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110th Congress                                            Rept. 110-701
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 2

======================================================================



 
       NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2008

                                _______
                                

                 July 11, 2008.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 5618]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 5618) to reauthorize and amend the 
National Sea Grant College Program Act, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an 
amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................5
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................5
  IV. Hearing Summary.................................................6
   V. Summary of Committee Actions....................................7
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions as Reported.........................8
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill as Reported.............8
VIII. Committee Views................................................10
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................11
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................11
  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4...............................12
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............12
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........12
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................12
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................12
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................12
XVII. Earmark Identification.........................................12
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........13

 XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported..........13
  XX. Committee Recommendations......................................22
 XXI. Additional Views...............................................23
XXII. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup.........................25
XXIII.Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................43


                              I. Amendment


  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``National Sea Grant College Program 
Amendments Act of 2008''.

SEC. 2. REFERENCES.

  Except as otherwise expressly provided therein, whenever in this Act 
an amendment or repeal is expressed in terms of an amendment to, or 
repeal of, a section or other provision, the reference shall be 
considered to be made to a section or other provision of the National 
Sea Grant College Program Act (33 U.S.C. 1121 et seq.).

SEC. 3. FINDINGS AND PURPOSE.

  (a) Findings.--Section 202(a) (33 U.S.C. 1121(a)) is amended--
          (1) by amending paragraph (1)(D) to read as follows:
                  ``(D) encourage the development of preparation, 
                forecast, analysis, mitigation, response, and recovery 
                systems for coastal hazards;'';
          (2) in paragraph (2) by striking ``program of research, 
        education,'' and inserting ``program of integrated research, 
        education, extension,''; and
          (3) by striking paragraph (6) and inserting the following:
          ``(6) The National Ocean Research Priorities Plan and 
        Implementation Strategy issued by the National Science and 
        Technology Council's Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and 
        Technology on January 26, 2007, identifies research priorities 
        for compelling areas of interaction between society and the 
        ocean, and calls for the engagement of a broad array of ocean 
        science sectors (government, academia, industry, and non-
        government entities) to address the areas of greatest research 
        need and opportunity.
          ``(7) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 
        through the national sea grant college program, offers the most 
        suitable locus and means for such commitment and engagement 
        through the promotion of activities that will result in greater 
        such understanding, assessment, development, utilization, and 
        conservation. The most cost-effective way to promote such 
        activities is through continued and increased Federal support 
        of the establishment, development, and operation of programs 
        and projects by sea grant colleges, sea grant institutes, and 
        other institutions, including strong collaborations between 
        Administration scientists and research and outreach personnel 
        at academic institutions.''.
  (b) Purpose.--Section 202(c) (33 U.S.C. 1121(c)) is amended by 
striking ``to promote research, education, training, and advisory 
service activities'' and inserting ``to promote integrated research, 
education, training, and extension activities''.

SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

  (a) Amendments.--Section 203 (33 U.S.C. 1122) is amended--
          (1) in paragraph (11) by striking ``advisory services'' and 
        inserting ``extension services'';
          (2) in each of paragraphs (12) and (13) by striking ``(33 
        U.S.C. 1126)''; and
          (3) by adding at the end the following:
          ``(17) The term `regional research and information plan' 
        means a plan developed by one or more sea grant colleges or sea 
        grant institutes that identifies regional priorities to 
        implement the National Ocean Research Priorities Plan and 
        Implementation Strategy.
          ``(18) The term `National Ocean Research Priorities Plan and 
        Implementation Strategy' means such plan and strategy issued by 
        the National Science and Technology Council's Joint 
        Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology on January 26, 
        2007.''.
  (b) Repeal.--Section 307 of the Act entitled ``An Act to provide for 
the designation of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary'' 
(Public Law 102-251; 106 Stat. 66) is repealed.

SEC. 5. NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM, GENERALLY.

  (a) Program Elements.--Section 204(b) (33 U.S.C. 1123(b)) is 
amended--
          (1) by amending in paragraph (1) to read as follows:
          ``(1) sea grant programs that comprise a national sea grant 
        college program network, including international projects 
        conducted within such programs and regional and national 
        projects conducted among such programs;'';
          (2) by amending paragraph (2) to read as follows:
          ``(2) administration of the national sea grant college 
        program and this title by the national sea grant office and the 
        Administration;'';
          (3) in paragraph (3), by striking ``and'';
          (4) by amending paragraph (4) to read as follows:
          ``(4) any regional or national strategic investments in 
        fields relating to ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources 
        developed in consultation with the board and with the approval 
        of the sea grant colleges and the sea grant institutes; and''; 
        and
          (5) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
          ``(5) methods for the national sea grant college program to 
        explore the environmental and scientific considerations, 
        including providing scientifically sound data, relative to the 
        production of ocean and coastal offshore petroleum, natural 
        gas, geothermal, wind, and ocean thermal energy resources, 
        including the siting of energy related facilities in the 
        coastal zone.''.
  (b) Technical Correction.--Section 204(c)(2) (33 U.S.C. 1123(c)(2)) 
is amended by striking ``Within 6 months of the date of enactment of 
the National Sea Grant College Program Reauthorization Act of 1998, 
the'' and inserting ``The''.
  (c) Functions of Director of National Sea Grant College Program.--
Section 204(d) (33 U.S.C. 1123(d)) is amended--
          (1) in paragraph (2)(A), by striking ``long-range'';
          (2) in paragraph (3)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``(A)(i) evaluate'' and inserting 
                ``(A) evaluate and assess'';
                  (B) by striking ``activities; and'' and inserting 
                ``activities;''; and
                  (C) by striking clause (ii); and
          (3) in paragraph (3)(B)--
                  (A) by redesignating clauses (ii) through (iv) as 
                clauses (iv) through (vi), respectively, and by 
                inserting after clause (i) the following:
                          ``(ii) encourage collaborations among sea 
                        grant colleges and sea grant institutes to 
                        address regional and national priorities 
                        established under subsection (c)(1);
                          ``(iii) encourage cooperation with Minority 
                        Serving Institutions--
                                  ``(I) to enhance collaborative 
                                research opportunities for faculty and 
                                students in the areas of atmospheric, 
                                oceanic, and environmental sciences, 
                                and remote sensing;
                                  ``(II) to improve opportunities for, 
                                and retention of, students and faculty 
                                from Minority Serving Institutions in 
                                the NOAA related sciences; and
                                  ``(III) to increase the number of 
                                such students graduating in NOAA 
                                science areas;''; and
                  (B) in clause (iv) (as so redesignated) by striking 
                ``encourage'' and inserting ``ensuring''.

SEC. 6. PROGRAM OR PROJECT GRANTS AND CONTRACTS.

  (a) Exemption From Limitation on Cost Share.--Section 205(a) (33 
U.S.C. 1124(a)) is amended in the matter following paragraph (2), by 
inserting ``or that are appropriated under section 208(b)'' before the 
period at the end.
  (b) Special Grants; Maximum Amount.--Section 205(b) (33 U.S.C. 
1124(b)) is amended by striking the matter following paragraph (3) and 
inserting the following:
``The total amount that may be provided for grants under this 
subsection during any fiscal year shall not exceed an amount equal to 5 
percent of the total funds appropriated for such year under section 
212.''.

SEC. 7. EXTENSION SERVICES BY SEA GRANT COLLEGES AND SEA GRANT 
                    INSTITUTES.

  Section 207(a) (33 U.S.C. 1126(a)) is amended in each of paragraphs 
(2)(B) and (3)(B) by striking ``advisory services'' and inserting 
``extension services''.

SEC. 8. TECHNICAL CORRECTION RELATING TO FELLOWSHIPS.

  Section 208(a) (33 U.S.C. 1127(a)) is amended by striking ``Not later 
than 1 year after the date of the enactment of the National Sea Grant 
College Program Act Amendments of 2002, and every 2 years thereafter,'' 
and inserting ``Every 2 years,''.

SEC. 9. NATIONAL SEA GRANT ADVISORY BOARD.

  (a) Redesignation of Sea Grant Review Panel as Board.--
          (1) Redesignation.--The sea grant review panel established by 
        section 209 of the National Sea Grant College Program Act (33 
        U.S.C. 1128), as in effect before the date of the enactment of 
        this Act, is redesignated as the National Sea Grant Advisory 
        Board.
          (2) Membership not affected.--An individual serving as a 
        member of the sea grant review panel immediately before the 
        enactment of this Act may continue to serve as a member of the 
        National Sea Grant Advisory Board until the expiration of such 
        member's term under section 209(c) of such Act (33 U.S.C. 
        1128(c).
          (3) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, 
        document, paper, or other record of the United States to such 
        sea grant review panel is deemed to be a reference to the 
        National Sea Grant Advisory Board.
          (4) Conforming amendments.--
                  (A) In general.--Section 209 (33 U.S.C. 1128) is 
                amended by striking so much as precedes subsection (b) 
                and inserting the following:

``SEC. 209. NATIONAL SEA GRANT ADVISORY BOARD.

  ``(a) Establishment.--There shall be an independent committee to be 
known as the National Sea Grant Advisory Board.''.
                  (B) Definition.--Section 203(9) (33 U.S.C. 1122(9)) 
                is amended to read as follows:
          ``(9) The term `Board' means the National Sea Grant Advisory 
        Board established under section 209.'';
                  (C) Other provisions.--The following provisions are 
                each amended by striking ``panel'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Board'':
                          (i) Section 204 (33 U.S.C. 1123).
                          (ii) Section 207 (33 U.S.C. 1126).
                          (iii) Section 209 (33 U.S.C. 1128).
  (b) Duties.--Section 209(b) (33 U.S.C. 1128(b)) is amended to read as 
follows:
  ``(b) Duties.--
          ``(1) In general.--The Board shall advise the Secretary and 
        the Director concerning--
                  ``(A) strategies for utilizing the sea grant college 
                program to address the Nation's highest priorities 
                regarding the understanding, assessment, development, 
                utilization, and conservation of ocean, coastal, and 
                Great Lakes resources;
                  ``(B) the designation of sea grant colleges and sea 
                grant institutes; and
                  ``(C) such other matters as the Secretary refers to 
                the Board for review and advice.
          ``(2) Biennial report.--The Board shall report to the 
        Congress every two years on the state of the national sea grant 
        college program. The Board shall indicate in each such report 
        the progress made toward meeting the priorities identified in 
        the strategic plan in effect under section 204(c). The 
        Secretary shall make available to the Board such information, 
        personnel, and administrative services and assistance as it may 
        reasonably require to carry out its duties under this title.''.
  (c) Extension of Term.--Section 209(c)(2) (33 U.S.C. 1128(c)(2)) is 
amended by striking the second sentence and inserting the following: 
``The Director may extend the term of office of a voting member of the 
Board once by up to 1 year.''.
  (d) Establishment of Subcommittees.--Section 204(c) (33 U.S.C. 
1123(c)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
  ``(8) The Board may establish such subcommittees as are reasonably 
necessary to carry out its duties under subsection (b). Such 
subcommittees may include individuals who are not Board members.''.

SEC. 10. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) Authorization.--Section 212(a) (33 U.S.C. 1131(a)) is amended to 
read as follows:
  ``(a) Authorization.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Secretary to carry out this title--
          ``(1) $66,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;
          ``(2) $72,800,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(3) $79,600,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(4) $86,400,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(5) $93,200,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(6) $100,000,000 for fiscal year 2014.''.
  (b) Repeal of Distribution Requirement.--Section 212 (33 U.S.C. 1131) 
is amended by striking subsection (c), and by redesignating subsections 
(d) and (e) as subsections (c) and (d), respectively.

                        II. Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of this bill is to reauthorize and amend the 
National Sea Grant College Program Act.

                III. Background and Need for Legislation

    The National Sea Grant College Program was established in 
1966 upon the enactment of the National Sea Grant College Act 
(33 U.S.C. 1121-1131) with the goal of improving marine 
resource conservation, management, and utilization. The Act was 
last reauthorized by the National Sea Grant College Program Act 
Amendments of 2002 (Public Law 107-299), and the authorization 
of appropriations expires at the end of Fiscal Year 2008. The 
National Sea Grant College Program is patterned after the Land 
Grant College System, which was created in 1862. Though 
originally assigned to the National Science Foundation, the 
National Sea Grant Office (NSGO) is now housed within the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
    Today, Sea Grant, as it is commonly called, is a nationwide 
network of over 30 Sea Grant College programs comprised of 
researchers, educators, and marine extension agents at some of 
the nation's top academic institutions. Sea Grant Colleges 
sponsor a wide range of applied and basic marine science 
research, education, training, and technical assistance 
programs promoting the understanding and utilization of ocean, 
coastal and Great Lakes resources. Sea Grant advisory and 
extension staff provide informal education for the general 
public, disseminate research findings to user groups, and 
communicate local needs and problems to Sea Grant and other 
marine-related program managers and researchers.
    The system also supports education and training through its 
two fellowship programs, the John A. Knauss Marine Policy 
Fellowship and the Sea Grant/NOAA Fisheries Graduate 
Fellowship. Sea Grant benefits from the input and support of 
the Sea Grant Review Panel (Review Panel). This panel is made 
up of 15 members with marine science backgrounds or knowledge 
and experience in the fields where Sea Grant works.
    The most significant developments over the past six years 
pertain to Sea Grant's strategic planning and program 
evaluation procedures. The National Sea Grant College Program 
Act Amendments of 2002 directed NOAA to contract with the 
National Research Council (NRC) to evaluate Sea Grant's process 
of reviewing individual programs and recommend ways to improve 
the overall effectiveness of the evaluation process to ensure 
fairness, consistency, and enhancement of performance. In its 
2006 report, the NRC noted that ``real improvements have 
occurred'' in Sea Grant since changes were instituted after the 
last NRC evaluation in 1994.\1\ The 2006 report recommended 
strengthening the strategic planning process for the individual 
programs; increasing the interaction between the NSGO and the 
individual programs; and improving the program rating and 
ranking process through annual assessments by the national 
office. In addition, the report provided recommendations to 
improve the independent reviews that are conducted on a four-
year cycle. Sea Grant's response to the NRC report dovetailed 
with the Bush Administration's efforts to carry out the 
recommendations of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Evaluation of the Sea Grant Program Review Process. Ocean 
Studies Board. 2006. National Research Council. Washington, DC. 210 pp.
    \2\U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. 2004. An Ocean Bluepint for the 
21st Century. Final Report of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. 
Washington, DC.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Administration's 2004 U.S. Ocean Action Plan\3\ called 
for the National Science and Technology Council's Joint 
Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology to prepare an 
Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy 
(Strategy). Issued in 2007 after significant input from the 
ocean research community, the Strategy established priorities 
for ocean science and technology for the next decade. Using 
this new interagency priorities plan for ocean science, NSGO 
and the Sea Grant colleges nationwide have developed a new 
strategic plan that links Sea Grant's priorities with the 
larger interagency effort. The realigned strategic planning 
effort, combined with the improvements in the review process 
recommended by the National Academy of Sciences, is intended to 
set Sea Grant on a more strategic course for the future.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\U.S. Ocean Action Plan: The Bush Administration's Response to 
the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. December 17, 2004. Council on 
Environmental Quality, Washington, DC. 39 pp. http://
www.oceans.ceq.gov.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Funding for the Sea Grant Program has not kept pace with 
the growing needs of our coastal communities. With the costs of 
research and education rising, the near flat funding of Sea 
Grant during the last few years has forced programs to reduce a 
number of education and outreach activities, leaving numerous 
high-quality research and outreach projects unsupported. These 
growing needs juxtaposed with the current budgetary landscape 
underpin the reasonable and justifiable increases in authorized 
appropriations reflected in H.R. 5618.
    The National Sea Grant College Program has established an 
impressive record over the course of its 42-year history. H.R. 
5618 builds on the experience of the Sea Grant Association, the 
Review Panel, NSGO, and Sea Grant's national network of 
stakeholders to strengthen this important extramural marine 
science and outreach program.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    The Energy and Environment Subcommittee held a hearing in 
the 110th Congress on May 21, 2008 to hear testimony on H.R. 
5618, from the following witnesses:
           Mr. Craig McLean, Deputy Assistant 
        Administrator for Programs and Administration, National 
        Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Oceanic and 
        Atmospheric Research
           Mr. Paul S. Anderson, President, Sea Grant 
        Association and Director, Maine Sea Grant College 
        Program
           Mr. M. Richard DeVoe, Executive Director, 
        South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium
           Mr. Patrick Riley, General Manager, Western 
        Seafood, Freeport, TX
    The hearing focused on the legislation to reauthorize the 
National Sea Grant Program through fiscal year 2014. The 
hearing also examined the program's major accomplishments, 
program activities, and the effectiveness of the extension and 
outreach aspects of program development.
    Mr. Craig McLean discussed the mission and importance of 
the Sea Grant Program, future plans for the program, some 
programmatic issues, and issues the administration would like 
to see addressed in the reauthorization. Mr. Paul Anderson 
represented the institutions through the association of the 32 
Sea Grant Programs from around the nation. He discussed the 
importance of supporting the National Sea Grant College 
Program, as well as the program's activities, accomplishments, 
and its contribution to NOAA's mission. Mr. Anderson also 
offered recommendations on how to strengthen the research, 
education and training components of the program. Mr. M. 
Richard DeVoe discussed the South Carolina Sea Grant program 
and its relationship to the overall Sea Grant program and 
summarized his key recommendations and expressed strong support 
for H.R. 5618. Mr. Patrick Riley represented the partners and 
stakeholders of the National Sea Grant College Program and he 
discussed the use of information generated through the programs 
extension and outreach efforts, and commented on its 
usefulness. Mr. Riley expressed his support for the Sea Grant 
program and for the reauthorization bill.

