Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?
                                                       Calendar No. 831
110th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     110-397

======================================================================



 
  DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE AND JUSTICE, SCIENCE, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2009

                                _______
                                

                 June 23, 2008.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Ms. Mikulski, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 3182]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 3182) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, science, and related agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2009, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2009

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $60,100,709,000
Amount of 2008 appropriations...........................  53,734,969,000
Amount of 2009 budget estimate..........................  55,929,033,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2008 appropriations.................................  +6,365,740,000
    2009 budget estimate................................  +4,171,676,000


                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Bill..............................................     3
Summary of the Bill..............................................     3
Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations.................     6
Congressional Budget Justifications..............................     7
Electronic Government (E-Gov) Initiatives........................     8
Noncareer Personnel Reductions-in-Force..........................     8
Appropriations Liaisons..........................................     8
Title I: Department of Commerce..................................     9
Title II: Department of Justice..................................    40
Title III: Science...............................................    87
Title IV:
    Related Agencies:
        Commission on Civil Rights...............................   108
        Equal Employment Opportunity Commission..................   108
        International Trade Commission...........................   109
        Legal Services Corporation...............................   109
        Marine Mammal Commission.................................   110
        Office of the United States Trade Representative.........   111
        State Justice Institute..................................   111
Title V: General Provisions......................................   112
Compliance With Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Sen- 
  ate............................................................   114
Compliance With Paragraph 7(c) Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   116
Compliance With Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   117
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   119
Disclosure of Congressionally Directed Spending Items............   119

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The bill provides funding for: (1) the Department of 
Commerce and its bureaus, and administrations: the 
International Trade Administration [ITA], the Bureau of 
Industry and Security [BIS], the Economic Development 
Administration [EDA], the Bureau of the Census, the National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration [NTIA], the 
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office [PTO], the National Institute 
of Standards and Technology [NIST], and the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]; (2) the Department of 
Justice; (3) several independent science agencies: Office of 
Science and Technology Policy [OSTP], the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration [NASA], the National Science 
Foundation [NSF]; and (4) several related commissions and 
agencies: the Commission on Civil Rights, the Equal Employment 
Opportunity Commission [EEOC], the International Trade 
Commission [ITC], the Legal Services Corporation [LSC], the 
Marine Mammal Commission, the U.S. Trade Representative [USTR], 
and the State Justice Institute [SJI].

                          Summary of the Bill

    The Committee recommends total discretionary appropriations 
of $57,900,000,000 for the Departments of Commerce and Justice, 
science, and related agencies for fiscal year 2009. This amount 
is $4,216,676,000 above the President's budget request.
    Security.--First and foremost, this bill protects our 
Nation and our communities from terrorism and violent crime.
    Counterterrorism.--The bill funds the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation [FBI], our country's domestic counterterrorism 
agency. The Committee recommendation fully supports the FBI's 
lead role in securing domestic national security by 
safeguarding the United States against weapons of mass 
destruction, terrorist attacks, and internal espionage. 
Accordingly, the recommendation supports initiatives totaling 
$369,635,000 above the fiscal year 2008 level to improve 
intelligence, including the addition of agents devoted to 
counterterrorism efforts. Through the Committee's full support, 
agents will be provided with the tools to improve intelligence 
driven investigations and enhance human presence in 
intelligence gathering.
    A key FBI security mission is to prevent the use of weapons 
of mass destruction on U.S. soil. The Committee supports this 
effort by providing the full budget request of $123,114,000, 
which is an increase of $30,055,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
level to enhance the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate, 
providing the FBI with significant resources to detect, 
identify, and track individuals that post threats to the United 
States. Further, the Committee fully supports the FBI in its 
efforts to save potentially millions of lives by improving its 
ability to dismantle dirty bombs through its Render Safe 
program.
    Fighting Violent Crime.--The Committee has been deeply 
troubled by the President's budget proposals to reduce Federal 
resources to fight, and to help State and local communities 
fight, violent crime. In the budget request, the President once 
again proposed dramatic cuts to funding for State and local law 
enforcement. The Committee rejects this reduction, and instead, 
recommends a total of $3,121,100,000 for State and local 
enforcement, which is $2,048,000,000 above the President's 
request. The Committee's recommendation includes $600,000,000 
for Community Oriented Policing Services [COPS] and 
$580,000,000 for Edward Byrne grants.
    The Committee wishes to ensure that the Federal Bureau of 
Investigations [FBI] have sufficient resources to support its 
duel mission to fight both traditional crime and terrorism. The 
Committee is pleased to note that the FBI does not propose to 
reduced the number of special agents devoted to criminal 
investigations, as has been proposed in prior years. The 
Committee is concerned that the FBI lacks sufficient resources 
to address emerging criminal investigation requirements, 
including those to address violent crime and other crimes 
against our most vulnerable individuals. Accordingly, the 
Committee recommendation includes funding increases to support 
25 additional special agents to investigate mortgage fraud and 
31 additional agents to investigate predators who use the 
Internet to exploit children.
    Fighting Crimes Against Children.--The Committee has 
provided substantial resources to protect our children from 
predators. The recommendation includes $294,870,000 for 
Department of Justice efforts to prevent, investigate, and 
prosecute crimes against children. This recommendation fully 
supports the critical Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety 
Act, and includes $$48,000,000, which is $9,000,000 above the 
President's budget request for new FBI agents dedicated to 
fighting Internet crimes against children.
    Competitiveness.--This bill makes critical investments in 
scientific research and technology to improve America's 
competitiveness. The Committee has followed the recommendations 
of the National Academy of Sciences ``Rising Above the 
Gathering Storm,'' making significant investments in our 
science agencies that will pay dividends for our future.
    Research.--The Committee recommends funding for research 
that will create new products and processes that support job 
creation. Specifically, the Committee recommends investing over 
$809,499,000 in the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology [NIST] for highly leveraged research that will 
contribute to the development of new innovative products and 
processes. The Committee also provides over $6,854,100,000 for 
basic research through the National Science Foundation [NSF].
    Education.--The ``Rising Above the Gathering Storm'' report 
emphasized that the future of U.S. competitiveness rests on our 
Nation's ability to train the next generation of scientists and 
engineers. For this reason, the Committee has invested over 
$790,410,000 in National Science Foundation [NSF] education and 
training programs, a $64,810,000 increase above the fiscal year 
2008 enacted level. This is a critical investment to ensure 
that our Nation leads the world in science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics from kindergarten to post graduate 
levels.
    Investing in an Innovation Friendly Government.--The bill 
provides important funding to ensure that we have a Government 
that protects our inventions. The Committee recommends the full 
budget request of $2,074,773,000 for the Patent and Trademark 
Office [PTO] to protect the intellectual property of our 
inventors. In addition, the Committee has provided language to 
allow the PTO to access up to $100,000,000 in additional fees 
should they become available in fiscal year 2009. The Committee 
has been troubled by the backlog of patent applications and the 
time it takes to process them.
    Climate Change.--The Commerce, Justice, and Science 
appropriations bill protects our planning by funding the 
science used to monitor and predict changes in Earth's climate. 
Through the science conducted at the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, this bill 
funds over 80 percent of the Federal climate change science. 
The Committee is extremely concerned that the President's 
budget request does not fully address the looming loss of Earth 
observation from satellites. Several satellites that provide 
critical climate and weather information are on borrowed time. 
For this reason, the Committee has recommended $1,400,000,000 
for NASA's Earth science mission, including $150,000,000 for 
new Earth science missions recommended by the National Academy 
of Science to measure arctic ice and $630,000,000 for NASA 
science to better understand how the Sun affects the Earth. In 
addition, the Committee recommends $1,100,000,000 to fund our 
next generation weather satellites, as well as $74,000,000 to 
restore critical sensors, that are important to understanding 
our plants climate.
    Accountability and Oversight.--The Committee is extremely 
concerned about the persistent pattern of cost overruns and 
schedule slippages on major projects and missions carried out 
by the agencies within this bill. In addition, recent reports 
have exposed a culture within many agencies that exhibits a 
lack of accountability and oversight of grant funding.
    Therefore, the Committee has recommended two bill-wide 
provisions to ensure greater oversight and fiscal 
responsibility of taxpayer dollars. First, the bill requires 
each agency to notify the Committee immediately upon 
identification of program cost overruns greater than 10 
percent. Second, a provision requires the Inspectors General of 
the Departments of Commerce and Justice, the NASA, and NSF to 
conduct reviews of grant and contract funds to ensure funds are 
being spent appropriately.
    Finally, the Committee intends to work with the Government 
Accountability Office [GAO] to begin annual reviews of selected 
large scale acquisition and construction projects. 
Specifically, the Committee requests that GAO develop a plan 
for ongoing reviews of such projects, with reports to the 
Committee on a biannual basis. Agencies shall provide access to 
all necessary data, as determined by GAO, in order for the 
reviews to be completed and provided in a timely manner to the 
Committee. The Committee believes that these project status 
reports will be very valuable in identifying cost overrun and 
schedule slippage problems early, so they can be addressed 
immediately.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    Section 505 contained in the ``General Provisions'' of 
title V provides procedures for the reprogramming of funds. To 
reprogram is to change the use of funds from the specific 
purposes provided for in the act and the accompanying report 
or, in the absence of direction from the Committee on 
Appropriations, from the specific purposes provided for in the 
administration's budget request. Each title of the bill has 
also traditionally included separate provisions that define 
permissible transfers of resources between appropriation 
accounts. These transfer authority provisions are also pursuant 
to section 505, and were initiated in the early 1990's to 
provide additional flexibility to the agencies under the 
subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    The Committee expects each department and agency to closely 
follow the reprogramming procedures listed in section 505, 
which are similar to provisions that applied in statute during 
fiscal year 2008. These procedures apply to funds provided 
under this act, or provided under previous appropriations acts 
that remain available for obligation or expenditure in fiscal 
year 2009, or provided from any accounts in the Treasury 
available to the agencies funded by this act. Section 505 
requires that the Committee on Appropriations be notified by 
letter, at least 15 days prior to: Reprogramming of funds, 
whether permanent or temporary, in excess of $500,000 or 10 
percent, whichever is less, between programs, projects or 
activities. This provision is also applicable in cases where 
several activities are involved with each receiving less than 
$500,000. In addition, the Committee is to be notified of 
reprogramming actions which are less than these amounts if such 
actions would have the effect of committing the agency to 
significant funding requirements in future years; increasing 
funds or personnel by any means for any project or activity for 
which funds have been previously denied or restricted by 
Congress; creating new programs, offices, agencies or 
commissions or substantially augmenting existing programs, 
offices, agencies or commissions; relocating offices or 
employees; reorganizing offices, programs, or activities.
    The Committee also expects that any items that are subject 
to interpretation will be reported. The Committee is concerned 
that, in some instances, the departments or agencies funded 
within this appropriations act are not adhering to the 
Committee's reprogramming guidelines that are clearly set forth 
in this report and in section 505 of the accompanying bill. The 
Committee expects that each department and agency funded in the 
bill will follow these notification policies precisely and will 
not reallocate resources or reorganize activities prior to 
submitting the required notifications to the Committee.
    The reprogramming process is based on comity between the 
Appropriations Committee and the executive branch. The 
Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies appropriations 
bill provides specific program guidance throughout this report 
and tables accompanying the bill. The process is intended to 
provide flexibility to meet changing circumstances and 
emergency requirements of agencies, if there is agreement 
between the executive branch and the Congress that such a 
change is warranted. Reprogramming procedures provide a means 
to agree on adjustments, if necessary, during a fiscal year, 
and to ensure that the Committee is kept apprised of instances 
where nonappropriated resources are used to meet program 
requirements, such as fee collections and unobligated balances 
that were not considered in the development of the 
appropriations legislation.
    In the absence of comity and respect for the prerogatives 
of the Appropriations Committees and Congress in general, the 
Committee will have no choice but to include specific program 
limitations and details legislatively. Under these 
circumstances, programs, projects, and activities become 
absolutes and the executive branch shall lose the ability to 
propose changes in the use of appropriated funds through the 
reprogramming process between programs, projects, and 
activities without seeking some form of legislative action.
    The Committee expects the executive branch departments to 
manage their programs, projects and activities within the 
levels appropriated. Reprogramming or transfer requests shall 
be submitted only in the case of an unforeseen emergency or 
situation that could not have been anticipated when formulating 
the budget request for the current fiscal year. Further, the 
Committee notes that when a department or agency submits a 
reprogramming or transfer request to the Committees on 
Appropriations, and does not receive identical responses from 
the House and Senate, it is the responsibility of the 
department or agency seeking the reprogramming to reconcile the 
differences between the two bodies before proceeding. If 
reconciliation is not possible, the items in disagreement in 
the reprogramming or transfer request shall be considered 
unapproved.

                  Congressional Budget Justifications

    The Committee directs that all departments and agencies 
funded within this bill shall submit all of their fiscal year 
2010 budget justifications concurrently with the official 
submission of the administration's budget to Congress. Further, 
all departments and agencies with classified programs are 
directed to submit their classified budget justification 
documents to the Senate Committee on Appropriations, through, 
appropriate means at the same time the unclassified budget 
justifications are transmitted.
    These justifications shall include a sufficient level of 
detailed data, exhibits and explanatory statements to support 
the appropriations requests, including tables that outline each 
agency programs, projects, and activities for fiscal years 2008 
and 2009. The Committee directs the chief financial officer of 
each department or agency under the subcommittees jurisdiction 
to ensure that adequate justification is given to each 
increase, decrease, staffing and function change proposed in 
the fiscal year 2010 budget, particularly within the 
departmental operations and management accounts.
    The Committee is concerned that many of the budget 
submissions are inadequate and necessitate multiple requests 
for additional information. This process is inefficient and 
unnecessarily delays access to information that is fundamental 
to the work of the Committee. The Committee expects that the 
fiscal year 2010 submission will include sufficient detail to 
justify all programs, projects and activities contained in each 
department, agency or commission budget request. Budget 
justifications are prepared not for the use of the agencies, 
but are the primary tool of the Committee to evaluate the 
resource requirements and proposals requested by the 
administration. The Committee expects all departments and 
agencies covered under this act to consult with the Committee 
on this issue prior to the submission of the fiscal year 2009 
budget request and justification materials.

               Electronic Government (E-Gov) Initiatives

    The administration is seeking funds for various E-Gov 
initiatives in the fiscal year 2009 budget requests for the 
departments, agencies, and commissions receiving appropriations 
in this act. In many cases, the development of information 
technology [IT] systems for various E-Gov initiatives, 
including the so-called ``lines of business'', is not being 
funded in the budget of the managing agency of the initiative. 
Instead, these cross-agency E-Gov initiatives are being funded 
through ``fee-for-service'' assessments to agencies.
    The Committee recommendation provides no funding for E-Gov 
activities for fiscal year 2009. If the departments or agencies 
determine that funds are necessary for these efforts, the 
Committee will consider a reprogramming of existing resources 
consistent with sections 505 and 515 of this act.

                Noncareer Personnel Reductions-in-Force

    The Committee directs departments or agencies funded in the 
accompanying bill that are planning to conduct a reduction-in-
force [RIF] to notify the Committee in writing 30 days in 
advance of the date of the proposed personnel action.

                        Appropriations Liaisons

    The Committee prefers to channel the majority of its 
inquiries and requests for information and assistance through 
the budget offices or comptroller offices of the departments 
and agencies which it oversees, but reserves the right to call 
upon any individual or organization in any agency under its 
jurisdiction.

                                TITLE I

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    The Committee recommends a total of $9,402,384,000 for the 
Department of Commerce [DOC]. The recommendation is 
$2,545,850,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level, 
excluding supplemental appropriations, and $1,185,866,000 above 
the budget request. On June 9, 2008, the Committee received a 
budget amendment that requests an additional $546,000,000 for 
the Department of Commerce's Bureau of the Census to cover 
increased costs of the 2010 Decennial Census due to 
mismanagement of a key information technology contract. The 
budget amendment proposes to reduce other agencies and bureaus 
of the Department of Commerce by $111,000,000. The Office of 
Management and Budget [OMB] transmitted the amendment too late 
for it to receive serious consideration by the Committee; 
therefore this report does not reflect the amended request.
    The Committee recognizes that the Department has highly 
diverse and specialized offices, research laboratories, and 
applied technology programs, all staffed by extremely dedicated 
people. Some of the Nation's top business analysts, technical 
engineers and environmental researchers are employed by the 
Department.
    The Nation relies on DOC to maintain America's 
competitiveness within today's foreign markets, and to promote 
and expand our international trade agreements. Programs within 
the Department continue to protect our businesses' intellectual 
property and maintain a high level of technical standards. The 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, in particular, 
has consistently demonstrated over time the value of advancing 
technical innovation while enhancing our economic security.
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] 
comprises about two-thirds of DOC's budget. It is the steward 
of many of our marine resources, forecaster of our weather, and 
surveyor of our coasts, among other responsibilities. The 
Committee's budget recommendation of $4,445,921,000 supports 
many of the Joint Ocean Commission's suggestions on improving 
our Nation's ocean community.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


                   International Trade Administration


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $405,172,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     420,431,000
Committee recommendation................................     420,431,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $420,431,000. The 
recommendation is $15,259,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by function, are displayed 
in the following table:

               INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION FUNDING
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Manufacturing and Services............................            48,592
Market Access and Compliance..........................            42,332
Import Administration.................................            66,357
Trade Promotion and U.S. Foreign Commercial Services..           237,739
Executive Direction...................................            25,411
                                                       -----------------
      Total Direct Obligations........................           420,431
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Offsetting Fee Collections.--The Committee recommendation 
adopts the proposed increase of $1,439,000 for offsetting fee 
collections. The Committee believes the fee estimate of 
$9,439,000 is realistic and achievable.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of Import 
Administration's [IA] vigorous enforcement of the U.S. 
antidumping [AD] and countervailing duty [CVD] laws in 
safeguarding U.S. industries and jobs against injurious and 
unfair foreign trade practices. IA is facing a substantially 
expanding workload and recently decided to apply, for the first 
time, the CVD law to China, a non-market economy. The Committee 
includes bill and report language to require an additional 
$3,814,000 in funding be provided to IA to fill vacant AD/CVD 
case analyst positions that are currently unfunded. Staffing of 
these unfunded positions in the AD/CVD Operations Enforcement 
Offices is critical to the Department's ability to conduct AD/
CVD investigations, administrative reviews, sunset reviews, 
changed circumstance reviews, other AD/CVD cases and unfair 
subsidy practices in CVD cases as an essential element of the 
effective administration of the AD/CVD laws. The Committee 
recommends that funding provided herein also be utilized to 
expand the size of AD/CVD verification teams and ensure that 
new analysts receive on-site training in verification practices 
and techniques.
    The Committee notes that IA's absorption of $2,000,000 in 
fees in recent years has eroded scarce resources that otherwise 
would have been expended in conducting investigations and 
reviews of AD/CVD cases. The Committee opposes the charging of 
fees to U.S. industries filing AD/CVD petitions, and therefore, 
believes that IA should not be charged for fees.
    Appalachian-Turkish Trade Project.--The Committee continues 
to recognize the importance of trade and investment 
opportunities to the Appalachian Region, and it is encouraged 
by the findings in reports that Appalachian firms could find 
significant trade and investment opportunities, particularly in 
the energy, hardwood, high technology, and transportation 
sectors, in the Republic of Turkey and the surrounding region. 
In this regard, the Committee supports the Appalachian-Turkish 
Trade Project [ATTP], a project to promote opportunities to 
expand trade, encourage business interests, stimulate foreign 
studies, and build a lasting and mutually meaningful 
relationship between Appalachian States and the Republic of 
Turkey, as well as neighboring regions, such as in Greece. The 
Committee commends the Commercial Service for its leadership 
role in helping to implement the mission of the ATTP. The 
Committee expects the Commercial Service to continue to be a 
prominent ATTP sponsor.
    World Trade Organization.--The Committee is aware of the 
World Trade Organization [WTO] Appellate Body's January 16, 
2003, ruling regarding the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset 
Act. The Committee directs the Department of Commerce, in 
consultation with the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, 
to continue to negotiate within the WTO to seek express 
recognition of the existing right of WTO Members to distribute 
monies collected from antidumping and countervailing duties. 
The agency shall consult with and provide regular reports, 
every 60 days, to the Senate Committee on Appropriations.
    In addition, the Committee directs that negotiations be 
conducted within the WTO consistent with the negotiating 
objectives contained in the Trade Act of 2002, Public Law 107-
210, to maintain strong U.S. trade remedies laws, prevent 
overreaching by WTO Panels and the WTO Appellate Body, and 
prevent the creation of obligations never negotiated or agreed 
to by the United States.
    The Committee is aware that ITA reduced fees for export 
promotion services and trade missions for 2005 hurricane-
affected companies. In light of the ongoing need to encourage 
exporting and assist local businesses with their economic 
recovery efforts, the Committee encourages ITA to find ways to 
extend these fee reductions through fiscal year 2009 for 
companies affected by hurricanes in the gulf region.
    The Committee provides funding for the following 
congressionally directed projects, and directs the 
International Trade Administration to refrain from charging 
administrative costs to these grants. The Committee expects 
that International Trade Administration will provide 
appropriate management and oversight of each grant.
    Vermont Global Trade Partnership, to assist small business 
to participate in trade missions--$400,000; and the National 
Textile Center Auburn University to continue and enhance 
research related to the textile industry--$1,000,000.

                    Bureau of Industry and Security


                     OPERATIONS AND ADMINISTRATION

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $72,855,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      83,676,000
Committee recommendation................................      83,676,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $83,676,000. The 
recommendation is $10,821,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The Bureau of Industry and Security [BIS] is the principal 
agency involved in the development, implementation, and 
enforcement of export controls for dual-use technologies. The 
Export Enforcement Division detects, prevents, investigates, 
and assists in the sanctioning of illegal dual-use exports.
    Within the amount provided under this heading, $40,988,000 
is for export administration, $36,838,000 is for export 
enforcement, and $5,850,000 is for management and policy 
coordination. These funds are provided to ensure BIS has the 
necessary resources to reduce security threats, ensure 
America's technological preeminence, and improve the recruiting 
and retention of qualified personnel.

                  Economic Development Administration

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $279,932,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     132,800,000
Committee recommendation................................     232,800,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $232,800,000. The 
recommendation is $47,132,000 below the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $100,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Economic Development Administration [EDA] provides 
grants to local governments and nonprofit agencies for public 
works, planning, and other projects designed to facilitate 
economic development. Funding amounts for the two 
appropriations accounts under this heading are displayed below.

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $249,100,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     100,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     200,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $200,000,000. The 
recommendation is $49,100,000 below the fiscal year 2008 level 
and $100,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
expects EDA to use all available carryover and prior year 
recoveries to the maximum extent possible.
    The purpose of Economic Development Assistance Programs 
[EDAP] is to stimulate employment and increase incomes in areas 
that are characterized by underutilized resources which, if put 
to productive use, can contribute to greater national 
productivity and balanced national economic growth. The 
structural economic problems of various geographic areas, 
though having distinct characteristics, are interrelated. Thus, 
an effective Federal economic development program must 
transcend the conventional conceptions of urban and rural 
development by addressing all geographic areas within a 
framework of national priorities and resources.
    The Committee is again disappointed by the administration's 
request for the Economic Development Assistance Programs [EDAP] 
especially given the ringing endorsement the administration 
showed with its fiscal year 2007 proposal. The EDAP is a highly 
leveraged program with a successful track record. The program's 
performance measures consistently show that the EDAP 
investments have attracted in private sector investment into 
distressed communities and helped create jobs as a result of 
these investments. Given these facts the Committee does not 
agree to the requested reduction. While the Committee remains 
very supportive of the EDAP it was unable to restore the 
programs funding to the fiscal year 2008 level.
    The Committee recommendation includes $105,800,000 for 
public works grants (title I); $27,000,000 for planning 
assistance; $9,400,000 for technical assistance; $500,000 for 
research and evaluation; $15,000,000 for trade adjustment 
assistance; and $42,300,000 for economic adjustment grants 
(title IX).
    A recent study provided for the U.S. Department of Veterans 
Affairs found that 18 percent of recently discharged veterans 
were unemployed, and, that of those finding employment, 1 out 
of 4 earned less than $22,000. Economic development programs 
such as the veteran business resource centers provide critical 
tools to veterans wishing to re-enter and succeed in the 
civilian workforce. The Committee recommends that of the funds 
provided for Economic Development Assistance, $800,000 shall be 
for veteran's resources centers as defined pursuant to section 
33(f) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 657c(f)) and that 
have been funded through grants from funds provided in the 
Science, State, Justice, Commerce and Related Agencies 
appropriations bill for fiscal year 2006 (Public Law 109-108) 
and the Revised Continuing Appropriations Resolution (Public 
Law 110-5).
    The Committee is aware of the exceptionally large 
geographic area, Hawaii and the American Pacific, served by the 
Hawaii Economic Development Administration office and 
increasing demands for services in the area and recommends 
increased staff support for this field office.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $30,832,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      32,800,000
Committee recommendation................................      32,800,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $32,800,000. The 
recommendation is $1,968,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee continues to support EDA's regional offices 
and reiterates its commitment to continuing the current 
operational structure with the six regional offices in Atlanta, 
Austin, Chicago, Denver, Philadelphia, and Seattle. The 
Committee's recommendation fully funds the request for the 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation which provides adequate 
funding to begin filling vacancies within the regional offices. 
The Committee again directs that vacancies within the regional 
offices be filled prior to any vacancies within headquarters.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $28,623,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      29,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      29,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $29,000,000. The 
recommendation is $377,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request. The increase provides 
for inflationary adjustments and ensures that funds will be 
available for the existing Native American Business Development 
Centers.

                ECONOMIC AND INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE


                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $81,075,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      90,621,000
Committee recommendation................................      90,621,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $90,621,000. The 
recommendation is $9,546,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    Economic and Statistical Analysis [ESA] encompasses the 
collection, tabulation, and publication of a wide variety of 
economic, demographic, and social statistics and provides 
support to the Secretary of Commerce and other Government 
officials in interpreting the state of the economy and 
developing economic policy. The Committee's recommendation 
fully funds the Bureau of Economic Analysis [BEA] as this 
bureau provides the most timely, relevant, and accurate 
economic accounts data to promote a better understanding of the 
U.S. economy.

                          Bureau of the Census

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,230,244,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   2,604,622,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,151,002,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $3,151,002,000. The 
recommendation is $1,920,758,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $546,380,000 above the budget request.
    On June 9, 2008, the Committee received a budget amendment 
that requests an additional $546,000,000 for the Department of 
Commerce's Bureau of the Census to cover increased costs of the 
2010 Decennial Census due to mismanagement of a key information 
technology contract. The budget amendment proposes to reduce 
other Agencies and Bureaus of the Department of Commerce by 
$111,000,000. The Office of Management and Budget [OMB] 
transmitted the amendment too late for it to receive serious 
consideration by the Committee; therefore this report does not 
reflect the amended request.
    The Committee notes that the fiscal year 2009 budget is a 
critical year for the Census Bureau as it begins initial 
operations of the decennial census. Accordingly, the amounts 
provided by the Committee to the Census Bureau are sufficient 
for the activities that are critical to the agency, including 
its primary function, the decennial census.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $202,838,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     238,740,000
Committee recommendation................................     238,740,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $238,740,000. The 
recommendation is $35,902,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and is the same as the budget request. This 
account provides for the salaries and expenses associated with 
the statistical programs of the Bureau of the Census, including 
measurement of the Nation's economy and the demographic 
characteristics of the population. These programs are intended 
to provide a broad base of economic, demographic, and social 
information used for decision-making by governments, private 
organizations, and individuals.
    Within the funds provided the Committee has provided the 
full increase of $8,118,000 to improve measurement of service 
sector. This increase will provide economic policy makers with 
more comprehensive and timely data on the service economy, 
which now accounts for 55 percent of economic activity. In 
addition, the Committee's recommendation provides $46,400,000 
to ensure a full Survey of Income and Program Participation 
[SIPP] sample of 45,000 households.

