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110th Congress                                            Rept. 110-253
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                     Part 1

======================================================================



 
               OCEAN AND COASTAL MAPPING INTEGRATION ACT

                                _______
                                

                 July 23, 2007.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Rahall, from the Committee on Natural Resources, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 2400]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Natural Resources, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 2400) to direct the Administrator of the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to establish an 
integrated Federal ocean and coastal mapping plan for the Great 
Lakes and coastal state waters, the territorial sea, the 
exclusive economic zone, and the Continental Shelf of the 
United States, and for other purposes, having considered the 
same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend 
that the bill as amended do pass.
  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Ocean and Coastal Mapping Integration 
Act''.

SEC. 2. INTEGRATED OCEAN AND COASTAL MAPPING PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--The Administrator of the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration shall establish a program to develop, in 
coordination with the Interagency Committee on Ocean and Coastal 
Mapping and affected coastal states, a coordinated and comprehensive 
Federal ocean and coastal mapping plan for the Great Lakes and coastal 
state waters, the territorial sea, the exclusive economic zone, and the 
Continental Shelf of the United States that enhances ecosystem 
approaches in decisionmaking for conservation and management of marine 
resources and habitats, establishes priorities for research and 
mapping, supports the siting of research and other platforms, enhances 
safety of navigation, and advances ocean and coastal science.
  (b) Program Parameters.--In developing such a program, the 
Administrator shall work with the Committee to--
          (1) identify all Federal and federally funded programs 
        conducting shoreline delineation and ocean or coastal mapping, 
        noting geographic coverage, frequency, spatial coverage, 
        resolution, and subject matter focus of the data and location 
        of data archives;
          (2) facilitate cost-effective, cooperative mapping efforts 
        that incorporate policies for contracting with non-governmental 
        entities among all Federal agencies conducting ocean and 
        coastal mapping, by increasing data sharing, developing 
        appropriate data acquisition and metadata standards, and 
        facilitating the interoperability of in situ data collection 
        systems, data processing, archiving, and distribution of data 
        products;
          (3) facilitate the adaptation of existing technologies as 
        well as foster expertise in new ocean and coastal mapping 
        technologies, including through research, development, and 
        training conducted among Federal agencies and in cooperation 
        with non-governmental entities;
          (4) develop standards and protocols for testing innovative 
        experimental mapping technologies and transferring new 
        technologies between the Federal Government, coastal state, and 
        non-governmental entities;
          (5) provide for the archiving, management, and distribution 
        of data sets through a national registry as well as provide 
        mapping products and services to the general public in service 
        of statutory requirements;
          (6) develop data standards and protocols consistent with 
        standards developed by the Federal Geographic Data Committee 
        for use by Federal, coastal state, and other entities in 
        mapping and otherwise documenting locations of federally 
        permitted activities, living and nonliving coastal and marine 
        resources, marine ecosystems, sensitive habitats, submerged 
        cultural resources, undersea cables, offshore aquaculture 
        projects, offshore energy projects, and any areas designated 
        for purposes of environmental protection or conservation and 
        management of living and nonliving coastal and marine 
        resources;
          (7) identify the procedures to be used for coordinating the 
        collection and integration of Federal ocean and coastal mapping 
        data with coastal state and local government programs;
          (8) facilitate, to the extent practicable, the collection of 
        real-time tide data and the development of hydrodynamic models 
        for coastal areas to allow for the application of V-datum tools 
        that will facilitate the seamless integration of onshore and 
        offshore maps and charts;
          (9) establish a plan for the acquisition and collection of 
        ocean and coastal mapping data; and
          (10) set forth a timetable for completion and implementation 
        of the plan referred to in subsection (a).

SEC. 3. INTERAGENCY COMMITTEE ON OCEAN AND COASTAL MAPPING.