                    V. Summary of Committee Actions

    On March 13, 2008, Rep. Madeleine Bordallo of Guam, for 
herself and Rep. Faleomavaega, Rep. Saxton, Rep. Abercrombie, 
Rep. Gilchrest, and Rep. Farr introduced H.R. 5618, the 
National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008, 
which was referred to the Committee on Natural Resources and 
subsequently to the Committee on Science and Technology.
    In the 110th Congress, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment met to consider H.R. 5618 as reported from the 
Committee on Natural Resources on June 18, 2008. Mr. Baird 
moved that the Subcommittee favorably report the bill, H.R. 
5618, to the Full Committee on Science and Technology without 
amendment. The motion was agreed to by a voice vote.
    The Committee on Science and Technology met on June 25, 
2008, to consider H.R. 5618 as reported by the Subcommittee and 
to consider the following amendments to the bill:
    An amendment offered by Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) 
to expand the functions of the Director of the National Sea 
Grant College Program to encourage the Sea Grant program to 
collaborate with Minority Serving Institutions in the 
atmospheric, oceanic, and environmental science research areas 
to improve the retention of the students and faculty from 
Minority Serving Institutions and increase the number of 
students graduating in these science fields.
    The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    An amendment offered by Rep. W. Todd Akin (R-MO) to amend 
Section 5 of the bill to add a new program element to the 
National Sea Grant College Program to require support for 
methods to minimize conflicts and delays in the expedited 
production of ocean and coastal energy resources including 
those associated with siting refineries in coastal areas.
    A second degree amendment was offered to Mr. Akin's 
amendment by Rep. Bartlett, Rep. Wu, and Rep. Akin to amend 
Section 5 of the bill to add a new program element to the 
National Sea Grant College Program to require support for 
development of methods to explore the environmental and 
scientific considerations, including provision of 
scientifically sound data, in connection with the production of 
ocean and coastal energy resources, including the siting of 
energy-related facilities in the coastal zone.
    The second degree amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    The amendment, as amended, was adopted by voice vote.
    An amendment offered by Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-GA) that would 
require the Director of the Sea Grant Program to advise the 
Secretary of Commerce on ways to incorporate programs and 
research on the expedited production of ocean and coastal 
energy resources into the curriculum of the program.
    The amendment failed by a recorded vote.
    Rep. Gingrey moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 5618, to the House, as amended. The motion was 
agreed to by a voice vote.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions as Reported

    H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College Program Act of 
2008, amends current law to expand the scope and purposes of 
the National Sea Grant College Program. The bill expands the 
responsibilities of the Sea Grant Review Panel and renames this 
panel the ``National Sea Grant Advisory Board.'' The bill 
directs the Board to provide advice to the Secretary of 
Commerce to ensure Sea Grant activities are consistent with and 
supportive of national objectives. In addition, the bill 
increases the percentage of funds exempt from the non-federal 
match requirement from the current 1 percent to 5 percent. The 
bill also amends the Sea Grant program performance review 
standards. H.R. 5618 replaces the ranking system review 
requirements adopted as part of the 2002 amendments with NRC-
recommended measures for program review, combined with program 
planning requirements.
    In addition the bill amends the duties of the Director of 
the Sea Grant Program to include encouragement of cooperation 
and research collaborations with Minority Serving Institutions. 
The bill adds a new program element to the National Sea Grant 
College Program to require support for development of methods 
to explore the environmental and scientific considerations, 
including provision of scientifically sound data, in connection 
with the production of ocean and coastal energy resources, 
including the siting of energy-related facilities in the 
coastal zone.
    Authorized funding levels would increase incrementally from 
$66 million to $100 million for the period between Fiscal Year 
2009 through Fiscal Year 2014.

        VII. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill as Reported


Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 entitles the legislation as the ``National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008.''

Section 2. References

    Section 2 clarifies that all amendment references in the 
legislation are made to the National Sea Grant College Program 
Act (33 U.S.C. 1121 et seq.).

Section 3. Findings and purposes

    Section 3 amplifies the extension aspects of the Sea Grant 
program and cites the relevance of the National Ocean Research 
Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy to the Sea Grant 
Program.

Section 4. Definitions

    Section 4 defines key terms included within the text of the 
proposed legislation, including ``regional research and 
information plan'' and ``National Ocean Research Priorities 
Plan and Implementation Strategy'' where they appear in the 
bill.

Section 5. National Sea Grant College Program, generally

    Section 5 amends the Program Elements to expand Sea Grant 
programs to include regional and national projects among Sea 
Grant institutions; to add regional strategic investments in 
projects undertaken through sea grant projects; and for the 
program to support development of methods to explore the 
environmental and scientific considerations in connection with 
the production of ocean and coastal energy resources, including 
the siting of energy-related facilities in the coastal zone. 
Section 5 also augments the functions of the Director of the 
National Sea Grant College Program to include encouragement of 
collaborations among participating colleges and institutions in 
the Sea Grant Program and encouraging collaborations with 
Minority Serving Institutions. This section also strikes the 
sea grant program performance ranking system for allocating 
additional resources on the basis of performance.

Section 6. Program or project grants and contracts

    Section 6 exempts the Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy 
Fellowship Program from having to match grant awards in order 
to achieve parity between fellows placed in Congressional 
offices with those fellows placed in federal agencies.
    This section also increases the percentage of funds exempt 
from the non-federal match requirement from the current 1 
percent to 5 percent.

Section 7. Extension services by Sea Grant colleges and Sea Grant 
        institutes

    Section 7 clarifies that one of the requirements for 
designation includes an extension program (as opposed to an 
``advisory service'').

Section 8. Technical Correction relating to fellowships

    Section 8 updates the statutory language requiring a report 
every two years on efforts to include minority and economically 
disadvantaged students.

Section 9. National Sea Grant Advisory Board

    Section 9 expands the responsibilities of the National Sea 
Grant Review Panel, renaming the panel as the ``National Sea 
Grant Advisory Board'' to more appropriately and accurately 
describe its purpose and function.

Section 10. Authorization of appropriations

    Section 10 increases authorized funding levels from $66 
million to $100 million for the period between Fiscal Year 2009 
through Fiscal Year 2014.

                         VIII. Committee Views

    It is the view of the Committee that the National Sea Grant 
College program plays an essential role in promoting knowledge-
based management of our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes 
resources. The Committee strongly supports the education, 
research, and extension missions of Sea Grant and believes this 
partnership between federal and state governments continues to 
provide many benefits to the nation. The Committee believes The 
National Sea Grant College Program has established an 
impressive record over the course of its 42-year history.
    The Committee is aware that many Sea Grant programs address 
issues of local as well as national concern. In the case of 
local Sea Grant projects within states, the general match 
requirement is appropriate. The Committee recognizes the 
concern of the Sea Grant community that the match requirement 
may constrain the ability of the Sea Grant Program to 
participate in joint competitive programs with other NOAA 
offices or other federal agencies because of the fact that 
incoming proposals for Sea Grant funding require a match. Thus, 
the Committee believes increasing the percentage of funds 
exempt from the non-federal match requirement from the current 
1 percent to 5 percent will alleviate this constraint.
    The Committee recognizes the ranking system review 
requirements adopted as part of the Sea Grant 2002 amendments 
created some disincentives for Sea Grant institutions to work 
cooperatively or form partnerships. The Committee recognizes 
the implementation of the National Academies' recommended 
measures for program review, combined with improved planning 
may provide a better mechanism to achieve continuous program 
improvement.
    The Committee believes there are many potential benefits 
that could be gained through greater collaboration between the 
Sea Grant colleges and institutions and Minority Serving 
Institutions. The Committee encourages the Sea Grant Program to 
adopt recommendations from the third national conference held 
by NOAA in conjunction with the Historical Black Colleges and 
Universities and Minority Serving Institutions outlined in the 
report: Expanding Opportunities in Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Sciences III.\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Jearld, A., Jr., and D. Peloquin, compilers. 2005. Expanding 
Opportunities in Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences III: Proceedings of 
the Third National Conference to Strengthen the Links among HBMSCUs, 
NOAA, Business, and Graduate Studies in Marine and Atmospheric 
Sciences, Held at Jackson State University, Jackson, 8MS. April 1-3, 
2001. Northeast Fisheries Science Center Reference Document 05-11.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Committee is aware that the needs for information, 
training, technology and management options of our coastal 
communities have increased, and that the funding for the Sea 
Grant program to support these needs has not been adequate. The 
Committee is also aware that the near flat funding of Sea Grant 
during the last few years has forced programs to reduce a 
number of education and outreach activities, leaving numerous 
high-quality research and outreach projects unsupported. The 
Committee supports modest increases of funding for the Sea 
Grant Program and H.R. 5618 reflects this support through the 
increased authorized funding levels for the Program of $66 
million to $100 million for the period between Fiscal Year 2009 
through Fiscal Year 2014.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section XI of this report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 5618 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
5618 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section XI of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate


H.R. 5618--National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008

    Summary: H.R. 5618 would authorize funding for the national 
sea grant program, which is administered by the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Assuming 
appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO estimates that 
spending for the program from those appropriations would total 
$316 million over the 2009-2013 period. An additional $182 
million would be spent after 2013, including $100 million 
authorized to be appropriated for 2014. Enacting H.R. 5618 
would not affect direct spending or revenues.
    H.R. 5618 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 5618 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 300 
(natural resources and environment).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
                                                                2009    2010    2011    2012    2013   2009-2013
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level..........................................      66      73      80      86      93       398
Estimated Outlays............................................      20      55      74      80      87       316
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: H.R. 5618 would authorize the 
appropriation of $498 million, including $398 million over the 
2009-2013 period and $100 million for fiscal year 2014, for the 
national sea grant program. Those amounts are used by NOAA for 
grants, fellowships, and related administrative functions under 
the program. For this estimate, CBO assumes that all amounts 
authorized by H.R. 5618 will be appropriated near the start of 
each fiscal year and that outlays will follow historical 
spending patterns for the sea grants program. In 2008, $57 
million was appropriated for this program.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 5618 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments. The bill would benefit public universities 
by reauthorizing the national sea grant college program, which 
provides grants to improve marine resource conservation, 
management, and utilization. Any costs state, local, or tribal 
governments might incur, including matching funds, would result 
from complying with conditions of aid.
    Previous estimate: On May 6, 2008, CBO transmitted a cost 
estimate for H.R. 5618 as ordered reported by the House 
Committee on Natural Resources on April 30, 2008. The two 
versions of the legislation are similar and the estimated costs 
are the same.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Cost: Tyler Kruzich; Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Neil Hood; Impact on 
the Private Sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Assistant Director 
for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 5618 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House Rule XIII, the goal of 
H.R. 5618 is to reauthorize and amend the national sea grant 
college program act.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 5618.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 5618 does not establish nor authorize the 
establishment of any advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 5618 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. Earmark Identification

    H.R. 5618 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of rule XXI.

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

       XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

                 NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM ACT

TITLE II--NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 202. DECLARATION OF POLICY.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress finds and declares the following:
          (1) The national interest requires a strategy to--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  [(D) encourage the development of forecast 
                and analysis systems for coastal hazards;]
                  (D) encourage the development of preparation, 
                forecast, analysis, mitigation, response, and 
                recovery systems for coastal hazards;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (2) Investment in a strong [program of research, 
        education,] program of integrated research, education, 
        extension, training, technology transfer, and public 
        service is essential for this strategy.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          [(6) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration, through the national sea grant college 
        program, offers the most suitable locus and means for 
        such commitment and involvement through the promotion 
        of activities that will result in greater such 
        understanding, assessment, development, utilization, 
        and conservation. The most cost-effective way to 
        promote such activities is through continued and 
        increased Federal support of the establishment, 
        development, and operation of programs and projects by 
        sea grant colleges, sea grant institutes, and other 
        institutions, including strong collaborations between 
        Administration scientists and scientists at academic 
        institutions.]
          (6) The National Ocean Research Priorities Plan and 
        Implementation Strategy issued by the National Science 
        and Technology Council's Joint Subcommittee on Ocean 
        Science and Technology on January 26, 2007, identifies 
        research priorities for compelling areas of interaction 
        between society and the ocean, and calls for the 
        engagement of a broad array of ocean science sectors 
        (government, academia, industry, and non-government 
        entities) to address the areas of greatest research 
        need and opportunity.
          (7) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration, through the national sea grant college 
        program, offers the most suitable locus and means for 
        such commitment and engagement through the promotion of 
        activities that will result in greater such 
        understanding, assessment, development, utilization, 
        and conservation. The most cost-effective way to 
        promote such activities is through continued and 
        increased Federal support of the establishment, 
        development, and operation of programs and projects by 
        sea grant colleges, sea grant institutes, and other 
        institutions, including strong collaborations between 
        Administration scientists and research and outreach 
        personnel at academic institutions.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Purpose.--It is the purpose of the Congress to achieve 
the objective of this title by extending and strengthening the 
national sea grant program, initially established in 1966, [to 
promote research, education, training, and advisory service 
activities] to promote integrated research, education, 
training, and extension activities in fields related to ocean, 
coastal, and Great Lakes resources.

