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110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     110-899

======================================================================



 
                HONORING THE HERITAGE OF THE COAST GUARD

                                _______
                                

 September 28, 2008.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Oberstar, from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                      [To accompany H. Res. 1382]

  The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, to whom 
was referred the resolution (H. Res. 1382) honoring the 
heritage of the Coast Guard, having considered the same, report 
favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the 
resolution be agreed to.

                       PURPOSE OF THE RESOLUTION

    H. Res. 1382 honors the long and proud heritage of the U.S. 
Coast Guard and the men and women that serve in the Coast Guard 
and have served in the Coast Guard and its many predecessor 
agencies over the past 219 years. The Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure honors the 41,873 officers 
and enlisted members in the Coast Guard and the 7,057 civilians 
employed by the Coast Guard and the proud and distinguished 
legacy which they strive to carry out the many missions 
established by Congress to protect our coast and waterways.

                   BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR RESOLUTION

    The heritage of the Coast Guard begins in the very first 
Congress of the United States that enacted, on August 7, 1789, 
an Act to promote safety and protect commerce that required, 
``That all expenses which shall accrue from and after the 
fifteenth day of August, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-
nine, in the necessary support, maintenance and repairs of all 
lighthouses, beacons, buoys and public piers erected, placed, 
or sunk before the passage of this act, at the entrance of, or 
within any bay, inlet, harbor, or port of the United States, 
for rendering the navigation thereof easy and safe, shall be 
defrayed out of the treasury of the United States.'' 1 Stat. 
53. This federal responsibility became known as the U.S. 
Lighthouse Service.
    On September 1, 1789, Congress passed an act providing for 
the registering and clearing of vessels and the regulation of 
coastwise trade. Only American-built vessels could be 
registered--the first cabotage law. 1 Stat. 55. Today, this 
service is provided by the Coast Guard's National Vessel 
Documentation Center.
    The next year, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander 
Hamilton, realizing that illegal importation of goods was 
robbing the treasury of its only source of revenue, urged 
Congress to adopt an act to create a maritime service to 
enforce customs laws. 1 Stat. 145, 175. This service was known 
by various names--``system of cutters'', ``Revenue Service'', 
and ``Revenue-Marine''--and was finally officially named the 
``Revenue Cutter Service'' in 1863. 12 Stat. 639.
    In the early 1800s, Robert Fulton designed the first 
commercially successful steamboat, the Claremont, which carried 
passengers on the Hudson River from New York City and Albany. 
This new mode of transportation would lead to speedier travel, 
but it was not necessarily safer. Many steam boilers failed in 
violent explosions taking many lives. In 1938, Congress passed 
an act to ``provide better security of the lives of passengers 
on board of vessels propelled in whole or in part by steam'' 
under the jurisdiction of the Justice Department giving the 
U.S. District Courts the authority to appoint inspectors of 
hulls and boilers. 5 Stat. 304. This ``service'', later to 
become the Steamboat Inspection Service, did not have much 
impact--explosions continued to increase with continued loss of 
life.
    It may be hard for 21st Century travelers to realize that 
the quickest and most economical way to transport anything in 
the early days of our nation was by water. Coastal packets--an 
early form of ``short-sea shipping'' carried the vast majority 
of raw materials, goods, and people up and down the coasts. 
Sailing vessels and later steam-ships often found themselves 
close to shore in violent storms.
    Shipwrecks were common and loss of life was great. Many 
private, local rescue organizations were established along the 
coast--most just provided shelters where shipwrecked sailors 
might find refuge. In 1848, Congress appropriated funds for 
these volunteer organizations to purchase equipment. 9 Stat. 