                     PERIODIC CENSUSES AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,027,406,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   2,365,882,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,912,262,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $2,912,262,000. The 
recommendation is $1,884,856,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $546,380,000 above the budget request.
    This account provides for the constitutionally mandated 
decennial census and other programs which are cyclical in 
nature. Additionally, individual surveys are conducted for 
other Federal agencies on a reimbursable basis.
    2010 Decennial Census.--The Committee recommendation fully 
funds the amended request to return the 2010 census to a more 
reliable paper-based operation. At the conclusion of the 2000 
census, the Census Bureau embarked on a noble effort to 
automate decennial census operations through the development 
and procurement of a handheld device to be used by field 
enumerators. The centerpiece of this effort is known as the 
Field Data Collection Automation [FDCA] program. FDCA's goal 
was to reduce life-cycle costs while improving the accuracy and 
timeliness of data collection. To the Committee's 
disappointment this effort was not successful, resulting in a 
techno-Katrina--a fiscal disaster that many foresaw but were 
unable to avoid. The current difficulties being encountered 
involving the FDCA portion of the 2010 Census are not the 
result of an unanticipated problem, but have been building for 
several years.
    After several recent reviews by independent entities, GAO, 
and even the Census itself, the problem has been identified as 
the delayed definition of systems requirements and management 
of the FDCA award. Although the Census Bureau decided in 2004 
to contract for handheld devices in order to increase 
efficiency and accuracy of the 2010 census, it was not until 
2006 that the Census awarded the contract for this activity. By 
delaying the award, nearly 2 years of critical development time 
for testing and evaluation were lost. As a result, the 
Secretary of Commerce has decided to utilize the handheld 
device units only for the Address Canvassing portion of the 
2010 census and to rely on a paper-based operation for Non-
Response Follow-Up [NRFU]. This decision will result in a more 
expensive 2010 census but at the same time will allow for more 
predictability in remaining cost estimates.
    The Committee has been informed that total life cycle costs 
have increased by nearly $2,500,000,000 to approximately 
$14,000,000,000. This has resulted in the need for an 
additional fiscal year 2008 appropriation of $210,000,000 and 
an amended budget request of $3,304,622,000 for fiscal year 
2009. The Bush Administration's fiscal orthodoxy has forced the 
Department of Commerce to propose unrealistic budget reductions 
to offset the increased costs associated with this fiasco. The 
Committee rejects the proposed offsets because the Committee 
believes that programs that are conducting their mission in a 
fiscally responsible manner should not be forced to suffer as 
the result of incompetence of others. Many of the programs 
identified for offsets already ``gave at the office'' and saw 
their budgets reduced during the final negotiations over the 
fiscal year 2008 appropriations process because of this 
administration's unwillingness to compromise. The Committee 
therefore will do the responsible thing and fund the increased 
costs not through unrealistic cuts or gimmicks but rather by an 
increase in funding and oversight.
    The Committee adopts by reference report language that 
accompanies the fiscal year 2008 supplemental appropriations 
for the Census Bureau regarding the development and reporting 
of milestones associated with the 2010 census.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $36,266,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      19,218,000
Committee recommendation................................      59,218,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $59,218,000. The 
recommendation is $22,952,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $40,000,000 above the budget request.
    Enhance 9-1-1.--The Committee is aware that the Digital 
Television Transition and Public Safety Fund made $43,500,000 
available in mandatory funding to implement the ENHANCE 911 Act 
of 2004. The Committee directs the Assistant Secretary to 
coordinate the work of the National Telecommunication and 
Information Administration [NTIA] on this critical program with 
other relevant Federal agencies.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $17,466,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      19,218,000
Committee recommendation................................      19,218,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $19,218,000. The 
recommendation is $1,752,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee retains language from previous years allowing 
the Secretary of Commerce to collect reimbursements from other 
Federal agencies for a portion of the cost of coordination of 
spectrum management, analysis, and operations. The NTIA shall 
submit a report to the Senate Committee on Appropriations no 
later than June 1, 2009, detailing the collection of 
reimbursements from other agencies related to spectrum 
management, analyses, and research.

    PUBLIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES, PLANNING, AND CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $18,800,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      20,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $20,000,000. The 
recommendation is $1,200,000 above the fiscal year 2008 funding 
level and $20,000,000 above the budget request. The Public 
Telecommunications Facilities Planning and Construction [PTFPC] 
program awards competitive grants that help public broadcasting 
stations, State and local governments, Indian tribes, and 
nonprofit organizations construct facilities to bring 
educational and cultural programming to the American public 
using broadcasting and nonbroadcasting telecommunications 
technologies.

                    TECHNOLOGY OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2008....................................................
Budget estimate, 2009...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     $20,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $20,000,000. The 
Committee has reconstituted the Technology Opportunities 
Program [TOP] to focus on expanding broadband deployment. The 
Committee notes that the National Academies of Sciences report 
``Rising above the Gathering Storm'' recommended that the 
Federal Government should ensure ubiquitous broadband Internet 
access. Several nations are well ahead of the United States in 
providing broadband access for home, school, and business. That 
capability can be expected to do as much to drive innovation, 
the economy, and job creation in the 21st century as did access 
to the telephone, interstate highways, and air travel in the 
20th century. The Committee directs that funding be awarded 
competitively for the construction of broadband networks and 
services. The Committee directs NTIA to notify the Committee 
within 120 days after enactment about the criteria to be used 
to review and evaluate proposals. Funds shall not be available 
for obligation until 30 days after the Committee is notified 
about the criteria.

               United States Patent and Trademark Office


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,915,000,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   2,074,773,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,074,773,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $2,074,773,000. The 
recommendation is $159,273,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request, to be derived 
from offsetting fee collections. The Committee agrees with the 
recommendation to extend the fee increase for USPTO through the 
end of fiscal year 2009. The Committee continues to provide 
bill language to allow the USPTO to have fuller access to fees, 
including $100,000,000 in fees collected above original 
estimates.
    The United States Patent and Trademark Office [USPTO] is 
the central hub of an innovation friendly government. USPTO 
examines patent applications, grants patent protection for 
qualified inventions, and disseminates technological 
information disclosed in patents. USPTO also examines trademark 
applications and provides Federal registration to owners of 
qualified trademarks. The USPTO is subject to the policy 
direction of the Secretary of Commerce, but the agency has 
independent control of its budget, expenditures, personnel, 
procurement and other administrative and management functions. 
Patent laws administered by the USPTO encourage invention, 
innovation, and investment. The USPTO plays a critical role in 
promoting the continued development of intellectual property of 
the Nation. For established companies, new patents improve 
competitiveness, increase productivity, help bring new products 
and services to market, and create jobs.
    Patent Pendency and Backlog.--The Committee remains 
frustrated by the lack of progress toward reducing patent 
pendency and the overall patent backlog. The Committee notes 
that the Patent Office took 3 weeks not the 3 years to award 
the patent for the invention of the telephone to Alexander 
Graham Bell. During the early part of this decade the Committee 
heard concerns about the redirection of patent filing fees and 
has since provided the USPTO with full access to its fees since 
2005. The subsequent years has seen the USPTO budget grow by 
over $500,00,000, yet pendency and backlog grow worse. As such 
the Committee has provided bill language to transfer funding to 
the Office of Inspector General for the express purpose of 
conducting continual audit engagements and oversight at the 
USPTO.
    USPTO Operations.--As a fee for service agency the USPTO 
operates in a business like model. In an effort to identify 
areas for improvement, the Committee directs the USPTO to adopt 
the principles of the Baldrige National Quality Program. The 
Baldrige Program represents the pinnacle of performance 
excellence for American business. The Committee directs the 
USPTO to work with the Baldrige Program to begin the process of 
incorporating these principles and to report to the Committee 
on a quarterly basis on progress made towards adoption.
    Patent Examiners.--The Committee is deeply concerned with 
the turnover in Patent examiners. Numerous reviews conducted by 
the General Accountability Office [GAO] have shown that for 
every two examiners hired one leaves the agency. Contrary to 
the view of senior management, most examiners who left the 
agency have cited the unreasonable work productivity goals as a 
major reason for their departure. In order to meet their goals 
many examiners have to work unpaid overtime or while on annual 
leave. These goals which were first adopted in the 1970's have 
not been updated to address the ever more complex technologies 
that encompass today's patent applications. The unrealistic 
goals are forcing junior examiners to leave which will have a 
lasting impact on the agency. The loss of this ``seed corn'' 
will make it difficult to replace the productivity rates of 
senior examiners when they subsequently retire. Therefore, the 
Committee has restricted access to $10,000,000 of fees until 
the Director begins a comprehensive reevaluation of the work 
productivity goals for patent examiners.
    Any deviations from the funding distribution provided for 
in this act and in its accompanying statement, including 
carryover balances, are subject to the standard reprogramming 
procedures set forth in section 505 of this act. In addition, 
60 days after the date of enactment of this act, the USPTO 
shall submit to the Senate Committee on Appropriations a 
spending plan for fiscal year 2009. This spending plan shall 
incorporate all carryover balances from previous fiscal years, 
and describe any changes to the patent or trademark fee 
structure.

                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY


             National Institute of Standards and Technology

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $755,847,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     638,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     813,499,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $813,499,000. The 
recommendation is $57,652,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $175,499,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation provides that up to $12,300,000 may be 
transferred from the Scientific and Technical Research and 
Services account to the Working Capital Fund, which the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST] uses to 
purchase equipment for its laboratories.
    NIST is one of the oldest Federal labs and has a long 
history of assisting with the Nation's industrial development. 
Beginning in the early 1900s with electricity standards, to 
assisting in the development of Standard Reference Material 
[SRM] such as SRM 143 DJK/RCK, to modern day mammograms and 
semiconductors, innumerable products and services rely in some 
way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology. NIST's mission 
is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by 
advancing measurement science, standards, and technology in 
ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of 
life. It carries out its mission in four complementary 
programs.
    A description of each NIST account and the corresponding 
Committee recommendation follows in the subsequent three 
headings.

             SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $440,517,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     535,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     489,499,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $489,499,000. The 
recommendation is $48,982,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $45,501,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendations are displayed in the 
following table with specific increases described:

   SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND SERVICES, DIRECT OBLIGATIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Laboratories and technical programs.....................         364,237
Strategic and Emerging Initiatives......................          27,750
NIST Center for neutron research........................          41,522
Center for nanoscale science technology.................          29,825
Baldridge National Quality Program......................           8,522
Corporate Services......................................          17,643
                                                         ---------------
      Total STRS........................................         489,499
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Innovation Investments.--The Committee recommendation 
provides for $31,380,000 in new fiscal year 2009 initiatives. 
Within the funding provided the Committee provides the 
following increases: $6,000,000 for Nano-Environment Safety and 
Health; $2,500,000 for Biosciences; $5,000,000 for Quantum 
Information Sciences; $5,000,000 for calibration support of 
climate change observation satellites; $380,000 for the Summer 
Teachers Institute at NIST targeting 5th through 8th grade math 
and science teachers; $3,250,000 for the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Program; and $9,250,000 for Strategic 
Measurement Partnerships
    Strategic Measurement Partnerships.--The Committee feels 
strongly about the benefits of a robust measurements and 
standards research program that pushes the frontiers of science 
and helps lay the foundation for innovation. However, the 
Committee is concerned that the insular culture of the NIST 
laboratories prevents it from fully exploiting outside 
partnerships which can provide needed expertise and help 
accelerate measurement development. The Committee therefore has 
included funding for a new Strategic Measurement Partnerships 
[SMP] program to facilitate cost-shared collaborative research 
partnerships and alliances with institutions of higher 
education that are focused on developing next generation 
measurements and standards. Funding for these partnerships will 
be limited to 5 years in length with a second 5-year period 
renewable at the option of NIST. Funding will support planning 
and research. Research decisions utilizing these funds will be 
made at the discretion of NIST and its partner. NIST is 
directed to provide the Committee with an operational plan for 
this program no later than 120 days after enactment.
    Printed Electronics Study.--The Committee believes that 
flexible, large area and printed electronics technology holds 
great promise for the competitiveness of the United States. 
NIST shall enter into an agreement with the National Academy of 
Sciences to undertake a study that examines the position of the 
United States in flexible electronics relative to efforts in 
other countries. The National Academies shall also consider the 
particular technologies and commercial sectors to which 
flexible electronics apply and the recommendations that must be 
undertaken at a Federal level for a national initiative.
    Office of Law Enforcement Standards [OLES].--The Committee 
remains a strong supporter of OLES and views its activities as 
an integral part efforts to support first responders. 
Therefore, the Committee continues support for OLES and 
provides $8,000,000 from ``Laboratories and technical 
programs'' to support this critical work.
    Fiscal Year 2009 Spend Plan.--The Committee is disappointed 
that NIST did not adhere to direction contained in the fiscal 
year 2008 Committee report to develop a new budget structure 
for the fiscal year 2009 budget submission. In response, the 
Committee directs NIST to submit a spend plan for the funding 
provided for ``Laboratories and technical programs'' and for 
Strategic and Emerging Initiatives no later than 45 days after 
enactment. The budget structure for this spend plan shall 
provide appropriation levels for each of the major laboratory 
operating units.
    The Committee provides funding within the amounts for 
Strategic Measurement Partnerships for the following 
congressionally directed projects, and directs the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology to refrain from charging 
administrative costs to these grants. The Committee expects 
that the National Institute of Standards and Technology will 
provide appropriate management and oversight of each grant.
    New York Center for National Competitiveness in Nanoscale 
Characterization--$1,000,000; UMBC/UMCP Ultrafast Dynamics for 
Next-Generation Nanotechnology--$2,000,000.
    Finally, additional funds of $12,300,000 are available for 
transfer to the Working Capital Fund for equipment and other 
purposes related to the STRS account.

                     INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $154,840,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       4,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     175,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $175,000,000. The 
recommendation is $20,160,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $171,000,000 above the budget request.
    Hollings Manufacturing Extension Programs [MEP].--The 
Committee recommendation provides $110,000,000 to fund MEP 
centers restoring the program to its traditional operating 
level. MEP supports a network of locally run centers that 
provide technical advice and consultative services to small 
manufacturing companies in all 50 States and Puerto Rico. Many 
of these firms lack the in-house technical knowledge and 
experience to implement cutting edge technologies and cost 
saving processes, which places them at risk from foreign 
competition. Since its inception, MEP has consistently been the 
program that small manufacturers could look to for assistance.
    Technology Innovation Program [TIP].--The Committee 
provides $65,000,000 to focus on developing innovative 
technologies that will improve the competitiveness of our 
nations. The Committee also provides bill language to allow TIP 
immediate access to prior year recoveries. The Committee 
recommendation will allow for approximately $40,000,000 in new 
project funding.

                  CONSTRUCTION OF RESEARCH FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $160,490,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      99,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     149,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $149,000,000. The 
recommendation is $11,490,000 below the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $50,000,000 above the budget request.
    The recommendation funds the highest priority safety, 
capacity, maintenance, and repair projects at NIST.
    JILA Expansion.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$13,000,000 towards the expansion of the building located on 
the University of Colorado's campus. The Committee is concerned 
that the proposed project, which has an estimated budget of 
$27,500,226, will require the Federal Government to pay over 80 
percent of the total cost of construction. The Committee 
appreciates the great research that has been conducted through 
the JILA partnership, however it is unlikely that the Committee 
will provide more than 50 percent toward the total cost of this 
project unless it is convinced to do otherwise.

                       NIST CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                                                        recommendations
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Boulder Building 1 Extension Project.................        $43,538,000
NIST Child Care Center (Building 916)................          6,000,000
JILA Expansion.......................................         13,000,000
Safety, Capacity, Major Modifications, and Repairs...         42,462,000
Congressionally Directed Projects....................         44,000,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total Direct Obligations, CRF..................        149,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee directs NIST to provide quarterly reports on 
the status of all construction projects, and to provide an 
accounting of projects.
    The Committee provides funding for the following 
congressionally directed projects, and directs the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology to refrain from charging 
administrative costs to these grants. The Committee expects 
that the National Institute of Standards and Technology will 
provide appropriate management and oversight of each grant.
    University of Alabama for a Interdisciplinary Science and 
Engineering Teaching and Research Center--$30,000,000; 
Mississippi St. University for expansion of the Research, 
Technology, and Economic Development Park--$6,500,000; 
University of Mississippi Medical Center--$6,500,000; 
University of Southern Mississippi for a Formulation Science 
building--$1,000,000.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $3,896,484,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   4,103,913,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,445,921,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $4,445,921,000 for 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA]. Of 
this amount, transfers total $82,000,000. The recommendation is 
$549,437,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level, 
excluding supplemental appropriations, and $342,008,000 above 
the budget request.
    The Committee has reviewed the U.S. Ocean Policy Report 
Card for 2007 issued by the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative. 
The report concludes that while State and regional initiatives 
continue to move forward on ocean governance reform, the lack 
of significant progress at the Federal level to commit adequate 
funding and affect meaningful ocean policy reform hinders 
national improvement. The report provides an overall grade of C 
from a C- average in 2006.
    The Committee agrees with this analysis and continues to be 
frustrated by the administration's reluctance to put real 
dollars towards all of NOAA's programs. During the conclusion 
of the fiscal year 2008 appropriation cycle the Congress was 
forced to make reluctant cuts to the budgets of many worthy 
programs because of the President's unwillingness to 
compromise. The result was that many of NOAA's programs that 
help save lives and livelihoods were reduced. With this budget 
the Committee notes that overall request is above the enacted 
level from fiscal year 2008. However, once the increase for 
NOAA's satellite programs is removed, the budget is once again 
a disappointment, as it either cuts or stagnates programs that 
are priorities to the ocean community. Therefore the Committee 
has taken the Commission's recommendations into account in 
developing this budget and has augmented the request where the 
President has dangerously underfunded several programs.

                  OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $2,856,277,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   2,831,253,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,051,911,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $3,051,911,000. The 
recommendation is $195,634,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level, excluding supplemental appropriations, and 
$220,658,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee provides funding for congressionally directed 
projects listed within the obligation tables for: the National 
Ocean Service; National Marine Fisheries Service; Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Research, National Weather Service; National 
Environmental, Satellite Data, and Information Service; and 
Program Support, and directs NOAA to refrain from charging 
administrative costs to these grants. The Committee expects 
that NOAA will provide appropriate management and oversight of 
each grant.

                      NOAA NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

    The Committee recommends $516,845,000 for the National 
Ocean Service [NOS]. NOS programs provide scientific, 
technical, and management expertise to promote safe navigation; 
assess the health of coastal and marine resources; respond to 
natural and human-induced threats; and preserve the coastal 
ocean and global environments.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

       NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Navigation Services:
    Mapping & Charting.................................           47,639
    Hydrographic Research and Technology Development...            7,424
    Electronic Navigational Charts.....................            6,128
    Shoreline Mapping..................................            2,424
    Address Survey Backlog/Contracts...................           31,173
    Geodesy............................................           22,860
    National Height Modernization......................            2,541
    Regional Geospatial Modeling Grants................            8,000
    Tide & Current Data................................           31,337
    Louisiana Geodetic Spatial Reference Center, LA....              700
    California Seafloor Mapping, CA....................            1,500
    Ordnace Reef UXO--Buoys, HI........................              500
    Extended Continental Shelf Mapping, AK.............              500
    Geo-Spatial Analysis of Weather Phenomena and                    500
     Disaster Recovery, AL.............................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Navigation Services.......................          163,226
                                                        ================
Ocean Resources Conservation and Assessment:
    Ocean Assessment Program (OAP):
        Integrated Ocean Observing System--Regional               30,000
         Observatories.................................
        NOAA IOOS......................................            8,000
        Coastal Services Centers.......................           20,254
        Coastal Storms.................................            2,874
        Ocean Health Initiative........................            7,900
        Coral Reef Programs............................           28,000
        Gulf Of Mexico Regional Collaboration..........            5,000
        Ocean Research Priorities Plan Implementation..            6,000
        Monitoring of Lake Erie Water Quality with                   250
         Remote Sensing, OH............................
        Pacific Coastal Services Center, HI............            4,500
        Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative, HI...............              700
                                                        ----------------
          Subtotal, Ocean Assessment Program (OAP).....          113,478
                                                        ================
    Response and Restoration:
        Response and Restoration Base..................           17,266
        Estuary Restoration Program....................            1,188
        Marine Debris..................................            4,000
        Lake Pontchartrain Initiatives.................              250
        Narragansett Bay and Little Narragansett Bay               1,000
         Watershed Restoration, RI.....................
                                                        ----------------
          Subtotal, Response and Restoration...........           23,704
                                                        ================
    National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS):
        NCCOS Headquarters.............................            3,800
        HABs, Hypoxia and Regional Ecosystem External             18,000
         Research......................................
        Center for Coastal Environmental Health &                 11,500
         Biomedical Research...........................
        Oxford Cooperative Lab.........................            5,000
        Center for Sponsored Coastal Research..........            2,700
        Center for Coastal Monitoring & Assessment.....            5,000
        Center for Coastal Fisheries and Habitat                   5,000
         Research......................................
        Marine Env. Health Research Lab--MEHRL.........            6,000
                                                        ----------------
          Subtotal, National Centers for Coastal Ocean            57,000
           Science.....................................
                                                        ================
          Total, Ocean Resources Conservation and                194,182
           Assessment..................................
                                                        ================
Ocean and Coastal Management:
    CZM Grants.........................................           70,000
    CZM Program Administration.........................            8,155
    CZM Non-Point Implementation Grants................            4,000
    National Estuarine Research Reserve System.........           22,326
    Marine Protected Areas.............................            2,128
    Marine Sanctuary Program Base......................           47,378
    Hawaii Inst. of Marine Biology Coral Research, HI..            2,000
    Thunder Bay, NMS lease buydown, MI.................            1,000
    Northwest Straits Citizens Advisory Commission, WA.            1,600
    Lake Winnipesaukee Watershed Management Plan, NH...              100
    City of Mobile National Maritime Museum of the Gulf              500
     of Mexico, AL.....................................
    Perdido Pass Inlet Management Study, AL............              250
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Ocean and Coastal Management..............          159,437
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL NOS..................................          516,845
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    CZM Grants.--The Committee provides $70,000,000 for the CZM 
grants program.
    Integrated Ocean Observing System [IOOS].--The Committee 
recommendation provides a total of $38,000,000 for the 
Integrated Ocean Observation System, of which $8,000,000 is for 
program administration and continued support for a testbed for 
quantitatively evaluating the performance of new and existing 
coastal technologies in the laboratory and under diverse 
environmental conditions. $30,000,000 is provided entirely for 
a competitive, regional ocean observing systems solicitation. 
The Committee directs NOAA, as part of the IOOS 5-year 
strategic plan, to develop a strategy for incorporating 
observations systems from estuaries, bays and other near shore 
waters as part of the IOOS regional network of observatories.
    Tides and Currents Data.--The Committee has provided 
$2,500,000 above the President's request to continue existing 
support for operations and maintenance of Physical 
Oceanographic Real-Time Systems [PORTS) as authorized by Public 
Law 107-372.
    Coral Reef Programs.--The funds provided include $737,000 
for Coral Reef Monitoring as requested by the administration 
under the NESDIS section. The Committee reiterates its 
direction that NOAA consolidate agency-wide Coral Reef 
activities under this one, NOS line item for future budget 
requests.
    Regional Geospatial Modeling Grants.--The Committee 
provides $8,000,000 to continue funding for this competitive 
program for researchers and resource managers to develop models 
or geographic information systems using existing geodetic, 
coastal remote sensing data, terrestrial gravity measurements 
or other physical datasets.

                 NOAA NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE

    The Committee recommendation provides $777,267,000 for the 
National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]. NMFS programs provide 
for the management and conservation of the Nation's living 
marine resources and their environment, including fish stocks, 
marine mammals, and endangered species. Using science-based 
conservation, management, and restoration activities, these 
resources can benefit the Nation on a sustained basis. NMFS 
seeks to build sustainable fisheries, recover protected 
species, and sustain healthy coastal ecosystems and the 
communities that depend on them.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

 NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Marine Mammals, Marine Turtles, and Marine Protected
 Species:
    Protected Species Research and Management Programs.           34,766
    Marine Mammal Protection (MMP).....................           41,340
    Other Protected Species............................            8,257
    Marine Turtles.....................................           10,003
    Atlantic Salmon....................................            6,000
    Pacific Salmon (Salmon Management Activities)......           62,879
    Hawaiian Monk Seals, HI............................            2,600
    Hawaiian Sea Turtles, HI...........................            7,100
    Ice Seal Research, AK..............................              950
    Marine Mammal Research--Alaska Sea Life Center, AK.            3,750
    Steller Sea Lion Conservation & Co-Management, AK..              210
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Marine Mammals, Marine Turtles, and Marine          178,105
       Protected Species...............................
                                                        ================
Fisheries Research and Management:
    Fisheries Research and Management Programs.........          159,585
    Expand Annual Stock Assessments--Improve Data                 40,504
     Collection........................................
    Economics and Social Sciences Research.............           10,658
    Salmon Management Activities.......................           24,381
    Regional Councils and Fisheries Commissions........           27,289
    Fisheries Statistics...............................           16,152
    Fish Information Networks..........................           22,013
    Survey and Monitoring Projects.....................           23,270
    Fisheries Oceanography.............................              995
    American Fisheries Act.............................            5,351
    Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants...............            2,567
    National Standard 8................................            1,035
    Reduce Fishing Impacts on Essential Fish Habitat                 517
     (EFH).............................................
    Reducing Bycatch...................................            3,360
    Product Quality and Safety.........................            7,127
    Narraganset Bay Window Program, RI.................            1,000
    Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab Disaster Assistance, MD              20,000
     and VA............................................
    Maine Groundfish Industry Emergency Economic                     300
     Assistance, ME....................................
    Gear Conversion Assistance, ME.....................              100
    Hawaii Seafood Safety and Sustainability, HI.......            1,500
    Alaska King Crab Research, AK......................            1,000
    Fishery Advisory Bodies, AK........................              150
    Florida Marine Replenishment Program, FL...........              200
    Disease Reduction in Klamath River Salmon, OR......              250
    Scallop Fishery Assessment, MA.....................            1,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Fisheries Research and Management.........          370,304
                                                        ================
Enforcement and Observers:
    Enforcement and Surveillance.......................           56,405
    Observers/Training.................................           32,680
    Pilot Red Snapper Observer Program, FL.............            1,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Enforcement and Observers/Training........           90,085
                                                        ================
Habitat Conservation & Restoration:
    Sustainable Habitat Management.....................           20,952
    Fisheries Habitat Restoration (Open Rivers & CBRP).           21,453
    Port Aransas Nature Preserve, TX...................              300
    Chesapeake Bay Oyster Restoration, MD and VA.......            4,600
    Alabama Oyster Restoration and Fishery Enhancement,            1,000
     AL................................................
    Merrimack River Fish Habitat Conservation, NH......              100
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Habitat Conservation & Restoration........           48,405
                                                        ================
Other Activities Supporting Fisheries:
    Antarctic Research.................................            2,639
    Aquaculture........................................            4,052
    Climate Regimes & Ecosystem Productivity...........            2,055
    Computer Hardware and Software.....................            3,417
    Cooperative Research...............................           11,455
    Information Analyses & Dissemination...............           19,328
    Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment &                        842
     Prediction Program (MarMap).......................
    National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)...........            8,211
    NMFS Facilities Maintenance........................            6,477
    Other Projects.....................................            5,003
    Southwest Fisheries Center.........................            1,000
    Regional Studies--Chesapeake Bay Studies...........            3,500
    Regional Studies--Southeast Area Monitoring &                  5,098
     Assessment Program (SEAMAP).......................
    Regional Science and Operations--MSA Implementation            8,071
     off Alaska........................................
    Bering Sea Fishermen's Association, AK.............              190
    Yukon River Drainage Association, AK...............              380
    Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities Coalition, AK...              150
    Summer Flounder Initiative, NJ.....................            1,000
    New England Multi-Species Survey, MA...............            3,000
    Consortium for Wildlife Bycatch Reduction, MA & NH.            1,250
    Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management, AL...........            1,250
    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric                     1,250
     Research, HI......................................
    Hawaii Fisheries Development, HI...................              750
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Other Activities Supporting Fisheries.....           90,368
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL NMFS.................................          777,267
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Fisheries Habitat Restoration.--The Committee provides no 
more than $6,000,000 for the Open Rivers initiative and directs 
that no State shall receive more that $500,000.
    Chesapeake Bay Oyster Restoration.--The Committee provides 
$4,600,000 for oyster restoration in the Chesapeake Bay. Of 
these funds, $2,600,000 is provided for oyster restoration in 
the Maryland waters of the Chesapeake Bay which shall be for 
on-the-ground and in-the water restoration efforts. In 
addition, $2,000,000 of these funds are for oyster restoration 
in Virginia waters of the Chesapeake Bay. Funds shall not be 
used for administrative costs, including banquets or salaries.
    Regional Studies--Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee directs 
NOAA's Chesapeake Bay Office to develop, within 9 months after 
enactment, a collaborative strategic research and assessment 
program with the States of Maryland and Virginia. This program 
will advance multiple species management by focusing on blue 
crabs, oysters, other resource species. In developing this 
program NOAA shall utilize the Sea Grant Programs from both 
States.
    Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab Disaster Assistance.--The 
Committee provides $20,000,000 to the States of Maryland and 
Virginia for economic assistance to watermen and communities 
impacted by recent restrictions on Chesapeake Bay blue crab 
harvests.
    Pacific Salmon Restoration.--The San Joaquin River 
Restoration Settlement will restore California's second longest 
river and help rebuild imperiled Pacific salmon runs. The 
National Marine Fisheries Service is obligated, under the 
Federal court order, to participate in the restoration planning 
and settlement implementation along with other Federal 
agencies. The Committee expects NMFS to identify and devote the 
appropriate resources to this restoration effort and promptly 
report back to the Committee on any developments. Continued 
delay by the NMFS to participate in this effort could undermine 
this important restoration effort.