SEC. 203. DEFINITIONS.

  As used in this title--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          [(9) The term ``panel'' means the sea grant review 
        panel established under section 209.]
          (9) The term ``Board'' means the National Sea Grant 
        Advisory Board established under section 209.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (11) The term ``project'' means any individually 
        described activity in a field related to ocean, 
        coastal, and Great Lakes resources involving research, 
        education, training, or [advisory services] extension 
        services administered by a person with expertise in 
        such a field.
          (12) The term ``sea grant college'' means any 
        institution, or any association or alliance of two or 
        more such institutions, designated as such by the 
        Secretary under section 207 [(33 U.S.C. 1126)] of this 
        Act.
          (13) The term ``sea grant institute'' means any 
        institution, or any association or alliance of two or 
        more such institutions, designated as such by the 
        Secretary under section 207 [(33 U.S.C. 1126)] of this 
        Act.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (17) The term ``regional research and information 
        plan'' means a plan developed by one or more sea grant 
        colleges or sea grant institutes that identifies 
        regional priorities to implement the National Ocean 
        Research Priorities Plan and Implementation Strategy.
          (18) The term ``National Ocean Research Priorities 
        Plan and Implementation Strategy'' means such plan and 
        strategy issued by the National Science and Technology 
        Council's Joint Subcommittee on Ocean Science and 
        Technology on January 26, 2007.

SEC. 204. NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM.

  (a) * * *
  (b) Program Elements.--The national sea grant college program 
shall consist of the financial assistance and other activities 
authorized in this title, and shall provide support for the 
following elements--
          [(1) sea grant programs which comprise a national sea 
        grant college program network, including international 
        projects conducted within such programs;
          [(2) administration of the national sea grant college 
        program and this title by the national sea grant 
        office, the Administration, and the panel;]
          (1) sea grant programs that comprise a national sea 
        grant college program network, including international 
        projects conducted within such programs and regional 
        and national projects conducted among such programs;
          (2) administration of the national sea grant college 
        program and this title by the national sea grant office 
        and the Administration;
          (3) the fellowship program under section 208; [and]
          [(4) any national strategic investments in fields 
        relating to ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources 
        developed with the approval of the panel, the sea grant 
        colleges, and the sea grant institutes.]
          (4) any regional or national strategic investments in 
        fields relating to ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes 
        resources developed in consultation with the board and 
        with the approval of the sea grant colleges and the sea 
        grant institutes; and
          (5) methods for the national sea grant college 
        program to explore the environmental and scientific 
        considerations, including providing scientifically 
        sound data, relative to the production of ocean and 
        coastal offshore petroleum, natural gas, geothermal, 
        wind, and ocean thermal energy resources, including the 
        siting of energy related facilities in the coastal 
        zone.
  (c) Responsibilities of the Secretary.--
          (1) The Secretary, in consultation with the [panel] 
        Board, sea grant colleges, and sea grant institutes, 
        shall develop at least every 4 years a strategic plan 
        that establishes priorities for the national sea grant 
        college program, provides an appropriately balanced 
        response to local, regional, and national needs, and is 
        reflective of integration with the relevant portions of 
        the strategic plans of the Department of Commerce and 
        of the Administration.
          (2) [Within 6 months of the date of enactment of the 
        National Sea Grant College Program Reauthorization Act 
        of 1998, the] The Secretary, in consultation with the 
        [panel] Board, sea grant colleges, and sea grant 
        institutes, shall establish guidelines related to the 
        activities and responsibilities of sea grant colleges 
        and sea grant institutes. Such guidelines shall include 
        requirements for the conduct of merit review by the sea 
        grant colleges and sea grant institutes of proposals 
        for grants and contracts to be awarded under section 
        205, providing, at a minimum, for standardized 
        documentation of such proposals and peer review of all 
        research projects.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (8) The Board may establish such subcommittees as are 
        reasonably necessary to carry out its duties under 
        subsection (b). Such subcommittees may include 
        individuals who are not Board members.
  (d) Director of the National Sea Grant College Program.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Subject to the supervision of the Secretary, the 
        Director shall administer the national sea grant 
        college program and oversee the operation of the 
        national sea grant office. In addition to any other 
        duty prescribed by law or assigned by the Secretary, 
        the Director shall--
                  (A) facilitate and coordinate the development 
                of a [long-range] strategic plan under 
                subsection (c)(1);

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) With respect to sea grant colleges and sea grant 
        institutes, the Director shall--
                  (A)[(i) evaluate] evaluate and assess the 
                performance of the programs of sea grant 
                colleges and sea grant institutes, using the 
                priorities, guidelines, and qualifications 
                established by the Secretary under subsection 
                (c), and determine which of the programs are 
                the best managed and carry out the highest 
                quality research, education, extension, and 
                training [activities; and] activities;
                  [(ii) rate the programs according to their 
                relative performance (as determined under 
                clause (i)) into no less than 5 categories, 
                with each of the 2 best-performing categories 
                containing no more than 25 percent of the 
                programs;]
                  (B) subject to the availability of 
                appropriations, allocate funding among sea 
                grant colleges and sea grant institutes so as 
                to--
                          (i) promote healthy competition among 
                        sea grant colleges and institutes;
                          (ii) encourage collaborations among 
                        sea grant colleges and sea grant 
                        institutes to address regional and 
                        national priorities established under 
                        subsection (c)(1);
                          (iii) encourage cooperation with 
                        Minority Serving Institutions--
                                  (I) to enhance collaborative 
                                research opportunities for 
                                faculty and students in the 
                                areas of atmospheric, oceanic, 
                                and environmental sciences, and 
                                remote sensing;
                                  (II) to improve opportunities 
                                for, and retention of, students 
                                and faculty from Minority 
                                Serving Institutions in the 
                                NOAA related sciences; and
                                  (III) to increase the number 
                                of such students graduating in 
                                NOAA science areas;
                          [(ii) encourage] (iv) ensuring 
                        successful implementation of sea grant 
                        programs;
                          [(iii)] (v) to the maximum extent 
                        consistent with other provisions of 
                        this Act, provide a stable base of 
                        funding for sea grant colleges and 
                        institutes; and
                          [(iv)] (vi) encourage and promote 
                        coordination and cooperation between 
                        the research, education, and outreach 
                        programs of the Administration and 
                        those of academic institutions; and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 205. CONTRACTS AND GRANTS.

  (a) In General.--The Secretary may make grants and enter into 
contracts under this subsection to assist any sea grant program 
or project if the Secretary finds that such program or project 
will--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

The total amount paid pursuant to any such grant or contract 
may equal 66\2/3\ percent, or any lesser percent, of the total 
cost of the sea grant program or project involved; except that 
this limitation shall not apply in the case of grants or 
contracts paid for with funds accepted by the Secretary under 
section 204(c)(4)(F) or that are appropriated under section 
208(b).
  (b) Special Grants.--The Secretary may make special grants 
under this subsection to implement the objective set forth in 
section 202(b). The amount of any such grant may equal 100 
percent, or any lesser percent, of the total cost of the 
project involved. No grant may be made under this subsection 
unless the Secretary finds that--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) the same or equivalent benefit cannot be obtained 
        through the award of a contract or grant under 
        subsection (a).
[The total amount which may be provided for grants under this 
subsection during any fiscal year shall not exceed an amount 
equal to 1 percent of the total funds appropriated for such 
year pursuant to section 212.]
The total amount that may be provided for grants under this 
subsection during any fiscal year shall not exceed an amount 
equal to 5 percent of the total funds appropriated for such 
year under section 212.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 207. SEA GRANT COLLEGES AND SEA GRANT INSTITUTES.

  (a) Designation.--
          (1) A sea grant college or sea grant institute shall 
        meet the following qualifications--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (F) meet such other qualifications as the 
                Secretary, in consultation with the [panel] 
                Board, considers necessary or appropriate.
          (2) The Secretary may designate an institution, or an 
        association or alliance of two or more such 
        institutions, as a sea grant college if the 
        institution, association, or alliance--
                  (A) * * *
                  (B) maintains a program of research, 
                [advisory services] extension services, 
                training, and education in fields related to 
                ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources.
          (3) The Secretary may designate an institution, or an 
        association or alliance of two or more such 
        institutions, as a sea grant institute if the 
        institution, association, or alliance--
                  (A) * * *
                  (B) maintains a program which includes, at a 
                minimum, research and [advisory services] 
                extension services.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (d) Duties.--Subject to any regulations prescribed or 
guidelines established by the Secretary, it shall be the 
responsibility of each sea grant college and sea grant 
institute--
          (1) to develop and implement, in consultation with 
        the Secretary and the [panel] Board, a program that is 
        consistent with the guidelines and priorities 
        established under section 204(c); and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 208. FELLOWSHIPS.

  (a) In General.--To carry out the educational and training 
objectives of this Act, the Secretary shall support a program 
of fellowships for qualified individuals at the graduate and 
post-graduate level. The fellowships shall be related to ocean, 
coastal, and Great Lakes resources and awarded pursuant to 
guidelines established by the Secretary. The Secretary shall 
strive to ensure equal access for minority and economically 
disadvantaged students to the program carried out under this 
subsection. [Not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of the National Sea Grant College Program Act 
Amendments of 2002, and every 2 years thereafter,] Every 2 
years, the Secretary shall submit a report to the Congress 
describing the efforts by the Secretary to ensure equal access 
for minority and economically disadvantaged students to the 
program carried out under this subsection, and the results of 
such efforts.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 209. SEA GRANT REVIEW PANEL.

  [(a) Establishment.--There shall be established an 
independent committee to be known as the sea grant review 
panel.
  [(b) Duties.--The Panel shall advise the Secretary and the 
Director concerning--
          [(1) applications or proposals for, and performance 
        under, grants and contracts awarded under section 205 ;
          [(2) the sea grant fellowship program;
          [(3) the designation and operation of sea grant 
        colleges and sea grant institutes, and the operation of 
        sea grant programs;
          [(4) the formulation and application of the planning 
        guidelines and priorities under section 204(a) and 
        (c)(1); and
          [(5) such other matters as the Secretary refers to 
        the panel for review and advice.
The Secretary shall make available to the panel such 
information, personnel, and administrative services and 
assistance as it may reasonably require to carry out its 
duties.]

SEC. 209. NATIONAL SEA GRANT ADVISORY BOARD.

  (a) Establishment.--There shall be an independent committee 
to be known as the National Sea Grant Advisory Board.
  (b) Duties.--
          (1) In general.--The Board shall advise the Secretary 
        and the Director concerning--
                  (A) strategies for utilizing the sea grant 
                college program to address the Nation's highest 
                priorities regarding the understanding, 
                assessment, development, utilization, and 
                conservation of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes 
                resources;
                  (B) the designation of sea grant colleges and 
                sea grant institutes; and
                  (C) such other matters as the Secretary 
                refers to the Board for review and advice.
          (2) Biennial report.--The Board shall report to the 
        Congress every two years on the state of the national 
        sea grant college program. The Board shall indicate in 
        each such report the progress made toward meeting the 
        priorities identified in the strategic plan in effect 
        under section 204(c). The Secretary shall make 
        available to the Board such information, personnel, and 
        administrative services and assistance as it may 
        reasonably require to carry out its duties under this 
        title.
  (c) Membership, Terms, and Powers.--(1) The [panel] Board 
shall consist of 15 voting members who shall be appointed by 
the Secretary. The Director and a director of a sea grant 
program who is elected by the various directors of sea grant 
programs shall serve as nonvoting members of the [panel] Board. 
Not less than 8 of the voting members of the [panel] Board 
shall be individuals who, by reason of knowledge, experience, 
or training, are especially qualified in one or more of the 
disciplines and fields included in marine science. The other 
voting members shall be individuals who, by reason of 
knowledge, experience, or training, are especially qualified 
in, or representative of, education, marine affairs and 
resource management, extension services, State government, 
industry, economics, planning, or any other activity which is 
appropriate to, and important for, any effort to enhance the 
understanding, assessment, development, utilization, or 
conservation of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources. No 
individual is eligible to be a voting member of the [panel] 
Board if the individual is (A) the director of a sea grant 
college or sea grant institute; (B) an applicant for, or 
beneficiary (as determined by the Secretary) of, any grant or 
contract under section 205; or (C) a full-time officer of 
employee of the United States.
  (2) The term of office of a voting member of the [panel] 
Board shall be 3 years for a member appointed before the date 
of enactment of the National Sea Grant College Program Act 
Amendments of 2002, and 4 years for a member appointed or 
reappointed after the date of enactment of the National Sea 
Grant College Program Act Amendments of 2002. The Director may 
extend the term of office of a voting member of the [panel] 
Board appointed before the date of enactment of the National 
Sea Grant College Program Act Amendments of 2002 by up to 1 
year. At least once each year, the Secretary shall publish a 
notice in the Federal Register soliciting nominations for 
membership on the [panel] Board.
  (3) Any individual appointed to a partial or full term may be 
reappointed for one addition full term. [A voting member may 
serve after the date of the expiration of the term of office 
for which appointed until his or her successor has taken 
office.] The Director may extend the term of office of a voting 
member of the Board once by up to 1 year.
  (4) The [panel] Board shall select one voting member to serve 
as the Chairman and another voting member to serve as the Vice 
Chairman. The Vice Chairman shall act as Chairman in the 
absence or incapacity of the Chairman.
  (5) Voting members of the [panel] Board shall--
          (A) receive compensation at a rate established by the 
        Secretary, not to exceed the maximum daily rate payable 
        under section 5376 of title 5, United States Code, when 
        actually engaged in the performance of duties for such 
        [panel] Board; and
          (B) be reimbursed for actual and reasonable expenses 
        incurred in the performance of such duties.
  (6) The [panel] Board shall meet on a biannual basis and, at 
any other time, at the call of the Chairman or upon the request 
of a majority of the voting members or of the Director.
  (7) The [panel] Board may exercise such powers as are 
reasonably necessary in order to carry out its duties under 
subsection (b).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 212. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  [(a) Authorization.--
          [(1) In general.--There are authorized to be 
        appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this title--
                  [(A) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2003;
                  [(B) $75,000,000 for fiscal year 2004;
                  [(C) $77,500,000 for fiscal year 2005;
                  [(D) $80,000,000 for fiscal year 2006;
                  [(E) $82,500,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
                  [(F) $85,000,000 for fiscal year 2008.
          [(2) Priority activities.--In addition to the amounts 
        authorized under paragraph (1), there are authorized to 
        be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2003 through 
        2008--
                  [(A) $5,000,000 for competitive grants for 
                university research on the biology and control 
                of zebra mussels and other important aquatic 
                nonnative species;
                  [(B) $5,000,000 for competitive grants for 
                university research on oyster diseases, oyster 
                restoration, and oyster-related human health 
                risks;
                  [(C) $5,000,000 for competitive grants for 
                university research on the biology, prevention, 
                and forecasting of harmful algal blooms, 
                including Pfiesteria piscicida; and
                  [(D) $3,000,000 for competitive grants for 
                fishery extension activities conducted by sea 
                grant colleges or sea grant institutes to 
                enhance, and not supplant, existing core 
                program funding.]
  (a) Authorization.--There are authorized to be appropriated 
to the Secretary to carry out this title--
          (1) $66,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;
          (2) $72,800,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (3) $79,600,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (4) $86,400,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (5) $93,200,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (6) $100,000,000 for fiscal year 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(c) Distribution of Funds.--In any fiscal year in which the 
appropriations made under subsection (a)(1) exceed the amounts 
appropriated for fiscal year 2003 for the purposes described in 
such subsection, the Secretary shall distribute any excess 
amounts (except amounts used for the administration of the sea 
grant program) to any combination of the following:
          [(1) sea grant programs, according to their rating 
        under section 204(d)(3)(A);
          [(2) national strategic investments authorized under 
        section 204(b)(4);
          [(3) a college, university, institution, association, 
        or alliance for activities that are necessary for it to 
        be designated as a sea grant college or sea grant 
        institute; and
          [(4) a sea grant college or sea grant institute 
        designated after the date of enactment of the National 
        Sea Grant College Program Act Amendments of 2002 but 
        not yet evaluated under section 204(d)(3)(A).]
  [(d)] (c) Availability of Sums.--Sums appropriated pursuant 
to this section shall remain available until expended.
  [(e)] (d) Reversion of Unobligated Amounts.--The amount of 
any grant, or portion of a grant, made to a person under any 
section of this Act that is not obligated by that person during 
the first fiscal year for which it was authorized to be 
obligated or during the next fiscal year thereafter shall 
revert to the Secretary. The Secretary shall add that reverted 
amount to the funds available for grants under the section for 
which the reverted amount was originally made available.
                              ----------                              


                SECTION 307 OF THE ACT OF MARCH 9, 1992

                          (Public Law 102-251)

   AN ACT to provide for the designation of the Flower Garden Banks 
                       National Marine Sanctuary.

