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                                                       Calendar No. 470
109th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     109-269

======================================================================



 
      IMPROVING OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN AFFECTED BY METH ACT OF 2006

                                _______
                                

                 June 23, 2006.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Grassley, from the Committee on Finance, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 3525]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Finance, having had under consideration an 
original bill (S. 3525), to amend subpart 2 of part B of title 
IV of the Social Security Act to improve outcomes for children 
in families affected by methamphetamine abuse and addiction, to 
reauthorize the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program, and 
for other purposes, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.

                   I. BACKGROUND AND COMMITTEE ACTION


Promoting Safe and Stable Families

    The Promoting Safe and Stable Families (PSSF) program 
(title IV-B, subpart 2 of the Social Security Act) primarily 
provides formula grants to States, territories and tribes for 
provision of four categories of services to children and 
families: family support, family preservation, time-limited 
reunification, and adoption promotion and support. In addition, 
a part of the total funding provided for the Safe and Stable 
Families program is reserved for certain grants under the Court 
Improvement Program (CIP). The CIP grants are distributed by 
formula to each eligible highest State court, and are for those 
courts to assess and make improvements to their handling of 
child welfare cases. Funds are also set aside from PSSF for 
evaluation, research, and technical assistance related to the 
program.
    Initially created as a program of ``Family Preservation and 
Support Services'' in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 
1993 (P.L. 103-66), the program was reauthorized, expanded, and 
given its current name by the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 
1997 (P.L. 105-89).
    Subsequently, Congress passed the Promoting Safe and Stable 
Families Amendments of 2001 (P.L. 107-133), which reauthorized 
the program through FY2006. That legislation also created the 
Mentoring Children of Prisoners program (section 439 of the 
Social Security Act) and authorized the U.S. Department of 
Health and Human Services (HHS) to make competitive grants to 
public or private entities for the purposes of establishing, 
expanding, or operating programs that provide mentoring 
services to children of prisoners.
    Most recently, the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-
171) increased the authorization for mandatory PSSF 
appropriations by $40 million for FY2006 and, separately, 
appropriated funding ($20 million for each of FY2006-FY2010) 
for two new kinds of grants under the Court Improvement 
Program. These grants are to support training legal and 
judicial personnel concerning child welfare proceedings and to 
improve the timely and complete decision making of courts on 
behalf of abused and neglected children.

Committee action

    The Senate Committee on Finance held two hearings on child 
welfare policy issues.
    On April 25, 2006 the Committee held a hearing on ``The 
Social and Economic Effects of the Methamphetamine Epidemic on 
America's Child Welfare System,'' that examined the effects 
that the methamphetamine epidemic is having on America's child 
welfare system.
    The Committee heard testimony from the following witnesses:
    Parents and Families Recovering from Meth Addiction: Alison 
Bruno, Aaronette Noble, Darren Noble and Joey Binckley;
    Kevin T. Frank, Regional Administrator for the Department 
of Public Health and Services Child and Family Services 
Division in South Central Montana, Billings, Montana;
    Nancy K. Young, Ph.D., Director, Children and Family 
Futures, Inc. National Center on Substance Abuse and Child 
Welfare, Irvine, California; and
    The Reverend Dr. Frederick Aigner, President/CEO, Lutheran 
Social Services of Illinois, Des Plaines, Illinois.
    On May 10, 2006, the Committee held a hearing on 
``Fostering Permanence: Progress Achieved and Challenges Ahead 
for America's Child Welfare System.''
    The purpose of the hearing was for members to hear 
testimony on child welfare issues generally, and the Promoting 
Safe and Stable Families program and the Mentoring of Children 
of Prisoners programs specifically. The authorization for both 
these programs is scheduled to end at the end of FY2006.
    The Committee heard testimony from the following witnesses:
    Joan Ohl, Commissioner of the Administration for Children, 
Youth, and Families, Washington, DC;
    Jackie Hammers-Crowell, former foster child and foster care 
advocate, Iowa City, Iowa;
    Gary Stangler, Executive Director, Jim Casey Youth 
Opportunities Initiative, St. Louis, MS;
    Joe Kroll, Executive Director, North American Council on 
Adoptable Children, St. Paul, Minnesota; and
    Arlene Templer, MSW, ACSW, CRC, Confederated Salish and 
Kootenai Tribes, Department of Human Resources Development, 
Social Services Division Manager, Pablo, MT.
    A bipartisan coalition of members, notably Senator Jay 
Rockefeller, IV (D-WV), Senator Olympia J. Snowe (R-ME), 
Senator Gordon Smith (R-OR) and Senator Kent Conrad (D-ND) 
worked with the Chairman and Ranking Member to develop several 
key features of the Committee bill. These members represent a 
range of rural States that are affected by meth problems. The 
group recognized the compelling problems facing the Native 
American and tribal populations on child welfare issues, 
particularly abuse of meth.
    The Committee finds that numerous reports indicate that 
methamphetamine abuse is on the increase, particularly among 
women of child-bearing age. The Committee finds that this has 
resulted in an increased strain on an already over-burdened 
child welfare system. The Committee also finds that long-term 
comprehensive family treatment has resulted in successful 
outcomes for families struggling with addiction. The Committee 
finds that targeting funds from the Promoting Safe and Stable 
Families for services such as family-based comprehensive long-
term drug treatment would further the goals of this program and 
improve outcomes for children in families affected by 
methamphetamine abuse and addiction. In addition, the Committee 
finds that, generally, the programs authorized by the Promoting 
Safe and Stable Families are performing well. The Committee 
finds that there is little reason to substantially alter the 
purpose or nature of these programs. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends only minor improvements, such as enhanced reporting 
requirements, to the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program 
and the Mentoring Children of Prisoners program.

                    II. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS


               SECTION I--SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS

    The short title of this bill is the Improving Outcomes for 
Children Affected by Meth Act of 2006.

SECTION 2--GRANTS FOR REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS TO INCREASE THE WELL-BEING 
   OF, AND IMPROVE THE PERMANENCY OUTCOMES FOR, CHILDREN AFFECTED BY 
                  METHAMPHETAMINE ABUSE AND ADDICTION


Reservation of funds

                              CURRENT LAW

    No provision.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill provides that in any year from FY2007-FY2011 that 
appropriations under this subpart are at least $345 million, 
HHS must reserve $40 million for grants to improve outcomes for 
children affected by methamphetamine abuse and addiction. (The 
bill separately sets the mandatory funding authorization for 
the Promoting Safe and Stable Families (PSSF) program at $345 
million for FY2007-FY2011 and continues the discretionary 
funding authorization of $200 million for each of those same 
years.)

Purpose

                              CURRENT LAW

    No provision.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill creates a new section in title IV-B subpart 2 of 
the Social Security Act that authorizes HHS to make competitive 
grants to regional partnerships that provide services and 
activities designed to increase the well-being of, and improve 
the permanency outcomes for, children who are in an out-of-home 
placement or who are at risk of such a placement as a result of 
parental or a caretaker's abuse of methamphetamines. These 
services and activities are to be provided via interagency 
collaboration and integration of programs and services.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    Methamphetamine, also known as ``meth,'' is the fastest 
growing drug threat in America. Reports estimate that over 12 
million Americans have tried meth. Meth-making operations have 
been uncovered in all 50 states, but the most wide-spread abuse 
has been concentrated in the western, southwestern and 
Midwestern United States.
    Methamphetamine abuse is on the increase, particularly 
among women of child-bearing age. This is having an impact on 
child welfare systems in many States. According to a survey 
administered by the National Association of Counties (``The 
Impact of Meth on Children'') meth is a major cause of child 
abuse and neglect. Forty percent of all the child welfare 
officials in the survey reported an increase in out-of-home 
placements because of meth in the last year.
    Many child welfare agencies are struggling to cope with the 
unique challenges associated with parental addiction to meth. 
Children living with a meth-addicted parent are often exposed 
to toxic chemicals emitted during the production of the drug. 
Children are also often left to fend for themselves and can be 
exposed to pornography and sexual abuse.
    The Committee finds that the meth epidemic puts a unique 
strain on child welfare agencies and therefore finds that 
targeting resources to address this issue is appropriate. The 
Committee also finds that outcomes for children affected by 
meth are enhanced when services provided by law enforcement, 
child welfare and substance abuse agencies are integrated. The 
Committee encourages eligible applicants for grants to 
collaborate with the State agency responsible for the 
administration of foster care.

Eligible applicants

    The bill defines an eligible applicant for the grants as a 
regional partnership (established on an intra- or interstate 
basis) and that includes any one or more of the following 
entities or individuals: child welfare service providers (non-
profit and for-profit), community providers of health or mental 
health services, local law enforcement agencies, judges and 
court personnel, juvenile justice officials, school personnel, 
the State child welfare agency, the State agency responsible 
for administering the substance abuse prevention and treatment 
block grant (authorized under title XIX-B, subpart II of the 
Public Health Services Act), tribal child welfare agencies (or 
a consortium of tribal agencies) and any other providers, 
agencies, personnel, officials or entities related to provision 
of child and family services funded under title IV-B, subpart 2 
of the Social Security Act.

