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                                                       Calendar No. 665
110th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     110-313

======================================================================



 
                       BOB HOPE MEMORIAL LIBRARY

                                _______
                                

                 April 10, 2008.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Bingaman, from the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 759]

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, to which was 
referred the Act (H.R. 759) to redesignate the Ellis Island 
Library on the third floor of the Ellis Island Immigration 
Museum, located on Ellis Island in New York Harbor, as the 
``Bob Hope Memorial Library'', having considered the same, 
reports favorably thereon without amendment and recommends that 
the Act do pass.

                                PURPOSE

    The purpose of H.R. 759 is to redesignate the Ellis Island 
Library on the third floor of the Ellis Island Immigration 
Museum, located on Ellis Island in New York Harbor, as the 
``Bob Hope Memorial Library.''

                          BACKGROUND AND NEED

    From 1892 to 1954, over twelve million immigrants entered 
the United States through immigration facilities located on 
Ellis Island, a small island in New York Harbor. Ellis Island 
is located in the upper bay just off the New Jersey coast, near 
the Statue of Liberty. Today, over 40 percent of America's 
population can trace their ancestry through Ellis Island.
    The main building of the Immigration Station was restored 
after 30 years of abandonment and opened as a museum in 1990, 
administered by the National Park Service. The Ellis Island 
Library is located on the third floor of the museum and houses 
the historical and ethnological resources collection, including 
over 1,000 oral histories.
    Noted entertainer Bob Hope was born Leslie Townes Hope in 
England in 1903. His parents emigrated from England to 
Cleveland in 1908, entering the United States through Ellis 
Island. Bob Hope's life story exemplifies the story of many who 
came to this country through Ellis Island, entering the country 
with little, but who then became successful citizens. Bob Hope 
died in 2003 at the age of 100.
    In recognition of his many decades of work entertaining 
American troops overseas, Congress enacted Public Law 105-67 in 
1997, which conferred on him status as an honorary U.S. Armed 
Forces Veteran. He was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 
1962, the Medal of Freedom in 1969, and the National Medal of 
Arts in 1995.
    In commemoration of Bob Hope's lifetime achievements as 
someone who entered the country through Ellis Island, H.R. 759 
would redesignate the Ellis Island Library as the ``Bob Hope 
Memorial Library.''

                          LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

    H.R. 759, sponsored by Congressman Engel and others, passed 
the House of Representatives by a vote of 420-1 on March 20, 
2007. There is no Senate companion measure. During the 109th 
Congress, the House of Representatives passed a similar 
measure, H.R. 323. The Senate did not take any action on that 
bill.
    The Subcommittee on National Parks held a hearing on H.R. 
759 on September 11, 2007. (S. Hrg. 110-213.) At its business 
meeting on January 30, 2008, the Committee on Energy and 
Natural Resources ordered H.R. 759 favorably reported without 
amendment.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in open 
business session on January 30, 2008, by a voice vote of a 
quorum present, recommends that the Senate pass H.R. 759.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

    Section 1 provides that the Ellis Island Library, located 
on the third floor of the Ellis Island Immigration Museum on 
Ellis Island, shall be known and redesignated as the ``Bob Hope 
Memorial Library.''
    Section 2 states that any legal reference to the Ellis 
Island Library shall be deemed to be a reference to the Bob 
Hope Memorial Library.

                   COST AND BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS

    The following estimate of costs of this measure has been 
provided by the Congressional Budget Office:

H.R. 759--An act to redesignate the Ellis Island Library on the third 
        floor of the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, located on Ellis 
        Island in New York Harbor, as the ``Bob Hope Memorial Library''

    H.R. 759 would redesignate the Ellis Island Library in New 
York as the Bob Hope Memorial Library. CBO estimates that 
implementing this legislation would have no significant effect 
on the operating budget of the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, 
which is administered by the National Park Service (NPS). We 
expect that one-time costs to revise NPS brochures, maps, and 
signs would be minimal because most such revisions would take 
place in conjunction with scheduled reprinting and other 
routine maintenance. CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 759 would 
not affect revenues or direct spending.
    H.R. 759 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Deborah Reis. 
This estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      REGULATORY IMPACT EVALUATION

    In compliance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
evaluation of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in 
carrying out H.R. 759. The Act is not a regulatory measure in 
the sense of imposing Government-established standards or 
significant economic responsibilities on private individuals 
and businesses.
    No personal information would be collected in administering 
the program. Therefore, there would be no impact on personal 
privacy.
    Little, if any, additional paperwork would result from the 
enactment of H.R. 759, as ordered reported.

