of the 
historic building.
    This increase will also enable the Courts to continue 
implementation of the Integrated Justice Information System 
[IJIS] and allow the Courts to upgrade fire and security alarm 
systems.

Transfer Authority

    The Committee authorizes the Courts to transfer up to 
$1,000,000 of the operations funds provided in the Federal 
Payment to the D.C. Courts among the accounts within the 
Federal Payment to the District of Columbia Courts 
appropriation. This flexibility will be especially important in 
implementing Family Court reforms. The Committee authorizes the 
Courts to transfer up to 4 percent of the capital funds 
provided. This flexibility will enable the Courts to prioritize 
renovations and construction projects.

Reporting Requirements

    The Courts are directed to submit monthly reports, through 
the General Services Administration, to the Senate and House 
Committees on Appropriations, within 15 calendar days after the 
end of each month, on the status of obligations by object class 
and a monthly personnel summary by position, full-time 
equivalent positions, and program/function. The obligation 
report should show, at a minimum, the original operating plan, 
current operating plan, obligations year to date, percent 
obligated, planned obligations year to date, percentage 
deviation from plan year to date, projected total obligations 
end of year, and projected surplus/deficit.
    In addition, the obligation report shall: (1) under the 
Defender Services Spending Plan, include a breakdown of 
expenditures for the Counsel for Child Abuse and Neglect 
Program and the program of representation of indigents in 
criminal cases under the Criminal Justice Act; (2) include a 
monthly breakdown of expenditures for the D.C. Courts' capital 
improvements; and (3) where year-to-date obligations exceed or 
fall below the plan estimates by 1 percent or more, include an 
explanation of why a category is over- or under-budgeted.
    Financial Plan.--The Executive Officer of the District of 
Columbia Courts shall provide a financial plan of the fiscal 
year 2006 enacted level for operations and capital improvements 
of the D.C. Courts to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and Senate no later than March 31, 
2006. The financial plan shall detail by object class the 
planned expenditure of the Courts' appropriation, describing 
any new initiatives or deviation from the conference report. 
The Committee shall provide a joint House-Senate letter of 
approval to the Courts after review of the financial plan. The 
Courts must provide 30 days notice to the Committee in order to 
deviate from the financial plan after approval of such plan by 
Congress.

            DEFENDER SERVICES IN DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA COURTS

Appropriations, 2005....................................     $38,192,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................      45,000,000
House allowance.........................................      45,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,000,000

    The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for attorney programs 
for indigent defendants, child abuse and guardianship cases 
administered by the D.C. Courts, the same as the President's 
request and $6,808,000 above the fiscal year 2005 enacted 
level. This funding increase will allow D.C. attorneys and 
investigators to receive the same hourly rate as their Federal 
counterparts.

 FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY 
                      FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Appropriations, 2005....................................    $178,560,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................     203,388,000
House allowance.........................................     203,388,000
Committee recommendation................................     201,388,000

    The Committee recommends $201,388,000 for the Court 
Services and Offender Supervision Agency [CSOSA]. This 
recommendation is $2,000,000 below the President's budget 
request and $22,828,000 more than the fiscal year 2005 enacted 
level.
    The District of Columbia Revitalization Act of 1997 
established CSOSA, assuming the functions of the District's 
pretrial services, adult probation, parole, and adult offender 
supervision functions. The mission of CSOSA for the District of 
Columbia is to increase public safety, prevent crime, reduce 
recidivism, and support the fair administration of justice in 
close collaboration with the community.
    The Revitalization Act relieved the District of Columbia of 
``state-level'' financial responsibilities and restructured a 
number of criminal justice functions, including pretrial 
services, parole, and adult probation. Following passage of the 
Revitalization Act, under the direction of a Trustee appointed 
by the U.S. Attorney General, three separate and disparately 
functioning entities of the District of Columbia government 
were reorganized into one Federal agency. CSOSA assumed its 
probation function from the D.C. Superior Court and its parole 
function from the D.C. Board of Parole. The Revitalization Act 
transferred the parole supervision functions to CSOSA and the 
parole decision-making functions to the U.S. Parole Commission 
[USPC]. On August 5, 1998, the parole determination function 
was transferred to the USPC, and on August 4, 2000, the USPC 
assumed responsibility for parole revocation and modification 
with respect to felons. The CSOSA appropriation is comprised of 
three components: The Community Supervision Program [CSP], the 
District of Columbia Pretrial Services Agency [PSA], and the 
Public Defender Service [PDS] for the District of Columbia. PDS 
is a federally funded independent D.C. agency responsible for 
the defense of indigent individuals and receives funding by 
transfer from the CSOSA appropriation. The CSP is responsible 
for supervision of offenders (either on probation or parole), 
and the PSA is responsible for supervising pretrial defendants.
    The Committee understands that the majority of the 
additional funds it is providing will be used to increase the 
capacity of residential substance abuse treatment for offenders 
at Karrick Hall from 21 to 100 participants. These resources 
will fund the level of treatment slots at the fully authorized 
level. The Committee recognizes that most offenders have 
serious drug addiction problems and must receive treatment in 
order to lead productive, crime-free lives. The Committee is 
pleased that CSOSA has made such steady progress in increasing 
the drug treatment capacity for offenders.
    The funding provided will also enable CSOSA to enhance its 
community-based and sanctions-based supervision strategy and 
support the fair administration of justice by providing the 
courts and the U.S. Parole Commission with timely, accurate and 
complete information required in their decision-making process. 
The Committee recommendation also includes $42,195,000 for the 
D.C. Pretrial Services Agency and a transfer of $29,833,000 for 
the D.C. Public Defender Service.

FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA FOR SECURITY COSTS RELATED 
               TO THE PRESENCE OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

Appropriations, 2005....................................     $14,880,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................      15,000,000
House allowance.........................................      15,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,000,000

    The Committee is aware that the District police, fire, and 
emergency personnel have had to provide security for a number 
of events due to the fact that the District of Columbia is the 
seat of the Federal Government and headquarters of many 
international organizations. Recently, the need for the 
District of Columbia to provide security has increased, thereby 
increasing over-time costs for personnel and diverting police 
from neighborhood patrols. The President has supported 
reimbursing the District for these costs. The Committee 
recommends $12,000,000 for this purpose which is $3,000,000 
below the President's request and the fiscal year 2005 level.
    The Committee understands that since the beginning of this 
year, the District has been expending its fiscal year 2005 
security resources at a rate of approximately $1,000,000 per 
month. Therefore, the Committee is providing the level of 
funding which assumes that the District will continue to spend 
at the current expenditure rate.

   FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER OF THE DISTRICT OF 
                                COLUMBIA

Appropriations, 2005....................................     $32,240,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................      20,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      16,500,000

    The Committee is providing $16,500,000 to the Chief 
Financial Officer of the District of Columbia for education, 
job-training, security, economic development, and health 
projects in the District of Columbia. The Committee intends to 
continue to provide a portion of these funds to Children's 
National Medical Center for a new pediatric intensive care unit 
and neonatal intensive care unit and to St. Coletta's of 
Greater Washington for its building project.

FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR THE ANACOSTIA WATERFRONT INITIATIVE IN THE DISTRICT 
                              OF COLUMBIA

Appropriations, 2005....................................      $2,976,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................       5,000,000
House allowance.........................................       5,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,000,000

    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 to continue to 
implement the Anacostia Waterfront Initiative, which is $24,000 
below the fiscal year 2005 enacted level and $2,000,000 below 
the President's budget request. These funds will support the 
construction of a multi-use hiker and biker trail system along 
both sides of the Anacostia River in the District of Columbia. 
This recreational amenity and transportation alternative will 
help connect neighborhoods and transform the Anacostia River 
into a great civic center for the city. The Committee 
understands that the 20-mile interconnected trail network will 
provide pedestrian and bicycle-friendly access to the shores of 
the Anacostia River and will serve to connect the regional 
trail system in Maryland to the National Mall. With alternative 
corridors and loops to choose from, users of the trail will 
find a variety of experiences and connections to other regional 
and national trails, including Fort Circle Trail, Bladensburg 
Trail, the East Coast Greenway and the Potomac Heritage Scenic 
Trail.
    The Committee continues to support the use of innovative 
bridges along the Anacostia bike trail and urges the District's 
Department of Transportation to consider using this new 
technology in other road projects throughout the city.

 FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY

Appropriations, 2005....................................      $4,762,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000, to be matched 100 
percent with local funds, for the Water and Sewer Authority 
[WASA] to implement the Combined Sewer Overflow Program. This 
is $238,000 more than the amount appropriated in fiscal year 
2005. The President requested no funds for this purpose. The 
Committee notes that this funding will assist WASA in designing 
a new system to address combined sewer overflows. The combined 
sewer system, which serves 33 percent of the District, was 
constructed in 1890 by the Federal Government. Because of its 
age and capacity contraints, the system discharges sanitary 
waste and storm-water into the surrounding rivers approximately 
60-75 times per year during heavy rains.

     FEDERAL PAYMENT TO THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA FOR TRANSPORTATION

Appropriations, 2005....................................      $2,480,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................       1,000,000

    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for transportation 
assistance in the District of Columbia, which is $1,480,000 
below the fiscal year 2005 enacted level. The President did not 
request funds for this purpose.
    The Committee intends that these resources be for expenses 
related to phase I implementation of the District's downtown 
circulator transit system. This new surface transportation 
service will provide high-frequency, high-quality, and low-cost 
service to connect the east and west sides of downtown, the 
White House, the National Mall and monuments area, the Capitol 
Complex, Union Station, and Georgetown. The Committee 
understands that these funds will be matched 100 percent by the 
District of Columbia and by the private sector (led by the 
Downtown Business Improvement District group). The Committee 
understands that Phase I of the Circulator is now operating and 
will include the following routes: (1) north-south along 7th 
Street, NW, between the Convention Center and the SW 
Waterfront; and (2) east-west between Georgetown and Union 
Station.

              FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR FOSTER CARE IMPROVEMENT

Appropriations, 2005....................................      $4,960,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................       2,000,000

    The Committee understands that in the District of Columbia, 
the Child and Family Services Agency [CFSA] is responsible for 
protecting approximately 3,000 children in ``out-of-home'' 
placements, and another 5,000 children in ``in-home'' 
placements. During its history, many children in CFSA's care 
have languished for extended periods of time due to managerial 
shortcomings and long-standing organizational divisiveness in 
the city. As a result, the agency was placed in receivership in 
1995. In June 2001, the court removed CFSA from receivership 
and put the agency under probation. That probationary period 
ended in January 2003.
    Concerned about CFSA's troubled history, the Committee 
began a Federal foster care initiative in fiscal year 2004 
which focused on improving several critical areas. These 
critical needs are: (1) intensive, early intervention when 
children enter care; (2) early mental health assessments and 
mental health services for all children in foster care; (3) 
recruitment and retention of qualified social workers; (4) 
recruitment and retention of foster parents; and (5) improved 
computer tracking of all children in foster care. During fiscal 
year 2004 and 2005, the Committee provided a total of 
$20,000,000 to fund these efforts. The Committee was extremely 
disappointed that the District's City Council voted to reduce 
local funding for CFSA in its fiscal year 2006 local budget. 
The Council took this action despite the objections of the 
Mayor, the Director of CFSA, the Court-appointed Federal judge 
who had served as the agency's receiver, and child welfare 
advocates in the District. The Committee believes strongly that 
these actions will undermine the significant strides that CFSA 
had made with Federal support. Further, the Committee is 
concerned about the precedent that the Council has taken by 
using Federal funds to supplant local funds, despite the clear 
language in the Act and believes that the Council's actions 
have violated the spirit of the law.
    Despite grave concerns that the Council will take a similar 
action next year, the Committee wants CFSA to continue to make 
improvements. Therefore, the Committee is providing funds to 
continue to provide loan repayment for social workers, to 
assist with post-adoption services and to continue to provide 
respite opportunities for foster parents.