                 NOAA OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH

    The Committee recommendation provides $403,413,000 for 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research [OAR]. OAR programs provide 
the environmental research and technology needed to improve 
NOAA weather, air quality warnings, forecasts, climate 
predictions, and marine services. To accomplish these goals, 
OAR supports a network of scientists in its Federal research 
laboratories, universities, and joint institutes and 
partnership programs.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

  OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH OPERATIONS, RESEARCH AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Climate Research:
    Laboratories & Cooperative Institutes..............           55,576
    Climate Observations & Services....................            8,299
    Competitive Research Program.......................          134,702
    Climate Operations.................................              900
    High Performance Computing Initiatives.............           14,028
    Univ. of Tennessee--Atmospheric Science Research,                200
     TN................................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Climate Research..........................          213,705
                                                        ================
Weather & Air Quality Research Programs:
    Laboratories & Cooperative Institutes..............           53,089
    U.S. Weather Research Program......................            5,500
    Tornado Severe Storm Research/Phased Array Radar...            2,972
    Wind Hazards Reduction Program, IA.................              850
    Redstone UAS Development for Weather and                       1,000
     Atmospheric Research, AL..........................
    Flooding/Storm Surge Disaster Mitigation, MS.......              500
    AIRMAP at Univ. of New Hampshire, NH...............              300
    Coastal and Inland Hurricane Monitoring and                      750
     Protection Program, AL............................
    Tornado and Hurricane Operations and Research, AL..            1,000
    Cooperative Inst. and Research Center for Southeast            1,500
     Weather, AL.......................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Weather & Air Quality Research............           67,461
                                                        ================
Ocean, Coastal & Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories & Cooperative Institutes..............           24,806
    National Sea Grant College Program.................           57,100
    Ocean Exploration & Research.......................           18,591
    NOAA's Undersea Research Program...................            9,200
    Aquatic Invasive Species Research..................              988
    Marine Aquaculture Research........................            1,622
    National Institute of Undersea Science and                     5,000
     Technology, MS....................................
    National Sea Grant Law Center, MS..................              750
    Tropical Ecosystem Science and Technology (TEST),                850
     MS................................................
    Coastal Vulnerability to Climate Change Study, AK..              940
    New Hampshire Lakes Association Aquatic Weed                     100
     Control Program, NH...............................
    Collaborative R&D; Initiative for the Gulf of                   1,000
     Mexico, AL........................................
    Lake Champlain Research Consortium, VT.............              350
    Nanotoxicology: The Biological Response to                       700
     Nanoparticle Exposure, AL.........................
    Lake Champlain Emerging Threats Initiative.........              250
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Ocean, Coastal & Great Lakes Research.....          122,247
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL, OAR.................................          403,413
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes.--Of the funds 
provided for Laboratories and Cooperative Institutes throughout 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, the Committee provides 
additional funding for NOAA to further its commitment to NOAA 
Cooperative Institute for the Northern Gulf of Mexico.
    Analysis of Unmanned Aircraft Systems [UAS].--The Committee 
supports NOAA's efforts to identify new technology platforms 
for studying the Arctic. The Committee directs NOAA to dedicate 
$1,000,000 from within the funds provided for Competitive 
Research Program for the analysis of arctic UAS data.
    National Sea Grant College Program.--The Committee is aware 
that NOAA is in discussions to create a new stand alone sea 
grant office on the gulf coast. To begin to cover the cost of 
this new office the committee has provided an additional 
$2,000,000 to support this effort.
    Supercomputing.--NOAA has an important responsibility to 
provide climate observations, research, and operational 
forecast products to the Nation. As NOAA moves toward 
establishing a National Climate Service, NOAA needs to expand 
its climate computing capacity to perform critical climate 
research and issue higher resolution regional climate 
forecasts. The Committee encourages NOAA to expand its 
partnership with the Department of Energy and the National 
Science Foundation to provide supercomputing capacity to help 
meet these needs.

                     NOAA NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE

    The Committee recommendation provides $847,943,000 for the 
NOAA National Weather Service [NWS]. NWS programs provide 
timely and accurate meteorologic, hydrologic, and oceanographic 
warnings and forecasts to ensure the safety of the population, 
mitigate property losses, and improve the economic productivity 
of the Nation. NWS is also responsible for issuing operational 
climate forecasts for the United States.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Observations, Forecasts, and Communications:
    Local Warnings and Forecasts:
        Local Warnings and Forecasts Base..............          601,876
        Air Quality Forecasting........................            5,445
        Alaska Data Buoys..............................            1,683
        Sustain Cooperative Observer Network...........            1,871
        National Mesonet Network.......................           11,000
        NOAA Profiler Network..........................            4,736
        Pacific Island Compact.........................            3,515
        Strengthen U.S. Tsunami Warning Network........           23,196
        Susquehanna River Basin Flood Warning System,              2,000
         PA............................................
        New England Weather Technology Initiative, NH..              200
        Hawaii Rain Gages for NWS Pacific Region HQ, HI              360
        Western Kentucky Environmental Monitoring                    700
         Network, KY...................................
                                                        ----------------
          Subtotal, Local Warnings and Forecasts.......          656,582
                                                        ================
Operations and Research:
    Advanced Hydrological Prediction Services..........            6,037
    Aviation Weather...................................            5,253
    WFO Maintenance....................................            7,316
    Central Forecast Guidance (includes Hurricane                 68,153
     Center)...........................................
    Joint Center for Hurricane Research, FL............              250
    Comprehensive Flood Evaluation Study, AL...........              700
    Remote Infrasonic Monitoring of Natural Hazards, MS            1,500
     and HI............................................
    Regional Ensembling System for Atmospheric                     1,500
     Dispersion, MS....................................
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Operations and Research................           90,709
                                                        ================
      Total, Observations, Forecasts, and                        747,291
       Communications..................................
                                                        ================
Systems Operation & Maintenance:
    NEXRAD.............................................           45,121
    ASOS...............................................            9,657
    Weather Radio Transmitters and Communications......            2,297
    AWIPS..............................................           38,065
    NWSTG Backup--CIP..................................            5,512
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Systems Operation & Maintenance...........          100,652
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL NWS..................................          847,943
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Williston Radar.--The Committee is concerned about radar 
coverage in the State of North Dakota and directs NOAA to 
maintain staffing and operations at the Williston Radar site 
through fiscal year 2009.
    National Mesonet Network Grants.--Mesonet networks are 
automated weather stations designed to observe mesoscale 
phenomena such as thunderstorms, dry lines, squall lines, and 
sea breezes. These phenomena can cause weather conditions in a 
localized area to be significantly different from that dictated 
by the ambient large-scale condition. These mesonet 
observations are critical to understanding the process by which 
these phenomena form, evolve, and dissipate assist 
meteorologists in understanding them in order to improve 
forecast skill.
    The Committee notes NOAA's long interest, with support from 
the National Research Council, in the development of a national 
mesonet system that will serve as an integrated surface and 
atmospheric observing system to improve near- and mid-term 
weather forecasting for all regions of the country. The 
Committee is aware that the National Research Council is 
nearing completion of a study for NOAA, ``Developing Mesoscale 
Meteorological Observational Capabilities to Meet Multiple 
National Needs'' which will provide a framework for a full 
scale national mesonet network.
    For this reason the Committee has provided an additional 
$11,000,000 for NOAA to competitively procure a national 
mesonet. The Committee directs NOAA to utilize $5,000,000 of 
these funds to maintain operations for existing mesonet network 
observation agreements. NOAA may use 10 percent of the funds to 
develop policies for operational and calibration requirements. 
In addition the Committee has provided an additional $1,500,000 
within the Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction 
appropriation to support mesonet integration with the Advanced 
Weather Interactive Processing System [AWIPS], as part of the 
AWIPS Technology Infusion program.
    The Committee expects NOAA to provide a written plan on how 
it will accomplish this program no later than January 2, 2009 
after enactment. This plan shall include a procurement strategy 
which encompasses a timetable for submission of proposals, as 
well as evaluation and selection criteria.

  NOAA NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA, AND INFORMATION SERVICE

    The Committee recommendation provides $177,900,000 for 
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service 
[NESDIS]. NESDIS programs operate environmental polar-orbiting 
and geostationary satellites and collect and archive global 
environmental data and information for distribution to users in 
commerce, industry, agriculture, science and engineering, the 
general public, and Federal, State, and local agencies.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE, DATA & INFORMATION SERVICE OPERATIONS,
                        RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Satellite Observing Systems:
    Satellite Command and Control Base.................           38,729
    NSOF Operations....................................            7,652
    Product Processing and Distribution................           31,457
    Product Development, Readiness & Application.......           20,415
    Product Development, Readiness & Application (Ocean            3,930
     Remote Sensing)...................................
    Joint Center/Accelerate Use of Satellites..........            3,294
    Commercial Remote Sensing Licensing & Enforcement..            1,285
    Office of Space Commercialization..................              634
    Group on Earth Observations (GEO)..................              500
    Ocean Surface Vector Winds Studies.................            3,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Environmental Satellite Observing Systems.          110,896
                                                        ================
Data Centers & Information Services:
    Archive, Access & Assessment.......................           35,526
    KY.................................................            1,361
    MD.................................................            6,088
    NC.................................................              275
    WV.................................................            1,434
    Coastal Data Development...........................            4,559
    Environmental Data Systems Modernization...........            9,511
    Cooperative Institute for Remote Sensing                       1,000
     Applications, AL..................................
    International Pacific Research Center, HI..........            1,750
    Regional Climate Centers, NE, IL, NY, NC, LA, NV...            3,000
    Integrated Data and Environmental Applications                 2,500
     Center, HI........................................
                                                        ----------------
      Total, NOAA's Data Centers & Information Services           67,004
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL, NESDIS..............................          177,900
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       NOAA-WIDE PROGRAM SUPPORT

    The Committee recommendation provides $426,543,000 for 
NOAA-wide program support. These programs provide for overall 
NOAA management, including staffing of the Under Secretary's 
office and services to NOAA and DOC field offices through the 
regional Administrative Support Centers. These programs also 
support NOAA's Education Office consistent with the 
recommendations of the Ocean Commission. The Facilities 
subactivity provides for repair and maintenance to existing 
facilities; facilities planning and design; and environmental 
compliance. The Office of Marine and Aviation Operations 
provides aircraft and marine data acquisition, repair, and 
maintenance of the existing fleet, planning of future 
modernization, and technical and management support for NOAA-
wide activities through the NOAA Commissioned Corps.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

          PROGRAM SUPPORT OPERATIONS, RESEARCH, AND FACILITIES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corporate Services:
    Under Secretary and Associate Offices Base.........           28,676
    Facilities.........................................           24,297
    NOAA Wide Corporate Services & Agency Management...          125,732
    IT Security........................................            2,050
    DOC Working Capital Fund...........................           36,583
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Corporate Services........................          217,338
                                                        ================
NOAA Education Program:
    Education Program/Initiative.......................            1,267
    Competitive Educational Grants.....................            3,250
    Educational Partnership Program/Minority Serving              15,334
     Institutions (EPPMSI).............................
    BWET Regional Programs.............................            9,700
    Ocean Education Grants.............................           15,000
    Narragansett Bay Marine Education (Save the Bay),              1,000
     RI................................................
    Science Education on the Tennessee-Tombigbee                     375
     Waterway, MS......................................
    Hawaii Education Program, HI.......................            1,500
    Base to Campus Conversion, ME......................              500
    Partnership to Advance Environmental Literacy, NY..              250
    Sea Grant Education Outreach, AL...................              500
                                                        ----------------
      Total, NOAA Education Program....................           48,676
                                                        ================
Marine Operations & Maintenance:
    Marine Services....................................          113,451
    Fleet Planning and Maintenance.....................           17,034
    Aviation Services..................................           30,044
                                                        ----------------
      Total, Marine Operations & Maintenance...........          160,529
                                                        ================
      GRAND TOTAL, PS..................................          426,543
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    NOAA Education Program.--The Committee provides $48,676,000 
for education programs, $32,148,000 above the budget request. 
The Joint Ocean Commission continues to highlight the need for 
ocean literacy and broaden young people's awareness of ocean 
issues that affect their daily lives. NOAA has established a 
successful track record of engaging all levels of the education 
community to send a clear, consistent message on ocean science 
using different media and methods tailored to individual 
community needs.
    Competitive Education Grants.--The Committee directs NOAA 
to fund existing education agreements prior to soliciting 
additional projects.
    Ocean Education.--The Committee remains concerned about 
NOAA's rate of progress regarding the Joint Ocean Commission 
Initiative, particularly in the area of education. This 
situation is further compounded by the fact that ocean has not 
been included as part of the President's American 
Competitiveness Initiative [ACI], which aims at funding science 
to maintain our competitive edge. The Committee also believes 
more needs to be done in the area of ocean literacy and the 
environment, consistent with NOAA's education and conservation 
mandates of 16 USC 1431 and 661. Much progress can be made 
toward these mandates by leveraging informal education 
partnerships regarding the ocean, specifically nonprofit 
aquariums. These partnerships can get children interested in 
careers in science, the foundation of ACI and a strong economy. 
Traditionally, Federal programs have fallen short in 
effectively providing funds which align to the operations and 
activities of these important nonprofit institutions. 
Therefore, the Committee has established a grant program 
focused on aquariums in an effort to enhance awareness, improve 
ocean literacy, and educate the public about the marine 
environment.
    BWET Regional Programs.--The Committee continues to believe 
in the BWET program and has continued funding for this program. 
The Committee applauds NOAA's effort to expand this program 
beyond the original programs in California, Chesapeake Bay, and 
Hawaii.

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $979,207,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   1,238,660,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,258,010,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,258,010,000. The 
recommendation is $278,803,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $19,350,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee provides funding for congressionally directed 
projects listed within the obligation table for the 
Procurement, Acquisition and Construction appropriation and 
directs NOAA to refrain from charging administrative costs to 
these grants. The Committee expects that NOAA will provide 
appropriate management and oversight of each grant.
    Committee recommendations are displayed in the following 
table:

                PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION AND CONSTRUCTION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Ocean Service:
    Coastal and Estuarine Land Protection Program (no            15,000
     more than 3 percent admin.)......................
    National Estuarine Research Reserve Construction &            6,890
     Land Acquisition.................................
    Marine Sanctuaries Construction/Acquisition.......            5,495
    Northern Gulf Institute, MS.......................            4,500
    Dauphin Island East End Coastline Restoration                   750
     Project, AL......................................
    Real Time Satellite Data Receiving Station, DE....              750
    Thunder Bay NMS Exhibit and Telepresence, MI......              500
    Horn Point Laboratory, MD.........................            2,000
    Chesapeake Bay Interpretive Buoy system (CBIS), MD              500
    Great Bay Partnership, NH.........................            3,000
                                                       -----------------
      Total, National Ocean Service--PAC..............           39,385
                                                       =================
National Marine Fisheries Service:
    Center for Marine Education and Research, MS......            1,500
    Mississippi Center for Conservation and                       1,600
     Biodiversity, MS.................................
    Center for Aquatic Resource Management, AL........            1,500
                                                       -----------------
      Total, National Marine Fisheries Service--PAC...            4,600
                                                       =================
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research:
    Research Supercomputing/CCRI......................           10,379
    Cooperative Institute and Research Center for                 4,000
     Southeast Weather, AL............................
    Pell Library and Undersear Exploration Center--               1,200
     research equipment, RI...........................
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Oceanic and Atmospheric Research--PAC....           15,579
                                                       =================
National Weather Service:
    Systems Acquisition:
        ASOS..........................................            1,635
        AWIPS.........................................           20,564
        NEXRAD........................................            8,376
        NWSTG Legacy Replacement......................            1,195
        Radiosonde Network Replacement................            4,014
        Weather and Climate Supercomputing............           26,169
        Cooperative Observer Network Modernization                3,734
         (NERON)......................................
        NOAA Profiler Network.........................           11,337
        Complete and Sustain NOAA Weather Radio.......            9,730
        Henderson County Weather Sirens, KY...........              110
        NOAA West Coast Doppler Radar, WA.............            2,000
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, NWS Systems Acquisition...........           88,804
                                                       =================
    Construction:
        WFO Construction..............................           12,504
        Center for Weather & Climate Prediction                   4,100
         (NCWCP)......................................
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, NWS Construction..................           16,604
                                                       =================
          Total, National Weather Service--PAC........          105,408
                                                       =================
NESDIS:
    Systems Acquisition & Construction:
        Geostationary Systems (GOES-N)................           73,263
        Geostationary Systems (GOES-R)................          477,000
        Polar Orbiting Systems (POES).................           65,419
        Polar Orbiting Systems (NPOESS)...............          287,985
        EOS & Advanced Polar Data Processing,                       990
         Distribution & Archiving Systems.............
        CIP--single point of failure..................            2,772
        Comprehensive Large Array Data Stewardship                6,476
         System (CLASS)...............................
        NPOESS Preparatory Data Exploration...........            2,455
        Restoration of Climate Sensors................           74,000
        Satellite CDA Facility........................            2,228
                                                       -----------------
    Total, NESDIS--PAC................................          992,588
                                                       =================
Program Support:
    Construction:
        Pacific Regional Facility.....................           60,250
        Southwest Fisheries Science Center............           15,000
        Fairbanks, AK, CDA............................           11,700
        Fleet Modernization...........................  ................
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Construction......................           86,950
                                                       =================
    OMAO Fleet Replacement:
        FSV Calibration...............................            1,000
        Hydro Survey Launch Construction..............            2,400
        Vessel Equip. & Tech Refresh..................            1,000
        Temporary Berthing for HENRY B. BIGELOW.......            1,000
        Ship Acquisition, Conversion & Maintenance....           10,040
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, OMAO Fleet Replacement............           15,440
                                                       =================
          Total, Program Support--PAC.................          102,390
                                                       =================
Prior Year Recoveries.................................           (2,000)
                                                       =================
          GRAND TOTAL, PAC............................        1,258,010
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Cooperative Weather and Research Center.--The Southeast 
United States experiences more severe weather events, such as 
hurricanes, tornados, lightning, flooding and severe droughts 
than any other region of the country. Unfortunately, NOAA 
dedicates few resources to respond and prepare for the severe 
weather events in this area. Unlike other regions, the 
Southeast does not possess the surveillance, research and 
forecasting assets to study and predict these events. To begin 
to remedy this disparity, the Committee has provided a total of 
$5,500,000 ($1,500,000 ORF and $4,000,000 PAC) for the National 
Weather Service to build a Cooperative Institute and Research 
Center for Southeast Weather and Hydrology and to begin to 
develop and acquire dual polar, phased array and multi 
frequency Doppler Radars and passive radiometers to study 
storms, improve rainfall estimates, and to begin to provide the 
citizens of the Southeast with state-of-the-art weather 
research and prediction capabilities.
    NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction [NCWCP].--
Based on revised information the Committee has fully funded the 
request for the NCWCP building but has shifted $10,000,000 to 
the operations, research, and facilities appropriation to more 
accurately reflect that these funds will be used primarily for 
rent, operations, and security of this facility.
    Satellite Management.-- The Committee appreciates the fact 
that NOAA has kept the Committee informed with regular status 
reports on its two satellite programs. However, the Committee 
remains concerned with both the GOES-R and NPOESS programs as 
both entering critical phases of their respective developments. 
In addition, there will soon be a void in senior management due 
to the transition to the next administration. The Committee 
notes that the Office of Inspector General's most recent 
investigation determined that the Department of Commerce lacks 
procedures for reporting and approving major deviations from 
plans. Specifically, the Inspector General recommended that the 
Department establish thresholds and procedures for reporting 
and approving major deviations from GOES-R's capability, cost, 
and schedule baseline, as well as enhancements to the baseline. 
The Committee directs NOAA and the Department of Commerce to 
implement this recommendation no later than October 1, 2008.
    GOES-R.--The Committee has adopted by reference the 
congressional reporting requirements that were included as a 
Department of Commerce general provision in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act of 2008.
    Commercial Satellite Data.--The Committee commends NOAA for 
its recent innovative and progressive actions to promote 
development of commercial sources of weather and climate change 
information. NOAA issued a formal solicitation in December 2007 
entitled ``Commercial Solutions to meet space-based Earth and 
space weather requirements of the United States Government.'' 
This was followed by an Industry Day in January 2008 entitled 
``Seeking Commercial Capabilities to Address U.S. Government 
Requirements for Satellite-based Observations.'' The Committee 
agrees that NOAA should provide incentives and commitments to 
commercial entities that can provide weather and climate change 
data as a supplement to NOAA's two core satellite systems. The 
Committee recognizes that such commercial sources may be low-
cost alternatives to traditional Government satellites. The 
Committee directs the NOAA to provide a report to the Committee 
no later than 120 days after enactment on actions that can be 
taken to obtain space based environmental information from 
commercial sources. The report should identify commercial 
sources of data and what specific actions NOAA will take to 
facilitate purchasing commercial environmental measurements 
through purchase commitments or other contracting incentives.
    Fuel Costs.--The Committee is aware the record fuel costs 
are severely restricting NOAA's ability to conduct fishery 
surveys. As such the Committee has provided an additional 
$3,940,000 in ``Ship Acquisition, Conversion, and Maintenance'' 
to address this pressing need.

                  PACIFIC COASTAL SALMON RECOVERY FUND

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $67,000,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      35,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      90,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $90,000,000 for the 
Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund. The recommendation is 
$23,000,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level and 
$55,000,000 above the budget request.

                        DISASTER MITIGATION FUND

Appropriations, 2008....................................................
Budget estimate, 2009...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     $50,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $50,000,000 to help 
alleviate the economic impacts associated with commercial 
fishery failures, fishery resource disasters, and State and 
Federal regulations. The Committee is aware of multiple 
requests for fishery assistance. Specifically, the Committee is 
aware of costs associated with reductions in fishing capacity 
in New England, costs associated with gear modifications to 
protect endangered species, as well as declared and pending 
disasters for west coast salmon, Chesapeake Bay blue crab, and 
gulf coast oysters. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
Commerce to provide the Committee with a spend plan for the 
allocation of these funds no later than 45 days after 
enactment.

                      COASTAL ZONE MANAGEMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       3,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,000,000

    The recommendation includes requested language allowing not 
to exceed $3,000,000 collected pursuant to the Coastal Zone 
Management Act to be transferred to the ``Operations, Research 
and Facilities'' account to offset the costs of implementing 
that act.

                   FISHERIES FINANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $6,000,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       1,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,000,000

    Language is included that is identical to previous years.

                                 OTHER


                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $44,294,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      61,083,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,083,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $44,083,000 for 
Departmental Management Salaries and Expenses. The 
recommendation is $211,000 below the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and $17,000,000 below the budget request.
    Within Departmental Management, the Salaries and Expenses 
account provides funding for the Secretary, Deputy Secretary, 
and support staff. Responsibilities involve policy development 
and implementation affecting United States and international 
activities, as well as, establishing internal goals and 
operations of the Department.
    Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program.--The Committee 
disagrees with the administration's proposed cancellation of 
the remaining unobligated subsidy balances associated with the 
Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program, and finds that funds 
available under section 101(f) of the Emergency Steel Loan 
Guarantee Act of 1999, as well as funds for salaries and 
administrative expenses needed to administer the Emergency 
Steel Loan Guarantee Program, that shall remain available until 
expended.

                   HCHB RENOVATION AND MODERNIZATION

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $3,722,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       7,367,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,367,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $7,367,000, which is 
$3,645,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level and the 
same as the budget request for the HCHB Renovation.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $22,020,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      24,766,000
Committee recommendation................................      24,766,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $24,766,000. The 
recommendation is $2,746,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.

  NATIONAL INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW ENFORCEMENT COORDINATION COUNCIL

Appropriations, 2008....................................................
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      $1,021,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee recommendation provides for funding for the 
National Intellectual Property Law Enforcement Coordination 
Council through a transfer from the U.S. Patent and Trademark 
Office.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    Section 101 makes Commerce Department funds available for 
advanced payments only upon certification of officials 
designated by the Secretary that such payments are considered 
to be in the public interest.
    Section 102 makes appropriations for salaries and expenses 
available for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for 
services, uniforms, and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 103 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce accounts and within NOAA 
appropriations. The provision makes transfers subject to the 
Committee's standard reprogramming procedures.
    Section 104 provides that any cost resulting from personnel 
actions shall be absorbed by the affected Department or Agency.
    Section 105 prohibits the use of any appropriated funds to 
trademark the phrase ``Last Best Place''.
    Section 106 authorizes the Secretary of Commerce to 
prescribe and enforce standards or regulations affecting safety 
and health in the context of scientific and occupational diving 
within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
    Section 107 provides authority for the Secretary of 
Commerce and Bureaus to collect and retain conference fees.
    Section 108 extends Congressional notification requirements 
for GOES-R Satellite program.
    Section 109 provides authority for the Secretary of 
Commerce to furnish certain services within the Herbert C. 
Hoover Building.
    Section 110 transfers prior year funding from the Fisheries 
Finance Program into NOAA Operations, Research, and Facilities 
Appropriation.
    Section 111 amends the Pacific Salmon Treaty Act.
    Section 112 provides authority for Secretary of Commerce to 
negotiate or reevaluate international agreements related to 
fisheries, marine mammals, or sea turtles.

                                TITLE II

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee recommends a total of $25,778,555,000 for the 
Department of Justice [DOJ]. The recommendation is 
$2,186,639,000 above the fiscal year 2008 funding level, 
excluding emergency supplemental appropriations, and 
$2,689,640,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee views the continual proposed elimination of 
critical State and local law programs as misguided and 
irresponsible. State and local law enforcement must have the 
resources necessary to fight crime and assist the Federal 
Government in the global war on terror. Repeated elimination of 
these important funds calls into question the Department's 
commitment to remain the Nation's premier law enforcement 
agency.
    Language is not included to rescind balances from the Crime 
Victims Fund, as requested by the administration.
    The Committee rejects the administration's request to 
transfer the responsibilities of the Office of Government 
Information Services [OGIS] to the Department of Justice. This 
proposal contravenes the OPEN Government Act of 2007 (Public 
Law 110-175). This law made significant overhauls to the 
Freedom of Information Act [FOIA] to ensure openness in 
government. The OPEN Government Act requires that the Office of 
Government Information Services be located in the National 
Archives and Records Administration and this request 
contradicts this legislation.
    Tribal Government Funding.--The Committee rejects the 
administration's proposal to discontinue specific set-asides 
for tribal COPS, correctional facility construction, tribal 
courts, and juvenile justice programs. The Department of 
Justice programs that have operated in past years are an 
essential part of the public safety and justice regimes in 
Indian Country. The Committee is concerned that the changes 
proposed to these programs by the administration if implemented 
would significantly affect the administration of justice in 
Indian communities.
    For the past several years, tribal leaders from across the 
country have made public safety and justice in Indian country a 
top priority, and have urged that adequate funding be provided 
for law enforcement officers, strong judicial systems, and 
detention facilities construction and staffing. The Committee 
is not aware that the Department of Justice consulted with 
tribal governments on this proposal which would essentially 
require tribal law enforcement agencies to compete for funding 
with State and local law enforcement agencies.
    Agent Benefits.--The Committee is concerned with the 
Department of Justice's neglect to address danger pay and 
equalize virtue of locality pay for Foreign Service employees 
that put their lives on the line every day to protect American 
citizens. The Committee strongly believes that DOJ employees 
serving abroad in appropriately designated areas should receive 
the same pay, benefits, and compensation as other Foreign 
Service employees from other agencies. The Committee is also 
concerned about the continuing failure by the Department to 
address the practice of penalizing employees stationed abroad 
by denying them locality pay. This denial not only affects 
their paychecks but has long term negative consequences on 
their retirement calculations. The Committee directs the 
Department to address this and any other potentially related 
compensatory concerns immediately, and to submit a report to 
the Senate Committee on Appropriations no later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this bill which details what the 
Department has done to address this inequity.
    The Committee is disappointed that the budget for the 
Department of Justice [DOJ] fails to articulate the resource 
requirements of other agency and Department activities on DOJ. 
The Committee requests the Government Accountability Office to 
assess the ability of the executive branch to develop reliable 
cost models that more accurately predict Department of Justice 
resource requirements resulting from planned activities and 
statutory requirements of other Departments and Agencies.
    The Committee requests that the Government Accountability 
Office review the costs to operate the Department of Justice's 
data centers from fiscal year 2006 through fiscal year 2008, 
and report its finding to the Committee no later than May 31, 
2009.
    United Financial Management System.--The Committee is 
extremely disappointed in the Department's inability to request 
appropriated funds for the Unified Financial Management System 
[UFMS] and instead has relied on excess taxes of the bureaus' 
operational appropriations accounts. If the Department believes 
that this system is a priority, it needs to send a budget 
amendment for fiscal year 2009 budget with appropriate offsets. 
If the Department continues to rely on these types of budget 
gimmicks in the future, the Committee will have no choice but 
to rescind the Department's authority to tax the law 
enforcement entities for which it has responsibility.
    Budget Restructuring Proposals.--The Committee remains 
concerned with the Department's repeated proposal to 
consolidate existing decision-units. All accounts within the 
DOJ, therefore, shall continue to use the fiscal year 2008 
decision-units and account structures, unless otherwise 
specified in prior years or in the following recommendation.

