Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?

110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     110-930
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     
                                     
                                     

                                                 Union Calendar No. 603

                               ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

              COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM

                       ONE HUNDRED TENTH CONGRESS

                       FIRST AND SECOND SESSIONS

                               2007-2008

                                     


                                     

  Available via the World Wide Web: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/congress/
                               index.html
                      http://www.house.gov/reform

January 2, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed


 ACTIVITIES REPORT OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT 
                                 REFORM
110th Congress 
 2d Session             HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 Report
                                                                110-930
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                     

                                     

                                                 Union Calendar No. 603

                               ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

              COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM

                       ONE HUNDRED TENTH CONGRESS

                       FIRST AND SECOND SESSIONS

                               2007-2008

                                     


                                     

  Available via the World Wide Web: http://www.gpoaccess.gov/congress/
                               index.html
                      http://www.house.gov/reform

January 2, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

              COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM

                 HENRY A. WAXMAN, California, Chairman
EDOLPHUS TOWNS, New York             TOM DAVIS, Virginia
PAUL E. KANJORSKI, Pennsylvania      DAN BURTON, Indiana
CAROLYN B. MALONEY, New York         CHRISTOPHER SHAYS, Connecticut
ELIJAH E. CUMMINGS, Maryland         JOHN M. McHUGH, New York
DENNIS J. KUCINICH, Ohio             JOHN L. MICA, Florida
DANNY K. DAVIS, Illinois             MARK E. SOUDER, Indiana
JOHN F. TIERNEY, Massachusetts       TODD RUSSELL PLATTS, Pennsylvania
WM. LACY CLAY, Missouri              CHRIS CANNON, Utah
DIANE E. WATSON, California          JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee
STEPHEN F. LYNCH, Massachusetts      MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
BRIAN HIGGINS, New York              DARRELL E. ISSA, California
JOHN A. YARMUTH, Kentucky            KENNY MARCHANT, Texas
BRUCE L. BRALEY, Iowa                LYNN A. WESTMORELAND, Georgia
ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON, District of   PATRICK T. McHENRY, North Carolina
    Columbia                         VIRGINIA FOXX, North Carolina
BETTY McCOLLUM, Minnesota            BRIAN P. BILBRAY, California
JIM COOPER, Tennessee                BILL SALI, Idaho
CHRIS VAN HOLLEN, Maryland           JIM JORDAN, Ohio
PAUL W. HODES, New Hampshire
CHRISTOPHER S. MURPHY, Connecticut
JOHN P. SARBANES, Maryland
PETER WELCH, Vermont
JACKIE SPEIER, California

                      Phil Barnett, Staff Director
                       Earley Green, Chief Clerk
               Lawrence Halloran, Minority Staff Director

                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                                  House of Representatives,
                                   Washington, DC, January 2, 2009.
Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Speaker: By direction of the Committee on 
Oversight and Government Reform, I submit herewith the 
committee's activities report for the 110th Congress.
                                           Henry A. Waxman,
                                                          Chairman.

                                     
?

                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Introduction.....................................................     1
 I. Oversight Accomplishments.........................................2
II. Legislative Accomplishments......................................10
III.Full Committee Proceedings.......................................33

IV. Subcommittee Activities..........................................52
        A. Domestic Policy.......................................    52
        B. Federal Workforce.....................................    81
        C. Government Management.................................    95
        D. Information Policy....................................   110
        E. National Security and Foreign Affairs.................   123

                                  (v)

  
                                                 Union Calendar No. 603
110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     110-930

======================================================================



 
  ACTIVITIES OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM

                                _______
                                

January 2, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Henry A. Waxman, from the Committee on Oversight and Government 
                    Reform, submitted the following

                                 REPORT

 ACTIVITIES OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND GOVERNMENT REFORM, 
           110TH CONGRESS, 1ST AND 2D SESSIONS, 2007 AND 2008

                              INTRODUCTION

    During the 110th Congress, the Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform held 203 oversight hearings and reported or 
discharged 372 bills and resolutions to the House for 
consideration. Significant reforms involving federal 
procurement practices, open government, and the independence of 
Inspectors General were enacted into law.
    Major investigations included examination of waste, fraud, 
and abuse in Iraq reconstruction and other government 
contracting; the activities of Blackwater and other private 
security contractors; the politicization of science in federal 
agencies; White House mismanagement of federal records; the 
Wall Street financial crisis and CEO compensation; the high 
cost of prescription drugs; formaldehyde levels in FEMA 
trailers; the treatment of wounded returning soldiers at Walter 
Reed Army Medical Center; and misleading veterans' charities. 
Other investigations examined the disclosure of CIA agent 
Valerie Plame Wilson's identity, the fratricide of Army Ranger 
Patrick Tillman, and the use of steroids in Major League 
Baseball.
    In the 110th Congress, the Committee Chair was Henry A. 
Waxman and the Ranking Member was Tom Davis. To carry out its 
duties as effectively as possible, the Committee at the 
beginning of the 110th Congress established the following five 
standing subcommittees: Subcommittee on Domestic Policy; 
Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, Postal Service, and the 
District of Columbia; Subcommittee on Government Management, 
Organizations, and Procurement; Subcommittee on Information 
Policy, Census, and National Archives; and Subcommittee on 
National Security and Foreign Affairs.
    This report describes the Committee's major oversight and 
legislative accomplishments, provides a chronological summary 
of Committee proceedings, and summarizes activities of the 
Subcommittees during the 110th Congress.

                      I. Oversight Accomplishments

    Pursuant to Rule X, Clause 2(d) of the Rules of the House, 
the Committee on Oversight adopted an oversight plan at the 
commencement of the 110th Congress consisting of topics 
designated for investigation, evaluation, and review by the 
Committee. The topics were selected by Chairman Henry A. 
Waxman, in consultation with the Ranking Minority Member, Rep. 
Tom Davis, other members of this Committee, and other 
Committees.
    The plan highlighted intended subjects of oversight, 
including:
           Agriculture, including policies regarding 
        the safety of our food supply;
           Energy and environment, including 
        governmental and nongovernmental activities and 
        policies relating to global warming, the extent to 
        which government agencies responsible for public health 
        and environmental protection are fulfilling their 
        responsibilities, and the nation's ability to develop a 
        sustainable energy sector;
           Government contracting, including the causes 
        and effects of the recent increase in procurement, the 
        importance of safeguards like competition from the 
        procurement process, and shortfalls in the acquisition 
        workforce;
           Healthcare, including alleged waste, fraud, 
        and abuse in the nation's healthcare system; federal 
        policies and programs that aim to prevent and treat 
        HIV/AIDS, as well as those related to reproductive 
        health; and the extent to which government health 
        programs are driven by sound scientific evidence rather 
        than political considerations;
           Homeland security, including alleged 
        procurement abuses at the Department of Homeland 
        Security, and how effectively DoD, DHS, and state 
        governors work together to promote security;
           Federal emergency management, including 
        government activities in the wake of Hurricane Katrina;
           Iraq reconstruction and troop support, 
        including allegations of waste, fraud, and abuse in the 
        use of private contractors conducting reconstruction 
        and troop support activities; and, among other topics,
           The White House, including the efficiency 
        and effectiveness of operations of the Executive Office 
        of the President and the Office of the Vice President.
    The Committee's oversight of these and many other issues in 
the 110th Congress resulted in substantial cost savings for 
American taxpayers and improvement in the effectiveness and 
efficiency of our government. Following are highlights of major 
oversight accomplishments of the Committee in the 110th 
Congress.

                             A. AGRICULTURE

    Crop Insurance. On May 3, 2007, a Committee hearing 
disclosed billions of dollars of waste, fraud, and abuse in the 
federal crop insurance program. At the hearing, GAO testified 
that over 40% of program funding--over $10 billion--never 
reached the farmers that the program is designed to assist. 
Witnesses identified billions of dollars in excess subsidies 
for the private insurers that administer the program.
    On June 18, 2008, Congress passed (over President Bush's 
veto) the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (H.R. 
6124). Provisions in this legislation contain reforms to the 
crop insurance program that will produce significant savings 
for the taxpayer. The legislation reduces excessive subsidies 
for insurers, provides new funding for program enforcement, and 
modifies other provisions resulting in waste and abuse by 
farmers and insurers, saving an estimated $3.4 billion over the 
next decade.

                       B. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT

    Uranium contamination in the Navajo Nation. On October 23, 
2007, the Committee held a hearing on the health and 
environmental impacts of uranium contamination in the Navajo 
Nation in the aftermath of decades of uranium mining and 
milling. Representatives of the Navajo Nation described 
widespread contamination of the surface and groundwater around 
four former milling sites and 520 abandoned uranium mines and 
the health risks that this contamination presents. Five federal 
agencies--the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the 
Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission 
(NRC), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and the Indian 
Health Service (IHS)--testified on the limited steps taken to 
date to clean up the contamination. The hearing represented the 
first occasion on which the five responsible agencies had met 
to discuss solutions.
    On June 16, 2008, the five agencies jointly submitted to 
the Committee a five-year plan to begin cleaning up the 
widespread uranium contamination in the Navajo Nation. Since 
that time, EPA assessed 70 houses and other structures near the 
abandoned mine sites for contamination and began demolishing 
contaminated structures.
    Allegations concerning the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences. In early 2007, Chairman Waxman 
and Domestic Policy Subcommittee Chairman Dennis Kucinich began 
investigating questions about the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and its then-director, 
Dr. David Schwartz. Chairmen Waxman and Kucinich expressed 
concern about potential conflicts of interest relating to an 
NIEHS proposal to privatize aspects of the journal 
Environmental Health Perspectives. The members also sought 
information relating to allegations of other misconduct by Dr. 
Schwartz.
    In August 2007, the Director of the National Institutes of 
Health (NIH) announced there would be a comprehensive review of 
Dr. Schwartz's conduct, and Dr. Schwartz temporarily stepped 
down from his position. Dr. Schwartz was never reinstated as 
Director. In February 2008, he formally tendered his 
resignation. In April 2008, NIH's Office of Management 
Assessment released a review of NIEHS management which 
documented numerous problems with the institute's programs and 
procedures and suggested recommendations for reform.
    Environmental Study of Santa Susana Field Laboratory in Los 
Angeles. The Santa Susana Field Laboratory in Los Angeles is a 
cold war legacy site with numerous toxic and radiological 
contamination issues in need of remediation. On May 23, 2007, 
Chairman Waxman learned that the Department of Energy was 
preparing to demolish structures at the Santa Susana Field 
Laboratory without completing an environmental impact statement 
as required by a federal court. Chairman Waxman wrote DOE to 
express his concerns and to request an assurance that an EIS 
would be prepared prior to the remediation. On June 27, 2007, 
the Department of Energy announced that it would comply with 
Chairman Waxman's request.

                       C. GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING

    GSA Outsourcing. On June 14, 2007, Chairman Waxman 
requested that the General Services Administration delay 
implementation of a proposal to expand GSA's use of contractors 
to conduct contract oversight and management until GSA could 
demonstrate whether necessary safeguards were in place. Based 
on findings of the Committee and other oversight entities 
regarding other federal agency outsourcing of contracting 
oversight, Chairman Waxman expressed concern that GSA's 
proposal could result in the improper outsourcing of inherently 
governmental functions, contractor conflicts of interest, and 
erosion of procurement oversight by federal officials that 
could lead to additional waste, fraud, and abuse.
    The next day, GSA announced that it had suspended its plans 
to outsource contract support services until it understood and 
responded to congressional concerns. After further consultation 
with Committee staff, GSA agreed to produce an ordering guide 
to help buyers identify government functions that cannot be 
outsourced and prevent contractor conflicts of interest.

                             D. HEALTHCARE

    Healthcare-Associated Infections. On April 16, 2008, the 
Committee held a hearing on healthcare-associated infections, a 
leading cause of death for Americans. A GAO report prepared for 
Chairman Waxman was released at the hearing, which recommended 
that the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) must 
identify priorities and do more to promote implementation of 
best practices to reduce healthcare associated infections. A 
subsequent Committee staff report released on September 22, 
2008, showed that the majority of state hospital associations 
have not adopted a proven program which could save thousands of 
lives and billions of dollars.
    On September 23, 2008, at a conference of infection control 
professionals, HHS announced a ``national action plan'' to 
address the problem of healthcare-associated infections. On 
October 1, 2008, the HHS Agency for Healthcare Research and 
Quality also announced a series of grants to ten states to 
reduce these infections.
    Lead in Children's Toys. Since 2005, Chairman Waxman has 
investigated the dangers to children from lead in toys, 
jewelry, and other products. A December 2006 report released by 
Chairman Waxman found exceptionally high levels of lead even in 
products sold in the Capitol gift shops.
    On July 31, 2008, Congress passed Chairman Waxman's Lead 
Free Toys Act (H.R. 3473) as part of H.R. 4040, a bill to 
reform the Consumer Product Safety Commission. This law will 
require immediate reductions in the amount of lead in 
children's products and contains the world's strongest 
restrictions on lead in children's products.
    Compendium of HIV Prevention Interventions. In May 2006, 
Ranking Member Waxman wrote to the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention (CDC) to ask why the agency had failed to update 
the Compendium of HIV Prevention Interventions with Evidence of 
Effectiveness, first released in 1999. The Compendium describes 
programs identified by CDC's scientific staffs as having been 
shown to reduce risk behaviors and HIV transmission and is used 
by health professionals in the field to maximize the 
effectiveness of their prevention efforts. In the May 2006 
letter and follow-up correspondence, Mr. Waxman expressed 
concern that even though CDC scientists had identified 
additional effective programs in the seven years since the 
Compendium was first issued, the CDC had not released an 
update.
    In response to Mr. Waxman's inquiries, CDC posted a full 
update to the Compendium on its website in November 2007.
    Safety of Diabetes Drug Avandia. On June 6, 2007, the 
Committee held a hearing on the role of the Food and Drug 
Administration in evaluating the safety of Avandia, a widely 
used diabetes drug. The hearing followed the publication of 
data indicating that the drug might put patients at higher risk 
of heart attacks. On the day of the hearing, FDA announced 
plans to add a ``black box'' warning on the drug's label 
alerting patients and physicians about the increased risk of 
heart failure.
    In July 2007, the FDA convened an advisory committee to 
review the data on the safety of Avandia. The recommendations 
of the advisory committee led to the addition of another 
``black box'' warning for heart problems in November 2007. FDA 
also requested that the manufacturer conduct a long-term study 
to determine the safety of Avandia.
    Conflicted Contractor at National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences. In February 2007, Chairman 
Waxman and Senator Barbara Boxer raised concerns about the 
potential conflicts of interest of Sciences International, a 
private contractor at the National Institute of Environmental 
Health Sciences (NIEHS) that was involved in reviewing the 
health risks of a chemical called bisphenol-A. In response to 
these concerns, NIEHS investigated and terminated Sciences 
International's contract.
    In April 2007, NIEHS, the National Toxicology Program 
(NTP), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) also 
committed to taking several additional actions. First, NIH 
initiated a broad review of NIH-wide and center-specific 
conflicts of interest policies to determine whether they are 
adequate. Second, NIEHS developed specific language on 
conflicts of interest for inclusion in new contracts. Third, 
NTP conducted an independent review of the bisphenol-A 
evaluation. Fourth, a working group of NTP's Board of 
Scientific Counselors evaluated all 44 NTP contracts for 
potential or actual conflicts of interest.
    In September 2008, NTP issued its report on bisphenol-A, 
finding that the chemical is potentially dangerous to human 
development and reproduction and may be linked to breast and 
prostate cancer.

                          E. HOMELAND SECURITY

    Deepwater Coast Guard Program. On February 8, 2007, the 
Committee held a hearing that examined procurement and 
oversight problems in the Coast Guard's Deepwater program, a 
multi-year $24 billion plan to refurbish the Coast Guard's 
offshore fleet. The hearing identified the Coast Guard's 
decision to turn over the design and production of the new 
ships to a private-sector entity called Integrated Coast Guard 
Systems (ICGS), a joint venture of defense contractors Lockheed 
Martin and Northrop Grumman, as a key cause of cost overruns 
and defective ships. In April 2007, the Coast Guard announced 
it was taking control of the project away from ICGS and was 
initiating proceedings to recoup some of the taxpayer funds 
ICGS had used to build the defective ships.

                    F. FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    Formaldehyde in Federal Emergency Management Agency 
trailers. On July 19, 2007, the Committee held a hearing on 
formaldehyde levels in FEMA trailers provided to displaced 
evacuees from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The hearing revealed 
that FEMA officials in Washington had ignored multiple warnings 
about high formaldehyde exposures in FEMA trailers because 
testing ``would imply FEMA's ownership of the issue.''
    The hearing and the Committee's ongoing investigation has 
led to multiple reforms. At the hearing, FEMA Administrator 
David Paulison announced that FEMA would ask the Centers for 
Disease Control to conduct comprehensive testing of the air 
quality of the trailers. Shortly after the hearing, FEMA also 
announced that it would discontinue deploying travel trailers 
for use by displaced disaster victims and would stop selling 
surplus units to the public.
    In December 2007, Congress directed in a consolidated 
appropriations measure that FEMA work with the CDC to complete 
the testing and develop policies concerning families remaining 
in FEMA issued trailers. In February 2008, CDC announced the 
test results, which confirmed high levels of formaldehyde in 
trailers. On February 14, FEMA announced that it would 
immediately begin relocating those families living in trailers 
with high levels of formaldehyde.
    On July 9, 2008, the Committee held a second hearing to 
examine the role and responsibility of the trailer 
manufacturers. This hearing revealed that the major 
manufacturer of FEMA trailers was aware of the high 
formaldehyde levels as early as March 2006, but failed to warn 
the occupants of the trailers or advise FEMA of its findings.

                G. IRAQ RECONSTRUCTION AND TROOP SUPPORT

    Improper Billing under the LOGCAP Contract. On February 7, 
2007, the Committee held a hearing to examine the use of 
private military contractors in Iraq. In response to Chairman 
Waxman's inquiries, the Defense Department announced that KBR 
had improperly billed the government for private security 
services under the logistical support contract known as 
``LOGCAP'' and that the Department would withhold $19.6 million 
in unjustified charges. Since then, KBR has disclosed to 
investors that up to $400 million in payments to the LOGCAP 
contract could be in jeopardy.
    Deficient Electrical Systems at U.S. Facilities in Iraq. On 
March 19, 2008, Chairman Waxman requested documents from the 
Defense Department related to reports that at least 12 service 
members in Iraq had died as the result of accidental 
electrocutions attributable to faulty wiring. On July 30, 2008, 
the Committee held a hearing to examine electrical problems 
leading to the injuries and deaths of military personnel and 
the Defense Department's management and oversight of 
contractors. The hearing revealed that the Defense Department 
had neglected numerous warnings of widespread electrical 
hazards throughout Iraq because ``neither LOGCAP nor DCMA have 
sufficient skill sets or expertise to perform adequate 
oversight of electrical work being performed by KBR.''
    The hearing and the Committee's ongoing investigation has 
led to increased oversight of electrical systems in Iraq. In 
July 2008, the Army modified the LOGCAP contract to mandate 
inspections and require training and certification of 
electricians. On September 8, 2008, the Army informed the 
Committee that it would reopen the investigation into the death 
of Staff Sergeant Ryan Maseth, a Special Forces soldier who was 
electrocuted while taking a shower in his living facilities. 
Three days later, the Army issued a Corrective Action Request 
to KBR, finding ``serious contractual noncompliance'' relating 
to the company's ``outstanding electrical and quality issues'' 
in Iraq.
    Baghdad Embassy Construction. On July 26, 2007, the 
Committee held the first congressional hearing on the Baghdad 
Embassy construction project, examining evidence of substandard 
work by the prime contractor, First Kuwaiti General Trading & 
Contracting Company. On October 9, 2007, and February 9, 2008, 
Chairman Waxman disclosed additional evidence of extensive 
flaws in the construction of the Iraq Embassy.
    These investigations have led to new oversight of the 
embassy construction project. In December 2007, Gen. Charles 
Williams, the director of the State Department's Bureau of 
Overseas Building Operations, resigned from his position. The 
Committee has also learned that the two top State Department 
officials in charge of the Embassy construction project, James 
Golden and Mary French, have also resigned. The Department of 
Justice is now conducting a criminal investigation into the 
matter.
    Private Security Contractors in Iraq. The Committee held 
hearings on February 7, 2007, and October 2, 2007, on private 
military contractors in Iraq. At the October 2 hearing, Erik 
Prince, the Chairman of the Prince Group LLC and Blackwater 
USA, was questioned about the actions of Blackwater under its 
$1.6 billion contract with the State Department. A staff 
memorandum released by Chairman Waxman showed that Blackwater 
had engaged in 195 ``escalation of force'' incidents since 
2005, including over 160 incidents in which Blackwater fired 
first.
    Following the Committee hearings, the House passed H.R. 
2740, a bill to expand the Military Extraterritorial 
Jurisdiction Act to provide federal criminal jurisdiction over 
the conduct of private military contractors working in 
proximity to a contingency operation, such as Blackwater 
personnel working for the State Department in Iraq. Congress 
also strengthened the Defense Department's oversight of 
security contractors in the Defense Authorization Act of 2007.
    Other reforms were implemented administratively. On October 
24, 2007, Assistant Secretary of State Richard Griffin, a 
witness at the Committee's October 2, 2007, hearing and the 
head of Diplomatic Security Service charged with overseeing 
Blackwater's activities, resigned his position. At a hearing on 
October 25, 2007, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice 
acknowledged that the State Department's oversight of 
Blackwater had been inadequate and agreed to adopt several 
reforms, including (1) installing video cameras on protection 
detail vehicles; (2) requiring the presence of a State 
Department security official on each protection mission; (3) 
establishing investigative teams to respond to incidents; and 
(4) appointing an Incident Review Board to consider possible 
referrals to the Justice Department.
    On June 30, 2008, Congress enacted the Government 
Contractor Accountability Act (H.R. 3928) as part of the 2008 
Supplemental Appropriations Act (H.R. 2642). This legislation 
requires privately held government contractors like Blackwater 
to disclose information about the salaries of their top 
executives.
    Care of Wounded Soldiers. Since February 2007, the 
Oversight Committee and its Subcommittee on National Security 
and Foreign Affairs have held four hearings on the care of 
wounded soldiers, including the first congressional hearing on 
conditions at Walter Reed. Multiple reforms have resulted from 
these hearings.
    Less than a week after the National Security Subcommittee 
held the first hearing on the conditions at Walter Reed on 
March 5, 2007, the top Army officer responsible for the 
failures at Walter Reed, the Surgeon General of the Army, Lt. 
Gen. Kevin Kiley, was forced to resign.
    The Committee hearings also prompted administrative reforms 
at the Defense Department and the Veterans Administration in 
2007, including a streamlined disability evaluation process, 
enhanced incentives to recruit and retain qualified military 
medical and mental health personnel, increased reliance on 
independent ombudspersons to help wounded warriors cut through 
red tape, the expanded application of Warrior Transition Units 
for returning soldiers with injuries or mental health concerns, 
more comprehensive application of mental health and traumatic 
brain injury screenings, and the reduction of specious 
discharges for returning soldiers with mental health concerns.
    In addition, the Committee's inquiry led to changes in the 
application of the ``A-76'' outsourcing process. After the 
Committee's March 5, 2007, hearing produced evidence that 
disruptions caused by the outsourcing process contributed to 
the conditions at Walter Reed, the Army announced a freeze in 
the A-76 process at Walter Reed and other Army medical 
facilities.

                             H. WHITE HOUSE

    Management of White House e-mail records. In March 2007, 
the Committee began an investigation into the use of RNC e-mail 
accounts by White House officials and the potential loss of 
presidential records. This investigation revealed that 88 White 
House officials held RNC e-mail accounts while serving in the 
White House, that these officials used the RNC e-mail accounts 
to conduct official government business, and that there was 
extensive destruction of these e-mails by the RNC. A related 
investigation examined the failure of the White House to 
properly archive millions of e-mails sent to and from its 
official White House servers.
    In response to the Committee's investigation, the House in 
July 2008 passed the Electronic Communications Preservation Act 
(H.R. 5811). This legislation directs the Archivist to 
establish standards for the capture, management, and 
preservation of electronic messages that are presidential 
records.
    In addition, the White House responded to the Committee's 
investigation with reforms that may reduce the use of political 
e-mail accounts for official business. Soon after the start of 
the Committee's investigation, the White House rewrote its 
staff guidance on the use of e-mail. The White House also 
provided official blackberries to all staff in the Office of 
Political Affairs.
    Travel by Officials of the Office of National Drug Control 
Policy. A Committee investigation revealed that John Walters, 
the Director of the White House Office of National Drug Control 
Policy, and his deputies traveled to 20 events with vulnerable 
Republican members of Congress in the months prior to the 2006 
elections. The trips were paid for entirely by federal 
taxpayers and several were combined with the announcement of 
federal grants or actions that benefited the districts of the 
Republican members.
    As a result of this investigation, Congress reduced the 
travel budget for the Office of National Drug Control Policy by 
25% for fiscal year 2008. The budget limitation included an 
express warning that travel by agency officials ``should occur 
for official business reasons only, not for political gain.''

                    I. OTHER WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE

    Defense Base Act Insurance. On May 15, 2008, the Committee 
held a hearing to examine the costs to taxpayers of Defense 
Base Act (DBA) Insurance. Federal law requires that all federal 
contractors working overseas obtain DBA insurance for their 
workers. Information obtained by the Committee revealed that 
from 2002 through 2007, the top four insurers made almost $600 
million in excess profits from coverage provided under the DBA 
program. On September 27, 2008, the House and Senate passed S. 
3001, the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2009. This legislation required that the Department 
of Defense develop a new, more cost-effective strategy for 
obtaining Defense Base Act insurance for agency contractors.
    Alleged Misconduct at the General Services Administration. 
In March 2007, the Committee commenced an investigation into 
allegations that Lurita A. Doan, the Administrator of the 
General Services Administration, had urged GSA employees to use 
government resources to help Republican candidates. Based on 
the Committee's investigation and its own fact-gathering, the 
Office of Special Counsel, the executive branch agency 
responsible for enforcing the Hatch Act, found that 
Administrator Doan had violated the Hatch Act. On June 8, 2007, 
the Special Counsel reported this finding to President Bush and 
recommended that he discipline her ``to the fullest extent'' 
for her actions. On April 29, 2008, President Bush asked Ms. 
Doan to step down from GSA. James A. Williams was nominated by 
President Bush to succeed Ms. Doan.
    Alleged Abuses by State Department Inspector General. In 
August 2007, Chairman Waxman commenced an investigation into 
the performance of State Department Inspector General Howard J. 
Krongard, particularly his alleged failure to authorize 
investigations into waste, fraud, and abuse in State Department 
activities in Iraq. On November 14, 2007, the Committee held a 
hearing on Mr. Krongard's conduct and Chairman Waxman released 
a staff report that described evidence that Mr. Krongard had 
failed to investigate reports of wasteful spending and 
procurement fraud relating to Iraq and Afghanistan, failed to 
cooperate with Justice Department investigations relating to 
the Iraq War, and exhibited a lack of independence from the 
State Department on audits and investigations. The hearing also 
revealed that Mr. Krongard's brother, former CIA Executive 
Director Buzzy Krongard, was a member of the Advisory Board of 
Blackwater USA, a company that was the subject of an 
investigation that Mr. Krongard had temporarily halted.
    In response to the Committee's investigation, the Inspector 
General opened investigations into fraud at the U.S. embassy. 
On December 7, 2007, Mr. Krongard resigned from his position as 
Inspector General, effective January 15, 2008. In June 2008, 
President Bush nominated Thomas Betro to be the new Inspector 
General.
    Part III provides additional details on the individual 
oversight hearings the Committee held in the 110th Congress.

                    II. Legislative Accomplishments


                A. BILLS AND AMENDMENTS ENACTED INTO LAW

    H.R. 390, the Preservation of Records of Servitude, 
Emancipation, and Post-Civil War Reconstruction Act. Introduced 
on January 10, 2007, by Rep. Tom Lantos, this legislation 
requires the establishment of a national database in the 
National Archives to preserve and make accessible and 
searchable, records of servitude, emancipation, and post-Civil 
War reconstruction. Under H.R. 390, grants will be made 
available to states, colleges and universities, and 
genealogical associations, to preserve similar records in their 
possession and make them available electronically.
    History: Introduced on January 10, 2007; Committee passed 
on January 11, 2007; House passed January 14, 2007; provisions 
of this bill were included in S. 3477, which was signed into 
law on October 13, 2008.
    H.R. 401, the National Capital Transportation Amendments 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Tom Davis on January 11, 2007, the bill 
authorizes federal funding for capital improvements and 
critical preventive maintenance needs for the Washington 
Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and improves 
accountability at WMATA.
    History: Introduced January 11, 2007; Committee passed May 
9, 2007; signed into law as Title VI of H.R. 2095, the Railroad 
Safety Enhancement Act.
    H.R. 1236, To amend title 39, United States Code, to extend 
the authority of the United States Postal Service to issue a 
semipostal to raise funds for breast cancer research. 
Introduced by Rep. Clay on February 28, 2007, the bill extends 
the sale of the Breast Cancer Research Semi-postal Stamp (BCRS) 
from December 31, 2007, to December 31, 2011. After the Postal 
Service's administrative costs are accounted for, monies raised 
above the regular postage rate are transferred to the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) and Department of Defense (DoD) for 
breast cancer research efforts.
    History: Introduced on February 28, 2007; Committee passed 
September 20, 2007; House passed October 30, 2007; a 
substantially similar bill, S. 597, was signed into law on 
December 21, 2007.
    H.R. 1309, Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 2007. 
Introduced by Rep. Clay on March 5, 2007, the bill increases 
public access to government information by strengthening the 
Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).
    History: Introduced on March 5, 2007; Committee passed 
March 12, 2007; House passed March 14, 2007; a substantially 
similar bill, S. 2488, was signed into law on December 31, 
2007.
    H.R. 1362, the Accountability in Contracting Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on March 6, 2007, H.R. 1362 required 
agencies to limit the use of abuse-prone contracts, to increase 
transparency and accountability in federal contracting, and to 
protect the integrity of the acquisition workforce. Provisions 
requiring the public disclosure of justifications for sole-
source contracts and the disclosure of contractor overcharges 
were enacted as part of H.R. 4986, the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008.
    History: Introduced March 6, 2007; Committee passed March 
12, 2007; House passed March 15, 2007; portions signed into law 
January 28, 2008.
    H.R. 2635, the Carbon-Neutral Government Act. Introduced by 
Rep. Waxman on June 7, 2007, the Carbon-Neutral Government Act 
aims to freeze and dramatically reduce the federal government's 
greenhouse gas emissions until the government is carbon-neutral 
in 2050. It also includes specific requirements for agency 
actions to help the government meet these goals. Provisions of 
this bill were incorporated into H.R. 3221.
    History: Introduced on June 7, 2007; Committee passed on 
August 3, 2007; H.R. 3221 passed the House on August 4, 2007; 
some of the provisions of H.R. 3221 were signed into law as 
part of H.R. 6 (P.L. 110-140).
    H.R. 3033, the Contractors and Federal Spending 
Accountability Act. Introduced by Rep. Maloney on July 12, 
2007, the bill requires a database of information on contractor 
and grantee integrity and performance.
    History: Introduced on July 12, 2007; Committee passed 
March 13, 2008; House passed April 23, 2008; signed into law as 
section 872 of S. 3001, the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2009.
    H.R. 3928, the Government Funding Transparency Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Christopher Murphy on October 23, 2007, the 
bill amends the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency 
Act of 2006 to require the names and total compensation of the 
five most highly compensated officers, if (1) the entity in the 
preceding fiscal year received 80% or more of its annual gross 
revenues and $25 million or more in annual gross revenues from 
federal awards; and (2) the public does not have access to 
information about the compensation of the entity's senior 
executives through reports filed under the Securities Exchange 
Act of 1934 or the Internal Revenue Code.
    History: Introduced October 23, 2007; Committee passed 
(amended) March 13, 2008; House passed April 23, 2008; signed 
into law as section 6201 of H.R. 2642, the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 2008.
    H.R. 4220, the Federal Food Donation Act of 2008. 
Introduced by Rep. Emerson on November 15, 2007, the bill would 
encourage the donation of excess food to nonprofit 
organizations that provide assistance to food-insecure people 
in the United States in contracts entered into by executive 
agencies for the provision, service, or sale of food.
    History: Introduced on November 15, 2007; Committee passed 
December 12, 2007; House passed December 17, 2008; signed into 
law as S. 2420 on June 20, 2008.
    H.R. 5683, the Government Accountability Office Act of 
2008. Introduced by Rep. Danny K. Davis on April 2, 2008, the 
bill improves the oversight, administration, and pay adjustment 
functions at GAO.
    History: Introduced on April 2, 2008; Committee passed May 
22, 2008; House passed June 9, 2008; signed into law September 
22, 2008.
    H.R. 5712, the Close the Contractor Fraud Loophole Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Welch on April 3, 2008, the bill requires 
contractors to report violations of criminal law and 
overcharging on federal contracts, whether performed 
domestically or overseas.
    History: Introduced April 23, 2008; Committee passed 
(amended) April 22, 2008; House passed April 23, 2008; signed 
into law as section 6101 of H.R. 2642, the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 2008.

                      B. BILLS PASSED BY THE HOUSE

    H.R. 404, the Federal Customer Service Enhancement Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Cuellar on January 11, 2007, the bill 
requires the Office of Management and Budget to develop 
customer service standards and performance measures for federal 
agencies and requires the head of each agency to collect 
information from its customers regarding the quality of its 
services.
    History: Introduced January 11, 2007; Committee passed June 
12, 2007; House passed July 23, 2007.
    H.R. 752, the Federal Electronic Equipment Donation Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Butterfield on January 31, 2007, the bill 
directs Federal agencies to donate excess and surplus Federal 
electronic equipment, including computers, computer components, 
printers, and fax machines, to qualifying small towns, 
counties, schools, nonprofit organizations, and libraries.
    History: Introduced January 31, 2007; Committee passed 
April 9, 2008; House passed May 21, 2008.
    H.R. 985, the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on February 12, 2007, the bill offers 
improved protections to federal whistleblowers who report 
wrongdoing to authorities. Federal employees and contractors 
are privy to information that enables them to play an essential 
role in ensuring government accountability.
    History: Introduced on February 12, 2007; Committee passed 
March 9, 2007; House passed March 14, 2007.
    H.R. 1254, the Presidential Library Donation Reform Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on March 1, 2007, the bill would 
require the disclosure of donors to presidential libraries.
    History: Introduced March 1, 2007; Committee passed March 
9, 2007; House passed March 14, 2007.
    H.R. 1255, the Presidential Records Act Amendments. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on March 1, 2007, the bill would 
nullify a 2001 presidential executive order to restore public 
access to presidential records.
    History: Introduced March 1, 2007; Committee passed March 
9, 2007; House passed March 14, 2007.
    H.R. 1433, District of Columbia House Voting Rights Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Norton on April 18, 2007, the bill would 
provide District of Columbia residents a vote in the House of 
Representatives. The bill permanently increases the size of the 
House by two members. One seat will go to the District of 
Columbia and the other seat will go to the next state in line 
to get a congressional seat. Based on the 2000 decennial census 
and apportionment calculations, Utah will get the second seat 
until the reapportionment taking place after the 2010 Decennial 
Census.
    History: Introduced March 9, 2007; Committee passed March 
13; the House passed a similar measure (H.R. 1905) April 19, 
2007.
    H.R. 1873, the Small Business Fairness in Contracting Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Braley on April 17, 2007, the bill contains 
provisions concerning contract bundling, government procurement 
goals for small business contracts, and the accuracy of 
contracting data maintained in federal databases. As reported 
by the Oversight Committee, the bill expands the definition of 
contract bundling to ensure that small businesses have access 
to work previously available for small business. The bill also 
improves the current bundling dispute process by allowing small 
businesses to request that the Small Business Administration 
(SBA) appeal a contract award to the contracting agency on 
their behalf and by requiring agencies to provide written 
responses to SBA. In addition, the bill would provide for the 
establishment of appropriate limitations on the award of 
contracts without competition to Alaska Native Corporations and 
other economically disadvantaged Indian tribes.
    History: Introduced on April 17, 2007; Committee passed May 
1, 2007; House passed May 10, 2007.
    H.R. 3548, the Plain Language in Government Communications 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Braley on September 17, 2007, the bill 
requires agencies to use plain language in government documents 
related to obtaining a service or a benefit. Examples of such 
documents include letters from the Social Security 
Administration about Social Security benefits or a notice from 
the Department of Veterans Affairs regarding the GI bill. The 
bill defines plain language as ``language that the intended 
audience can readily understand and use because it is clear, 
concise, well-organized, and follows other best practices of 
plain language writing,'' and requires agencies to use plain 
language in any new document that explains how to obtain a 
benefit or service or that is relevant to obtaining such a 
benefit or service.
    History: Introduced September 17, 2007; Committee passed 
March 13, 2008; House passed April 14, 2008.
    H.R. 3774, the Senior Executive Service Diversity Assurance 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Danny Davis on October 9, 2007, the 
bill would promote diversity in the Senior Executive Service 
(SES). It requires the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) to 
establish an office to oversee the SES, requires agencies and 
OPM to consider diversity when designating members of SES 
candidate evaluation panels, and requires each agency to submit 
a plan to OPM on how the agency will enhance and maximize 
opportunities for the advancement and appointment of 
minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities to the 
SES.
    History: Introduced October 9, 2007; Committee passed May 
1, 2008; House passed June 3, 2008.
    H.R. 4106, the Telework Improvements Act. Introduced by 
Rep. Danny Davis on November 7, 2007, the bill requires the 
head of each agency to establish a policy that allows 
authorized employees to telework. The bill provides a number of 
exceptions for situations such as an employee who cannot 
perform his or her job off-site. The bill requires the General 
Services Administration (GSA) to issue guidance (coordinating 
where appropriate with OPM and FEMA) on questions of 
eligibility, information security, making telework part of the 
agency's goals, and continuity of operations planning.
    History: Introduced November 7, 2007; Committee passed 
March 13, 2008; House passed June 3, 2008.
    H.R. 4108, a bill to amend section 3328 of title 5, United 
States Code, relating to Selective Service Registration. 
Introduced by Rep. George Miller on November 7, 2007, the 
legislation would provide for exemptions from determinations of 
ineligibility for federal employment for individuals who have 
received an honorable discharge from the armed services or who 
have performed at least ten years of federal service.
    History: Introduced on November 7, 2007; Committee passed 
November 8, 2007; House passed December 11, 2007.
    H.R. 4791, the Federal Agency Data Protection Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Clay on December 18, 2007, the bill would 
strengthen current requirements for protecting sensitive data 
that is stored or transmitted by federal agency information 
systems.
    History: Introduced December 18, 2007; Committee passed May 
21, 2008; House passed June 3, 2008.
    H.R. 4881, the Contracting and Tax Accountability Act. 
Introduced on December 19, 2007, the bill would establish a 
process to prevent companies with seriously delinquent federal 
tax debts from receiving new contracts.
    History: Introduced December 19, 2007; Committee passed 
March 13, 2008; House passed April 14, 2008.
    H.R. 5687, the Federal Advisory Committee Act Amendments. 
Introduced by Rep. Clay on April 3, 2008, the bill amends the 
Federal Advisory Committee Act to increase the transparency and 
accountability of federal advisory committees.
    History: Introduced April 3, 2008; Committee passed April 
9, 2008; House passed June 24, 2008.
    H.R. 5781, the Federal Employees Paid Parental Leave Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Maloney on April 14, 2008, the bill would 
amend Title 5 of the U.S. Code and the Congressional 
Accountability Act to provide four work weeks of paid parental 
leave for all federal employees.
    History: Introduced April 14, 2008; Committee passed April 
16, 2008; House passed June 19, 2008.
    H.R. 5787, the Federal Real Property Disposal Enhancement 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Moore on April 14, 2008, the bill 
allows agencies to retain all of the proceeds from the sale of 
surplus property instead of depositing them in the Treasury. 
The agencies may only use these funds for real property 
disposal activities, subject to appropriations. The bill also 
directs GSA to make the initial payment for the direct and 
indirect costs associated with selling the surplus property.
    History: Introduced April 14, 2008; Committee passed May 1, 
2008; House passed May 21, 2008.
    H.R. 5811, the Electronic Communications Preservation Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on April 15, 2008, the bill would 
modernize the requirements of the Presidential Records Act and 
the Federal Records Act to ensure that vital records, including 
e-mail records, are preserved.
    History: Introduced April 15, 2008; Committee passed May 1, 
2008; House passed July 9, 2008.
    H.R. 6388, the Government Accountability Office Improvement 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Waxman on June 26, 2008, along with 18 
other Committee Chairs, the bill would authorize the 
Comptroller General to sue for access to documents needed to 
discharge his duties. Other provisions of this bill give GAO 
authority to interview federal employees and administer oaths. 
The bill also affirms GAO's right to obtain records from three 
agencies that have sometimes thwarted GAO oversight by denying 
access to documents: the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid 
Services, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Federal 
Trade Commission.
    History: Introduced June 26, 2008; Committee passed July 
16, 2008; House passed July 29, 2008.
    H.R. 6500, the Thrift Savings Plan Enhancement Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on July 15, 2008, the bill would 
provide for the automatic enrollment of new federal employees 
in the Thrift Savings Plan, and make other improvements.
    History: Introduced by Rep. Waxman on July 15, 2008; 
Committee passed July 16, 2008; House passed July 30, 2008 as 
part of H.R. 1108.
    H.R. 6575, the Over-Classification Reduction Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Waxman on July 23, 2008, the bill would 
address the continuing problem of over-classification of 
information in the federal government. The bill requires the 
Archivist to resolve the problem of over-classification by 
standardizing the use of classifications and by establishing 
methods to increase oversight of the classification process. 
These include requiring random inspector general audits of 
classified information; establishing a process for those 
challenging classification decisions; requiring individuals to 
include personal identifiers when classifying information; and 
increased training.
    History: Introduced on July 23, 2008; Committee passed July 
23, 2008; House passed September 9, 2008.
    H.R. 6576, the Reducing Information Control Designations 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Waxman on July 23, 2008, the bill would 
require the Archivist of the United States to promulgate 
regulations regarding the use of the more than 100, and 
growing, information control designations used by the federal 
government.
    History: Introduced on July 23, 2008; Committee passed July 
23, 2008; House passed July 30, 2008.
    H.R. 6842, the National Capital Security and Safety Act. 
Introduced by Rep. Norton on September 9, 2008, the original 
bill would have required the District of Columbia to revise its 
laws regarding the use and possession of firearms as necessary 
to comply with the requirements of the Supreme Court in the 
case of District of Columbia v. Heller. A substitute amendment 
altered the bill on the House floor to remove the District's 
ban on semiautomatic weapons, weaken the ability of law 
enforcement to track firearms used in crimes, and allow people 
to obtain firearms without a criminal background check.
    History: Introduced September 9, 2008; Committee passed 
September 10, 2008; House passed September 17, 2008.
    H.R. 7217, the Federal Real Property Disposal Enhancement 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Moore on September 29, 2008, the bill 
allows the General Services Administration (GSA) to help pay 
the costs of other agencies' disposal activities. In 
particular, GSA will be able to help agencies pay costs with 
regard to properties that have yet to be declared excess. These 
costs include environmental cleanup, demolition, surveying, and 
life cycle costing. The bill would also allow agencies to 
retain the proceeds of sales of surplus property and is 
substantially similar to H.R. 5787.
    History: Introduced September 29, 2008; House passed 
September 29, 2008.
    H.R. 7216, a bill to amendment section 3328 of title 5, 
United States Code, relating to Selective Service registration. 
Introduced by Rep. George Miller on September 29, 2008, the 
bill would provide for exemptions from determinations of 
ineligibility for federal employment for individuals who have 
received an honorable discharge from the armed services and for 
the Selective Service System, instead of the Office of 
Personnel Management, to establish the process for deciding if 
an applicant for federal employment has knowingly and willingly 
failed to register.
    History: Introduced on September 29, 2008; House passed 
September 29, 2008.

                    C. BILLS PASSED BY THE COMMITTEE

    H.R. 984, the Executive Branch Reform Act. Introduced by 
Rep. Waxman on February 12, 2007, the bill would have made 
several changes to lobbying and lobbying disclosure laws. It 
would have required all political appointees and senior 
officials in federal agencies and the White House to report the 
contacts they have with private parties seeking to influence 
official government action. It would also have created a ban to 
prevent lobbyists who enter government services from working on 
issues affecting their former clients.
    History: Introduced February 12, 2007; Committee passed 
February 14, 2007.
    H.R. 1054, the District of Columbia Legislative Autonomy 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Norton on February 14, 2007, the bill 
amends the District of Columbia Home Rule Act to eliminate 
congressional review of newly-passed District laws.
    History: Introduced February 14, 2007; Committee passed 
August 2, 2007.
    H.R. 1433, the District of Columbia House Voting Rights 
Act. Introduced by Rep. Norton on March 9, 2007, the bill would 
provide District of Columbia residents a vote in the House of 
Representatives. The bill permanently increases the size of the 
House by two members. One seat will go to the District of 
Columbia and the other seat will go to the next state in line 
to get a congressional seat. Based on the 2000 decennial census 
and apportionment calculations, Utah will get the second seat 
until the reapportionment taking place after the 2010 Decennial 
Census.
    History: Introduced March 9, 2007; Committee passed March 
19, 2007; House debated the bill, but postponed consideration 
April 19, 2007.
    H.R. 2081, a bill to amend the District of Columbia Home 
Rule Act. Introduced by Rep. Norton on May 1, 2007, the bill 
would amend the District of Columbia Home Rule Act to increase 
the salary of the Chief Financial Officer of the District of 
Columbia. The legislation amends the District of Columbia Home 
Rule Act to increase the salary of the Chief Financial Officer 
of the District of Columbia to 150% of the rate of basic pay 
for level I of the Executive Schedule.
    History: Introduced May 1, 2007; Committee passed May 1, 
2007.
    H.R. 2780, a bill to amend title 5, United States Code, to 
clarify the method for computing certain annuities. Introduced 
by Rep. Moran on June 19, 2007, the bill would permit the use 
of high-three average salary computations for full- and part-
time work whether the work was performed before or after 1986, 
eliminating the adverse effect of part-time service performed 
late in an employee's career, and provide a simplified annuity 
computation in cases involving part-time service.
    History: Introduced June 19, 2007; Committee passed March 
13, 2007.
    H.R. 5912, a bill to make tobacco products nonmailable. 
Introduced by Rep. McHugh on April 29, 2008, the bill would 
make cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and roll-your-own tobacco 
nonmailable under the Postal Code. It would permit the Postal 
Service to apply civil penalties for violations, and to issue 
and enforce orders against those who violate the provisions for 
commercial or money-making purposes. It would also permit 
states to bring civil actions to enforce the provision, with 
prior notice to the Postal Service.
    History: Introduced April 29, 2008; Committee passed May 1, 
2008.