321, 322.
    In 1852, to correct the inadequacies of the 1838 law, 
Congress reorganized the Steamboat Inspection Service and 
formally established it as part of the Treasury Department. The 
Act established nine districts and nine supervising inspectors 
who, ``shall be fully competent to make a reliable estimate of 
the strength, seaworthiness, and other qualities of the hulls 
of steamers and their equipment, deemed essential to safety of 
life, when such vessels are employed in the carriage of 
passengers'', and in the case of an inspector of boilers, 
``shall be able to form a reliable opinion of the quality of 
the material, the strength, form, workmanship, and suitableness 
of such boilers and machinery to be employed in the carriage of 
passengers, without hazard to life, from imperfections in the 
material workmanship, or arrangement of any part of such 
apparatus for steaming.'' This Act also established for the 
first time certificates of inspection and the authority to 
promulgate pilot rules. 10 Stat. 1852.
    In that same year, Congress also established the Lighthouse 
Board to administer the nation's lighthouse system. The Board 
was made up of two officers of the Navy, two officers of the 
Engineer Corps, and two civilians of high scientific 
attainments whose services were at the disposal of the 
President, and an officer of the Navy and of the Engineers as 
secretaries. It was empowered under the Secretary of the 
Treasury to ``discharge all the administrative duties'' 
relative to lighthouses and other aids to navigation. The 
Secretary of the Treasury was president of the Board, and the 
Board was authorized to elect a chairman and to divide the 
coast of the United States into 12 lighthouse districts, and 
the President would assign an army or navy officer as 
lighthouse inspector to each district. 32 Stat. 112.
    In 1871, Congress again amended the 1852 Act to correct the 
inadequacies of the Act regarding steamboat safety and provide 
centralized supervision of the Steamboat Inspection Service by 
a ``Supervising Inspector General'' under the direct 
supervision of the Secretary of the Treasury and a Board of 
Supervising Inspectors who would establish rules and 
regulations for the uniform administration of the inspection 
laws. 16 Stat. 440.
    In 1874, Congress adopted legislation establishing life-
saving stations, life-boat stations, and houses of refuge ``for 
the better preservation of life and property from shipwreck'' 
at a series of locations along the coasts of the United States 
and authorized the Secretary of the Treasury to appoint 
Superintendents and keepers as necessary and to employ crews. 
The Act also established the life-saving medals of the first 
(gold) and the second (silver) class. The Secretary was 
authorized to adopt regulations to carry out the provisions of 
the Act. 43 Stat. 125.
    In 1878, Congress authorized the Secretary of the Treasury 
to establish life-saving stations at specific points along all 
of the coasts of the United States and further authorized the 
President, with the consent of the Senate, to appoint a General 
Superintendent of the Life-Saving Service under the immediate 
direction of the Secretary of the Treasury. Further, the 
Secretary of the Treasury was authorized to appoint officers of 
the Revenue Marine Service to act as inspectors and assistant 
inspectors of life-saving stations. Whenever a shipwreck 
occurred within the jurisdiction of one of the life-saving 
stations, the General Superintendent was instructed to conduct 
an investigation of ``all the circumstances connected with said 
disaster and loss of life to be made, with a view of 
ascertaining the cause of the disaster, and whether any of the 
officers or employees of the service have been guilty of 
neglect or misconduct in the premises . . .'' Keepers of life-
saving stations were paid $400 per year and were also empowered 
to be inspectors of customs, but did not receive any additional 
compensation for this additional responsibility. Members of 
life-boat crews were compensated at a rate of $8 for each 
rescue they participated in and $3 for each drill. 20 Stat. 
163.
    In 1884, Congress established the Bureau of Navigation as 
part of the Treasury Department. ``The Commissioner of 
Navigation, under the direction of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, shall have general superintendence of all commercial 
marine and merchant seamen of the United States . . .'' and 
``shall be charged with the supervision of the laws relating to 
the admeasurement of vessels, and the assigning of signal 