  (a) In General.--The Administrator, within 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, shall convene or utilize an existing interagency 
committee on ocean and coastal mapping to implement section 2.
  (b) Membership.--The committee shall be comprised of senior 
representatives from Federal agencies with ocean and coastal mapping 
and surveying responsibilities. The representatives shall be high-
ranking officials of their respective agencies or departments and, 
whenever possible, the head of the portion of the agency or department 
that is most relevant to the purposes of this Act. Membership shall 
include senior representatives from the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the Chief of Naval Operations, the United 
States Geological Survey, the Minerals Management Service, the National 
Science Foundation, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the 
United States Army Corps of Engineers, the Coast Guard, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and other 
appropriate Federal agencies involved in ocean and coastal mapping.
  (c) Chairman.--The committee shall have as its chairman the 
representative from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration. The chairman may create subcommittees chaired by any 
member agency of the committee. The full committee may form working 
groups to address issues of short duration.
  (d) Meetings.--The committee shall meet on a quarterly basis, but 
each subcommittee and each working group shall meet on an as-needed 
basis.
  (e) Coordination.--The committee shall coordinate activities, when 
appropriate, with--
          (1) other Federal efforts, including the Digital Coast, 
        Geospatial One-Stop, and the Federal Geographic Data Committee;
          (2) international mapping activities;
          (3) coastal states;
          (4) user groups through workshops and other appropriate 
        mechanisms; and
          (5) representatives of non-governmental entities.
  (f) Advisory Panel.--The Administrator may convene an ocean and 
coastal mapping advisory panel consisting of representatives from non-
governmental entities to provide input regarding activities of the 
committee.

SEC. 4. NOAA INTEGRATED MAPPING INITIATIVE.

  (a) In General.--Not later than 6 months after the date of enactment 
of this Act, the Administrator, in consultation with the Committee, 
shall develop and submit to the Congress a plan for an integrated ocean 
and coastal mapping initiative within the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration.
  (b) Plan Requirements.--The plan shall--
          (1) identify and describe all ocean and coastal mapping 
        programs within the agency, including those that conduct 
        mapping or related activities in the course of existing 
        missions, such as hydrographic surveys, ocean exploration 
        projects, living marine resource conservation and management 
        programs, coastal zone management projects, and ocean and 
        coastal observations and science projects;
          (2) establish priority mapping programs and establish and 
        periodically update priorities for geographic areas in 
        surveying and mapping across all missions of the National 
        Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, as well as minimum data 
        acquisition and metadata standards for those programs;
          (3) encourage the development of innovative ocean and coastal 
        mapping technologies and applications, such as Digital Coast, 
        through research and development through cooperative or other 
        agreements with joint or cooperative research institutes or 
        centers and with other non-governmental entities;
          (4) document available and developing technologies, best 
        practices in data processing and distribution, and leveraging 
        opportunities with other Federal agencies, coastal states, and 
        non-governmental entities;
          (5) identify training, technology, and other resource 
        requirements for enabling the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration's programs, vessels, and aircraft to support a 
        coordinated ocean and coastal mapping program;
          (6) identify a centralized mechanism or office for 
        coordinating data collection, processing, archiving, and 
        dissemination activities of all such mapping programs within 
        the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that meets 
        Federal mandates for data accuracy and accessibility and 
        designate a repository that is responsible for archiving and 
        managing the distribution of all ocean and coastal mapping data 
        to simplify the provision of services to benefit Federal and 
        coastal state programs; and
          (7) set forth a timetable for implementation and completion 
        of the plan, including a schedule for submission to the 
        Congress of periodic progress reports and recommendations for 
        integrating approaches developed under the initiative into the 
        interagency program.
  (c) NOAA Joint Ocean and Coastal Mapping Centers.--The Administrator 
may maintain and operate up to 3 joint ocean and coastal mapping 
centers, including a joint hydrographic center, which shall each be co-
located with an institution of higher education. The centers shall 
serve as hydrographic centers of excellence and may conduct activities 
necessary to carry out the purposes of this Act, including--
          (1) research and development of innovative ocean and coastal 
        mapping technologies, equipment, and data products;
          (2) mapping of the United States Outer Continental Shelf and 
        other regions;
          (3) data processing for nontraditional data and uses;
          (4) advancing the use of remote sensing technologies, for 
        related issues, including mapping and assessment of essential 
        fish habitat and of coral resources, ocean observations, and 
        ocean exploration; and
          (5) providing graduate education and training in ocean and 
        coastal mapping sciences for members of the National Oceanic 
        and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Officer Corps, 
        personnel of other agencies with ocean and coastal mapping 
        programs, and civilian personnel.
  (d) Enhanced Opportunities for Non-Governmental Contracting.--The 
Administrator shall continue developing a strategy for expanding 
contracting with non-governmental entities to minimize duplication and 
take maximum advantage of non-governmental capabilities in fulfilling 
the Administration's mapping and charting responsibilities. Within 120 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall 
transmit a report describing the strategy developed under this 
subsection to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of 
the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of 
Representatives.