                D. RESOLUTIONS APPROVED BY THE COMMITTEE

    All of the following measures except H. Res. 641 were 
approved by the House.
    H. Con. Res. 62, supporting the goals and ideals of a 
National Children and Families Day, in order to encourage 
adults in the United States to support and listen to children 
and to help children throughout the nation achieve their hopes 
and dreams, and for other purposes.
    H. Con. Res. 71, commemorating the 85th Anniversary of the 
founding of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive 
Association, a leading association for the nation's 1.3 million 
American citizens of Greek ancestry, and Philhellenes.
    H. Con. Res. 87, supporting the goals and ideals of a world 
day of remembrance for road crash victims.
    H. Con. Res. 88, honoring the life of Ernest Gallo.
    H. Con. Res. 105, supporting the goals and ideals of a 
National Suffragists Day to promote awareness of the importance 
of the women suffragists who worked for the right of women to 
vote in the United States.
    H. Con. Res. 117, commemorating the 400th Anniversary of 
the settlement of Jamestown.
    H. Con. Res. 138, supporting National Men's Health Week.
    H. Con. Res. 142, expressing the sense of the Congress that 
there should be established a National Pet Week.
    H. Con. Res. 143, concurrent resolution honoring national 
historic landmarks.
    H. Con. Res. 148, recognizing the significance of national 
Caribbean-American Heritage Month.
    H. Con. Res. 155, recognizing the historical significance 
of Juneteenth Independence Day, and expressing the sense of 
Congress that history should be regarded as a means for 
understanding the past and more effectively facing the 
challenges of the future.
    H. Con. Res. 165, supporting the goals and ideals of 
National Teen Driver Safety Week.
    H. Con. Res. 172, honoring the life of each of the nine 
fallen City of Charleston firefighters who lost their lives in 
Charleston, South Carolina, on June 18, 2007.
    H. Con. Res. 193, recognizing all hunters across the United 
States for their continued commitment to safety.
    H. Con. Res. 195, expressing the sense of the Congress that 
a National Dysphagia Awareness Month should be established.
    H. Con. Res. 198, expressing the sense of Congress that the 
United States has a moral responsibility to meet the needs of 
those persons, groups and communities that are impoverished, 
disadvantaged or otherwise in poverty.
    H. Con. Res. 205, supporting the goals and ideals of 
National Women's Friendship Day.
    H. Con. Res. 210, supporting the goals and ideals of Sickle 
Cell Disease Awareness Month.
    H. Con. Res. 211, supporting the goals and ideals of World 
Diabetes Day.
    H. Con. Res. 215, supporting the designation of a week as 
``National Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Automated External 
Defibrillator Awareness Week.''
    H. Con. Res. 223, honoring professional surveyors and 
recognizing their contributions to society.
    H. Con. Res. 254, recognizing and celebrating the 
centennial of Oklahoma statehood.
    H. Con. Res. 273, recognizing the 50th Anniversary of the 
National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences.
    H. Con. Res. 281, celebrating the birth of Abraham Lincoln 
and recognizing the prominence the Declaration of Independence 
played in the development of Abraham Lincoln's beliefs.
    H. Con. Res. 286, expressing the sense of Congress that 
Earl Lloyd should be recognized and honored for breaking the 
color barrier and becoming the first African American to play 
in the National Basketball Association League 58 years ago.
    H. Con. Res. 292, honoring Margaret Truman Daniel and her 
lifetime of accomplishments.
    H. Con. Res. 310, expressing support for a national day of 
remembrance for Harriet Ross Tubman.
    H. Con. Res. 334, supporting the goals and objectives of a 
National Military Appreciation Month.
    H. Con. Res. 351, honoring the 225th Anniversary of the 
Continental Congress meeting in Nassau Hall, Princeton, New 
Jersey, in 1783.
    H. Con. Res. 360, recognizing the important social and 
economic contributions and accomplishments of the New Deal to 
our Nation on the 75th anniversary of legislation establishing 
the initial New Deal social and public works programs.
    H. Con. Res. 364, recognizing the Significance of National 
Caribbean-American Heritage Month.
    H. Con. Res. 365, honoring the life of Robert Mondavi.
    H. Con. Res. 370, expressing support for designation of 
September 2008 as Gospel Music Heritage Month and honoring 
gospel music for its valuable and longstanding contributions to 
the culture of the United States.
    H. Con. Res. 376, congratulating the 2007-2008 National 
Basketball Association World Champions, the Boston Celtics, on 
an outstanding and historic season.
    H. Con. Res. 378, expressing support for designation of 
September 6, 2008, as Louisa Swain Day.
    H. Con. Res. 386, recognizing and celebrating the 232nd 
anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
    H. Con. Res. 429, recognizing the importance of the United 
States wine industry to the American economy.
    H. Res. 15, mourning the passing of President Gerald 
Rudolph Ford and celebrating his leadership and service to the 
people of the United States.
    H. Res. 42, recognizing Ann Richards's extraordinary 
contributions to Texas and American public life.
    H. Res. 49, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that there should be established a National 
Letter Carriers Appreciation Day.
    H. Res. 53, recognizing the life of Lamar Hunt and his 
outstanding contributions to the Kansas City Chiefs, the 
National Football League, and the United States.
    H. Res. 58, to honor Muhammad Ali, global humanitarian, on 
the occasion of his 65th birthday and to extend best wishes to 
him and his family.
    H. Res. 69, recognizing and honoring Benny Parsons and 
expressing the condolences of the House of Representatives to 
his family on his death.
    H. Res. 89, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that a day should be established as Dutch-
American Friendship Day to celebrate the historic ties of the 
United States and the Netherlands.
    H. Res. 90, congratulating Lovie Smith of the Chicago Bears 
and Tony Dungy of the Indianapolis Colts on becoming the first 
African-American head coaches of National Football League teams 
to qualify for the Super Bowl.
    H. Res. 127, recognizing and celebrating the 50th 
anniversary of the entry of Alaska in the Union as the 49th 
State.
    H. Res. 130, congratulating the National Football League 
champion Indianapolis Colts for winning Super Bowl XLI and for 
bringing the City of Indianapolis and the State of Indiana 
their first Lombardi Trophy.
    H. Res. 136, commending the Girl Scouts of the United 
States of America on the occasion of their 95th anniversary, 
for providing quality age-appropriate experiences that prepare 
girls to become the leaders of tomorrow and for raising issues 
important to girls.
    H. Res. 162, recognizing the contributions of the Negro 
Baseball Leagues and their players.
    H. Res. 179, expressing support for a National Foster 
Parents Day.
    H. Res. 180, honoring the life and achievements of Leo T. 
McCarthy and expressing profound sorrow on his death.
    H. Res. 189, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that a Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day should 
be established.
    H. Res. 198, recognizing the significance of Black History 
Month.
    H. Res. 223, supporting the goals and ideals of a National 
Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims.
    H. Res. 245, recognizing the religious and historical 
significance of the festival of Diwali.
    H. Res. 257, supporting the goals and ideals of Pancreatic 
Cancer Awareness Month.
    H. Res. 273, supporting the goals and ideals of Financial 
Literacy Month, and for other purposes.
    H. Res. 291, supporting the goals and ideals of Peace 
Officers Memorial Day.
    H. Res. 303, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that a day ought to be established to bring 
awareness to the issue of missing persons.
    H. Res. 307, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that public servants should be commended for 
their dedication and continued service to the Nation during 
Public Service Recognition Week, May 7 through 13, 2007.
    H. Res. 345, commemorating the 200th anniversary of the 
Archdiocese of New York.
    H. Res. 361, recognizing and honoring Jack Valenti and 
expressing the condolences of the House of Representatives to 
his family on his death.
    H. Res. 389, supporting the goals and ideals of Malaria 
Awareness Day.
    H. Res. 442, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that a National Youth Sports Week should be 
established.
    H. Res. 471, congratulating the National Hockey League 
Champions, the Anaheim Ducks, on their victory in the 2007 
Stanley Cup Finals.
    H. Res. 488, congratulating the Detroit Tigers for winning 
the 2006 American League Pennant and for bringing the City of 
Detroit and the State of Michigan their first trip to the World 
Series in 22 years.
    H. Res. 490, honoring the 2007 NBA Champion San Antonio 
Spurs.
    H. Res. 501, commending Craig Biggio of the Houston Astros 
for reaching 3,000 base hits as a Major League Baseball player 
and for his outstanding service to baseball and the Houston, 
Texas, region.
    H. Res. 519, honoring the life and accomplishments of 
renowned artist Tom Lea on the 100th anniversary of his birth.
    H. Res. 528, commemorating the 300th anniversary of the 
Town of New Milford, Connecticut.
    H. Res. 537, expressing support for the designation and 
goals of National 9-1-1 Education Month and for other purposes.
    H. Res. 544, expressing the sympathy and pledging the 
support of the House of Representatives and the people of the 
United States for the victims of the devastating thunderstorms 
that caused severe flooding in 20 counties in eastern Kansas 
beginning on June 26, 2007.
    H. Res. 551, acknowledging the progress made and yet to be 
made to rebuild the Gulf Coast region after Hurricanes Katrina 
and Rita.
    H. Res. 553, mourning the passing of former First Lady, 
Lady Bird Johnson, and celebrating her life and contributions 
to the people of the United States.
    H. Res. 554, supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Passport Month.
    H. Res. 578, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that there should be established a National 
Watermelon Month.
    H. Res. 584, supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Life Insurance Awareness Month.
    H. Res. 588, recognizing Martha Coffin Wright on the 200th 
anniversary of her birth and her induction into the National 
Women's Hall of Fame.
    H. Res. 605, supporting the goals and ideals of Gold Star 
Mothers Day.
    H. Res. 630, congratulating the Warner Robins Little League 
Baseball Team from Warner Robins, Georgia, on winning the 2007 
Little League World Series Championship.
    H. Res. 641, acknowledging the importance of understanding 
the history of the United States of America and recognizing the 
need to foster civic responsibility in all citizens.
    H. Res. 654, congratulating the Phoenix Mercury for winning 
the 2007 Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) 
Championship.
    H. Res. 663, supporting the goals and ideals of Veterans of 
Foreign Wars Day.
    H. Res. 671, supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.
    H. Res. 684, congratulating Shawn Johnson on her victory in 
becoming the 2007 World Artistic Gymnastics Champion in women's 
gymnastics.
    H. Res. 687, recognizing Reverend Theodore M. Hesburgh, 
C.S.C., for his contributions to the civil rights movement in 
the United States, his tireless work to reduce the threat of 
nuclear conflict, and his efforts to secure the peaceful 
resolution of international conflicts.
    H. Res. 695, expressing the support of the House of 
Representatives for the designation of a National Fire Fighter 
Appreciation Day to honor and celebrate the fire fighters of 
the United States.
    H. Res. 697, commending Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett 
Favre for establishing a National Football League record for 
most career touchdown passes, and for other purposes.
    H. Res. 728, expressing the support and sympathy of the 
House of Representatives and the people of the United States 
for the victims of the devastating flooding that occurred 
across many parts of Ohio in August 2007 and commending the 
communities, volunteer organizations, churches and emergency 
response agencies for their continuing work to restore the 
affected areas across the state.
    H. Res. 759, recognizing the 40th Anniversary of the Mass 
Movement for Soviet Jewish Freedom and the 20th Anniversary of 
the Freedom Sunday Rally for Soviet Jewry on the Mall in 
Washington, D.C.
    H. Res. 778, honoring the first responders and supporting 
the victims of the Southern California wildfires.
    H. Res. 782, expressing the sense of the House with respect 
to the Boston Red Sox victory in the 2007 Major League Baseball 
World Series.
    H. Res. 787, expressing the support and sympathy of the 
House of Representatives and the people of the United States 
for the victims of the tragic fire that occurred on Ocean Isle 
Beach, North Carolina, on October 28, 2007.
    H. Res. 785, recognizing the 100th Anniversary of Robstown, 
Texas.
    H. Res. 808, commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 
Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.
    H. Res. 816, congratulating the Colorado Rockies on winning 
the National League Championship.
    H. Res. 851, honoring local and state first responders, and 
the citizens of the Pacific Northwest in facing the severe 
winter storm of December 2 and 3, 2007.
    H. Res. 856, expressing heartfelt sympathy for the victims 
and families of the shootings in Omaha, Nebraska, on Wednesday, 
December 5, 2007.
    H. Res. 867, commending the Houston Dynamo soccer team for 
winning the 2007 Major League Soccer Cup.
    H. Res. 886, expressing sympathy to the victims and 
families of the tragic acts of violence in Colorado Springs, 
Colorado and Arvada, Colorado.
    H. Res. 892, expressing support for designation of a 
National Funeral Director and Mortician Recognition Day.
    H. Res. 923, recognizing the State of Minnesota's 150th 
anniversary.
    H. Res. 931, expressing support for designation of February 
17, 2008, as Race Day in America and highlighting the 50th 
running of the Daytona 500.
    H. Res. 942, recognizing the significance of Black History 
Month.
    H. Res. 952, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that there should be established a National 
Teacher Day to honor and celebrate teachers in the United 
States.
    H. Res. 960, congratulating the National Football League 
champion New York Giants for winning Super Bowl XLII and 
completing one of the most remarkable postseason runs in 
professional sports history.
    H. Res. 970, expressing support for designation of June 30 
as National Corvette Day.
    H. Res. 984, expressing support for the designation of July 
26, 2008, as National Day of the Cowboy.
    H. Res. 994, expressing support for designation of a 
National Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Awareness Day.
    H. Res. 1000, to commemorate the 250th Anniversary of the 
Naming of Pittsburgh as the culmination of the Forbes Campaign 
across Pennsylvania and the significance this event played in 
the making of America, in the settlement of the continent, and 
in spreading the ideals of freedom and democracy throughout the 
world.
    H. Res. 1002, expressing support for the designation of a 
Public Radio Recognition Month.
    H. Res. 1005, supporting the goals and ideals of Borderline 
Personality Disorder Awareness Month.
    H. Res. 1016, expressing the condolences of the House of 
Representatives on the death of William F. Buckley, Jr.
    H. Res. 1021, supporting the goals, ideals, and history of 
National Women's History Month.
    H. Res. 1026, recognizing the 100th anniversary of the 
founding of the Congressional Club.
    H. Res. 1029, congratulating and recognizing Mr. Juan 
Antonio Chi-Chi Rodriguez for his continued success on and off 
of the golf course.
    H. Res. 1073, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that public servants should be commended for 
their dedication and continued service to the nation during 
Public Service Recognition Week, May 5 through 11, 2008.
    H. Res. 1091, honoring the life, achievements, and 
contributions of Charlton Heston and extending its deepest 
sympathies to the family of Charlton Heston for the loss of 
such a great generous man, husband, and father.
    H. Res. 1113, celebrating the role of mothers in the United 
States and supporting the goals and ideals of Mother's Day.
    H. Res. 1114, supporting the goals and ideals of the Arbor 
Day Foundation and National Arbor Day.
    H. Res. 1122, recognizing Armed Forces Day.
    H. Res. 1128, expressing support of the goals and ideals of 
National Carriage Driving Month.
    H. Res. 1132, supporting the goals and ideals of Peace 
Officers Memorial Day.
    H. Res. 1143, supporting the goals and ideals of the apple 
crunch and the nation's domestic apple industry.
    H. Res. 1144, expressing support for the designation of a 
Frank Sinatra Day, in honor of the dedication of the Frank 
Sinatra commemorative stamp.
    H. Res. 1152, honoring Arnold Palmer for his distinguished 
career in the sport of golf and his commitment to excellence 
and sportsmanship.
    H. Res. 1153, celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage 
Month.
    H. Res. 1202, supporting the goals and ideals of a National 
Guard Youth Challenge Day.
    H. Res. 1219, celebrating the symbol of the United States 
flag and supporting the goals and ideals of Flag Day.
    H. Res. 1237, recognizing the historical significance of 
Juneteenth Independence Day, and expressing the sense of the 
House of Representatives that history should be regarded as a 
means for understanding the past and more effectively facing 
the challenges of the future.
    H. Res. 1262, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that the Secretary of Commerce should use all 
reasonable measures to ensure that every person is counted in 
the 2010 decennial census.
    H. Res. 1275, honoring the life of Timothy John Russert, 
Jr., public servant, political analyst, and author.
    H. Res. 1283, expressing heartfelt sympathy for the victims 
and their families following the tornado that hit Little Sioux, 
Iowa, on June 11, 2008.
    H. Res. 1311, expressing support for the designation of 
National GEAR UP Day.
    H. Res. 1356, celebrating the 221st anniversary of the 
signing of the Constitution of the United States of America, 
and for other purposes.
    H. Res. 1375, recognizing and supporting the goals and 
ideals of National Runaway Prevention Month.
    H. Res. 1392, supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Life Insurance Awareness Month.
    H. Res. 1418, congratulating Michael Phelps, 2008 Beijing 
Summer Olympics champion swimmer, on winning eight gold medals 
in the Games of the XXIX Olympiad and becoming one of the most 
highly decorated athletes in Olympic history.
    H. Res. 1420, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives regarding the terrorist attacks launched 
against the United States on September 11, 2001.
    H. Res. 1436, congratulating the Waipio Little League 
baseball team for winning the 2008 Little League World 
Championship.
    H. Res. 1453, supporting the goals and ideals of Sickle 
Cell Disease Awareness Month.
    H. Res. 1494, recognizing the 100th anniversary of the 
Christian Science Monitor newspaper.
    H. Res. 1499, Designating the third week of October as 
``National Estate Planning Awareness Week.''

                       E. POSTAL NAMING MEASURES

1. Enacted

    H.R. 49, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1300 North Frontage Road West in 
Vail, Colorado, as the ``Gerald R. Ford Jr. Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 335, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 152 North 5th Street in Laramie, 
Wyoming, as the ``Gale W. McGee Post Office.''
    H.R. 414, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 60 Calle McKinley, West in Mayaguez, 
Puerto Rico, as the ``Miguel Angel Garcia Mendez Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 433, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1700 Main Street in Little Rock, 
Arkansas, as the ``Scipio A. Jones Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 437, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 500 West Eisenhower Street in Rio 
Grande City, Texas, as the ``Lino Perez Jr. Post Office.''
    H.R. 514, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 16150 Aviation Loop Drive in 
Brooksville, Florida, as the ``Sergeant Lea Robert Mills 
Brooksville Aviation Branch Post Office.''
    H.R. 521, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2633 11th Street in Rock Island, 
Illinois, as the ``Lane Evans Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 577, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3903 South Congress Avenue in Austin, 
Texas, as the ``Sergeant Henry Ybarra III Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 625, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 4230 Maine Avenue in Baldwin Park, 
California, as the ``Atanacio Haro-Marin Post Office.''
    H.R. 954, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 365 West 125th Street in New York, 
New York, as the ``Percy Sutton Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 988, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 5757 Tilton Avenue in Riverside, 
California, as the ``Lieutenant Todd Jason Bryant Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 1260, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 6301 Highway 58 in Harrison, 
Tennessee, as the ``Claude Ramsey Post Office.''
    H.R. 1335, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 508 East Main Street in Seneca, South 
Carolina, as the ``S/Sgt Lewis G. Watkins Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 1384, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 118 Minner Street in Bakersfield, 
California, as the ``Buck Owens Post Office.''
    H.R. 1402, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 320 South Lecanto Highway in Lecanto, 
Florida, as the ``Sergeant Dennis J. Flanagan Lecanto Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 1425, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 4551 East 52nd Street in Odessa, 
Texas, as the ``Staff Sergeant Marvin `Rex' Young Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 1434, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 896 Pittsburgh Street in Springdale, 
Pennsylvania, as the ``Rachel Carson Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 1617, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 561 Kingsland Avenue in University 
City, Missouri, as the ``Harriett F. Woods Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 1722, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 601 Banyan Trail in Boca Raton, 
Florida, as the ``Leonard W. Herman Post Office.''
    H.R. 2025, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 11033 South State Street in Chicago, 
Illinois, as the ``Willye B. White Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 2077, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 20805 State Route 125 in Blue Creek, 
Ohio, as the ``George B. Lewis Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 2078, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 14536 State Route 136 in Cherry Fork, 
Ohio, as the ``Staff Sergeant Omer T. `O.T.' Hawkins Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 2089, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 701 Loyola Avenue in New Orleans, 
Louisiana, as the ``Louisiana Armed Services Veterans Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 2127, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 408 West 6th Street in Chelsea, 
Oklahoma, as the ``Clem Rogers McSpadden Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 2276, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 203 North Main Street in Vassar, 
Michigan, as the ``Corporal Christopher E. Esckelson Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 2309, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3916 Milgen Road in Columbus, 
Georgia, as the ``Frank G. Lumpkin Jr. Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 2467, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 69 Montgomery Street in Jersey City, 
New Jersey, as the ``Frank J. Guarini Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 2563, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 309 East Linn Street in Marshalltown, 
Iowa, as the ``Major Scott Nisely Post Office.''
    H.R. 2570, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 301 Boardwalk Drive in Fort Collins, 
Colorado, as the ``Dr. Karl E. Carson Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 2587, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 555 South 3rd Street Lobby in 
Memphis, Tennessee, as the ``Kenneth T. Whalum, Sr., Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 2654, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 202 South Dumont Avenue in 
Woonsocket, South Dakota, as the ``Eleanor McGovern Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 2688, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 103 South Getty Street in Uvalde, 
Texas, as the ``Dolph S. Briscoe Jr. Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 2765, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 44 North Main Street in Hughesville, 
Pennsylvania, as the ``Master Sergeant Sean Michael Thomas Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 2778, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3 Quaker Ridge Road in New Rochelle, 
New York, as the ``Robert Merrill Postal Station.''
    H.R. 2825, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 326 South Main Street in Princeton, 
Illinois, as the ``Owen Lovejoy Princeton Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 3052, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 954 Wheeling Avenue in Cambridge, 
Ohio, as the ``John Herschel Glenn Jr. Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3106, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 805 Main Street in Ferdinand, 
Indiana, as the ``Staff Sergeant David L. Nord Post Office.''
    H.R. 3196, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 20 Sussex Street in Port Jervis, New 
York, as the ``E. Arthur Gray Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3233, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at Highway 49 South in Piney Woods, 
Mississippi, as the ``Laurence C. and Grace M. Jones Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 3297, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 950 West Trenton Avenue in 
Morrisville, Pennsylvania, as the ``Nate DeTample Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 3307, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 570 Broadway in Bayonne, New Jersey, 
as the ``Dennis P. Collins Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3308, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 216 East Main Street in Atwood, 
Indiana, as the ``Lance Corporal David K. Fribley Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 3325, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 235 Mountain Road in Suffield, 
Connecticut, as the ``Corporal Stephen R. Bixler Post Office.''
    H.R. 3382, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 200 North William Street in 
Goldsboro, North Carolina, as the ``Philip A. Baddour Sr. Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 3446, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 202 East Michigan Avenue in Marshall, 
Michigan, as the ``Michael W. Schragg Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3468, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1704 Weeksville Road in Elizabeth 
City, North Carolina, as the ``Dr. Clifford Bell Jones Sr. Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 3470, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 744 West Oglethorpe Highway in 
Hinesville, Georgia, as the ``John Sidney `Sid' Flowers Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 3511, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2150 East Hardtner Drive in Urania, 
Louisiana, as the ``Murphy A. Tannehill Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3518, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1430 South Highway 29 in Cantonment, 
Florida, as the ``Charles H. Hendrix Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3530, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1400 Highway 41 North in Inverness, 
Florida, as the ``Chief Warrant Officer Aaron Weaver Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 3532, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 5815 McLeod Street in Lula, Georgia, 
as the ``Private Johnathon Millican Lula Post Office.''
    H.R. 3569, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 16731 Santa Ana Avenue in Fontana, 
California, as the ``Beatrice E. Watson Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3572, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 4320 Blue Parkway in Kansas City, 
Missouri, as the ``Wallace S. Hartsfield Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 3720, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 424 Clay Avenue in Waco, Texas, as 
the ``Army PFC Juan Alonso Covarrubias Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3721, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1190 Lorena Road in Lorena, Texas, as 
the ``Marine Gunnery Sgt. John D. Fry Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3803, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3100 Cashwell Drive in Goldsboro, 
North Carolina, as the ``John Henry Wooten Sr. Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 3936, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 116 Helen Highway in Cleveland, 
Georgia, as the ``Sgt. Jason Harkins Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 3974, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 797 Sam Bass Road in Round Rock, 
Texas, as the ``Marine Corps Corporal Steven P. Gill Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 3988, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3701 Altamesa Boulevard in Fort 
Worth, Texas, as the ``Master Sergeant Kenneth N. Mack Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 4009, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 567 West Nepessing Street in Lapeer, 
Michigan, as the ``Turrill Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4010, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 100 West Percy Street in Indianola, 
Mississippi, as the ``Minnie Cox Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4166, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 701 East Copeland Drive in Lebanon, 
Missouri, as the ``Steve W. Allee Carrier Annex.''
    H.R. 4185, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 11151 Valley Boulevard in El Monte, 
California, as the ``Marisol Heredia Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4203, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3035 Stone Mountain Street in 
Lithonia, Georgia, as the ``Specialist Jamaal RaShard Addison 
Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4210, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 401 Washington Avenue in Weldon, 
North Carolina, as the ``Dock M. Brown Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4211, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 725 Roanoke Avenue in Roanoke Rapids, 
North Carolina, as the ``Judge Richard B. Allsbrook Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 4240, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 10799 West Alameda Avenue in 
Lakewood, Colorado, as the ``Felix Sparks Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 4454, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3050 Hunsinger Lane in Louisville, 
Kentucky, as the ``Iraq and Afghanistan Fallen Military Heroes 
of Louisville Memorial Post Office Building'' in honor of the 
servicemen and women from Louisville Kentucky who died in 
service during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi 
Freedom.
    H.R. 5135, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 201 West Greenway Street in Derby, 
Kansas, as the ``Sergeant Jamie O. Maugans Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 5168, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 19101 Cortez Boulevard in 
Brooksville, Florida, as the ``Cody Grater Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 5220, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3800 SW. 185th Avenue in Beaverton, 
Oregon, as the ``Major Arthur Chin Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5395, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 11001 Dunklin Drive in St. Louis, 
Missouri, as the ``William `Bill' Clay Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5400, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 160 East Washington Street in Chagrin 
Falls, Ohio, as the ``Sgt. Michael M. Kashkoush Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 5472, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2650 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 
Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, as the ``Julia M. Carson Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 5477, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 120 South Del Mar Avenue in San 
Gabriel, California, as the ``Chi Mui Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5479, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 117 North Kidd Street in Ionia, 
Michigan, as the ``Alonzo Woodruff Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5483, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 10449 White Granite Drive in Oakton, 
Virginia, as the ``Private First Class David H. Sharrett II 
Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5489, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 6892 Main Street in Gloucester, 
Virginia, as the ``Congresswoman Jo Ann S. Davis Post Office.''
    H.R. 5517, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 7231 FM 1960 in Humble, Texas, as the 
``Texas Military Veterans Post Office.''
    H.R. 5528, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 120 Commercial Street in Brockton, 
Massachusetts, as the ``Rocky Marciano Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5631, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1155 Seminole Trail in 
Charlottesville, Virginia, as the ``Corporal Bradley T. Arms 
Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5975, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 101 West Main Street in Waterville, 
New York, as the ``Cpl. John P. Sigsbee Post Office.''
    H.R. 6061, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 219 East Main Street in West 
Frankfort, Illinois, as the ``Kenneth James Gray Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 6085, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 42222 Rancho Las Palmas Drive in 
Rancho Mirage, California, as the ``Gerald R. Ford Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 6092, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 101 Tallapoosa Street in Bremen, 
Georgia, as the ``Sergeant Paul Saylor Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6150, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 14500 Lorain Avenue in Cleveland, 
Ohio, as the ``John P. Gallagher Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6197, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 7095 Highway 57 in Counce, Tennessee, 
as the ``Pickwick Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6199, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 245 North Main Street in New City, 
New York, as the ``Kenneth Peter Zebrowski Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 6229, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2523 7th Avenue East in North Saint 
Paul, Minnesota, as the ``Mayor William `Bill' Sandberg Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 6338, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 4233 West Hillsboro Boulevard in 
Coconut Creek, Florida, as the ``Army SPC Daniel Agami Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 6437, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 200 North Texas Avenue in Odessa, 
Texas, as the ``Corporal Alfred Mac Wilson Post Office.''
    H.R. 6558, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1750 Lundy Avenue in San Jose, 
California, as the ``Gordon N. Chan Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6681, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 300 Vine Street in New Lenox, 
Illinois, as the ``Jacob M. Lowell Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6834, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 4 South Main Street in Wallingford, 
Connecticut, as the ``CWO Richard R. Lee Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 6847, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 801 Industrial Boulevard in Ellijay, 
Georgia, as the ``First Lieutenant Noah Harris Ellijay Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 6859, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1501 South Slappey Boulevard in 
Albany, Georgia, as the ``Dr. Walter Carl Gordon, Jr. Post 
Office Building.''\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Cleared for White House 11/20/2008 but not yet signed.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    H.R. 6874, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 156 Taunton Avenue in Seekonk, 
Massachusetts, as the ``Lance Corporal Eric Paul Valdepenas 
Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6902, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 513 6th Avenue in Dayton, Kentucky, 
as the ``Staff Sergeant Nicholas Ray Carnes Post Office.''
    H.R. 6982, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 210 South Ellsworth Avenue in San 
Mateo, California, as the ``Leo J. Ryan Post Office Building.''
    S. 171, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 301 Commerce Street in Commerce, 
Oklahoma, as the ``Mickey Mantle Post Office Building.''
    S. 1352, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 127 East Locust Street in Fairbury, 
Illinois, as the ``Dr. Francis Townsend Post Office Building.''
    S. 2174, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 175 South Monroe Street in Tiffin, 
Ohio, as the ``Paul E. Gillmor Post Office Building.''
    S. 2272, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service known as the Southpark Station in Alexandria, 
Louisiana, as the John ``Marty'' Thiels Southpark Station, in 
honor and memory of Thiels, a Louisiana postal worker who was 
killed in the line of duty on October 4, 2007.
    S. 2478, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 59 Colby Corner in East Hampstead, 
New Hampshire, as the ``Captain Jonathan D. Grassbaugh Post 
Office.''
    S. 3015, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 18 S. G Street, Lakeview, Oregon, as 
the ``Dr. Bernard Daly Post Office Building.''
    S. 3082, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1700 Cleveland Avenue in Kansas City, 
Missouri, as the ``Reverend Earl Abel Post Office Building.''
    S. 3241, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1717 Orange Avenue in Fort Pierce, 
Florida, as the ``CeeCee Ross Lyles Post Office Building.''

2. Approved by the House

    H.R. 1734, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 630 Northeast Killingsworth Avenue in 
Portland, Oregon, as the ``Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 3034, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 127 South Elm Street in Gardner, 
Kansas, as the ``Private First Class Shane R. Austin Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 3911, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 95 Church Street in Jessup, 
Pennsylvania, as the ``Lance Corporal Dennis James Veater Post 
Office.''
    H.R. 4342, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 824 Manatee Avenue West in Bradenton, 
Florida, as the ``Dan Miller Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4774, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 10250 John Saunders Road in San 
Antonio, Texas, as the ``Cyndi Taylor Krier Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 5506, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 369 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive in 
Jersey City, New Jersey, as the ``Bishop Ralph E. Brower Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 5932, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2801 Manhattan Boulevard in Harvey, 
Louisiana, as the ``Harry Lee Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6168, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 112 South 5th Street in Saint 
Charles, Missouri, as the ``Lance Corporal Drew W. Weaver Post 
Office Building.''
    H.R. 6169, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 15455 Manchester Road in Ballwin, 
Missouri, as the ``Specialist Peter J. Navarro Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 6198, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1700 Cleveland Avenue in Kansas City, 
Missouri, as the ``Reverend Earl Abel Post Office Building.'' 
Companion bill S. 3082 was enacted into law.
    H.R. 6208, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1100 Town and Country Commons in 
Chesterfield, Missouri, as the ``Lance Corporal Matthew P. 
Pathenos Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6226, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 300 East 3rd Street in Jamestown, New 
York, as the ``Stan Lundine Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6489, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 501 4th Street in Lake Oswego, 
Oregon, as the ``Judie Hammerstad Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6585, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 311 Southwest 2nd Street in 
Corvallis, Oregon, as the ``Helen Berg Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6772, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1717 Orange Avenue in Fort Pierce, 
Florida, as the ``CeeCee Ross Lyles Post Office Building.'' 
Companion bill S. 3241 was enacted into law.
    H.R. 6837, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 7925 West Russell Road in Las Vegas, 
Nevada, as the ``Private First Class Irving Joseph Schwartz 
Post Office Building.''

3. Approved by Committee

    H.R. 706, to redesignate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2777 Logan Avenue in San Diego, 
California, as the ``Cesar E. Chavez Post Office.''
    H.R. 915, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 110 East Alexander Street in Three 
Rivers, Texas, as the ``Veterans Memorial Post Office.''
    H.R. 2300, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 127 East Locust Street in Fairbury, 
Illinois, as the ``Dr. Francis Townsend Post Office Building.'' 
Companion bill S. 1352 was enacted into law.
    H.R. 3729, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 427 North Street in Taft, California, 
as the ``Larry S. Pierce Post Office.'' Companion bill S. 2110 
was enacted into law.
    H.R. 3744, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 411 Mount Holly Road in Fairdale, 
Kentucky, as the ``Lance Corporal Robert A. Lynch Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 3952, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 901 Pleasant Street in Attleboro, 
Massachusetts, as the ``Max Volterra Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 4284, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service known as the Southpark Station in Alexandria, 
Louisiana, as the John ``Marty'' Thiels Southpark Station in 
honor and memory of Mr. Thiels, a Louisiana postal worker who 
was killed in the line of duty on October 4 2007. Companion 
bill S. 2272 was enacted into law.
    H.R. 4826, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 88-40 164th Street in Jamaica, New 
York, as the ``Clarence L. Irving Sr. Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 5601, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 7925 West Russell Road in Las Vegas, 
Nevada, as the ``Sergeant Irving Joseph Schwartz Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 5933, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 5351 Laplaco Boulevard in Marrero, 
Louisiana, as the ``Lionel R. Collins Sr. Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 5978, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 76 Brookside Avenue in Chester, New 
York, as the ``1st Lieutenant Louis Allen Post Office.''
    H.R. 6187, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 4244 University Way NE. in Seattle, 
Washington, as the ``Jacob Lawrence Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6265, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 41 Purdy Avenue in Rye, New York, as 
the ``Caroline O'Day Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6286, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1025 Nevin Avenue in Richmond, 
California, as the ``Harold D. McCraw, Sr. Post Office 
Building.''
    H.R. 6342, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 440 2nd Avenue in Gallipolis, Ohio, 
as the ``Bob Evans Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6584, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 19300 South Molalla Avenue in Oregon 
City, Oregon, as the ``Alice Norris Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6586, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3624 Commercial Street Southeast in 
Salem, Oregon, as the ``Sue Miller Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6836, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 140 Merriman Road in Garden City, 
Michigan, as the ``John J. Shivnen Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 6956, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 12877 Broad Street in Sparta, 
Georgia, as the ``Yvonne Ingram-Ephraim Post Office Building.''
    H.R. 7286, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 46-02 21st Street in Long Island 
City, New York, as the ``Geraldine Ferraro Post Office 
Building.''