letters thereto, and designating their official number . . .'' 
and ``shall annually prepare and publish a list of vessels of 
the United States . . . and report annually to the Secretary of 
the Treasury the increase in vessels of the United States. . . 
. The Commissioner of Navigation shall be appointed by the 
President . . . by and with the advise and consent of the 
Senate, and shall receive a salary of four thousand dollars per 
annum.'' 23 Stat. 118.
    In 1903, Congress established the Department of Commerce 
and Labor, ``to foster, promote, and develop the foreign and 
domestic commerce, the mining, manufacturing, shipping, and 
fisheries industries, the labor interests, and the 
transportation facilities of the United States. The Light-House 
Board, the Light-House Establishment, the Steamboat Inspection 
Service, and the Bureau of Navigation were transferred from the 
Department of the Treasury to the new Department. 32 Stat. 25.
    In June 1904, 957 people died when the excursion steamer 
General Slocum burned in the East River of New York City. 
Reacting to this tragedy that killed many women and children, 
Congress, in March 1905, amended section 4405 of the Revised 
Statutes regarding the Steamboat Inspection Service, providing 
the Board of Supervising Inspectors with the authority to 
prescribe measures to prevent and extinguish fires, and 
determine the amount and type of lifesaving equipment required 
to be carried on board. The Secretary of Commerce and Labor was 
empowered to form a regulations committee with the authority to 
alter, amend, add to, or repeal rules and regulations made by 
the Board of Supervising Inspectors, with such rules and 
regulations to remain in effect until 30 days after the next 
meeting of the Board of Supervising Inspectors. The legislation 
established the right of appeal by a person to a board of local 
inspectors to the supervising inspector of that district and 
subsequently to the Supervising Inspector General. Further, the 
assistant inspectors were placed under the direct supervision 
of the local inspectors. 33 Stat. 1022.
    Responding to the rising number of casualties and deaths 
involving recreational motor boats, Congress enacted the Motor 
Boat Act of 1910, which required the inspection of all steam-
propelled ``motor boats'' over 40 feet in length. The Act 
required certain motor boats to be equipped with navigation 
lights, fog horn, bell, life preservers, and fire extinguisher. 
The operator of motor boats carrying passengers for hire was 
required to be licensed, but no examination was required for 
the license, which could be revoked or suspended by the local 
board of inspectors. The Secretary was authorized to prescribe 
regulations to implement the Act (some of which are still in 
effect today), and the penalty for a violation of the Act was 
$100. 36 Stat. 462.
    In 1915, Congress passed the ``Seamen's Act'' implementing 
many of the provisions of the first International Convention of 
the Safety of Life at Sea, including establishing among other 
provisions the two- and three-watch system on most vessels, 
payment requirements for seamen, the accommodations for seamen 
including bunk and washing spaces. The Act also established 
punishment for seamen who violated their employment 
``contract'', but prohibited corporal punishment such as 
flogging. Further, the Act required that at least 75 percent of 
the seamen be able to understand their orders, and established 
minimum qualifications for able seamen on vessels over 100 
gross tons, including decked fishing vessels, naval vessels and 
coast guard vessels on oceans and the Great Lakes. The Act 
contains detailed ``regulations'' for life-saving equipment, 
including lifeboats, their davits and equipment, embarkation 
arrangements, certification of lifeboat men, the manning of 
lifeboats, life jackets and life buoys. 38 Stat. 1164.
    In 1915, President Woodrow Wilson signed the ``Act to 
Create the Coast Guard'', an Act passed by Congress on January 
20, 1915, which combined the Life-Saving Service and Revenue 
CutterService to form the U.S. Coast Guard. A major thrust of 
this legislation was to provide pension and disability benefits to the 
life-savers. At the time, there was no federal pension plan for 
Treasury Department employees, and Congress did not want to create one 
that would require benefits for the many tax clerks and others who 
worked for the Department. The Revenue Cutter Service had a pension 
system similar to that of the Navy. Thus, by merging the two 