SEC. 5. INTERAGENCY PROGRAM REPORTING.

  No later than 18 months after the date of enactment of this Act, and 
biannually thereafter, the Chairman of the Committee shall transmit to 
the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate 
and the Committee on Natural Resources of the House of Representatives 
a report detailing progress made in implementing this Act, including--
          (1) an inventory of ocean and coastal mapping data within the 
        territorial sea and the exclusive economic zone and throughout 
        the Continental Shelf of the United States, noting the age and 
        source of the survey and the spatial resolution (metadata) of 
        the data;
          (2) an inventory and description of any new Federal or 
        federally funded programs conducting shoreline delineation and 
        ocean or coastal mapping since the previous reporting cycle;
          (3) identification of priority areas in need of survey 
        coverage using present technologies;
          (4) a resource plan that identifies when priority areas in 
        need of modern ocean and coastal mapping surveys can be 
        accomplished;
          (5) the status of efforts to produce integrated digital maps 
        of ocean and coastal areas;
          (6) a description of any products resulting from coordinated 
        mapping efforts under this Act that improve public 
        understanding of the coasts and oceans, or regulatory 
        decisionmaking;
          (7) documentation of minimum and desired standards for data 
        acquisition and integrated metadata;
          (8) a statement of the status of Federal efforts to leverage 
        mapping technologies, coordinate mapping activities, share 
        expertise, and exchange data;
          (9) a statement of resource requirements for organizations to 
        meet the goals of the program, including technology needs for 
        data acquisition, processing, and distribution systems;
          (10) a statement of the status of efforts to declassify data 
        gathered by the Navy, the National Geospatial-Intelligence 
        Agency, and other agencies to the extent possible without 
        jeopardizing national security, and make it available to 
        partner agencies and the public;
          (11) the status of efforts to coordinate Federal programs 
        with coastal state and local government programs and leverage 
        those programs; and
          (12) a description of efforts of Federal agencies to increase 
        contracting with non-governmental entities.

SEC. 6. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--In addition to the amounts authorized by section 306 
of the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act of 1998 (33 U.S.C. 892d), 
there are authorized to be appropriated to the Administrator to carry 
out this Act--
          (1) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;
          (2) $26,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;
          (3) $32,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (4) $38,000,000 for fiscal year 2011; and
          (5) $45,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2012 through 2015.
  (b) Joint Ocean and Coastal Mapping Centers.--Of the amounts 
appropriated under subsection (a), the following amounts shall be used 
to carry out section 4(c):
          (1) $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2008.
          (2) $11,000,000 for fiscal year 2009.
          (3) $12,000,000 for fiscal year 2010.
          (4) $13,000,000 for fiscal year 2011.
          (5) $15,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2012 through 2015.
  (c) Interagency Committee.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, from amounts authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years 2008 
through 2015 to the departments of the agencies, and the independent 
agencies, specified in section 3(b), the head of each such department 
or agency may make available not more than $10,000,000 per fiscal year 
to carry out interagency activities under section 3.

SEC. 7. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act:
          (1) Administrator.--The term ``Administrator'' means the 
        Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration.
          (2) Coastal state.--The term ``coastal state'' has the 
        meaning given that term by section 304(4) of the Coastal Zone 
        Management Act of 1972 (16 U.S.C. 1453(4).
          (3) Committee.--The term ``Committee'' means the Interagency 
        Committee on Ocean and Coastal Mapping established by section 
        3.
          (4) Exclusive economic zone.--The term ``exclusive economic 
        zone'' means the exclusive economic zone of the United States 
        established by Presidential Proclamation No. 5030, of March 10, 
        1983.
          (5) Non-governmental entities.--The term ``non-governmental 
        entities'' includes non-governmental organizations, members of 
        the academic community, and private sector organizations that 
        provide products and services associated with measuring, 
        locating, and preparing maps, charts, surveys, aerial 
        photographs, satellite imagines, or other graphical or digital 
        presentations depicting natural or manmade physical features, 
        phenomena, and legal boundaries of the Earth.
          (6) Ocean and coastal mapping.--The term ``ocean and coastal 
        mapping'' means the acquisition, processing, and management of 
        physical, biological, geological, chemical, and archaeological 
        characteristics and boundaries of ocean and coastal areas, 
        resources, and sea beds through the use of acoustics, 
        satellites, aerial photogrammetry, light and imaging, direct 
        sampling, and other mapping technologies.
          (7) Outer continental shelf.--The term ``Outer Continental 
        Shelf'' means all submerged lands lying seaward and outside of 
        lands beneath navigable waters (as that term is defined in 
        section 2 of the Submerged Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1301)), and of 
        which the subsoil and seabed appertain to the United States and 
        are subject to its jurisdiction and control.
          (8) Territorial sea.--The term ``territorial sea'' means the 
        belt of sea measured from the baseline of the United States 
        determined in accordance with international law, as set forth 
        in Presidential Proclamation Number 5928, dated December 27, 
        1988.