             III. Chronology of Full Committee Proceedings

    Business meeting to approve the committee's rules of 
procedure, establish subcommittee jurisdictions, and approve 
member assignments (January 18, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Allegations of Political Interference with the 
Work of Government Climate Change Scientists'' (January 30, 
2007). Witnesses: Dr. Francesca Grifo, Senior Scientist and 
Director of the Union of Concerned Scientists, Scientific 
Integrity Program; Rick Piltz, Director of Climate Science 
Watch; Dr. Drew Shindell, atmospheric physicist at NASA's 
Goddard Institute for Space Studies; Dr. Roger Pielke, 
political scientist and University of Colorado professor.
    Hearing on the ``Impact of CPA Decision-making on Iraq 
Reconstruction'' (February 6, 2007). Witnesses: Ambassador L. 
Paul Bremer, Former Administrator, Coalition Provisional 
Authority; Stuart W. Bowen, Jr., Special Inspector General for 
Iraq Reconstruction; David Oliver, Former Director of 
Management and Budget, Coalition Provisional Authority; 
Ambassador Timothy Carney, Coordinator for Economic Transition 
in Iraq, U.S. Department of State (State Department refused to 
allow him to testify).
    Hearing on ``Iraq Reconstruction: Reliance on Private 
Military Contractors'' (February 7, 2007). Witnesses: Kristal 
Batalona, Daughter of Wesley Batalona; Kathryn Helvenston-
Wettengel, Mother of Stephen Helvenston; Rhonda Teague, Wife of 
Michael Teague; Donna Zovko, Mother of Jerry Zovko; The 
Honorable Tina Ballard, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy 
and Procurement, U.S. Army; Andrew G. Howell, General Counsel, 
Blackwater USA; R. Timothy Tapp, Managing Director, Business 
Operations, Regency Hotel & Hospital Co.; W. Steve Murray Jr., 
Director of Contracting, ESS Support Services Worldwide; George 
Seagle, Director of Security, Government and Infrastructure 
Division, KBR; Tom Flores, Senior Director, Corporate Security, 
Fluor Corporation; Alan Chvotkin, Senior Vice President and 
Counsel, Professional Services Council.
    Hearing on ``Management of Large Homeland Security 
Contracts: Deepwater and SBInet'' (February 8, 2007). 
Witnesses: Richard Skinner, Inspector General, U.S. Department 
of Homeland Security; David Walker, Comptroller General of the 
United States, Government Accountability Office; Elaine Duke, 
Chief Procurement Officer, Department of Homeland Security; 
Greg Giddens, Director, SBI Program Executive Office, 
Department of Homeland Security; Admiral Thad Allen, 
Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard; Rear Admiral Gary Blore, 
Deepwater Executive Officer, U.S. Coast Guard; Jerry W. 
McElwee, Vice President, Boeing SBInet Program, Boeing Advanced 
Systems; Leo Mackay, President, Integrated Coast Guard 
Solutions (Lockheed Martin); Philip Teel, President, Northrop 
Grumman Ship Systems.
    Hearing on ``Allegations of Waste, Fraud, and Abuse in 
Pharmaceutical Pricing: Financial Impacts on Federal Health 
Programs and the Federal Taxpayer'' (February 9, 2007). 
Witnesses: Dr. Steven Schondelmeyer, PharmD, PhD., Professor 
and Head, Department of Pharmaceutical Care and Health Systems, 
University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy; Gerard F. 
Anderson, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Health Policy and 
Management Director, Center for Hospital Finance and 
Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; 
James W. Moorman, President and CEO, Taxpayers Against Fraud; 
Lew Morris, Counsel, Office of the Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Health and Human Services; John Dicken, Director, 
Health Care, U.S. Government Accountability Office; Patrick J. 
O'Connell, Chief, Civil Medicaid Fraud, Attorney General of 
Texas; Ron Tenpas, Associate Deputy Attorney General, U.S. 
Department of Justice.
    Business meeting to mark up H.R. 895, The Whistleblower 
Protection Enhancement Act, H.R. 984, The Executive Branch 
Reform Act, and H. Res. 42, recognizing Ann Richards's 
extraordinary contributions to Texas and American public life 
(February 14, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Iraq Reconstruction: An Overview'' (February 
15, 2007). Witnesses: David M. Walker, Comptroller General of 
the United States, Government Accountability Office; Stuart W. 
Bowen, Jr., Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction; 
William H. Reed, Director, Defense Contract Audit Agency.
    Hearing on ``Reform to the Presidential Library Donation 
Disclosure Process'' (February 28, 2007). Witnesses: Sharon 
Fawcett, National Archives and Records Administration; Celia 
Viggo Wexler, Common Cause; Sheila Krumholz, Center for 
Responsive Politics.
    Business meeting to consider views and estimates on the FY 
2008 budget, H. Con. Res. 62, supporting the goals and ideals 
of a National Children and Families Day, in order to encourage 
adults in the United States to support and listen to children 
and to help children throughout the nation achieve their hopes 
and dreams, and for other purposes, and H. Res. 162, 
recognizing the contributions of the Negro Baseball Leagues and 
their players (February 28, 2007).
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 1254, The Presidential 
Library Donation Reform Act, H.R. 1255, The Presidential 
Records Act Amendments, H.R. 1309, The Freedom of Information 
Act Amendments, H.R. 1362, the Accountability in Contracting 
Act, H. Res. 89, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that a day should be established as Dutch-
American Friendship Day to celebrate the historic ties of the 
United States and the Netherlands, H. Res. 136, commending the 
Girl Scouts of the United States of America on the occasion of 
their 95th anniversary, for providing quality age-appropriate 
experiences that prepare girls to become the leaders of 
tomorrow and for raising issues important to girls, and H. Res. 
198, recognizing the significance of Black History Month (March 
8, 2007).
    Business meeting to consider the District of Columbia House 
Voting Rights Act of 2007, and H.R. 2780, a bill to amend title 
5, United States Code, to clarify the method for computing 
certain annuities (March 13, 2007).
    Hearing on ``White House Procedures for Safeguarding 
Classified Information'' (March 16, 2007). Witnesses: Ms. 
Valerie Plame Wilson, former employee, Central Intelligence 
Agency; Dr. James Knodell, Director, Office of Security, The 
White House; Mr. Bill Leonard, Director, Information Security 
Oversight Office, National Archives and Records Administration; 
Mr. Mark Zaid, Attorney; Ms. Victoria Toensing, diGenova & 
Toensing, LLP.
    Hearing on ``Allegations of Political Interference with 
Government Climate Change Science'' (March 19, 2007). 
Witnesses: Philip Cooney, former chief of staff of the White 
House Council on Environmental Quality; Dr. James Hansen, 
director of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies; George 
Deutsch, former NASA public affairs officer; James Connaughton, 
Chairman of the White House Council on Environmental Quality; 
Dr. Roy Spencer, Principal Resident Scientist and the 
University of Alabama.
    Hearing on ``Safe and Affordable Biotech Drugs: The Need 
for a Generic Pathway'' (March 26, 2007). Witnesses: Dr. Janet 
Woodcock, M.D., Food and Drug Administration; Ganesh 
Venkataraman, Ph.D., Research Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; 
Geoffrey Allan, Ph.D., Insmed Incorporated; Bill Schwieterman, 
M.D., Tekgenics Corporation (formerly with FDA's Center for 
Biologics); Theresa Lee Gerrard, Ph.D., TLG Consulting, Inc. 
(formerly with Amgen and FDA's Center for Biologics); Inger 
Mollerup, Novo Nordisk A/S; Nelda Barnett, AARP; Scott D. 
McKibbin, State of Illinois; Mary Nathan, National Organization 
for Rare Disorders (NORD); Yvonne Brown, National Multiple 
Sclerosis Society; Jonah Houts, Express Scripts, Inc.; Priya 
Mathur, California Public Employees' Retirement System 
(CalPERS); Henry Grabowski, Ph.D., Duke University.
    Hearing on ``Allegations of Misconduct at the General 
Services Adminstration'' (March 28, 2007). Witnesses: The 
Honorable Chuck Grassley, U.S. Senator; The Honorable Lurita 
Doan, Administrator, General Services Administration; Brian D. 
Miller, Inspector General, GSA.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 1124, the DC Tuition 
Assistance Grant program, H. Con. Res. 71, commemorating the 
85th Anniversary of the founding of the American Hellenic 
Educational Progressive Association, a leading association for 
the nation's 1.3 million American citizens of Greek ancestry, 
and Philhellenes, H. Con. Res. 88, honoring the life of Ernest 
Gallo, H. Res. 179, expressing support for a National Foster 
Parents Day, H. Res. 273, supporting the goals and ideals of 
Financial Literacy Month, and for other purposes, H.R. 625, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 4230 Maine Avenue in Baldwin Park, California, as 
the ``Atanacio Haro-Marin Post Office,'' H.R. 988, to designate 
the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 
5757 Tilton Avenue in Riverside, California, as the 
``Lieutenant Todd Jason Bryant Post Office,'' H.R. 1402, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 320 South Lecanto Highway in Lecanto, Florida, as 
the ``Sergeant Dennis J. Flanagan Lecanto Post Office 
Building,'' H.R. 1425, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service located at 4551 East 52nd Street in 
Odessa, Texas, as the ``Staff Sergeant Marvin `Rex' Young Post 
Office Building,'' and H.R. 1434, to designate the facility of 
the United States Postal Service located at 896 Pittsburgh 
Street in Springdale, Pennsylvania, as the ``Rachel Carson Post 
Office Building'' (March 29, 2007).
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 401, the National Capital 
Transportation Amendments Act (April 18, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Misleading Information from the Battlefield'' 
(April 24, 2007). Witnesses: Mary Tillman, mother of Cpl. Pat 
Tillman; Kevin Tillman, brother of Cpl. Pat Tillman; Jessica 
Lynch, former Private, U.S. Army; Dr. Gene Bolles, former Chief 
of Neurosurgery, Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany; 
Hon. Thomas F. Gimble, Acting Inspector General, Department of 
Defense; Brigadier General Rodney Johnson, Army Criminal 
Investigative Command; Specialist Bryan O'Neal, U.S. Army; 
Senior Chief Petty Officer Stephen White, Navy SEAL; Lt. Col. 
John Robinson, formerly of U.S. Army Central Command (CENTCOM).
    Business meeting to consider a motion to subpoena the 
Executive Office of the President for contracts and contacts 
between the White House and MZM, Inc (April 25, 2007).
    Hearing on ``The Food and Drug Administration's Critical 
Mission and Challenges for the Future (May 1, 2007). Witnesses: 
Donald Kennedy, Ph.D., former FDA Commissioner (1977-1979); 
Frank Young, M.D., Ph.D., former FDA Commissioner (1984-1989); 
David Kessler, M.D., J.D., former FDA Commissioner (1990-1997); 
Andrew C. von Eschenbach, M.D., FDA Commissioner.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 1873, the Small Business 
Fairness in Contracting Act, H.R. 3772, the Senior Executive 
Service Diversity Assurance Act, H.R. 5787, the Federal Real 
Property Disposal Enhancement Act, H.R. 5811, the Electronic 
Communications Preservation Act, H.R. 2081, a bill to amend the 
District of Columbia Home Rule Act, H. Con. Res. 105 supporting 
the goals and ideals of a National Suffragists Day to promote 
awareness of the importance of the women suffragists who worked 
for the right of women to vote in the United States, H. Con. 
Res. 117, commemorating the 400th Anniversary of the settlement 
of Jamestown, H. Res. 53, recognizing the life of Lamar Hunt 
and his outstanding contributions to the Kansas City Chiefs, 
the National Football League, and the United States, H. Res. 
291, supporting the goals and ideals of Peace Officers Memorial 
Day, H. Res. 307, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that public servants should be commended for 
their dedication and continued service to the Nation during 
Public Service Recognition Week, May 7 through 13, 2007, H.R. 
1260, to designate the facility of the United States Postal 
Service located at 6301 Highway 58 in Harrison, Tennessee, as 
the ``Claude Ramsey Post Office,'' H.R. 1335, to designate the 
facility of the United States Postal Service located at 508 
East Main Street in Seneca, South Carolina, as the ``S/Sgt 
Lewis G. Watkins Post Office Building,'' H.R. 1617, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 561 Kingsland Avenue in University City, Missouri, 
as the ``Harriett F. Woods Post Office Building,'' H.R. 1722, 
to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 601 Banyan Trail in Boca Raton, Florida, as the 
``Leonard W. Herman Post Office,'' and H.R. 2025, to designate 
the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 
11033 South State Street in Chicago, Illinois, as the ``Willye 
B. White Post Office Building'' (May 1, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Waste, Fraud, and Abuse in the Federal Crop 
Insurance Program'' (May 3, 2007). Witnesses: Eldon Gould, 
Administrator of USDA's Risk Management Agency; Michael Hand, 
Deputy Administrator for Compliance, USDA Risk Management 
Agency; Phyllis Fong, USDA Inspector General; Lisa Shames, 
Acting Director for Natural Resources and the Environment, GAO; 
Bruce Babcock, Director of Iowa State University's Center for 
Agricultural and Rural Development; Dr. Bruce Gardner, 
University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural 
Resources; Steve Ellis, Vice President, Taxpayers for Common 
Sense.
    Hearing on the ``Montreal Protocol and Global Warming'' 
(May 23, 2007). Witnesses: Dr. Guus Velders, Senior Scientist 
on Ozone Layer Depletion, Climate Change, and Air Quality, 
Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency; Allan Thornton, 
Executive Director of the Environmental Investigation Agency; 
Dr. Mack McFarland, Global Environmental Manager, DuPont.
    Hearing on ``Invisible Casualties: The Incidence and 
Treatment of Mental Health Problems by the U.S. Military'' (May 
24, 2007). Witnesses: Army Specialist Thomas Smith; Richard and 
Carol Coons, Parents of Army Master Sergeant James Coons; 
Tammie LeCompte, Wife of Army Specialist Ryan LeCompte; Army 
Specialist Michael Bloodworth; Dr. Thomas Insel, Director, 
National Institute of Mental Health; Dr. Michael E. Kilpatrick, 
Department of Defense, Deputy Director, Deployment Health 
Support, accompanied by Dr. Jack Smith, Acting Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Clinical and Program Policy; Dr. 
Antonette Zeiss, Department of Veterans Affairs, Deputy Chief 
Consultant, Office of Mental Health Services, accompanied by 
Dr. Al Batres, Chief Officer, Office of Readjustment 
Counseling; Dr. John A. Fairbank, Duke University, Member, 
Institute of Medicine Committee on Veterans' Compensation for 
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; Major General Gale S. Pollock, 
Army Surgeon General.
    Hearing on ``FDA's Role in the Evaluation of Avandia's 
Safety'' (June 6, 2007). Witnesses: Andrew C. von Eschenbach, 
M.D., Commissioner, FDA; Steven Nissen, M.D., Chairman, 
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine; Bruce M. Psaty, M.D., 
Ph.D., Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Health Services; 
Co-director, Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of 
Washington; John B. Buse, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Medicine 
and Chief, Division of Endocrinology, University of North 
Carolina School of Medicine; Moncef Slaoui, Ph.D., Chairman, 
Research and Development, GlaxoSmithKline.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 2635, the Carbon Neutral 
Government Act, H.R. 404, the Federal Customer Service 
Enhancement Act, H. Con. Res. 87, supporting the goals and 
ideals of a world day of remembrance for road crash victims, H. 
Con. Res. 142, expressing the sense of the Congress that there 
should be established a National Pet Week, H. Con. Res. 148, 
recognizing the significance of national Caribbean-American 
Heritage Month, H. Con. Res. 155, recognizing the historical 
significance of Juneteenth Independence Day, and expressing the 
sense of Congress that history should be regarded as a means 
for understanding the past and more effectively facing the 
challenges of the future, H. Con. Res. 195, expressing the 
sense of the Congress that a National Dysphagia Awareness Month 
should be established, H. Res. 189, expressing the sense of the 
House of Representatives that a Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans 
Day should be established, H. Res. 257, supporting the goals 
and ideals of Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, and H. Res. 
361, recognizing and honoring Jack Valenti and expressing the 
condolences of the House of Representatives to his family on 
his death (June 12, 2007).
    Hearing on ``New Allegations Against GSA Administrator 
Lurita Doan: Retaliation Against Government Officials 
Cooperating with Investigators'' (June 13, 2007). Witness: 
Lurita Doan, head of the General Services Administration.
    Hearing on the ``Response of the Department of Health and 
Human Services to the Nation's Emergency Care Crisis'' (June 
22, 2007). Witnesses: Dr. William Schwab, professor and chief, 
department of traumatology and surgical critical care, 
University of Pennsylvania; Dr. Ray Johnson, associate director 
of the department of emergency medicine, Mission Hospital 
Regional Medical Center; Dr. Bob O'Connor, professor and 
chairman, department of emergency medicine, University of 
Virginia; Dr. Kevin Yeskey, Director of the Office of 
Preparedness and Emergency Operations and Acting Deputy 
Assistant Secretary in the Office of the Assistant Secretary 
for Preparedness and Response at HHS; Dr. Walter Koroshetz, 
Deputy Director, National Institute of Neurological Diseases 
and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health 
and Human Services.
    Hearing on ``Waste, Fraud, and Abuse at K-Town: How 
Mismanagement Has Derailed DOD's Largest Single Facility 
Construction Project (June 28, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Gregory D. 
Kutz, Managing Director, Forensic Audits and Special 
Investigations, Government Accountability Office; Mr. Terrell 
G. Dorn, Director, Physical Infrastructure, Government 
Accountability Office; Mr. Bruce A. Causseaux, Senior Level 
Contract and Procurement Fraud Specialist, Forensic Audits and 
Special Investigations, Government Accountability Office; 
Brigadier Gen. Danny K. Gardner, Director of Installations and 
Mission Support, United States Air Forces in Europe.
    Hearing on ``The Surgeon General's Vital Mission: 
Challenges for the Future'' (July 10, 2007). Witnesses: Dr. 
Richard Carmona, former Surgeon General; Dr. C. Everett Koop, 
former Surgeon General, Dr. David Satcher, former Surgeon 
General.
    Hearing on FEMA's Toxic Trailers (July 19, 2007). 
Witnesses: Dr. Scott Needle, Pediatrician, American Academy of 
Pediatrics; Ms. Mary DeVany, Industrial Hygienist, DeVany 
Industrial Consultants; Mr. Paul Stewart, Travel Trailer 
Occupant, December 2005-March 2006; Mrs. Lindsay Huckabee, 
Mobile Home Occupant, December 2005-Current; Mr. James Harris, 
Jr., Travel Trailer Occupant, April 2006-Current; The Honorable 
R. David Paulison, Administrator, Federal Emergency Management 
Agency.
    Hearing on ``Inadvertent File Sharing over Peer-to-Peer 
Networks'' (July 24, 2007). Witnesses: Ms. Mary Koelbel Engle, 
Associate Director for Advertising Practices, Bureau of 
Consumer Protection, Federal Trade Commission; Mr. Thomas D. 
Sydnor, II, Attorney-Advisor, Copyright Group, Office of 
International Relations, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; Mr. 
Daniel G. Mintz, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Department of 
Transportation; Mr. M. Eric Johnson, Professor of Operations 
Management, Director, Glassmeyer/McNamee Center for Digital 
Strategies, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College; General 
Wesley K. Clark, Chairman and CEO, Wesley K. Clark & 
Associates, Board Member--Tiversa, Inc.; Mr. Robert Boback, 
CEO, Tiversa, Inc.; Mr. Mark Gorton, Chief Executive Officer, 
The Lime Group.
    Hearing on ``Allegations of Waste, Fraud, and Abuse at the 
New U.S. Embassy in Iraq'' (July 26, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. John 
Owens, Former Employee, First Kuwaiti Trading & Contracting 
Company; Mr. Rory Mayberry, Former Subcontractor Employee, 
First Kuwaiti Trading & Contracting Company; Mr. Karl Demming, 
KBR; Major General (Retired) Charles E. Williams, Director, 
Office of Overseas Building Operations, Department of State; 
Mr. William Moser, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisitions, 
Department of State; Hon. Patrick Kennedy, Director, Office of 
Management Policy, Department of State; Mr. Howard J. Krongard, 
Inspector General, Department of State.
    Hearing on FEMA Preparedness in 2007 and Beyond (July 31, 
2007). Witnesses: Mr. R. David Paulison, Administrator, Federal 
Emergency Management Agency; Major General Terry Scherling, 
Director of the Joint Staff, National Guard Bureau; Mr. Matt 
Jadacki, Deputy Inspector General, Office of the Inspector 
General, Department of Homeland Security; Mr. Al Ashwood, 
Director, Oklahoma State Emergency Management Agency, 
President, National Emergency Management Agency; Mr. 
Christopher Geldart, Director, Office of National Capitol 
Region Coordination; Mr. Dewayne West, Director of Emergency 
Management for Johnston County, North Carolina, National 
Association of Counties, the International Association of 
Emergency Managers; Mr. Darrell Darnell, Director, District of 
Columbia Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency; Mr. 
William Jenkins, Director, Homeland Security & Justice Issues, 
Government Accountability Office; Ms. Kathleen Tierney, 
Director, Natural Hazards Center, University of Colorado-
Boulder.
    Hearing on ``The Tillman Fratricide: What the Leadership of 
the Department of Defense Didn't Know'' (August 1, 2007). 
Witnesses: The Honorable Donald Rumsfeld, former Secretary of 
Defense; Gen. John P. Abizaid (Retired), Former Commander, U.S. 
Central Command; Gen. Richard B. Myers (Retired), Former Chair, 
Joint Chiefs of Staff; Gen. Bryan Douglas Brown (Retired), 
Former Commander, U.S. Special Operations Command; Lt. Gen. 
Philip R. Kensinger, Jr. (Retired), Former Commander, U.S. Army 
Special Operations Command.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 1054, the District of 
Columbia Legislative Autonomy Act, H. Res. 544, expressing the 
sympathy and pledging the support of the House of 
Representatives and the people of the United States for the 
victims of the devastating thunderstorms that caused severe 
flooding in 20 counties in eastern Kansas beginning on June 26, 
2007, H. Res. 554, supporting the goals and ideals of National 
Passport Month, H.R. 2778, to designate the facility of the 
United States Postal Service located at 3 Quaker Ridge Road in 
New Rochelle, New York, as the ``Robert Merrill Postal 
Station,'' and H.R. 3106, to designate the facility of the 
United States Postal Service located at 805 Main Street in 
Ferdinand, Indiana, as the ``Staff Sergeant David L. Nord Post 
Office'' (August 2, 2007).
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 1236, To amend title 39, 
United States Code, to extend the authority of the United 
States Postal Service to issue a semipostal to raise funds for 
breast cancer research, H. Con. Res. 193, recognizing all 
hunters across the United States for their continued commitment 
to safety, H. Con. Res. 210, supporting the goals and ideals of 
Sickle Cell Disease Awareness Month, H. Res. 291, supporting 
the goals and ideals of Peace Officers Memorial Day, H. Res. 
584, supporting the goals and ideals of National Life Insurance 
Awareness Month, H. Res. 605, supporting the goals and ideals 
of Gold Star Mothers Day, H. Res. 641, acknowledging the 
importance of understanding the history of the United States of 
America and recognizing the need to foster civic responsibility 
in all citizens, H. Res. 663, supporting the goals and ideals 
of Veterans of Foreign Wars Day, H.R. 2089, to designate the 
facility of the United States Postal Service located at 701 
Loyola Avenue in New Orleans, Louisiana, as the ``Louisiana 
Armed Services Veterans Post Office,'' H.R. 2276, to designate 
the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 203 
North Main Street in Vassar, Michigan, as the ``Corporal 
Christopher E. Esckelson Post Office Building,'' H.R. 3233, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at Highway 49 South in Piney Woods, Mississippi, as the 
``Laurence C. and Grace M. Jones Post Office Building,'' H.R. 
3297, to designate the facility of the United States Postal 
Service located at 950 West Trenton Avenue in Morrisville, 
Pennsylvania, as the ``Nate DeTample Post Office Building,'' 
H.R. 3307, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 570 Broadway in Bayonne, New Jersey, 
as the ``Dennis P. Collins Post Office Building,'' H.R. 3308, 
to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 216 East Main Street in Atwood, Indiana, as the 
``Lance Corporal David K. Fribley Post Office,'' H.R. 3325, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 235 Mountain Road in Suffield, Connecticut, as the 
``Corporal Stephen R. Bixler Post Office,'' H.R. 3382, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 200 North William Street in Goldsboro, North 
Carolina, as the ``Philip A. Baddour Sr. Post Office,'' H.R. 
3518, to designate the facility of the United States Postal 
Service located at 1430 South Highway 29 in Cantonment, 
Florida, as the ``Charles H. Hendrix Post Office Building,'' 
and H.R. 3530, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1400 Highway 41 North in Inverness, 
Florida, as the ``Chief Warrant Officer Aaron Weaver Post 
Office Building'' (September 20, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Private Security Contracting in Iraq and 
Afghanistan'' (October 2, 2007). Witnesses: Erik Prince, 
Chairman, the Prince Group, LLC and Blackwater USA; Ambassador 
David M. Satterfield, Special Adviser, Coordinator for Iraq, 
Department of State; Ambassador Richard J. Griffin, Assistant 
Secretary, Bureau of Diplomatic Security and Director of the 
Office of Foreign Missions, Department of State; William H. 
Moser, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Logistics Management, 
Department of State.
    Hearing on ``Assessing the State of Iraqi Corruption'' 
(October 4, 2007). Witnesses: Judge Radhi Hamza al-Radhi, 
former head of the Iraqi Commission on Public Integrity; Mr. 
David Walker, Comptroller General of the United States; Mr. 
Stuart Bowen, Special Inspector General for Iraq 
Reconstruction; Ambassador Lawrence Butler, Deputy Assistant 
Secretary for Near East Affairs, U.S. Department of State; Ms. 
Claudia Rosett, Journalist-in-Residence, Foundation for Defense 
of Democracies.
    Hearing on ``EPA Black Carbon and Global Warming'' (October 
18, 2007). Witnesses: Dr. Mark Z. Jacobson, Prof. of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering, Atmosphere/Energy Program, Stanford 
University; Dr. Tami C. Bond, Asst. Prof. of Civil and 
Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-
Champaign; Dr. V. Ramanathan, Prof. of Climate and Atmospheric 
Sciences, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, University of San 
Diego; Dr. Charles Zender, Assoc. Prof. of Earth System 
Science, University of California at Irvine; Dr. Joel Schwartz, 
Professor of Environmental Epidemiology, Harvard University.
    Hearing on ``The Health and Environmental Impacts of 
Uranium Contamination in the Navajo Nation'' (October 23, 
2007). Witnesses: The Hon. George Arthur, Chairman, Resources 
Committee, Navajo Nation Council; The Hon. Stephen Etsitty, 
Director, Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency; Dr. 
Doug Brugge, Associate Professor, Tufts University School of 
Medicine; Mr. Larry King, Gallup, New Mexico; Ms. Edith Hood, 
Church Rock, New Mexico; Mr. Phil Harrison, Window Rock, 
Arizona; Mr. Ray Manygoats, Tuba City, Arizona; The Hon. Wayne 
Nastri, Regional Administrator, Region 9, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency; Mr. David Geiser, Deputy Director, Office of 
Legacy Management, U.S. Department of Energy; Dr. Charles L. 
Miller, Director, Office of Federal and State Materials and 
Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission; Mr. Robert G. McSwain, Acting Director, Indian 
Health Service; Mr. Jerry Gidner, Director, Bureau of Indian 
Affairs.
    Hearing on the State Department and the Iraq War (October 
25, 2007). Witness: Condoleezza Rice, Secretary of State.
    Hearing on ``Oil and Gas Exemptions in Federal 
Environmental Protections'' (October 31, 2007). Witnesses: Ms. 
Amy Mall, Senior Policy Analyst, Natural Resources Defense 
Council; Mr. Kendrick Neubecker, on behalf of Trout Unlimited, 
Carbondale, Colorado; Dr. Theo Colborn, President, the 
Endocrine Disruption Exchange; Dr. Daniel Teitelbaum, M.D., 
P.C., Medical Toxicologist, President, Medical Toxicology and 
Occupational Medicine, Denver, Colorado; Mr. Steve Mobaldi, 
Grand Junction, Colorado; Ms. Susan Wallace-Babb, Winnsboro, 
Texas; Dr. David E. Bolin, Deputy Director, State Oil and Gas 
Board, State of Alabama; Mr. Robert Anderson, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Minerals, Realty and Resource Protection, Bureau 
of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior; Mr. 
Benjamin H. Grumbles, Assistant Administrator for Water, U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency.
    Hearing on ``The Administration's Regulatory Actions on 
Medicaid: The Effects on Patients, Doctors, Hospitals, and 
States'' (November 1, 2007). Witnesses: David Parrella, 
director of the Connecticut Medicaid program; Barbara Miller, 
Maryland resident and former Medicaid beneficiary; Twila 
Costigan, foster care worker from Montana; Denise Herrmann, 
school nurse from Minnesota; Dr. Sheldon Retchin, Vice 
President for Health Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth 
University in Richmond; Dr. Angela Gardner, Vice President of 
the American College of Emergency Physicians and an emergency 
doctor from Galveston, Texas; Dr. Marjorie Kanof, Managing 
Director of the Health Care Division at the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO); Dennis Smith, Director of the CMS 
Center on Medicaid and State Operations.
    Hearing on ``Drug-Resistant Infections in the Community: 
Consequences for Public Health'' (November 7, 2007). Witnesses: 
Dr. Julie Louise Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention; Dr. James Burns, M.D., 
M.B.A., Chief Deputy Commissioner for Public Health, Virginia 
Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia; Dr. Elizabeth A. 
Bancroft, M.D., S.M., Medical Epidemiologist, Los Angeles 
County Department of Health Services, Los Angeles, California; 
Dr. Robert S. Daum, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, University 
of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; Mr. Steven L. Walts, Ed.D., 
Superintendent of Schools, Prince William County Schools, 
Manassas, Virginia; Dr. Eric Gale, M.D., Bronx Regional Medical 
Director, Institute for Family Health.
    Hearing on ``EPA Approval of New Power Plants: Failure to 
Address Global Warming Pollutants'' (November 8, 2007). 
Witnesses: The Honorable Stephen L. Johnson, Administrator, 
Environmental Protection Agency; Mr. Ron Curry, Secretary, New 
Mexico Environment Department; Mr. David Doniger, Policy 
Director, Climate Center, Natural Resources Defense Council; 
Dr. Daniel M. Kammen, Director, Renewable and Appropriate 
Energy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley; Mr. John 
Cline, Partner, Troutman Sanders LLP.
    Hearing on ``Assessing the State Department Inspector 
General (November 14, 2007). Witness: The Honorable Howard J. 
Krongard, Inspector General, U.S. Department of State.
    Hearing on ``One Year Later: Have TSA Airport Security 
Checkpoints Improved?'' (November 15, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. 
Gregory D. Kutz, Managing Director, Forensic Audits and Special 
Investigations, Government Accountability Office; Mr. John 
Cooney, Assistant Director, Forensic Audits and Special 
Investigations, Government Accountability Office; The Honorable 
Edmund ``Kip'' Hawley, Administrator, Transportation Security 
Administration.
    Hearing on ``Executive Pay: The Role of Compensation 
Consultants'' (December 5, 2007). Witnesses: Charles Elson, 
John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance, University of 
Delaware; Meredith Miller, Assistant Treasurer for Policy, 
Connecticut State Treasurer's Office; Daniel F. Pedrotty, 
Director, Office of Investment, AFL-CIO; Houman Shadab, Senior 
Research Fellow, Mercatus Center, George Mason University; 
James F. Reda, Managing Director, James F. Reda & Associates; 
Donald Lowman, Managing Director, Towers Perrin; Michael 
Powers, Global Practice Leader for Executive Compensation and 
Corporate Governance, Hewitt Associates; George Paulin, 
Chairman and CEO, Frederick W. Cook & Co.; Charles Scott, 
President of Human Capital Consulting, Mercer Human Resources 
Consulting.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 4220, the Federal Food 
Donation Act of 2008, H. Con. Res. 198, Expressing the sense of 
Congress that the United States has a moral responsibility to 
meet the needs of those persons, groups and communities that 
are impoverished, disadvantaged or otherwise in poverty, H. 
Con. Res. 254, recognizing and celebrating the centennial of 
Oklahoma statehood, H. Res. 816, congratulating the Colorado 
Rockies on winning the National League Championship, H.R. 3468, 
to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 1704 Weeksville Road in Elizabeth City, North 
Carolina, as the ``Dr. Clifford Bell Jones Sr. Post Office,'' 
H.R. 3720, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 424 Clay Avenue in Waco, Texas, as 
the ``Army PFC Juan Alonso Covarrubias Post Office Building,'' 
H.R. 3721, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1190 Lorena Road in Lorena, Texas, as 
the ``Marine Gunnery Sgt. John D. Fry Post Office Building,'' 
H.R. 3803, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3100 Cashwell Drive in Goldsboro, 
North Carolina, as the ``John Henry Wooten Sr. Post Office 
Building,'' H.R. 3988, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service located at 3701 Altamesa Boulevard in 
Fort Worth, Texas, as the ``Master Sergeant Kenneth N. Mack 
Post Office Building,'' H.R. 4210, to designate the facility of 
the United States Postal Service located at 401 Washington 
Avenue in Weldon, North Carolina, as the ``Dock M. Brown Post 
Office Building,'' H.R. 4211, to designate the facility of the 
United States Postal Service located at 725 Roanoke Avenue in 
Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, as the ``Judge Richard B. 
Allsbrook Post Office,'' H.R. 4240, to designate the facility 
of the United States Postal Service located at 10799 West 
Alameda Avenue in Lakewood, Colorado, as the ``Felix Sparks 
Post Office Building,'' S. 2174, to designate the facility of 
the United States Postal Service located at 175 South Monroe 
Street in Tiffin, Ohio, as the ``Paul E. Gillmor Post Office 
Building,'' H.R. 3911, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service located at 95 Church Street in Jessup, 
Pennsylvania, as the ``Lance Corporal Dennis James Veater Post 
Office,'' and H.R. 4342, to designate the facility of the 
United States Postal Service located at 824 Manatee Avenue West 
in Bradenton, Florida, as the ``Dan Miller Post Office 
Building'' (December 12, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Assessing Veterans'' Charities'' (December 13, 
2007). Witnesses: The Honorable Charles Grassley, United States 
Senator; Ed Edmundson, Father of a wounded veteran; Bonnie 
Carroll, Executive Director, Tragedy Assistance Program for 
Survivors; Tracy L. McCurdy, Director, Pennsylvania Bureau of 
Charitable Organizations; Daniel Borochoff, President, American 
Institute of Philanthropy; Bennett Weiner, Chief Operating 
Officer, Better Business Bureau; Robert M. Friend, President, 
American Veterans Coalition; Pamela L. Seman, Executive 
Director, Disabled Veterans Association.
    Hearing on ``The Mitchell Report: The Illegal Use of 
Steroids in Major League Baseball'' (January 15, 2008). 
Witnesses: The Honorable George Mitchell, former United States 
Senator; Mr. Bud Selig, Commissioner, Major League Baseball; 
Mr. Donald M. Fehr, Executive Director, Major League Baseball 
Players Association.
    Hearing on ``Assessing Veteran's Charities--Part Two'' 
(January 17, 2008). Witnesses: Roger Chapin, President, Help 
Hospitalized Veterans, Inc. and Coalition to Support America's 
Heroes Foundation; Richard Viguerie, President, American Target 
Advertising; Geoff Peters, President, Creative Direct Response; 
Belinda J. Johns, Senior Assistant Attorney General, California 
Attorney General's Office.
    Hearing on ``Addressing the Screening Gap: The National 
Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program'' (January 
29, 2008). Witnesses: Rosemarie Henson, Deputy Director, 
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health 
Promotion, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 
Lisa Mariani, Assistant Branch Chief, Program Services Branch, 
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for 
Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, U.S. Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention; Gail Carey, recipient of 
Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program benefits and 
volunteer, American Cancer Society; Dr. Otis Brawley, Medical 
Director, American Cancer Society; Shelley Fuld Nasso, 
Director, Public Policy, Susan G. Komen for the Cure Advocacy 
Alliance; Pama Joyner, PhD, Director, Breast and Cervical 
Health Program, Washington State Department of Health; Dr. 
Thomas Hoerger, Director, RTI-UNC Center for Excellence in 
Health Promotion Economics and RTI Health Economics and 
Financing Program.
    Business meeting to consider H. Con. Res. 273, recognizing 
the 50th Anniversary of the National Academy of Recording Arts 
& Sciences, H. Res. 867, commending the Houston Dynamo soccer 
team for winning the 2007 Major League Soccer Cup, H.R. 3532, 
to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 5815 McLeod Street in Lula, Georgia, as the 
``Private Johnathon Millican Lula Post Office,'' H.R. 3936, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 116 Helen Highway in Cleveland, Georgia, as the 
``Sgt. Jason Harkins Post Office Building,'' H.R. 4203, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 3035 Stone Mountain Street in Lithonia, Georgia, as 
the ``Specialist Jamaal RaShard Addison Post Office Building,'' 
H.R. 4454, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 3050 Hunsinger Lane in Louisville, 
Kentucky, as the ``Iraq and Afghanistan Fallen Military Heroes 
of Louisville Memorial Post Office Building'' in honor of the 
servicemen and women from Louisville Kentucky who died in 
service during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi 
Freedom, H.R. 5135, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service located at 201 West Greenway Street in 
Derby, Kansas, as the ``Sergeant Jamie O. Maugans Post Office 
Building,'' S. 2272, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service known as the Southpark Station in 
Alexandria, Louisiana, as the John ``Marty'' Thiels Southpark 
Station, in honor and memory of Thiels, a Louisiana postal 
worker who was killed in the line of duty on October 4, 2007, 
and S. 2478, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 59 Colby Corner in East Hampstead, 
New Hampshire, as the ``Captain Jonathan D. Grassbaugh Post 
Office'' (January 29, 2008).
    Hearing on ``Myths and Facts About Human Growth Hormone, B-
12, and Other Substances'' (February 12, 2008). Witnesses: Dr. 
Susan Shurin, Deputy Director, National Heart, Lung and Blood 
Institute, National Institutes of Health; Dr. Thomas T. Perls, 
MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine and Director, New 
England Centenarian Study, Boston University School of 
Medicine; Dr. Alan D. Rogol, MD, Ph.D, Professor of Clinical 
Pediatrics, University of Virginia; Professor of Clinical 
Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, also 
representing the Endocrine Society; Dr. Todd Schlifstein, 
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital for Joint 
Diseases.
    Hearing on ``The Mitchell Report: The Illegal Use of 
Steroids in Major League Baseball, Day 2'' (February 13, 2008). 
Witnesses: Roger Clemens, Major League Baseball player; Brian 
McNamee, Former Major League Baseball Strength and Conditioning 
Coach; Charlie Scheeler, Investigator on Senator Mitchell's 
staff.
    Hearing on ``Electronic Records Preservation at the White 
House'' (February 26, 2008). Witnesses: Alan R. Swendiman, 
Director, Office of Administration; Theresa Payton, Chief 
Information Officer, Office of Administration; The Honorable 
Allen Weinstein, Archivist of the United States; Gary M. Stern, 
General Counsel, National Archives and Records Administration; 
Sharon Fawcett, Assistant Archivist for Presidential Libraries.
    Hearing on ``Executive Compensation II: CEO Pay and the 
Mortgage Crisis'' (March 7, 2008). Witnesses: Dr. Susan M. 
Wachter, Richard B. Worley Professor of Financial Management, 
The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; The Honorable 
William F. Galvin, Secretary of State, the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; The Honorable Brenda L. Lawrence, Mayor, City of 
Southfield, MI; Dr. Anthony Yezer, Professor of Economics, The 
George Washington University; Ms. Nell Minow, Editor and Co-
Founder, The Corporate Library; Mr. Charles Prince, Former 
Chairman and CEO, Citigroup; Mr. Richard D. Parsons, Chair, 
Personnel and Compensation Committee, Citigroup; Mr. E. Stanley 
O'Neal, Former Chairman and CEO, Merrill Lynch; Mr. John D. 
Finnegan, Chair, Management Development & Compensation 
Committee, Merrill Lynch; Mr. Angelo R. Mozilo, Founder and 
CEO, Countrywide Financial Corporation; Mr. Harley W. Snyder, 
Chair, Compensation Committee, Countrywide Financial 
Corporation.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 2780, a bill to amend 
title 5, United States Code, to clarify the method for 
computing certain annuities, H.R. 3033, the Contractors and 
Federal Spending Accountability Act, H.R. 3548, the Plain 
Language in Government Communications Act, H.R. 4106, the 
Telework Improvements Act, H.R. 4881, the Contracting and Tax 
Accountability Act, H.R. 3928, the Government Funding 
Transparency Act, H. Con. Res. 310, expressing support for a 
national day of remembrance for Harriet Ross Tubman, H. Res. 
578, expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that 
there should be established a National Watermelon Month, and H. 
Res. 886, expressing sympathy to the victims and families of 
the tragic acts of violence in Colorado Springs, Colorado and 
Arvada, Colorado, H. Res. 892, expressing support for 
designation of a National Funeral Director and Mortician 
Recognition Day, H. Res. 952, expressing the sense of the House 
of Representatives that there should be established a National 
Teacher Day to honor and celebrate teachers in the United 
States, and H. Res. 994, expressing support for designation of 
a National Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Awareness Day, H. Res. 
1005, supporting the goals and ideals of Borderline Personality 
Disorder Awareness Month, H. Res. 1016, expressing the 
condolences of the House of Representatives on the death of 
William F. Buckley, Jr., H. Res. 1021, supporting the goals, 
ideals, and history of National Women's History Month, H.R. 
4185, to designate the facility of the United States Postal 
Service located at 11151 Valley Boulevard in El Monte, 
California, as the ``Marisol Heredia Post Office Building,'' 
H.R. 5395, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 11001 Dunklin Drive in St. Louis, 
Missouri, as the ``William `Bill' Clay Post Office Building,'' 
H.R. 5472, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 2650 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 
Street, Indianapolis, Indiana, as the ``Julia M. Carson Post 
Office Building,'' H.R. 5479, to designate the facility of the 
United States Postal Service located at 117 North Kidd Street 
in Ionia, Michigan, as the ``Alonzo Woodruff Post Office 
Building,'' H.R. 5483, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service located at 10449 White Granite Drive in 
Oakton, Virginia, as the ``Private First Class David H. 
Sharrett II Post Office Building,'' H.R. 5489, to designate the 
facility of the United States Postal Service located at 6892 
Main Street in Gloucester, Virginia, as the ``Congresswoman Jo 
Ann S. Davis Post Office,'' H.R. 5517, to designate the 
facility of the United States Postal Service located at 7231 FM 
1960 in Humble, Texas, as the ``Texas Military Veterans Post 
Office,'' H.R. 5528, to designate the facility of the United 
States Postal Service located at 120 Commercial Street in 
Brockton, Massachusetts, as the ``Rocky Marciano Post Office 
Building'' (March 13, 2008).
    Hearing on the 2010 Census (April 9, 2008). Witnesses: The 
Honorable Steven H. Murdock, Director, U.S. Census Bureau; The 
Honorable Preston Jay Waite, Deputy Director, U.S. Census 
Bureau; Mathew Scire, Director, Strategic Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; David Powner, Director, Information 
Technology Management Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Dr. Jason F. Providakes, Senior Vice President and General 
Manager, Center for Enterprise Modernization, The MITRE 
Corporation; Ms. Cheryl L. Janey, President, Civil Programs, 
Harris Corporation.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 752, the Federal 
Electronic Equipment Donation Act, and H.R. 5687, the Federal 
Advisory Committee Act Amendments, H. Res. 1026, recognizing 
the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Congressional 
Club, H.R. 5631, to designate the facility of the United States 
Postal Service located at 1155 Seminole Trail in 
Charlottesville, Virginia, as the ``Corporal Bradley T. Arms 
Post Office Building,'' and H.R. 1734, to designate the 
facility of the United States Postal Service located at 630 
Northeast Killingsworth Avenue in Portland, Oregon, as the 
``Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Post Office'' (April 9, 2008).
    Hearing on ``Healthcare-Associated Infections: A 
Preventable Epidemic'' (April 16, 2008). Witnesses: Don Wright, 
MD, MPH, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. 
Department of Health and Human Services; Cynthia Bascetta, 
Director for Health Care Issues, Government Accountability 
Office; Peter J. Pronovost, MD, PhD, Medical Director, Center 
for Innovation in Quality Patient Care and Assistant Professor, 
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine at 
Johns Hopkins University's School of Medicine; John Labriola, 
Senior Vice President and Hospital Director, William Beaumont 
Hospital-Royal Oak; Leah Binder, Chief Executive Officer, The 
Leapfrog Group; Edward Lawton, a survivor of hospital-acquired 
infections; Betsy McCaughey, PhD, Founder and Chairman, the 
Committee to Reduce Infection Deaths.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 5781, the Federal 
Employees Paid Parental Leave Act, H. Res. 49, expressing the 
sense of the House of Representatives that there should be 
established a National Letter Carriers Appreciation Day, H. 
Res. 127, recognizing and celebrating the 50th anniversary of 
the entry of Alaska in the Union as the 49th State, H. Res. 
1073, expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that 
public servants should be commended for their dedication and 
continued service to the nation during Public Service 
Recognition Week, May 5 through 11, 2008, H. Res. 1091, 
honoring the life, achievements, and contributions of Charlton 
Heston and extending its deepest sympathies to the family of 
Charlton Heston for the loss of such a great generous man, 
husband, and father, and H.R. 5477, to designate the facility 
of the United States Postal Service located at 120 South Del 
Mar Avenue in San Gabriel, California, as the ``Chi Mui Post 
Office Building'' (April 16, 2008).
    Hearing on ``Domestic Abstinence-Only Programs: Assessing 
the Evidence'' (April 23, 2008). Witnesses: The Honorable Lois 
Capps, U.S. Representative (CA-23); The Honorable Sam 
Brownback, U.S. Senator (KS); Ms. Shelby Knox, Youth Speaker; 
Mr. Max Siegel, Policy Associate, AIDS Alliance for Children, 
Youth, and Families; Dr. Georges Benjamin, M.D., Executive 
Director, American Public Health Association; Dr. Margaret 
Blythe, M.D., Chair, Committee on Adolescence, American Academy 
of Pediatrics; Dr. John Santelli, M.D., M.P.H., Department 
Chair, Professor of Clinical Population and Family Health, 
Mailman School of Public Health and Professor of Clinical 
Pediatrics, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia 
University; Dr. Stan Weed, Ph.D., Director, Institute for 
Research and Evaluation; Mr. Charles Keckler, Acting Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for Policy, Administration for Children and 
Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; Dr. 
Harvey Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D., President, Institute of Medicine 
of the National Academies; Dr. Marcia Crosse, Director, 
Healthcare, U.S. Government Accountability Office.
    Hearing on ``Oversight of Defense Department Acquisitions'' 
(April 29, 2008). Witnesses: Michael J. Sullivan, Director, 
Acquisition and Sourcing Management, Government Accountability 
Office; James Finley, Deputy Undersecretary for Acquisition and 
Technology; David Patterson, Principle Deputy Undersecretary of 
Defense for Comptroller.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 5787, the Federal Real 
Property Disposal Enhancement Act, H.R. 3772, the Senior 
Executive Service Diversity Assurance Act, H.R. 5912, a bill to 
make tobacco products nonmailable, H.R. 5811, the Electronic 
Communications Preservation Act, H. Res. 923, recognizing the 
State of Minnesota's 150th anniversary, H. Res. 1113, 
celebrating the role of mothers in the United States and 
supporting the goals and ideals of Mother's Day, H. Res. 1114, 
supporting the goals and ideals of the Arbor Day Foundation and 
National Arbor Day, H. Res. 1122, recognizing Armed Forces Day, 
and H. Res. 1132, supporting the goals and ideals of Peace 
Officers Memorial Day (May 1, 2008).
    Hearing on ``The Lack of Hospital Emergency Surge Capacity: 
Will the Administration's Medicaid Regulations Make It Worse?'' 
(May 5-6, 2008). Witnesses: Bruce Hoffman, Ph.D., Professor, 
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Security Studies 
Program, Georgetown University; Lisa Kaplowitz, M.D., Deputy 
Commissioner for Emergency Preparedness and Response, Virginia 
Department of Health; Roger Lewis, M.D., Ph.D., Department of 
Emergency Medicine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center; Jay Wayne 
Meredith, M.D., Professor and Chairman, Department of General 
Surgery, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center; Colleen 
Conway Welsh, Ph.D., Dean, Vanderbilt School of Nursing; The 
Honorable Michael O. Leavitt, Secretary, Department of Health 
and Human Services; The Honorable Michael Chertoff, Secretary, 
Department of Homeland Security.
    Hearing on ``Should FDA Drug and Medical Device Regulation 
Bar State Liability Claims?'' (May 14, 2008). Witnesses: Dennis 
and Kimberly Quaid, parents of newborn twins, Thomas Boone 
Quaid and Zoe Grace Quaid, who were victims of a heparin 
overdose; William H. Maisel, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Medical 
Device Safety Institute, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel 
Deaconess Medical Center, Boston; Aaron S. Kesselheim, M.D., 
J.D., Harvard Medical School, Division of Pharmacoepidemiology; 
David A. Kessler, M.D., J.D., Professor of Pediatrics and 
Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University 
of California, San Francisco; David Vladeck, J.D., Professor of 
Law, Georgetown University Law Center; Gregory Curfman, M.D., 
Editor, New England Journal of Medicine; Christine Ruther, 
President & Chief Engineer, C&R; Engineering, Inc.; State 
Representative David Clark (R-Utah), National Conference of 
State Legislatures (NCSL); John E. Calfee, Ph.D., American 
Enterprise Institute; Randall Lutter, Ph.D., Deputy 
Commissioner for Policy, Food and Drug Administration.
    Hearing on ``Defense Base Act Insurance: Are Taxpayers 
Paying Too Much?'' (May 15, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. Richard 
Ginman, Deputy Director of Defense Procurement and Acquisition 
Policy, U.S. Department of Defense; Mr. Shelby Hallmark, 
Director of Workers' Compensation Programs, U.S. Department of 
Labor; Mr. William H. Moser, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau 
for Administration Logistics Management, U.S. Department of 
State; Mr. James Dalton, P.E., Chief, Engineering and 
Construction, U.S. Corps of Engineers; Mr. Joseph P. Mizzoni, 
Deputy Auditor General for Acquisition and Logistics; Mr. John 
K. Needham, Director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management 
Issues, Government Accountability Office.
    Business meeting to consider H. Con. Res. 334, supporting 
the goals and objectives of a National Military Appreciation 
Month, H. Res. 1144, expressing support for the designation of 
a Frank Sinatra Day, in honor of the dedication of the Frank 
Sinatra commemorative stamp, H. Res. 1152, honoring Arnold 
Palmer for his distinguished career in the sport of golf and 
his commitment to excellence and sportsmanship, and H. Res. 
1153, celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (May 
15, 2008).
    Hearing on ``EPA's New Ozone Standards'' (May 20, 2008). 
Witnesses: Stephen L. Johnson, Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency; Susan E. Dudley, Administrator 
of OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs; Dr. 
Rogene Henderson, Chair, Clean Air Scientific Advisory 
Committee; Dr. Francesca Grifo, Senior Scientist, Union Of 
Concerned Scientists; Michael Goo, Climate Legislative 
Director, Natural Resources Defense Council; Dr. Roger O. 
McClellan, Advisor, Toxicology and Human Heath Risk Analysis; 
Alan Charles Raul, Partner, Sidley Austin, LLP.
    Hearing on ``Accountability Lapses in Multiple Funds for 
Iraq'' (May 22, 2008). Witness: Mary L. Ugone, Deputy Inspector 
General for Auditing, U.S. Department of Defense, Office of the 
Inspector General.
    Hearing on ``Examining Grantmaking Practices at the 
Department of Justice'' (June 19, 2008). Witness: Mr. J. Robert 
Flores, Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention.
    Business meeting to consider H. Con. Res. 365, honoring the 
life of Robert Mondavi (June 20, 2008).
    Hearing on ``Examination of AEY Contracts with the U.S. 
Government'' (June 24, 2008). Witnesses: Brigadier General 
William N. Phillips, U.S. Army, Commanding General, Picatinny 
Arsenal, Commander, Joint Munitions and Lethality Life Cycle 
Management Command; Mitchell A. Howell, Executive Director, 
Ground Systems and Munitions Division, Defense Contract 
Management Agency, U.S. Department of Defense; Stephen D. Mull, 
Acting Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Political 
Military Affairs, U.S. Department of State; Jeffrey Parsons, 
Executive Director, Army Contracting Command.
    Hearing on ``Waste, Fraud, and Abuse at K-Town: One Year 
Later'' (June 25, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. Gregory D. Kutz, 
Managing Director, Forensic Audits and Special Investigations, 
Government Accountability Office; Mr. Terrell G. Dorn, 
Director, Physical Infrastructure, Government Accountability 
Office; Mr. Bruce A. Casseaux, Senior Level Contract and 
Procurement Fraud Specialist, Forensic Audits and Special 
Investigations, Government Accountability Office; Maj. Gen. 
Mark Rogers, Vice Commander, United States Air Forces in 
Europe; Judith Garber, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State, 
Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, U.S. Department of 
State.
    Hearing on ``Governance and Financial Accountability of 
Rural Cooperatives: The Pedernales Experience'' (June 26, 
2008). Witnesses: The Honorable Troy Fraser, Chair, Business 
and Commerce Committee, Texas Senate; The Honorable Patrick 
Rose, Texas House of Representatives; Mr. John Watson, member 
of Pedernales Electric Cooperative; Mr. Carlos Higgins, member 
of Pedernales Electric Cooperative; Mr. Juan Garza, current 
General Manager of Pedernales Electric Cooperative; Mr. Glenn 
English, CEO of National Rural Electric Cooperative 
Association.
    Hearing on ``Manufacturers of FEMA Trailers and Elevated 
Formaldehyde Levels'' (July 9, 2008). Witnesses: Dr. Michael 
McGeehin, Director, Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, 
National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention; Mr. Jim Shea, Chairman, Gulf Stream 
Coach, Inc.; Mr. Steve Bennett, President, Pilgrim 
International, Inc.; Mr. Ronald J. Fenech, President, Keystone 
RV, Inc.; Mr. Peter Liegl, President and Chief Executive 
Officer, Forest River, Inc.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 6388, the Government 
Accountability Office Improvement Act, H.R. 6500, the Thrift 
Savings Plan Enhancement Act, H. Con. Res. 364, recognizing the 
Significance of National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, H. 
Res. 1128, expressing support of the goals and ideals of 
National Carriage Driving Month, H. Res. 1143, supporting the 
goals and ideals of the apple crunch and the nation's domestic 
apple industry, H. Res. 1202, supporting the goals and ideals 
of a National Guard Youth Challenge Day, H. Res. 1262, 
expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the 
Secretary of Commerce should use all reasonable measures to 
ensure that every person is counted in the 2010 decennial 
census, H. Res. 1311, expressing support for the designation of 
National GEAR UP Day, H.R. 6229, to designate the facility of 
the United States Postal Service located at 2523 7th Avenue 
East in North Saint Paul, Minnesota, as the ``Mayor William 
`Bill' Sandberg Post Office Building,'' H.R. 6338, to designate 
the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 
4233 West Hillsboro Boulevard in Coconut Creek, Florida, as the 
``Army SPC Daniel Agami Post Office Building,'' H.R. 6437, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 200 North Texas Avenue in Odessa, Texas, as the 
``Corporal Alfred Mac Wilson Post Office,'' and H.R. 6226, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 300 East 3rd Street in Jamestown, New York, as the 
``Stan Lundine Post Office Building'' (July 16, 2008).
    Hearing on ``Business Practices in the Individual Health 
Insurance Market: Terminations of Coverage'' (July 17, 2008). 
Witnesses: Keith and Heidi Bleazard, Logan, Utah; Dale Bonner, 
California Secretary of Business, Transportation and Housing 
Agency; Kevin Lembo, Connecticut State Healthcare Advocate; 
Abby Block, Director, Center for Drug and Health Plan Choice, 
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Stephanie W. 
Kanwit, Special Counsel and Healthcare Consultant.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 6575, the Over-
Classification Reduction Act (July 23, 2008).
    Hearing on ``The Medicare Drug Benefit: Are Private 
Insurers Getting Good Discounts for the Taxpayer?'' (July 24, 
2008). Witnesses: Stephen Schondelmeyer, Pharm.D., Ph.D., 
Professor and Head, Department of Pharmaceutical Care and 
Health Systems, University of Minnesota; Gerard Anderson, 
Ph.D., Professor and Director, Center for Hospital Finance and 
Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins 
University; Fiona M. Scott Morton, Ph.D., Professor of 
Economics, Yale School of Management, Yale University; Kerry 
Weems, Acting Administrator, Center for Medicare and Medicaid 
Services, Department of Health and Human Services; Mark 
Merritt, President and Chief Executive Officer, Pharmaceutical 
Care Management Association; Rick Smith, Senior Vice President 
for Policy, Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers 
Association (PhRMA); Paul Precht, Director of Policy and 
Communications, Medicare Rights Center; Judith Stein, Executive 
Director, Center for Medicare Advocacy.
    Hearing on ``Deficient Electrical Systems at U.S. 
Facilities in Iraq'' (July 30, 2008). Witnesses: U.S. Senator 
Bob Casey, (D-PA); Gordon S. Heddell, Acting Inspector General, 
U.S. Department of Defense; Don Horstman, Deputy Inspector 
General for Policy and Oversight, U.S. Department of Defense; 
Charlie E. Williams, Jr., Director, Defense Contract Management 
Agency; Keith Ernst, Former Director, Defense Contract 
Management Agency; Jeffrey P. Parsons, Executive Director, Army 
Contracting Command, U.S. Army; Tom Bruni, Theater Engineering 
and Construction Manager, KBR, Inc.
    Hearing on ``Impact of Proposed Legislation on the District 
of Columbia's Gun Laws'' (September 9, 2008). Witnesses: Cathy 
Lanier, Chief, District of Columbia Police Department; Phillip 
D. Morse, Sr., Chief, United States Capitol Police; Kevin C. 
Hay, Deputy Chief, United States Park Police; Robert Campbell, 
Director of Security, Washington Nationals Baseball Club.
    Business meeting to consider H.R. 6842, the National 
Capital Security and Safety Act, H. Con. Res. 223, honoring 
professional surveyors and recognizing their contributions to 
society, H. Con. Res. 351, honoring the 225th Anniversary of 
the Continental Congress meeting in Nassau Hall, Princeton, New 
Jersey, in 1783, H. Con. Res. 376, congratulating the 2007-2008 
National Basketball Association World Champions, the Boston 
Celtics, on an outstanding and historic season, H. Con. Res. 
386, recognizing and celebrating the 232nd anniversary of the 
signing of the Declaration of Independence, and H.R. 6199, to 
designate the facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 245 North Main Street in New City, New York, as the 
``Kenneth Peter Zebrowski Post Office Building'' (September 10, 
2008).
    Hearing on ``The Domestic Epidemic is Worse than We 
Thought: A Wake-Up Call for HIV Prevention'' (September 16, 
2008). Witnesses: Julie Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H., Director, 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Kevin Fenton, M.D., 
Ph.D., Director, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, 
STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention; Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., Director, National 
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National 
Institutes of Health; David Holtgrave, Ph.D., Professor and 
Chair, Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Johns Hopkins 
Bloomberg School of Public Health; Adaora Adimora, M.D., 
M.P.H., Division of Infectious Diseases, UNC School of 
Medicine; George Ayala, Psy.D., RTI International and AIDS 
Project Los Angeles; Heather Hauck, M.S.W., LICSW, Director, 
Maryland AIDS Administration, and Chair-Elect, National 
Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors; Frank J. 
Oldham, Jr., President, National Association of People with 
AIDS.
    Hearing on ``The Causes and Effects of the Lehman Brothers 
Bankruptcy'' (October 6, 2008). Witnesses: Dr. Luigi Zingales, 
Professor of Finance, University of Chicago; Dr. Robert F. 
Wescott, President, Keybridge Research LLC; Nell Minow, 
Chairman of the Board and Editor, The Corporate Library; 
Gregory W. Smith, General Counsel, Colorado Public Employees' 
Retirement Association; Peter J. Wallison, Arthur F. Burns 
Fellow in Financial Policy Studies, American Enterprise 
Institute; Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive 
Officer, Lehman Brothers Holdings.
    Hearing on the ``Causes and Effects of the AIG Bailout'' 
(October 7, 2008). Witnesses: Eric R. Dinallo, Superintendent, 
New York State Insurance Department; Lynn E. Turner, former 
chief accountant, Securities and Exchange Commission; Robert B. 
Willumstad, former Chief Executive Officer, AIG; Martin J. 
Sullivan, former Chief Executive Officer, AIG.
    Hearing on ``Credit Rating Agencies and the Financial 
Crisis'' (October 22, 2008). Witnesses: Jerome Fons, former 
executive, Moody's Corporation; Frank Raiter, former executive, 
Standard & Poor's; Sean Egan, Managing Director, Egan-Jones 
Ratings; Deven Sharma, President, Standard & Poor's; Raymond W. 
McDaniel, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Moody's 
Corporation; Stephen Joynt, President and Chief Executive 
Officer, Fitch Ratings.
    Hearing on ``The Role of Federal Regulators in the 
Financial Crisis'' (October 23, 2008). Witnesses: Alan 
Greenspan, former Chairman, Federal Reserve; John Snow, former 
Secretary of the Treasury; Christopher Cox, Chairman, 
Securities and Exchange Commission.
    Hearing on ``Hedge Funds and the Financial Market'' 
(November 13, 2008). Witnesses: Professor David Ruder, 
Northwestern University School of Law, Former Chairman, U.S. 
Securities and Exchange Commission; Professor Andrew Lo, 
Director, MIT Laboratory for Financial Engineering, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan School of 
Management; Professor Joseph Bankman, Stanford University Law 
School; Houman Shadab, Senior Research Fellow, Mercatus Center, 
George Mason University; John Alfred Paulson, President, 
Paulson & Co., Inc.; George Soros, Chairman, Soros Fund 
Management, LLC; James Simons, President, Renaissance 
Technologies, LLC; Philip A. Falcone, Senior Managing Partner, 
Harbinger Capital Partners; Kenneth C. Griffin, Chief Executive 
Officer and President, Citadel Investment Group, LLC.
    Hearing on the Collapse of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac 
(December 9, 2008). Witnesses: Leland Brendsel, former CEO, 
Freddie Mac; Daniel Mudd, former CEO, Fannie Mae; Franklin 
Raines, former CEO, Fannie Mae; Richard Syron, former CEO, 
Freddie Mac.

                      IV. Subcommittee Activities


                   A. SUBCOMMITTEE ON DOMESTIC POLICY

    The Subcommittee on Domestic Policy has jurisdiction over 
domestic policies, including matters relating to energy, labor, 
education, criminal justice, and the economy. The Subcommittee 
also has legislative jurisdiction over the Office of National 
Drug Control Policy. During the 110th Congress, Dennis Kucinich 
served as Chairman and Darrell Issa as Ranking Member.