Authorization of grants and minimum period of approval

    From the amount reserved from PSSF funding ($40 million), 
HHS must award grants in each of FY2007-FY2011 to eligible 
regional partnerships that meet the requirements established in 
this new section of the Social Security Act. An eligible 
regional partnership must be approved to receive a grant for no 
less than 2 years and may receive approval for as many as 5 
years. The amount of the grant must not be less than $500,000 
and not more then $1 million for each fiscal year.

Application requirements

    To be eligible for a grant out of this funding, an eligible 
regional partnership must submit a written application to HHS 
containing recent evidence that methamphetamine abuse has 
increased out-of-home placements for children or the number of 
children at risk of out-of-home placements in the partnership 
region. The application must also describe: (1) the goals and 
outcomes the regional partnership intends to achieve and which 
will enhance the well-being of children receiving services or 
taking part in activities funded by the grants and will lead to 
safety and permanence for them; (2) the joint activities to be 
funded (entirely or in part) with funds provided by the grant 
and the sequence in which the proposed activities will be 
conducted while the grant funding is made available; (3) the 
strategies for integrating programs and services found to be 
appropriate for the child (and, if appropriate, the child's 
family); and (4) its strategies for collaborating with the 
State child welfare agency (unless the lead agency for the 
regional partnership is that agency), for consulting, as 
appropriate, with the State agency responsible for 
administering substance abuse treatment and prevention 
services, and for consulting with State law enforcement and 
judicial agencies. Finally, the application must include any 
other information HHS may require.
    HHS may, to the extent it deems appropriate, exempt any 
regional partnership that includes a tribal child welfare 
agency or a consortium of such agencies from the requirement 
that the application describe what its strategies will be for 
collaborating with the State child welfare agency.

Use of funds and matching requirement

    The bill states that funds received by a regional 
partnership must only be used for services and activities 
intended to improve the well-being and permanence of children 
affected by methamphetamine abuse and addiction and, where 
appropriate, the child's family. Specific uses may include 
providing family-based, comprehensive long-term drug treatment 
services, early intervention and preventative services, 
counseling for children and families, mental health services, 
and parenting skills training.
    The bill provides that a regional partnership must provide 
non-Federal resources to support the activities and services of 
the grant equal to 15 percent of the total cost in years 1 and 
2 of the grant; 20 percent of such costs in the third and 
fourth years; and 25 percent for the fifth year of the grant. 
The non-Federal resources may be in cash or in-kind (and HHS is 
permitted to attribute the fair market value of such in-kind 
goods, services and facilities).

Consideration in making awards and determining their amounts

    The bill provides that in considering whether to award a 
grant and the amount of that grant, HHS must consider the 
demonstrated need of the eligible regional partnership applying 
for assistance. Further, it must ensure diversity among the 
lead agencies applying on behalf of an eligible regional 
partnership to which it awards these grants. Finally, in 
awarding these grants and determining their amounts, HHS must 
give priority to eligible regional partnerships in rural areas 
that have been significantly affected by methamphetamine abuse 
and addiction by parents or caretakers of children; have 
limited resources to address the needs of children affected by 
this abuse and addiction; and lack capacity for access to 
comprehensive family treatment services.

Performance indicators

    The bill requires HHS to establish indicators that will be 
used to periodically assess the performance of the regional 
partnerships awarded grants under this section and, 
specifically, their success in achieving increased well-being 
and improved permanence outcomes for children affected by 
parental or a caretaker's methamphetamine abuse and addiction. 
The indicators must be established no later than 18 months 
after this legislation is enacted and only after HHS consults 
with both its Administration for Children and Families (ACF) 
and its Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA). In addition--with respect to the 
States, territories, or tribes in which awards to regional 
partnerships have been made--HHS must consult with the 
following individuals: State and territorial governors, State 
legislators, State and local public officials responsible for 
administering child welfare and alcohol and drug abuse 
prevention and treatment programs, court staff, consumers of 
services or activities funded by the grants, advocates for 
children and parents who come to the attention of the child 
welfare system, and tribal officials.

Grantee reports and reports to Congress

    The bill requires each regional partnership that receives a 
grant under this section to report annually to HHS. The report 
must describe the activities carried out during the fiscal year 
with funds received under this grant, and any information HHS 
determines necessary to provide an accurate description of the 
activities conducted with the funds and of any planned changes 
in the use of the funds for the succeeding fiscal year. A 
regional partnership must submit its first annual report no 
later than September 30 of the first fiscal year that it 
receives this grant funding and by that same date for each year 
in which it continues to receive the grant funds. In addition, 
no later than 12 months after HHS establishes the performance 
indicators (described above), information regarding these 
indicators must be incorporated into each regional 
partnership's annual report.
    On the basis of these reports from the regional partnership 
grantees, the bill requires HHS to annually prepare a report on 
the services provided and activities conducted by the grants to 
increase the well-being of and improve permanence outcomes for 
children affected by parental or a caretaker's methamphetamine 
abuse and addiction. The report must also discuss the 
performance indicators established and the progress made to 
address the needs of families with methamphetamine abuse 
problems (who come to the attention of the child welfare 
system) and in achieving the goals of child safety, permanence 
and family stability. HHS must annually submit this report to 
the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of Representatives 
and the Committee on Finance of the Senate.

 SECTION 3--REAUTHORIZATION OF THE PROMOTING SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES 
                                PROGRAM


Extension of funding authorized for the Promoting Safe and Stable 
        Families program

                              CURRENT LAW

    For FY2006, authorizes mandatory funding of $345 million 
for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program (title IV-B, 
subpart 2 of the Social Security Act) and discretionary funding 
of $200 million for each of FY2002-FY2006.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill extends the mandatory PSSF funding authorization 
of $345 million for 5 years (FY2007-FY2011) and extends the 
discretionary funding authorization of $200 million for each of 
those same 5 years.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    PSSF funds are important in providing child welfare 
services.

Extension of court entitlement to allotment of set-aside funds and 
        required match

                              CURRENT LAW

    For each of FY2002-FY2006, each eligible State highest 
court is entitled to an allotment of funds to assess and make 
improvements in its handling of child welfare proceedings. This 
allotment is provided out of funds set-aside from the total 
funding provided for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
program. (The minimum which must be provided via this set-aside 
is $10 million per year and the maximum amount which may be 
available is $16.6 million per year.) In order to receive their 
full allotment of funds in each of these years, the State 
highest court must provide a 25 percent match of the Federal 
funds it is allotted.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill extends the entitlement of each eligible State's 
highest courts to this same allotment amount from funds set-
aside out of the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program 
appropriations for each of FY2007-FY2011, and it continues to 
condition a State highest court's full receipt of its allotment 
in each of those same 5 years on provision of a 25 percent 
funding match by the court.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    Improving the handling of child welfare proceedings by 
courts remains important.

Technical correction of funding of Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
        for FY2006

                              CURRENT LAW

    In December 2005 the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act, 2006 (P.L. 109-149) appropriated $305 million in mandatory 
funds for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program for 
FY2006. (At the time this was the full mandatory funding level 
authorized for the program.) The Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, 
which was enacted in February 2006, raised the mandatory 
funding authorization for the program to $345 million for 
FY2006.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill amends P.L. 109-149 to increase the FY2006 
mandatory appropriation provided for the Promoting Safe and 
Stable Families program to $345 million effective as of 
February 8, 2006.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    Technical Correction of funding of PSSF for FY2006.

 SECTION 4--REAUTHORIZATION AND EXPANSION OF THE MENTORING CHILDREN OF 
                           PRISONERS PROGRAM


Purposes amended

                              CURRENT LAW

    Provides that the purpose of the Mentoring Children of 
Prisoners program (section 439 of the Social Security Act) is 
to authorize HHS to make competitive grants to support the 
establishment or expansion and operation of programs that 
provide mentoring services to children of prisoners (via a 
network of public and private community entities) and which are 
in areas with substantial numbers of children who have 
incarcerated parents.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill adds a new purpose of this program. That purpose 
is to authorize HHS to enter into a cooperative agreement with 
a national mentoring support organization to provide greater 
flexibility nationwide to increase the number of children of 
prisoners receiving mentoring services.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    The Committee finds that while 20,000 children of prisoners 
have been matched with mentors, there are many more who have 
not. Approximately 2 million children have at least one parent 
in a Federal or State correctional facility, suggesting that 
the need for this sort of mentoring is substantial.
    The Committee also finds that while the Administration of 
Children and Families (ACF) has funded 218 site-based 
organizations; there are over 4000 mentoring programs across 
the country. Three States (Utah, Vermont and West Virginia) 
receive no MCP funding.
    The Committee finds that improving family's access to 
vouchers for mentoring services may increase access of these 
services for vulnerable children of prisoners.