                  [NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM

  [Sec. 307. (a) Definitions.--Section 203(6) of the National 
Sea Grant College Program Act (33 U.S.C. 1122(6)) is amended--
          [(1) by striking ``and'' at the end of subparagraph 
        (E);
          [(2) by redesignating subparagraph (F) as 
        subparagraph (G); and
          [(3) by inserting immediately after subparagraph (E) 
        the following new subparagraph:
          [``(F) the areas referred to as eastern special areas 
        in Article 3(1) of the Agreement between the United 
        States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist 
        Republics on the Maritime Boundary, signed June 1, 
        1990; in particular, those areas east of the maritime 
        boundary, as defined in that Agreement, that lie within 
        200 nautical miles of the baselines from which the 
        breadth of the territorial sea of Russia is measured 
        but beyond 200 nautical miles of the baselines from 
        which the breadth of the territorial sea of the United 
        States is measured; and''.
  [(b) International Program.--Section 3(a)(6) of the Sea Grant 
Program Improvement Act of 1976 (33 U.S.C. 1124a(a)(6)) is 
amended by inserting ``and special areas'' immediately after 
``exclusive economic zone''.]

                     XX. Committee Recommendations

    On June 25, 2008, the Committee on Science and Technology 
favorably reported H.R. 5618, as amended, by a voice vote and 
recommended its passage by the House of Representatives.

                         XXI. ADDITIONAL VIEWS

    I applaud Chairman Gordon and Ranking Member Hall as well 
as Energy and Environment Subcommittee Chairman Lampson and 
Ranking Member Inglis for bringing forward H.R. 5618 in a 
bipartisan manner. H.R. 5618 is important legislation that 
improves and expands upon the scope of the National Sea Grant 
College Program in a number of key ways to improve marine 
resource conservation, management, and utilization.
    While I supported favorably reporting this bill to the 
House, I wholeheartedly believe that the Committee missed a 
golden opportunity to improve this bill and address the single 
biggest concern that Americans face on a daily basis: the cost 
of energy. When it was established in 1966, one of the original 
goals of the National Sea Grant College Program was to better 
understand and utilize our oceanic resources as an important 
energy supply; yet I do not feel that H.R. 5618 fully addresses 
this issue.
    Therefore, I offered an amendment that would have brought 
together some of the nation's top academic institutions through 
the National Sea Grant College Program to find ways to expand 
the focus of the energy component of the program in order to 
better utilize our offshore resources for energy production in 
an environmentally sensitive manner. At a time when families 
are paying well over $4.00 for a gallon of regular gas, it is 
long overdue that we utilize every federal component possible 
to put in place the processes to explore American offshore 
energy resources.
    Unfortunately, my amendment failed on a near party-line 
vote. I am disappointed that some Members of the Committee 
chose to put partisan politics above the need to find common-
sense solutions to our nation's energy crisis. Ultimately, it 
is my hope that we will be able to utilize all available 
domestic sources of energy by including offshore research and 
exploration within the National Sea Grant College Program.

                                                      Phil Gingrey.


   XXII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE MARKUP BY THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND 
   ENVIRONMENT ON H.R. 5618, THE NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM 
                         AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2007

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 2008

                  House of Representatives,
            Subcommittee on Energy and Environment,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 10:05 a.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Nick 
Lampson [Chairman of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chairman Lampson. Good morning. This Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment will come to order. Pursuant to notice, the 
Subcommittee on Energy and Environment meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 4174, Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act of 2007, H.R. 5618, National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008, and a bill to 
establish a research, development, demonstration and commercial 
application program to promote research of appropriate 
technologies for heavy-duty plug-in hybrid vehicles and for 
other purposes.
    We will now proceed with the markup. Beginning with the 
opening statements, I will begin.
    Today the Subcommittee will consider three good bills.
    The first is H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act. This bill establishes an 
interagency ocean acidification research and monitoring 
program. H.R. 4174 was introduced by our colleague from Maine, 
Congressman Tom Allen, and is sponsored by a Member of this 
Subcommittee, Mr. Baird.
    On June 5th we heard from a panel of experts on ocean and 
atmospheric sciences testify in strong support of this 
legislation. The bill authorizes the formation of an 
interagency research and monitoring program to better 
understand ocean acidification and its potential impacts on 
marine organisms and marine ecosystems.
    The second bill we will is consider is H.R. 5618, the 
National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act. H.R. 5618 
was introduced by Congresswoman Bordallo, Chair of the 
Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Fisheries, 
Wildlife, and Oceans. This bill reauthorizes and amends the 
National Sea Grant College Program Act to implement changes in 
the program recommended by the National Academies of Science.
    The National Sea Grant College Program was last 
reauthorized in 2002. It is a partnership between states and 
the Federal Government to promote understanding, conservation, 
and management of our ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes 
resources. Sea Grants research, education, and extension 
programs have been very effective in training future scientists 
and resource managers, generating information to support sound 
resource management, and delivering applied research results to 
the people who rely on our coastal areas and Great Lakes for 
their livelihoods.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider draft legislation 
authored by Mr. Sensenbrenner, Ranking Member of the 
Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee, to enhance the 
Department of Energy's research program in heavy-duty hybrid 
trucks.
    Mr. Sensenbrenner does not sit on this subcommittee, and 
thus will not be joining us today. I understand that the 
manager's amendment has only one small technical change that 
needs to be made prior to introduction. This bill addresses a 
narrow segment of the automobile market with a tremendous 
potential impact. We heard in a Subcommittee hearing last week 
from witnesses who described the substantial oil savings and 
emissions reductions to be had in medium-to-heavy hybrid 
trucks, as well as the benefit to the whole domestic automotive 
sector from the invaluable lessons learned in designing and 
manufacturing these systems.
    I believe this is a very important piece of legislation in 
the large and complex puzzle that is our transportation sector, 
and I look forward to moving this bill through Committee and on 
to the Floor for consideration by the House.
    I urge the support of all Members of the Subcommittee for 
the three bills we will consider today. I look forward to 
working with all of you to further improve these important 
bills as we move to their consideration by the Full Committee.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Lampson follows:]
              Prepared Statement of Chairman Nick Lampson
    Good morning. Today the Subcommittee will consider three bills. The 
first is H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and 
Monitoring Act.
    This bill establishes an interagency ocean acidification research 
and monitoring program. H.R. 4174 was introduced by our colleague from 
Maine, Congressman Tom Allen, and is sponsored by a Member of this 
subcommittee, Mr. Baird.
    On June 5th we heard from a panel of experts on ocean and 
atmospheric sciences testify in strong support of this legislation. The 
bill authorizes the formation of an interagency research and monitoring 
program to better understand ocean acidification and its potential 
impacts on marine organisms and marine ecosystems.
    The second bill we will is consider is H.R. 5618, the National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act.
    H.R. 5618 was introduced by Congresswoman Bordallo, Chair of the 
Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and 
Oceans.
    This bill reauthorizes and amends the National Sea Grant College 
Program Act to implement changes in the program recommended by the 
National Academy of Sciences.
    The National Sea Grant College Program was last reauthorized in 
2002. It is a partnership between states and the Federal Government to 
promote the understanding, conservation, and management of our ocean, 
coastal, and Great Lakes resources. Sea Grants research, education, and 
extension programs have been very effective in training future 
scientists and resource managers, generating information to support 
sound resource management, and delivering applied research results to 
the people who rely on our coastal areas and Great Lakes for their 
livelihoods.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider draft legislation authored 
by Mr. Sensenbrenner, Ranking Member of the Investigations and 
Oversight Subcommittee, to enhance the Department of Energy's research 
program in heavy-duty hybrid trucks.
    Mr. Sensenbrenner does not sit on this subcommittee, and thus will 
not be joining us today. I understand that the manager's amendment has 
only one small technical change that needs to be made prior to 
introduction, and that we will take up any additional amendments in a 
Full Committee markup.
    This bill addresses a narrow segment of the automobile market with 
a tremendous potential impact. We heard in a Subcommittee hearing last 
week from witnesses who described the substantial oil savings and 
emissions reductions to be had in medium-to-heavy hybrid trucks, as 
well as the benefit to the whole domestic automotive sector from the 
invaluable lessons learned in designing and manufacturing these 
systems.
    I believe this is a very important piece of legislation in the 
large and complex puzzle that is our transportation sector. I look 
forward to moving this bill through Committee and on to the Floor for 
consideration by the House.
    I urge the support of all Members of the Subcommittee for the three 
bills we will consider today. I look forward to working with all of you 
to further improve these important bills as we move to their 
consideration by the Full Committee.

    Chairman Lampson. I now recognize Mr. Inglis to present his 
opening remarks.
    Mr. Inglis. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and thank you for 
holding this markup. Today we will consider three bills before 
this Subcommittee. H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act would organize and coordinate 
federal agency efforts to address ocean acidification into a 
comprehensive research, monitoring, and assessment program. Two 
weeks ago, this subcommittee held a hearing in which we 
received several recommended changes from the expert panel of 
witnesses. Representative Baird and I will introduce an 
amendment that acts upon these recommendations. As we move 
forward to Full Committee, I hope that we can further improve 
the international components of this bill and encourage our 
scientists to work with their colleagues overseas.
    Secondly, we will consider H.R. 5618, the National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act. Since its inception in 
1966, the National Sea Grant Program has been a successful 
collaborative effort of the Federal Government, State 
governments, and universities. Under the program, these groups 
work together to understand, develop, and conserve our coastal 
and ocean resources. As we mark up H.R. 5618, our goal should 
be a reauthorization that equips the Sea Grant Program to 
continue providing sound science and management products that 
benefit our coastal regions and conserve our coastal resources.
    Finally, we will consider draft legislation introduced by 
Mr. Sensenbrenner that would steer federal dollars toward 
research, development, and demonstration in the area of 
commercial truck hybrid technologies.
    Thank you again, Mr. Chairman. I look forward to working 
with you to advance this legislation.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Inglis follows:]
            Prepared Statement of Representative Bob Inglis
    Thank you for holding this markup, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we'll consider three bills before this subcommittee. H.R. 
4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act, 
would organize and coordinate federal agency efforts to address ocean 
acidification into a comprehensive research, monitoring and assessment 
program. Two weeks ago, this subcommittee held a hearing in which we 
received several recommended changes from the expert panel of 
witnesses. Rep. Baird and I will introduce an amendment that acts upon 
these recommendations. As we move forward to Full Committee, I hope 
that we can further improve the international components of this bill 
and encourage our scientists to work with their colleagues overseas.
    Secondly, we'll consider H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College 
Program Amendments Act. Since its inception in 1966, the National Sea 
Grant Program has been a successful collaborative effort of the Federal 
Government, State governments, and universities. Under the program, 
these groups work together to understand, develop, and conserve our 
coastal and ocean resources. As we markup H.R. 5618, our goal should be 
a reauthorization that equips the Sea Grant Program to continue 
providing sound science and management products that benefit our 
coastal regions and conserve our coastal resources.
    Finally, we will consider draft legislation introduced by Mr. 
Sensenbrenner that would steer federal dollars toward research, 
development, and demonstration in the area of commercial truck hybrid 
technologies.
    Thank you again, Mr. Chairman, and I look forward to working with 
you to advance this legislation.

    Chairman Lampson. Thank you, Mr. Inglis. Without objection, 
Members may place additional opening statements in the record 
at this point.
    We will now consider H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant 
College Program Amendments Act for 2008.
    I would again like to express my strong support for both 
the Sea Grant Program and Ms. Bordallo's bill, and I now 
recognize Mr. Inglis to present any remarks on the bill.
    Mr. Inglis. I would simply add, Mr. Chairman, that as I 
said in the opening statement, I support the bill and think it 
is--I would urge my colleagues to do likewise.
    Chairman Lampson. Thank you, Mr. Inglis. Does anyone else 
wish to be recognized? I ask unanimous consent that the bill is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point and that 
Members proceed with the amendments in order in the order of 
the roster. Without objection, it is so ordered. Are there any 
amendments? Hearing none, the vote is on the bill, H.R. 5618, 
the National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act for 2008. 
All those in favor say aye, those opposed say no. In the Chair, 
the ayes have it.
    I recognize Mr. Baird to offer a motion.
    Mr. Baird. Mr. Chair, I move that the Subcommittee 
favorably report H.R. 5618 to the Full Committee. Furthermore, 
I move that staff be instructed to prepare the Subcommittee 
legislative report and make necessary technical and conforming 
changes to the bill in accordance with the recommendations of 
the Subcommittee.
    Chairman Lampson. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye, those opposed no. The ayes have it. The bill is 
favorably reported. Without objection, the motion to reconsider 
is laid upon the table. Subcommittee Members may submit 
additional or Minority views on the measure.
    And I want to thank Members for their attendance. This 
concludes our Subcommittee markup. We are adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 10:27 a.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


                 H.R. 5618, Section-by-Section Analysis






                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
               H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College
                     Program Amendments Act of 2008

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE

    Section 1 entitles the legislation as the ``National Sea Grant 
College Program Amendments Act of 2008.''

SECTION 2. REFERENCES

    Section 2 clarifies that all amendment references in the 
legislation are made to the National Sea Grant College Program Act (33 
U.S.C. 1121 et seq.).

SECTION 3. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES

    Section 3 amplifies the extension aspects of the Sea Grant program 
and cites the relevance of the National Ocean Research Priorities Plan 
and Implementation Strategy to the Sea Grant Program.

SECTION 4. DEFINITIONS

    Section 4 defines key terms included within the text of the 
proposed legislation, including `regional research and information 
plan' and `National Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation 
Strategy' where they appear in the bill.