                          PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of H.R. 2400, Ocean and Coastal Mapping 
Integration Act, is to direct the Administrator of the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to establish an 
integrated federal ocean and coastal mapping plan for the Great 
Lakes and coastal state waters, the territorial sea, the 
exclusive economic zone, and the Continental Shelf of the 
United States, and for other purposes.

                  BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION

    Coastal mapping and surveys for nautical charting are two 
of the oldest functions of the federal government. The root of 
these activities dates back to 1807, when President Thomas 
Jefferson signed into law an Act requiring the President ``to 
cause a survey to be taken of the coast of the United States * 
* * together with such other matters as he may deem proper for 
completing an accurate chart of every part of the coast.'' Two 
hundred years later, the mapping and charting of our coasts and 
submerged lands off the continental shelf and in the Exclusive 
Economic Zone continues to be an issue of great national 
importance.
    Availability of quality, up-to-date, comprehensive maps and 
charts for all U.S. waters is important for myriad reasons. 
Accurate maps and charts are imperative to ensure safe 
navigation for marine shipping and to facilitate effective 
coastal planning for hazard mitigation, such as a storm surge. 
Maps and charts are required to develop and implement science-
based, ecosystem management approaches, to monitor competing 
and often conflicting uses of the marine environment, and to 
track environmental changes. Maps and charts are also, perhaps 
most obviously, important tools for identifying boundaries, 
including the extent of our continental shelf beyond the 200 
nautical mile limit of the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone.
    At least 15 federal agencies, most coastal states, and 
numerous local agencies, academic institutions, and private 
companies conduct mapping and charting activities in U.S. 
waters. Today, no central repository or coordinating body 
exists under law to oversee and track these mapping efforts. 
The lack of coordination leads to redundancy of efforts in 
certain areas, which can be extremely expensive and 
inefficient. While some areas are ``over mapped,'' there is a 
severe lack of data in other regions. The National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) currently designates 35,000 
square nautical miles of waters important to navigation that 
require updated information. Of the data that do exist, 
differences in scale, projection, resolution, reference frames, 
and the source and vintage of the data inhibit integration 
efforts. The lack of communication among agencies also masks 
opportunities for technology transfer and development.
    Additionally, should the U.S. accede to the United Nations 
Convention on the Law of the Sea, documentation and 
verification of the extent of the continental shelf will be 
required to claim an extended Exclusive Economic Zone where 
potentially $3.1 trillion in marine resources may be located.
    In 2004, the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy (USCOP) 
released a report at the request of the President and the 
Congress recommending actions needed to improve ocean policy in 
the United States. Among the suggestions made by the USCOP was 
a recommendation to consolidate and coordinate federal mapping 
activities, and that NOAA lead this effort. At the same time, 
the National Research Council completed a study to identify the 
most pressing national needs for coastal mapping and charting. 
This study, requested by three of the primary agencies involved 
in ocean and coastal surveys, identified the same need for 
coordination. Their findings included a need for a consistent 
spatial framework, increased access to geospatial data and 
mapping products, and increased inter- and intra-agency 
communication, cooperation, and coordination.
    Enactment of H.R. 2400 will provide a framework for an 
integrated ocean and coastal mapping program. This will improve 
the conservation and management of marine resources, and 
increase marine transportation safety. In addition, passage of 
H.R. 2400 will advance coastal and ocean science research and 
technology development and increase our understanding of the 
submerged land areas under U.S. jurisdiction, an area larger 
than the contiguous United States.

