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110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     110-855

======================================================================



 
HEAVY DUTY HYBRID VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION ACT 
                                OF 2008

                                _______
                                

 September 16, 2008.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 6323]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 6323) to establish a research, development, 
demonstration, and commercial application program to promote 
research of appropriate technologies for heavy duty plug-in 
hybrid vehicles, and for other purposes, having considered the 
same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend 
that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................4
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................4
  IV. Hearing Summary.................................................6
   V. Committee Actions...............................................8
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................9
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill (by Section)...........10
VIII. Committee Views................................................11
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................12
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................12
  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4...............................13
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............13
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........13
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................13
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................13
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................13
XVII. Earmark Identification.........................................13
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........13

 XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported..........14
  XX. Committee Recommendations......................................14
 XXI. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup.........................15
XXII. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................34

                              I. Amendment

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Heavy Duty Hybrid Vehicle Research, 
Development, and Demonstration Act of 2008''.

SEC. 2. ADVANCED HEAVY DUTY HYBRID VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH, 
                    DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, AND COMMERCIAL 
                    APPLICATION PROGRAM.

  (a) Establishment.--The Secretary shall establish a competitive 
research, development, demonstration, and commercial application 
program (referred to in this Act as the ``program'') to provide grants 
to applicants to carry out projects to advance research and development 
and to demonstrate technologies for advanced heavy duty hybrid 
vehicles.
  (b) Applications.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary shall issue requirements for 
        applying for grants under the program.
          (2) Selection criteria.--The Secretary shall establish 
        selection criteria for awarding grants under the program. In 
        evaluating applications, the Secretary shall--
                  (A) consider the ability of applicants to 
                successfully complete both phases described in 
                subsection (c); and
                  (B) give priority to applicants who are best able 
                to--
                          (i) fill existing research gaps and achieve 
                        the greatest advances beyond the state of 
                        current technology; and
                          (ii) achieve the greatest reduction in fuel 
                        consumption and emissions.
          (3) Partners.--An applicant for a grant under this section 
        may carry out a project in partnership with other entities.
          (4) Schedule.--
                  (A) Application request.--Not later than 180 days 
                after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
                Secretary shall publish in the Federal Register, and 
                elsewhere as appropriate, a request for applications to 
                undertake projects under the program. Applications 
                shall be due not later than 90 days after the date of 
                such publication.
                  (B) Application selection.--Not later than 90 days 
                after the date on which applications for grants under 
                the program are due, the Secretary shall select, 
                through a competitive process, all applicants to be 
                awarded a grant under the program.
          (5) Number of grants.--The Secretary shall determine the 
        number of grants to be awarded under the program based on the 
        technical merits of the applications received. The number of 
        grants awarded under the program shall not be less than 3 or 
        more than 7, and at least half of the grants awarded shall be 
        for plug-in hybrid technology.
          (6) Award amounts.--The Secretary shall award not more than 
        $3,000,000 to each recipient per year for each of the 3 years 
        of the project.
  (c) Program Requirements; Two Phases.--Each grant recipient shall be 
required to complete two phases:
          (1) Phase one.--
                  (A) In general.--In phase one, the recipient shall 
                research and demonstrate advanced hybrid technology by 
                producing or retrofitting one or more advanced heavy 
                duty hybrid vehicles.
                  (B) Report.--Not later than 60 days after the 
                completion of phase one, the recipient shall submit to 
                the Secretary a report containing data and analysis 
                of--
                          (i) the performance of each vehicle in 
                        carrying out the testing procedures developed 
                        by the Secretary under subparagraph (E);
                          (ii) the performance during such testing of 
                        each vehicle's components, including the 
                        battery, energy management system, charging 
                        system, and power controls;
                          (iii) the projected cost of each vehicle, 
                        including acquisition, operating, and 
                        maintenance costs; and
                          (iv) the emissions levels of each vehicle, 
                        including greenhouse gas levels.
                  (C) Termination.--The Secretary may terminate the 
                grant program with respect to the project of a 
                recipient at the conclusion of phase one if the 
                Secretary determines that the recipient cannot 
                successfully complete the requirements of phase two.
                  (D) Timing.--Phase one begins upon receipt of a grant 
                under the program and has a duration of one year.
                  (E) Testing procedures.--The Secretary shall develop 
                standard testing procedures to be used by recipients in 
                testing each vehicle. Such procedures shall include 
                testing a vehicle's performance under typical operating 
                conditions.
          (2) Phase two.--
                  (A) In general.--In phase two, the recipient shall 
                demonstrate advanced manufacturing processes and 
                technologies by producing or retrofitting 50 advanced 
                heavy duty hybrid vehicles.
                  (B) Report.--Not later than 60 days after the 
                completion of phase two, the recipient shall submit to 
                the Secretary a report containing--
                          (i) an analysis of the technological 
                        challenges encountered by the recipient in the 
                        development of the vehicles;
                          (ii) an analysis of the technological 
                        challenges involved in mass producing the 
                        vehicles; and
                          (iii) the manufacturing cost of each vehicle, 
                        the estimated sale price of each vehicle, and 
                        the cost of a comparable non-hybrid vehicle.
                  (C) Timing.--Phase two begins at the conclusion of 
                phase one and has a duration of two years.
  (d) Research on Vehicle Usage and Alternative Drive Trains.--The 
Secretary shall conduct research into alternative power train designs 
for use in advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicles. Such research shall 
compare the estimated cost, including operating and maintenance costs, 
emissions reductions, and fuel savings of each design with similar non-
hybrid power train designs under the conditions in which these vehicles 
are typically used, including, for each vehicle type--
          (1) number of miles driven;
          (2) time spent with the engine at idle;
          (3) horsepower requirements;
          (4) length of time the maximum or near maximum power output 
        of the vehicle is needed; and
          (5) any other factors that the Secretary considers 
        appropriate.
  (e) Report to the Congress.--Not later than 60 days after the 
Secretary receives the reports from grant recipients under subsection 
(c)(2)(B), the Secretary shall submit to the Congress a report 
containing--
          (1) an identification of the grant recipients and a 
        description of the projects to be funded;
          (2) an identification of all applicants who submitted 
        applications for the program;
          (3) all data contained in reports submitted by grant 
        recipients under subsection (c);
          (4) a description of the vehicles produced or retrofitted by 
        recipients in phase one and phase two of the project, including 
        an analysis of the fuel efficiency of such vehicles; and
          (5) the results of the research carried out under subsections 
        (d) and (h).
  (f) Coordination and Nonduplication.--To the maximum extent 
practicable, the Secretary shall coordinate, and not duplicate, 
activities under this Act with other programs and laboratories of the 
Department of Energy and other Federal research programs.
  (g) Cost Sharing.--Section 988 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 
U.S.C. 16352) shall apply to the program established pursuant to this 
section.
  (h) Electrical Grid Research Pilot Program.--The Secretary shall 
establish a pilot program through the National Laboratories and 
Technology Centers of the Department of Energy to research and test the 
effects on the domestic electric power grid of the widespread use of 
plug-in hybrid vehicles, including plug-in hybrid vehicles that are 
advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicles.
  (i) Definitions.--For purposes of this section:
          (1) Advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicle.--The term ``advanced 
        heavy duty hybrid vehicle'' means a vehicle with a gross weight 
        between 14,000 pounds and 33,000 pounds that is fueled, in 
        part, by a rechargeable energy storage system.
          (2) Greenhouse gas.--The term ``greenhouse gas'' means--
                  (A) carbon dioxide;
                  (B) methane;
                  (C) nitrous oxide;
                  (D) hydrofluorocarbons;
                  (E) perfluorocarbons; or
                  (F) sulfur hexafluoride.
          (3) Plug-in hybrid.--The term ``plug-in hybrid'' means a 
        vehicle fueled, in part, by electrical power that can be 
        recharged by connecting the vehicle to an electric power 
        source.
          (4) Retrofit.--The term ``retrofit'' means the process of 
        creating an advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicle by converting an 
        existing, fuel-powered vehicle.
          (5) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of 
        Energy.
  (j) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary 
        $16,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2009 through 2011 to carry 
        out this section.
          (2) Of the funds authorized under paragraph (1), not more 
        than $1,000,000 per fiscal year may be used for--
                  (A) carrying out the studies required under 
                subsection (d);
                  (B) carrying out the pilot program required under 
                subsection (h); and
                  (C) the administration of the program.

SEC. 3. EXPANDING RESEARCH IN HYBRID TECHNOLOGY FOR LARGE VEHICLES.

  Subsection (g)(1) of the United States Energy Storage Competitiveness 
Act of 2007 (enacted as section 641(g)(1) of the Energy Independence 
and Security Act of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 17231(g)(1))) is amended by 
inserting ``vehicles with a gross weight over 16,000 pounds,'' before 
``stationary applications''.

                        II. Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of H.R. 6323, the ``Heavy Hybrid Truck 
Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 2008,'' is to 
establish a research, development, demonstration, and 
commercial application program to promote research of 
appropriate technologies for heavy duty hybrid vehicles, and 
for other purposes.