SECTION 5. NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM, GENERALLY

    Section 5 amends the Program Elements to expand Sea Grant programs 
to include regional and national projects among Sea Grant institutions 
and to add regional strategic investments in projects undertaken 
through sea grant projects. Section 5 also augments the functions of 
the Director of the National Sea Grant College Program to include 
encouraging collaborations among Sea Grant colleges and institutions. 
This section also strikes the sea grant program performance ranking 
system for allocating additional resources on the basis of performance.

SECTION 6. PROGRAM OR PROJECT GRANTS AND CONTRACTS

    Section 6 exempts the Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship 
Program from having to match grant awards in order to achieve parity 
between fellows placed in Congressional offices with those fellows 
placed in federal agencies.
    This section also increases the percentage of funds exempt from the 
non-federal match requirement from the current one percent to five 
percent.

SECTION 7.  EXTENSION SERVICES BY SEA GRANT COLLEGES AND SEA GRANT 
                    INSTITUTES

    Section 7 clarifies that one of the requirements for designation 
includes an extension program (as opposed to an ``advisory service'').

SECTION 8. TECHNICAL CORRECTION RELATING TO FELLOWSHIPS

    Section 8 updates the statutory language requiring a report every 
two years on efforts to include minority and economically disadvantaged 
students.

SECTION 9. NATIONAL SEA GRANT ADVISORY BOARD

    Section 9 expands the responsibilities of the National Sea Grant 
Review Panel, renaming the panel as the ``National Sea Grant Advisory 
Board'' to more appropriately and accurately describe its purpose and 
function.

SECTION 10. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

    Section 10 increases authorized funding levels from $66 million to 
$100 million for the period between Fiscal Year 2009 through Fiscal 
Year 2014.


   XXIII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 5618, THE 
       NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM AMENDMENTS ACT OF 2008

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2008

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 11:02 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Gordon. This committee will come to order. The 
first order of business is to introduce our new Member, Mr. 
Carson, to serve on the Committee of Science and Technology. We 
currently have two open Subcommittee spots, on Research and 
Science Education Subcommittee and Investigations and Oversight 
Subcommittee.
    I would like to ask unanimous consent that Mr. Carson be 
elected to those Subcommittees.
    Without objection, so ordered. Congratulations, and welcome 
to the Committee, Mr. Carson. I know you will be a great 
addition.
    We will now proceed with the markup. Today we will be 
marking up two important bills. The first bill we will consider 
is H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College Program Amendments 
Act, and H.R. 5618 was introduced by Delegate Bordallo, Chair 
of the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and Oceans of the 
Natural Resources Committee.
    Our committee shares jurisdiction over the Sea Grant 
College Program with the Resources Committee. Our staff has 
been working closely with them.
    This bill reauthorizes and amends the National Sea Grant 
College Program Act of 2002, to implement changes recommended 
by the National Academies of Science.
    The bill increase the interaction between the National Sea 
Grant Office and the individual programs, improve the 
programmatic performance reviews, and strengthens strategic 
planning for the program.
    This program, created nearly 40 years ago, has matured into 
a state-Federal Government partnership to improve the 
conservation, management, and utilization of our oceans, 
coastal, and Great Lakes resources.
    The research, education, and extension programs of Sea 
Grants have been very effective in training future scientists 
and resource managers, providing education to the general 
public, generating information to support sound resource 
management, and delivering applied research results to the 
people who rely on our coastal areas and the Great Lakes for 
their livelihoods.
    Next, we will take up H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean 
Acidification Research and Monitoring Act, which was introduced 
by our colleague from Maine, Congressman Tom Allen, and co-
sponsored by Dr. Baird and Dr. Ehlers.
    This committee has continued to be a leader in the 
discussion of climate change and its consequences. Ocean 
Acidification is yet another phenomenon caused by the increase 
in atmospheric carbon dioxide, and it poses a significant 
threat to marine organisms and marine ecosystems.
    Earlier this month the Energy and Environmental 
Subcommittee heard from a distinguished panel of ocean and 
atmospheric scientists who testified in strong support of this 
legislation.
    These witnesses provided a number of recommendations to 
improve the bill. The staff exemplified bipartisan cooperation 
by working together to craft an amendment to the bill in the 
last week's Subcommittee markup to incorporate the 
recommendations of the witnesses.
    The bipartisan effort continued and is reflected in a final 
agreement that will be offered today.
    I strongly support each of these bills and look forward to 
working with my colleagues on the Committee to advance this 
important legislation.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.
    Mr. Hall. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I am pleased that the 
Committee is marking up these bills. Each of them addresses 
issues that are certainly of national importance.
    Mr. Chairman, the Committee's work on the National Sea 
Grant College Program amendments continues a tradition of 
ensuring the continuation of programs that produce sound 
science. H.R. 5618 reauthorizes a program that brings local, 
State, and federal resources together to do research on issues 
that are of great importance today. This bill also encourages 
regional collaboration on research projects, recognizing that 
problems do not stop at the state border.
    Additionally, H.R. 4174 organizes the Federal Government's 
approach to research and monitoring of ocean acidification. 
Oceans are a valuable resource, essential to our collective 
well-being. Although the government is conducting some research 
and monitoring of ocean acidification, it is still done in a 
very ad hoc manner; most of the time as part of another 
project. Due to the potential impacts of ocean acidification, 
this phenomenon requires a very comprehensive federal plan that 
will produce the sound science upon which we can make informed 
decisions on how to mitigate and how to adapt to it.
    Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you and your staff for 
working with us on these bills today. I yield back the balance 
of my time, sir.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I am pleased that this committee is 
marking up these bills today. Each of them addresses issues that are of 
national importance.
    Mr. Chairman, the Committee's work on the National Sea Grant 
College Program Amendments continues its tradition of ensuring the 
continuation of programs that produce sound science. H.R. 5618, 
reauthorizes a program that brings local, State and federal resources 
together to do research on issues that are important today. This bill 
also encourages regional collaboration on research projects, 
recognizing that problems do not stop at the state border.
    Additionally, H.R. 4174 organizes the Federal Government's approach 
to research and monitoring of ocean acidification. Oceans are 
invaluable resources, essential to our collective well-being. Although 
the government is conducting some research and monitoring of ocean 
acidification, it is being done in a very ad hoc manner--most of the 
time as part of another project. Due to the potential impacts of ocean 
acidification, this phenomenon requires a comprehensive federal plan 
that will produce the sound science upon which we can make informed 
decisions on how to mitigate and adapt to it.
    Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you and your staff for working 
with us on these bills before us today.
    I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Gordon. Without objection Members may place 
statements in the record at this point.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Mitchell follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Harry E. Mitchell
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we will mark up two important bills, H.R. 4174, the Federal 
Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act, and H.R. 5618, the 
National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act.
    The Sea Grant Colleges sponsor a number of vital marine science 
research, education, training, and technical assistance programs to 
promote the understanding and utilization of ocean, coastal, and Great 
Lakes resources.
    Today we will consider amendments to H.R. 5618 that will encourage 
the National Sea Grant College Program to explore methods for producing 
offshore energy sources such as petroleum, natural gas, geothermal, 
wind, and ocean thermal resources.
    According to the Department of Interior's Minerals Management 
Service, of all of the gas and oil believed to exist in the Outer 
Continental Shelf, 82 percent of natural gas and 79 percent of oil is 
located in areas that are already open to leasing.
    However, despite record-high gas prices, oil and gas companies have 
stockpiled over 10,000 permits for domestic drilling.
    I encourage the Sea Grant Colleges to examine methods for energy 
production in these areas of the Outer Continental Shelf that are 
already open to leasing.
    I urge my colleagues to support both H.R. 4174 and H.R. 5618.
    I yield back.