Loan Repayment for Social Workers

    The Committee is providing $1,000,000 for the repayment of 
student loans for social workers at CFSA. The Committee 
understands that the higher the caseload per social worker, the 
lower the quality of service to each of the caseworker's 
children. The District, like many cities, suffers from a high 
turnover rate of social workers. In fact, the national turnover 
rate has doubled since 1991. Clearly, the relatively low pay 
and difficult working conditions of social workers has resulted 
in a child welfare workforce crisis.
    The Committee recognizes that steps must be taken to 
encourage more workers to enter the child welfare workforce and 
improve the salaries, working conditions, and training of 
workers. Student loan repayment is aiding in the retention and 
improvement of conditions for the District's social workers.

Post Adoptive Services

    The Committee is providing $750,000 to assist CFSA in 
providing post permanency services to adoptive parents and 
guardians to ensure that children remain in stable homes. These 
resources will fund mental health services, respite support, 
training seminars, one-on-one counseling support, and a post-
permanency resource center.

Recruitment and Retention of Foster Parents

    The Committee is providing $250,000 to recruit and retain 
foster parents. The Committee recognizes that CFSA has 
experienced difficulties recruiting and retaining an adequate 
number of appropriate, qualified foster parents. This lack of 
sufficient numbers of foster homes has given rise to so-called 
group homes in the District.
    One reason for the shortage of foster parents is the lack 
of availability of respite care in the District. The Committee 
has been informed that foster parents do not have the same 
opportunities for respite as biological parents. Foster parents 
cannot merely send their children to spend the weekend with a 
relative or family friend, or to visit with a classmate at his 
or her home. Foster parents must seek out persons who have met 
many agency-established criteria. Therefore, foster parents 
often care for their children--many of whom have special 
needs--without significant breaks.
    Of the funds provided, the Committee intends that the 
Washington Council of Governments, which has years of 
experience with the D.C. foster care system, provide the direct 
service implementation of this respite proposal and that the 
Foster and Adoptive Parents Advocacy Center provide the 
oversight, quality control, and evaluation of the program. The 
Committee intends that resources shall provide: (1) emergency 
respite, which would be provided with less than 1 month's 
notice; (2) planned respite, which would be planned at least 1 
month in advance; and (3) ongoing respite, which would be at 
pre-established meeting times and places, e.g., Saturday 
programs, enrichment programs, and field trips.

Concerns About the District's Juvenile Justice System

    In fiscal year 2005, the Committee received a report and 
heard testimony from the District of Columbia's Inspector 
General which detailed the deplorable conditions and wasteful 
management at the Oak Hill Youth Facility, the city's juvenile 
detention facility. Afterwards, Committee members visited the 
campus to see the situation first-hand. The Committee found 
that not only are the buildings aged and decrepit, but as the 
Inspector General's report stated, important services such as 
substance abuse treatment programs are unavailable for drug-
addicted youths. Children who are detained and awaiting trial 
are commingled with those who are committed offenders.
    The Committee has stated that it agrees with the November 
6, 2001 recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Youth 
Safety and Juvenile Justice Reform that Oak Hill be ``closed 
and demolished.'' It is an old, decrepit, institution that is 
inadequate for youth detention and undoubtedly very expensive 
to operate and maintain. The Committee is concerned at the 
continued slow pace of progress and urges District officials to 
follow the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission and 
shut down Oak Hill as quickly as feasible.
    The Committee is also concerned with the poor delivery of 
services to youth in the District's court services and juvenile 
justice services agencies. The Committee strongly urges the 
District of Columbia government and all relevant agencies who 
participate in the welfare and oversight of troubled youth in 
the juvenile justice, education, mental health, and social 
services systems in the District to work together more closely 
and to diligently carry out the their responsibilities to 
better pursue and produce acceptable outcomes that demonstrate 
success in resolving all the district's juvenile justice 
problems.

   FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Appropriations, 2005....................................     $39,680,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................      41,616,000
House allowance.........................................      41,616,000
Committee recommendation................................      40,000,000

    The Committee has included $40,000,000 to augment and 
improve educational opportunities for all students in the 
District of Columbia. This is $320,000 above the fiscal year 
2005 enacted level and $1,616,000 below the President's budget 
request. This initiative is comprised of three interrelated 
components: investing in excellence in traditional public 
schools; expanding choice through high quality charter schools; 
and offering opportunity scholarships for low-income students 
in under-performing schools. Therefore, of the funds provided, 
$13,000,000 is to provide a scholarship program for low-income 
children in under-performing schools; $13,000,000 is for the 
development of quality public charter schools; $13,000,000 is 
to strengthen leadership and instructional excellence and 
increase student achievement at District of Columbia Public 
Schools in accordance with the No Child Left Behind Act; and 
$1,000,000 is for administrative expenses.

Improving Public Education

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for the District of 
Columbia Public Schools [DCPS]. Of these funds, the Committee 
directs that not less than $250,000 shall be to support the 
Superintendent's assessment of public school facilities. As it 
has since it first began providing funds for school improvement 
in fiscal year 2004, the Committee continues to direct DCPS to 
use some of this appropriation to recruit and retain principals 
and teachers to strengthen leadership and instructional 
excellence. Further, DCPS is directed to use a portion of these 
funds to improve student achievement by providing supplemental 
services and enhancing public school choice. Within 30 days of 
enactment, DCPS must provide an expenditure plan for the use of 
this appropriation.
    The Committee believes that some improvements were made 
with fiscal year 2004 and 2005 funding by rewarding excellence 
in D.C. public schools.

Hearings on Education

    The Committee held two hearings on public education in the 
District of Columbia which informed the fiscal year 2006 
recommendations. The first hearing, held on May 25, 2005 
focused on the public school and public charter school systems 
in the District, highlighting many areas which need 
improvement. The second hearing, held on June 15, 2005 reviewed 
the fiscal year 2006 local funds budget to support education.
    During both of these hearings, the Committee learned the 
following troubling information.

Poor Performance

    Only 32 percent of 4th graders in DCPS are reading at a 
basic level, compared to 62 percent nationally. Only 36 percent 
of these same students are performing at a basic level in math, 
compared to 77 percent nationally. This means that two out of 
every three 4th graders in the District cannot read, multiply, 
or divide at the appropriate grade level. Special education 
students make up 20 percent of the school system's enrollment 
of 61,710 students--twice the national average for school 
districts. DCPS students scored approximately 200 points below 
the national average on the SAT.

High Costs

    Per-pupil spending in the District of Columbia is the 
highest in the Nation. According to the National Education 
Association, the District spends $13,317 per pupil each year, 
which is much higher than the national average of $8,208.
    During its hearings, the Committee learned that 
insufficient funding is not the problem. To the contrary, 
according to the District's Chief Financial Officer, funding 
for the District's school system--including traditional public 
schools and charter schools--has increased 75 percent since 
fiscal year 1999, even though overall enrollment has actually 
dropped 5 percent during that same time period. Student 
enrollment in traditional public schools has dropped 19 percent 
since fiscal year 1999, as parents have sought out other 
options for their children. Yet funding for traditional public 
schools (not including charter schools) has increased 38 
percent over that same time period. It appears that the funding 
for DCPS is entirely decoupled from student enrollment.
    Despite large increases in spending, one-third of schools 
have no art or music education programs. Many school facilities 
remain open, even though they are well below capacity, are run-
down or even unsafe. These past failures are significant and 
have contributed to the 37 percent adult illiteracy rate in the 
District. The DCPS superintendent testified that over 30 
percent of DCPS teachers are not even certified.
    The Committee has lerned that DCPS spends only 50 cents of 
every operating dollar to directly educate its students. This 
is far below the national average of 61 percent and is lower 
than any of the 50 States.

Plan for Improvement

    The Committee understands that the District hired a new 
superintendent in August 2004 who has an ambitious plan to (1) 
improve teaching and learning in every classroom; (2) provide 
more efficient management and operations systems; and (3) 
increase collaborations with parents, civic organizations, 
businesses, and other city agencies.
    To accomplish the first goal, he plans to institute more 
challenging curriculum and standards, give high-performing 
schools greater autonomy, offer art and music education again, 
put new discipline policies in place, expand professional 
development for teachers, and partner with the business and 
civic community to gain their support for students.
    To accomplish the second goal, he plans to improve 
procurement processes, upgrade administrative systems, 
institute performance-based budgeting, complete a new 
information technology plan, and make the best use of all 
school facilities.
    To accomplish the third goal, he plans to provide more 
community briefings, open a new office devoted to parent 
involvement with 5 parent resource centers, and establish a 
business advisory committee to guide communications and 
outreach efforts city-wide.
    The Committee supports all of these planned efforts.

Reason for Concern

    Although the Committee is supportive of the new DCPS 
superintendent and his plan for over hauling the D.C. school 
system, the Committee is aware that five DCPS superintendents 
have come and gone over the past 7 years. Often the varied 
attempts by these individuals to fix the problems were met with 
delay, denial, and dismissal.
    The Committee is informed that a number of schools with 
declining enrollments and in deteriorating condition should be 
closed and disposed of for some better purpose. The Committee 
believes that the savings achieved by closing under-utilized 
school buildings can be used to repair and improve the 
remaining school buildings.
    In addition, the Committee understands that 4,633 students 
submitted applications to attend a public school outside of 
their neighborhood. There are 3,276 students on waiting lists 
at various schools in the District, with some schools' waiting 
lists as long as 250. The Committee would strongly support DCPS 
allocating funds to replicate successful pubic school models in 
neighborhoods identified in need of additional public school 
options.
    The Committee understands that DCPS' information technology 
[IT] systems are plagued with problems. In his own strategic 
plan, the superintendent states that DCPS' IT systems are 10-15 
years behind industry norms and that DCPS suffers from a ``huge 
technology gap.'' These severe IT problems undermine DCPS' 
ability to carry out its underlying mission. The Committee 
believes that the nature and complexity of these IT problems 
warrant a comprehensive, long-term solution. As the 
superintendent works to address this problem, the Committee 
recommends that he seek assistance from the State Information 
Technology Consortium [SITC], a non-profit organization with 
substantial experience in the development of IT collaborative 
solutions. SITC is well-suited to help DCPS develop practical, 
cost-effective solutions using existing technology investments.
    The Committee is supportive of the vision of the new 
superintendent and believes that he is personally and 
professionally skilled to make major improvements to the 
current system.
    However, the Committee plans to monitor the progress of 
DCPS' improvement--both in student achievement and in resource 
and facilities management. The Committee intends to intervene 
in the coming year if improvements in these areas are not 
achieved.