                III. Background and Need for Legislation

    Because large, heavy duty trucks rely on a diesel or 
gasoline internal combustion engine for power, they typically 
have relatively low fuel economy and high emissions. This is 
especially evident in trucks with duty-cycles that require 
frequent starts and stops or long periods of engine idling to 
power auxiliary systems such as bucket lifters, trash 
compactors, off-board power tools, air conditioning, 
refrigeration, or other work-related equipment. Switching a 
portion of the driving and auxiliary power loads away from the 
internal combustion engine to an alternate power source would 
enable these vehicles to realize considerable fuel savings and 
emissions reductions compared to conventional models. The 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that an average 
delivery truck using a hybrid drive system could save 
approximately 1,000 gallons of diesel per year compared to one 
with a conventional drive system.
    High fuel prices and tightening emissions standards provide 
an added impetus for the development of new heavy duty hybrid 
truck systems. Several manufacturers have technologies in 
various stages of development for a range of large commercial 
vehicle platforms such as package delivery vans, buses, refuse 
collection trucks, large utility ``bucket'' trucks, 
construction vehicles, and short- and long-haul tractor trailer 
trucks. Research supported by the Department of Defense (DOD) 
has also been a key driver of innovation for heavy hybrids 
since these technologies can provide several strategic 
advantages including substantial noise reduction, a source of 
alternative power for radar and weapons systems, reduction of 
overall weight and maintenance requirements, and longer ranges 
between vehicle refueling. Despite substantial investment in 
both the defense and commercial sectors, the cost of research 
and development and the final price of heavy duty hybrid 
vehicles remain prohibitively high, even for military 
applications. Consequently, there remain significant technical 
obstacles to development and final commercial application of 
these technologies that federally-sponsored R&D; activities can 
help to overcome.
    Managing a comprehensive federal R&D; program is complicated 
by the fact that there is no one-size-fits-all hybrid solution 
for the entire heavy duty vehicle sector. The power demands of 
heavy duty trucks are as varied as the applications, and 
deploying hybrid models into heavy truck fleets is more 
complicated than simply scaling up the hybrid systems used for 
passenger vehicles. For example, through the course of an 
average drive cycle the charging and discharging of a hybrid 
system on a refuse truck with its frequent starts and stops, 
dumpster lifting, and trash compaction will be considerably 
different than that of a utility truck, which may idle in one 
place for several hours to operate a boom or other equipment. 
Furthermore, developing hybrid systems for long-haul tractor 
trailer rigs (Class VIII) presents an even greater challenge 
since these vehicles seldom brake during a drive cycle, 
providing few opportunities for battery systems to recharge 
through regenerative braking. The energy storage devices and 
related control systems may be altogether different for each of 
these platforms. Future generations of heavy trucks may also 
include plug-in hybrid electric models that can store more 
electric energy in larger banks of batteries and charge these 
batteries through direct connection to the electricity grid 
either while in operation on a jobsite or in a parking lot or 
garage.
    The majority of federal funding for hybrid vehicle R&D; has 
focused on passenger vehicles which far outnumber heavy trucks. 
However, the federal R&D; portfolio should address the 
significant potential for fuel savings and emissions reductions 
through improvements in the heavy duty vehicle sector, and take 
advantage of the ability of this sector to deploy new 
technologies quickly. For example, according to the Oshkosh 
Truck Corporation, there are approximately 90,000 refuse trucks 
in the United States. Their collective fuel consumption is 
equivalent to 2.5 million passenger vehicles (based on 10,000 
gallons/year per truck). Eaton Corporation estimates that as 
few as 10,000 hybrid electric trucks could reduce diesel fuel 
usage by 7.2 million gallons per year (approx. 1 million 
barrels of oil), reduce annual NOX emissions by the 
amount equivalent to removing New York City's passenger cars 
for 25 days, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 83,000 
tons.
    Energy storage technology options for hybrid trucks 
generally include batteries, hybrid hydraulic systems, and 
ultra-capacitors. Batteries receive the most attention and 
research funding because of their applicability throughout the 
transportation sector. To expand the use of electricity in the 
vehicles sector, batteries must be smaller, lighter, cheaper, 
and more powerful. Vehicle batteries typically fall into one of 
three families of technologies: lead-acid, nickel metal hydride 
(NiMH), and lithium-ion (Li-ion). Lead-acid batteries have many 
advantages including their relative simplicity and low cost, 
wide-scale availability, domestic manufacturing capacity, and 
established recycling infrastructure. NiMH batteries are found 
in the current generation of hybrid vehicles and will be the 
battery of choice for many of the first generation heavy hybrid 
trucks. However, high weight and low power density are 
significant issues for both lead-acid and NiMH batteries. Many 
in the industry believe the future of hybrids depends on 
breakthroughs in new battery technologies, such as the lithium-
ion (Li-ion) batteries with their comparatively low weight and 
high power density. In addition to resolving remaining serious 
technical issues such as heat management, the cost of 
manufacturing Li-ion batteries remains prohibitively high for 
large-scale deployment in vehicles. There is also concern that 
the U.S. is falling behind countries like Japan, China and 
France in the race to develop and mass produce batteries for 
hybrid vehicles. Consequently, a significant effort is underway 
to build up a domestic supply chain.
    Plug-in hybrid applications that include an energy storage 
system charged by an external power source are a particularly 
attractive option for certain platforms of heavy dutyvehicles. 
Furthermore, heavy trucks fleets provide a valuable test-bed for 
demonstrating technologies that may ultimately end up in the passenger 
vehicle market. Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles (PHEV) is a critical near-to-
mid term technology option for drastically reducing the nation's 
dependence on foreign oil. PHEV's, unlike traditional hybrid 
application, shift most of the vehicle's energy source from petroleum 
to domestically-produced power from the electricity grid while still 
providing sufficient power to handle heavy duty applications. Some 
studies suggest that PHEV's may have the added benefit of reducing 
transportation-related carbon emissions, even if the electricity is 
generated solely from coal. Much research remains in developing the 
technology to reduce the weight and cost of the systems while improving 
reliability.
    The Department of Energy (DOE) has funded limited research 
on the hybridization of trucks, most recently through the 21st 
Century Truck Partnership which conducts research and 
development through joint public and private efforts. Other 
federal agencies involved in the 21st Century Truck Partnership 
include the Department of Defense, the Department of 
Transportation, and EPA. Because of the highly fragmented 
nature of the heavy duty vehicle manufacturing industry, there 
is limited in-house research and testing capabilities for even 
the largest of firms. The industry often relies on research 
efforts of unique Federal facilities such as DOE's National 
Renewable Energy Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory, 
the EPA's National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory, and 
the Army's National Automotive Center. Despite the potential 
economic and environmental benefits of hybrid trucks and the 
considerable technical hurdles that remain, the 21st Century 
Truck Partnership is facing decreased funding and an uncertain 
future as the administration chooses to focus federal research 
on the passenger vehicle market. DOE does not currently offer 
any competitive grants that target the development of 
technologies applicable for use in hybrid trucks.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    The Subcommittee on Energy and Environment held a hearing 
entitled, ``Hybrid Technologies for Medium-to-Heavy Duty 
Commercial Vehicles,'' on Tuesday, June 10, 2008 to receive 
testimony from the following witnesses:
           Mr. Terry Penney, Technology Manager, 
        Advanced Vehicle and Fuel Technologies, National 
        Renewable Energy Laboratory
           Mr. Eric M. Smith, Chief Engineer, Hybrid 
        Medium Duty Truck, Eaton Corporation
           Mr. Joseph Dalum, Vice President, Dueco Inc.
           Ms. Jill Egbert, Manager, Clean Air 
        Transportation, Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E;)
           Mr. Richard Parish, Senior Program Manager, 
        Calstart--Hybrid Truck Users Forum (HTUF)
    The hearing focused on a discussion draft of a bill to 
authorize a research, development and demonstration program on 
heavy duty hybrid vehicles authored by Rep. James 
Sensenbrenner.
    The witnesses all indicated a need for ongoing federal R&D; 
on hybrid technology applications in heavy duty vehicles. They 
all pointed to the substantial benefits of broader 
incorporation of hybrid technologies in this sector to address 
more stringent emission requirements, higher fuel costs, and as 
a mechanism to reduce carbon emissions in the transportation 
sector. They all pointed out the wide variety of medium and 
heavy duty vehicles and the challenges presented by these 
vehicles in comparison to the light-duty vehicles.
    Mr. Penney noted that although the benefits of integrating 
hybrid technologies into heavy duty vehicles are considerable, 
there are significant barriers to the broader adoption of these 
technologies by this sector. Additional information about the 
reliability of hybrid systems and the performance of other 
vehicle components are needed to assure manufacturers of heavy 
duty vehicles and their customers that these technologies will 
offer savings in fuel economy to offset any increases in the 
cost premiums associated with hybrid vehicles. The cost of 
production for energy storage systems, drive trains and power 
electronics all need to be reduced to facilitate broader 
production of hybrid vehicles.
    Mr. Smith testified about the work being done by his 
company, the Eaton Corporation, on hybrid technologies for 
application in commercial vehicles. Mr. Smith discussed the 
significant fuel savings and emission reduction that can be 
realized by hybrid electric power systems. He stated that 
hybrid power applications are well suited to heavy duty 
vehicles particularly in those of Classes V through VIII. Mr. 
Smith testified that the broader application of hybrid 
technologies is dependent upon the development and 
commercialization of lithium ion batteries. Mr. Smith urged the 
Committee to consider research and development support for 
electric hybrid, hydraulic hybrid, and plug-in hybrid systems 
for commercial vehicles.
    Mr. Dalum testified that rising fuel prices, tighter 
emission requirements, the national priority to reduce 
dependence on foreign oil, increased maintenance costs, and the 
increased interest in lowering carbon emissions are all factors 
leading to increased interest in applications of hybrid 
technologies for medium-duty and heavy duty vehicles. Mr. Dalum 
discussed the benefits of utilizing electric grid power to 
charge batteries that are then used to power equipment on 
stationary utility vehicles. Mr. Dalum expressed his belief 
that additional R&D; on hybrid systems would lead to further 
improvements in fuel savings. Mr. Dalum indicated several areas 
in need of further R&D; including improved battery systems and 
powertrain architectures, expanded design and performance 
evaluation of a broader range of specific applications for 
medium and heavy duty trucks. Mr. Dalum also indicated there 
were outstanding questions about the ability of the current 
electric grid to provide sufficient capacity for recharge of 
fleets of heavy duty vehicles.Mr. Dalum also urged support for 
additional research on plug-in hybrid applications for medium and heavy 
duty vehicles.
    Ms. Egbert discussed the experience of Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company (PG&E;) of incorporating medium and heavy duty 
hybrid and plug-in hybrid vehicles into their fleet. The 
applications most common in their fleets are for bucket trucks 
and trouble trucks, the vehicles used by first response teams 
to restore power outages. Ms. Egbert indicated that PG&E; has 
seen substantial fuel savings as a result of incorporating 
hybrid vehicles into their fleet. Ms. Egbert identified the 
significant additional cost for purchase of hybrid vehicles as 
a major barrier to their broader adoption. Ms. Egbert 
recommended the acceleration of research, development and 
deployment of these vehicles to realize the substantial 
benefits in fuel economy and emission reductions. Ms. Egbert 
also urged Congress to consider providing additional financial 
incentives to spur the market for hybrid vehicles.
    Mr. Parish discussed the activities of Calstart and the 
Hybrid Truck Users Forum and their cooperative efforts with the 
Department of Energy and the U.S. Army National Automotive 
Center to encourage demonstration of medium and heavy duty 
hybrid vehicles in commercial fleets. Mr. Parish indicated a 
need for the development of electrically-driven components 
required to enable medium and heavy duty trucks to implement 
engine off at idle capability as is seen in light duty 
passenger vehicles. Mr. Parish indicated that medium and heavy 
duty vehicles present additional challenges in design, 
development and deployment of hybrid technologies due to their 
weight, the diversity of classes and uses, and the requirement 
for durability of these vehicles. Mr. Parish expressed support 
for continuing the R&D; efforts that have been supported by the 
National Renewable Energy Laboratory as well as support for 
ongoing R&D; on heavy duty vehicles. Mr. Parish also indicated a 
need for purchase incentives to offset the higher upfront costs 
of medium and heavy duty hybrids.