    Chairman Gordon. We will now consider H.R. 5618, the 
National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008. I 
have already mentioned the purpose of the bill, and I would 
just like to state again my support for the Sea Grant Program 
and for the good bipartisan bill.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present any remarks on the 
bill.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, again, I thank you. The National 
Sea Grant College Program was established in 1966, and it is a 
program modeled after the Land Grant College Program. The 
intent of the Sea Grant Program was to focus studies on oceanic 
work and reap the benefits that the Land Grant Program got from 
teaching generations of Americans about agriculture, economics, 
and military tactics.
    The Sea Grant network has grown to include more than 30 
programs based at top universities in every coastal and Great 
Lakes state, Puerto Rico, and Guam. The program focuses its 
investments on high-priority research. These pressing issues 
include population growth and development of coastal 
communities, preparation and response to hurricanes and coastal 
storms and fisheries management, to name a few.
    Sea Grant is one of the few programs that are able to make 
an impact at the local and State levels and still be a national 
force for change. H.R. 5618 continues this great tradition of 
utilizing our nation's universities to train the next 
generation of ocean researchers while at the same time 
providing invaluable benefits to coastal communities and other 
stakeholders.
    I believe the National Sea Grant College Program Amendments 
Act of 2008, creates a strong foundation upon which future 
challenges can be addressed and overcome.
    And I thank you, and I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. The National Sea Grant College Program was 
established in 1966, a program modeled after the Land Grant College 
Program. The intent of the Sea Grant Program was to focus studies on 
oceanic work and reap the benefits that the Land Grant Program got from 
teaching generations of Americans about agriculture, economics, and 
military tactics.
    The Sea Grant network has grown to include more than 30 programs 
based at top universities in every coastal and Great Lakes state, 
Puerto Rico, and Guam. The program focuses its investments on high-
priority research. These pressing issues include: population growth and 
development of coastal communities; preparation and response to 
hurricanes and coastal storms; and fisheries management, to name a few. 
Sea Grant is one of the few programs that are able to make an impact at 
the local and State levels, and still be a national force for change.
    H.R. 5618 continues this great tradition of utilizing our nation's 
universities to train the next generation of ocean researchers while at 
the same time, providing invaluable benefits to coastal communities and 
other stakeholders. I believe the National Sea Grant College Program 
Amendments Act of 2008 creates a strong foundation upon which future 
challenges can be addressed and overcome.
    I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Gordon. Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Oh, Ms. Johnson is recognized.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I just have an 
amendment at the desk if you are ready.
    Chairman Gordon. We are not quite ready there, but so if no 
one else wants to be--address the body of the bill, then I ask 
unanimous consent that the resolution is considered as read and 
open to amendments at any point and that Members proceed with 
amendments in the order of the roster.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is amendment offered by 
the gentlelady from Texas, Ms. Johnson. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. I am, sir.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 5618 offered by Ms. Eddie 
Bernice Johnson of Texas.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading.
    And without objection, so ordered.
    I now recognize the gentlelady for five minutes to explain 
her amendment.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member 
Hall, for considering my amendment to H.R. 5618.
    The amendment would encourage corporation with minority-
serving institutions through research collaboration. It states 
that the Director of the National Sea Grant College Program 
shall encourage collaborations among Sea Grant colleges and Sea 
Grant institutions to address regional and national priorities. 
The Director should also encourage cooperation with minority-
serving institutions to enhance collaborative research 
opportunities for faculty and students in the area of ocean, 
environmental, and atmospheric sciences.
    The amendment also indicates that the Director shall 
improve opportunities for and retention of students and faculty 
from minority-serving institutions in these areas.
    And finally, the amendment tasks the Director to increase 
the number of students from minority-serving institutions 
graduating in NOAA-related areas.
    To summarize this amendment aims to increase the 
participation of people of color and research related to marine 
source conservation, management, and utilization. Support 
collaboration with minority-serving institutions is good for 
our nation. These institutions produce a high percentage of 
African-Americans and Hispanics with advanced degrees, and 
minority-serving institutions are powerhouses when it comes to 
the pipeline of highly-trained, intelligent individuals who are 
prepared for careers in science.
    And I am proud to offer this provision that is designed to 
increase the diversity of our scientific workforce. I thank 
you, Mr. Chairman, for the opportunity to speak on the 
amendment, and I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member Hall, for considering my 
amendment to H.R. 5618.
    The amendment would encourage cooperation with minority-serving 
institutions through research collaboration.
    It states that the Director of the National Sea Grant College 
Program shall encourage collaborations among sea grant colleges and sea 
grant institutes to address regional and national priorities.
    The Director shall also encourage cooperation with minority-serving 
institutions to enhance collaborative research opportunities for 
faculty and students in the areas of ocean-, environmental-, and 
atmospheric sciences.
    The amendment also indicates that the Director shall improve 
opportunities for, and retention of, students and faculty from 
minority-serving institutions in these areas.
    Finally, the amendment tasks the Director to increase the number of 
students from minority-serving institutions graduating in the NOAA-
related areas.
    To summarize, this amendment aims to increase the participation of 
people of color in research relating to marine resource conservation 
management, and utilization.
    Supporting collaboration with the minority-serving institutions is 
good for our nation.
    These institutions produce a high percentage of African Americans 
and Hispanics with advanced degrees.
    Minority-serving institutions are powerhouses when it comes to the 
pipeline of highly-trained, talented individuals who are prepared for 
careers in the sciences.
    I am proud to offer this provision that is designed to increase the 
diversity of our scientific workforce.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for the opportunity to speak on my 
amendment. I yield back.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Johnson, not only for the 
amendment but for your continuing championing of this very 
important issue. It has been clearly documented in this 
committee that we need to encourage minorities and women in 
these areas, that it is really the best way to get bumps up in 
that kind of talent since they are so unrepresented.
    Is there any further discussion on the amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Those opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is 
agreed to.
    The second amendment on the roster is the amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Missouri, Mr. Akin. Are you ready to 
proceed?
    Mr. Akin. Yes. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have an 
amendment. It is at the desk. I guess it is amendment two.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Mr. Chairman, I have amendment number 004 
offered by Mr. Akin of Missouri.
    Chairman Gordon. Let us see, Mr. Akin. Do you think we are 
in sync on that one?
    Mr. Akin. Excuse me? I was distracted here. Could you 
repeat the question?
    The Clerk. Amendment 004, amendment to H.R. 5618, offered 
by Mr. Akin of Missouri.
    Mr. Akin. 004 is the amendment number?
    Chairman Gordon. Counsel seems to think that is correct, so 
why don't we proceed.
    Mr. Akin. Okay. Well, thank you, Mr. Chairman. This 
amendment adds a focus on exploring energy resources and 
attempting to minimize conflicts between attempts to utilize 
coastal energy resources and the environment to the program 
elements of the Sea Grant College Program. And this is 
consistent with the findings and purposes of the original Sea 
Grant Program.
    The findings are actually listed, and this is a quote. 
``The vitality of our nation and the quality of life of its 
citizens depend increasingly on the understanding, assessment, 
development, utilization, and conservation of ocean, coastal, 
and Great Lakes resources. These resources supply food, energy, 
and the minerals and contribute to human health, the quality of 
the environment, national security, and the enhancement of 
commerce.''
    Now, what I was intending to do with this amendment, Mr. 
Chairman, was to build on what had been done in successful 
projects, for instance, one that was called the digital ocean. 
In this project Sea Grant funded and produced detailed maps of 
the Gulf of Mexico that gave oil and gas producers highly-
detailed information on where to lay pipelines and locate 
platforms. This information allowed oil and gas production to 
take place in a manner that promoted the sustainability of our 
marine ecosystem.
    It seems to me that whether we like it or not we are a 
little bit in a vise here between demand for oil and gas 
resources and our desire in this committee to make sure that 
those things are developed in a way that do the absolute most 
to protect the environment and to be in balance with everything 
else that are priorities that this bill lays out.
    And so I felt that this would be a good amendment that 
would further allow for a very well-controlled and well-
thought-out process in development of energy to make sure that 
it is in balance with the environment and all of the other 
different competing needs in these areas of water.
    So with that, Mr. Chairman, I would move for the adoption 
of the amendment.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Akin follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative W. Todd Akin
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    This amendment adds a focus on exploring energy resources and 
attempting to minimize conflicts between attempts to utilize coastal 
energy resources and the environment to the program elements of the Sea 
Grant College Program. This is consistent with the findings and 
purposes of the original Sea Grant Program, that we seek to amend here 
today, which is intended to help train individuals in the best way to 
utilize our ocean and coastal resources as well as our Great Lake 
resources.
    The underlying act declares that it is in the national interest to 
formulate a strategy to provide for the understanding and wise use of 
these resources and the environment. The findings of the Act further 
declare that ``The vitality of our nation and the quality of life of 
its citizens depend increasingly on the understanding, assessment, 
development, utilization, and conservation of ocean, coastal and Great 
lakes resources. These resources supply food, energy, and minerals and 
contribute to human health, the quality of the environment, national 
security, and the enhancement of commerce.''
    This commitment is exemplified by projects such as the Digital 
Ocean. In this project, Sea Grant funded and produced detailed maps for 
the Gulf of Mexico that gave oil and gas producers highly detailed 
information on where to lay pipelines and locate platforms. This 
information allowed oil and gas production to take place in a manner 
that promoted the sustainability of our marine ecosystem.
    The amendment I offer here seeks to build on these ideas by trying 
to get these varying groups to work together to address the crisis of 
our time, which is a shortage of viable energy resources that are 
necessary to our economic independence and national security.
    The amendment will ensure that the partners to the Sea Grant 
College Program will look at ways to minimize conflicts between the 
environmental community and the development of energy resources. It 
will require the program to provide support to research and training 
within education programs to ensure that the various needs of the 
country are balanced. As we seek to site windmills or utilize natural 
gas or geothermal resources in the ocean's floors, my amendment will 
require an approach to this program that will balance these competing 
interests.
    I urge my colleagues to support it and I yield back the balance of 
my time.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Akin. I will recognize 
myself for just a moment.
    I think we all share your interest and objective here. I 
have a concern that the Sea Grant Program has no budget for 
this and that it could constrain other programs, and right now 
there are already six federal agencies involving in citing of 
energy facilities in coastal areas; the Minerals Management 
Service, the Federal Energy Regulation Commission, the Coast 
Guard, the Department of Transportation, and Environmental 
Protection Agency, as well as NOAA.
    So, again, I appreciate and understand your interest here, 
and I am not going to object to your amendment. I just hope 
that it is, we need to keep it in context with this relatively 
small budget of this agency.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Well, yes. Mr. Rohrabacher is recognized.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Yes. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. I 
agree with the statement you just made, but I think we also 
have to put in perspective the importance of America's offshore 
resources. For 30 years we have not been permitted, this 
country has been denied the right to develop its offshore 
resources by basically cowering in front of groups of people 
who are shouting at us when we should have had the courage to 
stand up and say, I am sorry. We need the oil, or there are 
going to be serious repercussions.
    And right now our people are living with those serious 
repercussions from a lack of courage on the part of the U.S. 
Congress to tell these folks who were screaming at us, no. We 
will need the energy, and it will have a dramatic impact on our 
life if we do nothing. And we can't just rely on solar energy, 
which is years away.
    And thus, yes, you are right. There are other priorities 
within this program. We also have to put it in perspective, not 
only of those other programs, but of the suffering that is 
going on among the people of the United States.
    And I say suffering, I don't use that word lightly. All of 
the discretionary income of average citizens is being sucked 
out of their pockets. They are not being able to live a decent 
life and pay for their expenses. Their car needs to have tires. 
They can't put new tires on their car because all of that 
income is being taken away from them at the gas pump. And what 
is happening at the gas pump was totally predictable by not 
prioritizing the development of our offshore resources, as well 
as other types of areas where we could have. For example, it is 
nuclear energy where we didn't have one nuclear plant built 
within the last 30 years, we haven't had any new oil refineries 
in the last 30 years. So we need to keep that in context as 
well when we are thinking about good amendments like Mr. Akin 
has suggested to us today.
    So thank you very much. I would strongly support this 
amendment.
    Chairman Gordon. And I would hope that you would explain to 
Governor Schwarzenegger, who--some may be cowering before him--
--
    Mr. Rohrabacher. If you would allow me to answer the 
question, I am one of only two surfers in Congress. I have 
scuba dived off of the offshore oil----
    Chairman Gordon. I am just kidding with you.
    Mr. Rohrabacher.--and Arnold knows that very well. I was 
Arnold's first supporter in California just for the record.
    Chairman Gordon. Ms. Woolsey is recognized.
    Ms. Woolsey. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Mr. Chairman, as a Member who has a Sea Grant institution 
in her district, the University of California-Davis, Bodega Bay 
Marine Laboratories, I strenuously object to the Akin 
amendment. In fact, yes, I am screaming because the Sea Grant 
Program is about empowering institutions to study and protect 
our oceans. It is not about pandering to the oil and gas 
industry, and that, I believe, is what this amendment would do.
    The Akin amendment directs the Sea Grant colleges to work 
to expedite energy production, placing this above all other 
uses. This would completely redirect the Sea Grant Program to 
an activity incompatible with its mission, with its resources, 
and actually with its expertise.
    Public support for the Sea Grant Program has always been 
strong because its educational mission and its support of 
resource management approaches balance other competing needs. 
That support will be eroded if Sea Grant is perceives as biased 
towards the single goal of drilling or exploration in the 
coastal zone.
    Beyond that I would challenge anyone who thinks that 
drilling for oil on our coast is a good idea to come and see 
the beautiful coastline in my district. My district is across 
the Golden Gate Bridge, north of San Francisco, 40 miles or 40 
miles north of San Francisco, and it is full of natural 
treasure. It is home of whales, seals, sea lions, fish, and 
birds, and then after you have visited it, tell me you think it 
would look good covered in oil. I can tell you it would not.
    You know, you don't tear down a cathedral to make firewood, 
and you must not destroy a natural wonder to drill for oil.
    Mr. Chairman, I oppose the Akin amendment, and I urge all 
of my colleagues to do the same. Thank you, and I yield back.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Bartlett is recognized.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, I am personally kind of pleased 
that we haven't yet drilled in these offshore regions because 
had we drilled there we would have, and I am using the words of 
Hyman Rickover of a speech given 51 years ago. We would have 
used what he referred to as riotous living, denying it to our 
children and our grandchildren.
    I think we now are at the place where we really need to 
look at all of our energy resources. I will be opposed to 
drilling in ANWAR, offshore on our public lands, unless the 
revenues that we get from that are totally invested in 
renewables.
    Mr. Chairman, we have squandered 28 years when we knew to 
an absolute certainty that we were going to be here today with 
oil at prices like this and with the demand exceeding the 
supply. So I think that it is entirely appropriate that we look 
to environmentally responsible exploitation of these relatively 
small reserves of oil.
    If we have 10 billion barrels of oil in ANWAR, that will 
last the world and there is no alternative to share your oil 
with the world, because if we don't use the Saudi oil, someone 
else will use it. That will last the world 120 days. Big deal.
    So I am very supportive of this amendment, and we really 
need to use all of the energy and all of the revenues that we 
get from this little bit of undiscovered oil to invest it in 
alternatives. We now have wasted 28 years where we should have 
been doing this, and so now we are paying $4 a gallon for oil 
at the pump. We didn't need to be here, Mr. Chairman. This is a 
good amendment, and we need to pass it.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Akin, I will, unless, does anyone, Dr. 
Baird.
    Mr. Baird. My question here is Mr. Akin has described a 
prior Sea Grant activity that apparently mapped the ocean 
floor, which seems to me consistent with the purpose of the Sea 
Grant and the research mission as I understand it, which is the 
focus of Sea Grant. But this amendment seems to rather 
dramatically change one of the missions of Sea Grant schools, 
and it seems that what they are now, we are asking them to do 
is engage in almost lobbying.
    I mean, I will read from the amendment. ``To minimize the 
conflicts and delays in the expedited production.'' There is an 
assumption here that expedited production is a desired outcome 
and that it is, therefore, part of the Sea Grant mission to 
deal with expedited production of oil and gas.
    That is a dramatically different mission than I envision 
and understand Sea Grant to be. I don't think if you look at 
the legislation that the intent of establishing the Sea Grant 
Program was to expedite oil and gas production. I just find 
that rather contradictory, and hence, I don't see that this is 
really consistent with the mission of the legislation, the 
underlying bill, and I don't think it is consistent with 
preservation of the oceans. And, therefore, I think it would be 
advisable for us to defeat this amendment in order to preserve 
the integrity of the underlying mission.
    I do believe there is urgent challenges to meet our energy 
needs. I believe that have we had a responsible energy policy 
at the beginning of this Administration, I believe that had the 
President of the United States responded to the events of 
September 11 by suggesting the American people begin to 
conserve energy, develop alternative energies, we would be in a 
much different situation than we are, and I think he failed in 
that leadership opportunity.
    So I believe we need to produce more energy domestically. I 
profoundly believe it, but I think this is not the vehicle or 
the appropriate way to do that, and I would urge defeat of this 
amendment.
    Mr. Inglis. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Baird. Certainly.
    Mr. Inglis. I think that the gentleman makes a good point 
about the language here, and I wonder if Mr. Akin might 
entertain a friendly amendment to change the language. It is a 
good point that you are putting in legislation something that 
is quite directive in an unspecific kind of way.
    So if Mr. Akin might consider changing some of those words. 
Otherwise I would have to agree with the gentleman from 
Washington.
    Mr. Akin. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Inglis. Yes. Surely.
    Mr. Akin. Let me just, I happen to have----
    Chairman Gordon. Just for protocol I guess it is, really it 
is the gentleman----
    Mr. Baird. Yeah. I am happy to yield to Mr. Akin.
    Mr. Akin. That is who I was asking. I have the National Sea 
Grant College Program Act here in front of me, and it is the 
section four, and it says part-way into that paragraph, ``These 
resources supply food, energy, and minerals and contribute to 
human health and quality of the environment, national security, 
and the enhancement of commerce.'' So that is part of the 
National Sea Grant currently, what it does, and then you go 
over to basically about three pages into it, ``the term, 
resource, means living resources including natural and culture, 
plant life, fish, shellfish, marine mammals, wildlife,'' and B, 
it says, ``non-living resources including energy sources, 
minerals, and chemical substances.''
    So this is all part of what is going on, and I guess what I 
am trying to do is not change the focus. It seems to me the 
focus is that we take a holistic approach to solving our 
problems, and the whole point of this act is to bring all of 
these interests together and to come up with a balance. It 
seems to me that if we don't do the balance proactively now, 
the problem is going to be that there will be enough demand 
eventually that regardless of how we vote or what we think, we 
are going to have something shoved down our throat that does 
not do a good job balancing it.
    Mr. Baird. I appreciate the perspective, and I am aware of 
the language the gentleman refers to. My concern, however, is 
the language is talking about broadly the resources available 
in the seas. The language of the gentleman's amendment is 
specifically directing towards expedited production of the 
resources, not the research in, of what is there or how it is 
impacted and how it changes, but expediting production of one 
certain, one of those resources, and potentially, and here is 
my other concern, potentially at the expense of those other 
resources. And I think this is of substance. Potentially 
expediting the production of oil and gas can be at the expense 
of the other resources. We will shortly be marking up a bill 
about the study of ocean acidification. We have looked at, in 
this committee, extensively at global warming. One of my 
concerns is you are sort of mandating one side of this 
equation, which may well be in contrast, not only to the 
underlying intent of the bill, but the broader findings that I 
think are emerging from some of the research at Sea Grant. So--
--
    Mr. Akin. If the gentleman would yield----
    Mr. Baird. I don't know if have any time left to yield, but 
I will ask the Chair for his indulgence.
    Chairman Gordon. With unanimous consent we will allow Mr. 
Baird to have an additional five minutes, which he then will 
yield a portion of that to Mr. Akin.
    Mr. Akin. I would be open-minded to an amendment to the 
amendment if you wanted to say, because my objective is to 
balance the environmental piece with the other and to pull that 
together. And it seemed like this is a good way to do that, 
because we are not, in environmental I am using it in the 
broadest sense of the word, because we are talking about wind, 
we are talking about geothermal, all of these different types.
    The question is how do we balance all of these different 
needs, and it seemed like this was the best program or best 
forum to do that. I think the whole point of doing this is to 
prevent this sort of political reaction, we will drill 
anywhere, kind of thing. It seemed like this gets out in front 
a little bit on it, but I am quite open-minded to amendment to 
say that this has got to be done in balance and harmony with 
everything else.
    And so that, if you want to say in an environmentally-
friendly way or in balance, I am open-minded to that.
    Mr. Baird. I would certainly be willing to work with----
    Chairman Gordon. If the gentleman would, let me tell you, 
if I could----
    Mr. Akin. Please.
    Chairman Gordon.--where I think we are at least 
procedurally. I think we are a group in harmony in terms of 
trying to do the right thing here. This is a bill that we have 
really a small part, this is really, came out of the Natural 
Resources, and there is going to have to be an agreement with 
Natural Resources before this can get to the Floor.
    Now, I wish that we were at Subcommittee level so that we 
could then say, we will work on this going to out Full 
Committee, but we are not. We are at the Full Committee.
    Now, I would suggest that we work in good faith to try to 
get that amendment to Mr. Inglis and Mr. Baird and everybody 
can be right. But let me, I want to be clear that we are not 
working with just this family, and basically we have worked out 
everything this year, you know, pretty much, and so we are 
going to have an outside force. And so I cannot, you know, with 
this good conscience, you know, tell you that this can 
absolutely be worked out, because we got a whole other 
committee to have to deal with.
    But if you would like to take that approach, you know, we 
can move forward or you can, you know, I will let you, Mr. 
Akin, I will let you decide how you would like to----
    Mr. Akin. Well, Mr. Chairman, let me just ask something. My 
understanding was that this amendment, that we would have 
complete jurisdiction in this area as heard from the 
Parliamentarian. Is that information correct or not correct?
    Chairman Gordon. But they can stop the--yes. But the 
Resource Committee can stop the bill from going to the Floor.
    Mr. Akin. So they have got veto powers is what you are 
saying.
    Chairman Gordon. In essence, yes.
    Mr. Akin. Well, Mr. Chairman, what I would--let me just ask 
procedurally if we could do this, I would prefer if I could 
offer the amendment and then if they want to veto it based on 
that, then I would be happy to work with them and let them 
modify it to where they are comfortable with it. Procedurally 
can we do that?
    Chairman Gordon. I think, yes. I mean, we can certainly 
move forward. I mean, that is one more way to go about it. As I 
say----
    Mr. Akin. One thing we could do, Mr. Chairman----
    Chairman Gordon.--I can't make any guarantees to you 
because it is----
    Mr. Akin. I know there are no guarantees. I am not asking 
for guarantees. One thing we could do is there is a word here 
as we look at it, it says, expedited. If that would make people 
a little more comfortable, I am open-minded to take the word, 
expedited, out if that softens the language somewhat, if people 
want to look at that.
    Otherwise, I would just as soon go ahead and offer this 
amendment, we will vote on it, and just see how it goes.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Bilbray, did you have----
    Mr. Bilbray. Yes, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, again, this 
committee has been very bipartisan in our approach, but I think 
that the amendment's intention is to be proactive at something 
that we all know is coming down the pipeline. I would rather us 
have a proactive position that this needs, you know, the 
environmental impacts of energy development being renewable, 
whatever we do, needs to be a comprehensive approach, 
proactively rather than reacting to proposals or pressures.
    So I just think from both sides of the aisle this is 
somewhere, if you take, you know, you can soften the words 
around, but it is something we should take the leadership on 
that science should be leading the way to addressing the issues 
of offshore energy capabilities, be whatever the source, and 
this is the vehicle you want to use. You want to use the Sea 
Grant, not have to tag something on an Interior bill or an 
Energy bill off the side as having the environmental approach 
being an add-on rather than the leading factor in the 
consideration.
    So I would just ask both sides of the aisle to at least try 
to accommodate this, because I think that is what we are here 
for is to lead through science. And this is an issue we are not 
going to get away from, not going to avoid, so we might as well 
move forward with it together.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Would the gentleman yield?
    Chairman Gordon. I think Mr. Baird's time is over with, so 
let us get back to regular order. Who would seek to--okay. Mr. 
Rohrabacher.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Well, let me just note that, again, I am a 
scuba diver, and Brian and I are the only surfers in Congress, 
and we are not deadly afraid of offshore oil wells because we 
realize the oil disasters we have had in the last 20 years can 
almost all be traced back to tankers, and to the degree that we 
do not develop our offshore oil resources is the degree to 
which we depend more on tankers, which are much more dangerous 
to the ocean environment than an offshore oil rig.
    Also, they are dangerous to our economy, and they are also 
dangerous to our national security because those oil tankers 
are transferring oil to us but cash to people overseas who hate 
our way of life. What this amendment does and the vehicle that 
we are talking about placing this amendment in, this is 
precisely where you want to have something dealing with 
offshore oil drilling because this is aimed at trying to make 
it even safer than it is. If someone is saying, oh, we should 
oppose this because offshore oil drilling isn't safe, which I 
take exception with, that is no reason for us not to actually 
pass this amendment, because this would make it safer. We are 
actually asking people and our institutions to get involved 
with developing ways of, yes, expediting it, but expediting 
these things in a way that can be used, these resources can be 
used in an environmentally-safe way.
    Mr. Baird. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Yes. I certainly would.
    Mr. Baird. I appreciate the gentleman's last statements. My 
problem is I don't see language in the amendment that refers to 
anything that he just spoke about. I don't see any language in 
the amendment, and I may have missed something.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. But that is what this bill is all about.
    Mr. Baird. Speaking--no. I understand what the bill is 
about.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. That is what the Sea Grant Program is all 
about.
    Mr. Baird. I understand what the Sea Grant Program is 
about.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Right.
    Mr. Baird. What I don't understand is where in this 
amendment we see any language seeking about safety of 
extraction or environmental, reducing environmental impacts of 
the extraction. I don't see that in this amendment. What I see 
instead is the reverse.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Well, reclaiming my time, let me just note 
that is the whole purpose of the Sea Grant Program. We are not 
giving them money to try to find ways of doing things that make 
it more environmentally damaging. You have to assume that when 
we are putting it in, when we are trying to move money forward 
in this way to meet the challenge of our energy resources, that 
we are talking about, yeah, they are going to help us find ways 
to do this in an environmentally-safe way. And of course, the 
author of the amendment made it very clear that if you want to 
add those words to it, he is perfectly willing to add those 
words to it right now if you want to add them.
    But the fact is by its very nature that is what this 
amendment is all about, putting this in this bill, putting this 
language in this bill is talking about making offshore oil 
drilling safer for the people of this country.
    Chairman Gordon. If the gentleman would further yield.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Yes.
    Chairman Gordon. I think we need to be clear here that this 
amendment is not about having offshore drilling or not. We have 
offshore drilling.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Right.
    Chairman Gordon. We have millions of acres that are 
available for offshore drilling. We are drilling offshore right 
now.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Right.
    Chairman Gordon. What we are trying to do is put together a 
bill on really a different topic, and I am afraid what has 
happened here is, and you know, it does happen sometimes, but 
we are out of the regular order. You know, if we had an 
opportunity to look at this at the Subcommittee level, then we 
could have gotten this wording out.
    Again, there is no mischief on Mr. Akin's part whatsoever 
here, but, again, I want to be sure that is understood. There 
is offshore drilling.
    Mr. Baird. Mr. Chairman, reclaiming----
    Mr. Rohrabacher. I still have the time, and reclaiming my 
time for one moment. Let me say, we have, it has been 30 years 
of this type of, well, we can't agree, and let us find exact 
wording or this or--one reason or another of why we haven't 
been developing our energy resources. We haven't had one new 
nuclear plant, we haven't had any new offshore oil. Even as the 
tankers are breaking up off our coastline and putting oil onto 
our beaches, realizing that if we don't do our offshore wells 
we are going to have to rely on those tankers, we still haven't 
developed our offshore oil.
    Mr. Bilbray. Mr. Chairman, reclaiming my time.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Actually, it is my time, Brian. Yes, but I 
would be happy to yield to my friend, my fellow surfer, Brian 
Bilbray.
    Mr. Bilbray. Mr. Chairman, we are, let us get back to what 
we are, this is any type of, we may be talking about geothermal 
development, offshore wind.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. That is correct.
    Mr. Bilbray. We may be talking about all this. My biggest 
concern is if we ignore this issue and are not proactive, I 
have witnessed what happens. The Woodrow Wilson Bridge was 
exempted from environmental regulations because the 
obstructionism basically made Congress exempt all environmental 
regs for the Woodrow Wilson Bridge. The obstructionism that 
occurred in the California Coastal Commission over the border 
fence ended up creating a situation where the border fence was 
exempted.
    I would rather be proactive, address these environmental 
issues, and this is the vehicle to talk about the big pictures, 
not just oil. We are talking wind, we are talking geothermal, 
we are talking about what are the challenges environmentally 
and economically. Where do we go from here? But look at the 
picture. Now is the time to do it with science, not wait until 
the proposal and the crisis makes us try to find exemptions.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Thank you very much, Mr. Bilbray, and I 
would just then note that also there are, there is lots of 
science going into energy production, the tides and waves and 
the fact is----
    Ms. Woolsey. Mr. Chairman.
    Mr. Rohrabacher.--this is part of this as well.
    Chairman Gordon. The gentleman's time has expired.
    Ms. Woolsey. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. The gentlelady from California is 
recognized.
    Ms. Woolsey. I would just like to remind the author of the 
legislation that it says oil and gas exploration in the 
amendment. It doesn't say wind, doesn't say geothermal.
    Mr. Akin. Yes, it does.
    Ms. Woolsey. Oh, it does? But it does say oil and gas. 
Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay. Dr. Bartlett is recognized.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, would it be in order to ask 
unanimous consent for a text change that would remove the 
offending language and replace it with language that I think 
all of us can agree with?
    Chairman Gordon. It is my--Majority Counsel thinks we can. 
I will ask Minority Counsel if you have any----
    Mr. Akin. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Do you have the language before you?
    Mr. Bartlett. Yes, sir, I do.
    Chairman Gordon. Well, why don't you present it. With 
unanimous consent you can do most anything, so why don't you--
--
    Mr. Bartlett. All right. Thank you. If you have the text in 
front of you, this is number five in red at the bottom of the 
page. I would strike the language, minimize the conflicts and 
delays in the expedited, and replace it with the following 
words. Explore the environmental and scientific considerations 
relative to the----
    Chairman Gordon. I think we should now yield to Mr. Akin to 
see if he would----
    Mr. Akin. I would accept that amendment if everybody will 
do that unanimously. That is fine with me. Yeah. I think that 
softens the language some. I think it still gets the basic 
idea. What I am looking for is a holistic solution. I am not 
talking, I am talking about fish, I am talking about fishermen, 
I am talking about the whole deal so that you look at the thing 
in a package.
    Mr. Baird. Mr. Chairman, I would----
    Mr. Akin. Surfing, too.
    Mr. Baird.--except for the last remark I would commend Mr. 
Akin for his flexibility and commend Mr. Bartlett for his 
innovation, and it sounds like something I could certainly 
personally support. I appreciate the process that led us here, 
and I am grateful.
    Chairman Gordon. And Mr. Bartlett, if you would submit your 
language to the desk, please, so that we could have that.
    We are doing Subcommittee work at the Full Committee, and 
with everybody's indulgence we are trying to do it in the 
proper way, and so if anyone has any objection as we move 
forward, please let us know, because are trying--and now I 
think--all right.
    We need to let the language get to the desk and then my 
understanding is, Mr. Wu, you have some language also.
    Mr. Wu. Yes, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay. So do you have two copies by any 
chance?
    Mr. Wu. I can make another one right now.
    Chairman Gordon. Well, why don't you--okay. So okay. I 
think, has Mr. Bartlett submitted his language? Oh, he is 
putting it together. Is it at--oh, okay. Well, why don't we, 
while that is going on just to expedite things, Mr. Wu, if you 
could start having copies of yours made so we--thank you for 
your indulgence.
    We could recess for a couple of minutes while this is being 
done, but I am afraid it would be adios to a lot of folks, so 
we will just, while we are waiting do you want to, Mr. 
Bartlett, would you like to talk a little bit about peak oil 
while we are----
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, I savor every opportunity to 
educate the American public, but might I ask if it would be 
appropriate----
    Chairman Gordon. Is this under the unanimous consent? That 
would be too hard.
    Mr. Bartlett. Would it be appropriate to ask unanimous 
consent that we could move on and dispense with Mr. Gingrey's 
next amendment and then come back to the Akin amendment?
    Chairman Gordon. No. I think we need to finish this, 
because these things may be overlapping, and if you don't mind.
    Mr. Bartlett. Okay.
    Chairman Gordon. Let us see. So okay. Mr. Wu, why don't in 
the interim as we are waiting for these copies to get together, 
would you want to go ahead and describe your amendment, please?
    Mr. Wu. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    The precise language of my amendment, the only copy of 
which has now gone up to the desk, the thrust of it is to not 
obligate----
    Chairman Gordon. Well, you know, Mr. Wu, let us just wait. 
I am sorry. I am trying to be courteous to everybody's time, 
but we are going to be better off in the long run if we will 
just follow regular order here, and we need to do them--okay. 
So if the Clerk, do you have the amendment?
    The Clerk. I do not, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay. So we will, let us proceed on Mr. 
Bartlett's amendment, and we will close that, and then we will 
go to Mr. Wu.
    Mr. Akin. Mr. Chairman, if we had unanimous consent, we 
could just adopt his amendment.
    Chairman Gordon. You know, I think we are going to be 
better off if Minority and Majority Counsel agree that we are 
at the right place. In the long run we are just going to be 
better off. Again, there is no bad faith here, but I would hate 
for a comma or a word to be left out and somebody think that 
there was mischief.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Mr. Chairman, I would think that Mr. 
Bilbray could describe the biggest wave that he ever caught off 
Southern California. That would be very entertaining for us 
while we waited.
    Chairman Gordon. Well, let me just ask counsel. Jim, where 
are we now? Do you have, does the desk have all the materials 
they need? Also, Mr. Bartlett. Okay. Well, what about Mr. 
Bartlett? You have Mr. Wu's amendment, but what about Mr. 
Bartlett's amendment? Okay.
    Counsel. We have the wording, but we don't have copies of 
Mr. Bartlett's.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay. The Clerk will report Mr. Bartlett's 
second degree amendment. And what we are going to do is read it 
rather than waive it so that everybody could have that before 
them.
    The Clerk. Mr. Bartlett's second degree amendment to Mr. 
Akin's amendment to H.R. 5618. Okay. We are going to strike 
this. We are striking, minimize the conflicts and delays in the 
expedited. Insert, explore the environmental and scientific 
considerations related to, relative to.
    Chairman Gordon. All right. Mr. Bartlett is recognized to 
speak on his amendment.
    Mr. Bartlett. I think the amendment is self-explanatory. I 
think that Mr. Baird is correct that the, this college should 
not be lobbying, and the intent of what Mr. Akin wants to do I 
think is perfectly preserved with this word change. And I think 
that it removes the confusing language which is offensive to 
some.
    I don't think anybody can argue that we ought to be looking 
at the scientific and environmental implications of potential 
wind and drilling and so forth.
    Chairman Gordon. If there is no other, no objection or no 
other discussion, then all in favor of Mr. Bartlett's amendment 
to----
    Mr. Wu. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Yes, Mr. Wu.
    Mr. Wu. Parliamentary inquiry. If Mr. Bartlett's amendment 
passes, would I have an opportunity to offer my proposed 
language?
    Chairman Gordon. Yes, but it will be to Mr. Akin's 
amendment as amended by Mr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Wu. As amended by Mr. Bartlett. May I inquire----
    Chairman Gordon. Let us just, you know, the, I am getting 
some shaking of heads from the Minority Counsel, and let us 
work it out now. I don't want to work it out later. Tell me 
what the problem is.
    Then I guess the answer is, Mr. Wu, it depends on your 
amendment, whether we could be blocked or it, depending on the 
substance of your amendment.
    Mr. Wu. Mr. Chairman, if I may inquire as of Mr. Bartlett, 
the author of the secondary amendment, if I may make an inquiry 
of Mr. Bartlett at this point in time.
    Chairman Gordon. Of course.
    Mr. Wu. Mr. Bartlett, there is not that much difference 
between the language that you have proposed and that I have 
proposed at the desk. I think that the one concept that I think 
is important in this amendment process is the term that I have 
inserted in there to provide scientifically-sound data.
    Would you be amendable to working that scientifically-sound 
data concept into your secondary amendment?
    Mr. Bartlett. I have no, I think that, almost all 
scientists think that their evidence conforms to that 
characterization. No. I certainly have no objection to that.
    I think it is implied. Why would you want to do science 
that is not, yeah, that is really not science unless it is 
that, so I certainly have no objection to that.
    Mr. Wu. If the gentleman is willing to incorporate the 
term, scientifically-sound data, or words to that effect, I 
would withdraw any further efforts on my part.
    Mr. Bartlett. I have no objection to that.
    Chairman Gordon. My suggestion, and I hate to impose on the 
Committee, I think what we should do is take a three- or four-
minute recess, have the parties work together. Let us get the 
language so that everybody can see this, and do this in a way 
that we are all comfortable. I think that would be best, so 
with that the Committee is in recess.
    [Recess.]
    Chairman Gordon. The Committee will return to--the 
Committee is returning, and let me remind everybody that we are 
here, we have got a vote, so we are going to try to move 
forward.
    Mr. Bartlett is recognized.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, I ask unanimous consent to 
withdraw my amendment and submit another, a second-degree 
amendment, which is an amalgamation of Mr. Wu's amendment and 
my amendment, to which I think everybody agrees.
    Chairman Gordon. Without objection, the amendment, the 
Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Mr. Chairman, I have a second-degree amendment 
offered by Mr. Bartlett of Maryland of H.R. 5618, offered by 
Mr. Akin of Missouri.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    Okay. They have not been, I thought copies were made. Okay. 
If the copies were not made then, please read the amendment.
    The Clerk. Strike line five, to minimize the conflicts and 
delays in the expedited, and insert on line five, explore the 
environmental and scientific considerations including providing 
scientifically-sound data related to, relative to the. And 
strike on page two, line one and two, refineries, and insert, 
energy-related facilities.
    Chairman Gordon. The gentleman is recognized.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, I think the second-degree 
amendment is self-explanatory. Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. If no one else wishes to be recognized, 
all in favor of the amendment, say aye. Opposed, nay.
    The second-degree amendment passes.
    Mr. Akin. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. We have made this into a 
little bit of a career thing. If we could move for the adoption 
of the amendment as amended.
    Chairman Gordon. Without objection, all in favor say aye to 
the amendment from Mr. Akin. Opposed, nay. The amendment 
passes.
    Mr. Gingrey is recognized.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman, I have two amendments at the 
desk. I intend to drop or withdraw one of those amendments, 
amendment number two I will withdraw. I ask unanimous consent 
to withdraw, and I have another amendment at the desk, 
amendment number one.
    Chairman Gordon. Without objection, the Clerk will report 
the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment number is 001, amendment to H.R. 5618, 
offered by Mr. Gingrey of Georgia.
    Chairman Gordon. The gentleman is recognized.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman, thank you.
    I first want to commend the Energy and Environmental 
Subcommittee for its quick action on H.R. 5618, the National 
Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008. This 
bipartisan legislation expands the scope and purpose of the 
National Sea Grant College Program, and the amendment that I 
will be offering this morning will assist the Sea Grant Program 
and its expansion through H.R. 5618.
    In the declaration of policy in the original Sea Grant 
Program, the law originally adopted back in 1966, as Mr. Akin 
noted, notes that the vitality of our country is dependent on 
the understanding, development, and utilization of ocean and 
coastal resources, because these resources supply energy and 
contribute to a number of important goals for our country, 
including national security and commerce.
    Unfortunately, Mr. Chairman, the 89th Congress in 1966, 
seemed to be light years ahead of the 110th in 2008, because it 
was open to the potential of exploring and understanding what 
offshore domestic energy resources had to offer. With the 
improved technologies available for energy exploration on the 
outer Continental Shelf, it is time that this program once 
again lives up to its initial promise from over 40 years ago.
    And so that is why I am offering this common sense 
amendment. This amendment would add an additional duty for the 
director of the Sea Grant Program to move the curriculum of the 
program towards more energy resource exploration, including 
production of energy from petroleum, natural gas, geothermal, 
wind, and ocean thermal resources. At a time when families are 
paying $4.07 for a gallon of regular gasoline it is certainly 
overdue that we put in place the processes to explore American 
offshore resources.
    So, Mr. Chairman, the American people agree, and a recent 
poll, Rasmussen poll showed that 67 percent of Americans 
support exploration for oil off of our nation's coast. Yet 85 
percent of the lower 48 states out of Continental Shelf, OCS, 
energy resources remained under the lock and key of the Federal 
Government that is off limits to drilling.
    This amendment would bring together some of the Nation's 
top academic institutions through the Sea Grant Program to find 
ways to better utilize our offshore resources and energy 
production in an environmentally-sensitive manner. Their 
contribution will ultimately provide relief for working 
American families from the rising gas prices that they face 
each day by introducing more American supply into the 
marketplace.
    Mr. Chairman, a real solution is long overdue. Now is the 
time that our laws need to reflect real-world challenges, where 
we need reasonably-priced fuel to not only maintain our quality 
of life, but also preserve American economic growth and 
prosperity. And I believe that this amendment helps put us on 
that path.
    With that, Mr. Chairman, I want to just urge all of my 
colleagues to support this common sense amendment, and again, 
in essence, it just allows the director of the Sea Grant 
Program to include in the curriculum, not put it over and above 
any other part of the curriculum, but the----
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Gingrey follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Phil Gingrey
    Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Thank you Mr. Chairman. I first want to commend the Energy and 
Environment Subcommittee for its quick action on H.R. 5618, the 
National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008. This 
bipartisan legislation expands the scope and purposes of the National 
Sea Grant College Program, and the amendments that I will be offering 
this morning will assist the Sea Grant Program in its expansion through 
H.R. 5618.
    In the Declaration of Policy in the original Sea Grant Program, the 
law--originally adopted in 1966--notes that the vitality of our country 
is dependent on the understanding, development, and utilization of 
ocean and coastal resources because these resources supply energy and 
contribute to a number of important goals for our country--including 
national security and commerce.
    Unfortunately Mr. Chairman, the 89th Congress in 1966 seemed to be 
light years ahead of the 110th Congress in 2008, because it was open to 
the potential of exploring and understanding what offshore domestic 
energy resources had to offer. With the improved technologies available 
for energy exploration on the Outer Continental Shelf, it is time that 
this program once again lives up to its initial promise from over 40 
years ago.
    That is why I am offering these common sense amendments. My first 
amendment this morning would add an additional duty for the Director of 
the Sea Grant Program to move the curriculum of the program towards 
more energy resource exploration, including production of energy from 
petroleum, natural gas, geothermal, wind and ocean thermal resources.
    At a time when families are paying $4.07 for a gallon of regular 
gas, it is long overdue that we put in place the processes to explore 
American offshore resources. Mr. Chairman, the American people agree. A 
recent Rasmussen Poll shows that 67 percent of Americans support 
exploration for oil off of our nation's coasts. And yet, 85 percent of 
the lower 48 states' Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) energy resources 
remain under the lock and key of the Federal Government--off limits to 
drilling.
    This amendment would bring together some of the Nation's top 
academic institutions through the Sea Grant Program to find ways to 
better utilize our offshore resources for energy production in an 
environmentally sensitive manner. Their contribution will ultimately 
provide relief for working American families from the rising gas prices 
they face each day, by introducing more American supply into the 
marketplace.
    Mr. Chairman, a real solution is long overdue, and now is the time 
for our laws to reflect real world challenges, where we need 
reasonably-priced fuel to not only maintain our quality of life, but 
also preserve American economic growth and prosperity. I believe that 
this amendment helps put us on that path.
    I urge all of my colleagues to support this common sense amendment, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Gordon. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Gingrey. I would be glad to yield to the Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. We need to move, we need to, I think, move 
forward if we are going to take care of this.
    Mr. Gingrey. And I yield back. Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Gingrey.
    Let me just, I want to try to quickly say when I began 
Chairman of the Committee, I sincerely said that I want to be 
able to operate in a way that the minority is treated better 
than we were treated in minority and to operate in a way that 
when inevitably we, you know, Democrats becoming the minority 
again, that we would think that is fair.
    But that is a two-way street. Now, you know, this amendment 
was brought in two or three minutes before this markup started. 
We haven't had a chance to look at it. It by and large is about 
the same thing that Mr. Akin put forth and was worked out with 
Mr. Bartlett. So, I mean, you just can't run a committee this 
way, and you know, we want to try to be fair, we have tried to 
do this before, but it is just not right bringing in 
amendments, you know, again, literally two minutes before this 
thing started.
    So I am just going to have to, as has been the custom of 
this committee for many Chairmen back, when amendments aren't 
submitted 24 hours in advance, they are rejected.
    Now, I don't think we have done that yet, because we, you 
know, again, we want to try to work through things, but this is 
just not the way you need to proceed. So I am going to oppose 
this amendment.
    And is there anyone else that would like to speak?
    Mr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, I am sympathetic with the goals 
of the amendment, but I think it suffers from some of the same 
problems that the other amendment suffered from, and we have 
two choices here. One is to do as you implied, and that is to 
have a vote on it, and you will certainly win. The other is 
simply to break for the vote and to try to work out language 
that will not be offensive to either side and come back after 
the vote and consider the amendment.
    Chairman Gordon. You know, that is, as usual, Dr. Bartlett, 
you are reasonable and fair, but I think this is so, almost 
duplicate of the amendment we just went forth, I think that it 
is not going to be much that can be added in that regard.
    So I think that if no objection, I would like to just call 
a vote, and we will try to get back to regular order.
    All in favor of Mr. Gingrey's amendment, say aye. Opposed, 
nay. The nays seem to have it.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman, on that I would like a recorded 
vote. Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. The, let me see what our time on the Floor 
is.
    Okay. The Clerk will promptly call the roll.
    The Clerk. Chairman Gordon.
    Chairman Gordon. No.
    The Clerk. Chairman Gordon votes no. Mr. Costello.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Ms. Johnson.
    Ms. Johnson. No.
    The Clerk. Ms. Johnson votes no. Ms. Woolsey.
    Ms. Woolsey. No.
    The Clerk. Ms. Woolsey votes no. Mr. Udall.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Wu.
    Mr. Wu. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Wu votes no. Mr. Baird.
    Mr. Baird. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Baird votes no. Mr. Miller.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Lipinski.
    Mr. Lipinski. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Lipinski votes no. Mr. Lampson.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Ms. Giffords.
    Ms. Giffords. Aye.
    The Clerk. Ms. Giffords votes aye. Mr. McNerney.
    Mr. McNerney. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. McNerney votes no. Ms. Richardson.
    Ms. Richardson. No.
    The Clerk. Ms. Richardson votes no. Mr. Kanjorski.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Rothman.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Matheson.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Ross.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Chandler.
    Mr. Chandler. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Chandler votes no. Mr. Carnahan.
    Mr. Carnahan. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Carnahan votes no. Mr. Melancon.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Hill.
    Mr. Hill. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Hill votes no. Mr. Mitchell.
    Mr. Mitchell. Yes.
    The Clerk. Mr. Mitchell votes aye. Mr. Wilson.
    Mr. Wilson. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Wilson votes no. Mr. Carson.
    Mr. Carson. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Carson votes no. Mr. Hall.
    Mr. Hall. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Hall votes aye. Mr. Sensenbrenner.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Smith of Texas.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Rohrabacher.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Bartlett votes aye. Mr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Ehlers votes aye. Mr. Lucas.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mrs. Biggert.
    Ms. Biggert. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mrs. Biggert votes aye. Mr. Akin.
    Mr. Akin. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Akin votes aye. Mr. Feeney.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Neugebauer.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Inglis.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Reichert.
    Mr. Reichert. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Reichert votes no. Mr. McCaul.
    Mr. McCaul. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. McCaul votes aye. Mr. Diaz-Balart.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Gingrey.
    Mr. Gingrey. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Gingrey votes aye. Mr. Bilbray.
    [No response.]
    The Clerk. Mr. Smith of Nebraska.
    Mr. Smith of Nebraska. Aye.
    The Clerk. Mr. Smith votes aye.
    Chairman Gordon. Is there anyone whose vote wasn't, oh, 
excuse me. I am sorry.
    The Clerk. Mr. Brown.
    [No response.]
    Chairman Gordon. Is there anyone whose vote was not 
counted.
    Mr. Costello.
    Mr. Costello. No.
    The Clerk. Mr. Costello votes no.
    Chairman Gordon. Is there anyone else?
    If the Clerk will report.
    The Clerk. Mr. Chairman, 15 Members vote aye. No. Ten 
Members vote aye, and 15 Members vote no.