                   CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING

    H.R. 759, as reported, does not contain any congressionally 
directed spending items, limited tax benefits, or limited 
tariff benefits as defined in rule XLIV of the Standing Rules 
of the Senate.

                        EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS

    The testimony provided by the National Park Service at the 
September 11, 2007 subcommittee hearing on H.R. 759 follows:

 Statement of Daniel N. Wenk, Deputy Director, National Park Service, 
                       Department of the Interior

    Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee, thank you for 
the opportunity to appear before you to present the views of 
the Department of the Interior on H.R. 759, a bill to 
redesignate the Ellis Island library on the third floor of the 
Ellis Island Immigration Museum as the Bob Hope Memorial 
Library.
    The National Park Service believes there should be a strong 
association between the park and the person being commemorated, 
and that at least five years should have elapsed since the 
death of the person. This basic principle is reflected in our 
National Park Service Management Policies. Therefore, the 
Department cannot support this bill. On May 12, 2005, the 
Department also testified that we could not support H.R. 323, 
an identical bill from the 109th Congress.
    A unique repository of resources in history, ethnology, and 
sociology is located on the third floor of the Immigration 
Museum on Ellis Island. The space has been reconfigured to 
provide a reading room, a preschool children's reading center, 
an archive for controlled storage of valuable paper artifacts, 
and a room designed to provide retrieval access to the 
library's collection of more than 1,000 oral histories. It is a 
resource devoted to the American immigration experience and the 
stories of those who came to America with hopes and dreams for 
a better life. The library provides important lessons to our 
citizens of the meaning of liberty and opportunity in the 
history of our nation.
    Although Bob Hope's life story exemplifies the experience 
of many who came to the United States with little, rose to the 
heights of their professions, and gave back in abundance to 
their adopted nation, the Department cannot support H.R. 759. 
Bob Hope did enter the United States through Ellis Island, as 
did many other great Americans; however, there is no compelling 
connection between his life and the Ellis Island Immigration 
Museum.
    Bob Hope was born Leslie Townes Hope, the son of stonemason 
William Henry Hope and Avis Townes Hope. The family emigrated 
from England to Cleveland, Ohio in 1908, when Leslie, one of 
seven children, was not yet five years old. In Cleveland, the 
Hope family struggled financially, as they had in England. Mrs. 
Hope took in boarders to supplement her husband's erratic 
income. She gave singing lessons to Leslie, who entertained his 
family with song, impersonations, and dancing. When he left 
school at age 16, Leslie worked at a number of part-time jobs. 
He boxed for a short time under the name of ``Packy East'' but 
later changed his name to Lester Hope. His interest in 
entertainment and show business led him to take dancing lessons 
and to seek employment as a variety stage entertainer. Not 
until he had achieved considerable success on the stage did he 
begin using the name, ``Bob Hope.''
    Bob Hope's more than fifty-year commitment to public 
service has made him one of the most honored and esteemed 
performers in history. His charitable work and tours on behalf 
of the armed forces brought him the admiration and gratitude of 
millions and the friendship of every President of the United 
States since Franklin D. Roosevelt.
    National Park Service Management Policies 2006 states that 
the National Park Service will discourage and curtail 
commemorative works, especially commemorative naming, except 
when Congress specifically authorizes them or there is a 
compelling justification for the recognition, and the 
commemorative work is the best way to express the association 
between the park and the person, group, event, or other subject 
being commemorated. While Bob Hope had a distinguished career, 
we do not believe there is sufficient association between him 
and the Ellis Island Library to merit renaming the library.
    Mr. Chairman, this concludes my statement and I will be 
happy to answer any questions that members of the committee may 
have.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee notes that no 
changes in existing law are made by the Act H.R. 759, as 
ordered reported.