                          V. Committee Actions

    The Subcommittee on Energy and Environment met to consider 
a Chairman's Mark of the ``Heavy Hybrid Truck Research and 
Development Act of 2008'', a bill authored by Representative F. 
James Sensenbrenner on June 17, 2008 and to consider the 
following:
    An amendment offered by Ms. Biggert to add a provision to 
authorize research on alternative power trains for use in heavy 
duty hybrid vehicles and a study to compare the cost and fuel 
savings of each hybrid vehicle design receiving a grant under 
this program with that of a conventional non-hybrid vehicle. 
The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Baird moved that the Subcommittee favorably report the 
Chairman's Mark as amended to the Full Committee on Science and 
Technology. The motion was agreed to by a voice vote.
    The Chairman's Mark as reported by the Subcommittee was 
introduced on June 19, 2008 as H.R. 6323, the ``Heavy Hybrid 
Truck Research and Development Act of 2008.''
    On July 16, 2008, the House Committee on Science and 
Technology met to consider H.R. 6323 as reported from the 
Subcommittee on Energy and Environment and the following:
    An amendment-in-the-nature-of-a-substitute offered by Mr. 
Hall on behalf of Mr. Sensenbrenner to change the number of 
grantees and broaden the focus of the bill. The amendment was 
agreed to by voice vote.
    An amendment to the amendment-in-the-nature-of-a-substitute 
offered by Mr. Reichert to establish a pilot program at the 
Department of Energy to test the impact of plug-in hybrid 
electric vehicles on the electric power grid. The amendment was 
agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Hall offered a motion that the Committee favorably 
report the bill, H.R. 6323, as amended, to the House of 
Representatives. The motion was agreed to by voice vote. The 
bill was ordered to be reported favorably to the House of 
Representatives.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    H.R. 6323 directs the Secretary of DOE (Secretary) to 
establish a grant program for the development of advanced heavy 
duty hybrid vehicles. The bill gives the Secretary the 
discretion to award between three and seven grants based on the 
technical merits of the proposals received. At least half of 
the awarded grants must be for the development of plug-in 
hybrid trucks.
    Grants are awarded to applicants for two phases of research 
and development. In phase one, recipients must build at least 
one advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicle, conduct studies of the 
vehicle, and report to DOE on the performance, cost, and 
emissions levels of the vehicle. In phase two, recipients must 
produce 50 advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicles and report to 
DOE on the technological challenges and estimated costs 
involved in wide-scale manufacture.
    H.R. 6323 also directs the Secretary to conduct a study of 
alternative power train designs for use in advanced heavy duty 
hybrid vehicles. The study includes analysis of different 
designs under conditions of typical use. The bill also directs 
the Secretary to establish a pilot program through the National 
Laboratories to research and test the effects on the domestic 
electric power grid of widespread use of plug-in hybrid 
vehicles.
    Grant applicants may include partnerships between 
manufacturers, electrical utilities, or other entities to 
fulfill the program's requirements. Awards under H.R. 6323 will 
be for up to $3 million per year for three years. 
Appropriations are authorized for $16 million per year for 
fiscal years 2009 through 2011. H.R. 6323 also amends the 
Energy Storage Competitiveness Act of 2007 (enacted as section 
641(g)(1) of the Energy Independenceand Security Act of 2007 
(42 U.S.C. 17231(g)(1)) to include heavy trucks in the Secretary's 
priorities for applied energy storage research.

       VII. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill (by Section)


Section 1. Short title

    H.R. 6323 can be cited as the ``Heavy Duty Hybrid Vehicle 
Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 2008.''

Section 2. Advanced Heavy Duty Hybrid Vehicle Technology Research, 
        Development, Demonstration, and Commercial Application Program

    Section 2(a) directs the Secretary to establish a program 
to provide grants to carry out projects to advance research and 
demonstrate technologies for advanced heavy duty hybrid 
vehicles.
    Section 2(b) requires the Secretary to issue application 
requirements and to establish criteria for making grant awards. 
The Secretary must give priority to applicants who are best 
able to advance the current state of technology and achieve the 
greatest reductions in fuel consumption and emissions. To be 
eligible, recipients must produce trucks with a gross weight 
between 14,000 and 33,000 pounds (e.g. Class IV through Class 
VII vehicles). The Secretary is given discretion to award 
between three and seven grants based on the technical merits of 
the applications received. At least half of the grants are to 
be awarded for plug-in hybrid technology. Applicants can 
partner with other entities to fulfill the obligations of the 
program.
    Section 2(c) defines two phases of research by award 
recipients. In phase one, each recipient has one year to build 
or retrofit one or more advanced heavy duty hybrid vehicles. 
Recipients are required to collect and analyze data on the 
performance of key vehicle components; the estimated costs of 
producing, operating, and maintaining the vehicle; the 
emissions of the vehicle; and on overall vehicle performance 
according to guidelines established by the Secretary.
    If, at the conclusion of phase one, it is clear that a 
grant recipient will be unable to complete the requirements of 
phase two, the Secretary has the discretion to waive the 
requirement for phase two research and terminate the grant to 
that recipient.
    In phase two, recipients are required to demonstrate the 
advanced manufacturing processes of heavy duty plug-in vehicles 
by producing or retrofitting 50 advanced heavy duty hybrid 
vehicles within two years. Recipients must also report on the 
major technological obstacles they encounter in developing and 
producing the vehicles and on the projected costs of each 
vehicle.
    Award recipients are eligible to receive three million 
dollars per year for three years to complete both phases of the 
development program.
    Section 2(d) directs the Secretary to conduct a study of 
alternative power train designs for use in advanced heavy duty 
hybrid vehicles. The study would analyze these different 
designs under conditions which they are typically used, 
including the average number of miles driven, the time spent 
with the engine at idle, horsepower requirements, the length of 
time the maximum power is required, and other factors the 
Secretary determines to be appropriate.
    Section 2(e) requires the Secretary to report to Congress 
within 60 days on the findings of the reports submitted by 
grant recipients.
    Section 2(f) and 2(g) require the Secretary to coordinate 
the research conducted under this program with other research 
conducted by the Department. The cost sharing provisions of 
section 988 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16352) 
apply to the program.
    Section 2(h) directs the Secretary to establish a pilot 
program through DOE's National Laboratories to research and 
test the effects on the domestic electric power grid of the 
widespread use of plug-in hybrid vehicles, including heavy duty 
plug-in hybrid trucks.
    Section 2(i) defines the terms: advanced heavy duty hybrid 
vehicle, greenhouse gas, plug-in hybrid, retrofit, and 
Secretary for the purposes of this section.
    Section 2(j) authorizes appropriations of $16 million per 
year for fiscal years 2009 through 2011.

Section 3. Expanding research in hybrid technology for large vehicles

    This section amends the United States Energy Storage 
Competitiveness Act of 2007 (enacted as section Sec. 641(g)(1) 
of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 
Sec. 17231(g)(1)) to include vehicles with a gross weight over 
8501 pounds in the Secretary's priorities for advanced energy 
storage.