                         General Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $97,832,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     105,805,000
Committee recommendation................................      85,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $85,000,000. The 
recommendation is $12,832,000 below the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $20,805,000 below the budget request.
    The ``General Administration'' account provides funding for 
senior policy officials responsible for Departmental management 
and policy development. The specific offices funded by this 
account include: the immediate Office of the Attorney General; 
the immediate Office of the Deputy Attorney General; the 
immediate Office of the Associate Attorney General; Office of 
Legal Policy; Office of Public Affairs; Office of Legislative 
Affairs; Office of Professional Responsibility; Office of 
Intergovernmental and Public Liaison; and the Justice 
Management Division.
    The following table compares the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level to the fiscal year 2009 budget estimate and the 
Committee's recommendation for each office:

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Fiscal year
                                          Fiscal year     2009 committee
                                          2008 enacted    recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Departmental Leadership:
    Attorney General..................           $5,260            5,000
    Deputy Attorney General...........            4,814            3,164
    Office of Privacy and Civil                     380              400
     Liberties........................
    Associate Attorney General........            1,767            1,836
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal........................           12,221           10,000
                                       =================================
Intergovernmental Relations and
 External Affairs:
    Public Affairs....................            2,858            2,968
    Legislative Affairs...............            3,598            3,734
    Intergovernmental and Public                    927              962
     Liaison..........................
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal........................            7,383            7,664
                                       =================================
Executive Support and Professional
 Responsibility:
    Legal Policy......................            5,601            5,812
    Professional Responsibility.......            5,801            6,020
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal........................           11,402           11,832
                                       =================================
Justice Management Division...........           66,826           55,404
                                       ---------------------------------
      Total...........................           97,832           85,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Supporting Law Enforcement.--The Committee notes the 
Department's continual failures in fighting to protect the 
jurisdictions of its law enforcement entities. Not only has the 
Department lost every battle with the Office of Management and 
Budget over funding for the FBI, BOP, USMS, ATF, DEA, and the 
Detention Trustee, but it is now ceding its responsibilities in 
the interagency clearance process to allow other agencies to 
duplicate its statutory responsibilities. Under this lack of 
leadership, bureaucrats don't suffer--agents, guards, 
inspectors and those working in the field bear the brunt of 
this incompetence. This sophistry is not only contributing to 
the demise and undermining the foundations of the agencies 
under the Department's jurisdiction, but it is jeopardizing the 
safety of the American people. If funding is to continue for 
the General Administration of the Department of Justice, the 
Committee expects its leadership to vigorously support the law 
enforcement entities for which it is responsible.
    National Drug Intelligence Center [NDIC].--The Committee 
does not agree to provide $19,500,000 to the Department of 
Justice for the NDIC; this Center is outside of the 
subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    Departmental Offices.--The Committee has established 
specific limitations for each individual program and policy 
within the Departmental Offices. The accompanying bill includes 
a provision authorizing a cumulative total of transfers of up 
to 5 percent between each activity (Departmental Leadership; 
Intergovernmental/External Affairs; Executive Support/
Professional Responsibility; and Justice Management Division) 
and after 5 percent, the Department shall seek prior approval 
from the Senate Committee on Appropriations.

                 JUSTICE INFORMATION SHARING TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $85,540,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      93,868,000
Committee recommendation................................      86,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $86,000,000. The 
recommendation is $460,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and $7,868,000 below the budget request.
    The Justice Information Sharing Technology [JIST] account 
provides increased control to the Department Chief Information 
Officer [DCIO] to ensure that investments in information 
technology [IT] are well planned and aligned with the 
Department's overall IT strategy and enterprise architecture. 
JIST helps ensure that all DOJ components build systems that 
are interoperable with shared components and not stove-piped 
systems that become obsolete once operational. The Committee is 
supportive of IT enhancements and the creation of systems that 
work across agencies and Departments.

            TACTICAL LAW ENFORCEMENT WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $74,260,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     121,651,000
Committee recommendation................................     121,651,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $121,651,000. The 
recommendation is $47,391,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    This account centrally funds development, acquisition, 
deployment, operation and maintenance of the Justice 
Department's narrowband wireless communications network.
    The Committee supports the President's request of 
$25,000,000 within this account for the Integrated Wireless 
Network [IWN]. The Committee is concerned that the tactical 
radio communications systems of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
Firearms and Explosives [ATF], Drug Enforcement Administration 
[DEA], Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI], and United States 
Marshals Service [USMS] are obsolete and close to failure. IWN 
is a critical modernization effort for reliable, secure 
communications capability for handheld radios, surveillance 
equipment, and airborne operations that will help law 
enforcement agencies in their fight against drug crimes, 
violent crimes and terrorist cells. The administration, 
however, had failed to request adequate resources for this 
program, which is estimated at over $1,200,000,000 over 6 
years. The Committee requests that the Government 
Accountability Office [GAO] conduct a study that reviews: (1) 
the cost estimate and multi-year deployment plan for this 
program; and (2) an evaluation of the cost savings of such an 
integrated system as compared to legacy radio systems at the 
Department of Justice. Further, should additional funding be 
required for IWN in fiscal year 2009, the Committee will 
consider a reprogramming within existing resources, consistent 
with section 505 of this act.
    The Committee supports the broadest possible use of IWN 
across law enforcement agencies. However, the Department does 
not have the budgetary resources to fund other agencies use of 
the network. Should other agencies choose to use the network, 
they should assume the full cost of their participation.
    The Committee directs $500,000 to Washington State Patrol 
to complete the IWN site at Mount Sumas, Washington.

                   ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $240,649,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     263,791,000
Committee recommendation................................     268,791,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $268,791,000. The 
recommendation is $28,142,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $5,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Executive Office for Immigration Review includes the 
Board of Immigration Appeals, immigration judges, and 
administrative law judges who decide through administrative 
hearings whether to admit or exclude aliens seeking to enter 
the country, and whether to deport or adjust the status of 
aliens whose status has been challenged. This account also 
funds the Office of the Pardon Attorney which receives, 
investigates, and considers petitions for all forms of 
executive clemency.
    The Committee recommends an additional $5,000,000 above the 
budget request for the Executive Office for Immigration Review. 
The Committee is concerned about the growing immigration 
problem and the Executive Office of Immigration Review's [EOIR] 
ability to handle increasing caseloads and have provided 
additional funds to address rising backlogs. The Committee 
urges the Department to work with EOIR in developing a 
strategic plan for expansion, which shall be submitted to the 
Committee on Appropriations within 90 days of enactment.
    The Committee is concerned that the Executive Office for 
Immigration Review's has delayed implementation of its 22 new 
Measures to Improve the Immigration Courts and the Board of 
Immigration Appeals unveiled in 2007, which were mandated by 
the former Attorney General on January 9, 2006. The Committee 
therefore directs the agency to report within 30 days of 
enactment of all steps taken to fully, effectively and 
efficiently implement these measures including a timeline for 
implementation.
    In addition, the Committee provides $4,000,000 for Legal 
Services Orientation Program [LOP]. The Committee is 
disappointed that the Department of Justice failed to request 
funding for this important program in their budget request. The 
EOIR created the Legal Orientation Program in March 2003 but 
have never requested direct funding to run this program and 
instead have relied on Department of Homeland Security to fund 
the program. Congress explicitly stated in 2007 that they 
expected the Department of Justice to fund this program and not 
the Department of Homeland Security. The Committee encourages 
the Department of Justice to include the LOP in any future 
budget requests submitted to Congress.
    The LOP program informs detained aliens in immigration 
removal proceedings about the immigration court process, how to 
obtain legal representation or represent themselves and how to 
determine if they are eligible for any immigration relief or 
expedite the removal process.
    A 2008 study conducted by the Vera Institute found that the 
LOP participants move an average of 13 days faster through 
immigration court, were more likely to appear for court 
hearings than those who do not participate in the program and 
that the LOP increases immigration court efficiency.

                           DETENTION TRUSTEE

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,225,920,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   1,295,319,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,295,319,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,295,319,000. The 
recommendation is $69,399,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The Office of the Federal Detention Trustee account 
provides oversight of detention management, and improvement and 
coordination of detention activities to ensure that Federal 
agencies involved in detention provide for the safe, secure, 
and humane confinement of persons in the custody of the United 
States.
    The Committee is concerned about the Department's ability 
to anticipate the true funding needs for this account, 
particularly due to requirements associated with increased 
immigration enforcement efforts. The Committee will consider 
the use of existing resources should additional funding be 
required, subject to section 505 of this act.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department of Justice's 
prisoner reimbursement agreement with the District of Columbia 
is not consistent with requirements set forth in the National 
Capital Revitalization Act of 1997. The Committee urges the 
Department to work with the District of Columbia to review and 
update the reimbursement agreement consistent with this act. 
Should a new agreement require additional budgetary resources, 
the Committee would expect a either a budget amendment or a 
reprogramming request to be submitted consistent with section 
505 of this act.
    The Committee directs the Detention Trustee to report to 
the Committee on a quarterly basis the number of individuals in 
the detention trustee system, the projected number of 
individuals, and the annualized costs that are associated with 
them.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $70,603,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      75,681,000
Committee recommendation................................      75,681,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $75,681,000. The 
recommendation is $5,078,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    This account finances the activities of the Office of 
Inspector General [IG] including audits, inspections, 
investigations and other reviews of programs and operations of 
the Department of Justice to promote economy, efficiency, and 
effectiveness and to prevent and detect fraud, waste, and 
abuse, as well as violations of ethical standards arising from 
the conduct of Department employees in their numerous and 
diverse activities.
    The Committee continues to strongly support the IG's review 
of investigative tools used by the Department of Justice, 
including National Security Letters and USA PATRIOT Act section 
215 business orders. In addition, the Committee supports the 
IG's ongoing review of major information technology 
acquisitions, such as the FBI's Sentinel case management 
system.

                    United States Parole Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $11,462,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      12,570,000
Committee recommendation................................      12,570,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $12,570,000. The 
recommendation is $1,108,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The Commission is an independent body within the Department 
of Justice which makes decisions regarding requests for parole 
and supervision of Federal prisoners.

                            Legal Activities


                        GENERAL LEGAL ACTIVITIES

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $745,549,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     804,007,000
Committee recommendation................................     804,007,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $804,007,000. The 
recommendation is $58,458,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    This appropriation funds the establishment of litigation 
policy, conduct of litigation, and various other legal 
responsibilities, through the Office of the Solicitor General, 
the Tax Division, the Criminal Division, the Civil Division, 
the Environmental and Natural Resources Division, the Civil 
Rights Division, the Office of Legal Counsel, and Interpol.
    The Committee remains concerned DOJ is not requesting 
enough resources to keep litigation costs on pace with DHS 
enforcement activities.
    The Committee is concerned by the large number of suspected 
human rights violators from foreign countries who have found 
safe haven in the United States and directs the Criminal 
Division to increase efforts to investigate and prosecute 
serious human rights crimes committed by these foreign 
nationals, including genocide, torture and war crimes and other 
offenses committed by serious human rights violators. Within 
available funds, the Committee directs that $1,800,000 be 
allocated for an additional 10 attorneys, six analysts and 
associated support personnel in the Criminal Division to 
investigate and prosecute individuals who violate the Federal 
laws on serious human rights crimes, including but not limited 
to criminal statutes on genocide, torture and war crimes.
    The Committee recommendations, by Division, are displayed 
in the following table:

                             LEGAL DIVISIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Office of the Solicitor General........................           10,440
Tax Division...........................................          101,016
Criminal Division......................................          164,061
Civil Division.........................................          270,431
Environment and Natural Resources Division.............          103,093
Office of Legal Counsel................................            6,693
Civil Rights Division..................................          123,151
Interpol USNCB.........................................           24,548
Office of Dispute Resolution...........................              574
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................          804,007
------------------------------------------------------------------------

               THE NATIONAL CHILDHOOD VACCINE INJURY ACT

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $6,833,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       7,833,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,833,000

    The Committee recommendation provides a reimbursement of 
$7,833,000 for legal costs. The recommendation is $1,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level and equal to the 
budget request.
    This account covers Justice Department expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-660).

                           ANTITRUST DIVISION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $147,819,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     150,591,000
Committee recommendation................................     150,591,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $150,591,000. The 
recommendation is $2,772,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The Antitrust Division investigates potential violations of 
Federal antitrust laws, represents the interests of the United 
States in cases brought under these laws, acts on antitrust 
cases before the Supreme Court, and reviews decisions of 
regulatory commissions relating to antitrust law.

                        UNITED STATES ATTORNEYS

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,754,822,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   1,831,336,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,831,336,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,831,336,000. The 
recommendation is $76,514,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    This account supports the Executive Office for U.S. 
Attorneys and the 94 U.S. Attorneys headquarters offices 
throughout the United States and its territories. The U.S. 
Attorneys [USAs] serve as the principal litigators for the U.S. 
Government for criminal and civil matters. As in past years, 
the Committee directs the U.S. Attorneys to focus their efforts 
on those crimes where the unique resources, expertise, or 
jurisdiction of the Federal Government can be most effective. 
The Committee expects that the resources provided be directed 
to the highest priorities of the USAs.

                   UNITED STATES TRUSTEE SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $209,763,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     217,416,000
Committee recommendation................................     217,416,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $217,416,000. The 
recommendation is $7,653,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    The United States Trustee Program, authorized by 28 U.S.C. 
581 et seq., is the component of the Justice Department with 
responsibility for protecting the integrity of the bankruptcy 
system by overseeing case administration and litigation to 
enforce the bankruptcy laws. In fiscal year 2009, the U.S. 
Trustee Program will participate in an estimated 1.5 million 
business and consumer bankruptcy case filings. To carry out its 
duties in these cases under the Bankruptcy Code (title 11) and 
title 28 of the United States Code, the U.S. Trustee Program is 
organized into three levels: the Executive Office for United 
States Trustees in Washington, DC; United States Trustees in 21 
regions whose geographic jurisdiction is established by 
statute; and 95 field offices, which cover 150 court sites and 
280 other administrative hearing locations.
    The Committee continues to support the use of data-enabled 
forms, or ``smart forms'' for filing bankruptcy petitions and 
schedules. The data-enabled technology was developed jointly by 
the United States Trustee Program and the Administrative Office 
of the Courts [AOUSC]. The Committee supports the mandatory use 
of smart forms to further improve efficiencies in the 
bankruptcy system.
    The Committee notes that the Senate Committee on Indian 
Affairs held four hearings during the 110th Congress, revealing 
a longstanding public safety crisis on many reservations. One 
source of the problem is that Federal laws limit the ability of 
tribal governments to fight crime in their communities. Federal 
laws and court decisions limit tribal police arrest authority, 
prohibit tribal courts from trying non-Indians for reservation-
based crimes, and limit tribal court sentencing authority to 1 
year imprisonment. As a result, tribal communities rely solely 
on the United States to investigate and prosecute misdemeanors 
involving non-Indians and all felonies committed on Indian 
lands.
    Despite this reliance, Department of Justice data shows a 
27 percent decline in FBI investigative activity on Indian 
lands in the past decade, and Federal Indian country 
prosecutions have fallen 2 percent in the past 5 years. Over 
the past 10 years, U.S. attorneys have declined to prosecute 
approximately 62 percent of felony Indian country cases 
nationally.
    To address the public safety crisis in Indian country, the 
Committee urges the Department to provide additional FBI agents 
and Assistant U.S. Attorneys to investigate and prosecute 
violent reservation crimes. The Committee also urges the 
Attorney General to appoint tribal prosecutors and other 
experts in Federal Indian law to serve as Special Assistant 
U.S. Attorneys to prosecute reservation crimes.

                  FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $1,606,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       1,823,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,823,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,823,000. The 
recommendation is $217,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request. The recommendation fully 
provides for the adjudication of claims against: Germany 
relating to World War II; Cuba relating to the Castro regime; 
and Iraq relating to the U.S.S. Stark incident and Desert 
Shield/Storm.
    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission settles claims of 
American citizens arising from nationalization, expropriation, 
or other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

                     FEES AND EXPENSES OF WITNESSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $168,300,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     168,300,000
Committee recommendation................................     168,300,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $168,300,000. The 
recommendation is equal to the fiscal year 2008 enacted level 
and to the budget request.
    This account provides for fees and expenses of witnesses 
who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in which the 
United States is a party, including fact and expert witnesses. 
These funds are also used for mental competency examinations as 
well as witness and informant protection.

                      COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $9,794,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       9,873,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,873,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $9,873,000. The 
recommendation is $79,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and commensurate with the budget request.
    The Community Relations Service provides assistance to 
communities and persons in the prevention and resolution of 
disagreements relating to perceived discriminatory practices. 
The Attorney General may submit a reprogramming to the 
Committee for additional funding for conflict resolution and 
violence prevention activities of the Community Relations 
Service in accordance with reprogramming guidelines contained 
within this act.

                         ASSETS FORFEITURE FUND

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $20,990,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      20,990,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,990,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $20,990,000. The 
recommendation is the same as the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and to the budget request.
    This account provides funds to supplement existing 
resources to cover additional investigative expenses of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, Drug Enforcement 
Administration, and U.S. Marshals Service, such as awards for 
information, purchase of evidence, equipping of conveyances, 
and investigative expenses leading to seizure. Funds for these 
activities are provided from receipts deposited in the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund resulting from the seizure and liquidation of 
assets. Expenses related to the management and disposal of 
assets are also provided from the Assets Forfeiture Fund by a 
permanent indefinite appropriation.

                     United States Marshals Service


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $864,219,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     933,117,000
Committee recommendation................................     968,117,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $968,117,000. The 
recommendation is $101,594,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level, and $35,000,000 above the budget request.
    The core missions of the USMS include the apprehension of 
fugitives, protection of the Federal judiciary, protection of 
witnesses, execution of warrants and court orders, and the 
custody and transportation of accused and unsentenced 
prisoners.
    Judicial and Courthouse Security.--The Committee recommends 
an appropriation of $377,811,000 for judicial and courthouse 
security. The recommendation is $20,469,000 above the fiscal 
year 2008 funding level and identical to the budget request.
    Southwest Border.--The Committee's recommendation provides 
$12,746,000 and 52 Deputy U.S. Marshals, as requested by the 
President to address the increasing workload along the 
Southwest border. Additional Border Patrol agents have led to 
an inevitable increase in illegal immigrant arrests which in 
turn has increased the number of prisoners produced for Federal 
court proceedings. Deputy U.S. Marshals are under tremendous 
strain to protect Federal judges and prosecutors, transport 
prisoners, and secure cellblock operations. The Committee 
wishes to be kept informed of resource requirements of the USMS 
due to increased immigration enforcement activities.
    Regional Fugitive Task Forces.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $31,952,000 for existing regional 
fugitive task forces to include $14,585,000 for payroll 
expenses and, $17,367,000 for the day-to-day operating expenses 
for the six regional task forces.
    The Committee recommends an additional $10,000,000 above 
the budget request to establish new, or expand existing, 
regional fugitive task forces. Distribution of these resources 
should be based on the fugitive workload, giving emphasis to 
the workload created by the Adam Walsh Child Protection and 
Safety Act. Funding covers the cost of new Deputy U.S. 
Marshals, computer specialists, intelligence analysts, and 
administrative support positions, as well as the costs for 
facilities, information technology, communications, tactical 
gear, vehicles, and other start up costs.
    Sexual Offender Apprehension.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $25,000,000 for the USMS to enhance the USMS's ability 
to carry out its responsibilities to implement and enforce the 
Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act (Public Law 109-
248). The Committee is deeply concerned that the administration 
has failed to request resources to carry out this act. To 
fulfill its Adam Walsh Act responsibilities, the United States 
Marshals Service requires funding to hire and equip at least 
500 new Deputy Marshals over the next 3 to 5 years. The 
Committee recommendation will enable the USMS to hire at least 
100 additional Deputy U.S. Marshals and associated support 
staff in fiscal year 2009. This funding will also help 
establish the National Sex Offender Targeting Center, improve 
the information technology backbone, and reinforce the agency's 
infrastructure so that Deputy Marshals have timely, accurate 
investigative information to track down and arrest those who 
prey on our Nation's children.
    The recommendation includes $2,304,000 for construction in 
space controlled, occupied, or utilized by the USMS in United 
States courthouses and Federal buildings, including but not 
limited to the creation, renovation, and expansion of prisoner 
movement areas, elevators, and other law enforcement and court 
security support space. As in prior years, the Committee's 
intent is to provide for all construction activity to support 
the mission of the USMS in protection of the Federal judiciary 
and other law enforcement activities.
    The Committee is aware of the U.S. Marshals' efforts to 
pilot state-of-the-art detection capabilities at multiple high-
threat courthouses around the country and applauds the agency's 
plans to enhance courthouse security by acquiring proven 
equipment, training, and procedures to facilitate the screening 
and detection of evolving threats. Accordingly, the Committee 
recommendation envisions an aggressive schedule for rollout of 
detection technologies at pilot sites and the subsequent 
fielding of detection systems if the pilot evaluations meet the 
Marshals' expectations. Special consideration should be given 
to those technologies that have been deployed and proven 
effective by other agencies, such as the Transportation 
Security Administration.

                       NATIONAL SECURITY DIVISION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $73,373,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      83,789,000
Committee recommendation................................      83,789,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $83,789,000. The 
recommendation is $10,416,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The National Security Division [NSD] coordinates the 
Department's national security and terrorism missions through 
law enforcement investigations and prosecutions, and handling 
counterespionage cases. The NSD works in coordination with the 
FBI, the Intelligence Community, and U.S. Attorneys. Its 
primary function is to prevent acts of terrorism and espionage 
from being perpetrated in the United States by foreign powers.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 INTERAGENCY CRIME AND DRUG ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $497,935,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     531,581,000
Committee recommendation................................     511,741,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $511,741,000. The 
recommendation is $13,806,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $19,840,000 below the budget request.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement Account funds 
the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces [OCDETF]. 
This program was created in 1982 to ensure a coordinated, 
multi-agency approach to identifying, disrupting and 
dismantling those drug trafficking and money laundering 
organizations primarily responsible for the Nation's illicit 
drug supply. Through its nine regional task forces, this 
program utilizes the seven Federal law enforcement agencies to 
target major drug trafficking organizations and their financial 
infrastructure. This account also funds the OCDETF Fusion 
Center [OFC], an operational intelligence center combining the 
analytical resources and intelligence information of the OCDETF 
member agencies and others.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $6,493,489,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   7,065,140,000
Committee recommendation................................   7,085,140,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $7,085,140,000. The 
recommendation is $591,651,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $20,000,000 above the budget request.
    Five-Year Budget.--The Committee understands that the FBI's 
fiscal year 2009 budget request was originally formulated under 
a 5-year budget development process, but is concerned that it 
was not adopted by the administration. Implementation of a 
multi-year budget planning approach has been urged by the 
Committee in the past, as well as various external review 
groups, such as the National Academy for Public Administration. 
This approach will also allow the FBI to better participate in 
the Intelligence Community budget process. The Committee 
encourages the FBI to continue pursuing the 5-year budget with 
the administration.
    Cyber Initiative.--The Committee is concerned that the 
threat of cyber-related foreign intelligence operations to the 
United States is rapidly expanding. These cyber intrusions 
present a national security threat and have compromised 
thousands of computers on U.S. Government and private sector 
networks. The FBI is in a unique position to counter cyber 
threats as the only agency with the statutory authority, 
expertise, and ability to combine counterterrorism, 
counterintelligence, and criminal resources to neutralize, 
mitigate, and disrupt illegal computer-supported operations 
domestically. The Committee recognizes the FBI's efforts and 
recommends the full request of $75,000,000 for this effort, 
which includes an additional 211 positions and $38,648,000 to 
further the FBI's investigatory, intelligence gathering, and 
technological capabilities.
    Work Force Study.--The Committee is extremely disappointed 
that the FBI failed to comply with a requirement to complete a 
workforce study within 60 days of enactment of the fiscal year 
2008 act. As of June 2008, over 160 days after enactment of the 
fiscal year 2008 act, the Committee had not yet received this 
study. The Committee directs the FBI to provide this study 
immediately and provide the Committee with information on the 
cause of the unacceptable delay in fulfilling this reporting 
requirement.
    Workforce Distribution.--The Committee notes that the FBI's 
staffing levels have increased since 2001 and will increase 
again in fiscal year 2009. While the FBI has undergone a major 
reorganization of its mission priorities, the Committee is 
concerned that the Bureau has not adequately considered the 
proper distribution of its staffing to field offices around the 
country. As a result, staffing levels continue to vary 
dramatically from State to State, both in terms of the 
population of a State and the threats that exist within that 
State. As the FBI considers the distribution of new agents 
across the United States, the Committee encourages the FBI to 
also consider the allocation of agents to field offices that 
could alleviate disparities in the number of personnel between 
field offices.
    National Security.--The Committee recommends the full 
request to support the FBI's critical national security efforts 
to conduct investigations to prevent, disrupt and deter acts of 
terrorism, and continue to strengthen working relationships 
with other Federal, State and local partners. The Committee 
recommendation includes $3,385,350,000 in base funding and 
$369,635,000 in enhancements for national security initiatives, 
including $235,483,000 for domain and operations, $88,502,000 
for surveillance, $5,500,000 for technology, and $40,150,000 
for to build partnerships and strengthen the FBI workforce.
    Criminal Justice Information Services Division.--The 
Committee recommendation provides $558,000,000 including fee 
collections for the Criminal Justice Information Services 
Division [CJIS], including $307,000,000 in appropriated funds 
and $251,000,000 in user fees. As in previous years, under no 
circumstances is the FBI to divert funding collected through 
the CJIS user fee for any purpose other than CJIS, its 
refreshment plan, or a subsequent modernization plan for the 
current facility.
    The Committee is concerned by the large number of suspected 
human rights violators from foreign countries who have found 
safe haven in the United States and directs the FBI to increase 
efforts to investigate and support the criminal prosecution by 
the Department of Justice of serious human rights crimes 
committed by these foreign nationals, including genocide, 
torture, war crimes and other offenses committed by serious 
human rights violators. The Committee recommends, within 
available funds, $1,500,000 for an additional ten agents and 
associated support personnel at FBI headquarters to detect, 
investigate, and support the criminal prosecution of 
individuals who violate the Federal laws on serious human 
rights crimes, including but not limited to criminal statutes 
on genocide, torture and war crimes.
    FBI Headquarters Building.--The Committee is concerned that 
the limitations of the J. Edgar Hoover Building, which has not 
had any major structural improvements since it was opened in 
1974, could affect the FBI's ability to fulfill its mission. 
The building is inadequate for the current FBI Headquarters 
workforce, causing dispersal of FBI staff in to over 16 annex 
offices. The building also lacks adequate setback and other 
security features, which puts FBI operations and personnel at 
unacceptable risk. The Hoover Building does not meet the 
Interagency Security Committee's criteria for a secure Federal 
facility capable of handling intelligence and other sensitive 
information. The Committee finds these conditions unacceptable 
and directs the Government Accountability Office [GAO] to 
review the Hoover Building and associated off-site locations, 
and provide a analysis of the FBI's ability to fulfill its 
mission and security requirements under the present 
circumstances. The GAO study should also assess the benefits of 
a consolidated Headquarters facility.
    Critical Infrastructure.--The Committee is concerned that 
insufficient operations practices and substandard maintenance 
could result in systems failures and the unavailability of 
time-sensitive data to agents in the field. The Committee urges 
the Department of Justice to maintain and operate its critical 
facilities and physical infrastructure at the highest standard, 
consistent with industry best practices, to ensure that these 
systems can perform critical functions for the FBI.
    Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement.--Within funds 
provided, the Committee urges that the FBI to continue to make 
the detection, investigation, and prosecution of domestic and 
international intellectual property crimes an investigative 
priority. The Committee also urges the FBI to continue field 
office collaboration with the U.S. Attorneys' Computer Hacking 
and Intellectual Property Rights units and to continue to 
support the FBI Headquarters Intellectual Property Rights 
program coordination with the Department of Justice's Criminal 
Division's Computer Crime and Intellectual Property section.
    Innocent Images National Initiative [IINI].--The Committee 
recommendation provides $9,000,000 above the budget request for 
the Innocent Images National Initiative, for a total of 
$47,475,000 to increase the number of agents investigating 
Internet-related crimes against children by at least 30. The 
Committee has provided this increase to address the critical 
requirements for Federal law enforcement in attacking the 
problem of child sexual exploitation and child victimization.
    Mortgage Fraud.--The sub-prime mortgage crisis threatens 
the Nation's economic security. Suspicious Activity Reports 
filed by various financial institutions increased almost 200 
percent within the last 3 years alone, and show no signs of 
decreasing. This increase in mortgage fraud activity is greatly 
straining the FBI's white-collar crime investigative 
capabilities. Therefore, the Committee recommends an increase 
of $10,000,000 and at least 25 agents to augment the current 
positions conducting mortgage fraud investigations.
    Safe Street Task Forces.--The Committee remains concerned 
over the level of resources available for FBI criminal 
investigations, especially at a time when violent crime trends 
show signs of increasing in some localities and the continuing, 
pervasive threat from criminal gangs and gang violence. While 
most violent crime is a local crime problem, State and local 
authorities often depend upon the FBI for investigative, 
forensic, and technical assistance and leadership. The FBI's 
task force approach to combating street crime and gang violence 
is one of the successful strategies that contributed to 
previous decreases in violent crimes. Accordingly, the 
Committee urges the FBI, within available funds, to provide 
$4,000,000 for an additional 20 agents to augment existing task 
forces, and another $5,000,000 to add two additional task 
forces dedicated to targeting violent crime and gang violence.
    Construction Project Management.--The Committee recommends 
an additional $1,000,000 in this account to address 
construction project management and transitional workforce 
expenses.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $164,200,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      42,991,000
Committee recommendation................................     184,991,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $184,991,000 for the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation [FBI] construction. The 
recommendation is $20,791,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
funding level and $142,000,000 above the budget request. Of 
this amount, $33,191,000 shall be for sensitive compartmental 
information facilities [SCIFs], $9,800,000 is for improvements 
at the FBI Academy, and $50,000,000 shall be for the Terrorist 
Explosives Device Analytical Center.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,857,569,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   1,936,584,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,954,384,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,954,384,000. The 
recommendation is $96,815,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $17,800,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation provides $244,000,000 for Drug Enforcement 
Administration's [DEA] Drug Diversion Control Fee Account.
    The Drug Enforcement Agency's [DEA] mission is to enforce 
the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United 
States and bring to the criminal and civil justice system of 
the United States, or any other competent jurisdiction, those 
organizations and principal members of organizations involved 
in the growing, manufacturing, or distribution of controlled 
substances appearing in or destined for illicit traffic in the 
United States; and to support non-enforcement programs aimed at 
reducing the availability of illicit controlled substances on 
the domestic and international markets.
    The Committee supports the DEA's efforts to develop 
unmanned aerial systems [UAS] to provide narcotics surveillance 
and interdiction. The use of UAS has potential to significantly 
expand the DEA's ability to fight narcotics trafficking over 
larger geographical areas without the need for a significantly 
larger agent workforce or additional rated pilots. The 
Committee recommendation provides $17,800,000 above the budge 
request for the DEA to work in collaboration with the U.S. Army 
to develop and acquire UAS for tactical drug interdiction 
efforts.
    Drugs on Public Lands.--The Committee is very concerned 
that foreign drug-trafficking organizations are rapidly 
increasing the amount of marijuana grown on our Nation's public 
lands, creating unacceptable hazards to public safety and 
significant natural resource damage. The Committee urges the 
Drug Enforcement Administration to prioritize efforts to work 
with Federal land management agencies, including the U.S. 
Forest Service and National Park Service, and other State and 
local law enforcement partners to aggressively and permanently 
eradicate marijuana and other drug operations on public lands.
    The Committee strongly encourages DEA to increase the 
resources provided to investigate, apprehend and prosecute drug 
trafficking on public lands and to target those resources to 
areas with the highest concentration of trafficking activity.
    The Committee encourages the DEA to continue to consult and 
work with Alaskan State and local law enforcement agencies to 
find ways to tackle the State's methamphetamine problem. The 
Alaska problem is unique because the State's size and remote 
areas that are optimal for methamphetamine production 
laboratories.

          Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $984,097,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   1,027,814,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,042,814,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,042,814,000. The 
recommendation is $58,717,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $15,000,000 above the budget request.
    The mission of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, 
and Explosives [ATF] is to reduce violent crime, prevent 
terrorism, and protect the public. ATF reduces the criminal use 
of firearms and illegal firearms trafficking, and assists other 
Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in reducing 
crime and violence. ATF investigates bombing and arson 
incidents and provides for public safety by reducing the 
criminal misuse of explosives, trafficking in explosives, 
combating acts of arson and arson-for-profit schemes, and 
removing safety hazards caused by improper and unsafe storage 
of explosive materials. ATF enforces the Contraband Cigarette 
Trafficking Act which addresses the diversion of cigarette 
taxes often involving multi-million dollar trafficking plots, 
some of which have been traced to international terrorists.
    Violent Crime Impact Teams.--The Committee continues to 
strongly support the ATF's Violent Crime Impact Team [VCIT] 
initiative to pursue violent criminals and reduce the 
occurrence of homicides and firearms-related violent crime 
through the use of geographic targeting, proactive 
investigation, and prosecution of those responsible. The VCITs 
uses a multi-agency approach and work closely with State and 
local law enforcement to identify, target, disrupt, arrest, and 
prosecute violent criminals. The Committee recommendation 
includes a $15,000,000 increase above the base budget of 
approximately $45,000,000 to expand the staff level at the 
existing VCITs to 10 agents per VCIT, and to add four new VCITs 
in high crime areas.
    Conversion of Records.--The Committee recognizes the need 
for ATF to complete the conversion of tens of thousands of 
existing Federal firearms dealer out-of-business records from 
film to digital images at the ATF National Tracing Center 
[NTC]. Once the out-of-business records are fully converted, 
search time for these records will be reduced significantly. 
The Committee urges the ATF to continue the conversion and 
integration of these records.
    National Integrated Ballistic Information Network.--The 
Committee continues to support the National Integrated 
Ballistic Information Network [NIBIN], including significant 
investment made by State and local law enforcement partners to 
build the current NIBIN database. The Committee believes ATF 
should move expeditiously to ensure that ballistic-imaging 
technology is routinely refreshed, upgraded, and deployed to 
State and local law enforcement. The Committee urges ATF 
prioritize upgrading and replacing aging ballistic imaging 
equipment in its fiscal year 2009 operating budget and in 
future budget requests. ATF should ensure upgrades and 
replacements maximize and protect the resources invested by 
State and local law enforcement.

                         Federal Prison System

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$5,973,889,000 for the Federal Prison System, or Bureau of 
Prisons [BOP]. The recommendation is $548,401,000 above the 
fiscal year 2008 enacted level and $440,000,000 above the 
budget request.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $5,050,440,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   5,435,754,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,435,754,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,435,754,000. The 
recommendation is $385,314,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and equal to the budget request.
    The Committee is disappointed that in recent years the 
President's budget request for the Bureau of Prisons has 
consistently underestimated inmate population growth rates, 
medical costs inflation, and other fixed costs such as utility 
expenses. The Committee is concerned that unreliable estimates 
for these ``fixed costs'' could imperil safety at Federal 
prisons by forcing personnel reductions that would increase 
inmate-to-staff ratios to unacceptable levels. The Committee 
directs the Administration to re-estimate its fixed costs and 
prisoner population for fiscal year 2009 and provide the 
Committee with those estimates no later than 60 days after 
enactment of this act. Further, the Committee wishes to be 
notified of the current staff-to-inmate ratios at all Federal 
prisons on a monthly basis.
    The Committee commends the BOP on its work to address and 
prevent sexual misconduct. With funds provided in earlier 
appropriations acts, the National Institute of Corrections has 
made useful progress in providing training and technical 
support to correctional systems throughout the country to 
eliminate staff sexual misconduct with inmates, provide 
training in investigating cases, and training the ``trainers'' 
in order that employees at every level will be more aware of, 
and better prepared to deal with, these cases. The Committee 
directs the BOP to continue these efforts and to report to the 
Committee by March 31, 2009, on progress made in this area.
    The recommendation shall be expended in the following 
manner:

                          SALARIES AND EXPENSES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inmate Care and Programs...............................        1,922,701
Institution Security and Administration................        2,414,419
Contract Confinement...................................          897,468
Management and Administration..........................          201,166
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Inmate Care and Programs.--This activity covers the costs 
of all food, medical supplies, clothing, welfare services, 
release clothing, transportation, gratuities, staff salaries 
(including salaries of Health Resources and Services 
Administration commissioned officers), and operational costs of 
functions directly related to providing inmate care. This 
decision unit also finances the costs of education and 
vocational training, drug treatment, religious programs, 
psychological services, and other inmate programs such as Life 
Connections. This activity also covers costs associated with 
regional and central office executive direction and management 
support functions related to providing inmate care such as 
medical and drug treatment program.
    Institution Security and Administration.--This activity 
covers costs associated with the maintenance of facilities and 
institution security. This activity finances institution 
maintenance, motor pool operations, powerhouse operations, 
institution security and other administrative functions. 
Finally, this activity covers costs associated with regional 
and central office executive direction and management support 
functions such as research and evaluation, systems support, 
financial management, budget functions, safety, and legal 
counsel.
    Contract Confinement.--This activity provides for the 
confinement of sentenced Federal offenders in Government-owned, 
contractor-operated facilities contracts with State and local 
facilities, the care of Federal prisoners in contract community 
residential centers, and assistance by the National Institute 
of Corrections to State and local corrections. This activity 
also covers costs associated with management and oversight of 
contract confinement functions.
    Activations and Expansions.--The Committee expects BOP to 
adhere to the activation schedule included in BOP's budget 
submission. BOP shall notify the Senate Committee on 
Appropriations of any deviations to this schedule.
    Administrative Maximum United States Penitentiary.--The 
Committee recognizes the importance of ensuring that the 
Administrative Maximum United States Penitentiary [ADX], also 
known as ``Supermax,'' has adequate funding to retain staff 
levels necessary to provide strict oversight of prisoner 
activities and communications; and to ensure the safety of 
prison staff. Further, the facility has a pressing need to 
upgrade its security infrastructure. The Committee urges the 
Federal Bureau of Prisons to allocate funding necessary to 
address these safety requirements.
    National Institute of Corrections [NIC].--The Committee 
rejects the proposal in the President's budget to eliminate the 
National Institute of Corrections [NIC] from the Bureau of 
Prisons [BOP]. This Committee notes that efforts of the NIC 
contribute to cost efficiency and effectiveness is such areas 
as design and operation of new jails, prisons, community 
corrections programs, offender workforce development programs, 
and offender classification and risk management. The Committee 
urges the Department to continues operating the NIC within the 
Bureau of Prisons, and, if necessary, to submit a reprogramming 
proposal if sufficient funds are not available within the BOP 
for this effort.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $372,720,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      95,807,000
Committee recommendation................................     535,807,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $535,807,000 for the 
construction, modernization, maintenance, and repair of prison 
and detention facilities housing Federal prisoners. The 
recommendation is $163,087,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level, excluding emergency supplemental appropriations, 
and $440,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation provides for $70,627,000, 
equal to the full budget request for modernization and repairs.
    The Committee recommendation includes $440,000,000 for new 
construction to enable the Bureau of Prisons to reduce the 
backlog of new construction projects. This funding will help 
decrease crowding throughout the Federal prison system. Also, 
the Committee supports the provision of additional bedspace 
capacity for female inmates at new facilities. This capacity 
will significantly reduce crowding in this population, thereby 
enhancing safety and security.
    Within funds provided, the Committee recommendation 
provides for site selection and development, environmental 
assessment and feasibility, planning, and initial design work 
to build an FCI in Leavenworth, Kansas.
    Bill language is included clarifying that BOP may not 
transfer ``Building and Facilities'' appropriations to cover 
``Salaries and Expenses'' costs.

                FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED

                (LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES)

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $2,328,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       2,328,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,328,000

    The Committee recommendation provides a limitation on the 
administrative expenses of $2,328,000 for the Federal Prison 
Industries, Inc. The recommendation is equal to the 2008 fiscal 
year funding level and equal to the budget request.

                    Office on Violence Against Women

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $400,000,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     280,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     415,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $415,000,000. The 
recommendation is $15,000,000 above fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and $135,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee rejects the administration's proposal to 
create a consolidated, competitive grant program for the 
programs authorized in the Violence Against Women Act [VAWA], 
because, if approved, these proven and successful programs 
would cease to operate in the way that Congress intended. For 
over 10 years, VAWA programs have supported community efforts 
around the Nation to effectively respond to domestic violence, 
sexual assault, stalking, and dating violence. In the 109th 
session, Congress unanimously passed a VAWA reauthorization 
that continues successful programs and creates targeted new 
programs to address gaps in prevention services, housing, 
healthcare, criminal justice, and employment issues, and meet 
the needs of youth, native women, communities of color, and 
victims of sexual violence. These programs are designed to meet 
specific needs and create collaborations between distinct 
groups that can leverage their expertise and resources to 
address different aspects of domestic and sexual violence. The 
proposed competitive grant ignores the congressional intent 
behind these programs and would lead to less effective and 
potentially dangerous programming and disadvantage certain 
applicants, such as those from rural areas. Congress is firmly 
committed to ensuring that grantees have the necessary 
knowledge and history of providing effective services to 
victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
and stalking in order to ensure that VAWA funding is used 
wisely and well. Because of this, VAWA programs have many 
specific requirements and protections to ensure that work with 
law enforcement, child protective services, healthcare, and 
other systems is being done effectively and the confidentiality 
and safety of victims is maintained. The Committee believes 
that it is important to fund individual VAWA programs as 
authorized in order to meet distinct needs in the field and 
strengthen the continuum of intervention and prevention 
responses to victims, families, and communities.
    The Committee acknowledges the often underlying connections 
between domestic violence and a variety of related social ills 
including youth violence, homelessness and substance abuse. The 
Committee believes that the Violence Against Women Act programs 
not only provide critical services to victims fleeing from 
life-threatening violence but also addresses these costly 
social problems.
    Domestic violence impacts 1 in 4 American women over their 
lifetimes and 15.5 million children are exposed to domestic 
violence each year. Though the incidence of domestic violence 
assaults and murders has been steadily decreasing, there is an 
increase in demand for services due to improved criminal 
justice response and heightened public awareness. The 
Committee's funding recommendation reflects the long-term cost-
effectiveness of these services and the success in saving lives 
and preventing future violence.
    The Committee encourages the Department of Justice to work 
together with the Office on Violence Against Women to address 
the intersection of domestic violence and sexual assault with 
crimes such as gang violence, child abuse and trafficking. This 
collaboration would save money across sectors, by preventing 
many of these crimes.
    The most recent reauthorization of the Violence Against 
Women Act included a new emphasis on prevention and early 
intervention programs to stop violence before it began or 
became life-threatening. The Committee included funding for 
several evidence-based programs to prevent domestic and sexual 
violence including providing services for children who have 
been exposed to family violence and working with men and youth 
to change attitudes that support or condone violence.
    The table below displays the Committee recommendations for 
the programs under this office.

       VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN PREVENTION AND PROSECUTION PROGRAMS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
STOP Grants............................................         185,000
    National Institute of Justice--R & D...............          (1,880)
    Transitional Housing Assistance....................         (17,390)
Grants to Encourage Arrest.............................          59,000
Rural Domestic Violence Assistance Grants..............          42,000
Violence on College Campuses...........................           9,400
Civil Legal Assistance.................................          42,000
Sexual Assault Victims Services........................          12,000
Elder Abuse Grant Program..............................           4,500
Safe Havens Project....................................          14,000
Education and Training for Disabled Female Victims.....           6,580
CASA (Special Advocates)...............................          15,000
Training for Judicial Personnel........................           2,820
Stalking Database......................................           3,030
Court Training and Improvements........................           2,820
Services for Children/Youth Exposed to Violence........           2,770
Advocates for Youth/Services for Youth Victims.........           2,820
National Tribal Sex Offender Registry..................             940
Research on Violence Against Indian Women..............             940
Closed Circuit Television Grants.......................             940
Engaging Men and Youth in Prevention...................           2,500
Training Programs to Assist Probation and Parole                  5,000
 Officers..............................................
National Resource Center on Workplace Responses........             940
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         415,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Native American/Native Alaskan Liaison Office.--The 
Committee understands that Native American and Native Alaskan 
women experience a higher rate of violence compared to any 
other group in the United States. Alaska's forcible rape rate 
is 2.5 times larger than the national average. Alaska holds the 
highest rate in the United States of men murdering women. In 
fiscal year 2005, over 6,000 incidents of domestic violence 
were recorded. In response, in fiscal year 2005, a liaison 
office was created to address abuse and violence towards women 
in Alaska. The Committee includes $2,800,000 for the Native 
American/Native Alaskan Liaison Office for their work in 
Alaska. The Committee has provided $2,800,000 to the State of 
Alaska for the purposes of combating sexual assault and 
domestic violence. These funds may also be distributed to 
nonprofit entities that provide services such as: a crisis 
hotline, services to victims of sexual assault or domestic 
violence in rural areas, and medical assistance to victims.
    Within the funds appropriated, $183,800,000 is for general 
formula grants to the States. The fiscal year 2009 
recommendation will allow jurisdictions to implement mandatory 
pro-arrest and prosecution policies to prevent, identify, and 
respond to violent crimes against women, support coordination 
of State victim services, assist Native victims in Indian 
Country, and provide secure settings and specialized procedures 
for visitation and exchange of children in families 
experiencing domestic violence. The recommendation supports 
increasing access to comprehensive legal services for victims, 
providing short term housing assistance and support services 
for domestic violence victims and education and training to end 
violence against and abuse of women with disabilities.
    Sexual Assault Services Act [SASA].--The Committee 
recommendation provides $9,400,000 to begin a Federal program 
that directly funds the needs of sexual assault victims. As 
part of the Violence Against Women Act of 2005, Congress 
created the Sexual Assault Services Program [SASP] to address 
gaps in services to sexual assault victims and their families. 
While Congress has worked to ensure that crime controls are in 
place to address sexual offenders, Congress also wants to 
ensure that there is a dedicated stream of funding to provide a 
broad range of services to male, female and child sexual 
assault victims and their families through the well-established 
and well-regarded system of community-based rape crisis centers 
throughout the United States. These agencies' ability to serve 
the needs of victims has been hampered by a significant lack of 
resources. The Sexual Assault Services Program addresses this 
lack of resources and meets the distinct need to strengthen the 
continuum of intervention responses to sexual assault victims, 
their families and the community.
    Congress is firmly committed to ensuring that these rape 
crisis centers have access to technical assistance, training 
and support. SASP will provide such assistance through sexual 
assault coalitions located in every state, territory and within 
a number of Tribes.
    In addition, in recognition of the specialized needs of 
victims in Communities of Color, Congress established through 
the Sexual Assault Services Program, specific funds so that 
Communities of Color-led agencies with the necessary sexual 
assault expertise can provide these services directly. Congress 
has also ensured a set-aside for Indian tribes to enhance their 
response to victims of sexual assault and increase 
accountability to perpetrators within tribal communities.
    Addressing Violence Against Native Women.--Recent research 
has called attention to the dire needs of Indian tribes to 
address violence against Native women. The lack of a tribal 
order or protection and sex offender registry prevents Indian 
tribes from accessing and sharing this life-saving information. 
While American Indian women are victimized at more than double 
the rate of any other population of women in the United States, 
not a single comprehensive study of rates of violence has been 
conducted. The Committee recognizes this and includes funding 
for two programs to conduct research to help document the 
extent and nature of violence against Native women and to 
establish a tribal registry to enhance enforcement of tribal 
protection orders and monitoring of sex offenders.
    Services for Children and Youth.--As many as 10 million 
children a year witness violence in the home, and according to 
the Department of Justice girls and young women ages 16 to 24 
experience the highest rates of intimate partner violence. 
Recognizing the need to intervene early in this cycle of abuse 
and prevent future violence, the Committee is funding two new 
programs that support services for young people exposed to 
violence in the home and teens experiencing violence in their 
own relationships.

                       Office of Justice Programs

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $1,694,767,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     792,747,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,121,100,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $2,121,100,000 for 
the Office of Justice Programs [OJP]. The recommendation is 
$426,333,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level, 
excluding emergency supplemental appropriations, and 
$1,328,353,000 above the budget request. As in fiscal year 
2008, the Office on Violence Against Women is funded under a 
separate heading under this title.
    The Committee continues to be extremely concerned with the 
proposed merger of the Byrne Grant program and Local Law 
Enforcement Block Grant program resulting in a significantly 
reduced funding level. The Committee recommendation does not 
adopt this consolidation and retains the account structure used 
in previous fiscal years.
    The Committee continues to be concerned by the Department's 
continued endorsement of the National Motor Vehicle Title 
Information System. The Committee feels that the funding and 
administration of this program should be performed by a more 
appropriate entity, instead of the Department of Justice.

                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $196,184,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     134,647,000
Committee recommendation................................     240,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $240,000,000. The 
recommendation is $43,816,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $105,353,000 above the budget request.
    The Justice Assistance program provides support to State 
and local law enforcement. Funding in this account provides for 
assistance in the form of research, evaluation, statistics, 
regional information sharing, programs to assist the National 
Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and victim 
notification assistance. In addition, funding is included for 
the management and administration of all grants provided 
through OJP. The Committee again rejects the Department's 
proposed merger of all OJP programs under this heading and 
instead has maintained the account structure contained in last 
year's enacted legislation.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                           JUSTICE ASSISTANCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Institute of Justice........................            45,000
    Law Enforcement and Corrections Tech Centers                (15,000)
     [LETC's]........................................
    Office of Science and Technology [OST]...........           (25,000)
    Counterterrorism Research and Development........            (5,000)
Bureau of Justice Statistics.........................            40,000
State Automated Victim Notification System...........            15,000
Support Services for Victims.........................            10,000
Regional Information Sharing System [RISS]...........            50,000
    Pegasus Nationwide...............................           (12,000)
Missing and Exploited Children.......................            70,000
DNA/Forensics........................................             5,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total..........................................           240,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Institute of Justice [NIJ].--The Committee 
recommendation provides $50,000,000 for the NIJ. NIJ's mission 
is to advance scientific research, development, and evaluation 
to advance the administration of justice and public safety. The 
Committee directs that prior to the obligation of any funds, 
NIJ submit a spend plan on how resources will be allocated.
    NIJ Sole Sourcing.--The Committee is concerned about a 
number of questionable sole-source contracts by the National 
Institutes of Justice [NIJ]. NIJ has let sole-source contracts 
to write the administration's underlying position papers for 
some of the administration's most important initiatives that 
relate to public safety and terrorism prevention. The Committee 
strongly believes that there are numerous qualified and 
objective entities that are competent to conduct studies on 
matters related to law enforcement and that sole sourcing of 
contracts to former employees and lobbyists who have clients 
that could receive financial gain depending on the outcome of 
the findings is not in the best interest. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Attorney General to provide to the Senate 
Committee on Appropriations, no later than 90 days after the 
enactment of this bill a plan to: (1) implement a process to 
openly and competitively bid studies that ensure that taxpayers 
monies are spent in an ethical and fair way; (2) that describes 
the criteria that will be used to select these entities and 
make the awards; (3) that provides for an oversight process 
that will ensure future objectivity and fairness; (4) 
establishes criteria for NIJ seminars and the selection of 
participant speakers and invitees to those seminars.
    DNA and Forensics Initiative.--The Committee recommends 
$5,000,000 to assist with forensics and DNA. Within the amounts 
provided, OJP shall transfer $1,000,000 to support the 
continuation of the development of standards and standard 
reference materials at the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology [NIST] Office of Law Enforcement Standards [OLES], 
to maintain quality and proficiency within Federal, State, and 
local crime laboratory facilities.
    The Committee remains committed to the use of DNA analysis 
to exonerate the innocent, convict the guilty, and bring 
justice to victims but is concerned about the costs that public 
crime laboratories incur when they outsource analysis to 
private laboratories. The funding provided by the Committee to 
strengthen our criminal justice system by building capacity in 
public crime labs should not wasted. The Committee understands 
that the National Institute of Justice collects data on the 
cost to outsource as a condition of the capacity grants and has 
funded a program to analyze costs in the country's largest 
public labs. The National Institute of Justice shall provide a 
report to the Committee on the costs to outsource to private 
labs 60 days after enactment.
    NIJ Universities.--The Committee has become aware that 
there is no Federal standard for colleges and universities that 
relate to Forensic Science Education. The National Institute of 
Justice conducted a panel on Forensics Science Education and as 
a result, the Forensic Science Education Program Accreditation 
Commission was created. However, after expending taxpayer 
dollars NIJ has not created a Federal link between the 
Department of Justice and the Commission, thus the necessary 
universal standards have not been implemented as recommended by 
the Department of Justice's own findings. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the National Institute of Justice, within 60 
days of enactment of this bill to create the Federal link 
necessary to implement the recommended standards.
    Office of Science and Technology [OS&T;].--The Committee 
continues to support the efforts of the leadership of the NIJ's 
OS&T; and the continuing partnership that OS&T; has developed 
with the National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST]. 
To implement the mission of OS&T;, the Committee recommends 
$25,000,000 for OS&T.;
    Victim Notification.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$15,000,000 for the Bureau of Justice Assistance [BJA] to 
continue the State Automated Victim Notification grant program 
to allow States to join the National Victim Notification 
Network. No funding may be utilized from within the Victims 
Assistance Program for this initiative and funds provided under 
this heading shall require a 50 percent match from State, 
local, and private sources.
    Suppport Services for Victims.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $10,000,000 of which, $2,000,000 is for 
support costs for Office of Victims of Crime management and 
administration expenses.
    Regional Information Sharing System.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $50,000,000 for the Regional 
Information Sharing System [RISS]. The Committee supports RISS 
and its role in implementing the National Criminal Intelligence 
Sharing Plan. The RISS program maintains six regionally based 
information networks that provide for the automated exchange of 
crime and terrorism information between Federal, State, and 
local agencies. Of the funds provided, $12,000,000 is to 
support Pegasus with first emphasis on rural and non-urban law 
enforcement to enhance information technology capacity of 
critical hometown support and security forces.
    Missing Children Program.--The issue of child abduction and 
exploitation today, is part of the national conscience due to 
the numerous child pornography and missing children cases. OJP 
works with law enforcement agencies to target, dismantle, and 
prosecute predatory child molesters and those who traffic in 
child pornography. The Committee continues to strongly support 
the Missing and Exploited Children Program run by the BJA. The 
Committee recommends $75,000,000 to continue to expand efforts 
to protect the Nation's children, focusing on the areas of 
locating missing children, and addressing the growing wave of 
child sexual exploitation facilitated by the internet.
    The funding recommendations for the Missing and Exploited 
Children Program are displayed in the following table:

           NATIONAL CENTER FOR MISSING AND EXPLOITED CHILDREN
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                         Program                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children......          30,000
Jimmy Ryce Law Enforcement Training Center..............           5,000
Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.............          30,000
Missing and Exploited Children Office...................           3,000
AMBER Alert.............................................           5,000
Management and Administration...........................           2,000
                                                         ---------------
      Totals............................................          75,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Management and Administration.--The Committee 
recommendation provides that up to $35,000,000 of balances made 
available as a result of prior year de-obligations may be 
obligated for program management and administration, any 
balances made available as a result of prior year de-
obligations in excess of $35,000,000 shall only be obligated in 
accordance with section 505 of this act. In addition, 
consistent with prior practice, reimbursable funding for 
management and administration costs will be made available from 
programs administered by OJP from the ``Community Oriented 
Policing Services'' account. Remaining management and 
administration funding will be made available from the 
``Juvenile Justice Programs'' and the ``State and Local Law 
Enforcement Assistance'' accounts, and that these funds will be 
transferred to and merged with the ``Justice Assistance'' 
account. The Committee directs that any action taken by OJP 
relating to Circular A-76 shall be subject to the requirements 
of section 505 of this act.