1. Overview by Issue Area

    The Domestic Policy Subcommittee's jurisdiction is broad. 
As such, in the 110th Congress, the Subcommittee held oversight 
hearings covering eleven discrete policy areas. The 
Subcommittee concentrated its efforts in four of these areas, 
holding seven hearings and publishing four major letters 
concerning housing and finance; three hearings and three major 
letters on a health-related issue; four hearings and two major 
letters on a tax-related topic; and three hearings, one major 
letter and one report on an environmental topic.
            a. Housing and Finance
    The Subcommittee devoted six hearings to the foreclosure 
crisis. According to recent figures, nearly one million 
subprime borrowers have failed to make their mortgage payments 
for 60 days or more. In the third quarter of 2008 alone, 
264,000 foreclosure proceedings were brought against subprime 
borrowers. There could be as many as one million new 
foreclosure starts on subprime loans this year, which would 
represent a 13% increase over the previous year.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\See Appendix: Mortgage Loss Mitigations Statistics Industry 
Extrapolations (Quarterly for 2007 and 2008) (derived from HOPE NOW 
Loss Mitigation National Data) (online at: http:// www.hopenow.com/
upload/data/files/HOPE%20NOW%20Loss%20Mitigation%20National%20 
Data%20July%2007%20to%20September%2008.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The meltdown of the subprime mortgage market and the 
deflation of the housing price bubble, which have dominated 
recent national economic news, actually began earlier than 
2008. Its worst consequences were apparent in certain regions 
of the country (e.g., the Great Lakes) and certain low-income 
neighborhoods in cities across the nation. Cities such as 
Cleveland, Ohio, Detroit, Michigan, and Buffalo, New York, 
which have large concentrations of low-income residents as well 
as stagnant economic growth, were the first large cities to be 
affected by a wave of subprime mortgage lending and by 
widespread borrower default on those loans. The seeds for the 
current national crisis were present in the earlier regional 
crises. Large numbers of subprime and other risky loans 
continued to be made all across the country in 2005, 2006, and 
2007, as relatively low national default averages masked the 
warning signs from these early regional crises.
    The Subcommittee began its examination of the foreclosure 
problem in 2007 with two hearings that focused on subprime 
lending and bank regulation.\3\ The Subcommittee paid 
particular attention to Cleveland, Ohio. At the time, a number 
of hearing witnesses testified that the local crisis was a 
harbinger of a national problem. Indeed, a wave of foreclosures 
did erupt in the past twelve months across the South, 
Southwest, and California. It has caused the failure of large 
lending institutions (Washington Mutual, IndyMac) and 
investment banks (Bear Stearns, Lehman Brothers) with large 
subprime exposures.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\See Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government 
Reform Committee, Hearings on Foreclosure, Predatory Mortgage and 
Payday Lending in America's Cities, 110th Cong. (Mar. 21, 2007) (online 
at: http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_house 
_hearings&docid;=f:37416.pdf); and Foreclosure at the Front Step of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, 110th Cong. (May 21, 2007) (http://
frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc. 
cgi?dbname=110_house_hearings&docid;=f:40152.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    However, the problems characterizing subprime mortgages are 
not limited to those loans. Other kinds of mortgages are 
vulnerable to widespread default. Alt-A loans are expected to 
experience similar vulnerability. Both Alt-A and subprime loans 
were originated in large numbers without verification of income 
or assets.\4\ The problems facing Alt-A loans are especially 
significant for loans made in the West, where housing price 
deflation puts many borrowers significantly ``under water,'' 
meaning that their loans far exceed the market value of the 
house.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Amy Crews Cutts and William A. Merrill, Interventions in 
Mortgage Default: Policies and Practices to Prevent Home Loss and Lower 
Costs, Freddie Mac Working Paper #08-01, at 22 (Mar. 2008) (estimating 
that 80% of Alt-A's made in 2006 and 2007 were made without 
verification).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee held two more hearings in May 2008 on the 
phenomenon of vacant and abandoned houses caused by the 
foreclosure crisis.\5\ The first hearing examined the negative 
spill-over effects from the concentrations of vacant houses and 
the victims of this trend. These effects include: Declining 
property values of surrounding houses, loss of equity held by 
neighbors in these houses, loss of rental income to 
neighborhood landlords and sales to neighborhood merchants, 
increases in crime rates, increases in municipal costs for 
policing, a greater incidence of fire (due to vandalism and 
arson), increased demolition and building inspection costs, 
increased legal expenses, increased demand on city social 
service programs, and a direct loss of property tax 
revenues.\6\ The second hearing considered how to allocate 
federal aid to cities and localities to address the problems 
caused by vacant and abandoned houses.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\See Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government 
Reform Committee, Hearing on Neighborhoods: The Blameless Victims of 
the Subprime Mortgage Crisis, 110th Cong. (May 21, 2008) (online at: 
http://domesticpolicy.oversight.house.gov/story.asp?ID=1961) and Joint 
Hearing with Housing & Community Opportunity Subcommittee, Financial 
Services Committee, Targeting Federal Aid to Neighborhoods Distressed 
by the Subprime Mortgage Crisis, 110th Cong. (May 22, 2008) (online at 
http://domesticpolicy.oversight.house.gov/story.asp?ID=1968).
    \6\William C. Apgar, Mark Duda, and Rochelle Nawrocki Gorey, The 
Municipal Cost of Foreclosures: A Chicago Case Study, Homeownership 
Preservation Foundation, Housing Finance Policy Research Paper Number 
2005-1, at 10-11 (Feb. 27, 2005) (online at www.995hope.org/ content/
pdf/Apgar_Duda_Study_Full_Version.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In July 2008, Congress enacted H.R. 3221, the Housing and 
Economic Recovery Act which, among other things, authorized 
$3.9 billion in new federal funds to enable state and local 
governments to acquire and rehabilitate homes made vacant by 
the foreclosure crisis. The Subcommittee's oversight was 
instrumental in the development of the final allocation formula 
adopted by HUD.\7\ In Fall 2007, the Subcommittee also held a 
hearing on the inadequate enforcement of the Community 
Reinvestment Act (CRA) by bank regulators.\8\ Lack of CRA 
enforcement contributed to the need for, and emergence of, poor 
credit options.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\Letter from Dennis J. Kucinich to Steve Preston, Secretary, U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development (July 31, 2008). Chairman 
Kucinich's letter argued that HUD had discretion to interpret H.R. 
3221's allocation formula, and that HUD had already performed the 
necessary research to craft an allocation formula in preparing its 
testimony before the Subcommittee on May 22, 2008. Namely, HUD's 
testimony emphasized the importance of using US Postal Service data to 
determine actual vacancy rates and rates of actual increase in 
vacancies, as well as utilizing a small unit of analysis (census tract) 
for comparing jurisdictions' needs. HUD's final allocation formula 
reflected these Subcommittee priorities.
    \8\See Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government 
Reform Committee, Hearing on Upholding the Spirit of the CRA: Do CRA 
Ratings Accurately Reflect Bank Practices, 110th Cong. (Oct. 24, 2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In October 2008, Congress enacted the Emergency Economic 
Stabilization Act of 2008. The Act authorized creation of the 
Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), a $700 billion fund to 
address the slowdown in lending and to increase foreclosure 
prevention efforts.\9\ The Act envisaged the purchase of 
various kinds of assets and the promulgation of rules by 
Treasury on an emergency basis to address these problems. On 
November 12, 2008, Secretary of Treasury Henry M. Paulson, Jr. 
announced that he would not use the authorized funds to 
purchase troubled mortgage assets and implement a plan to 
reduce foreclosures on those mortgages.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\See Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, Pub. L. 110-
343.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    On November 14, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing with 
the top Treasury official in charge of the TARP. After 
receiving testimony confirming that Treasury had not, and would 
not, use TARP funds for foreclosure prevention despite 
unequivocal congressional intent and statutory language, 
Chairman Kucinich sent a letter to Representative Barney Frank, 
Chairman of the House Financial Services Committee. The letter 
relayed the Subcommittee's findings and recommended that 
Congress inform the White House that it will withhold the 
second installment of funding for the TARP pending a new 
Administration.
    The Subcommittee also examined risks to small investors 
posed by new hedge fund offerings. In 2007, a new financial 
investment became available to small investors. The management 
entities of two hedge funds, Fortress Investment Group and 
Blackstone Group L.P. (Blackstone), opened the door to direct 
investment by small investors in entities that had previously 
been limited only to large, mostly institutional investors, and 
extremely wealthy individuals.
    In multiple meetings between Subcommittee staff and staff 
from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), it 
became clear that the SEC was planning on allowing the initial 
public offering (IPO) of Blackstone to proceed without further 
considering whether the partnership should be considered an 
investment company pursuant to the Investment Company Act of 
1940,\10\ without demanding adequate disclosure of Blackstone's 
financial holdings, and without further considering the 
national security and tax implications of the IPO. On July 21, 
2008, Chairman Kucinich and Chairman Waxman of the Oversight 
and Government Reform Committee jointly issued a letter to SEC 
Chairman Christopher Cox requesting that the SEC delay approval 
of the IPO until the SEC reviewed the issues further and 
congressional hearings were held.\11\ The SEC refused to delay 
the IPO.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \10\15 U.S.C. Sec. Sec. 80a-1-a-64.
    \11\Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich and Rep. Henry A. Waxman to 
Christopher Cox, Chairman, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 
(July 21, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee subsequently held a hearing, ``After 
Blackstone: Should Small Investors Be Exposed to Risks of Hedge 
Funds,'' which focused on the nature of the new risks presented 
to investors by the public offerings of shares in alternate 
asset management entities and the adequacy of existing 
investment company regulations. The concerns raised at the 
hearing proved to be prescient: Blackstone Group LP has lost 
over 80% of its value after going public, and the federal 
regulatory deficiencies that allowed for inadequate disclosure 
to investors and the use of under-regulated and overly 
leveraged financial instruments are now recognized as prime 
contributors to the ongoing financial crisis.
            b. Health
    At the request of Subcommittee member Representative Elijah 
E. Cummings, the Subcommittee examined the provision of dental 
care to children under Medicaid. In February, 2007, a twelve-
year-old Maryland boy named Deamonte Driver died from a brain 
infection caused by untreated tooth decay. He was enrolled in 
Medicaid and had been assigned to United HealthCare, a national 
Managed Care Organization with a large presence in the State of 
Maryland.
    On May 2, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Evaluating Pediatric Dental Care under Medicaid'' to question 
the director of Medicaid, the Maryland State Medicaid Director 
and United HealthCare (United). The Subcommittee expanded its 
examination of the case by analyzing thousands of records 
produced by United. The Subcommittee concluded: (1) Deamonte 
was one of 10,780 Medicaid-enrolled children who had not seen a 
dentist in four or more years, (2) most of the dental services 
provided by the MCO were delivered by only seven dentists, (3) 
and the MCO's directory of providers was virtually useless. In 
response, the MCO conceded that the Subcommittee's findings 
were correct and committed to rectifying its own operational 
shortcomings.
    In 2008, the Subcommittee held two additional hearings on 
pediatric dental care. On February 14, 2008--a year after the 
death of Deamonte and nine months after the Subcommittee's 
first hearing on the matter--the Subcommittee held a hearing to 
evaluate the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services's (CMS) 
reforms in pediatric dental care under Medicaid. The hearing 
revealed the inadequacy of CMS's reforms, prompting the 
Subcommittee to encourage CMS to do more to achieve greater 
access to, and utilization of, pediatric dental care.\12\ The 
hearing, ``One Year Later: Medicaid's Response to System 
Problems Revealed by the Death of Deamonte Driver,'' exposed a 
failure of leadership at Medicaid.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \12\See Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government 
Reform Committee, Hearing on Medicaid's Response to Systemic Problems 
Revealed by the Death of Deamonte Driver, 110th Cong. (Feb. 14, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Shortly after the hearing, the Director of Medicaid 
resigned. The Subcommittee sent his replacement a detailed list 
of policy priorities. These included:
    (1) Conduct an EPSDT compliance review of the Medicaid 
dental programs in the states and the District of Columbia that 
had less than a 30% utilization rate in 2006.
    (2) Ensure that every state has a periodicity schedule and 
therefore met the federal requirement mandated by the OBRA 
1989.\13\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \13\Omnibus Budget and Reconciliation Act of 1989, Pub. L. No. 101-
239.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (3) Locate the findings of the Oral Health Technical 
Advisory Group (TAG), convened between 1999 and 2000, which 
addressed reimbursement rates as a policy matter and were 
redacted from CMS's Dental Guide in 2004. If appropriate, 
publish those policy recommendations now.
    (4) Conduct an audit of Georgia's Medicaid dental program 
and assess whether or not actions taken by the state's MCOs in 
2006 threatened access to dental care for Medicaid-eligible 
children in violation of federal law.
    (5) Identify more promising dental practices to highlight 
on CMS's nascent web page dedicated to outstanding models for 
increasing access to dental care. Additionally, encourage the 
commitment of additional funding to launch dental demonstration 
programs in a select number of states.
    (6) Make the Form CMS-416 more reliable to facilitate 
proper assessment of the efficacy of each State's EPSDT 
program.\14\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \14\Letter from Dennis J. Kucinich to Dennis Smith, Director, CMS 
(Apr. 1, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Medicaid notified the Subcommittee that they would adopt 
all of the Subcommittee's recommendations as policy priorities.
    Shortly after the release of its investigatory findings in 
October 2007, the Subcommittee expanded its investigation. The 
Subcommittee sought to evaluate whether United's dismal 
provider network in Prince George's County and its utilization 
rate throughout Maryland were unique. The Subcommittee expanded 
its review of United to include Apache County, Arizona; Essex 
County, New Jersey; Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; and 
Providence County, Rhode Island. In addition to evaluating 
United's performance in these jurisdictions, the Subcommittee 
also evaluated the performance of three other MCOs with 
presences in those counties and states, including: HealthChoice 
in Arizona, Keystone Mercy in Pennsylvania, and Amerigroup in 
New Jersey and Maryland.\15\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \15\Document Request from Dennis J. Kucinich to United (Jan. 8, 
2008); Document Request from Dennis J. Kucinich to HealthChoice (Apr. 
28, 2008); Document Request from Dennis J. Kucinich to Amerigroup; 
(Apr. 28, 2008); Document Request from Dennis J. Kucinich to Keystone 
Mercy (Apr. 28, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee reviewed the dental claims in FY 2006 for 
each of these MCOs and found that:
          (1) The percentage of children enrolled in Medicaid 
        without dental services for four consecutive years 
        between 2003 and 2006 ranged between 25% and 31% across 
        all states and MCOs;
          (2) In all jurisdictions and among all MCOs examined, 
        between two and nine dentists performed 50% of all 
        services rendered to children enrolled in Medicaid in 
        FY 2006; and
          (3) The dental provider networks among United and the 
        other MCOs are better than United's network in Prince 
        George's County but still far from adequate.
    On September 23, 2008, the Subcommittee held its fourth 
hearing, entitled, ``Necessary Reforms to Improve Access to, 
and Utilization of Pediatric Dental Care Under Medicaid.'' The 
new acting director of Medicaid reported significant progress 
in the implementation of reforms sought by the Subcommittee, 
such as locating the findings of the Oral Health Technical 
Advisory Group (TAG) convened between 1999 and 2000, which 
addressed reimbursement rates as a policy matter and were 
redacted from CMS's Dental Guide in 2004. CMS empowered a new 
Oral Health TAG to review, edit, and republish those findings.
    The new acting director also heeded the Subcommittee's call 
to identify the most promising dental practices nationwide and 
to promote those as models for other state Medicaid programs in 
conferences as well as on the Agency's website. Perhaps most 
importantly, CMS's new leadership conducted an Early and 
Periodic Screening and Diagnosis Treatment compliance review of 
the Medicaid dental program in the states and the District of 
Columbia that had less than a 30% utilization rate in 2006. CMS 
has also followed up with the District of Columbia and state 
programs to address their poor performance and ensure that they 
increase access to pediatric dental care.
            c. Veterans
    The Subcommittee examined the effects of privatization on 
the delivery of timely and accurate payments to veterans by the 
Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS). Retroactive pay 
awards to eligible retired veterans with disabilities were 
enacted by Congress in 2003 and 2004, but delays in delivering 
the new benefit were significant. DFAS determined that more 
than 133,000 potentially eligible veterans were waiting for 
adjudication of their claims three years after Congress enacted 
the laws. The backlog grew to over 217,000 veterans as the 
delays compounded.
    To determine the causes of the delays in the VA Retro 
program, the Subcommittee staff reviewed a total of 16,000 
pages of documents produced separately by DFAS and Lockheed 
Martin, the contractor, and also interviewed disabled veterans 
whose VA Retro payments had been delayed or denied. The 
investigation found that DFAS awarded a no-bid, cost plus fixed 
fee contract to Lockheed for the work to compute the 
retroactive pay awards, known as the VA Retro program. Lockheed 
originally agreed to a deadline of November 2007 to work 
through the backlog of VA Retro cases. But Lockheed missed that 
deadline and every succeeding one. By March 1, 2008, over 
60,000 eligible veterans still had not had their cases reviewed 
for payment.
    For its part, Lockheed was unable to automate calculation 
of VA Retro claims, as both Lockheed and the federal government 
had intended. The reasons were several: the individual 
circumstances of the disabled veterans were complicated and 
difficult to translate into reliable computer programming 
rules, and the databases necessary to automate did not exist at 
the project's inception. The government also bore 
responsibility. The VA and the military services were slow to 
put the data in the necessary form for automation.
    While Lockheed moved to hire more staff to perform the 
calculations manually, productivity remained low and top DFAS 
managers were concerned about the high number of errors their 
quality control auditors were detecting. But the federal 
government was powerless to hold the contractor accountable 
because the contract did not provide for penalties for poor 
contractor performance.
    In an effort to rescue the program from further delay, DFAS 
suspended its own quality control procedures, effectively 
allowing Lockheed to verify the accuracy of its own 
calculations. This, in combination with assigning federal 
workers to augment Lockheed's workforce, finally had the 
desired effect: By the end of June 2008, DFAS and Lockheed 
announced the VA Retro backlog had been eliminated, and 
Lockheed had received $18.74 million for the VA Retro program.
    One of those veterans whose eligibility was initially 
denied struggled for one year to get DFAS to reevaluate his 
denial. Eventually, he prevailed after producing documentation 
that would have also been available to Lockheed, and was 
ultimately awarded a $15,000 retroactive payment. He told the 
Subcommittee, ``Most guys who get a letter saying they get zero 
money would never challenge it. They wouldn't know how. I'd be 
surprised if they understand what they get in the mail. And 
lots of guys will just trust their government. I get sad to the 
point of crying seeing the guys in worse shape than me. [But] 
DFAS wants us to die or just give up trying [to get our 
benefits].''
    On July 15, 2008, the Subcommittee released the following 
findings in a report:\16\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \16\Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, Report on ``Die or Give Up Trying'': How Poor Contractor 
Performance, Government Mismanagement and the Erosion of Quality 
Controls Denied Thousands of Disabled Veterans Timely and Accurate 
Retroactive Retired Pay Awards, 110th Cong. (July 15, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Delays in the implementation and execution of the 
VA Retro program were significant. Government mismanagement and 
poor performance by Lockheed resulted in a delay of five and 
one-half years to review the claims of eligible disabled 
veterans after Congress created new benefits for retired 
veterans with combat-related and service-related disabilities.
     Up to 8,763 disabled veterans died before their 
cases were reviewed for VA Retro eligibility.
     DFAS found Lockheed's performance deficient but 
was unable to assess penalties by the contract's terms.
     DFAS cut back quality control and used federal 
workers to supplement Lockheed's workforce to decrease payment 
backlog.
     DFAS bypassed GAO regulations on statistical 
sampling in federal quality-control procedures.
     Lockheed applied a weaker standard to quality 
assurance than the standard mandated by GAO.
     Up to 60,051 payments to veterans were issued 
after a suspension of quality control measures went into effect 
on March 1, 2008.
     At least 28,283 veterans were denied retroactive 
pay based on determinations made wholly without quality 
assurance review.
    On, July 16, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``Examining Contractor Performance and Government Management of 
Retroactive Pay for Retired Veterans with Disabilities.'' This 
hearing examined the reasons for the significant delay in 
delivering the retroactive pay award to disabled retired 
veterans and assessed the government's management of the 
program. Zack E. Gaddy, the director of the Defense Finance and 
Accounting Service, and Joseph Cipriano, President, Lockheed 
Martin Business Process Solutions, testified at the hearing.
    The hearing and report produced significant changes at DFAS 
and the VA Retro program: DFAS agreed to conduct a 
comprehensive review of all ``No Pay Due'' determinations and 
all payments in excess of $2,500 to determine if errors were 
made. DFAS recently reported to the Subcommittee that an 
internal audit had found significant rates of error by Lockheed 
in both ``No Pay Due'' determinations and payments made in 
excess of $2,500.
            d. Tax
    The Subcommittee examined the circumstances and policy 
justifications surrounding the use of tax-exempt financing for 
private uses, notably the construction of professional sports 
stadiums. State and local officials have frequently agreed to 
finance construction of professional sports stadiums, and the 
cost is high. Often, proposals to publicly finance construction 
of professional sports stadiums are packaged as economic 
development or revitalization strategies.
    By 2001, taxpayers had spent about $17.5 billion on 99 
major league sports facilities. Taxpayers also assume a large 
share of costs for new professional sports facilities. Among 
new professional sports facilities built since 1990, the 
average public share of costs is estimated to be 80%. The 
subsidy includes outright building costs, which average $124 
million per facility; $48 million in foregone tax collections 
per stadium; and $24 million in land and infrastructure per 
stadium. Taxpayer expenditures on sports stadiums often occur 
in cities with significantly disintegrating public 
infrastructure. For example, in Cleveland there are five 
structurally deficient bridges and three publicly financed 
professional sports stadiums. In Minneapolis--the site of the 
August 1, 2007 I-35W bridge collapse that killed 13 people--
there are 10 structurally deficient bridges. Just a year before 
the tragic bridge collapse, taxpayers financed a new stadium 
for the Minnesota Twins.
    The Subcommittee held two hearings in 2007 to evaluate the 
promises made to cities which finance professional sports 
stadiums, as well as the extent to which public infrastructure 
funding is diverted toward professional sports stadiums.\17\ 
The hearings also examined federal enforcement of Treasury 
Department regulations pertaining to issuance of tax-exempt 
bonds for professional sports stadiums. The Subcommittee's 
hearings on stadium financing established the following: (1) 
local, state, and federal authorities massively subsidize the 
construction of professional sports stadiums; (2) on a federal 
level, the subsidization primarily takes the form of allowing 
municipalities to issue federally tax-exempt bonds that are 
used for the construction of the stadiums; (3) professional 
sports franchises have great leverage in negotiations with 
municipalities for new sports stadiums because the franchises 
themselves are able to leverage their monopoly status to 
threaten to move unless their demands are met; (4) the weight 
of economic analysis has established that, even from the 
perspective of municipalities, the public subsidization of 
professional sports stadiums is not an efficient mechanism to 
foster economic growth; and (5) federal subsidization in effect 
means that the federal taxpayer is abetting municipalities in 
bidding wars among themselves to keep or lure franchises from 
other cities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \17\Domestic Policy Subcommittee, House Committee on Oversight and 
Government Reform, Build It and They Will Come: Do Taxpayer-Financed 
Sports Stadiums, Convention Centers and Hotels Deliver as Promised for 
America's Cities?, 110th Cong. (Mar. 29, 2007) (online at 
frwebgate.access.gpo.gov / cgi-bin / 
getdoc.cgi?dbname=110_house_hearings&docid;=f:38037.pdf) and 
Professional Sports Stadiums: Do they Divert Public Funds from Critical 
Public Infrastructure?, 110th Cong. (Oct. 10, 2007).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee examined Treasury regulations pertaining 
to the public financing of sports stadiums with Payments-In-
Lieu-of-Taxes (PILOT). Chairman Kucinich sent a letter to the 
Treasury Department expressing concern about Treasury's 
interpretation of its PILOT regulations. The Subcommittee also 
investigated allegations that the City of New York 
misrepresented the actual value of land and stadium in its 
application for permission to finance the new Yankee Stadium 
with PILOT-backed tax exempt bonds. The Subcommittee's 
investigation revealed serious discrepancies and questionable 
assertions in the City's petition, and Chairman Kucinich wrote 
to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg to report the 
preliminary results of the Subcommittee majority staff's 
investigation.
    The Subcommittee held two additional hearings on the topic 
in September and October 2008.\18\ The hearings examined 
whether the use of the federal tax code to subsidize the 
construction of professional sports stadiums and arenas 
furthers the public interest, and examined alleged 
improprieties in the financing process. The Subcommittee's 
investigation into alleged improprieties in the appraisal of 
the new Yankee Stadium is ongoing.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \18\See Domestic Policy Subcommittee, House Committee on Oversight 
and Government Reform, Hearing on Gaming the Tax Code: the New York 
Yankees and the City of New York Respond to Questions About the New 
Yankee Stadium, 110th Cong. (Oct. 24, 2008); Hearing on Gaming the Tax 
Code: Public Subsidies, Private Profits, and Big League Sports in New 
York, 110th Cong. (Sept. 18, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
            e. Environment
    At the request of Subcommittee member Representative Diane 
E. Watson, the Subcommittee examined the environmental risks of 
dental mercury amalgam.
    Dental mercury amalgam, also known as ``silver fillings,'' 
is largely comprised of mercury. Dental offices are the third-
largest user of mercury, after wiring device/switch makers and 
manufacturers of measuring and control instruments. Mercury 
contained in the existing dental fillings of U.S.-based 
patients comprises over half of all mercury in use today, 
amounting to over 1000 tons.
    Dental amalgam is a significant source of mercury waste in 
the environment, especially in wastewater. The dental industry 
uses about approximately 40 tons of mercury per year.\19\ The 
mercury is used in the formation of dental amalgams. Of these 
40 tons, it is estimated that approximately 6.5 tons are 
disposed of by being washed down the drain.\20\ A 2005 study by 
the World Health Organization concluded that mercury from 
amalgam and laboratory devices accounts for 53% of total 
mercury emissions to water worldwide, and that one-third of the 
mercury in the sewage system comes from dental amalgam flushed 
down the drain.\21\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \19\Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, Testimony of Dr. Richard D. Fischer, Hearing on Assessing 
State and Local Regulation to Reduce Dental Mercury Emissions, 110th 
Cong. (July 8, 2008).
    \20\Jay A. Vandeven, and Steve. L. McGinnis, An Assessment of 
Mercury in the Form of Amalgam in Dental Wastewater in the United 
States, Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, at 349-366 (2005).
    \21\World Health Organization, Mercury in Health Care (Aug. 2005) 
(online at www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/medicalwaste/
mercurypolpaper.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Another study conducted by the Association of Metropolitan 
Sewerage Agencies (AMSA) in 2002 found that dental uses were 
``by far'' the greatest contributors of mercury load to 
municipal wastewater, on average contributing 40%, over 3 times 
the next greatest contributor.\22\ For example, the Central 
Contra Costa County Sanitary District estimates that each 
dental practice contributes 0.4 to 0.5 ounces of mercury per 
year totaling approximately 50% of the mercury in its 
wastewater. Mercury that settles in wastewater eventually finds 
its way into the air and water, where it may become a serious 
environmental and public health issue.\23\ In the New England 
region alone, over 10,000 lakes, ponds, and reservoirs, and 
over 46,000 miles of river are listed as impaired for fish 
consumption due to mercury.\24\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \22\Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies, Evaluation of 
Domestic Sources of Mercury, Household Mercury Poses National Clean 
Water Compliance Concerns (Aug. 2002).
    \23\Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, Testimony of Dr. Richard D. Fischer, Hearing on Assessing 
State and Local Regulation to Reduce Dental Mercury Emissions, 110th 
Cong. (July 8, 2008).
    \24\Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, Testimony of Dr. C. Mark Smith, Hearing on Assessing State 
and Local Regulation to Reduce Dental Mercury Emissions, 110th Cong. 
(July 8, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Mercury from dental amalgams is also a source of airborne 
emissions, though the amount is not known precisely. EPA 
estimates airborne mercury attributable to sludge incineration 
to be 0.6 tons per year annually. This figure may significantly 
undercount sludge-related mercury pollution, however. For 
example, the Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use 
Management estimated that mercury emissions in the northeast 
amount to 0.5 tons per year. EPA estimates that total mercury 
emitted as a byproduct of cremation of human remains is about 
0.3 tons per year. However, EPA's estimate might significantly 
understate the magnitude of mercury emissions from this source. 
A newly published article by an EPA environmental scientist 
estimates mercury emissions from cremation to be ten times more 
than the EPA estimate, at about three tons per year. The total 
amount of mercury emissions attributable to dental offices 
could be as high as nine to ten tons per year.
    At the request of Subcommittee member Representative Diane 
E. Watson, the Subcommittee held one hearing in 2007, 
``Environmental Risks of and Regulatory Response to Mercury 
Dental Fillings,'' which assessed the government's regulatory 
response to mercury in dental fillings. In 2008, the 
Subcommittee conducted a national survey of local and state 
regulatory responses to dental mercury followed by a hearing on 
July 8, 2008, ``Assessing State and Local Regulations to Reduce 
Dental Mercury Emissions.''
    The Subcommittee found that nearly all state and local 
governments have existing water quality standards that set a 
limit for the acceptable level of mercury in discharge 
concentrations. For example, King County, Washington's limit is 
0.2 milligrams parts per million, and Madison, Wisconsin, has a 
limit of 1.3 milligrams parts per trillion. To meet such 
limits, state and local governments must either prevent the 
mercury from being discharged or treat the wastewater before 
releasing it into the effluent. The most economical way to 
achieve the standard is through the installation of mercury 
amalgam separators in dentists' offices.
    Most state and local governments have adopted either a 
voluntary or a mandatory approach to the installation of 
separators. The survey found that successful voluntary programs 
were incentivized programs that offered less cumbersome 
compliance requirements and were underpinned with the threat of 
a mandatory program. The Subcommittee found that the exception 
to this rule was Duluth, Minnesota, where the small number of 
dentists and dental offices allowed the Western Lake Superior 
Sanitary District to have a hands-on approach not possible in 
larger cities.\25\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \25\Phone conversation between Subcommittee staff and Tim Tuominen, 
Lead Chemist, Western Lake Superior Sanitary District. (June 2, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Most of the state or local governments the Subcommittee 
surveyed initiated a voluntary program before enacting 
regulations, ordinances, or statutes mandating the installation 
of amalgam separators and a recycling program. Governments tend 
to switch to a mandatory program only when their voluntary 
programs fail to achieve their desired compliance goals. The 
disparity in compliance achieved between voluntary and 
mandatory programs is illustrated in the chart below. Note that 
the chart also indicates the impact that the separators have 
had on dental mercury emissions in wastewater.

                                            CHART: EFFICACY OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT MANDATORY PROGRAMS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                              Offices with       Offices with
      Name of state, county, or             Date of program                                    separators         separators       Reduction in mercury
             municipality                   implementation          Compliance deadline     installed before   installed after     contamination levels
                                                                                                program            program
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Washington State (Excluding King       August of 2003..........  August of 2005..........                <5%                80%  Too early to tell
 County).
Massachusetts........................  April of 2006...........  June of 2007............             70-75%                95%  47.6%
King County, WA......................  July of 2001............  July of 2003............                 3%                97%  51.1% to 57.0%
Central Contra Costa County, CA......  April of 2006...........  February of 2008........                15%                98%  69.8%
Narragansett Bay Commission Area of    July of 2004............  July of 2005............                 0%               100%  32.0%
 Rhode Island.
Milwaukee, WI........................  January of 2004.........  February of 2008........                 1%                91%  72.6%
Wichita, KS..........................  April of 2000...........  July of 2003............                 2%                98%  42.6%
Solon, OH............................  August of 2004..........  August of 2005..........                 0%               100%  52.7% to 73.2%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Subcommittee survey and hearing culminated in the 
publication of a federal guide to assist local and state 
regulators in their efforts to reduce dental mercury emissions. 
The report concluded that dental mercury emissions were most 
successfully curtailed by mandatory requirements to install and 
use mercury separation technology or voluntary programs 
enforced by the threat of a mandatory provision.\26\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \26\Domestic Policy Subcommittee, Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, Report on Reducing Dental Mercury Emissions: Installing 
Amalgam Separators and Achieving Compliance, 110th Cong. (Sept. 10, 
2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee also examined the environmental effects of 
the water bottling industry on rural communities. The 
consumption of bottled water is expanding both domestically and 
globally. The demand for bottled water has put new stresses on 
groundwater supplies and on associated wetlands, watersheds, 
and riparian environments, and on the environment of rural 
communities. On aggregated levels, the United States leads the 
world in total bottled water consumption. In 2002, 6,018.5 
million gallons of bottled water were consumed in the United 
States. Since 1992, the annual percentage increases have ranged 
from 8.2% to 18.4%, which translates to 21.1 gallons per person 
per year.
    The domestic water bottling industry has traditionally been 
comprised of a number of corporations, including many local 
entities. In recent years, however, the industry has undergone 
significant consolidation. The largest bottler of water in the 
United States is Nestle Waters of North America, a subsidiary 
of Nestle, the largest food manufacturer in the world, which 
has a 32% domestic market share.
    The environmental impacts of the bottled water industry are 
often highly concentrated in rural communities. The 
Subcommittee held a hearing on December 12, 2007, entitled 
``Assessing the Environmental Risks of the Water Bottling 
Industry's Extraction of Groundwater.'' The hearing examined 
the broader policy context of the water bottling industry; the 
impact on communities of water bottling plants; the geological/
hydrological dynamics and environmental effects of extraction 
on the surrounding watersheds, wetlands, and riparian systems; 
the growth, practices, and policies of the water bottling 
industry; and the adequacy of state property rights, state 
permitting systems, and federal regulations in addressing these 
issues.
            f. Emergency Preparedness
    At the request of Subcommittee Ranking Minority Member 
Darrell E. Issa, on December 10, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing, ``What the October Wildfires Reveal about Preparedness 
in Southern California,'' to examine Southern California's 
preparation for future wildfires. The hearing was in response 
to a wildfire that began on October 21, 2007, in Witch Creek, a 
rural area in the foothills of San Diego. Three days after the 
commencement of the fire, the Governor declared a state of 
emergency. President George W. Bush issued a major disaster 
declaration for the State of California and ordered federal aid 
to supplement state and local response efforts. At the height 
of the disaster, 23 fires were burning. By the time all the 
fires were contained, 368,000 acres of land had been burned, 
1,700 homes were destroyed, and 10 people lost their lives.
    According to testimony received at the hearing, the 
frequency and ferocity of wildfires in California is on the 
rise due to global warming, wildland-urban interface, and dry 
shrub. Southern California previously endured significant fires 
in 1970, 1977, 1980, 1985, 1987, 1993, and 2003. Both the 2003 
and 2007 fires were considered ``100 year'' fires for their 
unusual ferocity and extent. The hearing revealed that the 
damage caused by the Witch Creek fire could have been much 
worse were it not for the capable response efforts of local, 
state, and federal emergency responders. However, the absence 
of additional fires in San Diego's surrounding counties and in 
Northern California significantly helped to make the story of 
the October 2007 wildfires a success.
            g. Agriculture
    The Subcommittee examined the adequacy of United States 
Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulations and oversight to 
protect farmers and consumers. On March 13, 2008, the 
Subcommittee held a hearing, ``Is USDA Accounting for Costs to 
Farmers caused by Contamination from Genetically Engineered 
Plants?'' The hearing questioned the adequacy of USDA's 
enforcement of a provision of the National Environmental Policy 
Act of 1969 (NEPA), which requires consideration of the effects 
on farmers from contamination by genetically engineered (GE) 
plants that occurs before the plants are approved for testing 
or when they are deregulated by USDA's Animal and Plant 
Inspection Service.
    Contamination of conventional crops by GE plants can occur 
in several ways. First, GE plants can pollinate non-genetically 
engineered plant species if allowed to flower. Second, GE 
plants can grow as ``volunteers'' from a seed that was 
unintentionally left in soil from a previous growing season. 
Finally, GE plants can be mixed together with non-genetically 
engineered product in the grain-handling and/or food-processing 
system. Both field tests of regulated GE plant varieties as 
well as planting of deregulated varieties pose risks of 
contaminating non-GE crops. Although USDA points out that 
incidents of contamination are rare,\27\ when contamination has 
occurred, the consumer market--both domestic and 
international--has responded immediately, and farmers have 
incurred large costs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \27\USDA, Report of LibertyLink Rice Incidents (Oct. 5, 2007) 
(online at www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/content/2007/10/content/
printable/RiceReport10-2007.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NEPA requires the federal government to consider the 
environmental impacts of proposed government actions in the 
federal decision-making process.\28\ The Act requires federal 
agencies to prepare an Environmental Assessment (EA) or 
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for proposed federal 
actions that have a ``significant'' effect on the 
environment.\29\ NEPA defines ``significance'' with ten 
characteristics, codified at 40 C.F.R. Sec. 1508.27. The Act 
also created the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to 
coordinate government-wide compliance.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \28\42 U.S.C. Sec. Sec. 4321-45.
    \29\42 U.S.C. Sec. 4332. NEPA requires that all agencies of the 
federal government report on the environmental effects of all proposed 
government actions ``significantly affecting the quality of the human 
environment.''
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NEPA does not require that the federal government undertake 
the least environmentally harmful action, only that the federal 
government account for the potential harm caused by the 
proposed action. Additionally, NEPA mandates that federal 
government evaluate alternatives to the proposed action. As the 
Supreme Court explained in Robertson v. Methow Valley Citizens 
Council, ``NEPA itself does not mandate particular results, but 
simply prescribes the necessary process.''\30\ The Court 
further explained that ``NEPA merely prohibits uninformed--
rather than unwise--agency action.''\31\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \30\490 U.S. 332, 350 (1989).
    \31\Id. at 351.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NEPA requires federal agencies to report on the economic 
impact of proposed federal actions when those economic impacts 
are caused by the environmental impact. CEQ NEPA regulations 
state, ``[W]hen an environmental impact statement is prepared 
and economic or social and natural or physical environmental 
effects are interrelated, then the environmental impact 
statement will discuss all of these effects on the human 
environment.''\32\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \32\40 C.F.R. Sec. 1508.14
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In the entire 20-year history of its biotech crop program, 
the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has only 
conducted four EISs. Two of the EISs were ordered by courts in 
2007. The third and fourth were programmatic EISs initiated by 
the USDA in 2007 in connection with promulgation of new 
Genetically Modified Organism regulations. According to APHIS, 
the reason for the small number of EISs--in contrast to its 
issuance of thousands of notifications, permits, and 
deregulations--is that APHIS determined in nearly all cases 
that its proposed action, whether a notification or permit, did 
not have a ``significant'' impact as defined by NEPA.\33\ 
However, in two recent cases, federal district courts reviewed 
APHIS's determination of ``no significant impact'' for proposed 
actions related to two GE plants, Roundup Ready alfalfa and 
creeping bentgrass; held that APHIS's interpretation was 
inconsistent with the Act; and ordered APHIS to prepare EISs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \33\Conversation between Subcommittee majority staff and APHIS 
staff (Feb. 29, 2008).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee also examined USDA's regulation of food 
inspection. On January 30, 2008, the Humane Society of the 
United States released to the media video obtained by an 
undercover investigator at the Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing 
Company of Chino, California. The video documented inhumane 
handling of non-ambulatory, or downed, cattle and raised 
questions regarding the possibility of tainted meat being 
introduced into the food supply. In response to the Humane 
Society's allegations, Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer issued 
a statement expressing the USDA's confidence in the 
``inspection system and the food safety regulations that ensure 
the safety and wholesomeness of the food supply.''
    Secretary Schafer called for an investigation by the Office 
of the Inspector General in conjunction with the USDA's Food 
Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Agricultural 
Marketing Service (AMS). Hallmark/Westland voluntarily 
suspended operations on February 1, 2008, prior to issuance of 
a Notice of Suspension by FSIS. On February 17, 2008, Hallmark/
Westland voluntarily recalled 143 million pounds of fresh and 
frozen beef dating back to February 1, 2006. The meat recall 
was the nation's largest ever. Approximately 50 million pounds 
had been distributed to federal nutrition programs in at least 
45 states under the National School Lunch Program and programs 
for the poor and elderly. In press briefings concerning the 
beef recall, USDA officials repeatedly affirmed that the 
incidents at Westland/Hallmark represented an aberration in the 
meat industry.\34\ Dr. Kenneth Petersen said, ``FSIS believes 
this to be an isolated incident of egregious violations to 
humane handling requirements and the prohibition of non-
ambulatory disabled cattle from entering the food supply.''\35\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \34\See, e.g., USDA, Press Briefing on Humane Handling Procedures 
of Hallmark/Westfield Company (Feb. 8, 2008) (online at www.usda.gov/
wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_ 1OB?contentidonly=true&contentid;=2008/
02/0037.xml); USDA, Questions and Answers Regarding the Humane Society 
of the United States' Handling Allegations, (Feb. 6, 2008) (online at 
www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/
7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true&contentid;=Inhumane FAQs.xml); USDA, 
Technical Briefing Regarding Inhumane Handling Allegations (Jan. 31, 
2008) (online at www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/
7_0_1OB?contentidonly=true& contentid=2008/02/0028.xml).
    \35\USDA, Questions and Answers Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing Co. 
(Feb. 17, 2008) (online at www.fmi.org/foodsafety/usdaqawestland.pdf).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee discovered, however, that USDA had 
conducted two audits at Westland/Hallmark in the previous three 
years--once in 2005 and again in 2007. The 2005 audit cited 
minimal infractions--namely that the plant used its electronic 
prod excessively. The plant responded that the excessive use 
was due to a lack of battery power in the equipment and 
immediately rectified the shortcoming.\36\ In 2007, the USDA 
audit noted no infractions and instead gave Westland/Hallmark 
glowing reports.\37\ Only a few months later, a Humane Society 
undercover investigation revealed that the USDA's findings were 
a poor reflection of the dismal reality of operations at 
Hallmark/Westland.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \36\Interview of Steven Mendell, Owner, Hallmark/Westland Meat 
Packing Co., by Subcommittee Staff (Mar. 28, 2008); see also FSIS, 
Report of Human Handling Verification Visit of Hallmark/Westland Meat 
Packing Company FSIS Form 6000-31 (Dec. 8, 2005).
    \37\See FSIS, Report of Human Handling Verification Visit of 
Hallmark/Westland Meat Packing Company FSIS Form 6000-31 (May 18, 
2005).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The contrast between the Humane Society's investigation and 
the USDA audits raises a significant question: if the USDA did 
not know of the egregious practices that took place at 
Westland/Hallmark before the dissemination of the Humane 
Society video, then how could it be confident that similar 
practices are not taking place at slaughter plants nationally? 
In addition to alerting food safety authorities of possible 
risk resulting from beef contamination, the Humane Society 
video also made clear that USDA oversight is not infallible.
    On April 17, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing entitled 
``After the Beef Recall: Exploring Greater Transparency in the 
Meat Industry'' to examine that question. Subsequently, the 
Subcommittee expanded its investigation to include issues of 
agency treatment of whistleblowers. That investigation is 
ongoing.
            h. Drug Policy and Crime
    The Subcommittee held two oversight hearings in the 110th 
Congress in its exercise of its oversight and legislative 
responsibility for drug policy and the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy (ONDCP).
    On September 30, 2007, the Subcommittee held a field 
hearing in Baltimore, ``Combating Drug Abuse and Drug-related 
Crime: What Is Working in Baltimore,'' to study the provision 
and coordination of multiple services to at-risk juveniles and 
young adults, including mental health and substance abuse 
treatment, job training and housing. The City of Baltimore has 
struggled with significant drug abuse and drug-related violence 
problems for many years. Recently, Baltimore has undertaken 
innovative steps to address these problems, including drug 
courts and treatment modalities. Drug courts utilize a 
multidisciplinary and integrated approach that incorporates 
collaboration among courts, government, and community 
organizations.
    The challenges still facing Baltimore's drug-control 
efforts provide a lens through which to assess ONDCP and 
federal drug policy priorities. Because of inadequate federal 
funding for treatment and drug courts, many of the slots in 
Baltimore's innovative programs are reserved for those who 
already have had multiple encounters with the criminal justice 
system. Thus, first-time offenders who are easier to reach are 
not offered the type of intensive monitoring, treatment, and 
array of services that have been found to be most effective. In 
Baltimore as in the rest of the country, there is a huge 
treatment gap: many drug abusers in need of treatment cannot 
get it.
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration 
(SAMHSA) funding through block grants to states forms an 
important component of federal assistance to local treatment 
programs, and has declined in recent years. With respect to the 
overall drug control budget, treatment is disproportionately 
under-funded given the treatment gap and treatment's 
demonstrated cost-effectiveness compared to other drug-control 
strategies like drug interdiction, source country eradication, 
and enforcement. Baltimore's experience also highlights the 
need for the federal government to foster and fund greater 
service coordination and for extensive monitoring of outcomes 
to determine which broad strategies and specific programs work. 
Finally, Baltimore's effective and innovative incorporation of 
harm reduction programs into its drug-control strategy--
including methadone provision, needle exchange, and 
buprenorphine to combat heroin addiction--demonstrates that 
scientifically tested harm reduction programs have the 
potential to reduce drug-related harms without increasing drug 
abuse.
    On March 12, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing, ``The 
National Drug Control Strategy for 2008, the Fiscal Year 2009 
National Drug Control Budget, and Compliance with ONDCP 
Reauthorization Act of 2006: Priorities and Accountability at 
ONDCP,'' which addressed priorities in the nation's drug 
policy. On December 29, 2006, Congress passed the ONDCP 
Reauthorization Act of 2006, Pub. L. 109-469 (Reauthorization 
Act), which authorized certain funding levels of ONDCP's 
proprietary programs (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas, 
National Youth Antidrug Media Campaign, and Drug Free 
Communities Support Program) and set numerous reporting 
requirements to ensure ONDCP's accountability. ONDCP 
Reauthorization was the product of a long bipartisan effort 
with a key role played by this Committee.
    Hearing witnesses suggested that ONDCP was funding and 
supporting supply-side drug-control programs, such as source-
country eradication and interdiction at the expense of demand-
side initiatives, such as drug use prevention and treatment. 
This balance has been criticized by those who cite social 
scientific research demonstrating that, per dollar spent, 
demand-side initiatives, especially drug treatment, are more 
effective at combating drug abuse. Second, the hearing adduced 
serious questions about ONDCP's transparency and 
accountability. At the hearing, much of the data presented by 
ONDCP in its publications was challenged as inaccurate or 
misleading, and the progress that ONDCP has attributed to 
federal drug control operations was criticized as overstated 
and a product of cherry-picked data and shifting objectives. 
ONDCP also was criticized for being out of compliance with 
either the Reauthorization Act's reporting requirements or its 
obligation to revert to a more inclusive National Drug Control 
budget.
    Since the hearing, Subcommittee staff has continued to work 
with the relevant congressional appropriations staff to ensure 
that ONDCP remains accountable to congressional oversight and 
has met with ONDCP staff and relevant stakeholders to help 
improve ONDCP's operation and federal drug policy priorities.
    On May 10, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing, ``Lethal 
Loopholes: Deficiencies in State and Federal Gun Purchase 
Laws,'' which assessed the adequacy of a federal database used 
for checking the criminal and mental health records of gun 
purchasers. In 2004, nearly 30,000 Americans died by gunfire 
and more than twice that number were treated in emergency rooms 
for non-lethal firearm injuries. Social science has 
demonstrated that violence levels are related to the relative 
availability of firearms to high-risk individuals.
    Forty years after the passage of the Gun Control Act, 
individuals who are prone to use guns illegally are still 
getting guns legally. This pattern was repeated in the shooting 
on the campus of Virginia Tech, which took the lives of 32 
people. The Subcommittee examined loopholes and deficiencies in 
firearm purchasing prohibitions, the quality of the federal 
databases used in background checks prior to legal purchase of 
guns, and state efforts to stop illegal sales of guns. The 
hearing also looked at inconsistencies among the states in 
their supplemental gun prohibition laws.
            i. Science
    The Subcommittee examined a controversial leadership 
initiative at the National Institute of Environmental Health 
Sciences (NIEHS). NIEHS, one of the National Institutes of 
Health's (NIH) 27 institutes and centers, researches the links 
between environment and human health and reports its results to 
improve public health. NIEHS also hosts the peer-reviewed 
Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP), the leading 
environmental sciences journal and the National Toxicology 
Program (NTP), which evaluates chemicals and other agents that 
may harm human health.
    Soon after becoming the director of NIEHS on April 4, 2005, 
Dr. David Schwartz set in motion a new set of research 
priorities for NIEHS. His primary goal was to shift significant 
resources toward clinical research that was focused on 
discoveries that would contribute to treating or curing disease 
once the patient was already afflicted. There was also an 
effort to shift resources away from projects or programs that 
represented anything other than scientific research.
    In March, 2007, the Subcommittee, in conjunction with the 
Oversight and Government Reform Committee, began an inquiry 
into Dr. Schwartz's conduct as Director. Several similar 
investigations by House and Senate committees were subsequently 
launched. The inquiries looked into several allegations, 
including conflicts of interest, financial misconduct, 
profiting from his title as Director, and extremely low morale 
and lack of confidence among NIEHS employees. In August 2007, 
Dr. Schwartz was asked to temporarily step down as director of 
NIEHS while the NIH conducted its own internal investigation. 
The Subcommittee held a hearing entitled ``Will NIEHS's New 
Direction Protect Public Health?''
    The Subcommittee also began an investigation into the 
health dangers posed by cell phone use. On September 25, 2008, 
the Subcommittee held a hearing on the status of medical 
research on the connection between cell phone use and human 
health effects. The hearing, ``Tumors and Cell Phone Use: What 
the Science Says,'' examined potential links between mobile 
phone use and health effects.
    The scientific evidence linking cell phones to health 
effects is inconclusive. There is neither enough evidence to 
say there is a link nor enough to rule it out. The CTIA, an 
international industry trade group representing all wireless 
communication sectors, maintains that ``when it comes to your 
wireless device you can rest assured the scientific evidence 
states wireless devices do not pose a risk to you or your loved 
one.''\38\ Other scientists are less certain. A recent study 
summarizing the evidence of negative health effects of 
prolonged cell phone use found a higher frequency of occurrence 
of two types of brain cancers: glioma, a cancer of glial cells 
in the brain, and acoustic neuroma, a rare cancer of a nerve in 
the inner ear.\39\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \38\CTIA, (online at www.etia.org/consumer_info/safety/index.cfm/
AID/10371) (accessed on Sept. 23, 2008).
    \39\David O. Carpenter and Cindy Sage, Setting Prudent Public 
Health Policy for Electromagnetic Field Exposures, Reviews on 
Environmental Health, at 91-117 (Apr.-June 2008) (online at 
www.scribd.com/doc/4090137/ Setting-Prudent-Public-Health-Policy-for-
Electromagnetic-Field-Exposures):
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Evidence was also found to be growing for links to 
neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Amyotrophic 
Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) (also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease). 
The evidence for associations with other health effects is not 
as strong. They include ``spontaneous abortion, shifts in red 
and white blood cell counts, increased mutations in lymphocytes 
(white blood cells), and changes in brainwave activity,'' 
``reduced male fertility,'' parotid gland tumors, and 
``behavioral problems of emotion and hyperactivity around the 
age of school entry'' with prenatal and postnatal exposure.
            j. Labor
    The Subcommittee examined the enforcement of labor laws in 
New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Following the devastation 
caused by Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005, President Bush 
suspended numerous labor laws and employee immigration 
documentation requirements. The stated intent of these actions 
was to encourage the speedy clean-up and reconstruction of New 
Orleans. The Subcommittee found that the Administration's 
policies helped to create an environment of widespread 
workplace law violations.
    The Subcommittee held two hearings on the topic: 
``Evaluating the Labor Department in New Orleans: DOL's 
Performance in Investigating and Prosecuting Wage and Hour 
Violations and Protecting Guest Workers'' (field hearing in New 
Orleans) and ``The Adequacy of Labor Law Enforcement in New 
Orleans.''
    Over the course of its investigation, the Subcommittee 
discovered a significant legal loophole that left non-
agricultural guest workers, or H-2B visa holders, vulnerable to 
egregious exploitation including trafficking. The Subcommittee 
has made several attempts to rectify this loophole, including 
submitting comments to the Department of Labor's proposed 
rulemaking and advocating on behalf of a group of Indian 
workers who are victims of such trafficking. The Subcommittee 
continues to examine this matter in its effort to provide 
better protections for non-agricultural guest workers.
    Chairman Kucinich and Ranking Member Darrell Issa 
introduced H.R. 3875, a bipartisan bill that seeks to provide 
greater protection to workers in New Orleans who have been 
denied the wages they earned during the clean-up and 
reconstruction effort of the ravaged city.
            k. Energy
    At the request of full Committee Ranking Member Tom Davis, 
on April 25, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing, ``Federal 
Electric Transmission Corridors: Consequences for Public and 
Private Property,'' on implementation of a controversial 
provision relating to the siting of electric transmission 
lines. Section 1221 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 granted 
the federal government new powers to authorize the siting of 
electric transmission lines and eminent domain authority to 
energy companies seeking to construct those transmission 
lines.\40\ Traditionally, this was the exclusive authority of 
the states. The hearing examined implementation of Section 1221 
by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its upcoming designation 
of regions of the country as National Interest Electric 
Transmission Corridors (NIETCs). DOE's designations could have 
a profound impact on property owners and citizens living within 
the corridors, the country's energy infrastructure, and the 
environment.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \40\Energy Policy Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109-58.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Subcommittee also examined a controversy in gasoline 
measurement standards. The amount of gasoline by weight in a 
gallon pumped during the hot summer months is less than the 
same gallon pumped during cold winter months. This is due to a 
physical phenomenon known as thermal expansion. Oil companies 
have been aware of the thermal expansion of gasoline for over 
100 years, and since the 1920s they have compensated for this 
variation in transactions at the wholesale level. Compensation 
is applied by mathematically adjusting a given volume of 
gasoline at a given temperature to a standard temperature and 
volume.
    However, oil companies have not compensated for temperature 
at the retail level. The result is that the oil companies can 
buy gasoline at one temperature and sell it at another, thereby 
creating an opportunity for arbitrage, also known as the ``hot 
fuel premium.'' Existing technology that can correct for 
temperature at the retail level (known as Automatic Temperature 
Compensation or ATC) has been available for sale in Canada 
since the 1980s, and recently, the State of California 
certified it for use there. The oil industry opposes the 
deployment of this technology in the United States.
    The Subcommittee held two hearings and issued two reports. 
The reports estimated the national hot fuel premium to be about 
$1.5 billion in summer 2007. The hearings were entitled ``Hot 
Fuel: Big Oil's Double Standard for Measuring Gasoline'' and 
``ExxonMobil and Shell Answer Questions About Hot Fuel.''