Extension of the Mentoring Children of Prisoners program

                              CURRENT LAW

    Out of the funding provided for this program, HHS is 
required to make grants in each of FY2002-FY2006 for provision 
of mentoring services to children of prisoners. The grants may 
be made to eligible State or local governments, tribal 
governments or consortia, faith-based organizations, and 
community-based organizations.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill extends the requirement that HHS make grants (to 
State or local governments, tribal governments or consortia, 
faith-based organizations, and community-based organizations) 
for the provision of mentoring services to prisoners for each 
of FY2007-FY2011.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    The need for this program continues.

Increased access to mentoring services

                              CURRENT LAW

    No provision.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill establishes requirements for a cooperative 
agreement between HHS and a national mentoring support 
organization. HHS must award the cooperative agreement on a 
competitive basis to a national mentoring support organization 
that has substantial experience in mentoring and mentoring 
services for children, and in developing quality program 
standards for planning and assessing mentoring programs for 
children. The purpose of the cooperative agreement is for this 
national mentoring organization to: (1) identify and approve 
mentoring programs in all 50 states and the District of 
Columbia that meet certain quality program standards; (2) 
organize outreach activities to increase awareness among 
families of children of prisoners of the availability of 
vouchers for mentoring services (including making publicly 
available a list of approved programs to public and private 
entities); and (3) distribute vouchers directly to approved 
programs that have been selected by families of children of 
prisoners to provide mentoring services for their children.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    To provide for increased access for mentoring services for 
children of prisoners.

Application requirements

    The bill requires an organization seeking to enter this 
cooperative agreement with HHS to submit an application to HHS 
that demonstrates its experience with mentoring and mentoring 
services for children and with the development of quality 
program standards for planning and assessing mentoring programs 
for children. The application must also include a plan that 
details the proposed voucher distribution program and must 
include the quality program standards for mentoring developed 
by the entity and describe how the entity will organize and 
implement these quality program standards. The entity must 
further describe in its application how it will organize and 
implement the distribution of vouchers, including how it will 
ensure that children in urban and rural communities and 
children with other geographic, linguistic, or cultural 
barriers to receipt of mentoring services will have access to 
such services; and that, if the entity usually provides gender-
specific programs or services, both girls and boys will be 
appropriately served by the program. Finally, in its 
application the entity must also identify those organizations 
it knows that comply with quality program standards for 
mentoring; describe the strategic plan of the entity to work 
with families of prisoners to develop the list of mentoring 
programs that accept vouchers distributed under this program; 
and describe the methods that it will use to evaluate the 
voucher program, the extent to which the program is achieving 
the purposes of the cooperative agreement and supports the 
establishment or expansion and operation of programs that 
provide mentoring services to children of prisoners in areas 
where there are substantial numbers of children with 
incarcerated parents.
    In addition, the bill specifies that as a part of the 
application the entity must agree to: (1) include criminal 
background checks of mentors in any quality program standards 
for approved mentoring programs; (2) maintain records, make 
reports, and cooperate with reviews and audits that HHS finds 
necessary as part of overseeing the cooperative agreement and 
expenditures; (3) cooperate fully with the ongoing and final 
evaluation of the voucher program, including allowing HHS 
access to the voucher distribution program, program-related 
records and documents, and staff, as well as, to the mentoring 
programs to which vouchers were distributed; and (4) to provide 
any other information HHS finds necessary to show the entity's 
capacity to carry out the cooperative agreement.
    The bill states that the value of a voucher under this 
subsection can be disregarded for purposes of determining the 
eligibility for--or the amount of--any other Federal, or 
federally supported assistance for the recipient family.

Evaluations and reports

                              CURRENT LAW

    Requires HHS to conduct an evaluation of the mentoring 
programs conducted under the Mentoring Children of Prisoners 
provisions and to submit to Congress a report on the findings 
no later than April 15, 2005.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill requires HHS to conduct evaluations of the 
programs authorized under the Mentoring Children of Prisoners 
provisions, including the program for increased access to 
mentoring services (via vouchers) that is created in this 
legislation.
    The bill provides that no later than 12 months after the 
enactment of this legislation, HHS must submit a report to 
Congress that includes: (1) the characteristics of the 
mentoring programs funded under this section; (2) the plans for 
implementation of the cooperative agreement to increase access 
to mentoring services (including through distribution of 
vouchers); (3) a description of the outcome-based evaluation of 
the programs authorized under this section (which HHS is 
conducting as of the date of the bill's enactment), including 
how the evaluation has been expanded to evaluate the program to 
increase access to mentoring services through distribution of 
vouchers; and (4) the date by which HHS will submit to Congress 
a final report on this evaluation.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    To provide for the evaluation of and reporting to Congress 
on the new use of Mentoring Children of Prisoners funding.

Authorization of discretionary appropriations for Mentoring Children of 
        Prisoners

                              CURRENT LAW

    For each of FY2002 and FY2003, authorizes discretionary 
appropriations of $67 million for the Mentoring Children of 
Prisoners program; authorizes appropriations for this program 
in every succeeding year (indefinite or no-year limit) at 
``such sums as may be necessary''.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill authorizes appropriations up to $67 million for 
each of FY2007-FY2011.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    There continues to be a need for this program.

Reservation of program funds for mentoring voucher program

                              CURRENT LAW

    Annually provides that 2.5 percent of the funds 
appropriated for Mentoring Children of Prisoners must be 
reserved for HHS to spend on research, technical assistance and 
evaluation related to the programs funded.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill retains the current set-aside for research, 
technical assistance and evaluation. It further requires HHS to 
reserve not more than 50 percent of the total amount 
appropriated for each fiscal year to carry out the new program 
for increasing access to mentoring services (via vouchers). 
However, HHS must use at least $25 million of the appropriated 
funds to continue providing competitive grants to programs that 
provide mentoring services to children of prisoners. And if the 
total appropriation for the Mentoring Children of Prisoners 
program is less than $25 million, no funds would be available 
for the purpose of increasing access to mentoring services (via 
vouchers).

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    To reserve funds for competitive site-based grants for 
programs that provide mentoring services for children of 
prisoners.

GAO evaluation and report

                              CURRENT LAW

    No provision.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    No more than 3 years after the enactment of this 
legislation, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) must 
submit to Congress a report evaluating the implementation and 
effectiveness of the program first authorized by this 
legislation for increasing access to mentoring services (via 
vouchers).

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    To evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of the new 
voucher programs to increase access to mentoring services for 
children of prisoners.

            SECTION 5--ALLOTMENT AND GRANTS TO INDIAN TRIBES


Increase set-aside for tribal Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
        programs

                              CURRENT LAW

    Requires that 1 percent of all mandatory Promoting Safe and 
Stable Families funds, and 2 percent of any discretionary 
appropriations for the program, be set-aside for tribal 
programs. (The minimum tribal funding provided is $3.45 million 
and the maximum annual tribal funding possible is $7.45 
million.)

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill requires that 3 percent of all mandatory Promoting 
Safe and Stable Families funds, and 3 percent of any 
discretionary appropriations for the program, be set aside for 
tribal programs. (The minimum tribal funding provided would be 
$10.35 million and the maximum annual tribal funding possible 
would be $16.35 million.)

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    The Committee finds that the current set-aside for Indian 
tribal program is not sufficient to address the child welfare 
need in Indian country.

Access to allotment for tribal consortia

                              CURRENT LAW

    Out of the tribal funds reserved, Indian tribes or tribal 
organizations with an approved plan must be allotted Promoting 
Safe and Stable Families funds (based on the relative share of 
tribal persons under age 21 but only among tribes or tribal 
organizations with approved plans). HHS may exempt a tribe from 
any plan requirement that it determines would be inappropriate 
for that tribe (taking into account the resources, needs, and 
other circumstances of that tribe). However, no tribe or tribal 
organization may have an approved plan (or receive funds) 
unless its allotment is equal to at least $10,000. Funds 
allotted are paid directly to the tribal organization of the 
Indian tribe to which the money is allotted.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill permits tribal consortia to have access to an 
allotment of Promoting Safe and Stable Families program funds 
(and related technical assistance) on the same basis as is 
currently available to Indian tribes. A tribal consortia's 
allotment is to be determined based on the number of tribal 
persons under age 21 in each tribe that is a part of the tribal 
consortia. Where tribes choose to apply collectively as a 
consortium, the population of tribal persons under age 21 for 
each tribe would be combined in order to determine the size of 
the grant to the consortium, including whether the consortium 
meets the $10,000 eligibility threshold in the Act. A tribal 
consortium could select which Indian tribal organization (among 
the tribes in the consortium) would receive the direct payment 
of its allotment.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    The Committee finds that permanency outcomes for Indian 
children can be improved if tribal consortia are able to have 
access to an allotment of Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
funding on the same basis as is currently available to Indian 
Tribes.