organizations, life-savers and their families would be afforded at 
least minimal benefits. 38 Stat. 800.
    In 1918, Congress enacted an Act to require the numbering 
of all undocumented vessels propelled by machinery except 
public vessels and vessels of less than 16 feet in length 
propelled by an outboard motor. The numbers were to be not less 
than three inches and affixed to each bow in contrasting color. 
The same requirement prevails to this day for the display of 
state registration numbers required for all vessels propelled 
by machinery. 40 Stat. 602.
    In 1929, Congress enacted the ``Load Line Act'', requiring 
load lines on American vessels over 250 gross tons on a foreign 
voyage, except the Great Lakes. The regulations to implement 
the Act came into effect in September 1930. 45 Stat. 1492. 
Between May 20, and June 10, 1931, delegates from 30 maritime 
nations met in London to develop the International Load Line 
Convention, which was ratified by the United States on June 10, 
1931. The requirements of the Convention were incorporated into 
the Load Line Regulations adopted in 1930. In 1935, Congress 
further required load lines on merchant vessels of more than 
150 gross tons on a coastwise voyage, meaning ``a voyage on 
which a vessel in the usual course of her employment proceeds 
from one port or place in the United States or her possessions 
to another port or place in the United States or her 
possessions and passes outside the line dividing inland waters 
from the high seas . . .'' 49 Stat. 888. The 1935 Act was 
further amended in 1936. 49 Stat. 1543.
    The Act of June 30, 1932, ``authorized and directed the 
Secretary of Commerce to consolidate and coordinate the 
Steamboat Inspection Service and Bureau of Navigation into the 
Bureau of Navigation and Steamboat Inspection'' with all the 
duties and powers of each of the old bureaus transferred to the 
new bureau. The positions of Supervising Inspector General and 
Commissioner of Navigation were eliminated and a Director of 
the Bureau of Marine Inspection and Navigation was established. 
47 Stat. 415.
    On June 13, 1933, Congress amended the statutes relative to 
inspection of vessels, extending the inspection for ``steam 
vessels'' to vessels ``propelled by mechanical or electrical 
power'' and further amended the statutes to require the 
promulgation of regulations regarding the testing and approval 
of boilers, pressure vessels and the fitting thereof, including 
the pre-approval of the materials for construction. 48 Stat. 
125.
    On September 8, 1934, the cruise ship Morro Castle burned 
off the coast of New Jersey resulting in the death of 124 
passengers and crew. On January 24, 1935, the passenger vessel 
Mohawk collided with the Norwegian motorship Talisman, sinking 
the Mohawk with the loss of 14 passengers and 31 crewmembers. 
These two tragedies, plus several others, resulted in thorough 
Congressional investigation that sought to provide greater 
safety for passengers and crew. Senator Royal S. Copeland 
convened a technical committee which drafted a report on the 
state of maritime safety at the time and recommended specific 
safety legislation most of which was later adopted as 
regulation. S. Rept. 184.
    On May 27, 1936, Congress adopted Public Law 74-622 (49 
Stat. 1380), which reorganized and changed the name of the 
Bureau of Navigation and Steamboat Inspection to the Bureau of 
Marine Inspection and Navigation (``BMIN''). The number of 
inspection districts and supervising inspectors was reduced 
from 11 to seven. Ten principal traveling inspectors were 
appointed to observe conditions onboard ships at sea to assure 
that vessels were properly operated; crews well trained and 
discipline maintained; that passengers were instructed 
regarding lifeboat, fire, and abandon-ship procedures; and crew 
morale was maintained.
    The reorganization also established ``marine boards'' to 
investigate marine casualties. ``A'' boards, which investigated 
loss of life, consisted of a representative of the Department 
of Justice, the Coast Guard, and the Department of Commerce. 
These boards were required to investigate the fundamental 
causes of a casualty and fix responsibility. Other casualties 
were investigated by ``boards'' of one or two BMIN personnel 
depending on the severity of the casualty.
    The Act reorganizing BMIN had an important provision 
requiring that members of the newly established ``technical 
division'' be ``selected for their knowledge, skill, and 
practical experience in designing and supervising the 