    Chairman Gordon. The amendment is not passed.
    Are there any other amendments?
    If no, then the vote is on the bill H.R. 5618 as amended. 
All those in favor, say aye. All opposed, no. In the opinion of 
the Chair the ayes have it.
    And I, you know, we are just going to have to come back. So 
I am sorry for the inconvenience, but we will take a recess, 
come back after this and finish this, and we have one more bill 
in addition to this.
    [Recess.]
    Chairman Gordon. The Committee will reconvene, and I will 
recognize Dr. Gingrey for a motion.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee 
favorably report H.R. 5618 as amended, the National Sea Grant 
College Program Act of 2008, to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill do pass.
    Furthermore, I move that staff be instructed to prepare the 
legislative report and make necessary technical and conforming 
changes and that the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring 
the bill before the House for consideration.
    Chairman Gordon. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it.
    Mr. Akin. Mr. Chairman, should we ask for a recorded vote 
on that or----
    Chairman Gordon. I don't----
    Mr. Akin. Oh, maybe not. Okay.
    Chairman Gordon. Yes. The ayes have it, and the bill is 
favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days in 
which to submit supplemental, Minority, or additional views on 
the measure, ending Monday, May, June 30, excuse me, at 9:00 
a.m.
    I move pursuant to Clause one of rule 22 of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives that the Committee authorizes the 
Chairman to offer such motions as may be necessary in the House 
to adopt and pass H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College 
Program Amendments Act of 2008, as amended.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    I want to thank Members for their attendance, and we will 
see you next Wednesday probably.
    [Whereupon, at 1:33 p.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