                         VIII. Committee Views

    The hybridization of heavy duty trucks is an important goal 
that has been largely overlooked by the Federal government. 
While numerous federal grants are available for the production 
of hybrid and plug-in hybrid passenger vehicles, there are no 
grants available that specifically target the development of 
heavy duty hybrid vehicles. This is an unfortunate oversight. 
The Committee believes federal investment in this research will 
result in improvements in the fuel efficiency and emission 
profiles of heavy duty vehicles and is likely to provide 
significant economic benefits as well as benefits in energy 
efficiency and air quality.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to award the maximum 
number of grants if sufficient meritorious applications are 
received. The Committee believes that research applicable to 
heavy duty vehicles that make frequent stops such as delivery 
trucks, buses, and refuse collection vehicles and vehicles that 
idle on job sites for extensive periods to operate auxiliary 
functions such as utility ``bucket'' trucks should receive the 
highest priority for funding under this program. The Committee 
does not intend this research and development program to 
provide support for research and development on large, Class 
IV, passenger trucks. The definition of Advanced Heavy Duty 
Hybrid Vehicle included in the legislation specifically 
excludes Class VIII heavy duty vehicles (e.g. long-haul tractor 
trailer trucks). The Committee believes the significantly 
different technical requirements of those platforms likely 
merit funding under separate programs.
    The Committee believes it is important to provide funding 
to applicants best able to provide the greatest potential 
advancement over current technologies and for research that is 
most likely to lead to reduced fuel consumption and reduced 
emissions. In many cases, this will mean awarding applicants 
who propose hybrid designs that rely on multiple sources of 
energy for propulsion, and integration of propulsion and 
auxiliary power systems as this approach entails a greater 
technical challenge.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section X of this report 
pursuant to House rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 6323 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. H.R. 
6323 does authorize additional discretionary spending of $41 
million over the 2009-2013 period, with additional spending 
occurring in later years, as described in the Congressional 
Budget Office report on the bill, which is contained in Section 
X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate


H.R. 6323--Heavy-Duty Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development, and 
        Demonstration Act of 2008

    Summary: H.R. 6323 would direct the Secretary of Energy to 
establish a program to promote research and development of 
technologies to improve the efficiency and reduce emissions of 
certain types of vehicles. The bill would authorize the 
appropriation of $16 million in each of fiscal years 2009 
through 2011, primarily for grants to support efforts to 
develop advanced heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. Those funds also 
would support a program to study how widespread use of plug-in 
hybrid vehicles would affect the domestic electric power grid.
    Based on information from the Department of Energy (DOE) 
and assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 6323 would cost $41 million 
over the 2009-2013 period, with additional spending occurring 
in later years. Enacting the bill would not affect direct 
spending or revenues.
    H.R. 6323 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: For this 
estimate, CBO assumes that the authorized amounts will be 
provided near the start of each fiscal year and that outlays 
will follow historical spending patterns for existing research 
and demonstration programs administered by DOE. The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 6323 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 270 
(energy).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    By fiscal year in millions of dollars--
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
                                                                2009    2010    2011    2012    2013   2009-2013
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level..........................................      16      16      16       0       0        48
Estimated Outlays............................................       3      11      13       9       5        41
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 6323 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would not affect the budgets of state, 
local, or tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Megan Carroll; Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Leo Lex and Neil Hood; 
Impact on the Private Sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 6323 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House rule XIII, the goal of 
H.R. 6323 is to establish a research, development, 
demonstration, and commercial application program to promote 
research of appropriate technologies for heavy duty plug-in 
hybrid vehicles.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 6323.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 6323 does not establish or authorize a new advisory 
committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 6323 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. Earmark Identification

    H.R. 6323 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of rule XXI.

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

       XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is 
printed in italic and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

        UNITED STATES ENERGY STORAGE COMPETITIVENESS ACT OF 2007


SEC. 641. ENERGY STORAGE COMPETITIVENESS.

  (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``United 
States Energy Storage Competitiveness Act of 2007''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (g) Applied Research Program.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary shall conduct an 
        applied research program on energy storage systems to 
        support electric drive vehicles, vehicles with a gross 
        weight over 16,000 pounds, stationary applications, and 
        electricity transmission and distribution technologies, 
        including--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     XX. Committee Recommendations

    On July 17, 2008, the Committee on Science and Technology 
favorably reported the bill, H.R. 6323, ``Heavy Duty Hybrid 
Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 2008'' 
by a voice vote, and recommended its passage by the House of 
Representatives.


   XXI. PROCEEDINGS OF THE MARKUP BY THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND 
    ENVIRONMENT ON H.R. 6323, TO ESTABLISH A RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, 
 DEMONSTRATION, AND COMMERCIAL APPLICATION PROGRAM TO PROMOTE RESEARCH 
OF APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR HEAVY DUTY PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES, AND 
                           FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JUNE 18, 2008

                  House of Representatives,
            Subcommittee on Energy and Environment,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 10:05 a.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Nick 
Lampson [Chairman of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chairman Lampson. Good morning. This Subcommittee on Energy 
and Environment will come to order. Pursuant to notice, the 
Subcommittee on Energy and Environment meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 4174, Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act of 2007, H.R. 5618, National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act of 2008, and a bill to 
establish a research, development, demonstration, and 
commercial application program to promote research of 
appropriate technologies for heavy duty plug-in hybrid vehicles 
and for other purposes.
    We will now proceed with the markup. Beginning with the 
opening statements, I will begin.
    Today the Subcommittee will consider three good bills.
    The first is H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act. This bill establishes an 
interagency ocean acidification research and monitoring 
program. H.R. 4174 was introduced by our colleague from Maine, 
Congressman Tom Allen, and is sponsored by a Member of this 
Subcommittee, Mr. Baird.
    On June 5th we heard from a panel of experts on ocean and 
atmospheric sciences testify in strong support of this 
legislation. The bill authorizes the formation of an 
interagency research and monitoring program to better 
understand ocean acidification and its potential impacts on 
marine organisms and marine ecosystems.
    The second bill we will is consider is H.R. 5618, the 
National Sea Grant College Program Amendments Act. H.R. 5618 
was introduced by Congresswoman Bordallo, Chair of the 
Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Fisheries, 
Wildlife, and Oceans. This bill reauthorizes and amends the 
National Sea Grant College Program Act to implement changes in 
the program recommended by the National Academies of Science.
    The National Sea Grant College Program was last 
reauthorized in 2002. It is a partnership between states and 
the Federal Government to promote understanding, conservation, 
and management of our ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes 
resources. Sea Grants research, education, and extension 
programs have been very effective in training future scientists 
and resource managers, generating information to support sound 
resource management, and delivering applied research results to 
the people who rely on our coastal areas and Great Lakes for 
their livelihoods.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider draft legislation 
authored by Mr. Sensenbrenner, Ranking Member of the 
Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee, to enhance the 
Department of Energy's research program in heavy duty hybrid 
trucks.
    Mr. Sensenbrenner does not sit on this subcommittee, and 
thus will not be joining us today. I understand that the 
manager's amendment has only one small technical change that 
needs to be made prior to introduction. This bill addresses a 
narrow segment of the automobile market with a tremendous 
potential impact. We heard in a Subcommittee hearing last week 
from witnesses who described the substantial oil savings and 
emissions reductions to be had in medium-to-heavy hybrid 
trucks, as well as the benefit to the whole domestic automotive 
sector from the invaluable lessons learned in designing and 
manufacturing these systems.
    I believe this is a very important piece of legislation in 
the large and complex puzzle that is our transportation sector, 
and I look forward to moving this bill through Committee and on 
to the Floor for consideration by the House.
    I urge the support of all Members of the Subcommittee for 
the three bills we will consider today. I look forward to 
working with all of you to further improve these important 
bills as we move to their consideration by the Full Committee.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Lampson follows:]
              Prepared Statement of Chairman Nick Lampson
    Good morning. Today the Subcommittee will consider three bills. The 
first is H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and 
Monitoring Act.
    This bill establishes an interagency ocean acidification research 
and monitoring program. H.R. 4174 was introduced by our colleague from 
Maine, Congressman Tom Allen, and is sponsored by a Member of this 
subcommittee, Mr. Baird.
    On June 5th we heard from a panel of experts on ocean and 
atmospheric sciences testify in strong support of this legislation. The 
bill authorizes the formation of an interagency research and monitoring 
program to better understand ocean acidification and its potential 
impacts on marine organisms and marine ecosystems.
    The second bill we will is consider is H.R. 5618, the National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act.
    H.R. 5618 was introduced by Congresswoman Bordallo, Chair of the 
Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, and 
Oceans.
    This bill reauthorizes and amends the National Sea Grant College 
Program Act to implement changes in the program recommended by the 
National Academy of Sciences.
    The National Sea Grant College Program was last reauthorized in 
2002. It is a partnership between states and the Federal Government to 
promote the understanding, conservation, and management of our ocean, 
coastal, and Great Lakes resources. Sea Grants research, education, and 
extension programs have been very effective in training future 
scientists and resource managers, generating information to support 
sound resource management, and delivering applied research results to 
the people who rely on our coastal areas and Great Lakes for their 
livelihoods.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider draft legislation authored 
by Mr. Sensenbrenner, Ranking Member of the Investigations and 
Oversight Subcommittee, to enhance the Department of Energy's research 
program in heavy duty hybrid trucks.
    Mr. Sensenbrenner does not sit on this subcommittee, and thus will 
not be joining us today. I understand that the manager's amendment has 
only one small technical change that needs to be made prior to 
introduction, and that we will take up any additional amendments in a 
Full Committee markup.
    This bill addresses a narrow segment of the automobile market with 
a tremendous potential impact. We heard in a Subcommittee hearing last 
week from witnesses who described the substantial oil savings and 
emissions reductions to be had in medium-to-heavy hybrid trucks, as 
well as the benefit to the whole domestic automotive sector from the 
invaluable lessons learned in designing and manufacturing these 
systems.
    I believe this is a very important piece of legislation in the 
large and complex puzzle that is our transportation sector. I look 
forward to moving this bill through Committee and on to the Floor for 
consideration by the House.
    I urge the support of all Members of the Subcommittee for the three 
bills we will consider today. I look forward to working with all of you 
to further improve these important bills as we move to their 
consideration by the Full Committee.