construction and operation of vessels propelled by machinery, 
and shall be competent judged of the character, strength, 
stability and safety qualities of such vessels and their 
equipment.''
    In June 1936, Congress acted on several issues regarding 
maritime safety. On June 19, 1936, the Senate ratified the 1929 
Convention for Safety of Life at Sea (``SOLAS''). The following 
day, June 20, Congress extended inspection laws to sea-going 
motor vessels of 300 gross tons and over. 49 Stat. 1544. On 
June 23, Congress passed an Act to provide that all tank 
vessels carrying dangerous liquid cargos in bulk subject to 
inspection, bringing an additional 2,500 vessels under 
inspection. 49 Stat. 1889.
    On June 25, 1936, Congress enacted the ``Personnel Bill'' 
to improve conditions on board ship and to protect seaman. The 
Act established the eight-hour work day and three-watch system 
for both deck and engine room departments for a majority of 
seagoing vessels and required that a monthly inspection of 
crews quarters on all United States vessels weighing more than 
100 tons. The Act cancelled and required the reissue of all 
documents for lifeboatman and able seaman and required that 
members of the crew other than officers have a ``continuous 
discharge book''. The Act further required that 75 percent of 
the crew--below the grade of officers--be United States 
citizens, and that U.S. citizens constitute 80 percent of the 
crew of government-subsidized vessels. 49 Stat. 1930.
    In addition, Congress enacted the Merchant Marine Act of 
1936 establishing the Federal Maritime Commission.
    In 1938, the President, with the advice and consent of the 
Senate, ratified a number of draft conventions of the 
International Labor Organization, including the Officers' 
Competency Certificates Convention of 1936. Congress passed the 
act of July 17, 1939 (53 Stat. 1049) to carry out the 
provisions of the Convention. Provisions of this Act requiring 
licensed officers on a vessel weighing more than 200 gross tons 
operating beyond the boundary line remain in force today. 46 
U.S.C. 8304.
    As part of the Reorganization Act of 1939, the ``Bureau of 
Lighthouses in the Department of Commerce and its functions are 
hereby transferred to and shall be consolidated with and 
administered as part of the Coast Guard in the Department of 
the Treasury.'' 53 Stat. 1432.
    On April 25, 1940, Congress adopted the Motor Boat Act of 
1940 amending and adding to the Motor Boat Act of 1910. 
``Motorboats'' were defined in the Act as ``every vessel 
propelled by machinery and not more that sixty-five feet in 
length except tugboats and towboats propelled by steam.'' The 
Act established four classes of motorboats; prescribed 
requirements for navigational lights and sound-signaling 
devices; life-preservers (what today are called Personal 
Flotation Devices); fireextinguishers, backfire flame arrestors 
and bilge ventilation. The Act established licensing requirements for 
the operator of a motorboat carrying passengers for hire and 
specifically stated that, ``No person shall operate any motorboat or 
any vessel in a reckless of negligent manner so as to endanger the 
life, limb, or property of any person.'' 54 Stat. 163.
    In 1940, Congress amended the Revised Statutes ``to provide 
for the safe carriage of explosives or other dangerous or 
semidangerous articles or substances on board vessels; to make 
more effective the provisions of the International Convention 
for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1929, relating to the carriage 
of dangerous goods.'' 54 Stat. 1023.
    In February 1942, the functions relating to safety of life 
at sea, marine inspection, seamen's welfare and certain other 
maritime activities carried out by the Bureau of Marine 
Inspection and Navigation were temporarily transferred from the 
Department of Commerce to the U.S. Coast Guard (by executive 
order) for the duration of the war and until six months after 
the end of hostilities. The Coast Guard was responsible for 
those safety matters that had been regulated by BMIN: Approval 
of plans for merchant ships and their equipment; inspection of 
vessels to check stability, fire control or fireproofing, life-
saving and fire-fighting equipment; administration of load line 
requirements; administration and enforcement of the laws 
pertaining to the numbering of motor-boats and the issuance of 
certificates of inspection; examination, licensing, and 
certification of Merchant Marine personnel--masters, pilots, 
engineers, staff officers; investigation of marine casualties; 