2. Key Letters and Reports

            a. Housing and Finance
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Barney Frank, 
Chairman, House Financial Services Committee (Apr. 22, 2008). 
This letter suggested a number of modifications to the funding 
allocation formula contained in H.R. 5818, the Neighborhood 
Stabilization Act of 2008, including targeting neighborhoods 
with high concentrations of vacant properties.
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Steve Preston, 
Secretary, Housing and Urban Development Department (July 31, 
2008). This letter suggested that HUD had statutory discretion 
to improve upon the targeting formula in H.R. 3221, and 
suggested that HUD develop an allocation formula based on its 
testimony before a Domestic Policy Subcommittee hearing on May 
22, 2008. That testimony discussed how federal aid could be 
targeted based on concentrations of vacant properties.
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Editor, New York 
Times (Oct. 26, 2008). This letter commented that principal 
reductions on at-risk mortgage loans have a higher rate of 
preventing redefault than other kinds of loan modifications, 
and warned that the Treasury Department was not using properly 
funds that Congress had authorized to promote foreclosure 
prevention.
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Barney Frank, 
Chairman, House Financial Services Committee (Nov. 17, 2008). 
This letter relayed findings from a November 14, 2008, hearing 
of the Domestic Policy Subcommittee with Mr. Neel Kashkari, 
Interim Assistant Secretary for Financial Stabilization and the 
top Treasury official at the TARP. The letter discussed the 
ways in which Treasury was failing to use the TARP as Congress 
intended, and suggested that Congress should inform the White 
House that it would withhold the second installment of $350 
billion in funds for the TARP until a new Administration takes 
office.
            b. Health
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich and Rep. Elijah E. 
Cummings to Jonathan Dinesman, United HealthCare Group, and 
Susan Tucker, (Maryland) Department of Health and Mental 
Hygiene (Oct. 2, 2007). This letter presents the findings of a 
Subcommittee majority staff investigation into the adequacy of 
access to dental care for Medicaid beneficiaries in the State 
of Maryland and the circumstances of Deamonte Driver's death 
due to untreated tooth decay. Those findings include: Deamonte 
Driver was one of over 10,780 Medicaid-eligible children in 
Maryland who had not seen a dentist in four or more consecutive 
years, and most of United HealthCare's dental provider network 
was inactive, for a variety of reasons, making access to dental 
care for United HealthCare-enrolled beneficiaries difficult.
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich, to Dennis Smith, 
Director, Center for Medicaid & State Operations (Apr. 14, 
2008). This letter outlines a number of policy recommendations 
for improving access to pediatric dental care under Medicaid, 
as well as a number of recommendations at improving federal 
oversight of the Medicaid program.
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Herb Kuhn, Acting 
Director, Center for Medicaid & State Operations (Sept. 19, 
2008). This letter presented findings from the Subcommittee's 
majority staff's investigation of Medicaid pediatric dental 
care in several states. Those findings were: a high percentage 
of children enrolled in Medicaid did not receive dental care 
for four or more consecutive years; few dentists provided the 
majority of care to Medicaid enrollees who are children; and 
that dental provider networks are characterized by 
inaccuracies, making access to dental care difficult. Similar 
letters were sent to every State Medicaid Director, as well as 
the Medicaid Managed Care Organizations surveyed.
            c. Veterans
    Report, ``Die or Give Up Trying'': How Poor Contractor 
Performance, Government Mismanagement and the Erosion of 
Quality Controls Denied Thousands of Disabled Veterans Timely 
and Accurate Retroactive Retired Pay Awards, 110th Cong. (July 
15, 2008). This report found a pattern of mismanagement and 
inadequate contractor performance in the calculation and 
distribution of payments to veterans eligible for combat-
related special compensation and concurrent retired and 
disability pay.
            d. Tax
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Eric Solomon, 
Assistant Secretary for Tax Policy, Department of Treasury, and 
Douglas Shulman, Commissioner, Internal Revenue Service (May 
23, 2008). This letter raised concerns about Treasury's 
interpretation of regulations pertaining to the use of payments 
in lieu of taxes (PILOTs) to finance tax-exempt bonds for 
construction of professional sports stadiums.
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Michael R. 
Bloomberg, Mayor, City of New York (Oct. 14, 2008). This letter 
presents evidence of inaccuracies and possible material 
misrepresentations made by the City of New York to IRS in 
pursuit of PILOT-backed tax-exempt bonds for construction of a 
new Yankee Stadium.
            e. Environment
    Letter from Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich to Dr. Andrew von 
Eschenbach, Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration (July 
28, 2008). This letter details findings of Subcommittee's 
investigation into FDA compliance with the National 
Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) with respect to its 
classification of dental mercury as a medical device. The 
letter stressed that there was no evidence in the FDA 
administrative record that FDA had ever considered 
environmental impacts of classification or reclassification of 
mercury-related dental devices before foregoing an EA or EIS.
    Report, Reducing Dental Mercury Emissions: Installing 
Amalgam Separators and Achieving Compliance, 110th Cong. (Sept. 
10, 2008). This report, from a Subcommittee majority staff 
survey of state and local authorities, found that dental 
mercury emissions were most successfully curtailed by mandatory 
requirements to install and use mercury separation technology, 
or voluntary programs underpinned with the threat of a 
mandatory provision.
            f. Energy
    Report, American Consumers Will Pay a Hot Fuel Premium, 
110th Cong. (June 7, 2007). This report found that 513.8 
million gallons of gasoline sold in the summer of 2007 would be 
attributable to the thermal expansion of gasoline, and that 
consumers would pay a hot fuel premium during the summer in the 
range of $1.5 billion.

3. Hearings

    In the 110th Congress, the Domestic Policy Subcommittee 
held 31 hearings, receiving testimony from 217 witnesses.
    ``Foreclosure, Predatory Mortgage & Payday Lending in 
America's Cities'' (March 21, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. James 
Rokakis, Cuyahoga County Treasurer, Cleveland, OH; Ms. Inez 
Killingsworth, President, East Side Organizing Project, 
Cleveland, OH; Mr. Bill Rinehart, Vice President and Chief Risk 
Officer, Ocwen Financial Corp., West Palm Beach, FL; Mr. Josh 
Nassar, Vice President, Center for Responsible Lending, 
Washington, DC; Professor Dan Immergluck, Georgia Institute of 
Technology, Atlanta, GA; and Mr. Harry Dinham, President, 
National Association of Mortgage Brokers, Mclean, VA; Ms. Rita 
L. Haynes, CEO, Faith Community United Credit Union, Cleveland, 
OH; Mr. Ed Jacob, Northside Community Federal Credit Union, 
Chicago, IL; Mr. David Rothstein, Policy Matters Ohio, 
Cleveland, OH; Ms. Fran Grossman, ShoreBank Corp., Chicago, IL; 
Ms. Jean Ann Fox, Consumer Federation of America, Washington, 
DC; Mr. Calvin Bradford, National Training & Information 
Center, Chicago, IL; Mr. Thomas FitzGibbon, Jr., MB Financial 
Bank, Rosemount, IL; Mr. Jim McCarthy, President, Miami Fair-
Housing, Dayton, OH; Professor Michael T. Maloney, Department 
of Economics, Clemson, SC.
    ``Build It and They Will Come: Do Taxpayer-Financed Sports 
Stadiums, Convention Centers and Hotels Deliver as Promised for 
America's Cities?'' (March 29, 2007). Witnesses: Ms. Joyce 
Hogi, Bronx, NY; Mr. Frank Rashid, Detroit, MI; Mr. Nick 
Licata, President, Seattle City Council, Seattle, WA; Mr. Neil 
de Mause, author, Brooklyn, NY; Mr. Brad Humphreys, Ph.D., 
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL; Heywood 
Sanders, Ph.D., University of Texas, San Antonio, San Antonio, 
TX; Mr. Dennis Zimmerman, Falls Church, VA; Mr. Bob Murphy, 
President, Dayton Dragons, Dayton, OH; Mr. Michael Decker, 
Senior Managing Director, Research and Public Policy, The 
Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association, 
Washington, DC; Mr. Donald Korb, Chief Counsel, Internal 
Revenue Service.
    ``Federal Electric Transmission Corridors: Consequences for 
Public and Private Property'' (April 25, 2007). Witnesses: 
Representative Bill DeWeese, Majority Leader, Pennsylvania 
House of Representatives; Assemblyman Paul D. Tonko, Chair, 
Committee on Energy, New York State Assembly; Mr. Kurt Adams, 
Chairman, Maine Public Utilities Commission; Ms. Elizabeth 
Merritt, Deputy General Counsel, National Trust for Historic 
Preservation; Mr. Paul D. Koonce, Chief Executive Officer, 
Dominion Resources, Inc.; Mr. Chris Miller, President, Piedmont 
Environmental Council; Mr. Kevin Kolevar, Director, Office of 
Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of 
Energy.
    ``Evaluating Pediatric Dental Care Under Medicaid'' (May 2, 
2007). Witnesses: Ms. Laurie Norris, Staff Attorney, Public 
Justice Center; Dr. Frederick Clark, DDS, Dentist, Prince 
George's County, National Dental Association, member; Dr. 
Norman Tinanoff, DDS, Chair, Department of Pediatric Dentistry 
Dental School, University of Maryland; Mr. James Cosgrove, 
Ph.D., Director, Health Care, Government Accountability Office; 
Mr. Dennis Smith, Director, Center for Medicaid and State 
Operations Health and Human Services; Ms. Susan Tucker, MBA, 
Executive Director, Office of Health Services, Maryland 
Department of Health & Mental Hygiene; Dr. Allen Finklestein, 
Chief Dental Officer, United Health Care; Ms. Jane Perkins, 
Legal Director, National Health Law Program.
    ``Lethal Loopholes: Deficiencies in State and Federal Gun 
Purchase Laws'' (May 10, 2007). Witnesses: Ms. Robyn Thomas, 
Executive Director, Legal Community Against Violence; Mr. Paul 
Helmke, President, Brady Campaign Against Handgun Violence; Mr. 
John Feinblatt, Criminal Justice Coordinator for New York; Ms. 
Rachel L. Brand, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Legal 
Policy, U.S. Department of Justice; Mr. Stephen R. Rubenstein, 
Chief Counsel, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms & 
Explosives (will not testify, but will answer questions); 
Professor Daniel Webster, Johns Hopkins University; Professor 
Susan Sorenson, University of Pennsylvania; Mr. Ron Honberg, 
Director of Policy and Legal Affairs, National Alliance on 
Mental Illness.
    ``Foreclosure and the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland'' 
(May 21, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Charles Bromley, Adjunct 
Faculty, Levin College of Urban Affairs; Mr. Jim Rokakis, 
Treasurer, Cuyahoga County; Ms. Barbara Anderson, Board Member, 
East Side Organizing Project; Ms. Sandra F. Braunstein, 
Director, Division of Consumer and Community Affairs; Mr. 
Raymond Pianka, Judge, Cleveland Municipal Housing Court; Ms. 
Kathleen Engel, Professor, Marshall School of Law; Mr. Alex J. 
Pollock, Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute; Ms. 
Marlanne McCarty-Collins, Senior Vice President for Insight 
Bank.
    ``Hot Fuels: Big Oil's Double Standard for Measuring 
Gasoline'' (June 8, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Richard Suiter, 
Weights & Measures Coordinator, National Institute of 
Technology and Standards; Mr. Michael Cleary, Chairman, 
National Conference on Weights and Measures; Mr. Martin 
Gafinowitz, CEO, Gilbarco Veeder-Root; Mr. John Seibert, Owner-
Operator Independent Truck Drivers Association; Mr. Rex 
Tillerson, CEO, ExxonMobil (invited) Mr. John Hofmeister, 
President, Shell (invited); Mr. R. Timothy Columbus, General 
Counsel, National Association of Convenience Stores, and 
General Counsel, Independent Gasoline Marketers of America.
    ``Adequacy of Labor Law Enforcement in New Orleans'' (June 
26, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Jeffrey Steele, Former employee of 
the Army Corps of Engineers; Mr. Ted Smukler, Director of 
Public Policy, Immigrant Worker Justice; Ms. Jennifer 
Rosenbaum, Staff attorney, Immigrant Justice Project, Southern 
Poverty Law Center; Mr. Saket Soni and Mr. Jacob Horowitz, New 
Orleans Workers Center for Racial Justice; Mr. Paul DeCamp, 
Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, Employment Standards 
Administration, Department of Labor; Ms. Tracie Washington, 
President and CEO, Louisiana Justice Institute; Ms. Catherine 
Ruckelshaus, Litigation Director, National Employment Law 
Project.
    ``After Blackstone: Should Small Investors Be Exposed to 
Risks of Hedge Funds?'' (Wednesday, July 11, 2007). Witnesses: 
Mr. Andrew ``Buddy'' Donahue, Director of the Division of 
Investment Management, Securities & Exchange Commission; 
Professor Mercer Bullard, University of Mississippi Law School; 
Professor John Coffee, Columbia Law School; Mr. Joseph Borg, 
President of the Board of Directors of the North American 
Securities Administrators Association (NASAA); Mr. Peter 
Tanous, President and CEO, Lynx Investment Advisory, LLC.
    ``ExxonMobil and Shell Answer Questions About Hot Fuel'' 
(July 25, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Ben Soraci, U.S. Retail Sales 
Director, ExxonMobil Fuels Marketing Company; Mr. Hugh Cooley, 
Vice President and General Manager, National Wholesale and 
Joint Ventures, Shell Oil.
    ``Combating Drug Abuse and Drug-related Crime: What Is 
Working in Baltimore?'' (October 1, 2007). Witnesses: Ms. Lena 
Franklin, Director Recovery in Community; Ms. Rita Fayall, 
Program Coordinator, Meet Me Halfway Village Center; Mr. Leon 
Faruq, Program Director, Operation Safe Streets East; Ms. 
Sheryl Goldstein, Director, Mayors Office on Criminal Justice 
Dr. Josh Sharfstein, Commissioner, Baltimore City Health 
Department; The Honorable Ellen M. Heller, Retired, 
Administrative Judge and Judge in Charge of the Civil Docket, 
Circuit Baltimore City; The Honorable Jamey H. Weitzman, 
Associate Judge, Circuit Court of Baltimore City; The Honorable 
David W. Young, Associate Judge, Circuit Court of Baltimore 
City; Dr. Philip J. Leaf, Professor, John Hopkins Bloomberg 
School of Public Health.
    ``Will NIEHS' New Direction Protect Public Health?'' 
(September 25, 2007). Witnesses: Dr. Samuel H. Wilson, Acting 
Director, NIEH; Mr. George W. Lucier, Ph.D., Former Editor in 
Chief of EHP, and former Associate Director of NTP; Dr. Lynn 
Goldman, Professor, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School 
of Public Health; Ms. Peggy Shepard, Executive Director, WE ACT 
for Environmental Justice; Ms. Stefani D. Hines, M.A., M.S., 
Member, National Advisory Environmental Health Sciences Council 
(NAEHSC), Environmental Health Specialist at the University of 
New Mexico in Albuquerque.
    ``Professional Sports Stadiums: Do They Divert Public Funds 
from Critical Public Infrastructure?'' (October 10, 2007). 
Witnesses: Mr. Eric Solomon, Assistant Secretary for Tax 
Policy, Department of Treasury; Mr. Arthur J. Rolnick, Senior 
Vice President and Research Director, Federal Reserve Bank of 
Minneapolis; Professor Judith Grant Long, Assistant Professor 
of Urban Planning, Graduate School of Design, Harvard 
University; Professor David P. Hale, Director, Aging 
Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence, University of 
Alabama; Ms. Bettina Damiani, Director, Good Jobs New York; Mr. 
Steven Maguire, Ph.D., Specialist in Public Finance, 
Congressional Research Service.
    ``Upholding the Spirit of the CRA: Do CRA Ratings 
Accurately Reflect Bank Practices?'' (October 24, 2007) 
Witnesses: Ms. Sandra Thompson, Director, Division of 
Supervision and Consumer Protection, Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation; Ms. Sandra F. Braunstein, Director, Division of 
Consumer and Community Affairs, Board of Governors of the 
Federal Reserve System; Ms. Montrice Yakimov, Managing Director 
for Compliance and Consumer Protection, Office of Thrift 
Supervision; Ms. Ann Jaedicke, Deputy Comptroller for 
Compliance Policy, Comptroller of the Currency; Mr. Calvin 
Bradford, Board Member, National Training and Information 
Center; Mr. James H. Carr, Chief Operating Officer, National 
Community Reinvestment Coalition; Mr. Richard Marsico, 
Professor of Law, New York Law School, Director Justice Action 
Center; Mr. Hubert Van Tol, Director, Economic Justice, Rural 
Opportunities, Inc.
    ``Evaluating the Labor Department in New Orleans: DOL's 
Performance in Investigating and Prosecuting Wage and Hour 
Violations and Protecting Guest Workers'' (October 29, 2007). 
Witnesses: Professor Luz Molina, Clinical Professor, Law Clinic 
and Center for Social Justice, Loyola Law School; Mr. Jeffrey 
Steele, Former Clean-up Worker in New Orleans Tyrone Wilson, 
Former Clean-up Worker in New Orleans; Mr. Alfred McQuirter, 
Former Clean-up Worker in New Orleans; Mr. Rodney Smith, Former 
Clean-up Worker in New Orleans; Mr. Jaime Games, Worker; Mr. 
Sabulal Vijayan, Guest Worker; Ms. Maria Eugenia, Guest Worker; 
Mr. Rolando Sanchez, Guest Worker; Mr. Axel Landivar, Guest 
Worker; Mr. Daniel Castellanos, Former Guest Worker and 
Organizer with the New Orleans Workers' Center for Racial 
Justice; * Mr. Jacob Horowitz, New Orleans Workers' Center for 
Racial Justice, provided translation for Panel II.; Ms. Barbara 
Hicks, Director, Wage and Hour Division, Employment Standards 
Administration, Department of Labor District Office, New 
Orleans.
    ``Environmental Risks of and Regulatory Response to Mercury 
Dental Fillings'' (November 14, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Ephraim 
King, Director, Office of Science and Technology, Office of 
Water, Environmental Protection Agency; Dr. Norris Alderson, 
Director, Office of Science and Health Coordination, Food and 
Drug Administration; Mr. Ray Clark, Senior Partner, The Clark 
Group LLC; Mr. Bruce Terris, Partner, Terris, Pravlik & 
Millian, LLP; Mr. C. Mark Smith, Co-Chair, Mercury Task Force, 
New England Governor's Conference; Mr. Michael Bender, 
Executive Director, Mercury Policy Project; Dr. Rod Mackert, 
DDS and faculty member, Medical College of Georgia.
    ``What the October Wildfires Reveal About Preparedness in 
Southern California'' (December 10, 2007). Witnesses: Mr. Tony 
Morris, Founder and Researcher, Wildlife Research Network; Mr. 
Jeffrey Bowman, Former Fire Chief, City of San Diego Fire-
Rescue Department; Ms. Tracy Jarman, Fire Chief, City of San 
Diego Fire-Rescue Department; Mr. P. Michael Freeman, Fire 
Chief, Los Angeles County Fire Department; Mr. Chip Prather, 
Fire Chief, Orange County Fire Authority; Mr. Ruben Grijalva, 
Director, Department of Forestry and Fire Protection; Mr. Ron 
Roberts, Chairman, Board of Supervisors, County of San Diego; 
Ms. Nancy Ward, Region 9 Administrator, FEMA; Mr. Mark Rey, 
Undersecretary for National Resources and the Environment, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture; Mr. Steve Poizner, Commissioner, 
California Department of Insurance; Ms. Tracy Nelson, Chairman, 
La Jolla Indian Reservation.
    ``Assessing the Environmental Risks of the Water Bottling 
Industry's Extraction of Groundwater'' (December 12, 2007). 
Witnesses: Mr. Richard McFarland, McCloud Watershed Council; 
Ms. Terry Swier, Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation; Mr. 
Bill McCann, Save Our Groundwater; Ms. Heidi Paul, Vice 
President, Corporate Affairs, Nestle Waters North America, 
Inc.; Ms. Wenonah Hauter, Executive Director, Food & Water 
Watch; Professor David W. Hyndman, Department of Geological 
Sciences, Michigan State University; Professor Noah D. Hall, 
Wayne State University Law School; Mr. Joseph K. Doss, 
President and CEO, International Bottled Water Association; Mr. 
James Wilfong, Executive Director, H2O for ME.
    ``One Year Later: Medicaid's Response to Systemic Problems 
Revealed by the Death of Deamonte Driver'' (February 14, 2008). 
Witnesses: Mr. Dennis Smith, Director, Center for Medicaid and 
State Operations; Dr. Jim Crall, Director, Oral Health Policy 
Center, Professor and Chair, Section of Pediatric Dentistry, 
UCLA School of Dentistry; Dr. Burton Edelstein, Founding Chair, 
Children's Dental Health Project Professor and Chair, Social 
and Behavioral Sciences, Columbia University College of Dental 
Medicine.
    ``The National Drug Control Strategy for 2008, the Fiscal 
Year 2009 National Drug Control Budget, and Compliance with the 
ONDCP Reauthorization Act of 2006: Priorities and 
Accountability at ONDCP'' (March 12, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. John 
P. Walters, Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy; 
Mr. John Carnevale, Ph.D., President, Carnevale Associates, 
LLC; Ms. Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, Ph.D., Co-Director, RAND Drug 
Policy Research Center.
    ``Is USDA Accounting for Costs to Farmers Caused by 
Contamination from Genetically Engineered Plants?'' (March 13, 
2008). Witnesses: Mr. Harvey Howington, Conventional and GE 
Grain Grower, Lepanto, Arkansas; Mr. Todd Leake, Conventional 
and GE Grain Grower, Emerado, North Dakota; Mr. Don Cameron, 
Conventional, Organic and GE Crop Grower, Helm, California; Mr. 
Fred Kirschenmann, Organic Grain Grower, Medina, North Dakota; 
Professor Colin Carter, Agricultural Economist, University of 
California, Davis; Mr. Ray Clark, Senior Partner, The Clark 
Group LLC, Washington, DC; Ms. Cindy Smith, Administrator, 
Animal and Plant Inspection Service, U.S. Department of 
Agriculture.
    ``After the Beef Recall: Exploring Greater Transparency in 
the Meat Industry'' (April 17, 2008). Witnesses: Dr. Richard 
Raymond, Undersecretary, USDA, Food Safety; Ms. Lisa Shames, 
Director GAO, Natural Resources and the Environment; Mr. Stan 
Painter, Chairman, National Joint Council of Food Inspection 
Locals, American Federation of Government Employees; Dr. Temple 
Grandin, Professor, Colorado State University; Mr. Bev 
Eggleston, Owner, Ecofriendly Foods, LLC; Mr. Joel Salatin, 
Owner, Polyface Farms; Mr. Patrick Boyle, CEO, American Meat 
Institute; Mr. Wayne Pacelle, CEO, Humane Society of the United 
States; Dr. John J. McGlone, Fellow, American Humane & 
Professor, Texas Tech University; Mr. Adam Aronson, CEO, 
Arrowsight.
    ``Neighborhoods: The Blameless Victims of the Subprime 
Mortgage Crisis'' (May 21, 2008). Mr. Daniel T. Kildee, 
Treasurer, Genesee County, Michigan; Ms. Nancy Floreen, 
Councilmember, Montgomery County, Maryland; Mr. John Talmage, 
President and CEO, Social Compact; Ms. Vicki Been, Elihu Root 
Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy; Co-Director, 
Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, New York 
University School of Law; Ms. Phyllis G. Betts, Director, 
Center for Community Building and Neighborhood Action, School 
of Urban Affairs and Public Policy, University of Memphis; Mr. 
Alan Mallach, Senior Fellow, National Housing Institute; Mr. 
Doug Leeper, Code of Enforcement Manager, City of Chula Vista, 
California; Mr. Dean Baker, Co-Director, Center for Economic 
Policy Research.
    ``Targeting Federal Aid to Neighborhoods Distressed by the 
Subprime Mortgage Crisis'' (Thursday, May 22, 2008). Witnesses: 
Mr. Frank S. Alexander, Professor of Law, Emory University 
School of Law; Mr. Todd M. Richardson, Director, Program 
Evaluation Division, Office of Policy Development and Research, 
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; Mr. Thomas G. 
Kingsley, Urban Institute; Mr. Christopher Walker, Local 
Initiatives Support Corporation.
    ``Assessing State and Local Regulations to Reduce Dental 
Mercury Emissions'' (July 8, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. Michael 
Bender, Executive Director, Mercury Policy Project; Dr. Rich 
Fischer, Former President, International Academy of Oral 
Medicine and Toxicology; Mr. Curt McCormick, former 
Administrator, EPA Region 8; Mr. William Walsh, Counsel, 
American Dental Association; Ms. Pat Magnusson, King County, 
Seattle, Industrial Waste Investigator; Ms. Ann Farrell, 
Director, Central Contra Costa County Sanitary District, 
Engineering Department; Dr. Marc Smith, Deputy Director, 
Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection & Co-
chair, New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers 
Mercury Task Force; Mr. Owen Boyd, CEO, Solmetex.
    ``Examining Contractor Performance and Government 
Management of Retroactive Pay for Retired Veterans with 
Disabilities'' (July 16, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. Zack E. Gaddy, 
Director, Defense Finance and Accounting Service; Mr. Joseph 
Cipriano, President, Lockheed Martin Business Process 
Solutions; Mr. Gordon Heddell, Acting Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Defense Office of Inspector General; Mr. Pierre 
Sprey, Independent Statistics Expert.
    ``Gaming the Tax Code: Public Subsidies, Private Profits, 
and Big League Sports in New York'' (September 18, 2008). 
Witnesses: Mr. Stephen Larson, Associate Chief Counsel, 
Financial Institutions and Products, Internal Revenue Service; 
Assemblyman Richard L. Brodsky, 92nd Assembly District, New 
York State; Professor Clayton Gillette, New York University 
School of Law; Professor Brad R. Humphreys, Department of 
Economics, University of Alberta.
    ``Necessary Reform to Pediatric Dental Care Under 
Medicaid'' (September 23, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. Herb Kuhn, 
Acting Director, Center for Medicaid and State Operations; Ms. 
Alicia Cackley, Acting Director, Health Care Team, Government 
Accountability Office; Ms. Susan Tucker, MBA, Executive 
Director, Office of Health Services, Maryland Department of 
Health & Mental Hygiene; Mr. Patrick Finnerty, Director, 
Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services; Dr. Mark 
Casey, DDS, MPH, Dental Director, North Carolina Division of 
Medical Assistance; Ms. Linda Smith Lowe, Esq., Public Policy 
Advocate, Georgia Legal Services Program; Dr. Jane Grover, 
American Dental Association; Dr. Jim Crall, Director, Oral 
Health Policy Center, Professor and Chair, Section of Pediatric 
Dentistry, UCLA School of Dentistry.
    ``Tumors and Cell Phone Use: What the Science Says'' 
(Thursday, September 25, 2008). Witnesses: Mrs. Ellie Marks, 
Lafayette, California; Mr. Julius Knapp, Director, Office of 
Engineering and Technology, Federal Communications Commission; 
Dr. David O. Carpenter, Director, Institute for Health and the 
Environment, University of Albany; Dr. Ronald B. Herberman, 
Director, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.
    ``Gaming the Tax Code: the New York Yankees and the City of 
New York Respond to Questions About the New Yankee Stadium'' 
(October 24, 2008). Witnesses: Mr. Randy Levine, President, New 
York Yankees; Ms. Martha Stark, Commissioner, New York City 
Economic Development Corporation; Mr. Seth Pinsky, President, 
New York City Economic Development Corporation; Assemblyman 
Richard L. Brodsky, 92nd Assembly District of New York State.
    ``Is Treasury Using Bailout Funds to Increase Foreclosure 
Prevention, as Congress Intended?'' (November 14, 2008). 
Witnesses: Mr. Neel Kashkari, Interim Assistant Secretary of 
the Treasury for Financial Stability and Assistant Secretary of 
the Treasury for International Economics and Development; 
Professor Michael Barr, Former Deputy Assistant Secretary for 
Community Development, Department of Treasury, University of 
Michigan Law School & Center for American Progress; Professor 
Anthony B. Sanders, W.P. Carey School of Business, Arizona 
State University; Ms. Alys Cohen, Staff Attorney, National 
Consumer Law Center; Mr. Larry Litton, Chairman, Litton Loan 
Servicing LP; Mr. Stephen S. Kudenholdt, Partner, Thacher 
Proffitt & Wood; Mr. Thomas Deutsch, Deputy Director, American 
Securitization Forum.

 4. Legislation

    The Subcommittee worked on two measures:
    Rep. Kucinich's amendment to H.R. 5818, which modified the 
purposes of the legislation to emphasize the problems posed to 
neighborhoods by increasing rates of vacant and abandoned 
properties and changed the state-to-local jurisdiction funding 
formula to ensure that up-to-date vacancy statistics are used 
to suballocate the funds where they are most needed. The House 
adopted the amendment on May 7, 2008.
    H.R. 3875, a bipartisan bill introduced by Rep. Kucinich on 
October 17, 2007. This measure seeks to provide greater 
protection to workers in New Orleans who have been denied the 
wages they earned during the clean-up and reconstruction effort 
of the ravaged city.

B. SUBCOMMITTEE ON FEDERAL WORKFORCE, POSTAL SERVICE, AND THE DISTRICT 
                              OF COLUMBIA

    The Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, Postal Service, and 
the District of Columbia has jurisdiction over federal employee 
issues, the municipal affairs (other than appropriations) of 
the District of Columbia, and the Postal Service. The 
Subcommittee's jurisdiction includes postal namings, holidays, 
and celebrations. In the 110th Congress, Rep. Danny K. Davis 
served as Chairman and Rep. Kenny Marchant as Ranking Member.