    Chairman Lampson. I now recognize Mr. Inglis to present his 
opening remarks.
    Mr. Inglis. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and thank you for 
holding this markup. Today we will consider three bills before 
this Subcommittee. H.R. 4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification 
Research and Monitoring Act would organize and coordinate 
federal agency efforts to address ocean acidification into a 
comprehensive research, monitoring, and assessment program. Two 
weeks ago, this subcommittee held a hearing in which we 
received several recommended changes from the expert panel of 
witnesses. Representative Baird and I will introduce an 
amendment that acts upon these recommendations. As we move 
forward to Full Committee, I hope that we can further improve 
the international components of this bill and encourage our 
scientists to work with their colleagues overseas.
    Secondly, we will consider H.R. 5618, the National Sea 
Grant College Program Amendments Act. Since its inception in 
1966, the National Sea Grant Program has been a successful 
collaborative effort of the Federal Government, State 
governments, and universities. Under the program, these groups 
work together to understand, develop, and conserve our coastal 
and ocean resources. As we mark up H.R. 5618, our goal should 
be a reauthorization that equips the Sea Grant Program to 
continue providing sound science and management products that 
benefit our coastal regions and conserve our coastal resources.
    Finally, we will consider draft legislation introduced by 
Mr. Sensenbrenner that would steer federal dollars toward 
research, development, and demonstration in the area of 
commercial truck hybrid technologies.
    Thank you again, Mr. Chairman. I look forward to working 
with you to advance this legislation.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Inglis follows:]
            Prepared Statement of Representative Bob Inglis
    Thank you for holding this markup, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we'll consider three bills before this subcommittee. H.R. 
4174, the Federal Ocean Acidification Research and Monitoring Act, 
would organize and coordinate federal agency efforts to address ocean 
acidification into a comprehensive research, monitoring and assessment 
program. Two weeks ago, this subcommittee held a hearing in which we 
received several recommended changes from the expert panel of 
witnesses. Rep. Baird and I will introduce an amendment that acts upon 
these recommendations. As we move forward to Full Committee, I hope 
that we can further improve the international components of this bill 
and encourage our scientists to work with their colleagues overseas.
    Secondly, we'll consider H.R. 5618, the National Sea Grant College 
Program Amendments Act. Since its inception in 1966, the National Sea 
Grant Program has been a successful collaborative effort of the Federal 
Government, State governments, and universities. Under the program, 
these groups work together to understand, develop, and conserve our 
coastal and ocean resources. As we markup H.R. 5618, our goal should be 
a reauthorization that equips the Sea Grant Program to continue 
providing sound science and management products that benefit our 
coastal regions and conserve our coastal resources.
    Finally, we will consider draft legislation introduced by Mr. 
Sensenbrenner that would steer federal dollars toward research, 
development, and demonstration in the area of commercial truck hybrid 
technologies.
    Thank you again, Mr. Chairman, and I look forward to working with 
you to advance this legislation.

    Chairman Lampson. Thank you, Mr. Inglis. Without objection, 
Members may place additional opening statements in the record 
at this point.
    We will now consider a Chairman's mark of a bill to 
establish a research, development, demonstration, and 
commercial application program to promote research of 
appropriate technologies for heavy duty plug-in hybrid vehicles 
and for other purposes. This mark is the good work of 
Congressman Jim Sensenbrenner, and I will just again express my 
support for the gentleman's bill.
    I now recognize Mr. Inglis to present any remarks on the 
bill.
    Mr. Inglis. Mr. Chairman, I have no further remarks. I look 
forward to moving it to consideration.
    Chairman Lampson. Does anyone wish to be recognized?
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Lampson. Mr. Bartlett, you are recognized.
    Mr. Bartlett. Thank you very much. This bill recognizes a 
very serious problem, that is, the fact that trucks deliver 
most of everything that we have, and in the final delivery, the 
trucks are stopping and starting; and this is the least 
efficient, most polluting way to use a reciprocating engine. 
And so recognizing that the Air Force for several years now has 
been sponsoring the development of a hybrid truck for fueling 
their aircraft. My concern is that this bill is too narrowly 
drawn. The primary challenge in this development is not the 
plug-in feature. You can buy a Prius automobile and take it to 
a shop and they will make it a plug-in for you overnight. The 
primary challenge here is the drive train integrating the 
electric motor in the drive train and the battery pack. And I 
would be most favorable to the bill if it could be broadened to 
recognize the primary challenge, which is not the very simple 
plug-in feature, but the development of the drive train, the 
integration of the electric motor into the drive train, and the 
development of the batteries. These are huge trucks. Batteries 
will not carry them very far. The plug-in will not add a lot of 
versatility to it. The primary versatility is the fact that 
when you stop, your engine stops and you are no longer 
polluting and using fuel.
    So I would hope that before this gets to Full Committee 
that the bill could be broadened to investigate the really 
challenging features in this development. Thank you very much.
    Chairman Lampson. Thank you, Mr. Bartlett. Does anyone else 
wish to be recognized? I ask unanimous consent that the mark is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point and that 
Members proceed with amendments in order of the roster. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is a manager's amendment 
offered by the gentlelady from Illinois, Ms. Biggert. Are you 
ready to proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Biggert. Yes, Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
    Chairman Lampson. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to the Chairman's mark offered by Mrs. 
Biggert of Illinois.
    Chairman Lampson. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentlelady for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Ms. Biggert. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. This is a simple, 
straightforward amendment that is intended to resolve a 
potential jurisdictional conflict. Section 1(d) of the bill is 
rewritten to clarify that the department shall conduct research 
on vehicle usage and alternative drive trains which may help 
Mr. Bartlett in doing some more research on this and how those 
alternative drive trains perform in comparison to their 
conventional counterparts.
    And just to be clear, this language as well as the language 
of the rest of the bill is still open to critique and 
modification based on feedback from interested parties as we 
continue through this legislative process. But this really is a 
clarification that the jurisdiction will stay within this 
committee.
    So with that, I will yield back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Lampson. Thank you, Ms. Biggert. Is there further 
discussion on the amendment? No further discussion on the 
amendment. If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in 
favor say aye, opposed say no. The ayes have it, and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    Are there any amendments? The hearing on the vote is on the 
Chairman's mark to establish a research, development, 
demonstration, and commercial application program to promote 
research of appropriate technologies for heavy duty plug-in 
hybrid vehicles and for other purposes as amended. All those in 
favor will say aye, those opposed say no. In the opinion of the 
Chair, the ayes have it.
    I recognize Mr. Baird to offer a motion.
    Mr. Baird. Mr. Chair, I would move that the Subcommittee 
favorably report the mark as amended to the Full Committee. 
Furthermore, I move that staff be instructed to prepare the 
Subcommittee legislative report and make necessary technical 
and conforming changes to the bill in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Subcommittee.
    Chairman Lampson. The question is on the motion to report 
the mark favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye, those opposed no. The ayes have it. The mark is 
favorably reported. Without objection, the motion to reconsider 
is laid upon the table. Subcommittee Members may submit 
additional or Minority views on the measure.
    And I want to thank Members for their attendance. This 
concludes our Subcommittee markup. We are adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 10:27 a.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


                      H.R. 6323, Amendment Roster








    XXII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 6323, TO 
   ESTABLISH A RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, AND COMMERCIAL 
APPLICATION PROGRAM TO PROMOTE RESEARCH OF APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGIES FOR 
       HEAVY DUTY PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JULY 16, 2008