Strengthening Charter Schools

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for public charter 
schools in the District of Columbia, directed to specific 
initiatives which will strengthen schools, enhance capacity, 
improve academic quality, and create a network of integrated 
services. The Committee recommends the following initiatives 
within the amount provided for charter schools: $4,000,000 for 
the Direct Loan Fund for Charter Schools; $2,000,000 for Credit 
Enhancement; $2,000,000 for continuation of the City Build 
Charter School Program; $1,500,000 for flexible grants; 
$2,000,000 only for grants for public charter schools for 
improvement of public school facilities which are leased or 
owned by public charter schools; $400,000 for college access 
programming; $300,000 to create a truancy center; $250,000 for 
administration of Federal entitlement funding; $300,000 for 
data collection and analysis; and $250,000 for administration 
within the State Education Office. In addition, the Mayor of 
the District of Columbia is directed to continue the Public 
Education Improvement Incentive Grant program created in fiscal 
year 2005 with unobligated funds. Grant awards are a 
significant incentive to raising student achievement and 
supporting principals in their everyday work.
    The Committee has played a significant role in the 
development of public charter schools in the District of 
Columbia. With 42 public charter schools now educating 21 
percent of the student population, the District of Columbia has 
the distinction of having more charter schools per capita than 
any other city or State in the Nation. In fiscal year 2005 the 
Committee included language engaging the Government 
Accountability Office [GAO] to study the performance of the 
D.C. charter school authorizing boards (or ``authorizers'') in 
their approval and oversight roles. The authorizers in the 
District are the D.C. Board of Education and the D.C. Public 
Charter School Board. Specifically, the GAO was required to 
report on the performance of the authorizers in their role in 
monitoring the quality of instruction provided to the students 
attending charter schools. In the report, ``Charter Schools--
Oversight Practices in the District of Columbia'', issued in 
May 2005, the GAO found that under current law charter school 
authorizers are prohibited from revoking a charter for failure 
to accomplish the schools' academic goals before 5 years from 
issuance of the charter. The Committee is concerned that this 
unduly restricts the authorizers from taking necessary steps to 
ensure that the schools they charter are providing a quality 
education to their students.
    In the District of Columbia 19 schools are required under 
the No Child Left Behind Act to be making annual yearly 
progress [AYP] toward their academic goals, of which only 9 
achieved AYP. The Committee strongly believes that the charter 
school authorizers should have all the tools they need to 
provide oversight and support to the schools they charter. 
Therefore, the Committee strongly urges the Mayor and Council 
to review the requirements of both the D.C. School Reform Act 
and the No Child Left Behind Act and make any legislative 
changes necessary to ensure consistency between the two acts 
regarding the promotion of school quality. At a minimum, the 
law governing charter school authorization and oversight in the 
District should not constrain or prohibit authorizers from 
taking appropriate action to ensure that the public charter 
schools under their purview are reaching the academic 
achievement expectations required by the school charter or 
NCLB.
    Facilities.--Access to appropriate facilities is a major 
challenge of public charter schools. The Committee is 
encouraged that public charter schools will receive equal 
access to public facilities and financing. The following are 
specific areas of concern for the Committee.
    Co-location.--The Committee commends the Superintendent of 
the District of Columbia Public Schools and the Board of 
Education for assessing excess space in public school 
facilities and making some space available to pubic charter 
schools in need of appropriate school facilities immediately. 
The Committee understands that 10 public schools with 
underutilized classrooms will share space with a public charter 
school in the fall of 2005, so called ``co-locations''. The 
District requires that rental payments from a charter school be 
for the use of the host school, which provides a strong 
incentive to lease underutilized space (D.C. Code Sec. 38-
1831.01(b)(2)) because rental payments from charter schools 
provide a reliable revenue source for host schools. The 
Committee strongly supports the Superintendent as co-location 
leases are implemented for school year 2005-2006.
    Surplus Public School Facilities.--In March 2000 the 
District of Columbia Financial Responsibility and Management 
Assistance Authority transferred jurisdiction of 38 public 
school properties to the control of the Mayor of the District 
of Columbia. These so-called ``surplus school properties'' have 
been utilized for the following purposes: 6 have been sold to 
charter schools; 10 have been leased to charter schools; 5 are 
being used by D.C. Public Schools for office space; 3 are being 
used for shelter from homelessness; 4 are being used for 
government office space; 5 are vacant; 7 have been sold for 
economic development; and 2 are being leased to private 
entities.
    The School Reform Act of 1995 provided a preference for 
charter schools to obtain surplus property to alleviate 
identified lack of appropriate school space. The Committee 
strongly supported the legal preference in its fiscal year 2003 
and 2004 Committee reports. In addition, Public Law 108-335, 
Section 342(c) requires that charter schools are provided a 
right of first offer on the disposition of any property.
    The Committee requests a report from the Mayor of the 
District of Columbia, in consultation with the Chairman of the 
Council of the District of Columbia, on the current use of all 
38 original surplus properties, the market rate value of each 
property, and the profit generated from any prior sales to more 
fully understand the benefit to the city.
    The Committee strongly encourages the city to create a 
mechanism whereby the proceeds from sales or leases of surplus 
public school property are deposited into a segregated account 
for school facilities improvement. The proceeds would enable 
the Superintendent to improve the entire system at a time when 
facilities funding is limited.
    This year public charter schools spent $11,000,000 on the 
private real estate market to renovate facilities for 
educational use, and it is projected that charter schools will 
spend an additional $16,000,000 next year. The Committee 
remains concerned about the lack of appropriate educational 
space for public charter schools while former public school 
facilities are used for other purposes. The Committee expects 
that additional surplus public school facilities will be made 
available expeditiously to charter schools, consistent with the 
right of first offer required under Section 342(c) of Public 
Law 108-335.
    Incubator Facility.--The Committee strongly supports the 
creation of regional incubator facilities for public charter 
schools to house a small number of new schools in each facility 
for a limited time. The Committee directs that no later than 
February 1, 2006 the Mayor of the District of Columbia shall 
obligate prior year funding for such a facility or facilities, 
in partnership with the Building Hope Charter School Facilities 
Fund.
    City Build Charter School Program.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $2,000,000 to continue the City Build 
Charter School Program. The program shall first identify 
communities which have the greatest near term potential of 
attracting or retaining residents as ``City Build 
Communities''; then the Mayor may solicit proposals from public 
charter schools to locate in City Build Communities. The 
Committee strongly encourages that public charter schools which 
demonstrate community service activities, such as family 
literacy programs, receive priority in future grants. In 
addition, the Committee continues to strongly encourage the 
Mayor of the District of Columbia and the Deputy Mayor for 
Planning and Economic Development to give priority and to 
highly leverage public funds to projects which include charter 
schools or other educational space in future development in the 
District.
    The Mayor of the District of Columbia is directed to use up 
to $500,000 of prior year unobligated funds to conduct an 
independent study of how public school options may attract or 
retain families to live in the District of Columbia. Of these 
funds, the State Education Office may use such sums as 
necessary for administration of the study and creation of a 
database of where families live and attend school.
    To achieve the goal of attracting or retaining residents, 
the independent study shall assess the opportunity for schools 
to enhance neighborhoods; the capacity and desire of residents 
for authorizing specific neighborhood-based public charter 
schools; and recommendations on new policies necessary to 
encourage connections among schools and community. In addition, 
the study shall identify communities in the District which have 
recently experienced shifts in population, specifically of 
families with school-age children; communities where high 
quality public school options are at capacity; and communities 
that have recently undergone or will undergo in the near future 
residential development. This study shall inform the Mayor's 
selection of ``City Build Communities.''

Improving Opportunities for School Choice

    The Committee recommendation includes $14,000,000 to 
continue a scholarship program to allow low-income students 
attending consistently under-performing public schools to 
choose to attend private schools within the District. The 
Committee believes that this program is improving the academic 
prospects of students receiving scholarships and is stimulating 
improvement within the public school system.
    The Committee is providing funds for scholarships that will 
be available to low-income District students in grades K 
through 12 who are attending consistently low performing public 
schools. The scholarships are for the tuition, transportation, 
and fees at participating private schools within the District 
and cannot exceed $7,500 per elementary and middle school 
student. If the funds provided are not sufficient to serve all 
the eligible applicants, scholarships will be awarded through 
random selection.
            Program Is Succeeding
    The Committee is very pleased with the first year launch of 
the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program. In a very brief 
period, the Washington Scholarship Fund [WSF], the grantee 
administering the program, has accepted applications from more 
than 5,400 students. The Committee understands the challenges 
that WSF has met, given the speed with which the organization 
had to design, launch, and recruit for the historic new 
demonstration project in school choice. Even so, WSF has made 
substantial progress in the inaugural months of the program, as 
noted by the U.S. Department of Education in its first report 
to Congress on the program.
    In the ``Evaluation of the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship 
Program: First Year Report on Participation,'' the Institute 
for Education Sciences at the U.S. Department of Education 
noted that:
  --More than 1,800 eligible, low-income D.C. children applied 
        for the program for the 2004-2005 school year during an 
        extremely brief application period necessitated by the 
        lateness of the law's passage.
  --The average household income of the 2004-2005 applicants 
        was $18,742, far below the statutory requirement of 185 
        percent of the poverty level.
  --Compared to other scholarship programs across the Nation, 
        this program has a more diverse group of participating 
        schools, including 28 percent of schools that are not 
        religiously affiliated.
  --Based on applicant levels to date for 2005-2006, there will 
        be enough students for both the ``treatment'' and 
        ``control'' groups in all 13 grades (K-12) to provide a 
        sufficient sample for the rigorous, federally mandated 
        evaluation of the program.
    In addition to these conclusions from the Department of 
Education's April report, the Committee notes that last fall, 
1,029 students entered D.C. non-public schools using 
Opportunity Scholarships. The first year of the program offered 
scholarship recipients a choice of 58 participating schools. 
Over 95 percent of students who started the school year stayed 
in the program.
    The Committee is pleased that more than 1,000 students have 
received scholarships for the upcoming school year, 2005-2006, 
and that there are nearly 900 students in the control group for 
the Federal evaluation, including students in all 13 grades, K-
12.
            Private High School Capacity is Inadequate
    Against the backdrop of this very promising start, the 
Committee is concerned that there is a shortage of spaces in 
D.C. non-public high schools for students with scholarships. 
The Committee understands that presently there is a mismatch 
between the number of high school spaces available and the 
number of scholarship students seeking a space in a D.C. non-
public high school. As a result, students already in possession 
of a scholarship will have to leave the program due to the 
capacity constraint. This is a problem for the families and the 
students who will not have access to the choice they were 
awarded by virtue of receiving the scholarship. It will also 
have a deleterious effect on the Federal evaluation since some 
students in the ``treatment'' group will not in fact be able to 
use their scholarships and will not receive their desired 
``treatment.''
            Capacity Problem Will Worsen Every Year
    This is a problem that has already surfaced for the 
upcoming school year, but it will only get worse in the 3 
subsequent years of the demonstration project. Specifically, 
for the 2005-2006 school year there are between 40 and 60 high 
school students still looking for a school. Even without 
distributing any new scholarships in grades 6 through 12, the 
number of high school students who cannot find a space is 
expected to grow each year as current middle school students 
graduate: 152 8th graders entering high school in year 3, 175 
7th graders entering high school in year 4, and 179 6th graders 
entering high school in year 5. At this rate by the final year 
of the demonstration project, there will be 606 students in 
high school, even with no new scholarships being distributed 
past the fifth grade. If no action is taken, nearly 75 percent 
of students holding scholarships to attend high school will be 
unable to use them because of limited capacity.
            Reasons for Capacity Problems
    The Committee has been informed that there are apparently 
two primary reasons that capacity is limited in the high school 
grades: (1) the scholarship cap of $7,500 is below the cost of 
tuition and fees in the vast majority of D.C. non-public high 
schools, creating a financial hardship for schools who enroll 
scholarship students; (2) the requirement that students attend 
only schools within the District of Columbia severely limits 
the slots available at the high school level.
    The Committee plans to hold hearings to learn from expert 
witnesses about the full extent of the capacity limitations for 
the upcoming year and the subsequent academic years. It also 
intends to explore options for addressing these challenges, and 
to understand the implications of students not using their 
scholarships on the federally-mandated evaluation.
    The Committee deeply regrets that, because of a shortage of 
available spaces in D.C. non-public high schools, a number of 
students who are already enrolled in the scholarship program 
for 8th grade will be forced to return to failing public 
schools--negating the very choice of an alternative which the 
program was designed to create. The Committee also regrets that 
a number of students who applied for and successfully received 
scholarships through the lottery will not be able to use their 
scholarships after all.

       FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR FORENSICS AND BIOTERRORISM LABORATORY

Appropriations, 2005....................................      $7,936,000
Budget estimate, 2006...................................       7,200,000
House allowance.........................................       7,200,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,200,000

    The Committee recommends $5,200,000 for costs associated 
with the construction of a new bioterrorism and forensics 
laboratory in the District of Columbia. This is $2,000,000 less 
than the President's budget and $2,736,000 below the fiscal 
year 2005 enacted level. The District's laboratory capacity has 
not kept pace with the innovations in the field and is 
therefore unable to meet the demands of the current workload. 
Because of this lack of capacity, the District is forced to 
seek help from the FBI crime laboratory in Quantico, Virginia. 
The FBI has its own workload capacity and therefore limits the 
evidence it will process for the District. This lack of 
capacity and the limitations of old technology have led to many 
so-called ``cold'' or unsolved crime cases in the District. A 
new laboratory will not only allow the District to more 
effectively and efficiently process crime cases, but it will be 
an essential element in processing evidence associated with 
potential bioterrorism attacks. The Committee expects the 
District to provide at least an additional $1,500,000 in local 
funds for the costs associated with this new laboratory.

        FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR MARRIAGE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT

Appropriations, 2005....................................................
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      $3,000,000

Children Born to Married Parents Usually Have Brighter Futures

    The Committee is informed that every year almost 57 percent 
of babies born to residents of the District of Columbia are 
born to single mothers. This is more than 40 percent higher 
than the national average. The Committee understands that 
children raised by never-married mothers are 7 times more 
likely to be poor compared to those children born to married 
parents and that over 80 percent of long-term child poverty 
occurs in broken or never-married families.
    The Committee believes that marriage has an enormous 
potential to reduce poverty among couples who are unmarried at 
the time of their child's birth. Studies show that increasing 
the number of healthy marriages would also have substantial 
non-economic benefits for children. For example, children who 
are raised in marriage by their biological mother and father 
are less likely to have emotional and behavioral problems, to 
be physically abused, to become involved in crime, to fail in 
school, to abuse drugs, and to end up on welfare as adults.

Promoting Teen Abstinence has Positive Results

    The Committee is aware of the negative effects of sexual 
behavior among teenagers. Studies show that girls who begin 
sexual activity at an early age are more likely to become 
pregnant and give birth out of wedlock and to be single 
mothers. Since single mothers are far more likely to be poor, 
early sexual activity is linked to higher levels of child and 
maternal poverty. The Committee believes that abstinence 
education programs aid in encouraging teenagers to delay sexual 
activity and the negative consequences associated with it.

Marriage Development Accounts

    The Committee understands that most children born and 
raised in households where their biological parents are married 
are more financially and emotionally stable. As a way to assist 
low-income married couples to save money to pay for job 
training or education, buy a home or start their own 
businesses, the Committee is providing funds to establish 
``Marriage Development Accounts'' [MDAs] in the District of 
Columbia. MDAs will be available to married couples who are 
citizens or legal residents of the District of Columbia whose 
Federal adjusted gross income does not exceed $50,000 and whose 
net worth is less than $10,000 (excluding a primary residence 
and one vehicle).
    Participating couples will have a high incentive to save 
because their contributions will be matched at a ratio of 3:1 
by the Federal Government and partnering private institutions. 
As a requirement of participation, couples will receive 
training that helps them repair their credit, set a budget and 
savings schedule, and manage their money. The Capital Area 
Asset Building Corporation [CAAB], a non-profit organization 
which is already assisting low-income individuals through a 
network of community service providers, will manage this new 
program. The MDAs will be held by CAAB at local financial 
institutions.

Pre-Marriage Development Accounts

    The Committee is also providing funds for pre-Marriage 
Development Accounts [pMDAs], which will be available to 
engaged couples, each of whom is 18 or older and whose combined 
adjusted gross income is less than $50,000 and whose total net 
worth is less than $10,000. These accounts will also be 
available to individuals aged 16-22 who are not married, do not 
have children, and whose adjusted gross income is less than 
$25,000 (non-dependant individual's income) or $50,000 
(dependant individual's household income). pMDAs will give 
young people and couples who are about to be married the 
financial tools and life skills training to make positive 
choices and well-informed plans for the future. pMDAs will help 
engaged couples build a strong financial and emotional 
foundation to help foster successful and long-term marriages. 
pMDAs will also help low-income youths gain a longer-term 
perspective and provide incentives and training to make 
economically--and emotionally--sound life decisions.

Implementation

    The Committee is providing $1,500,000 to the Capital Area 
Asset Building Corporation [CAAB] to implement MDAs and pMDAs. 
CAAB is a non-profit organization currently serving a 
consortium of community service providers which are working 
with low-income families and individuals in the District of 
Columbia. CAAB will establish the MDAs and will jointly hold 
deposits with a qualified financial institution. Of the funds 
provided, the Committee intends that $400,000 shall be for 
program planning, marketing, evaluation account administration, 
and services to account holders.
    For each dollar that the couple or youth deposits, CAAB 
will reserve a $3 match in a separate parallel account, using 
Federal and private or local funds. The Committee directs CAAB 
to provide an accounting of all funds deposited--Federal, 
local, and private--by June 30, 2006.
    When the accountholder has accumulated enough savings and 
matching funds to purchase the asset and has completed a 
financial education course, payments from the MDA will be made 
directly to the asset provider such as a university or a 
financial institution. Couples who open an account and 
subsequently attend at least four marriage counseling classes 
will be eligible for a bonus of $300 for their account.

Restrictions on Funds

    MDAs and pMDAs may only be used to: (1) buy a home; (2) pay 
for post-secondary education or vocational training; or (3) 
start or expand a small business. Accountholders must attend at 
least 8 hours of financial education prior to withdrawing the 
matching funds to purchase the asset. Asset-specific training 
will also be available. The funds in the accounts must be 
invested within 3 years and the matched amount will only be 
paid directly to the asset provider such as a college or a job 
training facility or a financial institution. At the end of the 
3 year period, any match funds that are not used shall be 
returned to the general match pool so that these funds may be 
reallocated to new enrollees. The couple must then withdraw any 
of their own savings from the MDA and transfer them to their 
bank account.
    Engaged couples must marry prior to withdrawing funds from 
their pMDAs. Upon marriage, couples will receive a $200 bonus 
to pay for costs associated with marriage licenses and other 
fees. If the couple does not marry, neither will be entitled to 
the Federal-private matching funds in the account. In the event 
of certain life circumstances, one partner may receive half of 
the match. These life circumstances are limited to the death of 
the fiance, a conviction of a felony or misdemeanor crime of 
the fiance, or an indictment for domestic violence.
    Single individuals aged 16-22 who remain unmarried and 
childless may contribute to their accounts for up to 4 years. 
The participating community service providers will provide 
credit counseling, debt management counseling, and asset-
specific training. Couples who participate in pre-marital and 
marital counseling will receive a $300 bonus in their accounts. 
Unmarried youths will be required to receive life-skills 
training, and to work with mentors to develop long-term 
education, job training, and asset-building goals.
    CAAB and its participating service providers shall work 
with the East Capitol Center for Change and its network of 
faith-based organizations and the National Center for Fathering 
to ensure that these services are offered to all 
accountholders.

Federal Match

    The Committee is requiring that for every $3 in Federal 
funds for MDAs and pMDAs, the Capital Area Asset Building 
Corporation provide $1 in matching funds which shall be 
obtained from private entities.
    No more than a total of $9,000 of Federal and private 
matching funds may be provided to any participating married or 
engaged couple and no more than $4,500 of Federal and private 
matching funds may be provided to unmarried youths.

Promoting Successful Marriages and Encouraging Positive Life Decisions

    The Committee is providing $650,000 for the East Capitol 
Center for Change [ECCC] and $850,000 for the National Center 
for Fathering [NCF] to work with local churches and other 
faith-based organizations to provide marriage counseling, 
couples mentoring, couples coaching, marriage retreats, ``Dad 
training,'' and community outreach. Both ECCC and NCF will work 
with CAAB and its participating service providers to provide 
account holders with life skills counseling, couples mentoring, 
and youth mentoring (which will include relationship counseling 
and abstinence counseling). ECCC and NCF will work with the 
faith community to provide pre-marital and marital counseling 
and relationship mentors and coaches for participating couples.
    Recognizing the importance of grassroots support to ensure 
the success of these efforts, the Committee directs ECCC and 
NCF to expand their network of service providers by developing 
partnership with local churches, faith-based organizations, and 
other non-profit organizations. The Committee expects that ECCC 
and NCF will provide technical assistance and training to their 
partners in order to replicate the successful models which they 
are currently using.
    The Committee has included bill language requiring CAAB, 
ECCC, and NCF to submit detailed expenditure plans within 30 
days of enactment of the bill. In addition, the Committee is 
directing CAAB to provide detailed program requirements 
governing MDAs and pMDAs that comport with the above report 
language with 30 days of enactment of the bill.

              FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR LATINO YOUTH INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2005....................................................
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      $2,000,000

    The Committee is concerned about the problems and 
challenges facing many Latino youth in the District of 
Columbia. Latino youth make up more than 25 percent of the 
under-18 population in the District of Columbia, compared to 10 
percent nationally. Many of these young people do not have 
adequate access to key services including health insurance, 
health care and education and job training. The Latino dropout 
rate in the District is estimated to be in the range of 50 
percent. In addition, Latino families earned 54 percent less 
than the average District resident which is significant since 
income level is often affects educational achievement. 
Educational disparities are especially acute for English 
Language Learners who constitute a majority of Latino students 
in the District.
    A study released earlier this year by the Equal Rights 
Center documented that Spanish-speaking applicants for services 
such as Medicaid or Children's Health Insurance experienced 
some form of discrimination about 50 percent of the time in 
their encounters with the Department of Health, often when 
applying for coverage on behalf of Latino children who are U.S. 
citizens. This is troubling, especially since Latinos in the 
District are more likely than other Americans to experience 
certain health problems such as obesity, diabetes, heart 
disease, and certain cancers.
    The Committee has also learned that Latino youth are 
disproportionately represented in the various stages of the 
criminal justice system in the District. Data from the D.C. 
Metropolitan Police Department, showed that while the total 
number of arrests decreased from 1999 to 2000, the number of 
arrests of Latinos increased by almost 25 percent.
    For these reasons, the Committee has included $2,000,000 to 
begin a Latino youth initiative in the District.

Strengthening Latino Youth Programs

    The Committee is providing $1,250,000 to The National 
Council of La Raza [NCLR] to improve health and educational 
outcomes of Latino children and promote violence prevention 
among Latino youth in the District. Working in partnership with 
its community-based affiliates in the Metropolitan area, NCLR 
will establish a multi-faceted demonstration project focused on 
health, education, and violence prevention among Latino 
children and youth in the region. This initiative will build on 
and be integrated into existing, successful NCLR programs that 
serve and collaborate with low-income Latino children and 
youth.
    A key component of this effort will be the development of 
cadres of promotores or lay community promoters as a primary 
pathway to deliver culturally competent and language 
appropriate information to Latino communities on health and 
violence prevention.
    The objective of NCLR's work in the District will be to 
mobilize Latinos to take action in improving their children's 
health status and preventing violence and promoting well-being 
in their communities. One such strategy, the use of promotores, 
has been pioneered by NCLR and its affiliates in a number of 
health-related contexts, mainly in the Southwest. NCLR proposes 
to expand this approach to the D.C. region, target it toward 
children's health, and to study its potential effectiveness as 
a tool for gang-related violence prevention. NCLR's will also 
support, promote, and document the implementation of these 
demonstration programs to inform policy and practice more 
broadly across the region and the Nation.
    The Committee intends that resources will be divided among 
the core health and gang violence elements of the program and 
will support the work of the partner community-based affiliates 
in the D.C. area. Within each core element of the program, the 
Committee expects the bulk of the resources will be allocated 
to program interventions.