                   SECTION 6--STATE PLAN AMENDEMENTS


Monitoring and evaluation of families adopting or supporting 
        significant numbers of children

                              CURRENT LAW

    In order to receive Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
funds States must provide certain assurances to HHS.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill adds a new condition of funding under the program, 
which would require States to establish procedures to provide 
additional evaluation of any family that seeks to provide 
foster care to, or to adopt, a large number of children or more 
than one sibling group. This additional evaluation, which must 
be done before the placement is made, is to fully assess 
whether the family has the ability to care for this number of 
children. The statute provides that States must establish this 
additional evaluation procedure for a family seeking to care 
for, or adopt, more than 4 children or more than one group of 
siblings, or--provided the State can demonstrate good cause for 
this and receives approval from HHS--any other certain number 
of children or sibling groups the State chooses.
    In the case of a foster family, the procedures must also 
provide for ongoing monitoring to assess the family's continued 
ability to provide for this number of children or sibling 
groups. In the case of a family seeking to adopt, the 
procedures must include monitoring before the adoption is 
permitted, to enable the agency to assess whether the family 
has the ability to care for this number of children or 
siblings.
    Within 18 months of the legislation's enactment, and as a 
condition for continued approval of its PSSF plan, the State 
must submit to HHS a plan for implementing these procedures. 
Within 60 days of its receipt of such a plan from a State, HHS 
must notify the State of its approval of the plan or of any 
necessary additions or modifications that must be made before 
it can be approved.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    The Committee finds that, in recent years, there have been 
several high profile cases (New Jersey, Tennessee, and Ohio) of 
child abuse in families that were providing foster care or had 
adopted a large number of children from the foster care system. 
The Committee finds that many foster children have already 
endured child abuse or neglect, so there is a strong obligation 
to protect the children. Having a large number of children in 
the family can be much more challenging, and States need to 
ensure that the issue of existing family size has been 
addressed and considered prior to an additional foster care 
placement or an additional adoption for foster care. However, 
the Committee also finds that once an addition into a larger 
family has been approved, such families should be treated the 
same as every finalized adoption.

State submission of annual expenditure reports to HHS and provision of 
        report to Congress

                              CURRENT LAW

    States must spend ``significant portions'' of the funds 
they receive under the Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
program on four categories of services: family support, family 
preservation, time-limited family reunification, and adoption 
promotion and support; and they may spend no more than 10 
percent of the funds to administer the program. Every 5 years 
States must develop a plan, including goals, for the use of the 
program funds, and the plan must be made available to HHS and 
to the public. Further, States must annually review their 
progress in meeting those goals and they must separately submit 
to HHS (and make available to the public) descriptions of the 
service programs they intend to provide in the upcoming fiscal 
year (within each of the four service categories), the 
geographic areas where these services will be available, and 
the populations that will be served. Finally, States are 
required to furnish such reports to HHS, in whatever format and 
containing whatever information it may require.
    As implemented by HHS, States are required to spend at 
least 20 percent of their Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
funds on each of the four service categories (unless they can 
provide an ``especially strong rationale'' for not doing this). 
Every 5 years States must prepare a 5-year Child and Family 
Services Plan (CFSP) that establishes goals and describes the 
State's plan for provision of child and family services under 
the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program, as well as 
across a range of Federal child welfare programs (including 
Child Welfare Services under title IV-B, subpart 1 of the 
Social Security Act; State Grants, under the Child Abuse 
Prevention and Treatment Act; and the Chafee Foster Care 
Independence Program and related Education and Training 
Vouchers, both under section 477 of the Social Security Act). 
In addition, States must each year submit an Annual Progress 
and Services Report, the CFS-101 Part I--Annual Budget Request, 
and the CFS-101 Part II--Annual Summary of Child and Family 
Services. The reports must be submitted to the regional offices 
of the HHS Administration for Children and Families (ACF).
    On form CFS-101 Part I States report how they intend to 
allocate their Promoting Safe and Stable Families funds 
(between the four service categories) for the upcoming fiscal 
year and also request their funding allotments for Child 
Welfare Services, CAPTA State grants, the Chafee Foster Care 
Independence Program and Education and Training Vouchers. On 
form CFS-101, Part II States report how they expect to spend 
all child welfare dollars (Federal and State) in 13 separate 
categories (and by specific Federal funding stream). States 
must also report on the number of families or individuals 
expected to be served and the geographic areas that will be 
served. This information is due to the HHS regional office 3 
months before the start of the fiscal year for which funds are 
being requested (e.g., by June 30, 2005 for request of FY2006 
funds).

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    No later than June 30 of each year, the bill requires 
States to submit to HHS one copy of the forms CFS-101, Part I 
and CFS-101 Part II (or any successor forms) with information 
concerning planned expenditures for child and family services 
in the immediately succeeding fiscal year as well as a second 
set of the same forms showing the actual expenditures for child 
and family services in the immediately preceding fiscal year. 
However, with regard to the form (CFS-101 Part II) used to show 
actual expenditures by 13 separate categories and multiple 
funding streams, States would only be required to submit 
information regarding their actual expenditures for the 
preceding fiscal year under two Federal funding streams: the 
Child Welfare Services and Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
programs (title IV-B, subpart 1 and 2 of the Social Security 
Act.)
    The bill further provides that HHS must compile these 
reports (showing planned and actual expenditures for the 
specified fiscal years) and no later than September 30 of each 
year must submit this compilation to the Committee on Ways and 
Means of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
Finance of the Senate.
    The bill provides that the first State submission of such 
forms to HHS under this requirement must be made by June 30, 
2007 and that HHS must submit the first compilation of such 
forms to Congress by September 30, 2007.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    For many years, States have provided information on 
prospective spending plans for title VI-B, parts one and two. 
The Promoting Safe and Stable Families Program requires that 
States allocate ``significant sums,'' which is defined by 
regulation as 20 percent of the total, to each of the four 
categories. The Committee finds that current report 
requirements only reflect prospective spending plans and it 
would be very useful to HHS and Congressional oversight 
committees to have annual reports on the actual spending among 
the four categories to evaluate and track improvements and 
changes in program spending, particularly on adoption and post-
adoption services as the number of adopted children and 
adoptive families increases over time.

                       SECTION 7--EFFECTIVE DATE


                              CURRENT LAW

    Mandatory and discretionary funding for the Promoting Safe 
and Stable Families program is authorized through FY2006, 
including set-asides for allotments to tribes, grants to State 
highest courts, and expenditures by HHS (for evaluation, 
training, technical assistance, and research related to the 
program). HHS is authorized to make grants under the Mentoring 
Children of Prisoners program through FY2006 and funding for 
this program is authorized indefinitely.

                             COMMITTEE BILL

    The bill provides that effective with October 1, 2006, the 
annual funding authority (mandatory and discretionary) for the 
Promoting Safe and State Families program is extended through 
FY2011 (with current set-aside amounts continued for HHS and 
increased for tribes). HHS is authorized to make grants under 
the Mentoring Children of Prisoners program for each of FY2007-
FY2011 (with funds authorized for that purpose for those same 
years).
    Unless otherwise specified in the legislation, other 
changes made by the bill are also effective on October 1, 2006. 
However, if HHS determines that State legislation is required 
in order for a State to meet any new requirement under this 
legislation, the State must have until the completion of the 
first State legislative session after enactment of this act to 
comply with such new requirements.

                           REASON FOR CHANGE

    To extend funding authority for the Promoting Safe and 
Stable Families program and to extend the authorization for the 
Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program.

                       III. VOTE OF THE COMMITTEE

    In compliance with paragraph 7(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the following statements are made 
concerning the vote in the Committee's consideration of the 
bill.

Motion to report the bill

    The bill was ordered favorably reported by a unanimous 
voice vote on June 8, 2006. A quorum was present. No amendments 
were voted upon.

          IV. REGULATORY IMPACT STATEMENT AND RELATED MATTERS


                          A. Regulatory Impact

    In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
statement concerning the regulatory impact of the ``Improving 
Outcomes for Children Affected by Meth Act of 2006.''

                  IMPACT ON INDIVIDUALS AND BUSINESSES

    The bill extends the mandatory Promoting Safe and Stable 
Families funding authorization for 5 years. This provision 
allows States to continue to spend Promoting Safe and Stable 
Families funding and therefore does not impose any additional 
paperwork or regulatory burdens on individuals or businesses.
    The bill also creates a new section in title IV-B, subpart 
2 of the Social Security Act that authorizes the Department of 
Health and Human Services to make competitive grants to 
regional partnerships that provide services and activities 
designed to increase the well-being of and improve the 
permanency outcomes for children affected by methamphetamine 
abuse and addiction. Because application for these grants is 
voluntary, this provision does not impose any additional 
paperwork or regulatory burdens on individuals or businesses.
    The bill also authorizes appropriations for the Mentoring 
Children of Prisoners program and provides for increased access 
for mentoring services for children. Application for funding is 
voluntary, therefore this provision does not impose any 
additional paperwork or regulatory burden on individuals or 
businesses.