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $908,136,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     404,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,387,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,387,000,000. The 
recommendation is $478,864,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level, excluding supplemental appropriations, and 
$983,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

               STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants.............           580,000
    National Institute of Justice....................            (5,000)
    SLATT Intelligence State and Local Training......            (2,000)
Byrne Discretionary Grants...........................           190,000
Byrne Competitive Grants.............................            40,000
Indian Assistance....................................            30,000
    Tribal Prison Construction.......................           (15,000)
    Indian Tribal Courts.............................            (9,000)
    Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse grants........            (6,000)
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program..............           400,000
    Southwest Border Prosecutor Program..............           (25,000)
    Northern Border Prosecutor Program...............           (10,000)
    Southeast Border Prosecutor Program..............           (10,000)
Victims of Trafficking Grants........................            10,000
State Prison Drug Treatment..........................            10,000
Drug Courts..........................................            30,000
Prescription Drug Monitoring.........................             3,000
Prison Rape Prevention and Prosecution...............             5,000
    National Prison Rape Elimination Commission......            (1,692)
Capital Litigation...................................            10,000
Missing Alzheimer's Patients Grants..................             2,000
Mentally Ill Offender Act............................            12,000
Second Chance Act....................................            20,000
                                                      ------------------
      Total..........................................         1,387,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Capital Litigation.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$10,000,000 for Capital Litigation Improvement Grants, as 
authorized in the Justice For All Act. The Committee directs 
that any grants provided for the Capital Litigation 
Improvements, shall be provided pursuant to section 426 of the 
Justice For All Act, Public Law 108-405.
    SEARCH National Technical Assistance and Training 
Program.--The Committee supports efforts to assist States, such 
as West Virginia in the development and use of information 
through criminal justice information systems to accelerate the 
automation of their fingerprints identification processes and 
criminal justice data identification processes so that State 
and local law enforcement which are compatible with the FBI's 
Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System.
    Edward Byrne Discretionary Grants.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $190,000,000 for discretionary grants 
to help to improve the functioning of the criminal justice 
system with an emphasis on drugs, violent crime, and serious 
offenders. The Committee provides funding for the following 
congressionally directed projects, and directs the Department 
of Justice to refrain from charging administrative costs to 
these grants. The Committee expects that the Department of 
Justice will provide appropriate management and oversight of 
each grant. Within the amounts appropriated for discretionary 
grants OJP shall fund the following projects:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A Child is Missing, Fort Lauderdale, FL, to upgrade              100,000
 telephony technology and satellite mapping systems to
 assist in locating missing children in Kansas............
A Child is Missing, Fort Lauderdale, FL, to support A            100,000
 Child is Missing efforts in South Dakota.................
A Child Is Missing, Fort Lauderdale, FL, for law                 100,000
 enforcement assistance for missing and abducted children
 in Idaho.................................................
Advanced Science and Technology Adjudication Resource            500,000
 Center, Washington, DC, to train judges in forensic
 science and other technically complex areas of the law...
Alabama Center for Law and Civic Education, Birmingham,          400,000
 AL, to continue a community oriented, interdisciplinary
 team to design, implement and test solutions to the most
 pressing problems of violence effecting families.........
Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences, Montgomery, AL,       1,000,000
 for forensics research and operations....................
Alabama Department of Public Safety, Montgomery, AL, for         500,000
 law enforcement purposes.................................
Alaska Native Justice Center, Anchorage, AK, for funding         900,000
 to provide attorney referrals, information and resources
 to support Natives involved in legal issues..............
Allegheny County, Allegheny County, PA, for security             750,000
 cameras and a threat viewer emergency management
 visualization system.....................................
Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, funds         750,000
 for a statewide at-risk youth mentoring program involving
 faith based organization, schools, and non-profit
 entities.................................................
Boys Town, Las Vegas, NV, for expansion of services in Las       200,000
 Vegas to assist at-risk girls and boys...................
Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, CriMNet Program (MN             200,000
 Department of Public Safety), St. Paul, MN, for the
 statewide rollout of two major criminal justice
 information integration services.........................
Cape Girardeau County Sheriff's Office, Cape Girardeau,        1,000,000
 MO, to provide funding for competitive grants to
 sheriff's offices and multi-jurisdiction drug task forces
 to address specifically methamphetamine production and
 trafficking..............................................
CARITAS, Inc., Pawtucket, RI, for comprehensive case             200,000
 management services for adolescents receiving substance
 abuse treatment..........................................
Central Mountain Training Foundation, Canon City, CO, for        300,000
 interoperable communications equipment procurement and
 training.................................................
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Cheyenne River Indian                750,000
 Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court operations,
 prosecutors, the public defender's office, and detention
 programs.................................................
City of Albuquerque Police Department, Albuquerque, NM,          200,000
 for a family advocacy center supporting forensic training
 and a crisis support team................................
City of Allentown, Allentown, PA, for an anti-youth gang         200,000
 initiative in Allentown..................................
City of Baltimore Police Department, Baltimore, MD, to         1,100,000
 reduce illegal gun trafficking and gun violence..........
City of Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, for gang prevention and        250,000
 intervention training, project marketing, and outreach to
 hotspots.................................................
City of Fernley, Nevada, Fernley, NV, for law enforcement        300,000
 equipment................................................
City of Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL, to decrease crime        500,000
 and murders in Jacksonville..............................
City of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, for copper wire theft          400,000
 prevention efforts.......................................
City of Luverne, Luverne, AL, for police equipment........       150,000
City of New Haven, New Haven, CT, to develop a prisoner          300,000
 reentry initiative in collaboration with local law
 enforcement and homeless, behavioral, physical health,
 and family service providers.............................
City of Oakland, Oakland, CA, to recruit and hire                300,000
 additional police officers from within the Oakland
 community................................................
City of Richmond, Richmond, VA, to upgrade security at the       400,000
 Courts Building..........................................
City of Saginaw Police Department, Saginaw, MI, to acquire       200,000
 a gunshot locating system................................
City of Salem Police Department, Salem, OR, to create an          75,000
 automated citation system................................
City of San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, for a school-        500,000
 based partnership to provide gang resistance education
 and training.............................................
City of San Jose, San Jose, CA to assess the City's gang         250,000
 intervention and prevention programs.....................
City of St. Paul, St. Paul, MN, to replace the warning           250,000
 siren system that is used to warn the public about
 tornadoes, terrorism, and hazardous material emergencies.
City of Stockton, Stockton, CA, to support the positions         200,000
 of six youth gang outreach workers.......................
City of Trenton Police Department, Trenton, NJ, for a            200,000
 gunshot locating system..................................
City of Vancouver, Vancouver, WA, for a new records              500,000
 management system........................................
City of York, York, PA, for a crime response and                 300,000
 coordination project.....................................
Clark County, Las Vegas, NV, to operate a therapeutic            500,000
 foster care facility.....................................
Clark County, Clark County, KY, to purchase equipment,            90,000
 including portable radios................................
Clearfield City, Clearfield City, UT, for technology to          200,000
 combat gang activity.....................................
Community Renewal International, Shreveport, LA, to use a        100,000
 CRI Model for neighborhood terrorism and disaster
 preparedness.............................................
Coos County Sheriff's Office, Coquille, OR, for personnel        100,000
 and operational costs....................................
Criminal Information Sharing Alliance, Folsom, CA, for a         400,000
 law enforcement information sharing network in Texas.....
Criminal Justice Institute, University of Arkansas System,     1,000,000
 Little Rock, AR, for a national training center for rural
 law enforcement executives...............................
Dauphin County, Harrisburg, PA, for family group and at-         250,000
 risk youth counseling....................................
Daviess County Sheriff's Department, Daviess County, KY,         180,000
 to purchase mobile data terminals and other communication
 equipment................................................
Dona Ana County, Las Cruces, NM, to implement a jail             180,000
 diversion program........................................
Downriver Community Conference, Southgate, MI, for               500,000
 equipment upgrades to improve public safety
 interoperability among member communities................
Eastern Shore of Maryland Educational Consortium,                250,000
 Centreville, MD, to maintain and expand the Eastern Shore
 dropout prevention programs..............................
Essex County Prosecutor's Office, Newark, NJ, to expand          150,000
 the program to more witnesses and victims................
Forrest County Court Team for Maltreated Infants and             150,000
 Toddlers, Forrest Co., MS, to address the critical needs
 of maltreated infants and toddlers through the
 specialized Forrest County Court Team for Maltreated
 Infants and Toddlers.....................................
Fort Belknap Indian Community, Fort Belknap, MT, for             300,000
 additional staff, updated electronic data systems,
 equipment and training to ensure quality judicial
 services in the tribal court.............................
Genesee County, Genesee County, MI, for assistance for           100,000
 those transitioning from prison..........................
Grambling State University, Grambling, LA, for a workforce       200,000
 education and reentry program for the formerly
 incarcerated.............................................
Grant Sawyer Center, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, for         200,000
 Grant Sawyer Center at University of Nevada, Reno for
 judicial education.......................................
Haymarket Center, Chicago, IL, for a workforce development       250,000
 program for those with past criminal justice involvement,
 substance abuse, and economic and employment instability.
Heartland Family Service, Council Bluffs, IA, for family         600,000
 based treatment of drug-addicted mothers.................
Hennepin County, Hennepin County, MN, to facilitate the          250,000
 sharing of juvenile records between criminal justice
 agencies.................................................
Illinois Sheriff's Association, Springfield, IL, for law         250,000
 enforcement and clean-up of meth production and abuse....
Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, Indianapolis,       150,000
 IN, to enhance public safety and increase patrol time on
 the street...............................................
Inner Harbour for Children and Families, Douglasville, GA,       100,000
 to advance neurofeedback treatment to help troubled
 youths overcome deficits, avoid trouble, and become
 highly functioning members of society....................
Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines, IA, to             850,000
 provide methamphetamine abuse treatment for inmates in
 Polk, Scott and Story counties...........................
Iowa Legal Aid, Des Moines, IA, for continued                    300,000
 collaboration between the medical and legal communities
 in servicing low-income Iowans...........................
Jackson Medical Mall, Jackson, MS, for prevention programs       400,000
 for at-risk youth........................................
Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, for emergency           1,000,000
 responder software development...........................
Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Birmingham, AL, for law       200,000
 enforcement record integration...........................
John A. Logan College, Carterville, IL, to expand a pilot        100,000
 program that electronically tracks purchases of
 methamphetamine precursors...............................
King County Sheriff's Office, Seattle, WA, for the School        350,000
 Resource Officers Program................................
Kings County District Attorney's Office, Kings County, NY,       875,000
 for the investigation and prosecution of deed theft,
 mortgage fraud, and related real estate-based crimes.....
Latin America Youth Center, Langley Park, MD, to serve at        500,000
 risk youth and promote gang prevention...................
Linn County, Albany, OR, to expand the Linn County               200,000
 Dispatch and Emergency Operations Center to meet
 increasing demands.......................................
Local Initiatives and Support Corporation-Community Saftey       750,000
 Initiative, Jackson, MS, to promote strategic alliance
 between community developers and law enforcement, which
 will reduce crime and spur revitalization in troubled
 neighborhoods............................................
Lorain Police Department, Lorain, OH, to purchase in-car         500,000
 video cameras for law enforcement patrol vehi-  cles.....
Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, Monterey Park,          300,000
 CA, to upgrade an anti-gang data and analysis database...
Louisiana District Attorney's Association, Baton Rouge,          800,000
 LA, to support an early intervention program for at-risk
 elementary students......................................
Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, Lower Brule Indian Reservation,         500,000
 SD, for law enforcement, court operations, prosecutors,
 public defenders office, and detention equipment and
 operations...............................................
Luna County Sheriff's Department, Deming, NM, to address         375,000
 border-related criminal activity.........................
Luzerne County Community College, Luzerne County, PA, for        150,000
 training and equipment acquisition.......................
Madison County Commission, Huntsville, AL, for integrated      1,500,000
 law enforcement records..................................
Marshall County Sheriff's Department, Marshall County, KY,       400,000
 to purchase and upgrade law enforcement equipment........
McKinley County, Gallup, NM, for operations at a                 200,000
 comprehensive juvenile services center...................
Memorial Hermann Healthcare System, Houston, TX, for             300,000
 emergency communications equipment.......................
Menifee County Sheriff's Department, Menifee County, KY,          30,000
 to purchase law enforcement technology equipment.........
Mercer County, Trenton, NJ, to provide a comprehensive           200,000
 case management system for prisoners returning to the
 community................................................
Metropolitan Crime Commission, New Orleans, LA, to               450,000
 eliminate public corruption and reduce white collar crime
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for law          1,500,000
 enforcement intelligence.................................
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for digital      2,500,000
 forensic training........................................
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for training     1,000,000
 and research.............................................
Montana Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association, Helena,         200,000
 MT, for enhanced offender monitoring, tracking and
 notification to ensure public safety.....................
Montana State University at Billings, Billings, MT, for an       200,000
 academic program at the Montana Women's Prison that
 offers inmates general education coursework toward
 certificate or Associate degrees.........................
Multnomah County, Troutdale and Gresham, OR, to create a         275,000
 position in the Multnomah County District Attorney's
 Office to investigate and prosecute cases involving the
 victimization and exploitation of the elderly............
National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC), Washington,         500,000
 DC, for a national hotline that provides information and
 services to crime victims................................
National Judicial College, Reno, NV, for judicial                800,000
 education and scholarship of judges......................
Nevada Dept. of Public Safety, Carson City, NV, to assist        250,000
 probationers with diagnosed substance abuse problems and
 financial need in receiving treatment....................
New Hampshire Attorney General's Office, Concord, NH, to         750,000
 combat street-level drug trafficking.....................
New Hampshire State Police, Concord, NH, to combat gang        1,500,000
 and drug-related violence and crime......................
New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, to develop       250,000
 technology that would reduce accidental shootings, teen
 suicides, unauthorized use of firearms by family members
 and illegal secondary trade of weapons...................
New Mexico Administrative Office of the Courts, Santa Fe,        400,000
 NM, to continue drug court programs......................
North Carolina Sheriffs' Association, Raleigh, NC, for the       250,000
 North Carolina Sheriffs' Association to equip a training
 facility.................................................
Northern Regional Laboratory Group, Greeley, CO, to build        500,000
 a full service crime lab in Northern Colorado............
Northwest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville, AR, for       500,000
 a training center to reduce cases of child abuse and
 improve support for victims of child abuse...............
Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD, for law          750,000
 enforcement, court operations, prosecutors, public
 defenders office, and detention equipment and operations
 on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.....................
Oklahoma Department of Public Safety, Oklahoma City, OK,         150,000
 to continue replacement of Oklahoma's aging communication
 system...................................................
Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, Oklahoma City, OK,       100,000
 for information-sharing within and between State and
 local law enforcement agencies...........................
Oneida County District Attorney's Office, Utica, NY, for         215,000
 an information-sharing database to analyze gang related
 crime....................................................
Operation Our Town, Altoona, PA, for drug enforcement and        250,000
 gang prevention programs.................................
Orlando Regional Healthcare, Orlando, FL, for operations         125,000
 of the Sexual Trauma Recovery Center.....................
Our Children's Homestead, Rockford, IL, for the tutoring         200,000
 of at-risk youth in the foster system....................
Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, Cumberland County,          250,000
 PA, for a program that engages adults in reporting and
 intervening in child sexual abuse in Pennsylvania........
Phoenix House, Providence, RI, to upgrade a clinical           1,000,000
 management system........................................
Phoenix House Florida, Hillsborough County, FL, to upgrade       300,000
 health record technology.................................
Providence Police Department, Providence, RI, for a            1,000,000
 community-policing initiative to reduce drugs and drug-
 related crime............................................
Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN),                 500,000
 Washington, DC, for national anti-sexual assault programs
Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office, Alexandria, LA, for             200,000
 equipment and technology upgrades........................
Safe and Sound, Inc., Milwaukee, WI, for personnel and           600,000
 after-school programs....................................
Safe Streets Campaign, Tacoma, WA, to implement                  500,000
 comprehensive gang prevention, intervention and
 suppression strategies...................................
Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, for crime          800,000
 lab technologies.........................................
Sheriffs Youth Programs of Minnesota, Inver Grove Heights,       100,000
 MN, to be used by the Sheriffs Youth Program to expand
 programming at SYP's horse farm..........................
Simon Wiesenthal Center, Los Angeles, CA, to provide           1,000,000
 sensitivity training to law enforcement when
 investigating hate crimes and civil rights abuses........
South Royalton Legal Clinic at Vermont Law School, South         300,000
 Royalton, VT, to provide legal aid to economically-
 disadvantaged and vulnerable populations in Vermont......
St. Croix County District Attorney, Hudson, WI, for a             60,000
 specialized methamphetamine prosecution unit.............
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Standing Rock Indian                  250,000
 Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court operations,
 prosecutors, the public defender's office, and detention
 programs.................................................
State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, for the training of VPSO's,       2,000,000
 and the acquisition of emergency response and search and
 rescue equipment for rural communities...................
State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, for alcohol interdiction for      1,000,000
 investigation and prosecution of bootlegging crimes as
 part of a statewide effort to reduce Fetal Alcohol
 Syndrome.................................................
State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, to support coordinator and          210,000
 train law enforcement officers to teach drug abuse
 resistance education.....................................
State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, to develop a network to allow       235,000
 remote access to the criminal justice information, from a
 single point of access, thus allowing law enforcement and
 others Courts within the State to access court records...
Tallahassee Community College, Leon County, FL, to expand        200,000
 intelligence training programs...........................
TEAM 2000 Community Development Corporation, Elizabeth,          300,000
 NJ, to provide an integrated system of case management,
 education, and job development services for ex-offenders
 in the area..............................................
Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, for emergency                 400,000
 communications equipment.................................
Texas Team Focus, Morgan, TX, to establish a youth               350,000
 mentoring program........................................
The Marcus Institute, Atlanta, GA, to provide remediation        100,000
 for the potential consequences of childhood abuse and
 neglect..................................................
The Providence Center, Providence, RI, to help address           500,000
 barriers that incarcerated men and women face as they re-
 enter their communities..................................
The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,         400,000
 for law enforcement training purposes....................
The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS,       1,000,000
 for forensic science technology..........................
The University of Southern Mississippi, Gulfport, MS, for      1,000,000
 statewide public safety information sharing..............
The University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation           350,000
 Center, Knoxville, TN, for training and technical
 assistance under the Safe Streets Act....................
The Women's Sports Foundation, East Meadow, NY, to prevent       250,000
 delinquency and promote well-being among young women by
 involving them in physical activity......................
Town of Brantley, Brantley, AL, for law enforcement               75,000
 equipment................................................
Troy University, Troy, AL, for forensics research and            350,000
 operations...............................................
Uhlich Children's Advantage Network and YouthBuild Lake          250,000
 County, Chicago, IL, for the expansion of a violence
 prevention service network...............................
University of Baltimore School of Law, Baltimore, MD, for        500,000
 a mentoring program for at-risk youth to reduce truancy..
University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK, to equip the         150,000
 University of Central Oklahoma and Oklahoma State Bureau
 of Investigation Forensic Institution....................
University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, for              500,000
 community-based gun violence prevention and interven-
 tion.....................................................
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, to develop             500,000
 scientific, objective and reliable methods for detecting
 physical child abuse.....................................
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, to expand the          150,000
 regional biocontainment laboratory.......................
University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, to University of           1,000,000
 Memphis, Shelby County, the City of Memphis and the State
 District Attorney General jointly working on combining
 resources to deal with growing gang numbers and increased
 violent crime............................................
University of Mississippi, University, MS, to provide          2,250,000
 legal training for judges, prosecutors, lawyers, and law
 students and develops model programs and publications....
University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, to continue to          750,000
 advance law enforcement research and development.........
University of North Dakota School of Law, Grand Forks, ND,       300,000
 for the recruitment and retention of American Indian law
 students.................................................
University of South Carolina Law School, Columbia, SC, to        100,000
 support efforts of its law clinics.......................
Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT to          1,000,000
 combat increased illegal drug activities.................
Vermont State's Attorney's Office, Montpelier, VT, for the       100,000
 Special Investigation Unit's task forces.................
Wasco County, Wasco County, OR, for relocation costs and         300,000
 new equipment for a new interoperable 9-1-1 Emergency
 Dispatch Center..........................................
West Valley City, West Valley City, UT, for a state-of-the       250,000
 -art crime forensics lab.................................
West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, to support a         4,000,000
 forensic science initiative..............................
William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii,       500,000
 Honolulu, HI, to support a collaborative effort of law
 schools to provide cost-effective review of potentially
 viable cases of wrongful convictions.....................
Winona State University, Winona, MN, to provide training,        700,000
 technical assistance and publications to child protection
 professionals............................................
Wisconsin Department of Administration, Madison, WI, to        1,200,000
 support assistant district attorney positions in
 Milwaukee County and other counties that are scheduled to
 be laid off within the next year.........................
Women's Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh,                200,000
 Pittsburgh, PA, to provide a comprehensive range of
 services for victims of domestic violence and their
 children.................................................
Youth Service Bureau of Illinois Valley, Ottawa, IL, for         175,000
 programming to assist troubled youth and their families..
YWCA of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, to expand            300,000
 services for victims of domestic violence................
Zero to Three, Des Moines, IA, for coordinated care for          300,000
 abused and neglected infants and toddlers................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Second Chance Act.--The Second Chance Act (Public Law 110-
199) is a comprehensive response to improve outcomes for people 
released from prisons and jails and returning to our 
communities. Each year, nearly 670,000 people are released from 
State prisons and approximately 9 million are released from 
jails. A 2002 study by the Bureau of Justice Statistics 
estimated more than two-thirds of individuals released from 
prisons in 1994 were rearrested for a new offense within 3 
years and more than 50 percent returned for committing new 
crimes or for violating their conditions of supervision. And at 
least 95 percent of the individuals now in prison will be 
released and will return to communities, often without 
assistance or services.
    According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of 
Justice Statistics, an estimated 95 percent of all State 
prisoners will be released--with one-half of these individuals 
expected to return to prison within 3 years for the commission 
of a new crime or violation of their conditions of release. 
This cycle of recidivism not only compromises public safety, 
but also increases taxpayer spending. A February 2007 report 
from The Pew Charitable Trusts stated that if Federal, State, 
and local policies and practices do not change, taxpayers are 
expected to pay as much as $27,500,000,000 on prisons alone 
from 2007 to 2011 on top of current corrections spending.
    Adult and Juvenile Offender State and Local Reentry 
Demonstration.--The Second Chance Act (Public Law 110-199) 
reauthorizes the Adult and Juvenile Offender State and Local 
Reentry Demonstration Projects (sec. 101) to help States and 
communities test ways to reduce recidivism and address the 
alarming recidivism rates nationwide. The Demonstration 
Projects will provide grants to States and local governments 
that may be used to promote the safe and successful 
reintegration into the community of individuals who have been 
incarcerated. The Committee recognizes that State and local 
governments buckling under the pressure of unprecedented growth 
in jail and prison populations and so provides $10,000,000 for 
this important program to ensure public safety through 
initiatives geared at returning offenders.
    Mentoring Grants.--The Second Chance Act (Public Law 110-
199) authorizes the Prisoner Reentry Mentoring (sec. 211) 
grants to allow community and faith-based groups to recruit, 
train and match returning inmates with mentors. Having a mentor 
often means the difference between success and failure for 
inmates during their first, difficult days of transition from 
incarceration to freedom. The grants to nonprofit organizations 
may also be used for transitional services for re-integration 
into the community.
    Mentoring programs have been proven to significantly reduce 
recidivism. The grants to nonprofit organizations for mentoring 
and transitional services are a key element in reducing 
recidivism rates nationwide. For this new initiative the 
Committee recommendation provides $10,000,000.

                         WEED AND SEED PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $32,100,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      25,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $25,000,000. The 
recommendation is $7,100,000 below the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and $25,000,000 above the budget request.