preparation and publication of rules and regulations to protect 
passengers, officers, and crews of American ships; Merchant 
Marine Council activities; and the training of merchant 
mariners.
    In 1946, pursuant to Executive Order 9083 and 
Reorganization Plan No. 3, the Bureau of Marine Inspection and 
Navigation was abolished and became a permanent part of the 
Coast Guard under the Treasury Department.
    On May 10, 1956, Congress enacted the ``Ray Act'', now 
referred to as the ``Small Passenger Vessel Act'', requiring 
inspection of passenger vessels weighing less than 100 gross 
tons and carrying more than six passengers, to ensure that the 
vessel could be ``operated, and navigated with safety to life 
in the proposed service and that all applicable requirements of 
marine safety statutes and regulations are faithfully complied 
with.'' 70 Stat. 151.
    On September 1, 1958, Congress adopted the Federal Boating 
Act of 1958, amending the Motor Boat Act of 1940 making it 
applicable to all ``motor boats . . . on the navigable waters 
of the United States . . .'' and requiring the numbering of all 
vessels propelled by machinery of more than 10 horsepower and 
established a system whereby individual States could adopt a 
uniform numbering and certificate system. The Act further 
required that accidents involving numbered vessels be reported 
to the State in which the accident occurred and that the data 
collected by the States be reported to the Coast Guard. 72 
Stat. 1754. In 1961, Congress extended the requirements of the 
Federal Boating Act of 1958 to Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, 
and Guam. 75 Stat. 408.
    On July 20, 1965, Congress ``exempted oceanographic 
research vessels from the application of vessels inspection 
laws'', and declared that ``scientific personnel'' were not 
``passengers''. 79 Stat. 424.
    In 1967, Executive Order 167-81 transferred the U.S. Coast 
Guard from the Treasury Department to the newly-formed 
Department of Transportation.
    On August 10, 1971, Congress enacted the Federal Boat 
Safety Act of 1971, establishing manufacturer and operator 
requirements and the National Boating Safety Council to work 
with the Coast Guard in the adoption of regulations affecting 
recreational boating safety. The Federal Boat Safety Act of 
1971 granted broad authority to the Secretary to establish 
recreational boating safety standards that include 
manufacturing requirements and mandatory requirements for 
safety equipment. P.L. 92-75.
    In 1972, Congress enacted the Ports and Waterways Safety 
Act after finding that ``navigation and vessel safety, 
protection of the marine environment, and safety and security 
of United States port and waterways matters of major national 
importance; that increased vessel traffic in the Nation's ports 
and waterways creates substantial hazard to life, property, and 
the marine environment; that increased supervision of vessel 
and port operations is necessary; and that advanced planning is 
critical in determining proper and adequate protective measures 
for the Nation's ports and waterways and the marine 
environment, with continuing consultation with other Federal 
agencies, State representatives, affected users, and the 
general public. . . .'' The Act greatly expanded the Coast 
Guard's authority to regulate vessel activities in the 
navigable waters of the United States. P.L. 95-474.
    Nineteen years ago on March 24, 1989, the Exxon Valdez 
grounded on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound near Valdez, 
Alaska and released 10.8 million gallons of Prudhoe Bay crude 
oil. Congress enacted the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (``OPA-
90'') (P.L. 101-380) in response to this environmental 
disaster. It required that all vessels shipping oil into the 
country have a detailed plan to prevent spills and to contain 
and clean up a spill should one occur. OPA-90 also required the 
phase-out of single-hull tank vessels and tank barges and the 
development of Area Contingency Plans.
    In November 2002, Congress adopted the Maritime 
Transportation Security Act (P.L. 107-295) to provide for 
enhanced security at the nation's 361 ports and waterfront 
facilities, requiring the development and implementation of 
national, port and individual/facility security plans. The Act 
provided for port security grants to assist ports with physical 
security infrastructure needs.
    In 2003, Congress transferred the U.S. Coast Guard from the 
Department of Transportation to the newly-created Department of 
Homeland Security.