                       IMPACT ON PERSONAL PRIVACY

    The bill provides grants for services to children and 
families. In the context of seeking assistance, families may be 
asked about personal circumstances. The bill should not 
increase the amount of personal information and paperwork 
required.

                            V. COST ESTIMATE

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, June 21, 2006.
Hon. Charles E. Grassley,
Chairman, Committee on Finance,
U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed revised cost estimate for S. 3525, the 
Improving Outcomes for Children Affected by Meth Act of 2006. 
This estimate supersedes our original estimate, which was 
transmitted on June 20, 2006.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Christina 
Hawley Anthony.
            Sincerely,
                                          Donald B. Marron,
                                                   Acting Director.
    Enclosure.

S. 3525--Improving Outcomes for Children Affected by Meth Act of 2006

    Summary: S. 3525 would amend subpart 2 of part B of title 
IV of the Social Security Act to reauthorize various child 
welfare programs and to direct funding to assist families 
affected by methamphetamine abuse and addiction. The bill would 
increase discretionary authorizations by an estimated $1.1 
billion over the 2007-2011 period, and, assuming the 
appropriation of the authorized amounts, would result in 
additional outlays of $0.8 billion over the same period.
    Certain child welfare programs categorized as direct 
spending also would be reauthorized by the bill. As required by 
the Deficit Control Act, the costs of extending those mandatory 
programs--$1.4 billion over the 2007-2011 period--are already 
included in CBO's baseline. Therefore, enacting S. 3525 would 
not result in an estimated change in direct spending relative 
to those baseline projections.
    The bill contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined by the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA); 
any costs to state, local, or tribal governments would result 
from complying with conditions of federal assistance.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of S. 3525 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 500 
(education, training, employment, and social services).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                                                              2006     2007     2008     2009     2010     2011
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending Under Current Law:
    Estimated Authorization Level\1\......................      138       50       51       52       53       54
    Estimated Outlays.....................................      136      116       67       55       52       53
Proposed Changes:
    Promoting Safe and Stable Families:
        Authorization Level...............................        0      200      200      200      200      200
        Estimated Outlays.................................        O       40      150      190      200      200
    Mentoring Children of Prisoners:
        Estimated Authorization Level.....................        0       17       16       15       14       13
        Estimated Outlays.................................        0        1       12       14       15       14
    Total Changes:
        Estimated Authorization Level.....................        0      217      216      215      214      213
        Estimated Outlays.................................        0       41      162      204      215      214
Spending Under S. 3525:
    Authorization Level\1\................................      138      267      267      267      267      267
    Estimated Outlays.....................................      136      157      229      259      267      267
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Memorandum: Direct Spending from Program Extensions Assumed in CBO's Baseline

Promoting Safe and Stable Families:
    Estimated Budget Authority............................        0      345      345      345      345      345
    Estimated Outlays.....................................        0       93      283      328      345      345
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\The 2006 level is the amount appropriated for that year.

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that the 
legislation will be enacted near the end of fiscal year 2006, 
and that the authorized amounts will be appropriated for fiscal 
year 2007 and subsequent years. The estimated outlays reflect 
historical spending patterns for these programs.
    The bill would amend and reauthorize various child welfare 
programs, including the Promoting Safe and Stable Families 
(PSSF) program and the Mentoring Children of Prisoners program. 
PSSF is currently authorized through fiscal year 2006, and 
receives both mandatory and discretionary funding. Funding for 
the mandatory part of PSSF is $345 million for fiscal year 
2006; the discretionary portion received an appropriation for 
this year of $89 million. Reauthorization of PSSF would have no 
effect on direct spending relative to CBO's baseline because 
those mandatory costs are already assumed in the baseline. The 
Mentoring Children of Prisoners program is permanently 
authorized and received funding of $49 million for 2006. That 
program, along with discretionary grants under the PSSF 
program, would be reauthorized at stated amounts for fiscal 
years 2007 through 2011, for an estimated increase in 
discretionary authorizations of $1.1 billion over that period.

Spending subject to appropriation

    The bill would reauthorize discretionary grants under the 
PSSF program as well as the program for mentoring children of 
prisoners. PSSF currently is authorized through fiscal year 
2006. The program for mentoring children of prisoners is 
permanently authorized at ``such sums as may be necessary.''
    Promoting Safe and Stable Families. Discretionary 
appropriations for PSSF totaled $89 million for 2006. S. 3525 
would authorize appropriations for the discretionary PSSF 
grants at $200 million annually from 2007 through 2011, for a 
total of $1 billion over that 5-year period. Based on 
historical spending rates for the program, CBO estimates that 
resulting outlays would total $780 million over the 2007-2011 
period.
    Mentoring Children of Prisoners. S. 3525 would authorize 
appropriations of $67 million for the Mentoring Children of 
Prisoners program annually from 2007 through 2011. The program, 
which currently is permanently authorized, received an 
appropriation of $49 million for fiscal year 2006. For the 
purpose of this estimate, CBO estimates the ``such sums'' 
authorizations under current law by adjusting the 2006 
appropriation for inflation. The authorizations specified in 
the bill would exceed those amounts by $75 million from 2007 
through 2011. The bill would call for establishing a 
cooperative agreement with an entity charged with identifying 
appropriate mentoring organizations, providing outreach to 
eligible families about mentoring services, and distributing 
vouchers on behalf of these families for such services.

Direct spending

    S. 3525 would reauthorize mandatory grants under the PSSF 
program at $345 million each year for fiscal years 2007 through 
2011. Those grants currently are authorized at $345 million for 
fiscal year 2006. Under the procedures specified in section 257 
of the Deficit Control Act, the costs of extending PSSF are 
assumed in CBO's baseline. The bill would reserve $40 million 
of those funds for grants to regional partnerships for the 
provision of services such as drug treatment, counseling, and 
parental skills training.
    Section 6 could result in added costs for the federal 
program that provides federal matching funds to states for 
foster care and adoption assistance because it would require 
states to include assurances of additional monitoring of 
certain adoptive and foster homes in their plans. CBO estimates 
that the federal cost of this additional monitoring is likely 
to be less than $500,000 each year.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 3525 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined by UMRA. State, local, and tribal governments would 
benefit from grant funds authorized in the bill including funds 
reserved for implementing services for children affected by 
drug abuse. Any costs they might incur would result from 
complying with conditions of federal assistance.
    Previous CBO estimate: This estimate supersedes the cost 
estimate for S. 3525 that CBO transmitted on June 20, 2006. 
That estimate incorrectly assumed that the Mentoring Children 
of Prisoners program was not authorized beyond 2006, and showed 
costs for reauthorizing that program that did not account for 
the existing authorization.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Christina Hawley 
Anthony and Jonathan Morancy. Impact on State, Local, and 
Tribal Governments: Lisa Ramirez-Branum. Impact on the Private 
Sector: Molly Dahl.
    Estimate approved by: Robert A. Sunshine, Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

       VI. CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW MADE BY THE BILL, AS REPORTED

    Pursuant to the requirements of paragraph 12 of rule XXVI 
of the Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law 
made by the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing 
law proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

SOCIAL SECURITY ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE IV--GRANTS TO STATES FOR AID AND SERVICES TO NEEDY FAMILIES WITH 
CHILDREN AND FOR CHILD-WELFARE SERVICES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


PART B--CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Subpart 2--Promoting Safe and Stable Families

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                              STATE PLANS