Improving Latino Education

    The Committee has included $400,000 for the Mid Atlantic 
Equity Consortium, Inc. [MAEC] to administer a Latino Education 
Initiative. MAEC will administer a program aimed at reducing 
dropout rates and increasing achievement of Latino students, 
especially those who are English Language Learners [ELL]. MAEC 
will use research on Latino student achievement and available 
community resources to make policy recommendations. The 
Committee intends that MAEC should serve as the fiscal agent 
for these funds and may contract with or sub-grant to eligible 
entities in order to carry out the intent of the funding.
    Of this amount, the Committee has included sufficient funds 
for a Latino Education Director who will oversee and coordinate 
citywide efforts to improve educational opportunities and 
outcomes for Latino students.
    The Committee is informed that MAEC has expertise in this 
area and has been working with DCPS on related issues for 
several years. Because it is an independent nonprofit, it has 
the ability to work citywide to ensure that ELL and Latino 
students are well-served whether they attend DCPS, charter, or 
non-public schools.
    MAEC will coordinate the recruitment and hiring of the 
Latino Education Director. The Director will have 
responsibility to coordinate with all relevant parties: the 
District Government, DCPS, Charter Schools, Non-Public Schools, 
and community-based organizations involved in serving Latino 
students.
    The Committee is also providing $400,000 for the Latin 
American Youth Center [LAYC] YouthBuild Public Charter School 
[YouthBuild PCS], a newly approved charter school that takes to 
scale a highly successful program that the LAYC has operated 
for 10 years. The YouthBuild program has worked with D.C.'s 
most troubled youth--high school dropouts, former gang members, 
teen parents, adjudicated youth--and helped them obtain a GED 
and gain job skills in the construction industry while creating 
housing for homeless and low-income D.C. residents.
    The Committee understands that the YouthBuild Public 
Charter School combines academics and vocational training in 
one of D.C.'s fastest-growing job markets; benefits the 
community by rehabilitating low-income housing while teaching 
students construction skills; and is a proven program being 
taken to a larger scale.
    The promotion of education reform in small alternative 
settings in our Nation's capital has been a priority for the 
Congress. The YouthBuild PCS is fostering that reform by taking 
the most disconnected and disadvantaged youth in the Nation's 
capital and ensuring that the educational system works for them 
as well.

            FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR PRISONER RE-ENTRANT HOUSING

Appropriations, 2005....................................................
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................      $2,000,000

    The Committee is providing $3,000,000 for a Prisoner 
Reentrant Housing Initiative in the District of Columbia.

Many Ex-Offenders Face Homelessness

    The Committee understands that every year 2,500 former 
prisoners return home to the District. Returning offenders are 
assigned to the Court Services and Offender Supervisor Agency 
[CSOSA] for release plan investigation during parole or 
probation term. Those who cannot identify a safe place to live 
are assigned to halfway houses where their stays are capped at 
120 days.

Preventing Homelessness can Reduce Recidivism

    The Committee believes strongly that reducing the 
likelihood of homelessness for those exiting the halfway house 
system is critical to combating recidivism among returning 
prisoners. Stable housing increases the likelihood that the 
offender will successfully complete his or her term of parole 
or supervised release, find and maintain employment, maintain 
family relationships, and access the programs and services that 
contribute to successful reentry. CSOSA originally brought this 
issue to the attention of the D.C. Department of Housing and 
Community Development [DHCD] in December 2004, noting the 
relationship between stable housing and offenders' compliance 
with the conditions of community supervision. An important 
aspect of supervision is the offender's growing awareness of, 
and participation in, community-based social services; this 
occurs during the term of supervision and constitutes a 
critical stage of the reentry process. Currently, the D.C. 
reentry initiative offers individuals exiting the criminal 
justice system direct services and access to 30 community-based 
nonprofit organizations. Unity health care provides health 
services through a clinic designed specifically for reentrants. 
The Department of Employment Services provides job readiness 
and job placement services at its offices, and case workers 
assist reentrants in obtaining GED certification and enrollment 
in college courses at UDC.
    The Committee is aware that ex-offenders are faced with 
rebuilding their lives as they seek to join the workforce, 
support their families and become productive members of 
society. Despite successes in delivery of social and health 
care services, there is a very pressing need for affordable 
housing.

Incentives to Provide Housing for Ex-Offenders

    The Committee intends that the funding provided be used to 
offer incentives to encourage developers and non-profit 
organizations to rehabilitate or construct new housing for 
reentrants in order to increase the pool of available housing 
for those exiting the criminal justice system. Construction 
funding will be administered by the District's Department of 
Housing and Community Development [DHCD], which has the 
infrastructure in place to monitor housing construction 
incentives as part of the Housing Production Trust Fund. DHCD 
will issue a special Notice of Funding Availability [NOFA] to 
solicit developers of these housing units. The NOFA will 
include the following restrictions on developers using the 
funds: (1) the developer must derive reentrant tenants from 
designated non-profit support service agencies, (2) the units 
must be dedicated to reentrants for a period of at least 25 
years, (3) the operating funds for the first 6 months of 
tenancy will be eligible project expenses.

Federal-Local Partnership

    The Committee directs the District to partner with the 
federally-funded Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency 
[CSOSA] in this effort, which provides parole supervision 
services. The Committee understands that the District will 
offer participants access to job readiness and employment 
opportunities, healthcare services, education, child care, 
substance abuse counseling, and mental health services.

Rental Reimbursement for On-site Mentors

    The Committee believes that mentors play a crucial role in 
helping ex-offenders successfully reintegrate into society by 
providing them with emotional, psychological, spiritual and 
motivational support. Mentors can help ex-offenders find 
employment, make sure that they attend counseling sessions, and 
encourage them to reconcile with family members.
    A portion of the funds provided by the Committee is for 
rental reimbursements for mentors who agree to live in the same 
housing development as the ex-offenders. Since these mentors 
will live in close proximity to the program participants, they 
will be much more accessible and better able to provide one-on-
one support. As a condition of receiving these funds, the 
District must work with CSOSA to match mentors with 
participants. CSOSA has trained 200 mentors to date through its 
Faith-Based Reentry Initiative. The Committee believes that 
these mentors will make excellent candidates for this program. 
Recognizing the significant Latino population in the District, 
the Committee directs the District and CSOSA to ensure that 
participants are matched with bilingual mentors.

Concerns About Overcrowding at D.C. Jail

    The Committee is disappointed that the Council of the 
District of Columbia reduced the proposed fiscal year 2006 
local funds budget for the D.C. Department of Corrections by 
$4,000,000 at a time when there is serious overcrowding at the 
D.C. Jail. The Committee believes that this cut will impair the 
Department's ability to fully and securely staff its facilities 
and will also limit its ability to move jail inmates to 
available beds in nearby contract facilities. The Committee 
urges the Council, the Mayor, and the D.C. Department of 
Corrections to rectify this funding shortage.

     FEDERAL PAYMENT FOR THE NATIONAL GUARD YOUTH CHALLENGE PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2005....................................................
Budget estimate, 2006...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................        $500,000

    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000 for the 
creation of a D.C. National Guard Youth Challenge Program for 
at-risk youth. Youth ChalleNGe is a community-based program to 
help youth obtain a GED or high school diploma through 
mentoring, leadership and citizenship training, and community 
service.

            USE OF FEDERAL LANDS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

    The Committee is pleased that the President has recently 
proposed legislation to convey more than 200 acres of Federal 
land to the District. The Committee believes that converting 
Federal land to local use will not only enable the District to 
broaden its constricted tax base, but will allow the District 
to make better use of these land parcels. According to the 
Mayor, this transfer will ``simultaneously create economic 
opportunity, improve life for many D.C. residents and advance 
home rule.'' The Committee notes that the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget described the administration's 
proposal as a ``first step in a broader examination of 
underutilized Federal lands that may be considered for future 
conveyance to the District.'' To facilitate and expedite the 
better use of these properties, the Committee directs the 
District to seek the independent assistance of a firm to 
conduct an assessment of reuse options through, among other 
things, land transfers, revised lease arrangements, and joint 
ventures to determine the best use of the parcels. The firm 
should have extensive experience and an in-depth knowledge of 
all facets of the real estate capital markets and real estate 
valuation. In addition to industry knowledge, the firm should 
be independent and have an understanding and appreciation of 
the various stakeholders with an interest in the land survey 
program. The Committee directs the District to report on its 
progress with respect to firm recruitment and a plan for the 
Federal land survey by March 31, 2006.

              DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA LOCAL OPERATING BUDGET

    The Committee recommends a total of $8,700,158,000 for the 
operating expenses of the District of Columbia as contained in 
the fiscal year 2006 budget submitted to the Congress by the 
Government of the District of Columbia on June 6, 2005. Of the 
total, $5,007,344,000 is from local funds, $1,921,287,000 is 
from Federal grant funds, $1,754,399,000 is from other funds, 
$17,129,000 is from private funds, and $163,116,000 is from 
prior year funds. The Committee directs that any changes to the 
financial plan as submitted by the District must follow the 
reprogramming guidelines.
    The following tables detail the revenue and expenses plan 
of the District for fiscal year 2006:

                                         FISCAL YEAR 2006 FINANCIAL PLAN
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Grants and
                                                                  Local Funds     Other Revenue    Gross funds
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           Revenues
Local Sources:
    Property Taxes............................................       1,242,479   ..............       1,242,479
    Sales Taxes...............................................         876,129   ..............         876,129
    Income Taxes..............................................       1,405,670   ..............       1,405,670
    Gross Receipts............................................         246,891   ..............         246,891
    Other Taxes...............................................         330,364   ..............         330,364
    Licenses and Permits......................................          66,470   ..............          66,470
    Fines and Forfeitures.....................................         113,613   ..............         113,613
    Charges/Services..........................................          56,436   ..............          56,436
    Miscellaneous.............................................         416,335   ..............         416,335
    Fund Balance Use..........................................         591,642   ..............         591,642
    Transfers to Capital......................................         (30,000)  ..............         (30,000)
    Revenue Proposals/Onetime Revenues........................           8,729   ..............           8,729
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Local Revenues.................................       5,324,758   ..............       5,324,758
                                                               =================================================
Federal and Other Sources:
    Federal Payments..........................................  ...............          34,500          34,500
    Federal Grants............................................  ...............       1,904,539       1,904,539
    Private Grants............................................  ...............          16,213          16,213
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Federal Sources Revenues.......................  ...............       1,955,252       1,955,252
                                                               =================================================
Other Financing Sources:
    Lottery Transfer..........................................          73,100   ..............          73,100
                                                               =================================================
      Total General Fund Revenues.............................       5,397,858        1,955,252       7,353,110
                                                               =================================================
                         Expenditures
Current Operating:
    Governmental Direction and Support........................         340,859          171,975         512,834
    Economic Development and Regulation.......................         328,156          118,312         446,468
    Public Safety and Justice.................................         827,037           10,577         837,614
    Public Education System...................................       1,189,302          240,194       1,429,496
    Human Support Services....................................       1,307,530        1,405,819       2,713,349
    Public Works..............................................         366,101            8,375         374,476
    Financing and Other.......................................         588,717   ..............         588,717
    Cash Reserve (Budgeted Contingency).......................          50,000   ..............          50,000
    Lease Purchase Costs......................................  ...............  ..............  ...............
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Operating Expenditures........................       4,997,702        1,955,252       6,952,954
                                                               =================================================
    Paygo Capital.............................................         207,083   ..............         207,083
    Transfer to Trust Fund for Post-Employment Benefits.......         138,000   ..............         138,000
    General Fund Contribution to Capital Fund Balance.........          53,800   ..............          53,800
                                                               -------------------------------------------------
      Total General Fund Expenditures.........................       5,396,585        1,955,252       7,351,837
                                                               =================================================
    Operating Margin, Budget Basis............................           1,273   ..............           1,273
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                               GOVERNMENTAL DIRECTION AND SUPPORT
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
COUNCIL OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...............................       12,809       14,038  ............       14,038         14,038   ............         14,038         1,230   ...........
OFFICE OF THE D.C. AUDITOR........................................        1,784        2,008  ............        2,008          2,008   ............          2,008           224   ...........
ADVISORY NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSIONS.................................          976          976  ............          976            976   ............            976   ............  ...........
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR...............................................       10,439       13,454         (110)       13,343         13,454          (110)         13,343         3,014   ...........
OFFICE OF SECRETARY...............................................        3,679        4,241  ............        4,241          4,241   ............          4,241           563   ...........
CUSTOMER SERVICE OPERATIONS.......................................        1,052        1,048         (695)          353          1,048          (695)            353            (3)  ...........
OFFICE OF CITY ADMINISTRATOR......................................      111,424      173,880         (584)      173,297        173,880          (584)        173,297        62,456   ...........
OFFICE OF RISK MANAGEMENT.........................................        2,023        2,365         (500)        1,865          2,365          (500)          1,865           343   ...........
OFFICE OF PERSONNEL...............................................       14,056       13,544       (2,594)       10,950         13,544        (2,594)         10,950          (511)  ...........
HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT.......................................        1,978        2,000  ............        2,000          2,000   ............          2,000            22   ...........
OFFICE OF FINANCE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT.........................      188,016      200,888     (190,259)       10,630        200,888      (190,259)         10,630        12,873   ...........
OFFICE OF CONTRACTING AND PROCUREMENT.............................       12,334       14,642       (1,653)       12,989         14,642        (1,653)         12,989         2,308   ...........
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER............................       44,685       43,474       (4,052)       39,422         43,474        (4,052)         39,422        (1,211)  ...........
OFFICE OF PROPERTY MANAGEMENT.....................................       61,625       69,346      (49,795)       19,551         69,346       (49,795)         19,551         7,721   ...........
CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD............................................          764          806  ............          806            806   ............            806            42   ...........
BOARD OF ELECTION & ETHICS........................................        4,805        5,042  ............        5,042          5,042   ............          5,042           237   ...........
OFFICE OF CAMPAIGN FINANCE........................................        1,324        1,374  ............        1,374          1,374   ............          1,374            50   ...........
PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RELATIONS BOARD...................................          776          801  ............          801            801   ............            801            25   ...........
OFFICE OF EMPLOYEE APPEALS........................................        1,536        1,589  ............        1,589          1,589   ............          1,589            53   ...........
METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS....................          926          440  ............          440            440   ............            440          (486)  ...........
OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR THE DISTRICT OF CO- LUMBIA.....       62,381       66,275       (2,392)       63,883         66,275        (2,392)         63,883         3,894   ...........
OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL...................................       11,295       12,942  ............       12,942         12,942   ............         12,942         1,647   ...........
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER.............................      107,054      124,242       (3,951)      120,291        124,242        (3,951)        120,291        17,189   ...........
EMERGENCY PURCHASE CARDS..........................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, GOVERNMENTAL DIRECTION AND SUPPORT...................      657,740      769,418     (256,585)      512,834        769,418      (256,585)        512,834       111,678   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                               ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY MAYOR OF PLANNING............................       22,309       42,980  ............       42,980         42,980   ............         42,980        20,671   ...........
OFFICE OF PLANNING................................................        6,512        6,673  ............        6,673          6,673   ............          6,673           162   ...........
OFFICE OF LOCAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT..............................        1,040        1,438  ............        1,438          1,438   ............          1,438           398   ...........
OFFICE OF MOTION PICTURES AND TELEVISION..........................          564          579  ............          579            579   ............            579            15   ...........
OFFICE OF ZONING..................................................        2,581        2,902  ............        2,902          2,902   ............          2,902           321   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT.....................      145,265      210,710  ............      210,710        210,710   ............        210,710        65,445   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT SERVICES.................................       88,345       93,048       (2,534)       90,514         93,048        (2,534)         90,514         4,702   ...........
BOARD OF APPEALS AND REVIEW.......................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
BOARD OF REAL PROPERTY ASSES. & APPEALS...........................          342          431  ............          431            431   ............            431            89   ...........
DEPARTMENT CONSUMER & REGULATORY AFFAIRS..........................       37,247       40,251         (106)       40,145         40,251          (106)         40,145         3,003   ...........
COMMISSION ON ARTS & HUMANITIES...................................        9,918         (20)        9,898         9,918           (20)         9,898           9,918   ............
ALCOHOL BEVERAGE REGULATION ADMINISTRATION........................        4,877        4,702  ............        4,702          4,702   ............          4,702          (175)  ...........
DEPARTMENT OF BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS..................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION.........................................        7,656        7,976  ............        7,976          7,976   ............          7,976           320   ...........
OFFICE OF THE PEOPLE'S COUNSEL....................................        3,885        4,306  ............        4,306          4,306   ............          4,306           421   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF INSURANCE, SECURITIES AND BANKING...................       13,675       14,158  ............       14,158         14,158   ............         14,158           483   ...........
OFFICE OF CABLE TELEVISION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS.................        4,000        5,054  ............        5,054          5,054   ............          5,054         1,054   ...........
HOUSING AUTHORITY SUBSIDY.........................................  ...........        4,003  ............        4,003          4,003   ............          4,003         4,003   ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND REGULATION..................      338,298      449,128       (2,660)      446,468        449,128        (2,660)        446,468       110,830   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                    PUBLIC SAFETY AND JUSTICE
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
METROPOLITAN POLICE DEPARTMENT....................................      372,561      377,488       (5,398)      372,089        377,488        (5,398)        372,089         4,926   ...........
FIRE AND EMERGENCY SERVICES DEPARTMENT............................      145,364      156,268         (368)      155,900        156,268          (368)        155,900        10,904   ...........
POLICE OFFICERS' & FIRE FIGHTERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM...............      112,100      117,500  ............      117,500        117,500   ............        117,500         5,400   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS.........................................      121,447      132,686       (1,934)      130,751        132,686        (1,934)        130,751        11,239   ...........
NATIONAL GUARD....................................................        3,253        3,428  ............        3,428          3,428   ............          3,428           175   ...........
D.C. EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY..................................        5,030        5,495  ............        5,495          5,495   ............          5,495           465   ...........
COMMISSION ON JUDICIAL DISABILITIES & TENURE......................          213          218  ............          218            218   ............            218             5   ...........
JUDICIAL NOMINATION COMMISSION....................................          118          126  ............          126            126   ............            126             8   ...........
OFFICE OF POLICE COMPLAINTS.......................................        1,756        2,095  ............        2,095          2,095   ............          2,095           339   ...........
D.C. SENTENCING COMMISSION........................................          581          662  ............          662            662   ............            662            81   ...........
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF MEDICAL EXAMINER..............................        6,762        9,265  ............        9,265          9,265   ............          9,265         2,503   ...........
OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS.................................        6,647        7,057       (1,164)        5,893          7,057        (1,164)          5,893           410   ...........
CORRECTIONS INFORMATION COUNCIL...................................          155          155  ............          155            155   ............            155            (0)  ...........
CRIMINAL JUSTICE COORDINATING COUNCIL.............................        1,550        1,576  ............        1,576          1,576   ............          1,576            26   ...........
FORENSICS LABORATORY TECHNICIAN TRAINING PROGRAM..................          800          800  ............          800            800   ............            800   ............  ...........
OFFICE OF UNIFIED COMMUNICATIONS..................................       30,217       31,662  ............       31,662         31,662   ............         31,662         1,444   ...........
EMERGENCY AND DISASTER RESPONSE...................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, PUBLIC SAFETY AND JUSTICE............................      808,553      846,479       (8,864)      837,615        846,479        (8,864)        837,615        37,926   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                     PUBLIC EDUCATION SYSTEM
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
D.C. PUBLIC SCHOOLS...............................................      962,496    1,033,194      (54,157)      979,037      1,033,194       (54,157)        979,037        70,699   ...........
TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND.........................................        9,200       15,500  ............       15,500         15,500   ............         15,500         6,300   ...........
STATE EDUCATION OFFICE............................................       82,388       78,449  ............       78,449         78,449   ............         78,449        (3,939)  ...........
D.C. PUBLIC CHARTER SCHOOLS.......................................      196,802      239,284  ............      239,284        239,284   ............        239,284        42,483   ...........
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA............................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SUBSIDY....................       49,602       57,873  ............       57,873         57,873   ............         57,873         8,270   ...........
D.C. PUBLIC LIBRARY...............................................       32,402       34,473         (320)       34,153         34,473          (320)         34,153         2,071   ...........
COMMISSION ON ARTS & HUMANITIES...................................        5,357  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............       (5,357)  ...........
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA EDUCATIONAL INVESTMENT FUND..................  ...........       21,000  ............       21,000         21,000   ............         21,000        21,000   ...........
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CHARTER SCHOOLS INVESTMENT FUND..............  ...........        4,200  ............        4,200          4,200   ............          4,200         4,200   ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, PUBLIC EDUCATION SYSTEM..............................    1,338,246    1,483,973      (54,477)    1,429,496      1,483,973       (54,477)      1,429,496       145,727   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                     HUMAN SUPPORT SERVICES
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES......................................      442,380      414,015         (198)      413,817        414,015          (198)        413,817       (28,365)  ...........
CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES AGENCY..................................      220,802      236,762      (44,284)      192,478        236,762       (44,284)        192,478        15,960   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH.......................................      208,506      229,545      (42,917)      186,628        229,545       (42,917)        186,628        21,038   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH..............................................    1,637,183    1,729,326       (8,842)    1,720,484      1,729,326        (8,842)      1,720,484        92,143   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION................................       43,971       51,340       (7,450)       43,890         51,340        (7,450)         43,890         7,369   ...........
OFFICE ON AGING...................................................       21,133       21,415         (225)       21,190         21,415          (225)         21,190           282   ...........
PBC TRANSITION....................................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION FUND....................................        8,124        7,124  ............        7,124          7,124   ............          7,124        (1,000)  ...........
DISABILITY COMPENSATION FUND......................................       29,600       30,281  ............       30,281         30,281   ............         30,281           681   ...........
OFFICE OF HUMAN RIGHTS............................................        2,514        5,032  ............        5,032          5,032   ............          5,032         2,518   ...........
OFFICE ON LATINO AFFAIRS..........................................        4,462        4,485         (830)        3,655          4,485          (830)          3,655            22   ...........
D.C. ENERGY OFFICE................................................       17,839       21,147         (326)       20,820         21,147          (326)         20,820         3,308   ...........
CHILDREN AND YOUTH INVESTMENT FUND................................        5,068        8,068  ............        8,068          8,068   ............          8,068         3,000   ...........
BROWNFIELD REMEDIATION............................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
ASIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER AFFAIRS................................          353          540  ............          540            540   ............            540           186   ...........
OFFICE OF VETERANS AFFAIRS........................................          239          251  ............          251            251   ............            251            12   ...........
MEDICAID RESERVE..................................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
INCENTIVES FOR ADOPTION OF CHILDREN...............................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
DEPARTMENT OF YOUTH REHABILITATION SERVICES.......................  ...........       61,327       (2,237)       59,090         61,327        (2,237)         59,090        61,327   ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL HUMAN SUPPORT SERVICES................................    2,642,174    2,820,657     (107,308)    2,713,349      2,820,657      (107,308)      2,713,349       178,482   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                          PUBLIC WORKS
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS........................................      105,220      115,530      (20,488)       95,043        115,530       (20,488)         95,043        10,310   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION......................................       31,579       39,005         (214)       38,791         39,005          (214)         38,791         7,426   ...........
DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES......................................       40,790       46,530         (162)       46,369         46,530          (162)         46,369         5,740   ...........
D.C. TAXI CAB COMMISSION..........................................        1,258        1,362  ............        1,362          1,362   ............          1,362           104   ...........
WASHINGTON METRO AREA TRANSIT COMMISSION..........................           95          110  ............          110            110   ............            110            15   ...........
WASHINGTON METRO AREA TRANSIT AUTHORITY...........................      166,633      187,632  ............      187,632        187,632   ............        187,632        20,999   ...........
SCHOOL TRANSIT SUBSIDY............................................        4,670        5,169  ............        5,169          5,169   ............          5,169           499   ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, PUBLIC WORKS.........................................      350,245      395,339      (20,863)      374,476        395,339       (20,863)        374,476        45,094   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                       FINANCING AND OTHER
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RESERVE...........................................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
REPAYMENT OF LOANS AND INTEREST...................................      347,700      370,778  ............      370,778        370,778   ............        370,778        23,078   ...........
REPAYMENT OF GENERAL FUND DEFICIT.................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
SHORT-TERM BORROWINGS.............................................        4,000        5,500  ............        5,500          5,500   ............          5,500         1,500   ...........
INAUGURAL EXPENSES................................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
CERTIFICATES OF PARTICIPATION.....................................       15,252       15,000       (4,000)       11,000         15,000        (4,000)         11,000          (252)  ...........
SETTLEMENTS AND JUDGMENTS.........................................       20,270       20,655  ............       20,655         20,655   ............         20,655           385   ...........
WILSON BUILDING...................................................        3,633        3,740  ............        3,740          3,740   ............          3,740           107   ...........
WORKFORCE INVESTMENTS.............................................       38,114       61,110  ............       61,110         61,110   ............         61,110        22,996   ...........
TOBACCO TRUST FUND................................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
NON-DEPARTMENTAL..................................................       13,946       36,286  ............       36,286         36,286   ............         36,286        22,340   ...........
EMERGENCY PLANNING AND SECURITY FUND..............................       14,880  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............      (14,880)  ...........
ONE-TIME EXPENDITURES.............................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
TAX INCREMENT FINANCING (TIF) PROGRAM.............................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
CASH RESERVE......................................................       50,000       50,000  ............       50,000         50,000   ............         50,000   ............  ...........
GRANT DISALLOWANCE................................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
EQUIPMENT LEASE OPERATING.........................................       23,109       35,441       (8,000)       27,441         35,441        (8,000)         27,441        12,332   ...........
EMERGENCY AND CONTINGENCY RESERVE FUNDS...........................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
PAY-GO CONTINGENCY................................................       43,137  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............      (43,137)  ...........
PAY-GO CAPITAL....................................................        6,531      260,883  ............      260,883        260,883   ............        260,883       254,352   ...........
DEBT SERVICE--ISSUANCE COSTS......................................  ...........       40,000  ............       40,000         40,000   ............         40,000        40,000   ...........
SCHOOLS MODERNIZATION FUND........................................  ...........       12,208  ............       12,208         12,208   ............         12,208        12,208   ...........
DISTRICT RETIREE HEALTH CONTRIBUTION..............................  ...........      138,000  ............      138,000        138,000   ............        138,000       138,000   ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, FINANCING AND OTHER..................................      580,572    1,049,600      (12,000)    1,037,600      1,049,600       (12,000)      1,037,600       469,028   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                                                                        ENTERPRISE FUNDS
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                          Bill compared with--
                                                                      Approved   Fiscal year                Fiscal year                                               --------------------------
                          Agency/activity                           fiscal year      2006        Intra-      2006 less      Committee       Intra-        Committee     Fiscal year  Fiscal year
                                                                        2005       request      District       Intra-    recommendation    District    recommendation      2005          2006
                                                                                                              district                                                   approved      request
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY.........................................      287,206      295,710  ............      295,710        295,710   ............        295,710         8,504   ...........
WASHINGTON AQUEDUCT...............................................       47,972       50,512  ............       50,512         50,512   ............         50,512         2,540   ...........
STORM WATER.......................................................        3,792        6,673  ............        6,673          6,673   ............          6,673         2,881   ...........
D.C. LOTTERY & CHARITABLE GAMES CONTROL BOARD.....................      247,000      251,000  ............      251,000        251,000   ............        251,000         4,000   ...........
SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT COMMISSION...............................        7,322      339,630  ............      339,630        339,630   ............        339,630       332,308   ...........
D.C. RETIREMENT BOARD.............................................       15,277       30,078  ............       30,078         30,078   ............         30,078        14,801   ...........
CORRECTIONAL INDUSTRIES...........................................  ...........  ...........  ............  ...........  ..............  ............  ..............  ............  ...........
WASHINGTON CONVENTION CENTER AUTHORITY............................       77,176       78,900  ............       78,900         78,900   ............         78,900         1,724   ...........
NATIONAL CAPITAL REVITALIZATION CORPORATION.......................        7,849       52,731  ............       52,731         52,731   ............         52,731        44,882   ...........
UNIVERSITY OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA............................       90,575      102,200       (5,730)       96,470        102,200        (5,730)         96,470        11,625   ...........
D.C. OFFICE OF PERSONAL AGENCY TRUST FUND.........................          953        1,100  ............        1,100          1,100   ............          1,100           147   ...........
D.C. PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS...................................           17           17  ............           17             17   ............             17   ............  ...........
UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION FUND....................................      180,000      180,000  ............      180,000        180,000   ............        180,000   ............  ...........
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, ENTERPRISE FUNDS.....................................      965,140    1,388,551       (5,730)    1,382,821      1,388,551        (5,730)      1,382,821       423,411   ...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                           General Provisions