                          House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:05 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Gordon. Good morning. The Committee will come to 
order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science and Technology 
meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 3957, the Water 
Use Efficiency and Conservation Research Act; H.R. 2339, the 
Produced Water Utilization Act of 2007; and H.R. 6323, To 
establish a research, development, demonstration and commercial 
application program to promote research of appropriate 
technologies for heavy duty plug-in hybrid vehicles, and for 
other purposes.
    Before we start the markup, we have some Committee business 
to attend to. Yesterday, Ms. Donna Edwards of Maryland was 
appointed to serve on the Committee on Science and Technology. 
We currently have an open subcommittee slot on the Energy and 
Environmental Subcommittee, and I would like to ask unanimous 
consent that Ms. Edwards be elected to the Subcommittee. 
Without objection, so ordered.
    Congratulations, Ms. Edwards. I know that a lot that we do 
here on this committee affects Maryland and we look forward to 
working with you to get your input on that and also for you to 
be a liaison as well as Mr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett, do you want to welcome our new Member?
    Mr. Bartlett. Very happy to have you aboard. Our districts 
adjoin each other. When we have common interests, I will look 
forward to working with you. Thank you.
    Ms. Edwards. Thank you, Mr. Chairman and Mr. Bartlett. 
Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. And when you don't have common interests, 
you will still work with her though, won't you?
    Mr. Bartlett. Absolutely, but all the more so when we have 
common interests.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you. We will now proceed with the 
markup.
    Dwindling water supplies across the United States continue 
to percolate as the major disaster on our nation's horizon. 
Despite large spring rains in some states, the U.S. Drought 
Monitor shows that severe drought still grips the American 
Southeast, California across the Rocky Mountains, and Oklahoma 
and the Texas panhandle. In an effort to protect the country 
from an impending water scarcity crisis, the Committee has 
begun to search out ways for the Federal Government to spur new 
technology innovation in water research and development. Today 
the Committee will consider two bills aimed at preventing a 
future water supply catastrophe.
    First, we will take up H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency 
and Conservation Research Act, introduced by Representative Jim 
Matheson. H.R. 3957 establishes a research and development 
program within the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of 
Research and Development to promote water-use efficiency and 
conservation.
    Through this program, EPA will be able to develop and 
encourage the adoption of technologies and processes that will 
achieve greater water-use efficiencies, thus helping to address 
the water supply shortages. In addition, H.R. 3957 directs EPA 
to disseminate information on current water-use efficiencies 
and conservation technologies. This information will include 
incentives and impediments to development and 
commercialization.
    Next we will consider H.R. 2339, the Produced Water 
Utilization Act, introduced by our colleague from Texas and our 
Ranking Member, Mr. Hall. This bill creates a research, 
development and demonstration program to promote beneficial 
reuse of water produced in connection with oil and gas 
extraction. In the United States, up to 2.3 billion gallons per 
day of produced water is generated. Unfortunately, this water 
is not of sufficient quality to be used to meet our many needs 
for water. This legislation will provide innovative treatment 
technologies that will enable the reuse of this water in an 
environmentally responsible way.
    Let me also say that Congressman Hall and I have been 
discussing the issues of water. We think there are a variety of 
other things. We started this effort this year. We are going to 
continue to look into it next year and we hope that we are 
going to have again probably a series of bipartisan bills that 
we might combine for a real, again a major effort in water 
conservation and technologies for this important problem that 
faces our nation.
    Finally, we will consider H.R. 6323, the Heavy Duty Hybrid 
Research, Development and Demonstration Act, introduced by the 
Ranking Member of the Investigations and Oversight 
Subcommittee, Mr. Sensenbrenner. With skyrocketing full prices, 
energy concerns have been cemented at the forefront of public 
awareness. This committee has responded by pursuing an 
aggressive energy agenda in 2010 and we will continue this in 
the next Congress, and we provided a substantial portfolio of 
bills to the comprehensive energy package which became law last 
December. Mr. Sensenbrenner's bill represents another common 
sense approach to chipping away at our energy challenge.
    The heavy duty sector accounts for a very large portion of 
the Nation's fuel use and transportation-based emissions and 
even small improvements in their efficiency can have a 
substantial impact. Hybrid technologies hold the promise of 
greatly reducing the fuel consumption by the Nation's truck 
fleet. Mr. Sensenbrenner and his staff have worked closely with 
the Majority to ensure that grants under this program explore a 
wide range of hybrid technologies and applications and he has 
made further improvements with an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute.
    These three bills are important steps in ensuring that we 
have adequate water and power supplies across the country, and 
in pushing innovation in the heavy truck sector. I want to 
thank Representative Matheson, Representative Sensenbrenner and 
Ranking Member Hall for their efforts in these two important 
areas, and I ask that Members of the Committee support all 
three bills and move for their passage out of the Committee.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Gordon follows:]
               Prepared Statement of Chairman Bart Gordon
    Good Morning. The Committee will come to order. Pursuant to notice, 
the Committee on Science and Technology meets to consider the following 
measures:

          H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency and Conservation 
        Research Act;

          H.R. 2339, the Produced Water Utilization Act of 
        2007; and,

          H.R. 6323, To establish a research, development, 
        demonstration, and commercial application program to promote 
        research of appropriate technologies for heavy duty plug-in 
        hybrid vehicles, and for other purposes.

    Before we get started with the markup, we have some Committee 
business to attend to. Yesterday Ms. Donna Edwards of Maryland was 
appointed to serve on the Committee on Science and Technology.
    We currently have an open subcommittee slot on the Energy and 
Environment Subcommittee. I would ask unanimous consent that Ms. 
Edwards be elected to this subcommittee. Without objection, so ordered.
    Congratulations, and welcome to the Committee Ms. Edwards.
    We will now proceed with the markup.
    Dwindling water supplies across the United States continue to 
percolate as a major disaster on our nation's horizon. Despite 
tremendous spring rains in some States, the U.S. Drought Monitor shows 
that severe drought still grips the American Southeast, California 
across the Rocky Mountains, and Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle. In an 
effort to protect the country from an impending water scarcity crisis, 
the Committee has begun to search out ways for the Federal Government 
to spur new technological innovations in water research and 
development. Today the Committee will consider two bills aimed at 
preventing a future water supply catastrophe.
    First, we will take up H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency and 
Conservation Research Act introduced by Representative Jim Matheson. 
H.R. 3957 establishes a research and development program within the 
Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development to 
promote water-use efficiency and conservation.
    Through this program, EPA will be able to develop and encourage the 
adoption of technologies and processes that will achieve greater water-
use efficiency, thus helping to address the water supply shortages. In 
addition, H.R. 3957 directs EPA to disseminate information on current 
water-use efficient and conservation technologies. This information 
will include incentives and impediments to development and 
commercialization.
    Next, we will consider H.R. 2339, the Produced Water Utilization 
Act introduced by my colleague from Texas and our Ranking Member, Mr. 
Hall. This bill creates a research, development, and demonstration 
program to promote the beneficial reuse of water produced in connection 
with oil and gas extraction. In the United States, up to 2.3 billion 
gallons per day of produced water is generated. Unfortunately, this 
water is not of sufficient quality to be used to meet our many needs 
for water. This legislation will provide innovative treatment 
technologies that will enable the reuse of this water in an 
environmentally responsible way.
    Finally, we will consider H.R. 6323, the Heavy Duty Hybrid 
Research, Development, and Demonstration Act, introduced by the Ranking 
Member of the Investigations and Oversight Subcommittee, Mr. 
Sensenbrenner. With skyrocketing fuel prices, energy concerns have been 
cemented at the forefront of public awareness.
    This committee responded by pursuing an aggressive energy agenda in 
110th Congress, and provided a substantial portfolio of bills to the 
comprehensive energy package which became law last December. Mr. 
Sensenbrenner's bill represents another common sense approach to 
chipping away at our energy challenge.
    The heavy truck sector accounts for a very large portion of the 
Nation's fuel use and transportation-based emissions, and even small 
improvements in their efficiency can have a substantial impact. Hybrid 
technologies hold the promise of greatly reducing the fuel consumed by 
the Nation's truck fleet. Mr. Sensenbrenner and his staff have worked 
closely with the Majority to ensure that grants under this program 
explore a wide range of hybrid technologies and applications, and he 
has made further improvements with the Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute.
    These three bills are important steps in ensuring that we have 
adequate water and power supplies across the country, and in pushing 
innovation in the heavy truck sector. I want to thank Representative 
Matheson, Representative Sensenbrenner, and Ranking Member Hall for 
their efforts in these two important areas. I ask that Members of the 
Committee support all three bills and move for their passage out of the 
Committee.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.

    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I thank you for holding the markup 
today and for the three bills before us, and because you have 
so adequately explained these bills, I can make my remarks very 
brief.
    I simply would put my entire statement into the record with 
unanimous consent and I support the three bills we are marking 
up today and hope our colleagues will as well, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Mr. Chairman, thank you for holding this markup today to advance 
the three bills before us today. I will keep my opening remarks brief.
    H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency and Conservation Research Act 
introduced by Mr. Matheson would create a water technology research 
program at the EPA. Research and development of technologies that 
promote greater efficiencies in water use is one of the several 
responses we can make to the water shortages many of our constituents 
are experiencing.
    The second bill, H.R. 2339, the Produced Water Utilization Act of 
2008 is one I introduced, and I feel strongly about its potential to 
benefit our dual needs of energy and water. This bill would provide 
important funding for research, development, demonstration, and 
commercial application of technologies to purify and use produced water 
from oil and natural gas extraction for human, agricultural, and 
industrial purposes.
    H.R. 6323, Mr. Sensenbrenner's heavy duty hybrid vehicle bill, 
would establish a program at DOE to provide grants to carry out 
projects to advance research and development and to demonstrate 
advanced technologies for heavy duty plug-in hybrid vehicles. While 
heavy duty trucks make up a small portion of the market, the potential 
for fuel savings through hybrid technology is substantial.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I support the three bills we're marking up 
today and hope that our colleagues will as well. I yield back the 
balance of my time.

    Chairman Gordon. That was a wonderful statement, Mr. Hall.
    Without objection, Members may place statements in the 
record at this point.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Richardson follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Laura Richardson
    Chairman Gordon, Ranking Member Hall, and fellow Members of the 
Science and Technology Committee, I rise in strong support of each 
piece of legislation that is slated for today's Full Committee markup.

H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency and Conservation Research Act

    First I would like to thank my colleague Rep. Matheson (D-UT) for 
introducing H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency and Conservation 
Research Act, and for his leadership on this issue. My home State of 
California has dealt with its own series of water supply issues in the 
past. Likewise, State and local officials in California have pursued 
this issue in an aggressive manner. In my district we have a nationally 
recognized desalination project. The Long Beach City Council 
implemented strict water conservation regulations.
    Fact of the matter is Americans consume approximately 26 billion 
gallons of water per day, and similar to our consumption of oil, we are 
all going to have to learn to conserve.
    H.R. 3957 is a sound piece of legislation that designates the 
Environmental Protection Agency as the primary federal agency tasked 
with the responsibility of improving our nation's water use 
conservation technology. Given the EPA's track record on water quality 
issues, asking the agency to participate in this endeavor seems like a 
reasonable fit.
    Thirty years ago President Carter advised the Nation that 
conservation was necessary to our quality of life. This legislation 
takes a major step in progressing from statements to attainable goals. 
I encourage my colleagues to support this bill.