    Sec. 432. (a) Plan Requirements.--A State plan meets the 
requirements of this subsection if the plan--
          (1) provides that the State agency shall administer, 
        or supervise the administration of, the State program 
        under this subpart;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (5) contains assurances that the State will--
                  (A) annually prepare, furnish to the 
                Secretary, and make available to the public a 
                description (including separate descriptions 
                with respect to family preservation services, 
                community-based family support services, time-
                limited family reunification services, and 
                adoption promotion and support services) of--
                          (i) the service programs to be made 
                        available under the plan in the 
                        immediately succeeding fiscal year;
                          (ii) the populations which the 
                        programs will serve; and
                          (iii) the geographic areas in the 
                        State in which the services will be 
                        available; [and]
                  (B) perform the activities described in 
                subparagraph (A)--
                          (i) in the case of the 1st fiscal 
                        year under the plan, at the time the 
                        State submits its initial plan; and
                          (ii) in the case of each succeeding 
                        fiscal year, by the end of the 3rd 
                        quarter of the immediately preceding 
                        fiscal year;
                  (C) establish procedures to provide for the 
                additional evaluation of any family that 
                proposes to provide foster care for more than 4 
                children or more than 1 group of siblings (or 
                more than such number of children and groups of 
                siblings as the State, upon demonstration of 
                good cause and approval by the Secretary, may 
                establish), prior to permitting the family to 
                provide foster care to such children or 
                siblings, and to provide for ongoing monitoring 
                of the family (prior to and during the 
                provision of such foster care), to fully assess 
                whether the family has the ability to care for 
                such children or siblings; and
                  (D) establish procedures to provide for the 
                additional evaluation of any family that 
                proposes to adopt more than 4 children or more 
                than 1 group of siblings (or more than such 
                number of children and groups of siblings as 
                the State, upon demonstration of good cause and 
                approval by the Secretary, may establish), 
                prior to permitting the family to adopt such 
                children or siblings, and to provide pre-
                adoption monitoring of the family, to fully 
                assess whether the family has the ability to 
                care for such children or siblings before 
                permitting such adoption;
          (6) provides for such methods of administration as 
        the Secretary finds to be necessary for the proper and 
        efficient operation of the plan;
          (7)(A) contains assurances that Federal funds 
        provided to the State under this subpart will not be 
        used to supplant Federal or non-Federal funds for 
        existing services and activities which promote the 
        purposes of this subpart; and
          (B) provides that the State will furnish reports to 
        the Secretary, at such times, in such format, and 
        containing such information as the Secretary may 
        require, that demonstrate the State's compliance with 
        the prohibition contained in subparagraph (A);
          (8)(A) provides that the State agency will furnish 
        such reports, containing such information, and 
        participate in such evaluations, as the Secretary may 
        require; [and]
          (B) provides that, not later than June 30 of each 
        year, the State agency will submit to the Secretary--
                  (i) copies of forms CFS 101-Part I and CFS 
                101-Part II (or any successor forms) that 
                report on planned child and family services 
                expenditures by the agency for the immediately 
                succeeding fiscal year; and
                  (ii) copies of forms CFS 101-Part I and CFS-
                101, Part II (or any successor forms) that 
                provides, only with respect to the programs 
                authorized under this subpart and subpart 1, 
                actual expenditures by the State agency for the 
                immediately preceding fiscal year; and
          (9) contains assurances that in administering and 
        conducting service programs under the plan, the safety 
        of the children to be served shall be of paramount 
        concern.
    (b) Approval of Plans.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary shall approve a plan 
        that meets the requirements of subsection (a) only if 
        the plan was developed jointly by the Secretary and the 
        State, after consultation by the State agency with 
        appropriate public and non-profit private agencies and 
        community-based organizations with experience in 
        administering programs of services for children and 
        families (including family preservation, family 
        support, time-limited family reunification, and 
        adoption promotion and support).
          (2) Plans of indian tribes or tribal consortia.--
                  (A) Exemption from inappropriate 
                requirements.--The Secretary may exempt a plan 
                submitted by an Indian tribe or tribal 
                consortium from any requirement of this section 
                that the Secretary determines would be 
                inappropriate to apply to the Indian tribe or 
                tribal consortium, taking into account the 
                resources, needs and other circumstances of the 
                Indian tribe or tribal consortium.
                  (B) Special rule.--Notwithstanding 
                subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, the 
                Secretary may not approve a plan of an Indian 
                tribe or tribal consortium under this subpart 
                to which (but for this subparagraph) an 
                allotment of less than $10,000 would be made 
                under section 433(a) if allotments were made 
                under section 433(a) to all Indian tribes with 
                plans approved under this subpart with the same 
                or larger numbers of children.
    (c) Annual Submission of State Reports to Congress.--The 
Secretary shall compile the reports required under subsection 
(a)(8)(B) and, not later than September 30 of each year, submit 
such compilation to the Committee on Ways and Means of the 
House of Representatives and the Committee on Finance of the 
Senate.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 433. [42 U.S.C. 629C] ALLOTMENTS TO STATES.

    (a) Indian Tribes or Tribal Consortia.--From the amount 
reserved pursuant to section 436(b)(3) for any fiscal year, the 
Secretary shall allot to each Indian tribe with a plan approved 
under this subpart an amount that bears the same ratio to such 
reserved amount as the number of children in the Indian tribe 
bears to the total number of children in all Indian tribes or 
tribal consortia with State plans so approved, as determined by 
the Secretary on the basis of the most current and reliable 
information available to the Secretary. If a consortium of 
Indian tribes submits a plan approved under this subpart, the 
Secretary shall allot to the consortium an amount equal to the 
sum of the allotments determined for each Indian tribe that is 
part of the consortium.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                           PAYMENTS TO STATES

    Sec. 434. (a) Entitlement.--Each State that has a plan 
approved under section 432 shall be entitled to payment of the 
lesser of--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Direct Payments to Tribal Organizations of Indian 
Tribes or Tribal Consortia.--The Secretary shall pay any amount 
to which an Indian tribe or tribal consortium is entitled under 
this section directly to the tribal organization of the Indian 
tribe or tribal consortium (or in the case of a payment to a 
tribal consortium, such tribal organizations of the Indian 
tribes that are part of the consortium as the consortium shall 
designate).

              EVALUATIONS: RESEARCH; TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

    Sec. 435. (a) Evaluations.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary shall evaluate and 
        report to the Congress biennially on effectiveness of 
        the programs carried out pursuant to this subpart in 
        accomplishing the purposes of this subpart, and may 
        evaluate any other Federal, State, or local program, 
        regardless of whether federally assisted, that is 
        designed to achieve the same purposes as the program 
        under this subpart, in accordance with criteria 
        established in accordance with paragraph (2).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) Technical Assistance.--To the extent funds are 
available therefor, the Secretary shall provide technical 
assistance that helps States and Indian tribes or tribal 
consortia to--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 436. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS; RESERVATION OF CERTAIN 
                    AMOUNTS.

    (a) Authorization.--In addition to any amount otherwise 
made available to carry out this subpart, there are authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this subpart $345,000,000 [for 
fiscal year 2006. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, the 
total amount authorized to be so appropriated for fiscal year 
2006 under this subsection and under this subsection (as in 
effect before the date if the enactment of the Deficit 
Reduction Act of 2005) is $345,000,000.] for each of fiscal 
years 2007 through 2011.
    (b) Reservation of Certain Amounts.--From the amount 
specified in subsection (a) for a fiscal year, the Secretary 
shall reserve amounts as follows:
          (1) Evaluation, research, training, and technical 
        assistance.--The Secretary shall reserve $6,000,000 for 
        expenditures by the Secretary--
                  (A) for research, training, and technical 
                assistance costs related to the program under 
                this subpart; and
                  (B) for evaluation of State programs based on 
                the plans approved under section 432 and funded 
                under this subpart, and any other Federal, 
                State, or local program, regardless of whether 
                federally assisted, that is designed to achieve 
                the same purposes as the State programs.
          (2) State court improvements.--The Secretary shall 
        reserve $10,000,000 for grants under section 438.
          (3) Indian tribes or tribal consortia.--The Secretary 
        shall reserve [1] 3 percent for allotment to Indian 
        tribes or tribal consortia in accordance with section 
        433(a).
          (4) Improved outcomes for children affected by 
        methamphetamine abuse and addition.--With respect to 
        each of fiscal years 2007 through 2011, if the amount 
        appropriated to carry out this subpart for any such 
        fiscal year is at least $345,000,000, the Secretary 
        shall reserve $40,000,000 of the amount appropriated 
        for that fiscal year for grants under section 440.

                          DISCRETIONARY GRANTS

    Sec. 437. (a) Limitations on Authorization of 
Appropriations.--In addition to any amount appropriated 
pursuant to section 436, there are authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out this section $200,000,000 for each of 
fiscal years [2002 through 2006] 2007 through 2011.
    (b) Reservation of Certain Amounts.--From the amount (if 
any) appropriated pursuant to subsection (a) for a fiscal year, 
the Secretary shall reserve amounts as follows:
          (1) Evaluation, research, training, and technical 
        assistance.--The Secretary shall reserve 3.3 percent of 
        expenditure by the Secretary for the activities 
        described in section 436(b)(1).
          (2) State court improvements.--The Secretary shall 
        reserve 3.3 percent for grants under section 438.
          (3) Indian tribes or tribal consortia.--The Secretary 
        shall reserve [2] 3 percent for allotment to Indian 
        tribes or tribal consortia in accordance with 
        subsection (c)(1).
    (c) Allotments.--
          (1) Indian tribes or tribal consortia.--From the 
        amount (if any) reserved pursuant to subsection (b)(3) 
        fir any fiscal year, the Secretary shall allot to each 
        Indian tribe with a plan approved under this subpart an 
        amount that bears the same ratio to such reserved 
        amount as the number of children in the Indian tribe 
        bears to the total number of children in all Indian 
        tribes with State plans so approved, as determined by 
        the Secretary on the basis of the most current and 
        reliable information available to the Secretary. If a 
        consortium of Indian tribes applies and is approved for 
        a grant under this section, the Secretary shall allot 
        to the consortium an amount equal to the sum of the 
        allotments determined for each Indian tribe that is 
        part of the consortium.