1. Overview by Issue Area

            a. Federal Workforce
                (1) Pay for Performance
    On February 12, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Robbing Mary to Pay Peter and Paul: The 
Administration's Pay for Performance System.'' The hearing 
examined the implementation of pay-for-performance systems at 
the Internal Revenue Service and the Securities and Exchange 
Commission. It also examined the Director of National 
Intelligence's proposal to implement a pay-for-performance 
system across the intelligence community. The impact on pay, 
morale, minorities, and labor-management relations was also 
examined. Witness testimony revealed a number of problems in 
the design and implementation of these systems, which have led 
to labor disputes, adverse impacts on protected classes, 
confusion over what precisely constitutes ``good'' job 
performance, diminished employee morale, failure to provide 
cost of living increases to employees who meet performance 
expectations, and the use of invalidated performance management 
systems that were developed without the input or support of 
employees.
                (2) GAO
    Over the past two years, the Subcommittee has conducted 
vigorous oversight of the new personnel system at the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) to determine whether it 
is modern, effective, credible, transparent, and whether there 
are adequate safeguards in place to ensure fairness and prevent 
politicization and abuse. The Subcommittee sought to determine 
whether it was a good model that could be implemented 
governmentwide.
    The criteria for the Subcommittee's review were established 
by GAO as the appropriate basis for federal agencies to develop 
and implement new pay systems. However, the Subcommittee found 
that GAO failed to meet these criteria when implementing its 
own newly developed pay system. The Subcommittee found that GAO 
employees who met or exceeded performance expectations in 2006 
and 2007 did not receive an annual cost of living increase 
(COLA). Furthermore, the decision to deny these employees their 
COLA was based on a poorly executed compensation study 
conducted by Watson Wyatt Worldwide. The Subcommittee also 
found a lack of transparency in the new system; a lack of 
employee involvement in the development of the system; and that 
the system has an adverse impact on minorities and tenured 
employees.
    The Subcommittee documented these findings in the record 
established during the Subcommittee's joint House/Senate 
hearing on GAO's pay system, which was held in May 2007, as 
well as at the Subcommittee's November 2007 hearing on Senior 
Executive Service (SES) diversity in legislative branch 
agencies.
    Unfortunately, throughout the course of GAO's 
implementation of the most significant package of personnel 
reforms in its history, the agency never surveyed its employees 
to obtain their views on the new system. During the May 2007 
hearing, Chairman Davis asked GAO's Employee Advisory Council 
to work with the Subcommittee to develop and deploy such a 
survey. The survey was deployed on November 14, 2007, and 
closed on December 14, 2007, with a 71% response rate. GAO will 
be briefing Subcommittee staff on the survey findings.
    The Subcommittee staff has also been monitoring the 
disparity between African-American performance ratings and 
Caucasian performance ratings at GAO. The staff has and will 
continue to be briefed by the Ivy Consulting Group hired by GAO 
to study this matter.
    The Subcommittee's investigation culminated in the passage 
of H.R. 5683, the ``Government Accountability Act of 2008.'' 
Provisions of the bill were discussed at a March 13, 2008, 
hearing on GAO personnel reforms. Chairman Danny K. Davis 
introduced H.R. 5683 on April 2, 2008. It addressed a number of 
issues related to pay and personnel matters, access to 
information, and internal operations at GAO.
    The legislation supplements GAO's pay-for-performance pay 
system with a ``floor guarantee'' for employees. The ``floor 
guarantee'' provision will ensure that in the future GAO 
employees who are performing at a satisfactory level will 
receive at least as much as the annual adjustment under the GS 
system. However, the bill maintains some of GAO's flexibility 
to set an annual across-the-board increase. The bill also 
includes important provisions that will enhance the ability of 
GAO to perform its oversight functions. In addition, the bill 
provides for salary increases and lump sum payments to GAO 
employees who were denied cost of living increases in 2006 and 
2007.
    The bill was marked up by the Subcommittee on April 3, 
2008, was amended, and was favorably reported out of the full 
Committee on May 22, 2008. H.R. 5683 passed the House on June 
9, 2008, the Senate on August 1, 2008, and was signed into law 
on September 22, 2008. (Public Law No. 110-323)
                (3) Diversity
    Federal workforce diversity has been a longstanding 
priority of Chairman Davis. At his request, GAO has been 
carefully examining this issue for several years. In 2001 and 
2003, GAO issued reports on diversity in the Senior Executive 
Service (SES). GAO released its third report on the issue in 
December 2008. The third report examined whether or not the 
federal government has made any progress in diversifying the 
SES and examined the diversity in the senior ranks of the 
Postal Service.
    During this Congress, the Subcommittee held important 
hearings on the issue of diversity in the federal workplace. 
The first, held on May 10, 2007, examined diversity at the 
highest levels of executive branch agencies and the Postal 
Service. The second hearing, held on November 13, 2007, 
coincided with the release of a Subcommittee report entitled, 
``Senior Executive Service: Women and Minorities are 
Underrepresented in Most Legislative Branch Agencies.'' The 
hearing and the report revealed that the SES at each 
legislative branch agency (the Government Accountability 
Office, the Library of Congress (LOC), the Congressional Budget 
Office (CBO), the Government Printing Office (GPO), the U.S. 
Capitol Police (USCP), and the Architect of the Capitol (AOC)) 
was less diverse with respect to minorities than its workforce 
as a whole in FY 2007 and less diverse with respect to women in 
four of the agencies.
    In a letter dated November 14, 2007, Chairman Davis 
requested that the Inspectors General (IGs) for the legislative 
branch agencies conduct a review of their respective diversity 
offices. The Subcommittee followed up on its request to 
legislative branch inspector generals to audit their respective 
agency's diversity offices with a hearing on September 16, 
2008.
    The hearing revealed that the percentage of the female SES 
members is low in some agencies (e.g. GPO, 11.5%) in comparison 
to (a) the percentage of female SES members in the other 
legislative branch agencies (the average of the other four 
agencies is 37%), (b) the percentage of female executive branch 
SES members in 2007 (28.6%) or (c) the percentage of women in 
individual agencies' workforces (42.4% in GPO in 2007).
    The summary IG report revealed that the AOC and GPO have 
increased minority representation since 2002. While this is 
good news, GPO (the agency with the greatest percentage 
progress) still had the lowest minority representation 
percentage of the five agencies (18.5%), and the actual 
increase was from one minority in the SES (out of 21) to three 
(out of 26). At AOC, the increase was from two minorities in 
the SES (out of 15) to five (out of 27).
    The report went on to say that minority representation at 
the other three agencies (GAO, LOC and USCP) ``has been 
relatively stable.'' Actually, in all three agencies, the 
percentage of minorities in the SES went down somewhat (e.g., 
from 16.7% to 14% at USCP).
    The summary report stated that the agencies ``have 
generally made strides in improving diversity in developmental 
pools, particularly the representation of women.'' However, the 
percentage of the developmental pool constituting women at the 
AOC went down, from 25% in 2002 to 23% in 2007. The percentage 
of the developmental pool constituting women at the LOC 
increased by only one percentage point in five years (from 
39.6% to 40.6%). Also, the percentage of the developmental pool 
constituting minorities fell at AOC substantially (from 25.0% 
(4 of 16) to 12.8% (5 of 39)). On the other hand, the increase 
in the percentage of women in the developmental pool at GPO was 
remarkable (from 3.1% (one of 32) to 29.1% (23 of 79)). 
Notwithstanding this progress, the data reveals that GPO is 
still next to the bottom in this category.
    In September of 2007, GAO hired the Ivy Planning Group, an 
independent management and training consulting contractor, to 
assess why persistent gaps exist in performance rating averages 
between African-American and Caucasian GAO analysts. The Ivy 
Group completed its study and testified before the 
Subcommittee.
    Among other things, the Ivy Group found:
     There are differences in ratings between African 
American analysts and Caucasian analysts in general, by 
competency, pay band, team, and location, and regardless of the 
race of the rater, the differences are statistically 
significant.
     The same factors impact African American and 
Caucasian analysts' ratings differently. For example, having a 
Ph.D. has a statistically significant positive effect for 
Caucasian analysts but no effect for African American analysts.
     Caucasian analysts receive a ratings benefit from 
being assigned to high risk projects compared to African 
American analysts who receive no statistically significant 
benefit from being assigned to a high risk project.
     On average, raters of all races rated African 
American analysts lower than Caucasian analysts. The 
differences were statistically significant when the rater was 
African American, Hispanic, or Caucasian. Based on this data, 
rater race demographics did not influence Caucasian analysts' 
ratings.
     With the exception of the average rating for 
improving professional competence, African American analysts' 
mean scores were lower than Caucasian analysts' mean scores 
across all competencies. Two of the three competencies that 
were dropped in 2004 (improving professional competence and 
facilitating and implementing change) are two of the three 
competencies for which the differences were not statistically 
significant. While not statistically significant, they are the 
competencies for which African American analysts performed 
better.
    It is clear that the legislative branch agencies have a lot 
more work to do to diversify their senior ranks and that more 
oversight is needed in this area.
    H.R. 3774, the Senior Executive Service Diversity Assurance 
Act of 2007, was introduced by Subcommittee Chairman Danny K. 
Davis on October 9, 2007. The purpose of H.R. 3774 is to 
promote diversity in the Senior Executive Service (SES).
    The bill requires federal agencies to put in place systems 
that will attract and retain minorities in the SES. At a joint 
House and Senate Federal workforce Subcommittee hearing on 
April 3, 2008, GAO testified that a significantly lower number 
of minorities and women are members of the SES in comparison to 
the numbers of minorities and women employed in the GS-15 and 
GS-14 levels, the feeder pools for the SES. According to GAO, 
in 2007, minorities made up 22.5% of the employees in the SES 
development pool while only making up 15.8% of the SES. The 
purpose of H.R. 3774 is to ensure that there is not only a 
vibrant and diverse SES workforce but also that all qualified 
employees have the opportunity to become members of the SES.
    On April 15, 2008, the Subcommittee favorably reported H.R. 
3774 to the full Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. 
On May 1, 2008, the full Committee ordered the bill reported, 
as amended, by voice vote. The bill was amended to address 
concerns raised by the Office of Personnel Management and 
Department of Justice that the bill was unconstitutional 
because it required SES selection panels to be comprised of 
three members of which one was required to be a woman and 
another to be a minority. H.R. 3774 passed the House on June 3, 
2008.
                (4) Telework
    During previous Congresses, Chairman Davis has advocated 
for and introduced legislation to encourage teleworking in the 
federal government to better address emergency preparedness and 
continuity of operations.
    On May 7, 2007, Chairman Davis, along with Chairman Waxman, 
and Ranking Members Tom Davis and Kenny Marchant, wrote to 25 
federal departments and agencies requesting information on 
their telework programs. What the Subcommittee learned from 
agency responses was that telework is being inconsistently 
defined and implemented across the federal government.
    On November 6, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled, ``Telework: Breaking New Ground.'' The hearing 
examined why telework continues to be underutilized by federal 
agencies and what improvements are needed to allow more federal 
employees to participate in telework programs.
    To address the underutilization of teleworking across the 
federal government, Chairman Davis and Chairman Waxman 
introduced the ``Telework Improvement Act of 2007,'' H.R. 4106, 
which breaks new ground by ensuring that eligible federal 
employees have the opportunity to telework and that agencies 
are incorporating telework into their continuity of operations 
planning. The bill includes measures to improve the efficiency 
of the federal workforce through the revitalization of telework 
guidelines and procedures.
    H.R. 4106 is the result of bipartisan congressional 
cooperation and consultation with the OPM and other relevant 
government agencies. As the bill moved through the process, 
provisions were added to address the concerns of members of 
Congress and the Administration and ensure the proper oversight 
and implementation of the government's telework program. H.R. 
4106 was approved by the House on June 3, 2008.
                (5) Leave
    On March 6, 2008, the Subcommittee and the Joint Economic 
Committee held a hearing titled ``Investing in the Future of 
the Federal Workforce: Paid Parental Leave to Improve 
Recruitment and Retention.'' The hearing examined H.R. 3799, 
the ``Federal Employees Paid Parental Leave Act of 2007'' (the 
Act). Introduced by Rep. Carolyn Maloney on October 10, 2007, 
the Act provides that all federal employees receive eight weeks 
of full pay and benefits, while continuing to accrue leave, for 
leave taken for the birth or adoption of a child. Rep. Maloney 
also serves as Vice Chair of the Joint Economic Committee.
    The federal government trails other Organization for 
Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries in this 
area. The European Union, for example, requires that member 
countries offer 14 weeks of pay maternity leave. This boosts 
women's employment by increasing the likelihood that women will 
return to their jobs after childbirth. In general, research 
shows that paid family leave benefits can lead to increased 
productivity and morale, reduce absenteeism, and lower turnover 
and training costs. However, companies can see the benefits of 
paid family leave most directly in terms of reduced turnover 
costs. Women who had access to leave--either paid or unpaid--at 
the birth of their first child are more likely to go back to 
their job after childbirth. Research further confirms that paid 
leave is a better retention policy than unpaid leave because 
the probability of returning to the same employer after having 
a child is 5.4% greater for women who received paid maternity 
leave compared to those who received unpaid maternity leave.
    To address concerns raised by the Administration and 
members of Congress, Rep. Maloney reintroduced H.R. 3799 as 
H.R. 5781, the ``Federal Employees Paid Parental Leave Act of 
2008,'' on April 14, 2008. After discussions with Chairman 
Davis, provisions were added that directed GAO to study and 
submit to Congress a written report of the ``feasibility and 
desirability'' of offering an insurance benefit to federal 
employees (not to include parental leave) that would provide 
wage replacement during periods related to serious health 
conditions.
    The Subcommittee held a markup on April 15, 2008, to review 
and strengthen the bill. During the Subcommittee markup, H.R. 
5781 was amended by Chairman Waxman to provide four weeks 
instead of eight weeks of paid parental leave as a way to 
address potential cost concerns. H.R. 5781 as amended was 
approved by the Subcommittee by voice vote. The Oversight 
Committee marked up the bill on April 16, 2008, and ordered the 
bill to be reported without recommendation.
    Ultimately, Chairman Davis' provision requiring GAO to 
conduct a feasibility study on a type of ``disability 
insurance'' was removed from the bill when it was considered by 
the House on June 19, 2008. However, the Chairman made a direct 
request to GAO to execute the report, which GAO agreed to do. 
H.R. 5781 passed the House.
                (6) Health Care
    On Wednesday, December 3, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing to examine the Federal Employees Health Benefits 
Program Plan (FEHBP) benefit design decisions and the changes 
to the 2009 Blue Cross Blue Shield (the Blues) health benefit. 
Specifically, the hearing addressed changes in payment for 
services provided by non-participating providers (except in 
cases of medical emergency or accident).
    What emerged as the most controversial change to the Blues 
2009 benefit plan is that beneficiaries will be responsible for 
paying up to $7,500 for surgery performed by a non-
participating physician, expect in the case of medical 
emergencies and accidents. Previously, beneficiaries have been 
responsible for paying 25% of the plan's allowance, plus 100% 
of any billed amount above the plan allowance.
    The hearing witnesses included representatives from OPM, 
the Blues, an out-of-network physician, and an FEHBP 
consultant. While the Blues testified that they had made a 
mistake and were willing to renegotiate the 2009 non-
participating provider surgical benefit, OPM said that it was 
not. Members expressed concern that subscribers to Blue Cross 
Blue Shield would be unaware of the increased costs given that 
Open Season (the period in which federal employees are allowed 
to change health plans) would close in just a few days (on 
December 8) and urged OPM to work with the Blues to reconsider 
the controversial benefit option. Chairman Davis specifically 
called on OPM to delay the closing of Open Season and 
renegotiate with the Blues.
    The Subcommittee's hearing on the issue and Chairman Davis' 
advocacy on behalf of federal employees led to a reversal of 
course by OPM. Two days after the Subcommittee hearing, OPM 
announced that subscribers could delay their decision to choose 
a health plan until January 31, 2009, and that it would 
renegotiate the non-participating provider surgical benefit 
with the Blues.
                (7) Other Matters
    The Subcommittee held several other hearings on issues 
ranging from the federal government's policies on hiring ex-
offenders to how locality pay is calculated to recent 
legislative proposals to phase out the non-foreign cost-of-
living allowance in exchange for locality pay for federal 
civilian employees living in Alaska, Hawaii, and the United 
States territories.
    The Subcommittee is prepared to renew its efforts to pass 
legislation that has moved through the Subcommittee but has 
stalled in the Senate and continue its oversight of such areas 
as pay-for-performance, diversity in the federal workplace, and 
FEHBP.
            b. Postal Service
                (1) General Oversight
    On April 17, 2007, the Subcommittee held the first postal 
oversight hearing in over ten years. The hearing, entitled, 
``U.S. Postal Service: 101,'' was an overview of the Postal 
Service's operations and business processes; mail growth and 
delivery services; and infrastructure and realignment. This 
hearing identified areas for oversight and future postal 
hearings, which included hearings including contracting out of 
postal services and postal rate increases.
    After receiving numerous complaints about mail delivery 
services in Chicago, the Subcommittee held a hearing on May 31, 
2007, at the Dirksen Federal Courthouse in Chicago. The hearing 
examined mail delivery challenges in Chicago and what reforms 
or new systems need to be implemented to address them. The 
hearing spurred improvement by the Chicago Performance Cluster 
in all three service standards for the third quarter of FY 07 
(7/1/07-9/30/07) as compared to the second quarter (4/1/07-6/
30/07). Overnight service was 94% on-time, up from 93%; two-day 
service was 93% on-time and three-day service was 90% on time, 
up from 90% and 85% respectively.
    On July 19, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing to 
examine the Postal Service's plans to outsource mail delivery 
and other postal functions. While the Postal Service noted the 
efficiencies and cost savings of contracting out postal 
services, no independent study had been conducted by the Postal 
Inspector General or GAO to document any savings to the Postal 
Service. Furthermore, members questioned whether mail delivery, 
which many may consider an inherently governmental function, 
should be contracted out.
    The hearing led to an agreement between the Postal Service 
and the National Association of Letter Carriers which included 
new limits on contracting out the work of city letter carriers 
in more than 3,000 city delivery installations and placed a 
six-month moratorium on contracting out city carrier delivery 
services elsewhere in the country. During the moratorium, a 
union-management task force will be created to develop 
contracting out policy that will take into account the 
interests of all parties including the general public.
                (2) Implementation of Postal Reform Law
    The Subcommittee held its first postal hearing during the 
second session on February 28, 2008. The hearing, titled, 
``Implementation of the PAEA of 2006,'' examined the degree to 
which the Postal Service and the Postal Regulatory Commission 
(PRC) successfully implemented the ``Postal Accountability and 
Enhancement Act of 2006'' (PAEA). It was determined from 
witness testimony that the Postal Service and the PRC were 
making good progress in implementing PAEA. In fact, the PRC had 
developed the final regulations to implement new modern 
ratemaking and classification systems for market dominant and 
competitive mail products eight months ahead of the statutory 
deadline.
    On May 8, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing on the 
economics of universal mail. The hearing examined the degree to 
which the Postal Service had taken advantage of the provisions 
in PAEA to enhance its economic viability. The Postmaster 
General, Jack Potter, testified that overall mail volume 
declined by 3% in Quarter I and 3.3% in Quarter II, which were 
among the largest declines in postal history. At the same time, 
the Postal Service reached 96% on-time first class mail 
delivery for the fourth consecutive quarter. Mr. Potter also 
stated that the Postal Service had a 92% favorability rating 
from the American people.
                (3) Network Plan
    The Subcommittee held a postal hearing on July 24, 2008, 
entitled, ``The Three R's of the Postal Network Plan: 
Realignment, Right-Sizing, and Responsiveness.'' The hearing 
examined how the Postal Service's network plan, issued in June 
2008, would impact the mailing industry, the public, the postal 
workforce, and the future economic health of the Postal 
Service. Witnesses implored the Postal Service to right-size 
their operational network due to declining mail volumes. The 
Postmaster General testified that the Office of Personnel 
Management had given approval for the Postal Service to 
introduce a voluntary early retirement program to right-size 
its workforce.
    While members of Congress have expressed concern about the 
future economic viability of the Postal Service, they are also 
concerned that some cost saving initiatives that are being 
discussed would adversely impact the postal workforce. Two 
bills were introduced to protect the jobs of postal workers and 
limit the Postal Service's flexibility in realigning the 
network.
                (4) Legislation
    Rep. Stephen Lynch introduced H.R. 4236, ``Mail Network 
Protection Act of 2007.'' The bill required the Postal Service 
to bargain with postal unions before entering into a contract 
for mail processing, mail handling, or surface transportation. 
Senator Tom Harkin introduced S. 1457, the ``Mail Delivery 
Protection Act of 2007.'' The bill prohibited the Postal 
Service from contracting out the delivery of mail on any route 
with one or more families per mile.
    On April 24, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 
5912, ``Making Tobacco and Cigarettes NonMailable,'' which was 
introduced by Chairman Henry Waxman. In addition to prohibiting 
certain tobacco products for transport by the Postal Service, 
the bill contained protections for donors to charities who are 
solicited by mail. H.R. 5912 was introduced to improve on 
provisions in H.R. 2932, which was introduced by Rep. John 
McHugh. The bill made cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and roll-
your-own-tobacco ``nonmailable'' matter and that would be 
prohibited from being deposited in the mail, carried, or 
delivered through the mail.
    In a November 25, 2008, report entitled, ``Form 10-K,'' the 
Postal Service reported a year-to-date deficit of $2.3 billion. 
In the month of August 2008 alone, the Postal Service reported 
a net loss of about $960 million. During that month, revenue 
was about 10% below the level in August 2007, despite a 2.9% 
price increase implemented in May 2008. Overall mail volume was 
down 11.7% from the same period last year. In a September 25, 
2008, meeting with Chairman Davis, the Postmaster General said 
that the projected FY 2008 net loss for the Postal Service was 
$2.8 billion. The $2.8 billion in net loss would be added to 
the $4.2 billion the Postal Service had to borrow from the 
Federal Financing Bank for the two previous fiscal years.
    To address the financial crisis of the Postal Service, on 
December 20, 2008, Rep. McHugh introduced and Chairman Davis 
cosponsored H.R. 7313. The bill amends chapter 89 of title 5, 
United States Code, to allow the Postal Service to pay its 
share of contributions for annuitants' health benefits out of 
the Postal Service Retiree Health Benefits Fund. The 
legislation would continue requiring the Postal Service to make 
its yearly payment into the retiree health benefits fund, but 
would permit the Postal Service to pay its yearly retiree 
health premiums to the Office of Personnel Management out of 
the accrued funds in the Retiree Health Benefits Fund. This 
fund currently has a balance of over $25 billion. If enacted, 
H.R. 7313 will address the Postal Service's immediate financial 
crisis by reducing the Postal Service's expenses by roughly 
$2.3 billion in FY2009, or $28.1 billion through 2016.
            c. District of Columbia
    The Subcommittee worked closely with Delegate Eleanor 
Holmes Norton to hold hearings and move legislation critical to 
the District of Columbia.
                (1) Criminal Justice
    On Tuesday, October 16, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing on whether or not DC prisoners were being adequately 
prepared for re-entry into society with equal access to Bureau 
of Prisons (BOP) services. Subcommittee staff joined Delegate 
Norton on her visit to Rivers Correctional Institution (RCI) in 
Winton, North Carolina, and to the Federal Correctional 
Institution in Cumberland, Maryland, in preparation for the 
hearing. The hearing examined the drug treatment, vocational 
training and transitional programming available at BOP 
facilities and whether such services are available at RCI, a 
privately run institution under contract with BOP, that houses 
DC inmates. Testimony at the hearing made clear that RCI did 
not offer DC inmates the same level of vocational services that 
is offered at BOP facilities. As a result of the hearing, RCI 
is working with BOP to improve the range and quality of its 
vocational offerings for DC inmates.
    The Subcommittee followed up on those hearings with a March 
11, 2008, hearing on the parole, supervised release, and 
revocation of District offenders. As a result of enactment of 
the ``National Capital Revitalization and Self-Government 
Improvement Act of 1997'' (The Revitalization Act), the federal 
government assumed oversight authority and fiduciary control 
over the District of Columbia's Court System, Pretrial Services 
Agency, Public Defender Service, and adult probation and parole 
supervision services.
    The federal and District governments developed and set into 
motion a plan to transfer the responsibility of housing adult 
felons convicted of violating the D.C. Code from the requisite 
District of Columbia authorities to the Federal Bureau of 
Prisons. The transfer of responsibility for all sentenced 
District felons to the Federal Bureau of Prisons has been 
successfully accomplished in step with the requirements of the 
Revitalization Act. However, the resulting situation has 
produced a host of new policy issues and challenges, including 
ensuring the fair treatment and equal access of D.C. inmates to 
BOP programs in comparison to other federally housed prisoners, 
and addressing the geographical challenges of keeping inmates 
connected to their families and communities.
    This shift in responsibility brought with it significant 
changes to D.C.'s traditional sentencing system, which were 
required as a pre-condition for the federal government assuming 
responsibility for the incarceration of felons convicted of 
D.C. Code violations. These changes included the elimination of 
parole, the replacement of indeterminate sentencing with new 
determinate sentencing guidelines, and the enactment of 
mandatory minimum drug sentences.
    Since the abolishment of the D.C. Board of Parole on August 
5, 2000, direct authority for parole matters, conditions of 
supervised release and revocation proceedings concerning D.C. 
code violators has rested with the United States Parole 
Commission (USPC). In light of the numerous policy and 
procedural concerns that have been raised since the transfer of 
authority, the Subcommittee determined that a thorough 
examination of the USPC's application of D.C. parole laws and 
regulations in making its release and revocation decisions for 
D.C. code offenders was warranted.
    Another major by-product of the Revitalization Act was the 
creation of the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency 
(CSOSA) as an independent federal agency with the 
responsibility for providing supervision of all D.C. code 
offenders on probation, parole, and supervised release. To this 
end, CSOSA's main functions include reducing re-arrests, 
improving education and job skill levels, offering programs to 
address drug or alcohol dependency, operating community service 
programs, and providing overall supervision and support to 
approximately 15,500 offenders on parole, probation, or 
supervised release.
    In addition, the Subcommittee held a hearing on June 10, 
2008, to examine the federal government's policies on hiring 
ex-offenders, which appeared to be inconsistent from agency to 
agency. As a result, the Office of Personnel Management is 
surveying federal agencies to assess their policies on hiring 
ex-offenders.
                (2) WASA
    On Tuesday, April 15, 2008, the Subcommittee convened a 
hearing to examine proposed capital improvement projects of the 
District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (WASA) and 
drinking water quality. While WASA has made significant 
improvements over the years, it continues to grapple with 
enormous capital infrastructure costs, system modernization 
challenges, and fully meeting the Clean Water Act standards and 
Environmental Protection Agency permitting requirements. The 
hearing also examined H.R. 5778, the ``District of Columbia 
Water and Sewer Authority Independence Preservation Act,'' 
which was introduced by Rep. Chris Van Hollen to address the 
governance of WASA.
    The legislation provided the legal authority for WASA to 
function as a fully independent authority, by officially 
shifting oversight of the agency's financial operations and 
personnel matters from the DC Chief Financial Officer to WASA's 
Board of Directors. H.R. 5778 passed the House on June 9, the 
Senate on June 16, 2008, and was signed into law on July 15, 
2008. (Public Law No: 110-273)
                (3) Legislation
    H.R. 1124, ``To Extend the District of Columbia Access Act 
of 1999,'' was introduced by Ranking Member Tom Davis and 
cosponsored by Delegate Norton and Chairman Danny Davis. This 
measure provides for the D.C. Tuition Assistance Grant Program 
(DC TAG), federal government scholarships to District high 
school students to attend public colleges and universities in 
the United States. Since 1999, DCTAG has doubled the total 
number of District students attending college. The Subcommittee 
held a hearing on this bill, and H.R. 1124 quickly moved 
through the Subcommittee and full Committee, was approved by 
the House on May 14, 2007, and was signed into law on October 
24, 2007.
    Two bills of importance to the self governance of the 
District of Columbia, H.R. 733, the ``District of Columbia 
Budget Autonomy Act of 2007,'' sponsored by Rep. Tom Davis and 
Delegate Norton, and H.R. 1054, the ``District of Columbia 
Legislative Autonomy Act of 2007,'' sponsored by Delegate 
Norton, were the subject of a June 7, 2007, Subcommittee 
hearing. H.R. 733 would allow the District to enact its own 
local budget without annual congressional oversight and H.R. 
1054 would amend the District of Columbia Home Rule Act to 
eliminate the congressional review of newly-passed District 
laws. Both bills were favorably reported out of the 
Subcommittee on June 21, 2007.
    Chairman Danny K. Davis introduced H.R. 5551, to increase 
the hourly rate of attorneys representing indigent defendants 
in the District of Columbia from $65 to $80. The legislation 
was the subject of a March 11, 2008, Subcommittee hearing. The 
bill authorized the increases provided under the FY 2008 
Consolidated Appropriations Act. H.R. 5551 passed the House on 
April 1, 2008, the Senate on September 18, 2008, and was signed 
into law on October 2, 2008. (Public Law No: 110-201)
    S. 550, introduced by Sen. Daniel Akaka, preserved existing 
judgeships on the Superior Court of the District of Columbia by 
increasing the number of judges permitted to serve on the 
Court. The bill ensured that the Superior Court of the District 
of Columbia has a sufficient number of judges to fairly and 
swiftly handle pending caseloads. S. 550 passed the Senate on 
February 2, 2008, the House on April 1, 2008, and was signed 
into law on April 18, 2008. (Public law No: 110-335)
    At the request of Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, on April 
24, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing to examine H.R. 1246, 
the ``District of Columbia Attorney Establishment Act of 
2007.'' Part of Delegate Norton's ``Free and Equal'' 
legislative series, the bill amended the ``District of Columbia 
Home Rule Act'' to establish an elected Office of the District 
Attorney for the District of Columbia. The newly created office 
would have the authority to represent the District government 
in the prosecution of all local and civil cases. Currently, the 
U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia performs both the 
federal and local prosecutor functions with respect to all 
adults charged with felonies.
    On July 15, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing to 
consider H.R. 5600, the ``District of Columbia Court, Offender 
Supervision, Parole, and Public Defender Employees Equity Act 
of 2008.'' The bill, which was introduced by Delegate Norton 
and Rep. Tom Davis, would permit certain former District 
employees who were transferred to the federal government after 
enactment of the Revitalization Act, to have periods of service 
performed prior to 1997 included as part of the years of 
service used to determine the time at which such employees 
would be eligible to retire under the Federal Employee 
Retirement System or the Civil Service Retirement System. The 
Subcommittee marked up H.R. 5600 on September 16, 2008, and 
adopted an amendment in the nature of a substitute that was 
offered by Chairman Danny K. Davis. The amendment added 
language to the original bill to ensure that all affected 
District employees would be covered by the measure.
    Delegate Norton introduced H.R. 6322, the ``Public Charter 
Schools Home Rule Act of 2008,'' to allow the District 
government to exercise authority over the Public Charter School 
Board in the same manner as the District government may 
exercise authority over other government entities. The 
Subcommittee marked up and approved the bill on July 15, 2008. 
The full Committee ordered the bill to be reported favorably by 
a voice vote on July 16, 2008.

2. Reports

    Reflecting the Subcommittee's longstanding interest in the 
diversity of the federal workforce and the SES corps in 
particular, the Subcommittee held a hearing on November 13, 
2007, on the underrepresentation of women and minorities in the 
senior executive service of legislative branch agencies. The 
hearing was based on a report titled ``Senior Executive 
Service: Women and Minorities are Underrepresented in Most 
Legislative Branch Agencies.'' The report, which was prepared 
by the Subcommittee staff for Chairman Davis, is the first 
report to examine the diversity of the SES, and SES equivalent 
positions, in legislative branch agencies.
    Among other things, the report found that the 
representation of minorities in the legislative branch SES has 
stagnated and the representation of women improved only 
slightly between FY 2002 and FY 2007. Also, the average total 
compensation for minorities and women in FY 2007 was less than 
their non-minority and male counterparts.

3. Subcommittee Proceedings

    Hearing on ``Federal Personnel Reforms'' (March 8, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Impact of the District of Columbia College 
Access Act on Higher Education in the District of Columbia'' 
(March 22, 2007).
    Business meeting to mark up H.R. 1124, District of Columbia 
College Access Act of 1999, and H.R. 1054, DC Legislative 
Autonomy (March 27, 2007).
    Briefing with Postal Rate Commission (April 11, 2007).
    Hearing on ``The U.S. Postal Service: 101'' (April 17, 
2007).
    Hearing on ``Ensuring Diversity at the Senior Levels of the 
Federal Government and the Postal Service'' (May 10, 2007).
    Joint House and Senate hearing on Personnel Reforms at the 
Government Accountability Office (May 22, 2007).
    Field hearing on Chicago Postal Delivery Issues (May 31, 
2007).
    Hearing on District of Columbia Autonomy (June 7, 2007).
    Subcommittee hosted OPM Briefing on Locality Pay in non-
foreign areas (June 28, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Ensuring a Merit-Based Employment System: An 
Examination of the Merit Systems Protection Board and the 
Office of Special Counsel'' (July 12, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Inquiring Minds Want to Know: What is the 
Postal Service Contracting Out?'' (July 19, 2007).
    Hearing on ``The Postal Service: Planning for the 21st 
Century, Infrastructure and Realignment'' (July 26, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Federal Pay Policies and Administration'' 
(July 31, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Federal Benefits: Are We Meeting 
Expectations?'' (August 2, 2007).
    Business meeting to mark up H.R. 2780 amended, (D. Davis 
amendment) Reemployed annuitants; H.R. 1236 amended, (Clay 
amendment) Breast Cancer Research; H.R. 3551, OSC and MSPB 
Reauthorization Bill (Jordan amendment failed); and H.R. 1110, 
Pretax premiums for health insurance (TRICARE) (September 18, 
2007).
    Hearing on ``Doing Time: Are DC Prisoners Adequately 
Prepared for Reentry?'' (October 16, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Will Increased Postal Rates Put Postal Mailers 
Out of Business?'' (October 30, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Telework: Breaking New Ground'' (November 6, 
2007).
    Hearing on ``Senior Executive Service Diversity at 
Legislative Branch Agencies'' (November 13, 2007).
    Hearing on ``Federal Agency Pay for Performance Systems'' 
(February 12, 2008).
    Business Meeting to mark up H.R. 4106--the ``Telework 
Improvement Act of 2007'' (February 28, 2008)
    Hearing on ``Implementation of the Postal Accountability 
Enhancement Act of 2006'' (February 28, 2008).
    Hearing on Federal Family Leave (March 6, 2008).
    Hearing on District of Columbia Parole and Revocation and 
District of Columbia Court Compensation (March 11, 2008). 
Included a hearing panel on H.R. 5551 and S. 550.
    Hearing on Government Accountability Office Personnel 
Reform Legislation (March 13, 2008).
    Business Meeting to mark up H.R. 5683--the ``Government 
Accountability Office Act of 2008'' (April 3, 2008).
    Joint House and Senate Hearing on Senior Executive Service 
Executive Branch and U.S. Postal Service Diversity (April 3, 
2008).
    Hearing on District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority 
General Oversight (April 5, 2008). Included a panel on H.R. 
5778--the ``District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority 
Independence Preservation Act.''
    Business Meeting to mark up H.R. 3774, the ``Senior 
Executive Service Diversity Assurance Act'' and H.R. 5718, the 
``Federal Employees Paid Parental Leave Act'' (April 15, 2008).
    Hearing on District Attorney for the District of Columbia 
(April 24, 2008).
    Hearing on Nonmailable Tobacco and Cooperative Mail and 
Charities (April 24, 2008).
    Business Meeting to mark up H.R. 5550, to ``increase the 
maximum age to qualify for coverage as a child under the health 
benefits program for federal employees'' and H. R. 5912, to 
``make cigarettes and certain other tobacco products 
nonmailable'' (April 29, 2008).
    Hearing on Thrift Savings Board Automatic Enrollment and L 
Fund Default (Hearing One) (April 29, 2008).
    Hearing on Raising the Age for Young Adult Dependent 
Coverage Under Federal Employee Health Benefits Program 
(Hearing Two) (April 29, 2008).
    Hearing on The Economics of Universal Mail (May 8, 2008).
    Hearing on Part-Time Reemployment of Federal Annuitants 
(May 20, 2008).
    Hearing on Federal Government Policies on Hiring Ex-
Offenders (June 10, 2008).
    Hearing on Locality Pay (June 24, 2008).
    Hearing on Thrift Savings Plan and Minority Contracting 
(July 10, 2008).
    Business Meeting to mark up H.R. 6322, the, ``Public 
Charter School Home Rule Act of 2008'' (July 15, 2008).
    Hearing on District of Columbia Court, Offender 
Supervision, Parole, and Public Defender Employees Equity Act 
of 2008 (July 15, 2008).
    Hearing on ``The Three R's of the Postal Network Plan: 
Realignment, Right-Sizing and Responsiveness'' (July 24, 2008).
    Hearing on the Hatch Act (September 11, 2008).
    Business Meeting to mark up H.R. 5600, the ``District of 
Columbia Court, Offender Supervision, Parole, and Public 
Defender Employees Equity Act of 2008'' (September 16, 2008).
    Hearing on Legislative Branch Inspector General Reports on 
Diversity (September 16, 2008).
    Hearing on ``2009 Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Benefit: 
What it Means for Federal Employees'' (December 3, 2008).

4. Resolutions and Postal Naming Measures

    During the 110th Congress, the Subcommittee received over 
370 referrals of resolutions and postal naming measures. The 
Committee marked up 123 resolutions and 106 postal namings.

        C. GOVERNMENT MANAGEMENT, ORGANIZATION, AND PROCUREMENT

    The Subcommittee on Government Management, Organizations, 
and Procurement has jurisdiction over the management of 
government operations, reorganizations of the executive branch, 
and federal procurement. Rep. Edolphus Towns served as Chairman 
and Rep. Brian Bilbray as Ranking Member in the 110th Congress.

1. Oversight

    9/ 11 Health Effects: Federal Monitoring and Treatment of 
Residents and Responders (February 28, 2007).
    The hearing continued from previous Congresses the 
Committee's oversight of the federally funded programs that 
medically monitor and treat individuals who were exposed to the 
toxins of Ground Zero following the terrorist attacks at the 
World Trade Center. The health effects attributable to the 
attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) were both immediate and 
long-term, and they are still not fully understood more than 
five years after the attacks. Hundreds of thousands of people-
including first responders from all 50 states, and area 
residents, office workers, and school children-may have been 
exposed to an array of dust, smoke and toxic pollutants. Two 
major federally funded programs provide medical monitoring and 
treatment to first-responders and others who participated in 
the WTC rescue, recovery and clean-up operations: the FDNY 
Monitoring and Treatment Program, which monitors and treats 
firefighters, emergency medical technicians, paramedics, 
officers and FDNY retirees, and the WTC Medical Monitoring and 
Treatment Program, for volunteers and area residents. Funding 
concerns limit the ability of the programs to monitor and treat 
health problems associated with exposure to the toxins of 
Ground Zero. The hearing reviewed how programs could be 
modified and expanded to provide health care to all responders 
who are ill from their work at Ground Zero.
    Witnesses: Dr. John Agwunobi, Assistant Secretary for 
Health, Department of Health and Human Services and Chair of 
HHS task force on 9/11 health issues; Dr. John Howard, 
Director, National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH), 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of 
Health and Human Services and Federal 9/11 Health Coordinator; 
Ms. Linda I. Gibbs, Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services, 
City of New York; Mr. Edward Skyler, Deputy Mayor for 
Administration, City of New York; Dr. Robin Herbert, Director, 
World Trade Center Medical Monitoring Program Data and 
Coordination Center, Mt. Sinai Hospital; Dr. Joan Reibman, 
Director, World Trade Center Environmental Health Center at 
Bellevue Hospital; Mr. Marvin Bethea, Paramedic and 9/11 
Responder, New York City; Mr. John Sferazo, Ironworker and 9/11 
Responder, New York City.
    Federal Financial Statements for FY 2006: Fiscal Outlook, 
Management Weaknesses and Consequences (March 20, 2007).
    The hearing reviewed issues that prevent the federal 
government from receiving a clean audit opinion. The Government 
Management Reform Act of 1994 (GMRA) requires all agencies 
covered by the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 to have 
agency-wide audited financial statements. For the purposes of 
government auditing, there are three types of audit opinions 
agencies can receive on their financial statements: 
unqualified, qualified, and disclaimer. An ``unqualified'' 
opinion is granted when an auditor has concluded that an 
agency's statements are free of error and present an accurate 
picture of assets, liabilities, and net position at the time of 
their submission. A ``qualified'' opinion is issued when an 
agency's statements were deemed satisfactory with the exception 
of a few specific instances that cannot be completely verified. 
Lastly, a ``disclaimer'' is issued in cases where the auditor 
cannot substantiate the financial statements of an agency using 
the supporting documentation provided. The financial reporting 
requirements of GMRA have prompted improvements in federal 
accountability. In fiscal year 1996, only 6 of the 23 CFO Act 
agencies received unqualified opinions. By comparison, 19 out 
of 24 CFO Act agencies received unqualified opinions for fiscal 
year 2006.
    Witnesses: The Honorable David M. Walker, Comptroller 
General of the United States, Government Accountability Office; 
The Honorable Linda Combs, Controller, Office of Management and 
Budget, Executive Office of the President; The Honorable James 
T. Campbell, Acting Chief Financial Officer, U.S. Department of 
Energy; Mr. William Maharay, Deputy Inspector General of Audit 
Services, U.S. Department of Energy; The Honorable David 
Norquist, Chief Financial Officer, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. James L. Taylor, Deputy Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security.
    Hearing on Tax Collection Bills (April 19, 2007).
    The Subcommittee held a hearing on two bills related to tax 
collection. H.R. 1870, the Contractor Tax Enforcement Act, 
would prohibit delinquent federal tax debtors from being 
eligible to contract with federal agencies. H.R. 1865 would 
authorize a pilot program for local governments to offset 
federal tax refunds to collect local tax debts. Contractors owe 
the federal government billions of dollars in delinquent taxes. 
GAO reported that roughly 33,000 civilian agency contractors 
owed over $3 billion in unpaid federal taxes as of September 
30, 2004. Another GAO report on tax abuses by contractors 
working for the Department of Defense (DOD), the largest 
purchaser of goods and services in the federal government, 
found that over 27,000 DOD contractors owed nearly $3 billion 
in unpaid taxes. The Contractor Tax Enforcement Act is designed 
to mandate that tax compliance be a prerequisite for receiving 
a federal contract. H.R. 1865 would create a pilot program 
allowing localities to collect past-due, legally enforceable 
tax debts through reduced federal tax refunds, similar to 
existing programs that offset federal refunds to collect unpaid 
state taxes and child support obligations. The hearing reviewed 
the policy goals and issues of administration for the 
legislative proposals.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Paul A. Denett, Administrator, 
Office of Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and 
Budget; The Honorable Russell George, Treasury Inspector 
General for Tax Administration, Internal Revenue Service; Mr. 
Gregory D. Kutz, Managing Director, Forensic Audits and Special 
Investigations, U.S. Government Accountability Office; The 
Honorable Mick Cornett, Mayor, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 
representing the U.S. Conference of Mayors; The Honorable 
Barbara Ford-Coates, Tax Collector, Sarasota County, Florida, 
representing the National Association of Counties and the 
National Association of County Treasurers and Finance Officers; 
Ms. Patricia Weth, Deputy Treasurer, on behalf of The Honorable 
Francis X. O'Leary, Treasurer, Arlington County, Virginia.
    9/ 11 Health Effects: Environmental Impacts for Residents 
and Responders (April 23, 2007).
    The hearing continued the Subcommittee's review of the 
federal response to the 9/11 attacks and implementation of 
federally funded programs. The collapse of the Twin Towers on 
September 11 released a massive dust cloud containing thousands 
of tons of coarse and fine particulate matter, cement dust, 
glass fibers, asbestos, lead, hydrochloric acid, and other 
toxic pollutants. This cloud traveled from Ground Zero across 
the East River and through Brooklyn and residents may have been 
exposed to an array of dust, smoke, and toxic pollutants. On 
September 18, 2001, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
announced that the air outside of Ground Zero was ``safe to 
breathe'' and that ``ambient air levels were unlikely to cause 
short-term or long-term health effects to the general 
population.'' EPA's initial evaluation concerning air safety 
was made in an environment of uncertainty and without 
``sufficient data and analyses,'' according to the EPA's Office 
of Inspector General. Consequently, the original residential 
testing and cleanup program did not include the Borough of 
Brooklyn, or other boroughs outside Manhattan. This hearing 
examined the scientific evidence of environmental contamination 
in Brooklyn and other boroughs, the potential health effects on 
area residents, steps taken by federal, state, and local 
governments, gaps in agency coordination, and potential next 
steps to ensure the health of New York residents and others.
    Witnesses: Hon. Yvonne Graham, Deputy Brooklyn Borough 
President; Mr. Kwai-Cheung Chan, former Assistant Inspector 
General for Program Evaluation, Environmental Protection 
Agency; Mr. David Newman, Industrial Hygienist, New York 
Committee for Occupational Safety and Health; Mr. Patrick 
Roohan, Director, Bureau of Program Quality, Information and 
Evaluation, New York State Department of Health; Dr. Anthony 
Szema, Assistant Professor of Medicine, SUNY-Stony Brook School 
of Medicine; Ms. Suzanne Mattei, Executive Director, Sierra 
Club of New York City; Mr. Peter Gudaitis, Executive Director, 
New York Disaster Interfaith Services.
    Hearing on H.R. 2635, The Carbon-Neutral Government Act of 
2007 (May 17, 2007).
    This hearing received testimony regarding the greenhouse 
gas emissions resulting from the operation of the federal 
government and how to reduce the federal government's 
contribution to global warming. H.R. 2635, the Carbon-Neutral 
Government Act, would require federal agencies to inventory 
their greenhouse gas emissions, freeze emissions in 2010, and 
then reduce net emissions over time to achieve zero emissions 
by 2050. The bill directs EPA to set annual government-wide 
emissions targets to achieve these reductions. It also requires 
agencies to develop plans to meet these targets and publicly 
report progress on implementing their plans and reducing 
emissions on an annual basis. The legislation requires existing 
facilities to benchmark their energy performance annually using 
the Energy Star for Buildings benchmarking tool, which is a 
simple process that shows how a building compares to similar 
buildings in its energy use. The bill further targets the 
efficiency of day-to-day operations by strengthening the 
requirements for procurement of energy efficient products and 
barring the General Services Administration (GSA) from listing 
inefficient products in GSA schedules in product categories 
where more efficient products are available.
    Witnesses: Ms. Emily Figdor, Director, Federal Global 
Warming Program, U.S. Public Interest Research Group; Mr. 
Jeffrey Harris, Vice President for Programs, Alliance to Save 
Energy; Mr. Marshall Purnell, FAIA, President-Elect, The 
American Institute of Architects.
    Federal IT Security: The Future for FISMA (June 7, 2007).
    The hearing reviewed the Federal Information Security 
Management Act (FISMA) and federal agency efforts to improve 
the security, integrity, and reliability of the federal 
government's information systems. In its FY 2006 report to 
Congress on FISMA implementation, OMB stated that progress was 
made in increasing the number of systems certified and 
accredited, but agencies demonstrated mixed results in 
upgrading the quality of their certification and accreditation 
processes. During FY 2006, agency Inspectors General identified 
and reported significant flaws in compliance efforts at 
specific agencies in several key areas. According to agency 
IGs, only 19 out of 25 agencies were reported to have an 
effective process in place to remedy identified security 
weaknesses or vulnerabilities. In addition, 9 out of 25 
agencies were rated as poor or failing in terms of maintaining 
a quality certification process for their systems. The hearing 
examined whether the measures used to report on FISMA 
compliance are providing adequate information for assessing 
agency security practices and whether new metrics should be 
developed to do a better job of identifying system 
vulnerabilities.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Karen S. Evans, Administrator, 
Office of E Government and Information Technology, Office of 
Management and Budget; Mr. Gregory C. Wilshusen, Director, 
Information Security Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Mr. Vance Hitch, Chief Information Officer, Department of 
Justice; Mr. Phil Bond, President and CEO, Information 
Technology Association of America; Mr. Paul Kurtz, Partner & 
Chief Operating Officer, Good Harbor Consulting, LLC; Mr. John 
W. Carlson, Executive Director, Financial Services Roundtable/
BITS; Mr. James Andrew Lewis, Director and Senior Fellow, 
Technology and Public Policy Program, Center for Strategic and 
International Studies.
    Inspectors General: Independence and Accountability (June 
20, 2007).
    The Inspector General Act of 1978 (IG Act) created 
independent offices in executive departments and agencies 
headed by Inspectors General. Inspectors General (IGs) serve as 
the principal watchdogs of the nation's major federal agencies 
and are responsible for conducting and supervising audits and 
investigations in an effort to prevent and detect fraud and 
abuse in their agencies' programs and operations. To 
effectively carry out their mission, Inspectors General must be 
independent and objective, which requires that they be 
insulated from improper management and political pressure. This 
hearing reviewed how IGs in federal departments and agencies 
can maintain independence from political pressure, whether IGs 
have the resources and authority required to fulfill their 
duties, and how IGs who fail to perform with integrity can be 
held accountable. The hearing also discussed H.R. 928, the 
Improving Government Accountability Act, sponsored by Rep. Jim 
Cooper. The Improving Government Accountability Act would 
strengthen the role of the IGs in providing independent 
oversight within federal agencies. It includes provisions for 
(1) a defined term of office for the IGs and conditions for 
removal, (2) IGs to submit their budgets directly to OMB and 
Congress, (3) the statutory establishment of a combined PCIE 
and ECIE Council, (4) changes in IG investigative and law 
enforcement authorities, and (5) the application of semiannual 
reporting requirements with respect to inspection reports and 
evaluation reports.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Clay Johnson, Deputy Director for 
Management, Office of Management and Budget, Executive Office 
of the President and Chair, President's Council on Integrity 
and Efficiency and Executive Council on Integrity and 
Efficiency; The Honorable Phyllis Fong, Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture and Chair, Legislation Committee, 
President's Council on Integrity and Efficiency; Ms. Christine 
Boss, Inspector General, National Science Foundation and Vice-
Chair, Executive Council on Integrity and Efficiency; The 
Honorable Eleanor Hill, former Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Defense; The Honorable Ken Mead, former Inspector 
General, U.S. Department of Transportation; The Honorable Nikki 
Tinsley, former Inspector General, Environmental Protection 
Agency; Mr. Jeffrey Steinhoff, Managing Director, Government 
Accountability Office; Ms. Vanessa Burrows, Congressional 
Research Service; Mr. Fred Kaiser, Congressional Research 
Service.
    Federal Contracting: Do Poor Performers Keep Winning? (July 
18, 2007).
    Using case studies at federal departments, this hearing 
explored the disconnect between the requirement to take past 
performance seriously and the minimal effects of a poor track 
record. The goal of the hearing was to explore what changes are 
needed so that government contracts are awarded to companies 
experienced in delivering results, not just experienced in 
getting government contracts. Federal agencies are required by 
statute to award contracts to a responsible source that has a 
satisfactory performance record and a satisfactory record of 
integrity and business ethics. In addition to the threshold 
qualification of responsibility, for major contracts the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requires contracting 
officers to consider past performance as part of the source 
selection process. However, cases suggest that poor performance 
often does not prevent contractors from receiving future work 
from the government, and that there is an apparent disconnect 
between actual contract performance, how performance reviews 
are calculated, and the weight given to past performance in the 
selection process for new contracts. The hearing reviewed 
contracts at the Department of Energy and Department of 
Homeland Security that were renewed or extended despite serious 
performance problems on existing contracts.
    Witnesses: Mr. William Woods, Director, Acquisition and 
Sourcing Management, Government Accountability Office; Mr. 
William Desmond, Associate Administrator, National Nuclear 
Security Administration, Department of Energy, accompanied by 
Mr. Tyler Przybylek, Senior Adviser to the Administrator, 
National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy; 
The Honorable Gregory Friedman, Inspector General, U.S. 
Department of Energy; Ms. Elaine Duke, Chief Procurement 
Officer, Department of Homeland Security; The Honorable Richard 
Skinner, Inspector General, Department of Homeland Security.
    9/11 Health Effects: The Screening and Monitoring of First 
Responders (September 10, 2007).
    This hearing updated the Subcommittee's previous hearings 
on health care for 9/11 responders with new reports from the 
Government Accountability Office and the New York City 
Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and discussed possible 
federal legislation to consolidate and fund screening and 
treatment programs. GAO updated an extensive study of 9/11 
health programs, finding that HHS programs for monitoring and 
treating 9/11 responders are not comprehensive and have been 
hindered by bureaucratic obstacles. GAO found that HHS's WTC 
Federal Responder Screening Program stopped scheduling 
screening examinations from January 2007 to May 2007 because 
there was a change in the administration of the WTC Federal 
Responder Screening Program, and certain interagency agreements 
were not established in a timely way to keep the program fully 
operational. In April 2006 the program also stopped scheduling 
and paying for specialty diagnostic services because a contract 
with the program's new provider network did not cover these 
services. Almost a year later, the contract was modified, and 
the program resumed scheduling and paying for these services in 
March 2007.
    Witnesses: Ms. Cynthia Bascetta, Director, Health Care, 
Government Accountability Office; Dr. Lorna Thorpe, Deputy 
Commissioner of Health, New York City Department of Health and 
Mental Hygiene, and Director, Division of Epidemiology; Dr. 
Spencer Eth, Senior Vice President and Medical Director, 
Behavioral Health Services, St. Vincent Medical Centers of New 
York; Mr. Thomas McHale, Detective, Port Authority of New York 
and New Jersey Police.
    Federal Contracting: Removing Hurdles for Minority-Owned 
Small Businesses (September 26, 2007).
    This hearing examined the 8(a) business development program 
and other contracting programs that are designed to assist 
small and disadvantaged business owners in accessing the 
federal marketplace. In May 2007, the House approved the Small 
Business Fairness in Contracting Act (H.R. 1873), which would 
increase the percentage of contracts awarded to small 
businesses to 25% and the government-wide procurement goal for 
small disadvantaged businesses from 5% to 8%. The Small 
Business Administration (SBA) is responsible for assisting 
executive branch agencies in the administration of federal 
procurement programs. Agency heads are responsible for 
achieving small business goals within their agencies. The 1978 
Small Business Act required all federal agencies with 
procurement powers to establish an Office of Small and 
Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) and appoint a 
director to head the office. The Act charges each agency's 
OSDBU director with promoting the interests of small and 
disadvantaged businesses pursuing federal contracts. Section 
15(k)(3) of the Small Business Act requires that OSDBU 
directors be responsible only to and report directly to agency 
heads or deputy agency heads. A GAO study found that nearly 
half of the OSDBU directors did not report directly to the 
agency head or deputy agency heads. Several OSDBU directors 
indicated that they reported to lower level agency officials. 
The hearing also discussed barriers embedded in the contracting 
process itself that can impede minority firms from winning 
government contracts.
    Witnesses: Mr. Calvin Jenkins, Deputy Associate 
Administrator, Office of Government Contracting and Business 
Development, U.S. Small Business Administration; Mr. Anthony 
Martoccio, Director, Office of Small Business Programs, 
Department of Defense; Mr. William B. Shear, Director, 
Financial Markets and Community Investment, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Mr. Preston Jay Waite, Deputy Director, 
U.S. Census Bureau; Mr. Michael L. Barrera, President & CEO, 
United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Mr. Damon 
Kinnebrew, Treasurer, Association of Minority Enterprises of 
New York; Ms. Allegra F. McCullough, Former SBA Associate 
Deputy Administrator, Government Contracting & Business 
Development; Mr. Anthony W. Robinson, President, Minority 
Business Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund.
    Technology for Secure Identity Documents (October 18, 
2007).
    This hearing examined the different technology options for 
identification documents, such as chips, security printing, and 
other commercially available technologies, to learn the 
relative levels of security that different technologies 
provide, as well as the costs and scalability associated with 
each. Identification documents issued by the federal and state 
governments vary widely in their format and in what data is 
included. Concerns about immigration, homeland security, and 
identity theft have prompted calls for more secure 
identification cards for use in everyday transactions such as 
boarding airplanes, opening bank accounts, and verifying 
employment eligibility. Multiple, overlapping programs exist at 
the federal and state levels to issue more secure 
identification documents. Federal government identity documents 
include passports; passport cards under the Western Hemisphere 
Travel Initiative; the Transportation Worker Identity 
Credential; immigration documents such as green cards, work 
permits, and border crossing cards for non-U.S. citizens; 
enhanced Social Security cards; the Common Access Card for 
Department of Defense personnel and contractors; and 
identification cards for federal employees and contractors 
required by Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12. At the 
state level, the federal REAL ID act sets minimum standards for 
state driver's licenses and identification cards, focusing on 
verification of identity documents during the issuance process. 
The various identity cards use different technologies to 
increase security. These technologies can be divided into two 
types--physical security features and information technology 
features. Selecting the best technology for secure 
identification often requires choices to be made among 
security, cost, and privacy. Cost and infrastructure concerns 
limit the widespread deployment of smart cards for everyday 
transactions. Without the proper infrastructure, smartcards do 
not provide added security without physical security features 
as well. Witnesses discussed the practical limitations in terms 
of logistics and cost of deploying the most advanced security 
features widely, along with the benefits and potential cost 
savings of high security documents.
    Witnesses: Ms. Kathy Kraninger, Director, Screening 
Coordination Office, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Benjamin M. Brink, Assistant Public Printer for Security and 
Intelligent Documents, Government Printing Office; Mr. David M. 
Temoshok, Director, Identity Policy and Management, Office of 
Government-wide Policy, General Services Administration; Ms. 
Bonnie Rutledge, Director, Vermont Department of Motor 
Vehicles; Ms. Kathryn K. Alsbrooks, Director, U.S. Federal 
Programs, Lasercard Corporation; Mr. Neville Pattinson, Vice 
President, Gemalto Inc., representing the Secure ID Coalition; 
Mr. Reed Stager, Digimarc Corporation, representing the 
Document Security Alliance.
    Too Many Cooks? Coordinating Federal and State Health IT 
(November 1, 2007).
    This hearing explored current federal, state, and local 
efforts to transform the health care landscape using health IT 
and how agencies and stakeholders can coordinate to meet the 
needs of our nation's most vulnerable populations. Legislative 
efforts on health IT date back to 2001, when the Senate 
proposed Health Information Exchange (HIE) grants for hospitals 
and nursing homes and reimbursement to hospitals for costs 
incurred to develop IT systems. In 2003, the Medicare 
Modernization Act (MMA) required the Secretary of Health and 
Human Services to adopt electronic prescription standards and 
establish a Commission for Systemic Interoperability. MMA also 
included a provision to invest in infrastructure for 
transmitting clinical data to improve outcomes in selected 
high-risk populations. In past Congresses, health IT bills have 
passed either one body or the other, but haven't been enacted 
into law. Federal contracts have been awarded to six states to 
support state and regional data sharing, coordinate state and 
local health IT, and demonstrate improvements in health quality 
and safety. States recognize that health IT will require 
significant upfront investments, with over half of state 
leaders saying that funding will be a challenge. Another 
primary concern about the adoption of health IT is how 
standards should be adopted and how current grants and 
contracts facilitate the connection between health IT and 
reducing health disparities. Other challenges addressed 
included privacy of personal health information and the 
historical distrust of federal and state health initiatives by 
minority populations, and the resistance by patients from low-
income backgrounds, or who are limited English proficient to 
identifying themselves to federal programs.
    Witnesses: Dr. Robert M. Kolodner, National Coordinator for 
Health Information Technology, Department of Health and Human 
Services; Ms. Cheryl Austein Casnoff, Associate Administrator, 
Office of Health Information Technology, Health Resources 
Services Administration; Dr. Carolyn M. Clancy, Director, 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; Ms. Christine 
Bechtel, Vice President of Public Policy & Government 
Relations, eHealth Initiative; Dr. Winston Price, Chair, Health 
IT and Transparency Advisory Board, State of Georgia; Ms. Lori 
Evans, Deputy Commissioner for Health IT Transformation, State 
of New York; Dr. Farzad Mostashari, Assistant Commissioner, 
Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, City of New York; Dr. 
Neil Calman, President, The Institute for Urban Family Health.
    9/11 Health Effects: Why Did HHS Cancel Contracts for 
Responder Health Care? (January 22, 2008).
    This hearing continued the Subcommittee's oversight of 
management and contracting for health care for police, fire and 
recovery workers who responded to the attacks on the World 
Trade Center on September 11, 2001. On October 23, 2007, the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a 
request for proposals to create a World Trade Center Business 
Process Center. Proposals were due on December 19, 2007. On 
December 13, 2007, CDC abruptly cancelled the solicitation. A 
procurement official from CDC claimed that the solicitation was 
cancelled due to cost concerns, even though bids that would 
estimate costs had not yet been submitted. The hearing 
questioned why the solicitation was suddenly canceled and 
examined the serious adverse impact of delays on the program, 
particularly for responders living outside of the NYC area.
    Witnesses: Dr. Jim Melius, Chair, Advisory Board, WTC 
Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program; Ms. Cynthia Bascetta, 
Director, Health Care, Government Accountability Office; Mr. 
Kevin Mount, retired heavy equipment operator, NYC Department 
of Sanitation, currently a Florida resident; Mr. Joseph 
Libretti, ironworker, Local 580, currently a Pennsylvania 
resident; Mr. Frank Fraone, Operations Chief, Menlo Park, CA 
Fire Department.
    Military Base Realignment: Contracting Opportunities for 
Impacted Communities (February 8, 2008).
    A major vehicle for achieving cost savings is the 
consolidation of defense facilities, which has periodically 
been done through the base realignment and closure process 
(BRAC). This hearing examined whether BRAC contracting 
opportunities are accruing to small, local, veteran-owned, or 
minority-owned businesses, and whether state and local 
governments have input into contracts awarded in their 
communities. Federal contracts for the renovation, expansion, 
and construction of DOD facilities are awarded by the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers and Naval Facilities Engineering Command. 
Cost estimates to implement BRAC have increased from $21 
billion to $31 billion. There are presently three million 
veteran small business owners. Although Congress has enacted a 
governmentwide procurement goal of 3% for service-disabled 
veteran-owned businesses (SDVOBs), every year since that law 
has been in place the Department of Defense has failed to meet 
it. For FY 2006, the SBA reported that DOD awarded 0.67% of 
contracts to service-disabled veteran-owned firms. The hearing 
reviewed planning to fully extend business opportunities to 
small and minority business contractors, especially veteran-
owned businesses.
    Witnesses: Mr. Timothy Foreman, Director, Office of Small 
and Disadvantaged Business Utilization, Secretary of the Navy; 
Ms. Tracey Pinson, Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged 
Business Utilization, Secretary of the Army; Ms. Luwanda 
Jenkins, Special Secretary, Governor's Office of Minority 
Affairs, State of Maryland; Mr. Hubert Green, President, Prince 
George's County Black Chamber of Commerce; Mr. John Watkins, 
President, Ingenium Corporation; Mr. Rick Weidman, Executive 
Director, Policy & Government Affairs, Vietnam Veterans of 
America.
    Surplus Property: Improving Donation and Sales Programs 
(February 13, 2008).
    This hearing reviewed GSA rulemaking on surplus property 
transfer programs and H.R. 752, the Federal Electronic 
Equipment Donation Act of 2007. This bill, sponsored by Rep. 
G.K. Butterfield, directs the GSA to give highest preference to 
schools, local governments, and other qualifying recipients 
located in Enterprise Communities and Empowerment Zones (EC/EZ) 
when transferring surplus computers and related equipment. The 
language in this bill draws largely from Executive Order 12999, 
titled ``Educational Technology: Ensuring Opportunity for All 
Children in the Next Century.'' H.R. 752 requires the GSA to 
give highest preference to EZ or EC recipients when 
transferring the equipment. Witnesses testified on the 
efficiency of existing processes and proposed changes.
    Witnesses: Ms. Becky Rhodes, Deputy Associate 
Administrator, General Services Administration; Ms. Estelle 
Sanders, Mayor, Town of Roper, North Carolina; Mr. Shane 
Bailey, President, National Association of State Agencies for 
Surplus Property; Mr. John Rosenthall, President, Small Towns 
Alliance; Mr. Thomas Williams, President, National Auctioneers 
Association.
    Federal IT Security: A Review of H.R. 4791 (February 14, 
2008).
    This hearing reviewed the 2002 Federal Information Security 
Management Act (FISMA) and federal agency efforts to improve 
the security, integrity, and reliability of the federal 
government's information systems. In addition, the hearing 
focused on legislation introduced by Chairman Clay and Chairman 
Towns that will amend FISMA by establishing new agency 
requirements for securing personal or sensitive data. FISMA 
reauthorized and strengthened provisions in the Government 
Information Security Reform Act that require federal agencies 
to identify and minimize potential risks to the security of 
their information and information systems. According to CRS, 
agencies reporting incidents of potentially compromised data 
during FY 2006 included the Departments of Veterans Affairs, 
Transportation, and Energy, and the Internal Revenue Service. 
H.R. 4791, the Federal Agency Data Protection Act, would 
strengthen current requirements for protecting sensitive data 
that is stored or transmitted by federal agency systems. The 
bill would amend FISMA by adding several new information 
security policies and procedures for OMB, agencies, and agency 
contractors.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Karen S. Evans, Administrator, 
Office of E-Government and Information Technology, Office of 
Management and Budget; Mr. Gregory C. Wilshusen, Director, 
Information Security Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Mr. Alan Paller, Director of Research, SANS Institute; Mr. 
Bruce McConnell, President, McConnell International, LLC; Mr. 
Tim Bennett, President, Cyber Security Industry Alliance.
    Federal Security: ID Cards and Background Checks (April 9, 
2008).
    This hearing examined Homeland Security Presidential 
Directive 12 (HSPD-12), which requires all federal employees 
and contractors to undergo background checks and to use a 
standardized identification card. To standardize the federal 
government's use of identification cards, the directive 
requires the creation of a federal standard for secure IDs, to 
be issued to employees following background checks; that these 
IDs be used to gain physical access to federal facilities and 
logical access to federal information systems with the use of 
electronic authentication; and that these IDs be interoperable 
across the entire federal government. This hearing reviewed 
OMB's performance issuing policies and guidance and ensuring 
compliance of HSPD-12. GAO found that agencies have made 
progress in completing the necessary background checks for 
employees, but the HSPD-12 program is incurring high costs.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Karen Evans, Administrator for E-
Government and Information Technology, Office of Management and 
Budget; Ms. Kathy Dillaman, Associate Director of 
Investigations, Office of Personnel Management; Ms. Linda 
Koontz, Director, Information Management Issues, Government 
Accountability Office, accompanied by Ms. Brenda Farrell, 
Director, Defense Capabilities and Management, Government 
Accountability Office; Mr. Michael Sade, Acting Deputy 
Assistant Commissioner for Integrated Technology Service, 
Federal Acquisition Service, General Services Administration; 
Mr. Thomas Wiesner, Deputy Chief Information Officer, Office of 
the Assistant Secretary for Administration and Management, 
Department of Labor; Mr. Robert Zivney, Vice President, 
Marketing, Hirsch Electronics, representing the Security 
Industry Association; Mr. Benjamin Romero, Chair, Information 
Technology Association of America Security Clearance Reform 
Task Group, representing the Security Clearance Reform 
Coalition.
    Hearing on H.R. 5712 & H.R. 5787 (April 15, 2008).
    This legislative hearing reviewed H.R. 5712, the Close the 
Contractor Fraud Loophole Act, and H.R. 5787, the Federal Real 
Property Disposal Enhancement Act. H.R. 5712 would revise 
regulations requiring contractors that discover fraud to report 
it to appropriate government authorities to remove an exemption 
to the reporting requirement for contracts performed overseas. 
The hearing examined how such an exemption came to be proposed 
in regulations, in light of extensive evidence of fraud in 
overseas contracting, especially in Iraq and Afghanistan. H.R. 
5787, the Federal Real Property Disposal Enhancement Act, 
reforms the law governing federal surplus land to give agencies 
incentives to sell or otherwise dispose of unneeded property. 
Under existing law, funds from the sale of surplus real and 
related personal property by the General Services 
Administration are returned to the Treasury. H.R. 5787 would 
allow agencies to retain all of the proceeds from the sale of 
surplus property. The agencies may only use these funds for 
real property capital improvements and disposal activities, 
subject to appropriations.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Paul Denett, Administrator for 
Federal Procurement Policy, Office of Management and Budget; 
Mr. Barry Sabin, Deputy Assistant Attorney General, Criminal 
Division, U.S. Department of Justice; Mr. David Drabkin, Acting 
Chief Acquisition Officer and Senior Procurement Executive, 
General Services Administration; Ms. Colleen Preston, Executive 
Vice President, Professional Services Council.
    Management of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture (May 14, 2008).
    Discrimination in the delivery of services to minority and 
limited-resource farmers and the treatment of minority 
employees at the USDA is a longstanding problem that resulted 
in a multi-billion dollar settlement of a class-action 
discrimination suit by black farmers. In light of the USDA's 
history of civil rights abuses, Congress enacted legislation 
intended to end discriminatory practices within the Department. 
The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights (ASCR) 
was created in March 2003 to provide overall leadership and 
coordination of all civil rights programs across the 
Department. This hearing reviewed the USDA's implementation of 
this latest reorganization and management of the agency's civil 
rights enforcement. According to GAO, the ASCR repeatedly 
withheld access to certain records, instructed employees not to 
cooperate with GAO, and actually forced GAO investigators to 
depart from USDA premises when GAO was seeking to interview 
USDA employees as part of its review. GAO was later permitted 
to conduct interviews when accompanied by USDA Inspector 
General. Although Congress instituted a series of reforms to 
ensure the Office of Civil Rights was given resources, 
autonomy, and authority, delays in processing discrimination 
complaints and the lack of diversity among county-level 
officials remain a problem within the USDA. The hearing 
questioned whether there has been any improvement in the 
management of the USDA's civil rights programs.
    Witnesses: Mr. John Boyd, President, National Black Farmers 
Association; Ms. Lesa Donnelly, Adviser for Women's Issues, 
USDA Coalition of Minority Employees; Mr. Lupe Garcia, 
President, Hispanic Farmers and Ranchers of America, Inc.; Mr. 
Phil Givens, President, Phil Givens Company, representative of 
Native American farmers; Mr. Lawrence Lucas, President, USDA 
Coalition of Minority Employees; The Honorable Margo McKay, 
Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of 
Agriculture; The Honorable Phyllis Fong, Inspector General, 
U.S. Department of Agriculture; Ms. Lisa Shames, Director, 
Agriculture and Food Safety, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office.
    Oversight of Federal Financial Management (June 3, 2008).
    The hearing examined the results of GAO's audit of the 
federal government's consolidated financial statement (CFS) for 
the fiscal year ending in 2007. The Government Management 
Reform Act of 1994 (GMRA) requires all agencies covered by the 
Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 to have agency-wide 
audited financial statements beginning in fiscal year 1996. For 
the purposes of government auditing, there are three types of 
audit opinions agencies can receive on their financial 
statements: unqualified, qualified, and disclaimer. An 
``unqualified'' opinion is granted when an auditor has 
concluded that an agency's statements are free of error and 
present an accurate picture of assets, liabilities, and net 
position at the time of their submission. A ``qualified'' 
opinion is issued when an agency's statements were deemed 
satisfactory with the exception of a few specific instances 
that cannot be completely verified. Lastly, a ``disclaimer'' is 
issued in cases where the auditor cannot substantiate the 
financial statements of an agency using the supporting 
documentation provided. For fiscal year 2007, 19 of the 24 
agencies received unqualified audit opinions. The hearing also 
reviewed compliance with the Improper Payments Information Act 
of 2002 (IPIA). The IPIA requires annual reviews of all agency 
programs that may be susceptible to improper payments, but a 
GAO review in 2007 indicates that not all agencies reported 
conducting risk assessments.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Gene L. Dodaro Acting Comptroller 
General of the United States, Government Accountability Office; 
Mr. Daniel Werfel, Acting Controller, Office of Management and 
Budget, Executive Office of the President; The Honorable J. 
David Patterson, Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller), Department of Defense.
    ID Cards: Reissuing Border Crossing Cards (June 25, 2008).
    The State Department and the Department of Homeland 
Security's Citizenship and Immigration Services agency issue 
the Border Crossing Card (BCC) to Mexican nationals who are 
frequent visitors to the United States. Between 2008 and 2012, 
the State Department projects that 5.75 million BCCs will 
expire and need to be replaced, creating increased demand for 
renewals. The hearing examined the steps the State Department 
is taking to meet demand, including hiring temporary consular 
staff and contracting with the private sector for application 
intake. The hearing also reviewed questions about the physical 
security of the card.
    Witnesses: Mr. Tony Edson, Acting Principal Deputy 
Assistant Secretary, U.S. Department of State; Ms. Colleen M. 
Manaher, Director, Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, 
Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Department of Homeland 
Security; Mr. Jess Ford, Director, International Affairs and 
Trade, Government Accountability Office; Mr. Aaron Fuller, 
President, Computer Sciences Corporation, Inc.; Mr. Rick 
Patrick, Senior Vice President for Federal Programs, L-1 
Identity Solutions, Inc.; Mr. William T. Alsbrooks, former 
Group Vice President, Information Systems Credential Technology 
Group, General Dynamics.
    Management of the Digital TV Transition: Is New York City 
Prepared? (July 18, 2008).
    On February 17, 2009, television stations nationwide will 
turn off their analog broadcasts and will broadcast only in 
digital format. The Subcommittee reviewed management of federal 
programs to assist with the transition, including controls over 
a program to issue vouchers to citizens to purchase converter 
boxes. The hearing examined the impact of the transition and 
outreach to heavily-impacted neighborhoods in New York City.
    Witnesses: Mr. Bill Ritter, Anchor, WABC-TV, New York, NY; 
Mr. Mark Lloyd, Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, 
Leadership Conference on Civil Rights; The Honorable Meredith 
Attwell Baker, Acting Assistant Secretary for Communications 
and Information, National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration, Department of Commerce; Ms. Monica Shah Desai, 
Chief of the Media Bureau, Federal Communications Commission.
    Passing the Baton: Preparing for the Presidential 
Transition (September 24, 2008).
    The hearing assessed preparations for the presidential 
transition and reviewed expert research on federal executive 
management challenges surrounding the transition. GAO 
highlighted executive management challenges that they believe 
the incoming Administration will need to confront from the 
first days of its term. These include oversight of financial 
institutions, the ongoing operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, 
DOD and DHS readiness, the 2010 census, and other high-risk 
areas.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Clay Johnson, Deputy Director for 
Management, Office of Management and Budget; The Honorable Gene 
L. Dodaro, Acting Comptroller General of the United States, 
Government Accountability Office; Ms. Gail Lovelace, Chief 
Human Capital Officer, General Services Administration; Dr. 
Martha Kumar, Professor, Department of Political Science, 
Towson University; Ms. Doris Hausser, National Academy of 
Public Administration; Dr. Don Kettl, Professor, Fels Institute 
of Government, University of Pennsylvania; Ms. Patricia 
McGinnis, President and CEO, Council for Excellence in 
Government.