H.R. 2339, the Produced Water Utilization Act of 2007

    I want to commend the distinguished Ranking Member, Mr. Hall for 
introducing H.R. 2339, the Produced Water Utilization Act of 2007.
    We all agree that we must increase our domestic supply of energy. 
However this process results in a product called produced water, which 
is water that is contaminated by dissolved solids.
    Consequently, this water supply is rendered useless for consumption 
or irrigation and must be pumped back into the ground to dispose of 
safely.
    The legislation that Mr. Hall introduced will allow us to safely 
utilize produced water thereby creating an additional source of water 
for human consumption and irrigation.
    This is a sound piece of legislation and I encourage my colleagues 
to support this bill.

H.R. 6323, Heavy Duty Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle R&D;

    I want to acknowledge my colleague Rep. Sensenbrenner (R-WI) for 
introducing H.R. 6323, a bill to promote heavy duty plug-in hybrid R&D.;
    While we have seen a concerted effort to bring this technology to 
passenger vehicles, commercial vehicles are far behind despite their 
heavy fuel consumption.
    Indeed we heard testimony during the hearing on Mr. Sensenbrenner's 
bill that this technology will save each heavy duty truck 1,000 gallons 
of fuel per year. With the rising cost of energy and many local and 
State governments facing budget constraints, this legislation could 
impact their respective departments and reduce the cost of business.
    In my home State of California, Pacific Gas & Electric, which 
serves northern and central California, has been a leader on this 
issue, utilizing this technology in their service trucks. We have to 
change the way we consume energy in this country, and the Federal 
Government has to take a leading role in this effort.
    H.R. 6323 will take us in the right direction, and I encourage my 
colleagues to support this bill.
    Mr. Chairman I yield back my time.

    [The prepared statement of Mr. Mitchell follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Harry E. Mitchell
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we will mark up H.R. 3957, the Water Use Efficiency and 
Conservation and Research Act, H.R. 2339, the Produced Water 
Utilization Act, and H.R. 6323, the Heavy Hybrid Truck Research, 
Development, and Demonstration Act.
    Arizona is no stranger to the pressures of rising population and 
prolonged drought.
    We are one of the fastest growing states, and despite some helpful 
precipitation this winter, many portions of our state our still well 
into a second decade of drought.
    I believe that it is absolutely critical that we address the 
growing shortage of our nation's water supply and work to establish 
progressive and cost-effective water resource management policies.
    H.R. 3957 would help us gain a better understanding of our water 
use and shortages by establishing a research and development program 
within EPA to promote water efficiency and conservation.
    I urge my colleagues to support this important legislation.
    I yield back.

    Chairman Gordon. We will now consider H.R. 6323, To 
establish a research, development, demonstration and commercial 
application program to promote research of appropriate 
technologies for heavy duty plug-in hybrid vehicles and for 
other purposes.
    Mr. Sensenbrenner is not able to be here today but he has 
put together a good bill, and I recognize Mr. Hall to present 
any remarks he might have.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I have the remarks that Mr. 
Sensenbrenner would deliver if he were here and I ask unanimous 
consent to put them in the record.
    Chairman Gordon. With no objection, the statement is agreed 
to for the record.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Sensenbrenner follows:]
            Prepared Statement of F. James Sensenbrenner Jr.
    This Monday, President Bush announced that he lifted the executive 
ban on offshore drilling. Increasing our domestic oil supply is an 
important part of combating the current energy crisis. But if we're 
serious about energy independence, we have to do more. We also have to 
drastically reduce our demand.
    This bill is a step in that direction. The Department of Energy 
(DOE) administers several grants to speed production of hybrid cars, 
but DOE does not have a single grant specifically intended for trucks. 
Trucks currently consume 48 percent of our fuel and each individual 
truck consumes substantially more fuel than a passenger car. In 
addition, industries turn their trucks over faster than consumers and 
can therefore adopt new technologies faster. This means trucks, not 
cars, are the low hanging fruit.
    This bill will establish DOE's first grant program to promote 
hybrid and plug-in hybrid trucks. It will also advance research in the 
area, expand DOE's focus to include trucks as well as cars, and 
establish a cost-share program that will put hybrid and plug-in hybrid 
trucks on the road. I thank the Chairman and his staff for considering 
this bill.

    Chairman Gordon. I would like to express my support for 
this bill, and I thank my good friend from Wisconsin for 
working to cooperate with my staff, or our staff, on this.
    Does anyone wish to be recognized?
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett. Thank you very much.
    Through a series of those infamous earmarks, I have been 
sponsoring the development of a hybrid plug-in truck through 
the Mack Truck Company, now known as Volvo Power Train. This 
bill is an excellent addition to those efforts. This is plug-in 
hybrid. Many of our large trucks use a reciprocating engine in 
the least efficient, most polluting way and stop and go, 
picking up trash, delivering things. There is an enormous need 
for this. It will greatly reduce pollution and increase the 
efficiency of these vehicles, so I am in strong support of this 
bill, which builds on the developments that I have been 
privileged to support through a series of earmarks. Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Bartlett. One just quick 
note also is, one of the benefits of plug-in hybrids is, that 
you can plug them in at night at an, if you will pardon the 
expression, off-peak time, where oftentimes electricity is 
being generated and not even used. So that is another benefit 
of this.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, I would like to note that when 
we have fully developed these plug-in hybrids, they can really, 
really add to the efficiency of our electrical net. As you 
point out, the power company can send a signal through the line 
as to when to charge them up, like at 2 a.m. in the morning 
when nobody is taking showers or cooking food. But another 
thing can happen. When they are through with their day's work 
and their battery is charged, they now can sell electricity 
back to the grid. So the more and more these plug-in hybrids we 
have, the more capability we have to even out the power demand 
and so they can be charging up during the night and giving some 
of it back, that they haven't used during the day, give back to 
the grid in the evening when the demand is very high. So this 
is a very important development and I am pleased to support 
this bill.
    Chairman Gordon. Well, thanks for your past work. This is a 
good bill, and I am sorry that Mr. Sensenbrenner couldn't be 
here but you can tell him on our behalf that even a blind 
squirrel occasionally gets an acorn and that we appreciate his 
work.
    I ask unanimous consent----
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Mr. Chairman, move to strike the last 
word. Let me just note, and I agree with Dr. Bartlett, whose 
Ph.D. and expertise always astonishes me and also I stand in 
admiration of the great contribution he makes. Let me just note 
that as we move towards the electrification of American 
transportation, which I support and think is and should be the 
long-term goal for people who have long-term strategies for 
getting us out of this energy crisis, it will not simply do to 
believe that we do not have to increase the amount of 
electricity in our society in order to achieve that goal. Not 
all of the technologies that we are going to be able to bring 
to play are going to sort of even out so you can plug it in at 
night and so you don't have to have any more electricity being 
produced. The fact is, if we are going to move towards an 
electrified transportation system, we are going to need new 
sources of electricity. Now, whether that is produced by oil or 
whether that is produced by natural gas or whether that is 
produced by solar in some way or whether it is produced by 
nuclear power, we are going to need more sources of energy to 
increase the supply if we are going to meet the goals that have 
just been expressed, and I just want to make sure that is 
clearly on the record as we start down this road, and I think 
this committee will play a major role in steering America 
towards an electrified transportation system that is pollution-
free. It is a good thing, but we have some serious challenges 
of where to get that electricity. We shouldn't downplay that, 
the importance of finding more sources and more supply for 
electricity as we move in that direction.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Rohrabacher. I certainly 
agree with that statement, and I also agree with you that this 
committee will play a major role and this will be a high 
priority for this. If there is no one on my left, then Dr. 
Ehlers is recognized.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Just following this 
theme, Mr. Rohrabacher did outline the various options, but in 
view of the issues we are facing with potential global climate 
change, CO2 emissions and so forth, and for other 
reasons having to do with resource availability, let us face 
it, it is going to have to be nuclear plants producing 
electricity, and we might as well face up to that and get on 
that bandwagon quickly as a nation. We gave it up in a time 
when we shouldn't have some 20 years ago and that has really 
set us back compared to the rest of the developed world. It is 
high time we get in high gear on that program again and get 
operating so that we will be able to meet the needs of our 
nation. Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Does anyone else wish to be recognized? 
Then Dr. Ehlers--oh, I am sorry. Dr. Bartlett is recognized.
    Mr. Bartlett. Thank you very much. Mr. Rohrabacher is 
exactly right. As we run down the fossil fuel exhaustion curve, 
we are going to need more energy everywhere. But our future for 
electric energy is much brighter than our future for liquid 
fuels. With more nuclear, with wind, with solar, with micro 
hydro, with true geothermal where we are close enough to the 
molten core of the Earth, I think we can make reasonably the 
amount of electricity that we need, maybe not as much as we 
would like to use. That same thing is not true of liquid fuel. 
We have a very, very challenging future in liquid fuels. This 
is just one more reason that this is really good bill because 
it moves it in a direction for transportation where we use 
electricity, which is going to be much easier to produce in the 
future than liquid fuels.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Gingrey, as long as you are not going 
to say that Dana Rohrabacher is exactly right. Hearing that 
twice in one day is a little bit tough. Dr. Gingrey.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman, I promise not to say that. I do 
want to join my colleagues on this side in regard to getting a 
plug in for--no pun intended there either--for utilizing all 
sources of energy and the need, of course, to improve the 
electricity grid. As we know in this country, most electricity 
is generated by coal, coal-powered plants, some natural gas, 
which is much cleaner but also much more expensive, and though 
in this country the supply of coal is estimated to be 1.5 
trillion tons of coal and we use about a billion tons a year, 
so there is plenty of that black rock gold sitting around that 
we could convert into liquid petroleum. That would help our 
dependency, relieve our dependency from foreign countries in 
regard to fossil fuels. So clean coal technology, let me just 
put in a plug for that. But this is a great bill and I am 
highly supportive of it and I just wanted to put in my two 
cents worth in regard to energy, and I yield back, Mr. 
Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Gingrey. As we continue the 
filibuster of Mr. Sensenbrenner's bill, let me also point out 
that the astronauts from the STS-124 are back. They are going 
to be in the Rayburn Room B-339 at 5:30 and they are going to 
have ice cream. You know, I brought my daughter the last time 
or two and so if you would like to come by, it is a nice 
environment to bring your constituents, your family and also to 
say thanks to these brave astronauts.
    Now I ask unanimous consent that the bill is considered as 
read and open to amendment at any point and that Members 
proceed with the amendments in order of the roster. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute offered by Mr. Hall in substitute for 
the gentleman from Wisconsin, Mr. Sensenbrenner. Are you ready 
to proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Hall. I think so. I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment in the nature of a substitute to H.R. 
6323 offered by Mr. Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain his 
amendment.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, this amendment combines input from 
numerous Members of this committee and from the Department of 
Energy and from industry leaders in both the utility and truck 
manufacturing sectors. In addition to technical changes, the 
amendment changes the number of grants from a set number of 
five to a range of three to seven. This range will allow DOE to 
adjust the number of grants it issues based on the quality of 
applications it receives. The amendment also broadens the 
platform and allowable technologies that are eligible for 
grants, allowing more manufacturers to qualify and the best 
proposals to succeed. Finally, the amendment expands the 
reporting requirements on both grant recipients and DOE to help 
advance necessary technologies in this area, and I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Sensenbrenner follows:]
            Prepared Statement of F. James Sensenbrenner Jr.
    This amendment combines input from numerous Members of the 
Committee, from the Department of Energy (DOE), and from industry 
leaders in both the utility and truck manufacturing sectors.
    In addition to technical changes, the amendment changes the number 
of grants from a set number of five to a range of three to seven. The 
range will allow DOE to adjust the number of grants it issues based on 
the quality of applications it receives. The amendment also broadens 
the platforms and allowable technologies that are eligible for grants, 
allowing more manufacturers to qualify and the best proposals to 
succeed.
    Finally, the amendment expands the reporting requirements on both 
grant recipients and DOE to help advance necessary technologies in this 
area.