                            COMMITTEE ACTION

    H.R. 2400 was introduced on May 21, 2007, by the Chairwoman 
of the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife and Oceans, 
Congresswoman Madeleine Z. Bordallo (D-GU). The bill was 
referred to the Committee on Natural Resources, and within the 
Committee to the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife and 
Oceans. The bill was also referred to the Committee on Science 
and Technology. The Subcommittee met on June 5, 2007, to 
receive testimony related to the bill. The legislation received 
positive endorsements from the witnesses, including the 
Administration.
    On June 19, 2007, the Subcommittee met to mark up the bill. 
Chairwoman Bordallo offered an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute to direct the NOAA Administrator to facilitate the 
creation of a national registry for federally-funded ocean and 
coastal mapping data. The substitute amendment also included 
provisions to allow the NOAA Administrator to use an existing 
entity to fulfill the requirement for an Interagency Committee 
on Ocean and Coastal Mapping, such as the Joint Subcommittee on 
Ocean Science and Technology established under the Bush 
administration Ocean Action Plan, and authorized the 
Administrator to establish a non-federal advisory panel to 
provide input to the Interagency Committee. The substitute 
amendment also directed the NOAA Administrator to facilitate 
the integration of onshore and offshore maps and charts. The 
Bordallo substitute amendment was adopted by voice vote. The 
bill, as amended, was then forwarded to the Full Committee by 
voice vote.
    On June 28, 2007, the Committee on Natural Resources 
considered the bill. Chairwoman Bordallo offered a non-
controversial amendment in the nature of a substitute to 
clarify the role of states in the coordination process; 
strengthen the directive to implement mapping activities in 
addition to research and planning; clarify the role of private 
contractors in the gathering of mapping data; and, to encourage 
the development of ocean and coastal mapping technologies and 
applications, including the Digital Coast. The substitute 
amendment was adopted by unanimous consent. The bill, as 
amended, was then ordered favorably reported to the House of 
Representatives by unanimous consent.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 cites this Act as the ``Ocean and Coastal Mapping 
Integration Act.''

Section 2. Integrated ocean and coastal mapping program

    Section 2 would direct the Administrator of the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in coordination 
with the Interagency Committee on Ocean and Coastal Mapping and 
affected coastal states, to establish a comprehensive Federal 
ocean and coastal mapping program for U.S. coastal, ocean, and 
Great Lakes Waters. The program would increase cooperation and 
communication among Federal agencies, coastal States, and 
nongovernmental entities in an effort to establish more 
efficient methods of collecting data, testing and implementing 
new technologies, and managing and disseminating data.

Section 3. Interagency Committee on Ocean and Coastal Mapping

    Section 3 would establish an Interagency Committee on Ocean 
and Coastal Mapping, or allow the Administrator of NOAA to 
utilize an existing entity, comprising senior representatives 
of relevant Federal agencies and chaired by a representative 
from NOAA. The Committee would meet quarterly and coordinate as 
appropriate with other Federal, international, state, and 
private entity activities. In addition, Section 3 would 
authorize the Administrator to convene an Advisory Panel 
consisting of representatives from nongovernmental entities to 
provide input regarding activities of the Interagency 
Committee.

Section 4. NOAA integrated mapping initiative

    Section 4 would require the Administrator of NOAA, in 
consultation with the Interagency Committee, to submit to 
Congress within six months after the date of enactment a plan 
for an integrated ocean and coastal mapping initiative within 
NOAA. Section 4 would direct the Administrator of NOAA to 
develop a strategy to use nongovernmental entity capabilities 
through expanded contracting. Finally, Section 4 would 
authorize the Administrator of NOAA to operate three Joint 
Ocean and Coastal Mapping Centers to serve as hydrographic 
centers of excellence. The centers could conduct a variety of 
activities, including mapping, advancing the use of remote 
sensing technologies, training NOAA and other employees, and 
providing research and development of mapping technologies.

Section 5. Interagency program reporting

    Section 5 would require the Chairman of the Interagency 
Committee to report to Congress no later than 18 months after 
the date of enactment, and biannually thereafter, the progress 
made in implementing this Act.