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SEC. 438. ENTITLEMENT FUNDING FOR STATE COURTS TO ASSESS AND IMPROVE 
                    HANDLING OR PROCEEDINGS RELATING TO FOSTER CARE AND 
                    ADOPTION.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary shall make grants, in 
accordance with this section, to the highest State courts in 
States participating in the program under part E, for the 
purpose of enabling such courts--

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    (c) Allotments.--
          (1) Grants to assess and improve handling of court 
        proceedings relating to foster care and adoption.--
                  (A) In general.--Each highest State court 
                which has an application approved under 
                subsection (b) of this section for a grant 
                described in subsection (b)(2)(A) of this 
                section, and is conducting assessment and 
                improvement activities in accordance with this 
                section, shall be entitled to payment, for each 
                of fiscal years [2002 through 2006] 2007 
                through 2011 from the amount reserved pursuant 
                to section 436(b)(2) (and the amount, if any, 
                reserved pursuant to section 437(b)(2)), of an 
                amount equal to the sum of $85,000 plus the 
                amount described in subparagraph (B) of this 
                paragraph for the fiscal year.

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    (d) Federal Share.--Each highest State court which receives 
funds paid under this section may use such funds to pay not 
more than 75 percent of the cost of activities under this 
section in each of fiscal years [2002 through 2006] 2007 
through 2011.

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   [GRANTS] FUNDING FOR PROGRAMS FOR MENTORING CHILDREN OF PRISONERS

    Sec. 439. (a) Findings and [Purpose] Purposes.--
          (1) Findings.--

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          (2) [Purpose] Purposes.--[The purpose of this section 
        is to authorize the Secretary to make competitive] The 
        purposes of this section are to authorize the 
        Secretary--
                  (A) to make competitive grants to applicants 
                in areas with substantial numbers of children 
                of incarcerated parents, to support the 
                establishment or expansion and operation of 
                programs using a network of public and private 
                community entities to provide mentoring 
                services for children of prisoners[.]; and
                  (B) to enter into a cooperative agreement 
                with a national mentoring support organization 
                to provide greater flexibility nationwide to 
                increase the number of children of prisoners 
                receiving mentoring services.

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    (c) Program Authorized.--From the amounts appropriated 
under subsection [(h)] (i) for a fiscal year that remain after 
applying subsection [(h)(2)] (i)(2), the Secretary shall make 
grants under this section for each of fiscal years [2002 
through 2006] 2007 through 2011 to State or local governments, 
tribal governments or tribal consortia, faith-based 
organizations, and community-based organizations in areas that 
have significant numbers of children of prisoners and that 
submit applications meeting the requirements of this section, 
in amounts that do not exceed $5,000,000 per grant.

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    [(g) Evaluation.--The Secretary shall conduct an evaluation 
of the programs conducted pursuant to this section, and submit 
to the Congress not later than April 15, 2005, a report on the 
findings of the evaluation.
    [(h) Authorization of Appropriations; Reservation of 
Certain Amounts.--
          [(1) Authorization.--There are authorized to be 
        appropriated to carry out this section $67,000,000 for 
        each of fiscal years 2002 and 2003, and such sums as 
        may be necessary for each succeeding fiscal year.
          [(2) Reservation.--The Secretary shall reserve 2.5 
        percent of the amount appropriated for each fiscal year 
        under paragraph (1) for expenditure by the Secretary 
        for research, technical assistance, and evaluation 
        related to programs under this section.]
    (g) Increased Access to Mentoring Services.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary shall award, on a 
        competitive basis, a cooperative agreement with an 
        eligible entity (as specified in paragraph (2)) for the 
        purposes of--
                  (A) identifying and approving mentoring 
                programs in all 50 States and the District of 
                Columbia that meet certain quality program 
                standards;
                  (B) organizing outreach activities, including 
                making publicly available a list of such 
                approved programs, to appropriate public and 
                private entities described in subsection (d)(2) 
                to increase awareness of the availability of 
                vouchers for mentoring services among families 
                of children of prisoners; and
                  (C) distributing vouchers directly to such 
                approved programs that have been selected by 
                families of children of prisoners to provide 
                mentoring services for their children.
          (2) Eligible entity.--For purposes of paragraph (1), 
        an entity eligible for a cooperative agreement under 
        this subsection shall be a national mentoring support 
        organization that has substantial experience--
                  (A) in mentoring and mentoring services for 
                children; and
                  (B) in developing quality program standards 
                for the planning and assessment of mentoring 
                programs for children.
          (3) Application requirements.--To be eligible for a 
        cooperative agreement under this subsection, an entity 
        shall submit to the Secretary an application that 
        includes the following:
                  (A) Qualifications.--A demonstration that the 
                entity meets the experience requirements of 
                paragraph (2).
                  (B) Plan description.--A detailed description 
                of the proposed voucher distribution program, 
                which shall--
                          (i) include the quality program 
                        standards for mentoring developed by 
                        the entity;
                          (ii) describe how the entity will 
                        organize and implement such quality 
                        program standards and distribution 
                        program, including how the entity plans 
                        to ensure that--
                                  (I) children in urban and 
                                rural communities and children 
                                with other geographic, 
                                linguistic, or cultural 
                                barriers to receipt of 
                                mentoring services will have 
                                access to such services; and
                                  (II) if the entity usually 
                                provides gender-specific 
                                programs or services, both 
                                girls and boys will be 
                                appropriately served by the 
                                program;
                          (iii) identify those organizations 
                        known by the entity to comply with such 
                        quality program standards;
                          (iv) describe the strategic plan of 
                        the entity to work with families of 
                        prisoners to develop the list of 
                        mentoring programs that accept vouchers 
                        distributed under the program for 
                        mentoring services; and
                          (v) describe the methods to be used 
                        by the entity to evaluate the program 
                        and the extent to which the program is 
                        achieving the purposes described in 
                        paragraph (1) and subsection (a)(2)(A).
                  (C) Criminal background checks.--An agreement 
                to include in any quality program standards for 
                approved mentoring programs the requirement for 
                criminal background checks for mentors.
                  (D) Records, reports, and audits.--An 
                agreement to maintain such records, make such 
                reports, and cooperate with such reviews and 
                audits as the Secretary may find necessary for 
                purposes of oversight of the cooperative 
                agreement and expenditures.
                  (E) Evaluation.--A commitment to cooperate 
                fully with the Secretary's ongoing and final 
                evaluation of the voucher distribution program, 
                including providing the Secretary with access 
                to the program and program-related records and 
                documents, staff, and the mentoring programs to 
                which vouchers were distributed.
                  (F) Other.--Such other information as the 
                Secretary may find necessary to demonstrate the 
                entity's capacity to carry out the cooperative 
                agreement under this subsection.
          (4) Federal assistance eligibility.--The amount of a 
        voucher under this subsection may be disregarded for 
        purposes of determining the eligibility for, or the 
        amount of, any other Federal or Federally supported 
        assistance for the recipient family.
    (h) Evaluation; Reports.--
          (1) Evaluation.--The Secretary shall conduct an 
        evaluation of the programs authorized under this 
        section, including the program for increasing access to 
        mentoring services authorized under subsection (g).
          (2) Reports.--Not later than 12 months after the date 
        of enactment of the Improving Outcomes for Children 
        Affected by Meth Act of 2006, the Secretary shall 
        submit a report to Congress that includes the 
        following:
                  (A) The characteristics of the mentoring 
                programs funded under this section.
                  (B) The plans for implementation of the 
                cooperative agreement for the program 
                authorized under subsection (g).
                  (C) A description of the outcome-based 
                evaluation of the programs authorized under 
                this section that the Secretary is conducting 
                as of such date of enactment and how such 
                evaluation has been expanded to include an 
                evaluation of the program authorized under 
                subsection (g).
                  (D) The date on which the Secretary shall 
                submit a final report on such evaluation to 
                Congress.
    (i) Authorization of Appropriations; Reservation of Certain 
Amounts.--
          (1) Authorization.--There are authorized to be 
        appropriated to carry out this section $67,000,000 for 
        each of fiscal years 2007 through 2011.
          (2) Reservations.--
                  (A) Research, technical assistance, and 
                evaluation.--The Secretary shall reserve 2.5 
                percent of the amount appropriated for each 
                fiscal year under paragraph (1) for expenditure 
                by the Secretary for research, technical 
                assistance, and evaluation related to programs 
                under this section.
                  (B) Increased access to mentoring services.--
                          (i) In general.--Subject to clauses 
                        (ii) and (iii), the Secretary shall 
                        reserve not more than 50 percent of the 
                        amount appropriated for each fiscal 
                        year under paragraph (1) for purposes 
                        of carrying out the program for 
                        increasing access to mentoring services 
                        authorized under subsection (g).
                          (ii) Assurance of funding for general 
                        program grants.--With respect to each 
                        fiscal year for which amounts are 
                        appropriated to carry out this section, 
                        not less than $25,000,000 of such 
                        amounts (or, if the amount appropriated 
                        for a fiscal year is less than that 
                        amount, the amount appropriated for 
                        that fiscal year that remains after 
                        applying subparagraph (A)) shall be 
                        used by the Secretary for purposes of 
                        making grants under subsection (c).
                          (iii) Contingent percentage 
                        reduction.--If the amount appropriated 
                        for a fiscal year is not sufficient for 
                        the Secretary to satisfy the 
                        requirements of clauses (i) and (ii), 
                        the Secretary shall reduce the 
                        percentage described in clause (i) by 
                        such number of percentage points as is 
                        necessary for the Secretary to satisfy 
                        the requirement of clause (ii).