    Chairman Gordon. Is there further discussion on the 
amendment?
    The second amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
also--pardon me. Okay. The second amendment on the roster is an 
amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington, Mr. 
Reichert. Are you ready to proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Reichert. Yes, sir.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to the amendment in the nature of a 
substitute to H.R. 6323 offered by Mr. Reichert of Washington.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    Mr. Reichert. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I think it is 
timely, it is convenient, I guess, that this amendment is the 
last amendment for the day in consideration of all the comments 
made. This amendment really applies to some of the ideas and 
thoughts expressed by the Members here present.
    This is a very simple amendment. It seeks to understand the 
impact that an increasing number of plug-in hybrid vehicles 
would have on our domestic electric power grid. In Washington 
State, 85 percent of our power is provided by hydroelectricity 
so we really understand this issue in the Northwest. Plug-in 
hybrid electric vehicles offer a clean alternative to our 
current gas-powered cars, SUVs and trucks. They have the 
potential to help reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil 
as well as fossil fuels, which would increase our national and 
economic security. The amendment merely directs the Secretary 
of Energy to establish a pilot program to research and test the 
effects that this new technology will have on our power grids. 
The reporting requirements are the same as in the underlying 
bill. It calls for a report on these findings within 60 days of 
the completion of the hybrid program and drive train studies. 
This amendment does not include a new authorization for any 
additional funds. It merely adds this study on the electric 
power grid to the list of approved research projects and 
demonstrations already included in the bill. I ask for the 
Committee to adopt this common sense amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Gordon. Is there further discussion on this good 
amendment?
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chairman, since about half of our 
electricity is produced by coal, I think it is appropriate to 
make a brief comment about coal and how much we have. It has 
been said for several years now that we have 250 years of coal 
at current use rates. The National Academies of Science has 
taken a recent look at that. They said that the last time we 
evaluated the amount of coal we had was in the 1970s and they 
now believe there is about 100 years of coal at current use 
rates. But if we had 250 years of coal at current use rates and 
if you increase its use only two percent--Albert Einstein said 
the most powerful force in the universe was the power of 
compound interest. Just two percent growth doubles in 35 years, 
four times bigger in 70 years, eight times bigger in 105 years, 
16 times bigger in 140 years. So if you increase the use of 
coal only two percent, it drops from 250 years, but the 
National Academies says we have only 100 years to 85 years. 
When you use some of the energy from coal to convert it to a 
gas or a liquid, you have dropped it now to 50 years, and it is 
unavoidable we will share any of our energy sources with the 
world, because if we use oil or if we use coal to displace some 
of the energy here in our country, then we are not buying 
energy overseas and someone else can buy it, and since we use a 
fourth of the world's energy, that 50 years shrinks to 12.5 
years. So what that means is, if those 250 years of coal--the 
National Academies says only 100--but if those 250 years and 
you increase its use only two percent, you convert it to a gas 
or a liquid and share it with the world, which you must, it 
lasts 12.5 years.
    We just need to keep these realities in mind. There is a 
lot of--how did Alan Greenspan define it--irrational exuberance 
out there about these energy sources we have in our country. 
That is the reality for coal, and I thank you, sir.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Bartlett.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment? Mr. McNerney 
is recognized.
    Mr. McNerney. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I want to support 
Mr. Reichert's amendment.
    It is clear to me that use of plug-in hybrids is going to 
have a large impact on our national electric system and it is 
incumbent upon us to understand what that impact is going to be 
and how to deal with it because it offers us an opportunity to 
use vehicles as a storage mechanism for energy. So I applaud 
the amendment and I offer my support.
    Chairman Gordon. Ms. Biggert is recognized.
    Ms. Biggert. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I support the 
amendment and I just wanted to say that I think that this bill 
and the amendment is so important to really improving the use 
of hybrids, hybrid plug-ins and particularly looking at 
commercial trucks, which obviously is going to take this, 
beyond automobiles and really further our conservation as well 
as improving the use of gasoline. I think that one of the 
companies in my district, Navistar, has done so much on this, 
working with the hybrids and with the hybrid plug-in. I think 
that having the grants available for all types of commercial 
vehicles is going to help so much to reduce our oil 
consumption, and I congratulate the sponsors of the bill. I 
yield back.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Biggert. Does anyone else 
have any comments? I think this sets a record for the most nice 
things said about Mr. Sensenbrenner at any one time. So if 
there is no further discussion on the----
    Mr. Ehlers. Just tell him he should stay away more often.
    Chairman Gordon. I will be happy to. If no, the vote occurs 
on the amendment. All in favor, say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes 
have it and the amendment is agreed to.
    Are there other amendments to the amendment in the nature 
of a substitute? If no, then the vote occurs on the amendment. 
All in favor, say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    The vote is now on the bill, H.R. 6323 as amended. All in 
favor, say aye. All opposed, no. In the opinion of the Chair, 
the ayes have it. I recognize Mr. Rohrabacher for a motion.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. I believe it is Mr. Reichert who will----
    Chairman Gordon. Okay. I recognize----
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Whoever it is.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. No, it is me. Mr. Chairman, I move that 
the Committee favorably report H.R. 6323 as amended to the 
House with the recommendation that the bill do pass. 
Furthermore, I move that staff be instructed to make necessary 
technical and conforming changes and that the Chairman take all 
necessary steps to bring the bill before the House for 
consideration.
    Chairman Gordon. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the bill is 
favorably reported. Without objection, the motion to reconsider 
is laid up on the table. Members will have two subsequent 
calendar days in which to submit supplemental Minority or 
additional views on the measure ending Monday, July 21 at 9 
a.m.
    I move pursuant to clause 1 of the rule 22 of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives that the Committee authorize the 
Chairman to offer such motions as may be necessary in the House 
to adopt and pass H.R. 6323 as amended. Without objection, so 
ordered.
    Before we adjourn, let me just say to everyone, this 
appears to be our last markup for this year and this session. 
Things, you know, went smoothly today, but the reason for that 
was that there was lots of collaboration. I thank all of you 
for your presence. It is important for you to be here. I hope 
that one thing that we can do as we go into maybe September 
when we are not going to be having any markups is have the 
opportunity for us to sit down as a committee informally and 
talk about what we want to do next year, and I think we had a 
good discussion today. We want to find out what is important to 
your districts, what is important to the country, and we will 
try to get an agenda that either we will pass off to Mr. Hall 
or we will keep it here, whichever way it might be, but one way 
or the other, we want to work together, and I very, very 
sincerely thank everyone for a very productive year. I hope 
that you will all go back to your press secretaries and talk at 
home about these three bills that you got out today. There are 
more good ones.
    Thank you very much, and we are adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 10:59 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

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      H.R. 6323 as reported by the Subcommittee, Amendment Roster