                       JUVENILE JUSTICE PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $383,513,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     185,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     400,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $400,000,000. The 
recommendation is $16,487,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $215,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                            JUVENILE JUSTICE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Part A--Management and Administration..................             500
Part B--State Formula..................................          74,500
Part E--Challenge Grants and Projects..................          65,000
Youth Mentoring Grants.................................          80,000
Title V--Incentive Grants..............................          65,000
    Tribal Youth.......................................         (15,000)
    Gang Prevention....................................         (10,000)
    Alcohol Prevention.................................         (25,000)
Secure Our Schools Act.................................          10,000
Victims of Child Abuse Programs........................          25,000
Juvenile Accountability Block Grant....................          80,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         400,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan.
    Fairness and Objectivity in the Award of Competitive 
Grants.--The Committee is deeply concerned about the 
allegations that the Department steered fiscal year 2007 
juvenile justice grants to favored recipients instead of 
awarding them to deserving grantees who ranked more highly in a 
peer-reviewed process. As noted previously, within 30 days of 
enactment of this act, the Department is directed to provide a 
full accounting of the process used in 2007, as well as, a 
report on corrective measures taken to ensure fairness and 
objectivity in the award of all future discretionary grants. 
The Committee also directs the Inspector General to review the 
2007 grant award process and report to Senate Committee on 
Appropriations expeditiously.
    Juvenile Justice Summary.--Established in 1974 and most 
recently authorized in 2002 with bipartisan support, the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act [JJDPA]--
together with the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant [JABG]--
embodies a partnership between the Federal Government and the 
U.S. States, territories and the District of Columbia to 
protect children and youth in the juvenile and criminal justice 
system, to effectively address high-risk and delinquent 
behavior, and to improve community safety. Recent adolescent 
brain development research demonstrating the importance of the 
teen years in the establishment of an individual's ``executive 
functions'' (decisionmaking, understanding consequences, 
planning, and impulse control), coupled with strong data from 
evaluations of effective prevention and intervention 
approaches, reveal the critical importance of these Federal 
investments in shaping the lives of millions of at-risk youth 
and enhancing the safety of our neighborhoods.
    Title II, Part B of the JJDPA: State Formula Grants 
Program.--Through this program, Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP] provides funds directly to 
States, territories, and the District of Columbia to help them 
to support increased availability of effective prevention and 
intervention programs, to implement comprehensive State 
juvenile justice plans based on detailed studies of needs in 
their jurisdictions, as well as to implement juvenile justice 
system improvements to achieve compliance with the core 
requirements of the JJDPA. For example, State formula grants 
have supported Multisystemic Therapy, shown to cut rates of 
juvenile offender rearrests in half.
    Title V of the JJPDA: Grants for Local Delinquency 
Prevention Programs.--Commonly known as the Community 
Prevention Grants Program, title V funds collaborative, 
community-based delinquency prevention efforts to reach youth 
in high-risk situations. For example, a study compared five 
housing projects without community based programs to reach 
youth to five receiving these programs. At the beginning, drug 
activity and vandalism were the same. But by the time the study 
ended, the projects without the programs had 50 percent more 
vandalism and scored 37 percent worse on drug activity.
    Juvenile Accountability Block Grant [JABG].--JABG provides 
States and units of local government with funds to develop 
programs to promote greater accountability in the juvenile 
justice system, including building, expanding, and operating 
juvenile facilities; training correctional personnel, hiring 
additional judges, prosecutors, probation officers, and court-
appointed defenders; and funding pre-trial services for 
juveniles. The purpose areas of JABG were expanded 
significantly under the 2002 and 2005 reauthorizations to 
provide for: graduated sanctions programs that include 
counseling, restitution, community service, and supervised 
probation; more substance abuse programs; mental health 
screening and treatment; restorative justice programs; gang 
prevention; anti-bullying initiatives; and offender re-entry 
approaches.
    Part G of the JJDPA: Juvenile Mentoring.--Juvenile 
Mentoring enables communities to run high-quality mentoring 
programs. For example, a study of a national juvenile mentoring 
program found that those in the program were one-half as likely 
to begin illegal drug use and nearly one-third less likely to 
hit someone compared to those who were randomly assigned to a 
waiting list.
    Funding for OJJDP.--Authorized under title II, part A of 
the JJDPA, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention [OJJDP], a component of the U.S. Department of 
Justice's Office of Justice Programs, supports States and 
communities in their efforts to develop and implement effective 
and coordinated prevention and intervention programs and to 
improve the juvenile justice system in order to enhance public 
safety, prevent delinquency, protect children and provide 
treatment and rehabilitative services tailored to the needs of 
juveniles and their families. OJJDP provides for training, 
technical assistance, research, and evaluation to identify 
``what works'' and to disseminate that information widely to 
State and local program personnel.
    Discretionary Grants.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $65,000,000 for part E programs. The Committee 
provides funding for the following congressionally directed 
projects, and directs the Department of Justice to refrain from 
charging administrative costs to these grants. The Committee 
expects that the Department of Justice will provide appropriate 
management and oversight of each grant. Within the amounts 
provided, OJP shall fund the following proposals:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama 4-H Foundation, Auburn, AL, for juvenile justice         500,000
 prevention programs......................................
Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega, AL, for         150,000
 youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs............
An Achievable Dream, Newport News, VA, to continue and           300,000
 expand assistance programs for at-risk youth.............
Baptist Child and Family Services, San Antonio, TX, to           250,000
 prevent juvenile delinquency.............................
Baton Rouge Bar Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, for the             250,000
 operations of a teen court with a peer jury trial system.
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Louisiana, Lake Charles, LA,         200,000
 to increase programming for at-risk children in
 southwestern Louisiana...................................
Bolder Options, Minneapolis, MN, to continue Bolder              150,000
 Options' unique model of one-on-one mentoring to reduce
 truancy and raise academic standards of Twin Cities youth
Boys and Girls Club of Central Pennsylvania, Harrisburg,         100,000
 PA, for a mentoring-based gang prevention program........
Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to provide        1,000,000
 crime prevention and outreach services to rural youth....
Boys and Girls Clubs of the Grand River in South Dakota,         150,000
 McLaughlin, SD, to provide services and programming......
Boys and Girls Home of Nebraska, South Sioux City, NE, for       250,000
 a treatment and services program to serve child and
 teenaged victims of trauma...............................
Boys Town New England, Portsmouth, RI, to increase               161,000
 services for at-risk girls and boys in the juvenile
 justice system...........................................
Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, Baltimore, MD, for youth           1,000,000
 mentoring programs for at-risk children..................
Cherokee County Family Resource Center, Heflin, AL, for          100,000
 youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs............
Children and Families First, Wilmington, DE, to provide          400,000
 service intervention to girls ages 12-18.................
Chippewa Cree Tribe, Rocky Boy's Reservation, MT, to             250,000
 restore a detention facility to house juvenile offenders,
 provide in-house education and offer treatment services..
Citizenship Trust at American Village, Montgomery, AL, for       450,000
 youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs............
City of Boston, Boston, MA, to implement a comprehensive         750,000
 community-based youth crime reduction pro-  gram.........
City of Brockton, Brockton, MA, for the expansion of after-      250,000
 school programs designed to reduce youth  crime..........
City of Chesapeake, Chesapeake, VA, for a gang deterrence        100,000
 program..................................................
City of Jackson, Jackson, MS, for prevention programs for        250,000
 at-risk teens............................................
City of Omaha, Omaha, NE, for the expansion of after             500,000
 school educational programming...........................
City of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, for the Youth          1,000,000
 Violence Reduction Partnership...........................
City of South Salt Lake, South Salt Lake, UT, for after          100,000
 school program expansions................................
County of Fresno, Fresno, CA, for a collaborative gang           300,000
 prevention program.......................................
Friends of CASA of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, CA,          375,000
 for intervention and permanent placement for infants and
 toddlers in the foster care system.......................
Generations, Inc., Camden, NJ, for services to assist            150,000
 families and communities in reducing juvenile vio-  lence
Girl Scouts USA, Baltimore, MD, for a youth mentoring          1,000,000
 program for at-risk children of adult offenders..........
Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition,                    250,000
 Philadelphia, PA, for the National Comprehensive Center
 for Fathers for a mentoring-based, fatherhood initiative.
Jobs For Delaware Graduates, Inc., Dover, DE, to expand        1,353,000
 services delivered to at-risk students in middle and high
 school...................................................
Juvenile Justice Program for University of Alabama,              125,000
 Tuscaloosa, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice
 programs.................................................
Linking Learning to Life At-Risk Youth Training Program,         500,000
 Burlington, VT, to prepare at-risk high school students
 for successful employment and post-secondary education...
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI, to continue the         350,000
 operations of safe summer sites..........................
Morgan County System of Services, Decatur, AL, for youth         125,000
 mentoring and juvenile justice programs..................
New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department, Santa        300,000
 Fe, NM, to implement a pilot juvenile crime prevention
 program..................................................
Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID, to help reduce child neglect        150,000
 and abuse at the Nez Perce Tribe.........................
Ogden School District, Ogden, UT, to assist in funding           150,000
 district's after-school programs, addiction counseling,
 and juvenile courts project..............................
OliveCrest, Las Vegas, NV, to expand therapeutic foster          200,000
 care operations..........................................
Pawtucket Police Department, Pawtucket, RI, for youth            493,000
 education programs designed to decrease truancy..........
Phoenix House, Dallas, TX, for residential substance abuse       250,000
 treatment for adolescents................................
Police Athletic League of New Jersey, Freehold, NJ, to           250,000
 coordinate a statewide after-school program with the goal
 of deterring juvenile crime..............................
Reconcile New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for a workforce          300,000
 construction project to provide at-risk youth with the
 skills for successful entry into the hospitality and
 construction industries..................................
Rose Brooks Center, Kansas City, MO, to provide services         300,000
 to victims of domestic violence and their child-  ren....
Rosebud Boys and Girls Club, Mission, SD, for services,          100,000
 programming, equipment and supplies......................
Save the Children, Westport, CT, for after-school and            500,000
 summer literacy programs in Arkansas.....................
Sea Research Foundation, Inc., Mystic, CT, to expand             300,000
 academic course offerings in science and technology to an
 additional 100,000 students each year....................
Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Fort Yates, ND, for equipment,      1,200,000
 staffing, and operations of a youth detention center.....
Suffolk University, Boston, MA, for the development of           500,000
 comprehensive juvenile justice programs aimed at reducing
 recidivism...............................................
Team Focus, Inc., Mobile, AL, for youth mentoring and            600,000
 juvenile justice programs................................
TuskMac CDC, Tuskegee, AL, for youth mentoring and               100,000
 juvenile justice programs................................
Union Springs YMCA, Union Springs, AL, for youth mentoring       100,000
 and juvenile justice programs............................
United Way of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA, for a            400,000
 youth crime prevention and intervention initiative.......
University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, to provide       350,000
 planning, training and assistance to schools to help them
 prevent and manage violence..............................
University of Delaware's Center for Drug and Alcohol              65,000
 Studies, Newark, DE, to continue a statewide survey of
 youth that provides estimates of student substance abuse,
 crime and gambling.......................................
University of Montana, Missoula, MT, for teacher training,       400,000
 curriculum development and awareness initiatives to
 combat bullying as well as the development of emergency
 protocol for school shootings............................
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for youth               400,000
 mentoring and domestic violence prevention programs......
Vermont Department of Children and Families, Waterbury,          700,000
 VT, for state-wide at-risk youth assistance programs.....
Village of Richton Park, Richton Park, IL, for the               300,000
 development of a youth intervention program..............
Visiting Nurse Association of Omaha, Omaha, NE, for a            300,000
 comprehensive crime intervention program for vulnerable
 women, infants, children, and teens......................
Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance, Madison, WI, for a       700,000
 grant program to reduce disproportionate minority
 juvenile contact.........................................
Wittenberg University, Springfield, OH, for a coordinated,       300,000
 evidence-based approach to serve at-risk youth in the
 local community..........................................
YWCA Center for Families, Salt Lake City, UT, to provide         300,000
 equipment for new Center for Families, which aims to end
 domestic violence through prevention, intervention and
 accountability...........................................
YWCA Columbus, Columbus, OH, to expand After-School              750,000
 Programs for At-Risk Youth and Programs for Homeless
 Families.................................................
YWCA Madison, Madison, WI, to expand a neighborhood and          500,000
 school-based crime reduction program.....................
Zero to Three, Omaha, NE, to educate juvenile and family         150,000
 court judges in early childhood development in order to
 improve the child welfare system for maltreated infants
 and toddlers.............................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Gang Prevention.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$10,000,000 for this anti-gang education initiative.
    Enforcing the Underage Drinking Laws Program.--Within the 
funds provided in the At-Risk Children Program (title V), the 
Committee provides $25,000,000 for grants to assist States in 
enforcing underage drinking laws.
    Secure Our Schools Act.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $10,000,000 for expenses authorized by the Secure Our 
Schools Act that support efforts to ensure school safety and 
crime deterrence, coordinated with State and local law 
enforcement agencies.
    Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $25,000,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act [VOCA] (Public Law 101-647). 
Within the funds provided, $10,000,000 shall be for Regional 
Child Advocacy Centers Programs. The Regional Children's 
Advocacy Centers [RCACs] were established through the Victims 
of Child Abuse Act to provide information, consultation, 
training, and technical assistance to communities, and to help 
establish child-focused programs that facilitate and support 
coordination among agencies responding to child abuse. The 
RCACs and the National Children's Alliance [NCA] have 
identified several joint initiatives which include: developing 
centers in underserved areas; support and development of Tribal 
CACs; constituent involvement; marketing; and public awareness. 
In working on these initiatives, the RCACs have created 
programs such as the National Training Academy, which trains 
professionals and multi-disciplinary teams investigating child 
abuse, and the telemedicine pilot project, which assists remote 
areas in investigating child abuse.

                    PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS BENEFITS

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $74,834,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      69,100,000
Committee recommendation................................      69,100,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $69,100,000. The 
recommendation is $5,734,000 below the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and equal to the budget request.
    This mandatory program provides a lump-sum death benefit 
payment to eligible survivors of Federal, State, and local 
public safety officers whose death was the direct and proximate 
result of a traumatic injury sustained in the line of duty.
    Public Safety Officers Benefits.--The Committee directs the 
Government Accountability Office [GAO] to provide an analysis 
of, and recommendations to improve, Federal and State programs 
to assist public safety officers and their survivors, who are 
catastrophically injured or killed in the line of duty.

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $587,233,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     600,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $600,000,000. The 
recommendation is $12,767,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $600,000,000 above the budget request.
    Local law enforcement is not only essential to ensure the 
safety of the public, but also plays a critical role in 
preventing and responding to terrorist threats. Since its 
creation, the Community Oriented Policing Services [COPS] 
office has assisted State and local law enforcement agencies by 
providing grants, training, and technical assistance that not 
only ensure public safety from traditional crime, but also 
better enables law enforcement officers to address the growing 
threat from terrorist organizations.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                  COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                        Program                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Training and Technical Assistance......................           6,000
COPS Hiring Grants.....................................          50,000
Law Enforcement Technology and Interoperability........         110,000
Violent Gang and Gun Crime Reduction...................          20,000
Meth Hot Spots.........................................          61,187
Bullet-Proof Vests.....................................          25,850
    NIST/OLES..........................................          (1,880)
Tribal Law Enforcement.................................          15,040
Criminal Records Upgrade...............................           5,960
DNA Analysis Backlog Reduction/Crime Labs..............         180,963
    Debbie Smith DNA Backlog grants....................        (151,000)
    Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing grants          (5,000)
    DNA Training and Education.........................          (6,000)
    DNA R&D............................................;          (5,000)
    DNA Identification of Missing Person...............          (3,000)
    DNA Evidence Analysis Turn Around Time.............         (10,983)
Paul Coverdell Forensic Science........................          40,000
Child Sexual Predator Elimination/Sex Offender                   55,000
 Management............................................
Management and Administration..........................          30,000
                                                        ----------------
      Total............................................         600,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Any deviations from the above plan are subject to the 
reprogramming requirements of section 505.

             PUBLIC SAFETY AND COMMUNITY POLICING PROGRAMS

    Training and Technical Assistance.--The Committee 
recommendation provides for $5,000 for COPS to provide Training 
and Technical Assistance to assist agencies with developing 
innovative community policing strategies through applied 
research and evaluation initiatives.
    Bullet-Proof Vests.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$25,850,000 for COPS testing of bullet-proof vests. Of the 
amount provided $5,000,000 is for the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology's [NIST] Office of Law Enforcement 
Standards [OLES] to continue supporting the ballistic and stab-
resistant material compliance testing programs, as well as for 
other technical support related to public safety weapons and 
protective systems.
    Tribal Law Enforcement.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $15,040,000 for tribal law enforcement efforts, which 
is the same as the budget request. The recommendation combines 
funds in this heading with funds previously appropriated under 
State and Local Law Assistance. These funds may be used for 
training, hiring equipment, court improvement projects, and 
alcohol and substance abuse reduction programs.
    The Committee notes the condition of certain Navajo Nation 
detention and court facilities and urges the Department of 
Justice to take action to address Navajo Nation detention and 
court facilities in need of repair. The Navajo Nation, with a 
population of 300,000, is the largest American Indian tribe, 
and with a reservation larger than 25,000 square miles, Navajo 
Nation public services are struggling to contain crime, which 
has risen to levels many times higher than national averages. 
Navajo Nation judicial services are also struggling to provide 
adequate court facilities to accommodate the approximate 80,000 
cases that are handled by the Navajo Nation Supreme Court, 
eight judicial districts and peacemaker courts. Adequate 
detention and court facilities are needed to address these 
levels. The Department of Justice shall review the state of 
existing detention and court facilities and the need for new 
detention and court facilities on Navajo Nation land and not 
later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this act 
shall provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations on 
its findings regarding Navajo Nation detention and court 
facilities and a description of actions that have been or will 
be taken by the Department relating to such facilities.
    Drug Courts.--The Committee recognizes that drug courts 
greatly improve substance abuse treatment outcomes, 
substantially reduce crime, and produce significant societal 
benefits. The Committee notes that a new study funded by the 
U.S. Department of Justice, conducted by The Urban Institute's 
Justice Policy Center, ``To Treat or Not to Treat: Evidence on 
the Prospects of Expanding Treatment to Drug-Involved 
Offenders,'' found that drug courts yield a substantial 
reduction in crime and more than $1,000,000,000 of annual cost 
savings. The Committee is concerned that the while the study 
found that there are 1.47 million arrestees who are legally and 
clinically eligible for Drug Court, only 55,000 are currently 
served by the program. The committee supports the expansion of 
drug courts in order to bring this the Drug Court Program to 
scale and effectively address this population.
    DNA Turnaround Pilot.--The Committee recommends $10,983,000 
to reduce the turn-around-time for the analysis of DNA 
evidence. While the Committee continues to believe that 
enhanced DNA laboratory capacity is critical to the ability of 
crime laboratories to meet the increase demand for DNA testing 
services, the Committee also believes crime labs and the 
criminal justice system should benefit from that increased 
capacity. More and more, the criminal justice system is 
realizing the importance of collecting, preserving, and 
submitting forensic evidence. This has resulted in sharp 
increases in the submissions of DNA evidence to our public 
crime labs. The Committee believes that innovative ideas and 
programs are necessary to make an impact on the growing needs 
of laboratories. The Committee proposes that a national model 
be developed through a pilot program for our Nation's public 
crime labs. Through improved efficiency and capacity of 
laboratories; maximizing the effective utilization of DNA 
technology; and re-engineering DNA processes using proven 
automation and expert systems; crime labs will reach the goal 
of a 30-day turn-around-time. The Department shall provide to 
the Committee no later than 60 days after enactment a plan to 
implement the pilot program to include details on establishing 
a requirement for a diagnostic review of the lab as a condition 
of the grant; reporting requirements on progress reached by 
successful applicants over prior years; and development of a 
public and password protected website reporting progress made 
by the labs as part of the pilot program. Further, the 
Committee requests the Department report on implementation of 
the pilot program 180 days after grants are awarded to the 
crime labs.
    COPS Technology.--The Committee provides funding for the 
following congressionally directed projects, and directs the 
Department of Justice to refrain from charging administrative 
costs to these grants. The Committee expects that the 
Department of Justice will provide appropriate management and 
oversight of each grant. Within the amounts provided, the COPS 
program office shall fund the following projects:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama Criminal Justice Information Center (ACJIC),             500,000
 Montgomery, AL, for law enforcement data gathering and
 dissemination............................................
Alabama--Tombigbee Regional Commission, Camden, AL, for          400,000
 traffic safety technology and law enforcement equipment..
Arkansas State Police, Little Rock, AR, to implement an          200,000
 interoperable system to provide an interactive picture of
 law enforcement resources in route and at the scene of
 critical incidents or natural disasters..................
Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation,       100,000
 Poplar, MT, for the operation of a 9-1-1 call center.....
Baltimore County, Baltimore County, MD, for technology         1,500,000
 upgrades.................................................
Berkeley Township Police Department, Bayville, NJ, for a         500,000
 comprehensive video security system......................
Caddo Parish District Attorney, NW Louisiana, LA, to equip       200,000
 a sexual predator task force.............................
Calhoun County Sheriff, Anniston, AL, for law enforcement        350,000
 data gathering and dissemination.........................
Calvert County, Calvert County, MD, to purchase equipment.       500,000
Centenary College, Shreveport, LA, for improvement of            500,000
 campus security..........................................
Center for Technology Commercialization, Westborough, MA,        750,000
 for the continued development of law enforcement
 technology and training programs.........................
Cherry Hill Township, Cherry Hill, NJ, for law enforcement       250,000
 communications...........................................
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Cheyenne River Indian                250,000
 Reservation, SD, for upgrades and maintenance to the 9-1-
 1 system.................................................
City of Allentown, Allentown, PA, for security camera            400,000
 acquisition and installation.............................
City of Astoria, Astoria, OR, to enhance public safety           325,000
 radio systems............................................
City of Bayonne, Bayonne, NJ, to purchase equipment for a        600,000
 new centralized command and control operations center....
City of Billings, Billings, MT, to purchase digital video        269,000
 cameras, a tactical blanket system and a tactical armored
 security vehicle.........................................
City of Brewton, Escambia, AL, for equipment and                 200,000
 technology upgrades......................................
City of Burien, Burien, WA, for emergency communications         150,000
 upgrades.................................................
City of Calera, Calera, AL, for equipment and technology         250,000
 upgrades.................................................
City of Camden, Camden, NJ, for the purchase of equipment      1,000,000
 to more effectively fight crime..........................
City of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, to implement 800 MHz         200,000
 radios for non-public safety agencies....................
City of Dothan, Dothan, AL, for equipment and technology         300,000
 upgrades.................................................
City of Fayetteville, Fayetteville, AR, to purchase,             500,000
 install and implement a simulcast radio system...........
City of Flint, Flint, MI, for in-car computers and in-car        500,000
 cameras..................................................
City of Flora, Flora, MS, for equipment upgrades and             250,000
 improvements for the police department...................
City of Gadsden, Gadsden, AL, for equipment and technology       250,000
 upgrades.................................................
City of Greenville Police Department, Greenville, SC, for        150,000
 mobile data terminals....................................
City of Gulf Shores, Gulf Shores, AL, for equipment and          350,000
 technology upgrades......................................
City of Hartford, Hartford, CT, to purchase first                300,000
 responder and emergency equipment for a new municipal
 public safety complex....................................
City of Hartford, Hartford, CT, for equipment at a new           750,000
 public safety complex....................................
City of Houston, Houston, TX, for interoperability........       125,000
City of Inglewood Police Department, Inglewood, CA, to           500,000
 upgrade the Inglewood Police Department's radio system...
City of Iowa City, Iowa City, IA, for integrated emergency       125,000
 resources................................................
City of Jackson, Jackson, MS, for crime fighting                 750,000
 technology...............................................
City of Kalispell, Kalispell, MT, to create a public             750,000
 safety training and testing facility for first responders
City of Kaysville, Kaysville, UT, for police station             100,000
 equipment................................................
City of Kenosha Police Department, Kenosha, WI, for              100,000
 technology upgrades......................................
City of Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, for law enforcement                130,000
 equipment................................................
City of Little Rock, Arkansas, Little Rock, AR, to upgrade       500,000
 an 800 MHz communications network and complete its
 conversion to a digital system...........................
City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, to expand the City         500,000
 of Los Angeles mass notification system..................
City of Medford, Medford, OR, to provide for the merging         700,000
 of two existing 9-1-1 dispatch centers into one facility.
City of Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL, to improve the             400,000
 ability to process and store photographic evidence for
 investigations and emergencies...........................
City of Milwaukee Police Department, Milwaukee, WI, to           650,000
 install a gunshot location system for high crime areas...
City of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, MN, for the purchase of        300,000
 car cameras and mobile data centers for police officers..
City of Missoula, Missoula, MT, for a new police                 300,000
 headquarters.............................................
City of Modesto, Modesto, CA, for law enforcement                500,000
 communications equipment.................................
City of Montgomery and Montgomery County, Montgomery, AL,        650,000
 for equipment and technology upgrades....................
City of Newark Police Department, Newark, DE, for the            115,420
 purchase of video surveillance cameras in the downtown
 area.....................................................
City of North Las Vegas Police Department, North Las             300,000
 Vegas, NV, for a records management system...............
City of Oakland, Oakland, CA, to provide law enforcement         500,000
 equipment................................................
City of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for deployment of            250,000
 security cameras in 15 different business districts......
City of Prattville, Prattville, AL, for equipment and            400,000
 technology upgrades......................................
City of Radford, Radford, VA, for the transition into a          250,000
 new police department facility...........................
City of Sioux City, Sioux City, IA, for meth related             100,000
 training.................................................
City of South Jordan, South Jordan, UT, for high-speed           150,000
 wireless hotspots for police to transfer data and share
 information..............................................
City of Spokane, Spokane, WA, for new law enforcement            500,000
 technology...............................................
City of Stamford, Stamford, CT, to purchase critical             300,000
 console equipment for a new emergency communications
 platform.................................................
City of Williamsport, Williamsport, PA, for a wireless           450,000
 digital video surveillance system........................
City of Yonkers Police Department, Yonkers, NY, to reduce        250,000
 non-emergency 9-1-1 calls through the creation of a new
 public hotline...........................................
City of York, York, PA, for security camera acquisition          200,000
 and installation.........................................
Clarion County, Clarion County, PA, for an interoperable         500,000
 communications initiative................................
Cobb County Office of Economic Development, Cobb County,         100,000
 GA, for public safety first responder regional
 communications interoperability..........................
Colorado Association of Chiefs of Police, Denver, CO, for        400,000
 an electronic state-wide law enforcement information-
 sharing network..........................................
Delaware State University, Dover, DE, to test and evaluate     2,000,000
 a mobile crime scene and evidence tracking application...
Delta County, Delta County, MI, for the installation of          176,000
 laptop computers in police patrol vehicles...............
East Baton Rouge Parish, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA, to         100,000
 upgrade law enforcement technologies.....................
East Bay Regional Communications System Authority, Dublin,       500,000
 CA, to create an interoperable communications system.....
Franklin County Emergency Services Alliance, Franklin            500,000
 County, PA, for an interoperable communications
 initiative...............................................
Gallatin County Commission, Bozeman, MT, to construct a          500,000
 facility, update emergency response technology, and
 ensure the protection of citizens and regional assets....
Goodhue County Sheriff's Office, Red Wing, MN, to purchase       750,000
 800 MHz user end radios for all public safety officials
 in Goodhue County........................................
Goodwater Police Department, Goodwater, AL, for equipment         50,000
 and technology upgrades..................................
Harford County, Harford County, MD, for technology               365,000
 upgrades.................................................
Hawaii Criminal Justice Data Center, Honolulu, HI, to          1,500,000
 integrate state and local law enforcement databases for
 better access at all levels of the justice system........
Henderson Nevada Police Department, Henderson, NV, to            500,000
 purchase a tactical robot and equip a law enforcement
 training facility........................................
Hot Springs Police Department, Hot Springs, AR, to equip         512,000
 police vehicles with mobile data terminals and enable
 their access to local, state and federal databases.......
Idaho State Police, Meridian, ID, for the Criminal               355,000
 Information Sharing Alliance Network to improve
 coordinated information sharing between participating
 state law enforcement agencies...........................
Ingham County Law Enforcement Technology Upgrades, Mason,        500,000
 MI, for equipment upgrades...............................
Itasca County, Grand Rapids, MN, for the implementation of       300,000
 a new 800 MHz public safety radio system.................
Johnson County, Franklin, IN, to upgrade the public safety       850,000
 communications system in Johnson County, Indiana.........
Johnson County Government, Olathe, KS, to provide a              150,000
 unified radio communication system for Johnson County
 officials and local jurisdictions within the county......
Kanawha County Commission, Charleston, WV, for Kanawha         1,000,000
 County to purchase mobile and portable interoperable
 radios...................................................
Kansas Adjutant General's Office, Topeka, KS, to establish       250,000
 a secure database that connects law enforcement and
 emergency management personnel to private sector
 resources needed in a catastrophic  event................
Lafayette Police Department, Lafayette, LA, for                  200,000
 interoperable communication..............................
Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Las Vegas, NV,         750,000
 for a Total Containment Vessel and other law enforcement
 equipment................................................
Lenoir Police Department, Lenoir, NC, for law enforcement        200,000
 communications technology................................
Macomb County, Macomb County, MI, to establish an                500,000
 emergency operations center..............................
Marshall University, Huntington, WV, for a highly advanced     5,000,000
 state-of-the-art DNA laboratory..........................
Marshall University, Huntington, WV, to support a training       825,000
 initiative for personnel in the area of computer crime
 investigations...........................................
Mason and Oceana Counties, Pentwater, MI, to operate a           300,000
 joint 9-1-1 emergency communications center..............
Missoula County, Missoula, MT, to build a public safety          750,000
 operations and training center...........................
Mobile County Commission, Mobile, AL, for equipment and          650,000
 technology upgrades......................................
Moorhead Public Service, Moorhead, MN, to be used by             100,000
 Moorhead Public Service to increase Internet speeds for
 police patrol cars and fire vehicles in order to push
 real-time video surveillance and GIS mapping into the
 vehicles.................................................
New Orleans Police Foundation, New Orleans, LA, for law          500,000
 enforcement technology integration and information
 sharing..................................................
North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, Raleigh, NC,       100,000
 for firearms and ballistics analysis equipment...........
Northwest Citizens Patrol, Baltimore, MD, for information        150,000
 technology system upgrades and support person-  nel......
Oakland County Sheriff, Oakland County, MI, to upgrade a         200,000
 biometric identification enhancement project.............
Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD, for              250,000
 upgrades and maintenance to the tribal 9-1-1 sys-  tem...
Passaic County Prosecutor's Office, Paterson, NJ, for a          200,000
 regional fiber optic network and the construction of a
 countywide interoperable communications network..........
Pleasant Grove Police Department, Pleasant Grove, UT, for        200,000
 police department's wireless network.....................
Rockland County Office of Fire & Emergency Services,             250,000
 Pomona, NY, for a countywide interoperable public safety
 communications system....................................
Roseville Police Department, Macomb County, MI, to               150,000
 consolidate police, fire and emergency medical service
 dispatch functions into one entity.......................
Russellville Police Department, Russellville, Logan              125,000
 County, KY, to purchase mobile data terminals and other
 communications equipment.................................
Southern Kansas Multi-Jurisdictional SWAT, Cowley,               150,000
 Greenwood, Montgomery, and Sumner Counties, KS, for the
 implementation of the Law Enforcement Visual Intelligence
 Tool for four Kansas counties............................
Springfield Police Department, Springfield, VT, for              200,000
 equipment upgrades.......................................
St. Albans City Police Department, St. Albans, VT, to            100,000
 purchase equipment.......................................
St. Clair County, St. Clair County, MI, to complete an 800       250,000
 MHz communications system................................
St. Louis County Sheriff's Office, Duluth, MN, The               300,000
 requested funds would be used by St. Louis County
 Sheriff's Department to develop a regional
 interoperability mobile data system that will link
 multiple responders to incident details with secure
 communications...........................................
State of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, for the phased build-out       500,000
 of a statewide interoperable communications system for
 first responders.........................................
Talladega County Commission, Talladega, AL, for radio            100,000
 upgrades.................................................
The City of Beech Grove, Beech Grove, IN, to enhance             100,000
 public safety with in-car cameras and at hot spots in the
 City to provide real-time feeds to the police command
 center...................................................
The City of Shelbyville, Shelbyville, IN, to complete the        900,000
 interoperable wireless public safety communications
 system for first responders in Shelbyville, IN...........
The Courage To Speak Foundation, Inc., Norwalk, CT, to           950,000
 expand, develop and evaluate substance abuse prevention
 programs.................................................
The Delaware State Police Department, Dover, DE, for             100,000
 preliminary engineering assessments before message
 switcher upgrades........................................
The Delaware State Police Department, Dover, DE, for the         500,000
 purchase and installation of in-car cameras and related
 equipment................................................
The Delaware State Police Department, Dover, DE, for the         250,000
 purchase of a mobile gunshot locator system..............
The New Castle County Police Department, New Castle, DE,         200,000
 for a program to increase the efficiency and
 effectiveness of license plate scanning technology for
 law enforcement..........................................
Town of Anderson, Anderson, AL, for equipment and                 50,000
 technology upgrades......................................
Town of Enfield, Enfield, CT, for interoperability                75,000
 communication upgrades and expert consultation...........
Town of Enfield, Enfield, CT, to evaluate the local               75,000
 emergency communications system and identify areas in
 need of improvement......................................
Town of Kearny, Kearny, NJ, for the purchase and                 200,000
 installation of a webcam buffer zone monitoring system to
 specifically monitor the Kuehne chemical plant and CSX
 rail yards...............................................
Town of Secaucus, Secaucus, NJ, for interoperable law            100,000
 enforcement communications...............................
Town of Somerville, Somerville, AL, for equipment and             65,000
 technology upgrades......................................
University of Colorado, Denver, CO, to establish a               100,000
 forensics center.........................................
University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, for forensics          250,000
 research and operations..................................
Upper Peninsula 15 County Consortium, Upper Peninsula, MI,       500,000
 for equipment to complete a statewide 800 MHz radio
 system...................................................
Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT, to           506,000
 improve and increase the interoperability of statewide
 radio communications systems.............................
Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT, for          500,000
 the purchase of mobile computing units and necessary
 support staff for police vehicles........................
Vermont State Police, Waterbury, VT, for a statewide             250,000
 digital in-car camera system, an automated vehicle
 locator system and a replacement scanner.................
Vermont Supreme Court, Court Administrator's Office,             250,000
 Montpelier, VT, for a judiciary case management and
 electronic filing system.................................
Vernon Police Department, Vernon, CT, for police in-car           60,000
 video recording systems..................................
Virginia State Police, Wytheville, VA, to support the            250,000
 Virginia State Police Southwest Virginia Drug Task Forces
 in their efforts to stop methamphetamine and drug-related
 crimes...................................................
Washoe County Sheriff's Office, Washoe, NV, to equip a DNA       800,000
 analysis lab and process DNA samples.....................
Wells County Sheriff's Office, Bluffton Police Department,       100,000
 Bluffton 9-1-1 Dispatch Center, Ossian Police Department,
 Wells County, IN, to enhance interoperability between
 Wells County, the City of Bluffton and the Town of Ossian
 police and sheriff departments...........................
West Virginia Sheriffs' Association, Charleston, WV, to        3,400,000
 purchase visualization technology........................
Will County, Will County, IL, for integrated criminal            300,000
 justice information systems..............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Technology Program.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$110,000,000 for the COPS Law Enforcement Technology Program. 
Within the funds provided, $5,000,000 shall be transferred to 
NIST to continue the efforts of the Office of Law Enforcement 
Standards [OLES] in developing a comprehensive suite of minimum 
standards for law enforcement communications. In addition, 
these funds should be used to support the development and 
implementation of a compliance assessment program to ensure 
that communications equipment purchased through this grant 
program is compliant, where applicable with existing standards.
    Interoperable Standards.--The Committee is pleased that 
significant progress has been made in the issuance of standards 
to specify the required functionality for the Project 25 Inter-
RF-Subsystem Interface [ISSI], Console Interface, and Fixed 
Station Interface for land mobile radio systems. The Committee 
directs that funds provided to OLES for standards development 
under this section should be used to complete the remaining 
aspects of these interfaces, including conformance and 
interoperability test standards for each of the interfaces. In 
addition, funds should be used to begin the development of 
standards for emerging technologies such as VoIP applications 
for public safety operations.
    Methamphetamine Hot Spots.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $61,187,000 to State and local law enforcement 
programs to combat methamphetamine production and distribution, 
to target drug ``hot spots,'' and to remove and dispose of 
hazardous materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs. The 
Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 to reimburse the 
Drug Enforcement Administration for assistance to State and 
local law enforcement for proper removal and disposal of 
hazardous materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs and to 
initiate container programs. The Committee recommendation also 
includes $10,000,000 for a competitive grant program for 
community-based efforts to educate the public about emerging 
drug threats through research-based prevention methods or to 
enhance the ability of a community to prevent or reduce drug 
abuse, including thorough training, education, and technical 
assistance.
    The Committee provides funding for the following 
congressionally directed projects, and directs the Department 
of Justice to refrain from charging administrative costs to 
these grants. The Committee expects that the Department of 
Justice will provide appropriate management and oversight of 
each grant. Within the amounts provided for methamphetamine hot 
spots, the COPS program office shall fund the following 
proposals:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alabama District Attorney's Association, Montgomery, AL,       1,100,000
 to combat the methamphetamine problem and educated
 citizens of its dangers..................................
Arkansas State Police, Little Rock, AR, to certify and           500,000
 equip officers assigned to investigate, seize, dismantle,
 and direct the clean-up of clandestine methamphetamine
 labs.....................................................
Carson City, Carson City, NV, for efforts in combating           300,000
 methamphetamine in Northern Nevada.......................
City of Montrose, Montrose, CO, for communications and           150,000
 safety equipment to assist a drug task force and for an
 educational outreach program.............................
City of Rochester, Rochester, NY, to intensify patrols,          675,000
 improve the tracking of narcotics shipments, provide
 technical support and enhance local crime prevention
 programs for at-risk youth...............................
Clackamas County, Oregon City, OR, to continue the               100,000
 operations of the Clackamas County Meth Enforcement Team.
Criminal Justice Institute, University of Arkansas System,       500,000
 Little Rock, AR, to continue providing methamphetamine-
 focused courses for the Arkansas law enforcement
 community................................................
Heartland Family Service, Omaha, NE, for the                     100,000
 Methamphetamine Treatment Program for Omaha, NE..........
Idaho Meth Project, Boise, ID, for the Idaho Meth Project        300,000
 will support a statewide effort to combat the use of meth
Iowa Office of Drug Control Policy, Des Moines, IA, for an       750,000
 electronic database to assist efforts to enforce limits
 on sales of pseudoephedrine..............................
Iowa Office of Drug Control Policy, Des Moines, IA, for a        500,000
 multi-tier interdiction initiative to combat drug
 distribution networks....................................
Iowa Office of Drug Control Policy, Des Moines, IA, for          600,000
 coordinated regional meth investigations.................
Marion County, all cities throughout Marion County, OR,          400,000
 for programs targeted at reducing the potential and
 actual effects of meth on children.......................
Minot State University, Minot, ND, for methamphetamine           500,000
 research and public education............................
Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics, Jackson, MS, to combat        1,500,000
 methamphetamines.........................................
Montana Meth Project, Missoula, MT, to prevent the use of      1,000,000
 methamphetamines and the related social problems,
 especially among teenagers...............................
National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, CO,         100,000
 for a study that addresses the clean-up and risks of
 former methamphetamine laboratories and smokehouses pose
 to people, including children............................
Nebraska Meth Project, Lincoln, NE, to support a campaign        500,000
 to significantly reduce the prevalence of methamphetamine
 use in Nebraska..........................................
New Mexico Attorney General, Albuquerque, NM, to implement       500,000
 a state-wide anti-methamphetamine campaign...............
Orange County Government, Orlando, FL, to remediate              100,000
 environmental dangers of methamphetamine labs in Orange
 County...................................................
Pierce County Alliance, Tacoma, WA, for an information         1,200,000
 clearinghouse and technical training center to aid in the
 fight against methamphetamine............................
Pierce County Alliance, Tacoma, WA, for an anti-               1,000,000
 methamphetamine initiative...............................
Rockdale County Sheriff's Office, Rockdale County, GA, to         50,000
 identify, seize, and clean up clandestine methamphetamine
 drug labs and assist in the eradication of meth use......
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud Indian Reservation, SD, for         850,000
 law enforcement, court operations, prosecutors, the
 public defenders office and detention programs...........
State of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM, for a statewide meth        1,000,000
 eradication program......................................
Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force, Chattanooga, TN, for     1,250,000
 a statewide program that supports law enforcement,
 training, intelligence and public awareness in dealing
 with meth and meth cleanup...............................
The Colorado Meth Project, Denver, CO, for an anti-              500,000
 methamphetamine campaign.................................
The Wyoming Meth Project, Casper, WY, for fighting the            75,000
 methamphetamine problem..................................
The Wyoming Meth Project, Cheyenne, WY, to reduce youth          100,000
 meth use.................................................
University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, to implement a       600,000
 project to improve Nebraska's community corrections and
 methamphetamine abuse treatment services.................
University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, to address the need           75,000
 for transitional services for recovering addicts in
 Wyoming..................................................
University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, to address gaps in            50,000
 substance abuse treatment and transitional services in
 the State................................................
Wisconsin Department of Justice, Madison, WI, for the          1,000,000
 continuation of a statewide anti-methamphetamine
 initiative...............................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    DNA Backlog/Crime Log Improvement.--The Committee 
recommends $180,963,000 to strengthen and improve the current 
Federal and State DNA collection and analysis systems that can 
be used to accelerate the prosecution of the guilty while 
simultaneously protecting the innocent from wrongful 
prosecution.
    Paul Coverdell Forensic Science.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $40,000,000 for the Paul Coverdell 
Forensic Sciences Improvement Grants. Coverdell grants are 
intended to improve the quality and timeliness of forensic 
science and medical examiner services, including services 
provided by laboratories operated by states and those operated 
by units of local government. Coverdell grants provide 
flexibility to State and local crime labs by allowing them to 
obtain funds to address their most critical needs.
    Child Sexual Predator Elimination.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $55,000,000 for a new national 
initiative to provide grants to State and local governments to 
locate, arrest and prosecute sexual predators. The Committee 
recommends the appointment of an Assistant U.S. Attorney in 
each judicial district as a coordinator to prepare a 
comprehensive, district-wide strategy in consultation with 
social services providers and partners from Federal, State and 
local law enforcement agencies. The Committee directs the COPS 
office to coordinate with the National Center for Missing and 
Exploited Children in developing a program that includes 
detection, apprehension, and prosecution of sex offenders who 
victimize children. The Committee believes it is essential to 
build specialized units in law enforcement agencies across the 
country to attack this problem in a concerted, coordinated 
manner. The grants should assist State and local law 
enforcement entities to specifically focus on sexual predators 
who fail to register, child sexual exploitation and sex 
offenders who prey upon children. These predator units should 
be created in a manner that is geographically balanced and 
levels itself to testing the model in various settings; and in 
major urban police departments, State law enforcement agencies, 
smaller jurisdictions, and regional groupings of agencies. The 
Prosecutorial Remedies and Other Tools to End the Exploitation 
of Children Today Act of 2003, Public Law 108-21 authorized 
grants for Sex Offender Apprehension Programs.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 201 limits the amount of funding the Attorney 
General can use for official reception and representation.
    Section 202 prohibits the use of funds in this title to pay 
for an abortion except where the life of the mother would be in 
danger.
    Section 203 prohibits the use of funds in this title to 
require a person to perform or facilitate an abortion.
    Section 204 requires female prisoners to be escorted when 
off prison grounds.
    Section 205 allows the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation. The 
provision also prohibits transfers of funds from the Bureau of 
Prisons Buildings and Facilities account unless the President 
certifies that such a transfer is necessary to the national 
security interests of the United States and also subjects any 
such transfers to section 505 of this act.
    Section 206 provides authority for a personnel management 
demonstration project.
    Section 207 provides authority for the Bureau of Alcohol, 
Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives to use confiscated funds 
during undercover operations.
    Section 208 limits the placement of maximum or high 
security prisoners to appropriately secure facilities.
    Section 209 restricts Federal prisoner access to certain 
amenities.
    Section 210 sets obligation and expenditure requirements 
for the FBI's information technology programs.
    Section 211 requires the availability of appropriations for 
obligations beyond the current fiscal year to comply with 
reprogramming procedures.
    Section 212 prohibits the use of funds to plan for, begin, 
continue, finish, process, or approve a public-private 
competition under OMB Circular A-76 for work performed by 
employees of the Bureau of Prisons or of the Federal Prison 
Industries, Incorporated.
    Section 213 prohibits U.S. attorneys from simultaneously 
holding multiple jobs outside of the scope of a U.S. attorney's 
professional duties.
    Section 214 requires the Government Accountability Office 
to certify the FBI is using a performance management baseline 
that complies with OMB standards.
    Section 215 requires the Government Accountability Office 
to certify that the FBI has met certain standards to control 
costs related to computer acquisitions.
    Section 216 requires that the Attorney General shall submit 
quarterly reports to the Inspector General of the Department of 
Justice regarding the costs and contracting proceeding relating 
to each conference held by the Department of Justice during 
fiscal year 2009 for which the costs to the Government more 
than $20,000.