    The Committee has modified section 104 and section 105 to 
allow the District to use locally-generated funds for lobbying 
purposes. The Committee has included language to maintain a 
complete prohibition on the use of Federal funds for this 
purpose.
    The Committee has modified section 117 to allow the 
District to use locally-generated revenues to support programs 
that provide individuals with sterile needles and syringes. 
This is consistent with a provision approved by the Senate and 
included in the Senate bill since fiscal year 2003. The 
Committee has included language that maintains a complete 
prohibition on the use of Federal funds for this purpose.
    The Committee has included language (sec. 127) that allows 
the District, based upon revenue certified by the District's 
Chief Financial Officer, to increase by 25 percent, the amount 
appropriated for non-tax revenues or ``Other-Type'' funds and 
to increase by 6 percent the amount appropriated from all other 
fund sources within the District's operating budget. The 
language retains congressional oversight by requiring 
notification to the committees prior to the expenditure of any 
increased amount.
    The Committee has included language (sec. 128) that would 
allow the District to borrow from its emergency and contingency 
reserve funds for cash flow management purposes. Among other 
restrictions, the provision allows for borrowing only when the 
amount in each fund is above 50 percent and then only to the 
extent that such borrowing does not deplete the fund below a 50 
percent threshold. In addition, the provision requires the 
District to replenish any funds borrowed within 9 months or by 
the end of the fiscal year, whichever occurs earlier.
    The Committee has included language (sec. 131) that conveys 
15 acres of Federal Park Service land to the District of 
Columbia to be used for educational purposes. This conveyance 
of title for educational purposes reflects the mutual interest 
of the Committee and the District of Columbia to provide a 
suitable campus environment for a public boarding school to 
prepare more District students for success in college and the 
professional world. The Committee joins with District leaders 
in supporting public boarding school as a critical component of 
the District's education portfolio and an important 
contribution to national education reform. In addition, the 
Committee fully supports and encourages the District's 
commitment to collaborating closely with a community 
organization to develop the plan for a boarding school on the 
described land.
    The Committee expects that the lease will be executed not 
later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this 
subsection; will lease the described land without consideration 
to a non-profit District of Columbia corporation to develop, 
manage, and administer a boarding school for the public 
welfare; will be for a long term, and shall provide for a 
renewal of the initial term; and will be assignable by the 
lessee for the purpose of securing indebtedness of the lessee, 
except that any successor in interest to the lessee shall 
utilize the property for an educational institution for the 
public welfare.
    The Committee bill includes provisions (sec. 132 and sec. 
133) that extend through fiscal year 2006, the authority of the 
Office of the Chief Financial Officer [OCFO] over personnel, 
procurement, and the preparation of fiscal impact statements. 
The intent of the Committee is to exempt all aspects of the 
OCFO's contracting and procurement from the District of 
Columbia's Procurement Practices Act and to extend the OCFO's 
independent personnel authority and its authority to prepare 
fiscal impact statements during the post control board period.
    The Committee bill includes language (sec. 134 and sec. 
135) to ensure that annuitants retired from the Secret Service 
are entitled to receive appropriate annual pay increases.
    The bill contains a provision (sec. 137) to authorize the 
District to establish a separate title for the Anacostia 
Waterfront Corporation from funds currently appropriated under 
the Economic Development title in the District's fiscal year 
2006 appropriation. This provision does not increase the 
District's overall appropriation request.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports on 
general appropriations bills identify each Committee amendment 
to the House bill ``which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.''
    Items providing funding for fiscal year 2006 which lack 
authorization are as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal payment for emergency planning and security costs    $12,000,000
 in the District of Columbia...............................
Federal payment for the Water and Sewer Authority..........    5,000,000
Federal payment for the Anacostia Waterfront Initiative....    3,000,000
Federal payment for transportation.........................    1,000,000
Federal payment for foster care improvements...............    2,000,000
Federal payment for the Office of the Chief Financial         16,500,000
 Officer...................................................
Federal payment for bioterrorism and forensics lab.........    5,200,000
Federal payment for the National Guard Youth Challenge           500,000
 Program...................................................
Federal payment for marriage development...................    3,000,000
Federal payment for Latino Youth Initiative................    2,000,000
Federal payment for prisoner reentrant housing.............    3,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on July 21, 2005, 
the Committee ordered reported, en bloc S. 1446, an original 
bill making appropriations for the District of Columbia and 
other activities chargeable in whole or in part against the 
revenues of said District for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 2006, and for other purposes, H.R. 2528, making 
appropriations for Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, 
and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2006, and for other purposes with an amendment in the nature of 
a substitute and an amendment to the title; and H.R.3058, 
making appropriations for the Departments of Transportation, 
Treasury, the Judiciary, Housing and Urban Development, and 
related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2006, 
and for other purposes, with an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute, provided that the bill be subject to further 
amendment and the bill be consistent with its budget 
allocation, by a recorded vote of 28-0, a quorum being present. 
The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Cochran
Mr. Stevens
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Craig
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. DeWine
Mr. Brownback
Mr. Allard
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Ms. Landrieu

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the Committee.''