                       SUMMARY OF THE LEGISLATION

    H. Res. 1382 honors the long and proud heritage of the U.S. 
Coast Guard that begins in the very first Congress of the 
United States that enacted, on August 7, 1789, an Act 
establishing in the Treasury Department a lighthouse service to 
promote safety and protect commerce. 1 Stat. 53. This federal 
responsibility became known as the U.S. Lighthouse Service.
    Today, the U.S. Coast Guard has many responsibilities 
including: Search and Rescue; Marine Safety; Ports, Waterways, 
and Coastal Security; Illegal Drug Interdiction; Undocumented 
Migrant Interdiction; Defense Readiness; Marine Environmental 
Protection; Living Marine Resources Law Enforcement; Aids-to-
Navigation and Waterways Management; Domestic and Polar Ice 
Operations; and other Law Enforcement responsibilities. Each 
day, the 41,873 officers and enlisted members in the Coast 
Guard and the 7,057 civilians employed by the Coast Guard carry 
out these missions to protect the coasts and waterways of the 
United States. The Committee honors each and every one of them 
and all those who were part of the many predecessor 
organizations that now make up our Coast Guard.

            LEGISLATIVE HISTORY AND COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    On July 29, 2008, Chairman James L. Oberstar introduced H. 
Res. 1382 to honor all the men and women of today's Coast 
Guard, and all of the predecessor organization that have formed 
its purpose of protecting the coast, protecting life and 
property at sea, protecting the environment, and protecting the 
nation's ports and waterways.
    On July 31, 2008, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure met in open session to consider H. Res. 1382, 
and ordered the resolution reported favorably to the House by 
voice vote with a quorum present.

                              RECORD VOTES

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report to include the total number of 
votes cast for and against on each record vote on a motion to 
report and on any amendment offered to the measure or matter, 
and the names of those members voting for and against. There 
were no recorded votes taken in connection with consideration 
of H. Res. 1382 or ordering the resolution reported. A motion 
to order H. Res. 1382 reported favorably to the House was 
agreed to by voice vote with a quorum present.

                      COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS

    With respect to the requirements of clause 3(c)(1) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in this report.

                          COST OF LEGISLATION

    With respect to the requirements of clause 3(d)(2) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, H. Res. 1382 
is a resolution of the House of Representatives and therefore 
does not have the force of law. As such, there is no cost 
associated with this resolution for fiscal year 2008, or for 
any fiscal year thereafter.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(2) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, and 
308(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee 
advises that the resolution contains no measure that authorizes 
funding, so no comparison of the total estimated funding level 
for the relevant programs to the appropriate levels under 
current law is required.
    2. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(4) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding, so no statement of general performance and 
objectives for any measure that authorizes funding is required.
    3. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(3) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding. Neither a cost estimate nor comparison for 
any measure that authorizes funding is required.

                     COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XXI

    Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, H. Res. 1382 does not contain any 
congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff 
benefits as defined in clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of rule XXI 
of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

                   CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    With respect to (3)(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, H. Res. 1382 is a resolution of the 
House of Representatives and therefore does not have the force 
of law. As such, clause (3)(d)(1) of rule XIII does not apply.

                       FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    H. Res. 1382 contains no Federal mandates.

                        PREEMPTION CLARIFICATION

    Section 423 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
requires the report of any Committee on a bill or joint 
resolution to include a statement on the extent to which the 
bill or joint resolution is intended to preempt state, local, 
or tribal law. The Committee states that H. Res. 1382 does not 
preempt any state, local, or tribal law.

                      ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act are created by this 
resolution.

                APPLICABILITY TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that the resolution does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 
104-1).

         CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW MADE BY THE BILL, AS REPORTED

    H. Res. 1382 makes no changes in existing law.