SEC. 440. GRANTS FOR REGIONAL PARTNERSHIPS TO INCREASE THE WELL-BEING 
                    OF, AND IMPROVE THE PERMANENCY OUTCOMES FOR, 
                    CHILDREN AFFECTED BY METHAMPHETAMINE ABUSE AND 
                    ADDICTION.

    (a) Purpose.--The purpose of this section is to authorize 
the Secretary to make competitive grants to eligible applicants 
to provide, through interagency collaboration and integration 
of programs and services, services and activities that are 
designed to increase the well-being of, and improve permanency 
outcomes for, children who are in an out-of-home placement or 
are at risk of being placed in an out-of-home placement as a 
result of a parent's or caretaker's abuse of methamphetamines.
    (b) Eligible Applicants Defined.--In this section, the term 
``eligible applicant'' means a regional partnership (which may 
be established on an interstate or intrastate basis) and that 
shall include any one or more of the following:
          (1) Nonprofit child welfare service providers.
          (2) For-profit child welfare service providers.
          (3) Community health service providers.
          (4) Community mental health providers.
          (5) Local law enforcement agencies.
          (6) Judges and court personnel.
          (7) Juvenile justice officials.
          (8) School personnel.
          (9) The State child welfare agency that is 
        responsible for the administration of the State plan 
        under this part and part E.
          (10) The State agency responsible for administering 
        the substance abuse prevention and treatment block 
        grant provided under subpart II of part B of title XIX 
        of the Public Health Service Act.
          (11) Tribal child welfare agencies (or a consortium 
        of such agencies).
          (12) Any other providers, agencies, personnel, 
        officials, or entities that are related to the 
        provision of child and family services under this 
        subpart.
    (c) Program Authorized.--
          (1) In general.--From the amounts (if any) reserved 
        for each of fiscal years 2007 through 2011 under 
        section 436(b)(4), the Secretary shall award grants 
        under this section for each such fiscal year to 
        eligible applicants that satisfy the requirements of 
        this section, in amounts that are not less than 
        $500,000 and not more than $1,000,000 per grant per 
        fiscal year.
          (2) Required minimum period of approval.--An eligible 
        applicant shall be approved to receive a grant under 
        this section for a period of not less than 2, and not 
        more than 5, fiscal years.
    (d) Application Requirements.--To be eligible for a grant 
under this section, an eligible applicant shall submit to the 
Secretary a written application containing the following:
          (1) Recent evidence that methamphetamine abuse has 
        increased the number of out-of-home placements for 
        children, or the number of children who are at risk of 
        being placed in an out-of-home placement, in the 
        partnership region.
          (2) A description of the goals and outcomes to be 
        achieved during the funding period for the grant that 
        will enhance the well-being of children receiving 
        services or taking part in activities conducted with 
        funds provided under the grant and lead to safety and 
        permanence for such children.
          (3) A description of the joint activities to be 
        funded in whole or in part with the funds provided 
        under the grant, including the sequencing of the 
        activities proposed to be conducted under the funding 
        period for the grant.
          (4) A description of the strategies for integrating 
        programs and services determined to be appropriate for 
        the child and where appropriate, the child's family.
          (5) A description of the strategies for--
                  (A) collaborating with the State agency 
                responsible for the administration of this part 
                and part E (unless the lead agency for the 
                regional partnership of the eligible applicant 
                is such agency); and
                  (B) consulting, as appropriate, with the 
                State agency responsible for administering 
                substance abuse treatment and prevention 
                services, and the State law enforcement and 
                judicial agencies.
        To the extent the Secretary determines that a 
        requirement of this paragraph would be inappropriate to 
        apply to an eligible applicant that includes a tribal 
        child welfare agency or a consortium of such agencies, 
        the Secretary may exempt the eligible applicant from 
        satisfying such requirement.
          (6) Such other information as the Secretary may 
        require.
    (e) Use of Funds.--Funds made available under a grant made 
under this section shall only be used for services or 
activities that are consistent with the purpose of this section 
and may include the following:
          (1) Family-based comprehensive long-term drug 
        treatment services.
          (2) Early intervention and preventative services.
          (3) Children and family counseling.
          (4) Mental health services.
          (5) Parenting skills training.
    (f) Matching Requirement.--
          (1) Federal share.--A grant awarded under this 
        section shall be available to pay a percentage share of 
        the costs of services provided or activities conducted 
        under such grant, not to exceed--
                  (A) 85 percent for the first and second 
                fiscal years for which the grant is awarded to 
                an eligible applicant;
                  (B) 80 percent for the third and fourth such 
                fiscal years; and
                  (C) 75 percent for the fifth such fiscal 
                year.
          (2) Non-federal share.--The non-Federal share of the 
        cost of services provided or activities conducted under 
        a grant awarded under this section may be in cash or in 
        kind. In determining the amount of the non-Federal 
        share, the Secretary may attribute fair market value to 
        goods, services, and facilities contributed from non-
        Federal sources.
    (g) Considerations in Awarding and Amount of Grants.--In 
awarding grants under this section and determining the amount 
of such grants, the Secretary shall--
          (1) consider the demonstrated need of an eligible 
        applicant for assistance;
          (2) ensure that grants are awarded to a diverse 
        number of the eligible applicants described in 
        subsection (b); and
          (3) give priority to awarding grants to eligible 
        applicants located in rural areas that--
                  (A) have been significantly affected by 
                methamphetamine abuse and addiction by parents 
                or caretakers;
                  (B) have limited resources for addressing the 
                needs of children affected by such abuse and 
                addiction; and
                  (C) have a lack of capacity for access to 
                comprehensive family treatment services.
    (h) Performance Indicators.--Not later than 18 months after 
the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall 
establish indicators that will be used to assess periodically 
the performance of the eligible applicants awarded grants under 
this section in using funds made available under such grants to 
achieve the purpose of this section. In establishing such 
indicators, the Secretary shall consult with the Assistant 
Secretary for the Administration for Children and Families, the 
Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration, the chief executive officers of the States or 
territories in which eligible applicants awarded a grant under 
this section are located, legislators of such States and 
territories, State and local public officials responsible for 
administering child welfare and alcohol and drug abuse 
prevention and treatment programs in such States and 
territories, court staff in such States and territories, 
consumers of the services or activities in such States and 
territories, advocates for children, parents, and caretakers 
who come to the attention of the child welfare system, and 
tribal officials of tribal child welfare agencies (or a 
consortium of such agencies) awarded a grant under this 
section.
    (i) Reports.--
          (1) Grantee reports.--
                  (A) Annual report.--Not later than September 
                30 of the first fiscal year in which an 
                eligible applicant receives funds under a grant 
                awarded under this section, and annually 
                thereafter until September 30 of the last 
                fiscal year in which an eligible applicant 
                receives funds under a grant awarded under this 
                section, the eligible applicant shall submit to 
                the Secretary a report on the activities 
                carried out during that fiscal year with such 
                funds. The report shall contain such 
                information as the Secretary determines is 
                necessary to provide an accurate description of 
                the activities conducted with such funds and of 
                any changes in the use of such funds that are 
                planned for the succeeding fiscal year.
                  (B) Incorporation of information related to 
                performance indicators.--Not later than 12 
                months after the establishment of performance 
                indicators under subsection (h), each eligible 
                applicant awarded a grant under this section 
                shall incorporate into the annual report 
                required under subparagraph (A) information 
                required in relation to such indicators.
          (2) Reports to congress.--On the basis of the reports 
        submitted under paragraph (1), the Secretary annually 
        shall submit to the Committee on Ways and Means of the 
        House of Representatives and the Committee on Finance 
        of the Senate a report on--
                  (A) the services provided and activities 
                conducted with funds provided under grants 
                awarded under this section;
                  (B) the performance indicators established 
                under subsection (h); and
                  (C) the progress that has been made in 
                addressing the needs of families with 
                methamphetamine abuse problems who come to the 
                attention of the child welfare system and in 
                achieving the goals of child safety, 
                permanence, and family stability.

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    DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2006

TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Administration for Children and Families

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                   PROMOTING SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES

    For carrying out section 436 of the Social Security Act, 
[$305,000,000] $345,000,000 and for section 437, $90,000,000.