Section 6. Authorization of appropriations

    Section 6 authorizes appropriations to NOAA for this 
program on an incrementally increasing basis as follows: $20 
million for fiscal year 2008, $26 million for fiscal year 2009, 
$32 million for fiscal year 2010, $38 million for fiscal year 
2011, and $45 million for each of fiscal years 2012 through 
2015. The Joint Ocean and Coastal Mapping Centers would be 
authorized to receive some of this funding.

Section 7. Definitions

    Section 7 defines key terms.

            COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Regarding clause 2(b)(1) of rule X and clause 3(c)(1) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee on Natural Resources' oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

                  FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    The functions of the proposed advisory committee authorized 
in the bill are not currently being nor could they be performed 
by one or more agencies, an advisory committee already in 
existence or by enlarging the mandate of an existing advisory 
committee.

                   CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact this bill.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. Cost of Legislation. Clause 3(d)(2) of rule XIII of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives requires an estimate and 
a comparison by the Committee of the costs which would be 
incurred in carrying out this bill. However, clause 3(d)(3)(B) 
of that rule provides that this requirement does not apply when 
the Committee has included in its report a timely submitted 
cost estimate of the bill prepared by the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    2. Congressional Budget Act. As required by clause 3(c)(2) 
of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
section 308(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, this 
bill does not contain any new budget authority, spending 
authority, credit authority, or an increase or decrease in 
revenues or tax expenditures.
    3. General Performance Goals and Objectives. As required by 
clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII, the general performance goal or 
objective of this bill, as ordered reported, is to direct the 
Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration to establish an integrated federal ocean and 
coastal mapping plan for the Great Lakes and coastal state 
waters, the territorial sea, the exclusive economic zone, and 
the Continental Shelf of the United States, and for other 
purposes.
    4. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate. Under clause 
3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives and section 403 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974, the Committee has received the following cost estimate 
for this bill from the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office:

H.R. 2400--Ocean and Coastal Mapping Integration Act

    Summary: H.R. 2400 would direct the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to establish an integrated 
mapping program encompassing the Great Lakes, coastal state 
waters, the territorial sea, the exclusive economic zone, and 
the continental shelf of the United States. The bill also would 
establish an interagency committee to coordinate federal 
mapping of ocean and coastal areas, require an integrated 
mapping plan to identify and describe all mapping programs, and 
authorize up to three joint centers for ocean and coastal 
mapping to be located at colleges or universities. For those 
purposes, the bill would authorize the appropriation of $296 
million over the 2008-2015 period.
    Assuming appropriation of the amounts authorized by the 
bill, CBO estimates that implementing the bill would cost $7 
million in fiscal year 2008 and $116 million over the 2008-2012 
period. CBO estimates that $180 million would be spent after 
2012, including $135 million authorized to be appropriated 
between 2013 and 2015. Enacting H.R. 2400 would not affect 
revenues or direct spending.
    This legislation contains no intergovernmental or private-
sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act 
(UMRA) and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: H.R. 2400 would 
authorize the appropriation of between $20 million and $45 
million a year for each of fiscal years 2008 through 2015 for a 
new ocean and coastal mapping initiative. Of those amounts, 
between $10 million and $15 million a year would be available 
for research and other mapping programs to be carried out at 
newly authorized ocean and coastal mapping centers.
    The estimated budgetary impact of H.R. 2400 is shown in the 
following table. The costs of this legislation fall within 
budget function 300 (natural resources and environment). For 
this estimate, CBO assumes that the full amounts authorized by 
the bill will be appropriated for each year and that outlays 
will follow historical spending patterns for similar NOAA 
programs.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
                                                                       2008     2009     2010     2011     2012
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level \1\............................................       20       26       32       38       45
Estimated Outlays..................................................        7       15       25       32      37
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ In addition to the levels shown for 2008 through 2012, the bill would also authorize the appropriation of
  $135 million over the 2013-2015 period.

    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 2400 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Deborah Reis and David 
Reynolds; Impact on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Leo 
Lex; Impact on the Private Sector: Jacob Kuipers.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 104-4

    This bill contains no unfunded mandates.

                           EARMARK STATEMENT

    H.R. 2400 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e) or 9(f) of rule XXI.

                PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any State, local or 
tribal law.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    If enacted, this bill would make no changes in existing 
law.