2. Legislation

    During the 110th Congress, 13 bills originating in the 
Government Management Subcommittee were passed in the House of 
Representatives, with six becoming law.
    The following bills were signed into law, either as 
standalone bills or through inclusion in other legislation:
     H.R. 928, Inspector General Reform Act of 2008 
(Rep. Cooper), which enhances the effectiveness and 
independence of Inspectors General, who are the principal 
watchdogs of federal programs.
     H.R. 3033, Contractors and Federal Responsibility 
Act (Rep. Maloney), which creates a comprehensive, centralized 
database that lists civil, criminal and administrative 
proceedings concluded by federal and state governments against 
federal contractors and grantees.
     H.R. 3179, Local Preparedness Acquisition Act 
(Rep. Towns), which allows state and local governments to 
purchase homeland security equipment using the federal 
government's pre-negotiated favorable pricing.
     H.R. 3928, Government Contractor Accountability 
Act (Reps. Christopher Murphy and Welch), which requires any 
company or organization receiving 80% or more of their revenue 
from federal contracts to disclose the salaries of their most 
highly-compensated officers.
     H.R. 5712, Close the Contractor Fraud Loophole Act 
(Rep. Welch), which closes a loophole in a proposed rule so 
that mandatory fraud reporting requirements would apply to U.S. 
contractors working overseas as well as to contractors working 
here at home.
     H.R. 6073 (Rep. Foxx), to provide that federal 
employees receiving their pay by electronic funds transfer 
shall be given the option of receiving their pay stubs 
electronically.
    The following bills passed the House:
     H.R. 180, Darfur Accountability and Divestment Act 
of 2007 (Rep. Lee), which requires disclosure of investments 
and business interests in certain industries in Sudan.
     H.R. 404, Federal Customer Service Enhancement Act 
(Rep. Cueller), which requires the establishment and 
enforcement of customer service standards for federal agencies.
     H.R. 752, Federal Electronic Equipment Donation 
Act (Rep. Butterfield), which directs federal agencies to 
transfer excess computer equipment to local schools and 
educational nonprofits.
     H.R. 4881, Contracting and Tax Accountability Act 
(Reps. Ellsworth and Towns), which withholds most federal 
contracts from companies that are delinquent on their federal 
taxes.
     H.R. 5787, Federal Real Property Disposal 
Enhancement Act of 2008 (Rep. Moore), which requires GSA to 
identify and dispose of excess properties, evaluate disposal 
costs and benefits, and prioritize disposal decisions based on 
agency missions and anticipated future need for holdings.
     H.R. 6113, Paperwork Assistance Act (Rep. Boyda), 
which requires a federal agency to include on all government 
forms a website and telephone number for questions about the 
form.
     H.R. 6406 (Rep. Larson), to elevate the Inspector 
General of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to a 
presidentially-appointed, Senate-confirmed position.

          D. INFORMATION POLICY, CENSUS, AND NATIONAL ARCHIVES

    The Subcommittee on Information Policy, Census, and 
National Archives has jurisdiction over public information and 
records laws such as the Freedom of Information Act, the 
Presidential Records Act, and the Federal Advisory Committee 
Act, the Census Bureau, and the National Archives and Records 
Administration. Rep. William Lacy Clay served as Chairman and 
Rep. Michael Turner as Ranking Member during the 110th 
Congress.

1. Oversight

            a. Census
                (1) Budget Issues
    A substantial part of the Subcommittee's oversight 
activities involved the Census Bureau and plans for the 2010 
Census. The Subcommittee interacted with the Census Bureau on a 
myriad of issues during both sessions of the 110th Congress. 
The Subcommittee paid particular attention to budget issues as 
they affected Census preparations.
    Congress has routinely exempted the Census from the flat-
line funding requirements of a Continuing Resolution (CR) in 
other years, most notably in 1998 and 1999 prior to Census 
2000. On October 7, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
entitled ``Critical Budget Issues Affecting the 2010 Census'' 
to bring into focus what would happen if the Administration did 
not request an exemption from a flat-line CR for the Census 
Bureau. The objective was to take clear steps to insure that:
     There would be no scaling back, cancellation or 
delay in the Dress Rehearsal as planned.
     Nothing in the CR language would hinder, delay or 
deny the planned funding and execution of the contracts for the 
handheld computers, the advertising program, the partnership 
program, or the data capture program.
     That OMB would use every means necessary to grant 
Bureau of the Census officials any waivers or exemptions from 
Administration spending restrictions in order for them to meet 
these goals.
    Census Bureau officials made it clear that a CR which did 
not exempt the Census would have significant, negative 
consequences for the intricate decade-long plan for the 2010 
Census. Administration witnesses emphasized that without such 
language, a CR would dramatically jeopardize the accuracy, 
cost, and coverage of the 2010 Census.
    Despite the efforts of the Subcommittee in FY 2008, the 
Continuing Resolution (CR) passed without an exemption and the 
Bureau had to cancel various aspects of its dress rehearsal. In 
FY 2009, the Bureau was facing the same funding shortfalls and 
risking further problems with the planning and implementation 
of the 2010 Census. The Subcommittee, with the assistance of 
the full Committee and congressional leadership, successfully 
persuaded the Administration to request an exemption for FY 
2009 Continuing Resolution and the 2010 Census was spared 
further harm from the budget process.
                (2) Field Data Collection Automation
    The Subcommittee was very active in its oversight of the 
Field Data Collection Automation (FDCA) system. The 
Subcommittee monitored the Bureau's progress constantly 
regarding FDCA. This involved regular briefings from Census, 
GAO, and the contractors and consultants involved with the FDCA 
system. Some of the results of this oversight are discussed 
chronologically below.
    In April 2006, the Census Bureau entered into a contract 
with the Harris Corporation to develop an FDCA system. Under 
the contract, Harris was supposed to build handheld computers 
for data collection in two phases: address canvassing prior to 
the census and non-response follow-up as part of the census 
process, as well as provide support for the field operations. 
The contract was a cost-plus contract with an initial estimated 
value of $600 million. GAO issued warnings about the state of 
the FDCA project in April 2007 testimony before Congress, 
cautioning that inadequate contract management could lead to 
cost-overruns and inadequate performance of the handheld 
computers. According to GAO, the Census Bureau's actions 
``raised serious questions about the Bureau's preparations for 
conducting the 2010 Census. GAO recommended numerous corrective 
actions to address the risks associated with the 2010 Census, 
but many of them were not implemented.
    Around the same time, the Census Bureau asked a private 
consultant, the MITRE Corporation, to assess the FDCA program 
and Harris Corporation's progress in meeting the contract's 
goals. MITRE delivered its report to the Census Bureau in June 
2007, underscoring GAO's findings that the FDCA contract was 
off track.
    In December 2007 testimony, GAO reiterated what it had been 
saying now for several years, again raising concerns about the 
viability of the handheld technology and the Census Bureau's 
ability to manage the risks threatening the FDCA project.
    In March 2008, GAO designated the 2010 Census as a high-
risk area that warranted immediate attention as a result of the 
Census Bureau's failure to strengthen its systems testing and 
risk management activities, define performance requirements for 
the handheld computers, and develop a comprehensive plan to 
control its costs and manage operations. According to GAO, the 
Census Bureau's actions ``raised serious questions about the 
Bureau's preparations for conducting the 2010 Census.
    With the full Committee, the Subcommittee held joint 
hearings in April and June 2008, continuing to urge the Census 
Bureau, the Commerce Department, and the Bush Administration to 
recognize and move forward on the recommendations of the GAO 
and MITRE Corporation.
    Due to this serious mismanagement, the Census Bureau was 
forced to abandon its plans for the handheld computers to 
gather data from households that did not mail in their census 
forms, or non response follow-up (NRFU), and to revert to a 
paper census. These changes will cost the taxpayer up to $3 
billion. For years, the Government Accountability Office and 
other auditors raised concerns about the Census Bureau's 
management of the contract. But the Census Bureau failed to 
respond to these concerns with any sense of leadership or 
urgency.
    When the Bureau decided to abandon its plans to use the 
handheld computers for NRFU, they had to rework their contract 
with Harris Corporation. Although the original cost estimate 
for the reworked contract was $1.3 billion, following stringent 
oversight by the Subcommittee and full Committee the final cost 
was reduced to approximately $800 million, saving taxpayers 
$500 million.
    Throughout the 110th Congress, the Subcommittee held 
numerous oversight hearings on many different aspects of the 
2010 Census. The Subcommittee supplemented these risk 
management hearings continually with meetings and briefings 
with Census, GAO, and the contractors and consultants regarding 
many issues. Subjects examined included Census preparations; 
Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA); dress rehearsal; group 
quarters; SIPP (Survey on Income and Program Participation); 
community partnerships; Census undercount; Census in schools; 
Census data and its use in the development process; 
recruitment, hiring and training a diverse workforce; 
communications campaign; and U.S. Territories' Census data.
            b. Information Policy
    Chairman Clay submitted and received responses to questions 
submitted to the Honorable Jim Nussle, Director of the Office 
of Management and Budget on June 12, 2008, regarding improving 
federal statistics on disability that stemmed from the hearing 
on June 4, 2008. OMB agreed to include the six disability 
questions from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey 
(ACS) in all federal surveys that request data about race, sex, 
age and ethnicity, including the American Housing Survey (AHS). 
They will also suggest that the ACS disability questions be 
considered as part of the redesigned survey and will study 
which other surveys would be appropriate to have the disability 
questions.
    The Subcommittee also examined how well the Department of 
Homeland Security is fulfilling its role as the leading federal 
agency charged with coordinating response and recovery efforts 
in the event of a major Internet disruption. In addition, the 
Subcommittee reviewed the roles and responsibilities of private 
sector stakeholders in the development of Internet recovery 
plans and heard their recommendations for improving the 
nation's cyber security policy framework.
    Further, the Subcommittee examined issues relating to the 
protection of patient privacy and the establishment of a 
framework for a uniform national health privacy standard. The 
subcommittee also provided oversight to review the integrity of 
Electronic Voting Systems.
            c. National Historical Publications and Records Commission
    The Subcommittee conducted oversight over the National 
Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), the 
grant-making arm of the National Archives and Records 
Administration (NARA). NHPRC was targeted in the President's 
proposed FY 2009 budget for zero funding for grants and zero 
funding for staff to administer the agency and its programs. 
For FY 2009, the Subcommittee supported full funding for 
national grants, for staffing, and other administrative costs.
    On March 11, 2008, Chairman Clay sought to increase the 
funding of the NHPRC with H.R. 5582, which would authorize 
appropriations for the National Historical Publications and 
Records Commission for FY2010-FY2014 at $20 million per year. 
The bill sought to increase funding by $10 million over 
existing funding. Although the re-authorization was not enacted 
in this Congress, the Subcommittee was able to include 
authorization for funding to establish a national database for 
records of servitude, emancipation and post Civil War 
Reconstruction in S. 3477, which passed in the House on 
September 27, 2008.
            d. FOIA
    Chairman Clay introduced H.R. 1309, the Freedom of 
Information Act Amendments of 2007, which provided a bipartisan 
approach to streamlining the FOIA process and increasing 
transparency in government. Two key provisions within the OPEN 
Government Act include expanding access to attorney's fees for 
citizens who successfully challenge an agency's denial of 
information, along with the creation of a new FOIA tracking 
system for pending requests. In addition, the Act requires 
agencies to disclose the type of FOIA exemptions used to redact 
specific information sought after in many requests. Lastly, the 
bill will establish a government-wide ombudsman to help reduce 
the number of requests that are eventually resolved through 
costly and time-consuming litigation. This bill passed in 2007 
and was signed into law in December, 2007.
    The Subcommittee also examined the plans for the structure 
and function of the government-wide ombudsman, the Office of 
Government Information Services (OGIS), which is charged with 
reviewing the FOIA policies and procedures of administrative 
agencies to make sure they are in compliance with the new law. 
Congress placed OGIS within the National Archives and Record 
Administration to serve as an impartial mediator to resolve 
disputes between FOIA requestors and administrative agencies. 
The Subcommittee provided the U.S. Archivist with an 
opportunity to share his strategic plan to implement the law 
and establish OGIS. The Subcommittee also heard from the open 
government community about how to structure a highly functional 
office that will make FOIA work more effectively.
            e. FISMA
    The Subcommittee reviewed the 2002 Federal Information 
Security Management Act (FISMA) and federal agency efforts to 
improve security, integrity, and reliability of the federal 
government's information systems. In addition the Subcommittee 
examined whether the information assurance activities of 
private sector entities, including their cyber security best 
practices, would be appropriate. Chairman Clay, along with 
Chairman Waxman and Subcommittee on Government Management, 
Organization and Procurement Chairman Towns, spearheaded the 
passage of H.R. 4791, the Federal Agency Data Protection Act. 
This measure amended FISMA by establishing new agency 
requirements for securing personal or sensitive data. The 
inquiries were coordinated with the Subcommittee on Government 
Management, Organization and Procurement and the full 
Committee.

2. Legislation

    H.R. 1309. Chairman Wm. Lacy Clay introduced, with 
Committee Chairman Waxman and Rep. Platts, the Freedom of 
Information Act Amendments of 2007. H.R. 1309 provides a 
bipartisan approach to streamlining the FOIA process and 
increasing transparency in government. Two key provisions 
within the Act include expanding access to attorney's fees for 
citizens who successfully challenge an agency's denial of 
information, along with the creation of a new FOIA tracking 
system for pending requests. In addition, the Act requires 
agencies to disclose the type of FOIA exemptions used to redact 
specific information sought after in many requests. Lastly, the 
bill will establish a governmentwide ombudsman to help reduce 
the number of requests that are eventually resolved through 
costly and time-consuming litigation. H.R. 1309 was passed by 
the House in March 2007. On December 18, 2007, the House passed 
a substantially similar bill, the OPEN Government Act of 2007 
(S. 2488), which was signed by President Bush on December 31, 
2007.
    H.R. 4791. This bill was introduced by Chairman Clay along 
with Chairman Waxman and Chairman Towns and passed the House on 
June 3, 2008. This bill strengthens requirements for ensuring 
the effectiveness of information security controls over 
information resources that support federal operations and 
assets. The bill amends tile 44 of the United States Code as 
follows:
     Defines ``personally identifiable information'' as 
any information about an individual maintained by a federal 
agency, including information about the individual's education, 
finances, medical, criminal, or employment history, that can be 
used to distinguish or trace such individual's identity or that 
is otherwise linked or linkable to the individual.
     Includes within the information security duties of 
the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and 
requires agencies to update their information security programs 
including requirements for maintaining a current inventory of 
such systems, implementing information security requirements 
for mobile digital devices maintaining or transmitting such 
information, and developing, implementing, and overseeing 
remediation plans to address vulnerabilities in information 
security protections.
     Requires the Director to report to Congress a 
summary of information security breaches reported by agencies 
to the Director and the federal information security incident 
center.
     Requires the Director to oversee the establishment 
of policies, procedures, and standards for agencies to follow 
in the event of a breach involving the disclosure of personally 
identifiable information
     Requires agency heads to delegate to their Chief 
Information Officer the authority to ensure compliance and to 
enforce information security requirements, including developing 
and maintaining an inventory of personal computers, laptops or 
hardware containing personally identifiable information.
     Requires agencies to include in their information 
security programs: procedures for notifying individuals whose 
personally identifiable information may have been compromised 
or accessed following a breach; and procedures for the timely 
reporting of breaches involving personally identifiable 
information.
     Includes among functions of Chief Human Capital 
Officers the prescription of policies and procedures for exit 
interviews of employees, including a full accounting of all 
federal personal property assigned.
     Requires agency heads to implement expeditiously 
and revise as necessary a plan to ensure the security and 
privacy of information collected or maintained by or on behalf 
of agencies from the risks posed by certain peer-to-peer file 
sharing programs and requires the Comptroller General to review 
and report to specified congressional committees on the 
adequacy of such plans.
     Requires audits (currently, evaluations are 
required) of agency information programs and practices to 
determine whether information security controls are effective.
     Amends the E-Government Act of 2002 to require the 
Director to develop best practices for agencies to follow in 
conducting privacy impact assessments.
    H.R. 5687. This bill was introduced by Chairman Clay and 
Chairman Waxman and passed the House on June 24, 2008. It 
amended the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) to increase 
the transparency and independence of federal advisory 
committees. It also requires appointments to advisory 
committees to be made without regard to political affiliation 
or activity, and requires the public disclosure of any conflict 
of interest.

3. Proceedings

            (1) Hearings
    ``The Presidential Records Act of 1978: A Review of the 
Executive Branch Implementation and Compliance'' (March 1, 
2007).
    This hearing examined issues relating to the implementation 
of the Presidential Records Act of 1978, including the history 
of the Act, the role of the National Archives and Records 
Administration in releasing presidential records to the public, 
and the likely impact of Executive Order 13233 on research.
    Witnesses: Dr. Allen Weinstein, Archivist of the United 
States; Dr. Harold Relyea, a Specialist in American Government 
with the Congressional Research Service of the Library of 
Congress; Dr. Robert Dallek, Presidential biographer and 
historian; Mr. Thomas Blanton, Director of the National 
Security Archive at George Washington University; Dr. Anna 
Nelson, Distinguished Historian in Residence at The American 
University; Mr. Scott Nelson, Senior Attorney at the Public 
Citizens Litigation Group; and Mr. Steven Hensen, representing 
the Society of American Archivists.
    ``Ensuring Fairness and Accuracy in Elections Involving 
Electronic Voting Systems'' (April 18, 2007).
    This hearing examined the use of modern electronic voting 
systems and the potential vulnerabilities associated with them.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Robin Carnahan, Secretary of 
State, State of Missouri; The Honorable Gracia M. Hillman, 
Commissioner, U.S. Election Assistance Commission; Mr. Randolph 
Hite, Director, Information Technology Architecture and 
Systems, U.S. Government Accountability Office; Avi R. Rubin, 
Ph.D., Technical Director, Information Security Institute, 
Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University; Mr. 
John S. Groh, Vice President, Election Systems & Software 
International, and Chairman, Election Technology Council; and 
Diane Golden, Ph.D., Director, Missouri Assistive Technology 
Council (on behalf of the National Association of Assistive 
Technology Act Programs).
    ``Progress of the 2010 Reengineered Census'' (April 24, 
2007).
    This hearing examined the Census Bureau's progress on the 
2010 Reengineered Census, which was developed by the Bureau in 
response to a 2001 congressional mandate that the Bureau 
overhaul the census process to reduce the undercount and cost 
of the decennial census. The subcommittee also examined the 
Bureau's process for monitoring contracts for the 2010 Census.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Robert L. Bowser, Mayor, East 
Orange New Jersey, Vice Chair, Urban Economic Policy Committee 
of the U.S. Conference of Mayors; The Honorable Preston Jay 
Waite, Associate Director for Decennial Census, U.S. Bureau of 
the Census; The Honorable Kenneth Prewitt, professor, Columbia 
University, Director, U.S. Bureau of the Census (1998-2001); 
Mathew J. Scire, Director, Strategic Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Michael Murray, Vice President of 
Program, Civil Business Unit, Government Communications 
Systems, Harris Corporation; Karen Narasaki, President and 
Executive Director, Asian American Justice Center; and Joseph 
Salvo, Ph.D., Director, Population Division, New York City 
Department of Planning.
    ``Certification and Testing of Electronic Voting Systems'' 
(May 7, 2007).
    This hearing examined issues relating to the certification 
and testing of electronic voting systems under the Help America 
Vote Act of 2002. The hearing was held in New York, NY.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Donetta L. Davidson, Chairman, 
U.S. Election Assistance Commission; Mark W. Skall, Chief, 
Software Diagnostics and Conformance Testing Division, National 
Institute on Standards and Technology; Douglas A. Kellner, Co-
Chair, New York State Board of Education; Dr. David Wagner, 
Associate Professor, Computer Science Division, University of 
California, Berkeley; Lawrence Norden, Brennan Center for 
Justice, New York University School of Law; John Washburn, 
VoteTrustUSA Voting Technology Task Force; and Mac J. 
Slingerlend, President and CEO, CIBER, Inc., accompanied by 
John Pope, Vice President for Contracts.
    ``Federal IT Security: The Future of FISMA'' (Joint 
Hearing) (June 7, 2007).
    This hearing reviewed the 2002 Federal Information Security 
Act (FISMA) and federal agency efforts to improve security, 
integrity, and reliability of the federal government's 
information systems. In addition, the hearing examined whether 
the information assurance activities of private sector 
entities, including their cyber security best practices, would 
be appropriate models for improving the information security of 
federal agencies. The hearing was held with the Subcommittee on 
Government Management, Organization and Procurement.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Karen S. Evans, Administrator, 
Office of E-Government and Information Technology, Office of 
Management and Budget; The Honorable Vance Hitch; Chief 
Information Officer, U.S. Department of Justice; Gregory C. 
Wilshusen, Director, Information Security Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Phil Bond, President and CEO, 
Information Technology Association of America; Paul Kurtz, 
Partner & Chief Operating Office, Good Harbor Consulting, LLC; 
John W. Carlson, Executive Director, Financial Services 
Roundtable/BITS; and James Andrew Lewis, Director and Senior 
Fellow, Technology and Policy Program, Center for Strategic and 
International Studies.
    ``Protecting Patient Privacy in Healthcare Information 
Systems'' (June 19, 2007).
    This hearing examined issues relating to the protection of 
patient privacy and the establishment of a framework for a 
uniform national health privacy standard.
    Witnesses: Valerie C. Melvin, Director of Information 
Management Issues, Government Accountability Office, 
accompanied by Linda D. Koontz, Director for Information 
Management Issues, Government Accountability Office; Mary R. 
Grealy, President, Healthcare Leadership Council; Byron 
Pickard, President, American Health Information Management 
Association; and Peter Swire, Senior Fellow, Center for 
American Progress.
    ``2010 Census: Improving Local Government Participation in 
LUCA'' (June 26, 2007).
    This hearing examined issues relating to the Local Update 
of Census Addresses program. Specifically, the Subcommittee 
discussed ways to increase local government participation in 
the program.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Heather Hudson, Vice President, 
National Conference of Black Mayors and Mayor, Greenville, MS; 
The Honorable Charles Louis Kincannon; Mathew Scire, Director, 
Strategic Issues, U.S. Government Accountability Office; Keith 
Hite, President, National Association of Towns and Townships 
and Executive Director, Pennsylvania State Association of 
Township Supervisors; and Robert Coates, Governor's census 
Liaison, Office of State Budget Management, State of North 
Carolina. Written testimony was submitted by Mary Heim, Chief, 
Demographic Unit, Department of Finance, State of California.
    ``2010 Census: Reducing the Undercount in the Hispanic 
Community'' (July 9, 2007).
    This field hearing examined the Census Bureau's efforts to 
use community partnerships and other forms of outreach and 
education to ensure full participation and an accurate 
enumeration of the Hispanic/Latino population in the 2010 
Census. The hearing was held in San Antonio, Texas.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Charles Louis Kincannon, Director, 
U.S. Bureau of the Census; the Honorable Kevin Wolff, City 
Council member, Mayor Pro Tem, City of San Antonio; Steven 
Saldana, President, Catholic Charities Archdiocese of San 
Antonio; Arturo Vargas, Executive Director, National 
Association of Latino Elected Officials Educational Fund; L. 
Diane Bennett, President and CEO, Kineta Corp, Charlotte, NC; 
and Lydia Camarillo, Vice President, Southwest Voter 
Registration Education Project.
    ``2010 Census: Recruitment, Hiring, and Training a Diverse 
Workforce'' (July 26, 2007).
    This hearing examined the Census Bureau's plans for 
achieving a diverse workforce, particularly with respect to the 
2010 decennial Census. The Subcommittee evaluated the Bureau's 
progress toward achieving its stated goal of increasing the 
diversity of its workforce from enumerators to senior level 
management.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Charles Louis Kincannon, Director, 
U.S. Bureau of the Census; Mathew Scire, Director of Strategic 
Issues, Government Accountability Office; Leigh A. McMGee, 
Chair, Census Advisory Committee on the American Indian and 
Alaska Native Population; Dr. Bernie Miller, Chair, Census 
Advisory Committee on the African American Population; Deeana 
Jang, Policy Director, Asian Pacific Islander Health Forum; 
Rosa Rosales, National President, League of United Latin 
American Citizens; and Stephen J. Pemberton, Chief Diversity 
Office and Vice President, Diversity and Inclusion, Monster 
Worldwide, Inc.
    ``Utilizing Public Policy and Technology to Strengthen 
Organ Donor Programs'' (September 25, 2007).
    This hearing examined the state of organ donation 
nationwide and efforts to increase the number of available 
donations. Specifically, the subcommittee reviewed public and 
private sector activities intended to strengthen organ 
procurement and transplantation systems nationwide.
    Witnesses: James Burdick, M.D., Director, Division of 
Transplantation, Healthcare Systems Bureau, Health Resources 
and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services; Clive O. Callender, M.D., FACS, Founder and 
Principal Investigator, National Minority Organ Tissue 
Transplantation Education Program; Caverson Walls, kidney 
donor, professional basketball player; Elizabeth Rubin, former 
President and current Board member, Transplant Recipients 
International Organization (TRIO); Timothy L. Pruett, M.D., 
Strickler Family Professor of Transplantation and Surgery, 
University of Virginia, and President, Organ Procurement and 
Transplantation Network/United Network of Organ Sharing; Susan 
Dunn, President-elect, Association of Organ Procurement 
Organizations, President and CEO, Donor Alliance, Inc.; and 
Jeffrey S. Crippin, Past President, America Society of 
Transplantation, Medical Director, Liver Transplantation 
Program, Barnes Jewish Hospital, and Professor of Medicine, 
Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
    ``Critical Budget Issues Affecting the 2010 Census'' 
(October 16, 2007).
    This hearing examined the impact of a continuing resolution 
(CR) on the operations of the 2010 Census. The subcommittee 
started the process to ensure that, as negotiations commenced 
for the 2008 Continuing Resolution, there would be no scaling 
back, cancellation, or delay in the Census dress rehearsal as 
planned, and nothing in the CR language would hinder, delay or 
deny plans, funding and execution of operations.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Otto J. Wolfe, Chief Financial 
Officer and Assistant Secretary for Administration, U.S. 
Department of Commerce; The Honorable Charles Louis Kincannon, 
Director, U.S. Bureau of the Census; and The Honorable Preston 
Jay Waite, Deputy Director, U.S. Bureau of the Census.
    ``Cybersecurity: A Review of Public and Private Efforts to 
Secure Our Nation's Internet Infrastructure'' (October 23, 
2007).
    This hearing examined how well the Department of Homeland 
Security is fulfilling its role as the leading federal agency 
charged with coordinating response and recovery efforts in the 
event of a major Internet disruption. In addition, the 
subcommittee reviewed the roles and responsibilities of private 
sector stakeholders in the development of Internet recovery 
plans and heard their recommendations for improving the 
nation's cyber security policy framework.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Gregory T. Garcia, Assistant 
Secretary for Cyber Security and Communications, Department of 
Homeland Security; Gregory C. Wilshusen, Director, Information 
Technology, Government Accountability Office; Daniel S. Ross, 
Chief Information Officer, State of Missouri; John T. Sabo, 
President; Information Technology-Information Sharing & 
Analysis Center; Ken Silva, Chief Security Office, VeriSign, 
Inc.; Larry Clinton, President, Internet Security Alliance; 
Catherine T. Allen, Chairman & CEO, Santa Fe Group; and 
Kiersten Todt Coon, Vice President for Risk Management, Good 
Harbor Consulting, LLC.
    ``Census Data and Its Use in the Development Process'' 
(October 29, 2007).
    This hearing examined issues relating to census data and 
their use in community development programs, including the 
impact of the accuracy of census data on community development; 
how census data is used in community development programs; and 
how stakeholders in the community development process use 
census data in decision making. The hearing was held in Dayton, 
Ohio.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Dean Lovelace, Commissioner, 
Dayton City Commission; Mathew Scire, Director, Strategic 
Issues, Government Accountability Office; Steve Kelley, 
Director, Office of Strategic Research, Ohio Department of 
Development; Dan Barton, President, Grafton Hill Neighborhood 
Association; David Bohardt, Vice President, St. Mary 
Development Corporation; Teresa Brandt, President, Dayton View 
Historic; Theresa Gasper, President, Full Circle Development, 
LLC; Karin Manovich, Historic South Park, Incorporated; and 
Idotha Bootsie Neal, President, Wright Dunbar, Inc. Written 
testimony was submitted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census.
    ``A Review of the Census Bureau's Risk Management 
Activities for IT Acquisitions'' (December 11, 2007).
    This hearing examined the Census Bureau's planning and 
management of key information technology systems and 
infrastructure for the 2010 Census and the Bureau's response to 
recommendations by the Government Accountability Office in its 
report titled ``Information Technology: Census Bureau's Needs 
to Improve Its Risk Management of the Decennial Systems'' (GAO-
08-79).
    Witnesses: The Honorable Charles Louis Kincannon, Director, 
U.S. Bureau of the Census; David Powner, Director, Information 
Technology Management Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Mathew Scire, Director, Strategic Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Cheryl L. Janey, President of Civil 
Programs, Harris Corporation; Judy Marks, President, Lockheed 
Martin Transportation and Security Solutions; and Tom Romeo, 
Director, Federal Civil Agencies, IBM Global Business Services.
    ``Federal IT Security: A Review of H. R. 4791'' (Joint 
Hearing) (February 8, 2008).
    This hearing examined the 2002 Federal Information Security 
Management Act (FISMA) and federal agency efforts to improve 
the security, integrity, and reliability of the federal 
government's information systems. In addition, the hearing 
focused on H.R. 4791, which amended FISMA by establishing new 
agency requirements for securing personal or sensitive data. 
The hearing was held with the Subcommittee on Government 
Management, Organization and Procurement.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Karen S. Evans, Administrator, 
Office of E-Government and Information Technology, Office of 
Management and Budget; Gregory C. Wilshusen, Director, 
Information Security Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Alan Paller, Director of Research, SANS Institute; Bruce 
McConnell, President, McConnell International, LLC; and Tim 
Bennett, President, Cyber Security Industry Alliance.
    ``Privacy: The Use of Commercial Information Resellers by 
Federal Agencies,'' (March 11, 2008).
    This hearing examined the role of commercial information 
resellers in gathering data about individuals on behalf of 
agencies, and whether there are adequate privacy safeguards in 
place for such transactions. In addition, the hearing reviewed 
provisions contained in H.R. 4791 that would establish new 
privacy related safeguards and restrictions on agencies that 
obtain information about individuals from commercial 
information resellers.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Karen S. Evans, Administrator, 
Office of E-Government and Information Technology, Office of 
Management and Budget; Linda D. Koontz, Director, Information 
Management Issues, Government Accountability Office; Hugo 
Teufel III, Chief Privacy Officer, Department of Homeland 
Security; Ari Schwartz, Deputy Director, Center for Democracy 
and Technology; Stuart Pratt, President, Consumer Data Industry 
Association; and Paula J. Bruening, Deputy Director, Center for 
Information Policy Leadership.
    ``Examining the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA)--
Current Issues and Developments'' (April 2, 2008).
    This hearing examined the Federal Advisory Committee Act 
(FACA), its implementation, and changes needed to increase the 
transparency and independence of advisory committees.
    Witnesses: Robin Nazzaro, Director, National Resources and 
Environment, Government Accountability Office; Robert Flaak, 
Director, Committee Management Secretariat, General Services 
Administration; Sidney A. Shapiro, Associate Dean for Research 
and Development, Wake Forest School of Law on behalf of the 
Center for Progressive Reform; and Frank Wilson, Committee 
Management Officer, Department of Defense.
    ``2010 Census: Progress on the Development of the Field 
Data Collection Automation Program (FDCA)'' (Joint Hearing) 
(April 9, 2008).
    This hearing examined the Bureau's progress on completion 
of the requirements for the two systems, schedules, costs, and 
the Commerce Secretary's plans for implementing the 
recommendations of the 2010 Census Risk Reduction Task Force 
and expert panel, and the Bureau's actions on GAO 
recommendations. The hearing was held with the full Committee.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Steven H. Murdock, Director, U.S. 
Census Bureau; Mathew Scire, Director, Strategic Issues, 
Government Accountability Office; David Powner, Director, 
Information Technology Management Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Dr. Jason F. Providakes, Senior Vice 
President and General Manager, Center for Enterprise 
Modernization, The MITRE Corporation; Dr. Glenn S. Himes, 
Executive Director, Center for Enterprise Modernization, The 
Mitre Corporation; Judy F. Marks, President, Transportation and 
Security Solutions, Lockheed Martin Corporation; and Cheryl L. 
Janey, President, Civil Programs, The Harris Corporation.
    ``H.R. 5811, The Electronic Communications Preservation 
Act'' (April 23, 2008).
    This hearing examined H.R. 5811, which aims to modernize 
federal record keeping by requiring agencies to begin 
preserving electronic records electronically. The bill requires 
such electronic preservation for electronic communications such 
as e-mails, but recommends that agencies preserve all 
electronic records electronically. In addition, H.R. 5811 
provides for oversight of the maintenance and preservation of 
presidential records, including e-mails sent and received by 
presidential advisors. The bill calls on the Archivist of the 
United States to establish standards for the management and 
preservation of these records and to certify that the president 
is meeting those standards.
    Witnesses: Linda Koontz, Director, Information Management 
Issues, Government Accountability Office; Gary Stern, General 
Counsel, National Archives and Records Administration; Paul 
Wester Jr., Modern Records Program, National Archives and 
Records Administration; and Patrice McDermott, Director, 
Openthegovernment.org.
    ``Census Data: Special Issues Related to U.S. Territories'' 
(Joint Hearing) (May 21, 2008).
    This hearing examined the disparate treatment of the U. S. 
Territories by the Census Bureau and the unavailability of 
current and reliable data of these areas. The hearing also 
provided an opportunity for representatives from these 
territories, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the Interior 
Department's Office of Insular Affairs to inform the 
subcommittees on how this data deficiency impedes local and 
federal government officials, academics and private sector 
representatives from carrying out their responsibilities. This 
hearing was held with the Insular Affairs Subcommittee of the 
House Committee on Natural Resources.
    Witnesses: Thomas Mesenbourg, Acting Deputy Director, U.S. 
Bureau of the Census; Nikalao Pula, Director, Office of Insular 
Affairs, U.S. Department of the Interior; The Honorable Felix 
P. Camacho, Governor of Guam; Mr. Fransciso Cimadevilla, Vice 
President and Editor in Chief, Casiana Communications; and 
Frank L. Mills, Director, Eastern Caribbean Center at the 
University of the Virgin Islands.
    ``Does Federal Statistical Data Adequately Serve People 
Living with Disabilities?'' (June 4, 2008).
    This hearing examined the federal government's efforts to 
collect reliable data to evaluate policy and measure the 
quality of life of people living with disabilities.
    Witnesses: Steven Tingus, Deputy Assistance Secretary for 
Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services; Mr. Daniel Bertoni, Director, Education, Workforce 
and Income Security Issues, Government Accountability Office; 
Honorable Anthony Coelho, Former member of Congress, Author of 
the Americans with Disabilities Act; Ms. Pat Pound, Vice 
Chairperson, National Council on Disability; Eddie Glenn 
Bryant, Governor's Committee on Employment of People with 
Disabilities, Dr. Holly Hollingsworth, Associate Research 
Professor, Occupational Therapy, Washington University School 
of Medicine.
    ``2010 Census: Assessing the Census Bureau's Progress'' 
(Joint Hearing) (June 11, 2008).
    This hearing examined the Bureau's progress announcing a 
major redesign of the 2010 Census with a particular focus on 
development and implementation of key plans and milestones, 
preparation for address canvassing, which is set to begin in 
early 2009; and negotiations with Harris Corporation over the 
cost of the FDCA contract. The hearing was held with the full 
Committee.
    Witnesses: Honorable Steven H. Murdock, Director, U.S. 
Census Bureau; Arnold A. Jackson, Associate Director for 
Decennial Census, U.S. Census Bureau; David Powner, Director, 
Information Technology Management Issues, Government 
Accountability Office; Mathew Scire, Director, Strategic 
Issues, Government Accountability Office; Dr. Jason F. 
Providakes, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Center 
for Enterprise Modernization, The MITRE Corporation; Dr. Glenn 
S. Himes, Executive Director, Center for Enterprise 
Modernization; and Michael P. Murray, Vice President, Programs, 
The Harris Corporation.
    ``2010 Census: Using the Communications Campaign to 
Effectively Reduce the Undercount'' (July 10, 2008).
    This hearing examined the Census Bureau's plan to use the 
2010 Integrated Communications Campaign to help ensure that 
hard-to-count communities are not disproportionately under 
counted. The hearing also explored whether the Bureau was on 
course to build upon the successful accomplishments of the 2000 
Census.
    Witnesses: The Honorable Steven H. Murdock, Director, U.S. 
Bureau of the Census; Jeff Tarakajian, Executive Vice President 
of Client Services, DraftFCB; Mark Neuman, Chair, 2010 Census 
Advisory Committee; Roderick Harrison, Director of DataBank, 
Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies; Dr. Barbara A. 
McKinzie, Chair, 2010 Census Subcommittee, National Pan 
Hellenic Council; and David J. Lange, General Manager, 
Scholastics Marketing Partners, Scholastic, Inc.
    ``Implementation of the Office of Government Information 
Services'' (September 17, 2008).
    This hearing examined the structure and function of the 
Office of Government Information Services (OGIS) established by 
the Openness Promotes Effectiveness in Our National Government 
Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-175). The hearing addressed members' 
concerns that delays in structuring the office would lead to a 
backlog which would effectively undermine its purpose. The 
hearing provided the Archivist with an opportunity to share 
with members planning activities to date and a vision of how 
the OGIS will be structured. Additionally, several experts 
offered recommendations on how to best structure the OGIS to 
ensure its success.
    Witnesses: Honorable Allen Weinstein, Archivist, National 
Archives and Records Administration; Thomas Blanton, Director, 
National Security Archive at George Washington University; 
Patrice McDermott, Director, Openthegovernment.org; Rick Blum, 
Coordinator, Sunshine in Government Initiative; and Terry 
Mutchler, Executive Director, Pennsylvania's Office of Open 
Records.
    ``How Information Policy Affects the Competitive Viability 
of Small and Disadvantaged Business in Federal Contracting'' 
(September 24, 2008).
    This hearing examined obstacles that negatively affect 
opportunities for small businesses to grow and succeed. The 
hearing also reviewed some of the information, data and 
assumptions dealing with the subject of minority contracting 
and federal programs with a particular focus on how they 
addressed discrimination against minority businesses.
    Witnesses: Thomas Boston, Economist, Georgia Tech 
University; Jon Wainwright, National Economic Research 
Associates (NERA); Anthony Brown, Senior Associate, MGT of 
America; Mr. Anthony Robinson, President, Minority Business 
Enterprise Legal Defense and Education Fund Inc.; and Earl 
Peek, President, Diamond Ventures, LLC.
            (2) Business Meetings
    Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 2007 and 
Presidential Records Act (March 6, 2007).
    This business meeting was held to review and mark up the 
Freedom of Information Act (H.R. 1309) and the Presidential 
Records Act (H.R. 1255). The Subcommittee approved H.R. 1309 
and H.R. 1255 by voice vote and reported the bills to the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
    Federal Data Protection Act (April 16, 2007).
    This business meeting was held to review and mark up the 
Federal Agency Data Protection Act. The Subcommittee approved 
H.R. 4791 by voice vote and reported the bill to the Committee 
on Oversight and Government Reform.
    Plain Language in Government Communications Act (January 
24, 2008).
    This business meeting was held to review and mark up the 
Plain Language in Government Communications Act of 2007(H.R. 
3548). The Subcommittee approved H.R. 3548 by voice vote and 
reported the bill to the Committee on Oversight and Government 
Reform.