        H.R. 5618, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendment Roster






                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
               H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College
                     Program Amendments Act of 2008

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE

    Section 1 entitles the legislation as the ``National Sea Grant 
College Program Amendments Act of 2008.''

SECTION 2. REFERENCES

    Section 2 clarifies that all amendment references in the 
legislation are made to the National Sea Grant College Program Act (33 
U.S.C. 1121 et seq.).

SECTION 3. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES

    Section 3 amplifies the extension aspects of the Sea Grant program 
and cites the relevance of the National Ocean Research Priorities Plan 
and Implementation Strategy to the Sea Grant Program.

SECTION 4. DEFINITIONS

    Section 4 defines key terms included within the text of the 
proposed legislation, including `regional research and information 
plan' and `National Ocean Research Priorities Plan and Implementation 
Strategy' where they appear in the bill.

SECTION 5. NATIONAL SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM, GENERALLY

    Section 5 amends the Program Elements to expand Sea Grant programs 
to include regional and national projects among Sea Grant institutions 
and to add regional strategic investments in projects undertaken 
through sea grant projects. Section 5 also augments the functions of 
the Director of the National Sea Grant College Program to include 
encouraging collaborations among Sea Grant colleges and institutions. 
This section also strikes the sea grant program performance ranking 
system for allocating additional resources on the basis of performance.

SECTION 6. PROGRAM OR PROJECT GRANTS AND CONTRACTS

    Section 6 exempts the Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship 
Program from having to match grant awards in order to achieve parity 
between fellows placed in Congressional offices with those fellows 
placed in federal agencies.
    This section also increases the percentage of funds exempt from the 
non-federal match requirement from the current one percent to five 
percent.

SECTION 7.  EXTENSION SERVICES BY SEA GRANT COLLEGES AND SEA GRANT 
                    INSTITUTES

    Section 7 clarifies that one of the requirements for designation 
includes an extension program (as opposed to an ``advisory service'').

SECTION 8. TECHNICAL CORRECTION RELATING TO FELLOWSHIPS

    Section 8 updates the statutory language requiring a report every 
two years on efforts to include minority and economically disadvantaged 
students.

SECTION 9. NATIONAL SEA GRANT ADVISORY BOARD

    Section 9 expands the responsibilities of the National Sea Grant 
Review Panel, renaming the panel as the ``National Sea Grant Advisory 
Board'' to more appropriately and accurately describe its purpose and 
function.

SECTION 10. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

    Section 10 increases authorized funding levels from $66 million to 
$100 million for the period between Fiscal Year 2009 through Fiscal 
Year 2014.