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA OFFICIAL CODE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                                TITLE 3.


              DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS.


                               SUBTITLE I


GENERAL.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                               Chapter 3


Armory Board.

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Subchapter II. Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 3-326. TITLE TO STADIUM TO VEST IN UNITED STATES; DATE; CONVEYANCE 
                    AND LEASE TO DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA; NON-
                    TRANSFERABILITY; USES OF PROPERTY; REVERSION FOR 
                    NONCOMPLIANCE.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d)(1) The instrument of conveyance and the lease referred 
to in subsection (c) of this section shall provide that all 
right, title, and interest conveyed to the District of Columbia 
pursuant to such instrument of conveyance shall revert to the 
United States and the lease shall terminate if:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (4) Any property which reverts to the Secretary under this 
subsection shall be administered by the Secretary as part of 
the Park System of the Nation's Capital in accordance with the 
provisions of the Act of August 25, 1916 (16 U.S.C. 
Sec. Sec. 1, 2-4), and other provisions of the law generally 
applicable to units of the national park system.
    (e)(1) Upon receipt of a written description from the 
District of Columbia of not more than 15 contiguous acres 
(hereinafter referred to as ``the 15 acres''), with the longest 
side of the 15 acres abutting one of the roads bounding the 
property, within the area designated ``D'' on the revised map 
entitled ``Map to Designate Transfer of Stadium and Lease of 
Parking Lots to the District'' and bound by Oklahoma Avenue, 
NE, Benning Road, NE, the Metro line, and C Street, NE, and 
execution of a long-term lease that is contingent up the 
Secretary's conveyance of the 15 acres and for the purpose 
consistent with this paragraph, the Secretary shall convey the 
15 acres described land to the District of Columbia for the 
purpose of siting, developing, and operating an educational 
institution for the public welfare, with first preference given 
to a pre-collegiate public boarding school.
    (2) Upon conveyance, the portion of the stadium lease that 
affects the15 acres on the property and all the conditions 
associated therewith shall terminate, and the 15 acres property 
shall be removed from the ``Map to Designate Transfer of 
Stadium and Lease of Parking Lots to the District'', and the 
long-term lease described in paragraph (1) shall take effect 
immediately.

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                                TITLE 5


POLICE, FIREFIGHTERS, AND CHIEF MEDICAL EXAMINER

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                               Chapter 7


Police and Firefighters Retirement and Disability.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Subchapter I. Retirement and Disability, 1916.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 5-745. PENSION RELIEF ALLOWANCE OR RETIREMENT COMPENSATION 
                    INCREASE.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) This section shall not apply with respect to officers 
and members of the Metropolitan Police force or the Fire 
Department of the District of Columbia who retire after the 
effective date of this subsection.
    (f) This section shall not apply with respect to any 
annuitant retired from the United States Secret Service 
Division, other than an annuitant retired from the United 
States Secret Service Uniformed Division.

Sec. 5-745A. ANNUITY INCREASE FOR UNITED STATES SECRET SERVICE 
                    DIVISION.

    (a) Each annuitant retired from the United States Secret 
Service Division, other than an annuitant retired from the 
United States Secret Service Uniformed Division, shall be 
entitled to receive an increase annually equal to the General 
Schedule overall average pay increase that is effective in 
accordance with title 5 of the United States Code, section 
5303.
    (b) In the event that an annuity increase cannot be 
determined under subsection (a) because title 5 of the United 
States Code, section 5303, is superseded or nullified, then 
each annuitant retired from the United States Secret Service 
Division, other than an annuitant retired from the United 
States Secret Service Uniformed Division, shall be entitled to 
receive an increase annually under the provisions of title 5 of 
the District of Columbia Code, section 5-718 (c-1) and (c-2).

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DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2005, PUBLIC LAW 108-335

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE I--FEDERAL FUNDS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                 Federal Payment for School Improvement

  For a Federal payment for a school improvement program in the 
District of Columbia, $40,000,000, to be allocated as follows: 
for the District of Columbia Public Schools, $13,000,000 to 
improve public school education in the District of Columbia; 
for the State Education Office, $13,000,000 to expand quality 
public charter schools in the District of Columbia, to remain 
available until September 30, 2006; for the Secretary of the 
Department of Education, $14,000,000 to provide opportunity 
scholarships for students in the District of Columbia in 
accordance with division C, title III of the District of 
Columbia Appropriations Act, 2004 (Public Law 108-199; 118 
Stat. 126), of which up to $1,000,000 may be used to administer 
and fund assessments: Provided, That of the $13,000,000 for the 
District of Columbia Public Schools, not less than $2,000,000 
shall be for a new incentive fund to reward high performing or 
significantly improved public schools; not less than $2,000,000 
shall be to support the Transformation School Initiative 
directed to schools in need of improvement: Provided further, 
That of the remaining amounts, the Superintendent of the 
District of Columbia Public Schools shall use such sums as 
necessary to provide grants to schools which are not eligible 
for other programs referenced under this heading, and to 
contract for management consulting services and implement 
recommended reforms: Provided further, That the Comptroller 
General shall conduct a financial audit of the District of 
Columbia Public Schools: Provided further, That of the 
$13,000,000 provided for public charter schools in the District 
of Columbia, $2,000,000 shall be for the City Build Initiative 
to create neighborhood-based charter schools; $2,750,000 shall 
be for the Direct Loan Fund for Charter Schools; $150,000 shall 
be for administrative expenses of the Office of Charter School 
Financing and Support to expand outreach and support of charter 
schools; $100,000 shall be for the D.C. Public Charter School 
Association to enhance the quality of charter schools; 
[$4,000,000] $4,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
shall be for the development of an incubator facility for 
public charter schools; $2,000,000 shall be for a charter 
school college preparatory program; and [$2,000,000 shall be 
for a new incentive fund] $2,000,000, to remain available until 
expended, shall be for a new incentive fund to reward high 
performing or significantly improved public charter schools: 
Provided further, That the District of Columbia government 
shall establish a dedicated account for the Office of Charter 
School Financing and Support (the Office) that shall consist of 
the Federal funds appropriated in this Act, any subsequent 
appropriations, any unobligated balances from prior fiscal 
years, any additional grants, and any interest and principal 
derived from loans made to Charter Schools, and repayment of 
dollars utilized to support credit enhancement earned in this 
or any fiscal year: Provided further, That the account shall be 
under the control of the District of Columbia Chief Financial 
Officer who shall use those funds solely for the purposes of 
carrying out the Credit Enhancement Program, Direct Loan Fund 
Grant Program, and any other charter school financing under the 
management of the Office: Provided further, That in this and 
subsequent fiscal years the Office of the Chief Financial 
Officer shall conduct an annual audit of the funds expended by 
the Office and provide an annual financial report to the Mayor, 
the Council of the District of Columbia, the Office of the 
District of Columbia Treasurer and the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and Senate for 
these funds showing, by object class, the expenditures made and 
the purpose therefor: Provided further, That not more than 
$250,000 of the total amount appropriated for this program may 
be used for administrative expenses and training expenses 
related to the cost of the National Charter School 
Conference(s) to be hosted by December 2006; and no more than 5 
percent of the funds appropriated for the direct loan fund may 
be used for administrative expenses related to the 
administration and annual audit of the direct loan, grant, and 
credit enhancement programs.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  of   Committee    Amount  of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the Budget Resolution
 for 2006: Subcommittee on the District of Columbia:
    Discretionary...........................................          593          593          581      \1\ 580
Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2006....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........      \2\ 509
    2007....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........           56
    2008....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........           18
    2009....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........           10
    2010 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA          392           NA          366
 2006.......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2005 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2006
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                       Senate Committee recommendation compared with  (+
                                                                                                                             or -)
               Item                      2005       Budget estimate  House allowance     Committee    --------------------------------------------------
                                    appropriation                          \1\         recommendation        2005                        House allowance
                                                                                                        appropriation   Budget estimate        \1\
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

             TITLE I

          FEDERAL FUNDS

Federal payment for Resident               25,395           33,200           33,200           33,200           +7,805   ...............  ...............
 Tuition Support.................
Federal payment for Emergency              14,880           15,000           15,000           12,000           -2,880           -3,000           -3,000
 Planning and Security Costs in
 the District of Columbia........
Federal payment to the District           189,274          221,693          221,693          218,912          +29,638           -2,781           -2,781
 of Columbia Courts..............
Defender Services in District of           38,192           45,000           45,000           45,000           +6,808   ...............  ...............
 Columbia Courts.................
Federal payment to the Court              178,560          203,388          203,388          201,388          +22,828           -2,000           -2,000
 Services and Offender
 Supervision Agency for the
 District of Columbia............
Federal payment to the District             4,762   ...............          10,000            5,000             +238           +5,000           -5,000
 of Columbia Water and Sewer
 Authority.......................
Federal payment for the Anacostia           2,976            5,000            5,000            3,000              +24           -2,000           -2,000
 Waterfront Initiative \2\.......
Federal payment to the Criminal             1,290            1,300            1,300            1,300              +10   ...............  ...............
 Justice Coordinating Council....
Federal payment for the Unified             5,952   ...............  ...............  ...............          -5,952   ...............  ...............
 Communications Center...........
Federal payment for Public School           5,952   ...............  ...............  ...............          -5,952   ...............  ...............
 Libraries.......................
Federal payment for the Family                992   ...............  ...............  ...............            -992   ...............  ...............
 Literacy Program................
Federal payment for                         2,480   ...............  ...............           1,000           -1,480           +1,000           +1,000
 Transportation Assistance.......
Federal payment for Foster Care             4,960   ...............  ...............           2,000           -2,960           +2,000           +2,000
 Improvements....................
Federal payment to the Office of           32,240   ...............          20,000           16,500          -15,740          +16,500           -3,500
 the Chief Financial Officer of
 the District of Columbia........
Federal payment for School                 39,680           41,616           41,616           40,000             +320           -1,616           -1,616
 Improvement.....................
Federal payment for Bioterrorism            7,936            7,200            7,200            5,200           -2,736           -2,000           -2,000
 and Forensics Labs..............
Federal payment for the National   ...............  ...............  ...............             500             +500             +500             +500
 Guard Youth Challenge in the
 District of Columbia............
Federal payment for Marriage       ...............  ...............  ...............           3,000           +3,000           +3,000           +3,000
 Development Accounts............
Federal payment for Latino youth   ...............  ...............  ...............           2,000           +2,000           +2,000           +2,000
 Initiative......................
Federal payment for Prisoner       ...............  ...............  ...............           3,000           +3,000           +3,000           +3,000
 Reentrant Housing...............
                                  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal funds to the         555,521          573,397          603,397          593,000          +37,479          +19,603          -10,397
       District of Columbia......

    DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA FUNDS

        Operating Expenses

Operating expenses...............      (7,168,491)      (8,700,158)      (8,700,158)      (8,700,158)     (+1,531,667)  ...............  ...............
                                  ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, District of Columbia      (7,168,491)      (8,700,158)      (8,700,158)      (8,700,158)     (+1,531,667)  ...............  ...............
       funds.....................
                                  ======================================================================================================================
      Grand total:
          Federal Funds to the            555,521          573,397          603,397          593,000          +37,479          +19,603          -10,397
           District of Columbia..
          District of Columbia         (7,168,491)      (8,700,158)      (8,700,158)      (8,700,158)     (+1,531,667)  ...............  ...............
           funds.................
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ H.R. 3058.
\2\ Funds are for the Anacostia Riverwalk and Trail construction.