                E. NATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN AFFAIRS

    The Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs 
has oversight jurisdiction over national security, homeland 
security, and foreign affairs. Rep. John F. Tierney served as 
Chairman and Rep. Christopher Shays as Ranking Member during 
the 110th Congress.
    Over the 110th Congress, the National Security and Foreign 
Affairs Subcommittee conducted robust, sustained, and 
constructive oversight on a wide range of subjects; held 33 
hearings; and organized countless briefings and fact-finding 
travel by Subcommittee members. The Subcommittee's oversight 
efforts touched on five continents, dozens of countries, and 
outer space.
    The Subcommittee conducted oversight of, among others, the 
Defense Department, the State Department (including USAID), and 
the Veterans Administration, including investigating how well 
these and other national security agencies coordinate together. 
The Subcommittee also examined numerous companies and non-
governmental organizations. In addition to the summaries below, 
testimony, member statements, and archived webcasts can be 
found on the Subcommittee's website: http://
nationalsecurity.oversight. house.gov/.

1. Pakistan

    U.S. relations and efforts with the Islamic Republic of 
Pakistan and its people were a central focus of the 
Subcommittee during the 110th Congress. Pakistan has manifest, 
strategic importance to the United States, particularly in 
light of its effect on U.S. efforts in Afghanistan, its nuclear 
tensions with India, and its struggles to inculcate democracy 
and quell militant extremism.
    The Subcommittee conducted a significant series of 
oversight activities aimed at: understanding the nature of the 
threats to U.S. national security emanating from Pakistan's 
terrorist presence and growing insurgency; evaluating the 
scope, effectiveness, and relative balance of U.S. assistance 
to Pakistan; assessing U.S. policies' effect on Pakistan's own 
efforts to bolster democratic institutions and civil society in 
order to deliver on its promise of democracy; and promoting 
U.S. policies designed to enhance a long-term, strategic, 
people-to-people relationship.
            a. Hearings
     On May 9, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Extremist Madrassas, Ghost Schools, and U.S. Aid to 
Pakistan: Are We Making the Grade on the 9/11 Commission Report 
Card?'' Witnesses included: Mr. Christopher Kojm, former 
President of the 
9/11 Public Discourse Project and Deputy Director of the 9/11 
Commission; Dr. Samina Ahmed, South Asia Project Director, 
International Crisis Group; Ms. Lisa Curtis, Senior Research 
Fellow, South Asia, Asian Studies Center, The Heritage 
Foundation; and Mr. Craig Cohen, Deputy Chief of Staff, and 
Fellow, Post-Conflict Reconstruction Project, International 
Security Program, Center for Strategic & International Studies.
     On July 12, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Pakistan at the Crossroads; Afghanistan in the 
Balance.'' Witnesses included: the Hon. Richard A. Boucher, 
Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of South and Central Asian 
Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
     On December 19, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Pakistani Elections: Will They be Free and 
Fair or Fundamentally Flawed?'' Witnesses included: the Hon. 
Thomas A. Daschle, former two-time Senate Majority and Minority 
Leader and co-author of the pre-election assessment report on 
Pakistan commissioned by the National Democratic Institute; Mr. 
Thomas E. Garrett, Regional Program Director, Middle East and 
North Africa for the International Republican Institute; and 
Mr. Mark L. Schneider, Senior Vice President, International 
Crisis Group.
     On January 29, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Pakistani Elections: Will They be Free and 
Fair or Fundamentally Flawed? (Part II).'' Witnesses included: 
the Hon. Richard A. Boucher, Assistant Secretary of State, 
Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, U.S. Department of 
State.
     On June 24, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Oversight of U.S. Coalition Support Funds to 
Pakistan.'' Witnesses included: Mr. Charles Michael Johnson, 
Jr., Director, International Affairs and Trade Division, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Mr. Steve Sebastian, 
Director, Financial Management and Assurance Team, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; Maj. Gen. Bobby Wilkes, USAF 
(Ret.), Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for South Asia, 
Office of the Secretary of Defense, U.S. Department of Defense; 
Mr. John P. Roth, Deputy Comptroller (Program/Budget), Office 
of the Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller), U.S. Department 
of Defense; and Amb. Stephen D. Mull, Acting Assistant 
Secretary of State, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, U.S. 
Department of State.
     On September 24, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Oversight of U.S.-Pakistan Relations: From Ad 
Hoc and Transactional to Strategic and Enduring.'' Witnesses 
included: Ms. Lisa Curtis, Senior Research Fellow, South Asia, 
Asian Studies Center, The Heritage Foundation; Dr. C. Christine 
Fair, Senior Political Scientist, RAND Corporation; Dr. Daniel 
Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, 
Council on Foreign Relations; and Mr. Brian Katulis, Senior 
Fellow, Center for American Progress.
            b. Official Travel/Delegations
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted oversight in Islamabad, Rawalpindi, and 
Peshawar, Pakistan, on April 1-3, 2007. The delegation examined 
U.S. relations with, and domestic stability in, Pakistan, 
including the status of democratization, efficacy of U.S. aid, 
and state of counter-terrorism operations. The delegation was 
led by Subcommittee Chairman Rep. John F. Tierney (D-MA) and 
included Subcommittee Members Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) and 
Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC), as well as Subcommittee guest Rep. 
George Miller (D-CA) and Subcommittee staff.
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted oversight in Islamabad and Peshawar, Pakistan, 
on September 11-12, 2007. The delegation examined U.S. 
relations with, and domestic stability in, Pakistan, including 
the status of democratization, efficacy of U.S. aid, and state 
of counter-terrorism operations. The delegation was led by Rep. 
Stephen Lynch (D-MA) and included Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY), 
Rep. Todd Platts (R-PA), and Subcommittee staff.
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted oversight in Karachi and Islamabad, Pakistan, on 
March 27-29, 2008. The delegation examined U.S. relations with, 
and domestic stability in, Pakistan, including democratization, 
efficacy and accountability of U.S. aid and military 
reimbursements, and counter-terrorism actions. The delegation 
was led by Subcommittee Chairman Rep. John F. Tierney (D-MA) 
and included Subcommittee Member Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) and 
Subcommittee staff, as well as Subcommittee guests Rep. Jim 
Moran (D-VA), Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Rep. Keith Ellison 
(D-MN), and Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-WY).
            c. Other
     On July 31, 2007, the Subcommittee hosted a 
meeting with the Pakistani-American Leadership Conference and 
the Karachi Chamber of Commerce.
     On January 22, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing by the Pakistan Movement for Justice Party. The 
briefing was led by Mr. Imran Khan, leader of the Movement for 
Justice Party.
     On January 23, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing by the Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP). Briefers included 
Ms. Sherry Rehman, Member of Parliament and President of 
Central Policy Planning, PPP, and Dr. Javaid Laghari, Senator 
and Leadership, PPP.
     On March 7, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing on Pakistan and Afghanistan by the National Democratic 
Institute. Briefers included: Mr. Peter M. Manikas, Senior 
Associate and Regional Director, National Democratic Institute; 
and Ms. Sheila Fruman, Senior Resident Director, National 
Democratic Institute.
     On August 20, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing on pending legislation designed to establish 
Reconstruction Opportunity Zones (ROZs) in Pakistan. Briefers 
included staff of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, 
the Department of Defense, and the Department of State.
     On September 25, 2008, the Subcommittee majority 
staff released a report titled ``U.S. Coalition Support Funds 
to Pakistan: From Ineffective, Unaccountable Reimbursements to 
a Long-Term, Strategic Relationship.''

2. Afghanistan

    U.S. military and reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan 
garnered substantial attention by the Subcommittee during the 
110th Congress and necessitates continued and sustained 
oversight. The security situation in Afghanistan has 
deteriorated significantly during this period, Afghanistan's 
nascent government continues to struggle with capacity and 
corruption, the efforts by the various U.S. agencies involved 
in Afghanistan requires greater coordination, and U.S. and 
international donor development efforts continue to face 
crucial challenges of security, accountability, and 
sufficiency. The Subcommittee pursued significant oversight 
focused on U.S. interagency efforts to assist the Afghanistan 
government and people in their security and development 
strategies.
            a. Hearings
     On July 12, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Pakistan at the Crossroads; Afghanistan in the 
Balance.'' Witnesses included: the Honorable Richard A. 
Boucher, Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of South and 
Central Asian Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
     On June 18, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Oversight of U.S. Efforts to Train and Equip Police 
and Enhance the Justice Sector in Afghanistan.'' Witnesses 
included: Mr. Charles Michael Johnson, Jr., Director, 
International Affairs and Trade Division, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Mr. Frank Ward, Deputy Assistant 
Inspector General for Inspections, U.S. Department of State; 
Maj. Gen. Bobby Wilkes, USAF (Ret.), Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for South Asia, Office of the Secretary of Defense, 
U.S. Department of Defense; Amb. David T. Johnson, Assistant 
Secretary of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs; Mr. Mark Ward, Senior Deputy Assistant 
Administrator, Asia Bureau, U.S. Agency for International 
Development; and Mr. Bruce Swartz, Deputy Assistant Attorney 
General, Criminal Division, U.S. Department of Justice.
            b. Official Travel/Delegations
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted oversight in Kabul and Asadabad, Afghanistan, on 
April 4-5, 2007. The delegation examined the progress of U.S. 
efforts in Afghanistan, with particular focus on security, 
political reform, drug control policy, and reconstruction. The 
delegation was led by Subcommittee Chairman Rep. John F. 
Tierney (D-MA) and included Subcommittee Members Rep. Betty 
McCollum (D-MN) and Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC), as well as 
Subcommittee guest Rep. George Miller (D-CA) and subcommittee 
staff.
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted oversight in Kabul and Nuristan Province, 
Afghanistan, on September 12-13, 2007. The delegation assessed 
the progress of U.S. efforts in Afghanistan, with particular 
focus on security and counter-terrorism. The Delegation was led 
by Rep. Stephen Lynch (D-MA) and included Rep. Brian Higgins 
(D-NY), Rep. Todd Platts (R-PA), and Subcommittee staff.
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted oversight in Kabul and Herat, Afghanistan, on 
March 25-26, 2008. The delegation examined progress in 
Afghanistan, with particular focus on the efficacy and 
accountability of U.S. aid, and on the security situation and 
counter-terrorism efforts. The delegation was led by 
Subcommittee Chairman Rep. John F. Tierney (D-MA) and included 
Subcommittee Member Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) and Subcommittee 
staff, as well as Subcommittee guests Rep. Jim Moran (D-VA), 
Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Rep. Keith Ellison (D-MN), and 
Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-WY).
            c. Other
     On July 12, 2007, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing with Afghanistan's Ambassador to the U.S., Amb. Said 
Tayeb Jawad.
     On March 7, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing on Pakistan and Afghanistan by the National Democratic 
Institute. Briefers included: Mr. Peter M. Manikas, Senior 
Associate and Regional Director, National Democratic Institute; 
and Ms. Sheila Fruman, Senior Resident Director, National 
Democratic Institute.
     On April 10, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing with U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, Amb. William 
Wood.
     On April 30, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing on the State Department's Public-Private Partnership 
for Justice Reform in Afghanistan. The Subcommittee was briefed 
by Amb. Thomas Schweich, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, 
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, U.S. 
Department of State.
     On June 18, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
meeting with a group of Afghan Members of Parliament and 
Ministry of Interior officials. The Afghan delegation included 
members of the Committee on National Defense and the Committee 
on Internal Security in the Afghan Parliament.
     On June 26, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing on the state of independent media in Afghanistan. 
Briefers included Aaron Lobel, President, American Abroad 
Media, and Saad Mohseni, Chairman, Moby Media Group.

3. Iran

    U.S. relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran were the 
subject of significant Subcommittee hearings and activities. As 
the United States has had no formal relations with Iran for 
decades, the Subcommittee held a series of hearings and 
numerous briefings to better understand the current Iranian 
government and leadership, its populace, and the significance 
of Iran for the region.
    Subcommittee efforts also sought to provide a full 
accounting of the interactions between the Bush Administration 
and Iran, particularly through hearing from U.S. government 
officials directly involved in such interactions. Finally, the 
Subcommittee explored the prospects and consequences for 
various alternative approaches to Iran, including diplomacy and 
military action.
            a. Hearings
     On October 30, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Iran: Reality, Options, and Consequences. Part 
1--Iranian People and Attitudes.'' Witnesses included: Ken 
Ballen, President of Terror Free Tomorrow; Karim Sadjadpour, an 
associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace; 
and Dr. Kenneth Katzman, Middle East Specialist with the 
Congressional Research Service.
     On November 7, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Iran: Reality, Options, and Consequences. Part 
2--Negotiating with the Iranians: Missed Opportunities and 
Paths Forward.'' Witnesses included: Ambassador James Dobbins, 
Director of the International Security and Defense Policy 
Center at RAND Corporation; Hillary Mann Leverett, Principal 
and CEO of Strategic Energy and Global Analysis, LLC; Dr. Flynt 
Leverett, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation; Mr. 
Lawrence Haas of the Committee on the Present Danger; and Dr. 
Suzanne Maloney, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute.
     On November 14, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Iran: Reality, Options, and Consequences. Part 
3--Regional and Global Consequences of U.S. Military Action in 
Iran.'' Witnesses included: Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, USA 
(Ret.); Dr. Paul Pillar of Georgetown University; Lt. General 
Paul Van Riper, USMC (Ret.); Mr. Ilan Berman, Vice President 
for Policy at the American Foreign Policy Council; and Colonel 
Samuel B. Gardiner, USAF (Ret.).

4. Africa

            a. AFRICOM
    The Subcommittee devoted significant attention to oversight 
of the Department of Defense's establishment of its new 
combatant command, the U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM). In 
October 2008, AFRICOM assumed control of all Defense Department 
activities on the African continent, an area of responsibility 
that was formerly divided between U.S. European Command 
(EUCOM), U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), and U.S. Pacific 
Command (PACOM).
    AFRICOM represents a significant new government entity in 
terms of costs, personnel, physical plant, authorities and 
responsibilities. It also has engendered significant 
controversy arising from African concerns that AFRICOM 
represents a U.S. ``invasion'' of the continent, and general 
concerns that AFRICOM symbolizes the militarization of 
diplomacy, humanitarian assistance, and development.
    The Subcommittee has undertaken oversight efforts to assess 
the Defense Department's existing activities on the African 
continent; to ascertain AFRICOM's future planning objectives; 
and to evaluate AFRICOM's interactions with African nations, 
multilateral organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and 
other U.S. government agencies.
                (1) Hearings
     On July 15, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``AFRICOM: Rationales, Roles, and Progress on the Eve of 
Operations.'' Witnesses included: Ms. Theresa Whelan, Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for African Affairs, Office of 
the Secretary of Defense, U.S. Department of Defense; Amb. Mary 
C. Yates, Deputy Commander for Civil-Military Activities, U.S. 
Africa Command; Maj. Gen. Michael A. Snodgrass, Chief of Staff, 
U.S. Africa Command; Ms. Lauren Ploch, Analyst in African 
Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division, U.S. 
Congressional Research Service; and Mr. John Pendleton, 
Director, Force Structure and Defense Planning Issues, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office.
     On July 23, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``AFRICOM: Rationales, Roles, and Progress on the Eve of 
Operations--Part 2.'' Witnesses included: Amb. Jim Bishop, Vice 
President for Humanitarian Policy and Practice, InterAction; 
Dr. Stephen Morrison, Director of Africa Programs, Center for 
Strategic & International Studies; Ms. Kathleen Hicks, Senior 
Fellow in International Securities, Center for Strategic & 
International Studies; and Mr. Mark Malan, Peace-building 
Program Officer, Refugees International.
                (2) Official Travel/Delegations
     The Subcommittee led a congressional staff 
delegation that conducted oversight in Paris, France; Bamako 
and Kati, Mali; Nairobi and Lamu, Kenya; Djibouti, Djibouti; 
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; and Stuttgart, Germany, on October 18-
28, 2008. The delegation examined U.S. national security 
interests and programs on the African continent, with 
particular focus on AFRICOM, Defense Department interagency 
participation and coordination in Africa, the activities of the 
Combined Joint Task Force--Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA), and the 
Trans-Sahara Counter-Terrorism Partnership (TSCTP).
            b. Darfur
    U.S. efforts in Darfur, Sudan, were an important part of 
the Subcommittee's oversight work in the 110th Congress. As 
part of its review, the Subcommittee examined ways to encourage 
the government of Sudan to help end the conflict in Darfur, 
including by putting pressure on international partners of the 
government--such as the People's Republic of China.
    Following the guidance of advocacy groups and policy 
experts, the Subcommittee sought to bring attention to Darfur 
before the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics in hopes of increasing 
China's willingness to apply pressure to its Sudanese partners. 
The Subcommittee was instrumental in raising congressional and 
public awareness about the Darfur crisis as well as the 
relationship between China and the government of Sudan.
                (1) Hearings
     On June 7, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Darfur and the Olympics: A Call for International 
Action.'' Witnesses included Nick Anderson and Ana Slavin, 
founders of Dollars for Darfur, Northfield Mount Hermon School; 
Daoud Ibrahaem Hari, interpreter and Darfuri refugee; Joey 
Cheek, Olympic gold medalist in 2004 at the Turino Winter 
Olympic games; Tegla Loroupe, 2006 United Nations Ambassador of 
Sport and a 2000 Summer Olympic athlete; John Prendergast, 
Senior Advisor to the International Crisis Group and Co-Founder 
of the ENOUGH Campaign; and Ambassador Lawrence Rossin (Ret.), 
Senior International Coordinator for the Save Darfur Coalition.
                (2) Official Travel/Delegations
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that included meetings with international aid workers and 
visits to Darfur refugee camps in Chad in September 2008. The 
delegation included: Rep. Stephen Lynch (D-MN), Rep. Brian 
Higgins (D-PA), Rep. Todd Platts (R-PA), and Subcommittee 
staff.

5. Latin America and Energy Security

    The Subcommittee investigated the current and projected 
state of Latin America's energy resources and the resulting 
implications for regional stability and U.S. national security. 
Specifically, the Subcommittee conducted oversight with regard 
to the need for integration of U.S. national security and 
energy policies, and explored challenges and opportunities for 
energy cooperation in Latin America.
            a. Hearings
     On March 11, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``National Security and Latin America: Challenges and 
Opportunities on Energy Cooperation.'' Witnesses included: 
David Goldwyn, President of Goldwyn International Strategies 
LLC; Paulo Sotero, Director of the Brazil Institute of the 
Woodrow Wilson Center; Dr. Ray Walser Ph.D., Senior Policy 
Analyst for Latin America at The Heritage Foundation; and Eric 
Farnsworth, Vice President of the Council of Americas.
            b. Other
     On January 29, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
briefing with Teodoro Petkoff, a prominent politician and 
newspaper editor in Venezuela, to discuss the current situation 
in Venezuela, including the internal political dynamics, as 
well as prospects for improved relations between the United 
States and Venezuela.

6. Iraq

    The Subcommittee has pursued numerous oversight projects 
and initiatives related to Iraq, including conducting oversight 
of waste, fraud, and abuse of U.S. taxpayer dollars in Iraq. 
These activities have included oversight of U.S. efforts to 
ensure the security of weapons stockpiles; waste, fraud, and 
abuse at the new U.S. Embassy in Iraq; accountability for small 
arms given to the Iraqi Security Forces; and U.S. policy on 
Iraqi refugee resettlement.
            a. Hearings
     On March 22, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Iraq: IEDs and Munitions, Are They Secured?'' 
Witnesses included: Ms. Davi D'Agostino, Director, Defense 
Capabilities and Management with Government Accountability 
Office, who testified on the release of a report by GAO; and 
Lieutenant General Gregory S. Newbold, retired from the U.S. 
Marine Corps.
     On July 26, 2007, the Subcommittee held a joint 
hearing with the full Oversight Committee titled ``Allegations 
of Waste, Fraud, and Abuse at the New U.S. Embassy in Iraq.'' 
Witnesses included: Mr. John Owens, Former Employee, First 
Kuwaiti Trading & Contracting Company; Mr. Rory Mayberry, 
Former Subcontractor Employee, First Kuwaiti Trading & 
Contracting Company; Mr. Karl Demming, KBR; Major General 
(Retired) Charles E. Williams, Director Office of Overseas 
Building Operations, U.S. Department of State; Mr. William 
Moser, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Acquisitions, U.S. 
Department of State; Hon. Patrick Kennedy, Director, Office of 
Management Policy, U.S. Department of State; and Mr. Howard J. 
Krongard, Inspector General, U.S. Department of State.
            b. Official Travel/Delegations
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted business in Jordan, Iraq, and Lebanon on January 
6-11, 2008. The delegation included: Rep. Steven Lynch, Rep. 
Robert J. Wittman, Rep. Peter Welch, and Subcommittee staff.
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted business in Iraq on October 8-10, 2008. The 
delegation included: Rep. Steven Lynch, Rep. Todd Platts, Rep. 
Michael H. Michaud, and Subcommittee staff.
            c. Other
     On July 20, 2007, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing by Refugees International to report findings from its 
trip to visit refugee camps in Jordan, Lebanon, and Turkey.
     Beginning in September 2007, the Subcommittee 
raised concerns about arms accountability procedures in Iraq 
with the Inspector General's office of the Department of 
Defense. The Department of Defense Inspector General released a 
subsequent classified report, ``Assessment of the 
Accountability of Arms and Ammunition Provided to the Security 
Forces of Iraq,'' to the Subcommittee on July 3, 2008.
     On July 23, 2008, the Subcommittee, with 
coordination and leadership by Rep. Peter Welch, hosted a 
briefing on Iraqi refugees by Jonathan Finer, a correspondent 
for The Washington Post who worked in the Baghdad Bureau, and 
Naseer Nouri, a former interpreter and correspondent for The 
Washington Post.

6. ``Taking Care of Our Troops''

    Over the course of the 110th Congress, the Subcommittee 
conducted extensive, sustained, and constructive oversight 
aimed at ensuring that the United States is doing everything 
possible to protect the health, safety, and well-being of our 
troops and their families, including with rigorous oversight 
over the military healthcare system as well as efforts to 
prevent, treat, and prosecute sexual assaults.
            a. Military Healthcare and Veterans
    Following reports of unsanitary living conditions and 
unacceptable treatment of wounded service members and veterans 
at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the Subcommittee committed 
itself to the investigation of military housing, standards of 
care, and long-term physical and mental health care for 
seriously injured soldiers. The Subcommittee sought to ensure 
that the solemn promises of our nation to its war heroes are 
kept, and that the highest standards of care are given to 
wounded service members and veterans.
    The Subcommittee's oversight efforts included briefings, 
hearings, and site visits to Department of Defense and Veterans 
Affairs medical treatment facilities. The Subcommittee also 
maintained oversight of agency coordination and transition of 
active duty soldiers into the Veterans' Administration system.
                (1) Hearings
     On March 5, 2007, the Subcommittee held a field 
hearing at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC, 
titled ``Is This Any Way To Treat Our Troops? The Care and 
Conditions of Wounded Soldiers at Walter Reed.'' Witnesses 
included: Specialist Jeremy Duncan; Annette McLeod, Wife of 
Cpl. Wendell ``Dell'' McLeod; Staff Sgt. John Daniel Shannon; 
Lieutenant General Kevin C. Kiley, M.D., U.S. Army Surgeon 
General; Major General George W. Weightman, Commander (former), 
Walter Reed Army Medical Center; Ms. Cynthia A. Bascetta, 
Director, Health Care, U.S. Government Accountability Office; 
General Peter Schoomaker, Chief of Staff of the Army; and 
General Richard A. Cody, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army.
     On April 17, 2007, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Is This Any Way to Treat Our Troops?--Part II: Follow-
Up on Corrective Measures Taken at Walter Reed and Other 
Medical Facilities Caring for Wounded Soldiers.'' Witnesses 
included: Togo D. West, Jr., Former Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs and Former Secretary of the Army; Jack Marsh, Former 
Secretary of the Army; Arnold Fisher, senior partner Fisher 
Brothers New York and chairman of the Board for the Intrepid 
Museum Foundation; Lawrence Holland, senior enlisted advisor to 
the Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs; Charles ``Chip'' 
Roadman, former Air Force surgeon general; Michael L. 
Dominguez, Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense 
(Personnel and Readiness), U.S. Department of Defense; Major 
General Gale S. Pollack, Army Surgeon General (Acting) and 
Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM); and Major 
General Eric Schoomaker, Commander, Walter Reed Army Medical 
Center.
     On September 26, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Third Walter Reed Oversight Hearing: Keeping 
the Nation's Promise to Our Wounded Soldiers.'' Witnesses 
included: Mr. John Pendleton, Acting Director, Health Care, 
U.S. Government Accountability Office; Mr. Daniel Bertoni, 
Director, Education, Workforce, and Income Security, U.S. 
Government Accountability Office; the Honorable Michael L. 
Dominguez, Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense 
(Personnel and Readiness), U.S. Department of Defense; the 
Honorable Patrick W. Dunne (RADM ret.), Assistant Secretary for 
Policy and Planning, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; and 
Major General Eric Schoomaker, Commander, Walter Reed Army 
Medical Center.
     On February 27, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``One Year after Walter Reed: An Independent 
Assessment of the Care, Support, and Disability Evaluation for 
Wounded Soldiers.'' Witnesses included: Mr. John Pendleton, 
Acting Director, Health Care, U.S. Government Accountability 
Office; Mr. Daniel Bertoni, Director, Education, Workforce, and 
Income Security, U.S. Government Accountability Office; 
Lieutenant General Eric Schoomaker, Surgeon General/Commander 
U.S. Army Medical Command; the Honorable Michael L. Dominguez, 
Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Personnel and 
Readiness), U.S. Department of Defense; and the Honorable 
Patrick W. Dunne (RADM ret.), Assistant Secretary for Policy 
and Planning, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.
                (2) Other
     The Subcommittee investigated the use of private 
contractors at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The 
Subcommittee also toured and requested documents regarding 
finances and reimbursement by patients treated at Ward 72 of 
Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the Eisenhower Executive 
Nursing Suite.
     Subcommittee staff attended a briefing by the 
President's Commission on Care for America's Returning Wounded 
Warriors on June 27, 2007.
     Subcommittee members and staff visited Walter Reed 
Army Medical Center on September 24, 2007, to meet with 
soldiers and administrators and assess whether conditions had 
improved there since the Subcommittee's March 2007 field 
hearing.
     The Subcommittee sponsored a briefing on the U.S. 
Army's Traumatic Brain Injury Task Force on January 16, 2008, 
by Brigadier General Don Bradshaw.
     The Subcommittee sponsored a July 22, 2008, 
briefing on the Army Barracks Modernization Program following 
reports of unsanitary living conditions at Ft. Bragg, NC.
     Subcommittee staff conducted a site visit of 
Richmond VAMC on October 7, 2008, following complaints of 
unsanitary conditions and poor administrative response to 
patient needs.
     At the Subcommittee's request, the Government 
Accountability Office report ``Veterans Disability Benefits: 
Better Accountability and Access Would Improve the Benefits 
Delivery at Discharge Program'' (GAO-08-901) was issued on 
September 9, 2008.
     At the Subcommittee's request, the Government 
Accountability Office report ``Military Disability System: 
Increased Supports for Servicemembers and Better Pilot Planning 
Could Improve the Disability Evaluation Process'' (GAO-08-1137) 
was issued on September 24, 2008.
     At the suggestion of Subcommittee Chairman John F. 
Tierney, the U.S. Army looked into the feasibility of 
establishing ombudsman offices within the Army Medical Command. 
As of November 2008, about 60 Army ombudsmen were employed at 
32 locations in the United States and abroad. The ombudsman 
system also includes an anonymous website submission system.
            b. Military Sexual Assault
    The Subcommittee conducted robust, bipartisan oversight 
into the response and prevention of sexual assaults in the 
military, including having conducted hearings to determine why 
this pernicious problem continues to be inadequately addressed 
within the Department of Defense.
                (1) Hearings
     On July 31, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Oversight Hearing on Sexual Assault in the Military.'' 
Witnesses included: Honorable Louise M. Slaughter, Member of 
Congress (NY-28); Honorable Jane S. Harman, Member of Congress 
(CA-36); Ms. Ingrid Torres, MSW, CSW, Washington, DC; Mrs. Mary 
Lauterbach, Mother of Lance Cpl. Maria Lauterbach, Vandalia, 
Ohio; Mr. Michael Dominguez, Principal Deputy Under Secretary 
for Defense (Personnel and Readiness); Lieutenant General 
Michael D. Rochelle, Deputy Chief of Staff G-1, United States 
Army; and Ms. Brenda S. Farrell, Director, Defense Capabilities 
and Management, U.S. Government Accountability Office.
     On September 10, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Oversight Hearing on Sexual Assault in the 
Military--Part 2.'' Witnesses included: Dr. Kaye Whitley, 
Director, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, U.S. 
Department of Defense; and Ms. Brenda S. Farrell, Director, 
Defense Capabilities and Management, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office.
                (2) Other
     At the Subcommittee's request, the Government 
Accountability Office report ``Military Personnel: The DOD and 
Coast Guard Academies Have Taken Steps to Address Incidents of 
Sexual Harassment and Assault, but Greater Federal Oversight Is 
Needed'' (GAO-08-296) was released on January 17, 2008.
     The Subcommittee sponsored a briefing on July 10, 
2008, by the Department of Veterans Affairs regarding military 
sexual trauma. Briefers included: Dr. Gerald Cross, Principal 
Deputy Under Secretary for Health and Dr. Antonette Zeiss, VHA-
Mental Health Services.
     At the Subcommittee's request, the Government 
Accountability Office report ``Military Personnel: DOD's and 
the Coast Guard's Sexual Assault Prevention and Response 
Programs Face Implementation and Oversight Challenges'' (GAO-
08-924) was released in August 2008.
            c. Missile Defense
    The Subcommittee conducted robust and sustained oversight 
of the U.S. ballistic missile defense system, the largest 
research development program in the Department of Defense, 
consisting in recent years of over $10 billion a year.
    The initial stage of this investigation culminated in a 
series of three hearings. Themes explored during this 
investigation included: examining the threats and realities 
associated with ballistic missiles; determining how that 
ballistic missile threat compares to other vulnerabilities 
facing the United States; weighing the technical prospects for 
success in the U.S.'s missile defense efforts, especially with 
the ground-based, mid-course system; and measuring the costs 
involved in this effort.
    This series of hearings aimed to achieve the most accurate 
picture possible of where the U.S. currently stands on its 
missile defense efforts, and to provide a solid foundation for 
efficient and effective decision-making going forward.
                (1) Hearings
     On March 5, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Oversight of Ballistic Missile Defense (Part 1): 
Threats, Realities, and Tradeoffs.'' Witnesses included: Mr. 
Joseph Cirincione, President of the Ploughshares Fund; Mr. 
Steven Hildreth, Specialist in National Defense, Foreign 
Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division, Congressional Research 
Service; Mr. Baker Spring, F.M. Kirby Research Fellow in 
National Security Policy at the Heritage Foundation; and Dr. 
Stephen E. Flynn, Ph.D., CMD, USCG (ret.), Senior Fellow for 
National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations.
     On April 16, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``What are the Prospects, What are the Costs?: Oversight 
of Missile Defense (Part 2).'' Witnesses included: Dr. Lisbeth 
Gronlund, Senior Scientist and Co-Director of the Global 
Security Program with the Union of Concerned Scientists; Dr. 
Richard L. Garwin, Ph.D., Fellow Emeritus, Thomas J. Watson 
Research Center, IBM; Mr. Jeff Kueter, President, The George C. 
Marshall Institute; and Mr. Philip E. Coyle, III, Senior 
Advisor with the Center for Defense Information.
     On April 30, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled, ``Oversight of Missile Defense (Part 3): Questions for 
the Missile Defense Agency.'' Witnesses included: Lieutenant 
General Henry A. ``Trey'' Obering III, Director of the Missile 
Defense Agency, Department of Defense; Mr. Philip E. Coyle, 
III, Senior Advisor with the Center for Defense Information; 
Dr. Henry F. Cooper, Ph.D., Chairman of High Frontier; and Mr. 
Joseph Cirincione, President of the Ploughshares Fund.
                (2) Official Travel/Delegations
     The Subcommittee led a congressional delegation 
that conducted business in Prague, Czech Republic, on March 29, 
2008. The delegation was led by Subcommittee Chairman John F. 
Tierney (D-MA) and included Rep. Betty McCollum (D-MN) and 
Subcommittee staff, and Subcommittee guest Members Rep. Jim 
Moran (D-VA), Rep. Maurice Hinchey (D-NY), Rep. Keith Ellison 
(D-MN), and Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-WY). The Subcommittee met 
with key Czech legislators and civil society members to discuss 
the U.S. proposal to build a missile defense radar station in 
the Czech Republic.
                (3) Other
     On March 4, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
briefing by the Missile Defense Agency on agency activities.
     On April 9, 2008, the Subcommittee hosted a 
delegation of legislators from the Czech Republic focused on 
the U.S. proposal to build a missile defense radar station in 
the Czech Republic.

7. Nonproliferation

    Oversight of nuclear weapons activities was a high priority 
for Subcommittee actions during the 110th Congress. Topics of 
Subcommittee hearings included the monitoring of present and 
future U.S. responsibilities in the current nuclear regime; the 
potential for the militarization of space; and the effect of 
planned deployments or changes to the U.S. nuclear posture, 
such as the continued deployment and testing by the Missile 
Defense Agency of a missile shield, and its effect on relations 
with foreign countries. In addition, the nuclear activities of 
Iran, Russia, and Pakistan were also topics of Subcommittee 
investigations. This multifaceted approach, which entailed 
careful examination of U.S. compliance with international 
treaty obligations and the role of current U.S. agencies, 
Administration programs, and policies in these areas, led to 
several oversight hearings and actions.
            a. Weaponization of Space
                (1) Hearings
     On May 23, 2007, the Subcommittee held an 
oversight hearing titled ``Weaponizing Space: Is Current U.S. 
Policy Protecting Our National Security?'' The hearing was held 
to explore the Administration's military and diplomatic 
policies toward the use of space. The hearing examined the 2006 
National Space Policy (unclassified version) and the impact of 
Administration policies on the use of space by other countries 
and on space debris mitigation, such as that created by the 
January 2007 anti-satellite test by the People's Republic of 
China. Witness included: Major General James B. Armor, Jr., 
Director, National Security Space Office, U.S. Department of 
Defense; Hon. Donald Mahley, Deputy Assistant Secretary for 
Threat Reduction, U.S. Department of State; Dr. Laura Grego, 
Ph.D. Staff Scientist, Global Security Program, Union of 
Concerned Scientists; Ms. Theresa Hitchens, Director, Center 
for Defense Information; Mr. Jeff Kueter, President, The George 
C. Marshall Institute; and Mr. David Cavossa, Executive 
Director, Satellite Industry Association.
                (2) Other
     As a result of questions raised by the 
Subcommittee's May 2007 hearing, the Subcommittee requested 
that the GAO compare the current National Space Policy with 
that issued by previous Administrations, and that given the 
increasing number of civil, commercial, and military satellite 
objects in space, whether rules of the road type guidelines and 
increased international cooperation on space issues are needed. 
The Subcommittee was also interested in determining the extent 
to which the U.S. military is taking a risk-based approach to 
dealing with the emerging threats to space-based assets, from 
an all-hazards perspective. This would include a comprehensive 
review of threats, identifying critical space assets, weighing 
risk, and determining ways to mitigate the risk, including 
through the use of diplomatic tools.
     In September 2008, the GAO issued a report titled 
``U.S. Efforts to Protect Space Assets and Capabilities'' 
(classified).
            b. International Nonproliferation Efforts
             (1) Hearing
     The Subcommittee sponsored a briefing on June 27, 
2007, titled International Perspectives on Strengthening the 
Nonproliferation Regime. Briefers included: the Hon. Martin 
Briens, Counselor, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Embassy of 
France; Alexei Arbatov, Ph.d., former member of the Russian 
parliament and currently a scholar in residence at the Carnegie 
Moscow Center; Pierre Goldschmidt, Ph.d., Former IAEA Deputy 
Director General and Head of the Department of Safeguards, 
former Director General of company responsible for fuel supply 
and spent fuel management of seven Belgian nuclear plants, and 
currently a Visiting Scholar at the Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace; George Perkovich, Ph.d., Vice President 
for Studies--Global Security and Economic Development, Carnegie 
Endowment for International Peace; and Mr. Henry Sokolski, 
Executive Director, Nonproliferation Policy Education Center.

8. Defense Department Acquisitions, Property Controls, and Supplier 
        Base

    The Subcommittee has actively explored instances of waste, 
fraud, and abuse in the Department of Defense's acquisitions 
process, including by conducting a hearing focused on the 
overall picture of the current state of Defense Department 
acquisitions as well as with separate and ongoing Subcommittee 
investigations.
    The Subcommittee also conducted oversight of the Department 
of Defense's disposal and controls over excess military 
property. The Subcommittee requested that the GAO investigate 
whether sensitive military equipment and supplies were being 
made available to the general public, such as via purchases and 
auction sales on the Internet.
    Finally, the Subcommittee initiated an investigation into 
the Defense Department's own knowledge of its defense supplier 
base.
            (1) Hearings
     On April 29, 2008, the Subcommittee, in 
conjunction with the full Oversight and Government Reform 
Committee, held a hearing titled ``Oversight of Defense 
Department Acquisitions.'' Witnesses included: Michael J. 
Sullivan, Director of Acquisition and Sourcing Management with 
the GAO; James Finley, Deputy Undersecretary for Acquisition 
and Technology with the Department of Defense; and David 
Patterson, Principle Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for 
Comptroller.
     On April 10, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Investigation into the Sale of Sensitive, In-Demand 
Military Equipment and Supplies on the Internet.'' This hearing 
followed an undercover investigation tasked by the Subcommittee 
and carried out by the GAO's Special Investigations Unit. 
Witnesses included: Mr. Gregory D. Kutz, Managing Director of 
Forensic Audits and Special Investigations with the Government 
Accountability Office; Mr. Charles W. Beardall, Deputy 
Inspector General for Investigations with the Department of 
Defense; Mr. Tod Cohen, Vice President for Government 
Relations, eBay Inc.; Mr. Jim Buckmaster, CEO of 
Craigslist.org; Mr. Alan F. Estevez, Principal Assistant Deputy 
Under Secretary of Defense (Logistics and Materiel Readiness) 
with the U.S. Department of Defense; and Ms. Sarah H. Finnecum, 
Director of Supply and Maintenance Directorate with the United 
States Army, G-4 (Logistics).
            (2) Other
     On October 7, 2008, at the request of the 
Subcommittee, the GAO issued a report titled ``A Departmentwide 
Framework to Identify and Report Gaps in the Defense Supplier 
Base Is Needed'' (GAO-09-5).

9. Emerging Thinking in National Security Strategy

    The Subcommittee devoted substantial attention to 
highlighting the best of emerging thinking in overarching 
national security strategy. This inherently interagency subject 
area was a natural fit for the Subcommittee's broad oversight 
jurisdiction. The Subcommittee explored guiding security 
principles and innovative thinking with the benefit of the 
perspective gained over the seven years following the September 
11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
            a. Hearings
     On October 10, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Six Years Later: Assessing Long-Term Threats, 
Risks and the U.S. Strategy for Security in a Post-9/11 
World.'' Witnesses included: Mr. Walter Isaacson, President & 
CEO, The Aspen Institute; Dr. Robert J. Lieber, Professor & 
International Relations Field Chair, Georgetown University; and 
Jessica T. Mathews, President, Carnegie Endowment for 
International Peace.
     On November 6, 2007, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Six Years Later (Part II): 'Smart Power' and 
the U.S. Strategy for Security in a Post-9/11 World.'' 
Witnesses included: the Hon. Richard L. Armitage, former Deputy 
Secretary of State; and Dr. Joseph S. Nye, Jr., former 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security 
Affairs and Chairman, National Intelligence Council.
     On February 14, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Six Years Later (Part III): Innovative 
Approaches to Combating Terrorists.'' Witnesses included: Col. 
Michael J. Meese, US Army, Professor and Head, Social Sciences 
Department, United States Military Academy, West Point; Dr. 
Angel Rabasa, Senior Policy Analyst, RAND Corporation; Dr. 
Amitai Etzioni, University Professor, The George Washington 
University; and Dr. Daniel L. Byman, Director, Center for Peace 
and Security Studies, Georgetown University.

10. The Future of American Diplomacy

    The Subcommittee investigated the effectiveness of current 
American diplomatic efforts, with a particular focus on the 
impact of post-9/11 security measures on U.S. embassy 
activities and outreach. More broadly, the Subcommittee 
evaluated the overarching purposes of U.S. diplomatic presence 
abroad and best practices for maintaining and improving U.S. 
relations with foreign governments and the people those 
governments represent.
            a. Hearing
     On January 23, 2008, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing titled ``Fortress America Abroad: Effective Diplomacy 
and the Future of U.S. Embassies.'' Witnesses included: 
Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering, former Undersecretary of State 
for Political Affairs (1997-2001); Ambassador Marc A. Grossman, 
former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs (2001-
2005) and currently Vice Chairman of the Cohen Group; Dr. Jane 
C. Loeffler, author of The Architecture of American Diplomacy 
and Fortress America, and Mr. John K. Naland, President of the 
American Foreign Service Association (AFSA).

11. International Police Training

    The Subcommittee began an investigation into the current 
efforts by the United States government--through a variety of 
departments--to assist other countries in training their police 
forces. This investigation included a preliminary hearing on 
the State Department's Antiterrorism Assistance Program.
            a. Hearing
     On June 4, 2008, the Subcommittee held a hearing 
titled ``Oversight of the State Department's Antiterrorism 
Assistance Program.'' Witnesses included Charles M. Johnson, 
Jr., Director, International Affairs and Trade, U.S. Government 
Accountability Office; Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley, Deputy 
Coordinator, Programs, Policy, Budget and Operations, Office of 
the Coordinator for Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of State; 
and Lynda Tibbetts, Acting Director, Office of Antiterrorism 
Assistance, Bureau of Diplomatic Security, U.S. Department of 
State.