                               TITLE III

                                SCIENCE

                   EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

                Office of Science and Technology Policy

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $5,184,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       5,303,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,184,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,184,000. The 
recommendation is the same as the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and $119,000 below the budget request.
    The Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP] was 
created by the National Science and Technology Policy, 
Organization, and Priorities Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-282) 
and coordinates science and technology policy for the White 
House. OSTP provides scientific and technological information, 
analysis, and advice for the President and for the executive 
branch; participates in formulation, coordination, and 
implementation of national and international policies and 
programs that involve science and technology; maintains and 
promotes the health and vitality of the U.S. science and 
technology infrastructure; reviews and analyzes, with the 
Office of Management and Budget, the research and development 
budgets for all Federal agencies; and coordinates research and 
development efforts of the Federal Government to maximize the 
return on the public's investment in science and technology and 
to ensure Federal resources are used efficiently and 
appropriately.
    Next Generation Radar.--OSTP is directed to convene a 
series of meetings over the next 6 months in order to 
coordinate the research and development of the next generation 
of ground based radar. The meetings should be attended by NOAA, 
NSF, NASA and any other Federal agencies that will benefit from 
a coordinated approach to fulfilling the needs of the country. 
By coordinating the Federal efforts, costs for future 
procurements will be reduced because redundant efforts will be 
eliminated. No later than 9 months after enactment, OSTP shall 
provide a report to the Committee on the results of the 
meetings and a plan that can move forward in future year budget 
requests.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Appropriations, 2008.................................... $17,329,400,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................  17,614,200,000
Committee recommendation................................  17,814,000,000

    The Committee's recommendation provides $17,814,000,000 for 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA]. The 
recommendation is $504,600,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level, and $199,800,000 above the budget request.
    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was 
established by the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 
(Public Law 85-568) to conduct space and aeronautical research 
and development and to conduct flight activities for peaceful 
purposes. NASA's unique mission of exploration, discovery, and 
innovation is intended to preserve the United States' role as 
both a leader in world aviation and as the pre-eminent space-
faring nation. It is NASA's mission to: advance human 
exploration, use, and development of space; advance and 
communicate scientific knowledge and understanding of the 
Earth, the solar system and the universe; and research, 
develop, verify, and transfer advanced aeronautics and space 
technologies.
    NASA's vision for space exploration maps out an aggressive 
role for the United States in manned space exploration. 
However, the potential costs are substantial and will likely be 
very difficult to maintain at the current estimated funding 
levels. In addition, the Committee feels strongly that NASA 
must show its commitment to those human spaceflight activities 
already underway. The Shuttle program and the construction of 
the International Space Station [ISS] continue to be the 
primary focus of the Nation's manned space flight activities. 
Nevertheless, the replacements for the Space Shuttle's manned 
and heavy lift capabilities must also be considered as part of 
any plan for continued human access to space but not to the 
detriment of existing obligations.
    The Committee is concerned that NASA will neglect areas 
that only tangentially benefit, or do not fit within, the 
exploration vision. The Committee believes that NASA must work 
diligently to balance existing programs and priorities with its 
plans for the future. Counterbalancing future priorities 
against current programs places existing research and expertise 
in jeopardy and risks squandering significant Federal 
investments that may be essential to the exploration vision.
    In addition, the Committee is concerned that the strong, 
balanced science program that has served the Nation so 
successfully for many years is being left behind rather than 
being nurtured and sustained. That science program has been 
based on a set of carefully crafted scientific strategies that 
are founded on scientific and technical merit, relevance to 
overall national needs, and broad consultation with the 
scientific community.
    The Committee has chosen to articulate the funding levels 
of programs within the account structure for NASA in the form 
of tables. Major mission and program funding is listed within 
the tables and, if necessary, supplemented with explanatory 
report language.

                                SCIENCE

Appropriations, 2008....................................           (\1\)
Budget estimate, 2009...................................  $4,441,519,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,522,884,000

\1\The fiscal year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to 
modify the agency's fiscal year 2009 appropriations account structure. 
This act reflects the new structure. For comparability purposes, 
$4,706,178,000 was allocated for such activities in fiscal year 2008.

    The Science account encompasses four lines of study: Earth 
Science, Planetary Science, Heliophysics, and Astrophysics. 
This funding seeks to answer fundamental questions concerning 
the ways in which Earth's climate is changing; the comparison 
of Earth with other planets in the solar system and around 
other stars; the connections between the Sun and Earth; and the 
origin and evolution of planetary systems, the galaxy, and the 
universe, including the origin and distribution of life in the 
universe. These objectives are achieved through robotic flight 
missions, ground-based scientific research and data analysis, 
and the development of new technologies for future missions.

                                 SCIENCE
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Earth Science:
    Earth Science Research............................          380,554
        Research and Analysis.........................          245,669
        Computing and Management......................          104,913
        Airborne Science..............................           31,771
        Near Earth Object Observations................            3,701
    Earth Systematic Missions.........................          741,813
        Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM)........          125,841
        Glory Mission.................................           46,772
        Landsat Data Continuity Mission...............          139,380
        NPOESS Preparatory Project....................           94,410
        Decadal Survey Missions.......................          150,000
        Ocean Surface Topography Mission..............            8,040
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............          177,370
    Earth System Science Pathfinder...................           81,692
        Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO).............           23,227
        Aquarius......................................           29,102
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           29,363
    Earth Science Multi-Mission Operations............          140,519
    Earth Science Technology..........................           46,087
        Advanced Technology Initiatives...............            8,325
        Instrument Incubator..........................           25,866
        Advanced Info Systems Technology..............           11,896
    Applied Sciences Pathways.........................           48,839
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Earth Science.........................        1,439,504
                                                       =================
Planetary Science:
    Planetary Science Research........................          270,810
        Planetary Science Research and Analysis.......          142,381
        Lunar Science Research........................          105,000
        Operating Missions and Analysis...............           19,529
        Education and Directorate Management..........            3,900
    Discovery.........................................          246,966
        GRAIL.........................................          122,383
        Moon Mineralogy Mapper........................            2,701
        Discovery Future..............................           50,448
        Discovery Research............................           18,816
        Operating Missions and Data Analysis..........           52,618
    New Frontiers.....................................          263,930
        Juno..........................................          244,959
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           18,971
    Mars Exploration..................................          463,194
        2009 Mars Science Lab.........................          300,000
        Mars Scout (2013).............................            6,697
        Mars Research and Analysis....................           24,938
        Operating Missions and Data Analysis..........          131,559
    Outer Planets.....................................          101,089
    Technology........................................           64,927
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Planetary Science.....................        1,410,916
                                                       =================
Astrophysics:
    Astrophysics Research.............................          152,291
        Astrophysics Research and Analysis............           61,377
        Balloon Project...............................           24,607
        Operating Missions and Data Analysis..........           66,307
    Cosmic Origins....................................          707,543
        Hubble Space Telescope........................          165,000
        James Webb Space Telescope....................          395,000
        Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared                   72,823
         Astronomy....................................
        SIRTF/Spitzer.................................           71,720
        Astrophysics Future Missions..................            3,000
    Physics of the Cosmos.............................          157,037
        Gamma-ray Large Space Telescope (GLAST).......           23,155
        Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)..............            8,500
        Herschel......................................           27,152
        Planck........................................            9,444
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           88,786
    Exoplanet Exploration.............................           48,105
        Kepler........................................           25,193
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           22,912
    Astrophysics Explorer.............................          119,127
        Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer...........           65,222
        NuStar........................................           30,000
        Operating Missions and Data Analysis..........           23,905
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Astrophysics......................        1,184,103
                                                       =================
Heliophysics:
    Heliophysics Research.............................          198,794
        Heliophysics Research and Analysis............           33,922
        Sounding Rockets..............................           45,100
        ACE...........................................            4,020
        Operating Missions and Data Analysis..........           71,452
        Research Range................................           32,300
        GSFC Building Support.........................           12,000
    Living with a Star................................          252,389
        Solar Dynamics Observatory....................           24,051
        Radiation Belt Storm Probes...................          165,000
        Solar Probe...................................           18,000
        Balloon Array for Radiation...................              944
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           44,394
    Solar Terrestrial Probes..........................          136,590
        Magnetospheric Multiscale.....................          108,100
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           28,490
    Heliophysics Explorer Program.....................           41,291
        Interstellar Boundary Explorer................            9,490
        Other Missions and Data Analysis..............           37,301
    New Millennium....................................            4,297
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Heliophysics......................          633,361
                                                       =================
Reallocation of prior year unobligated balances.......         (156,000)
                                                       -----------------
      TOTAL, SCIENCE..................................        4,522,884
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Earth Science.--Earth science is a critical part of the 
balanced space program long advocated by this Committee. NASA 
Earth science missions are central to our ability to monitor 
and provide warnings about climate, weather, and other hazards. 
To that end, the Committee provides a programmatic increase of 
$47,000,000 above the budget request, for a total of 
$150,000,000, to accelerate the Earth science decadal missions 
in development. The agency is directed to ensure that these 
missions include the full complement of data collection 
capabilities as recommended by the National Academies' Earth 
science decadal report. The Committee strongly supports the 
acceleration of the ICE-Sat II mission to ensure launch no 
later than 2013 as recommended by the National Academies. The 
Committee notes that ICE-Sat II will be critical to our 
continued monitoring of the Antarctica and Greenland ice 
sheets.
    The Committee continues to expect NASA's Earth science 
portfolio to have a continuous mixture of small-, medium-, and 
observatory-class Earth science missions that guarantee regular 
and recurring flight opportunities for the Earth science 
community.
    Landsat Data Continuity Mission [LDCM].--The Committee 
supports the development and flight of a thermal infra-red 
sensor [TIRS] to maintain continuity of the critical 
measurements made by this Landsat sensor for scientific 
research and water management applications. The Committee urges 
NASA to initiate development of TIRS within available funds, 
and to identify the earliest and least expensive development 
approach and flight opportunity for the TIRS. NASA should 
report back to the Committee on this development approach no 
later than October 31, 2008.
    Stennis Space Center [SSC].--The recommendation includes an 
increase of $15,000,000 above the budget request for the NASA 
Earth Science Applications Program for the Earth Applications 
program managed through Stennis Space Center. This funding 
increase shall only be used to support new competitively 
selected applications projects to be selected during fiscal 
year 2009. These projects will integrate the results of NASA's 
Earth observing systems and Earth system models (using 
observations and predictions) into decision support tools to 
serve applications of national priority including, but not 
limited to: homeland security; coastal management; agriculture 
efficiency; and water and disaster management.
    Heliophysics.--Within funds provided to advance scientific 
knowledge of the Sun's impact on the Earth, the Committee 
provides the full budget requirements of $165,000,000 for the 
Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission and $108,100,000 for the 
Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, as well as $18,000,000 for 
the Solar Probe Mission. The Committee notes that the Solar 
Probe mission is the highest priority recommendation of the 
National Academies' heliophysics decadal report, and therefore 
strongly urges the Agency to work to achieve a launch no later 
than 2015.
    Planetary Science.--Within funds provided to advance 
scientific knowledge of our solar system, the Committee 
provides the full budget requirement $463,194,000 for the Mars 
rovers and related science. The Committee is deeply troubled by 
the cost overruns on the Mars Science Lab, and directs NASA to 
report no later than October 31, 2008 on the management and 
accountability actions taken to ensure that costs do not 
continue to grow.
    Lunar Landers.--The Committee is pleased that NASA has 
chosen to continue its previously planned robotic lunar lander 
mission. This mission was selected by NASA in 2005 and is now a 
pathfinder for an anticipated network of small lunar science 
landers and orbiters based on requirements of the Science 
Mission Directorate's expanded Lunar Science Program. The first 
two mini-landers are planned to be launched together in the 
2013-2014 timeframe to initiate a geophysical sensor network 
across the Moon. NASA anticipates that the missions selected 
and managed by the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program Office will 
transition this small lunar lander effort to the Lunar Science 
Program, managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, in the 
Science Mission Directorate no later than fiscal year 2010. In 
anticipation of this action, the Committee provides $10,000,000 
for the selected lunar lander mission, as requested by NASA.
    Astrophysics.--Within funds provided to advance scientific 
knowledge of the origins of the Universe, the Committee 
provides the full budget requirements of $165,000,000 for the 
Hubble Space Telescope and $395,000,000 for the James Webb 
Space Telescope. The Committee also provides the full budget 
request of $8,500,000 for the Joint Dark Energy Mission [JDEM] 
and continues to support development of the JDEM through full 
and open competition with project management residing at the 
appropriate NASA center.
    Wallops Flight Facility [WFF].--The Committee has long 
advocated that the WFF is an important national asset that can 
be better utilized by focusing on emerging technologies that 
meet national needs and NASA priorities. The Committee 
therefore provides programmatic increases of: $11,000,000 for 
advanced technology development of small satellites and 
unmanned aerial systems [UAS] that have the potential of 
lowering the costs of space and Earth science missions 
consistent with the goals of venture class missions recommended 
by the National Academies' Earth science decadal report; and 
$14,000,000 to improve launch pad infrastructure.
    Reallocation of Funds.--The Committee has included a 
reallocation of fiscal year 2008 funds in the amount of 
$145,000,000 to ensure the full 2009 budget requirements for 
programs and activities adjusted as a result of NASA's May 30, 
2008 reprogramming request. NASA shall report on this 
reallocation no later than 30 days after enactment of this act.

                              AERONAUTICS

Appropriations, 2008....................................           (\1\)
Budget estimate, 2009...................................    $446,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     500,000,000

\1\The fiscal year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to 
modify the agency's fiscal year 2009 appropriations account structure. 
This act reflects the new structure. For comparability purposes, 
$511,706,000 was allocated for such activities in fiscal year 2008.

    The Aeronautics account funds research in key areas related 
to the development of advanced aircraft technologies and 
systems, including those related to aircraft safety, 
environmental compatibility, and fuel efficiency; and research 
that supports the Next Generation Air Transportation System in 
partnership with the Joint Planning and Development Office.

                               AERONAUTICS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aviation Safety........................................           75,000
Airspace Systems.......................................           90,000
Fundamental Aeronautics................................          250,000
Aeronautics Test Program...............................           85,000
                                                        ----------------
      TOTAL, AERONAUTICS...............................          500,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee is concerned with the steady decline in the 
aeronautics research and technology request. Even more 
alarming, NASA's budget projections indicate that this trend 
will continue. The Committee is committed to the research NASA 
conducts in aeronautics, and to the benefits, both in terms of 
safety and economics, that will be made available to the public 
through NASA-led research.
    The Committee notes that NASA plans to carry over 
approximately $50,000,000 in unobligated fiscal year 2008 
aeronautics research funds, therefore the Committee's 
recommendation provides NASA with a total of $550,000,000 in 
resources for aeronautics research in fiscal year 2009.

                              EXPLORATION

Appropriations, 2008....................................           (\1\)
Budget estimate, 2009...................................  $3,500,469,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,530,490,000

\1\The fiscal year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to 
modify the agency's fiscal year 2009 appropriations account structure. 
This act reflects the new structure. For comparability purposes, 
$3,143,083,000 was allocated for such activities in fiscal year 2008.

    The Exploration account funds the capabilities required to 
develop, demonstrate, and deploy the transportation, life 
support, and surface systems that will enable sustained human 
and robotic exploration of the Moon and beyond.

                               EXPLORATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Constellation Systems:
    Constellation Systems Program......................        2,905,129
        Program Integration and Operations.............          748,178
        Crew Exploration Vehicle.......................        1,101,436
        Crew Launch Vehicle............................        1,018,515
        Cargo Launch Vehicle...........................           37,000
    Commercial Crew and Cargo COTS.....................          173,045
                                                        ----------------
      Subtotal, Constellation Systems..................        3,078,174
                                                        ================
Advanced Capabilities:
    Human Research Program.............................          151,883
        ISS Medical Project............................           19,945
        Research Infusion Projects.....................          131,938
    Exploration Technology Development.................          244,099
        ISS Research...................................           24,783
        Technology Infusion Projects...................          219,316
    Lunar Precursor Robotic Program....................           56,334
        Lunar Precursor Robotic Program Management.....           16,380
        Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter...................           39,954
                                                        ----------------
          Subtotal, Advanced Capabilities..............          452,316
                                                        ================
          TOTAL, EXPLORATION...........................        3,530,490
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Ares I and Orion.--The Committee provides the full budget 
request of $1,101,436,000 for Ares I, the new Crew Launch 
Vehicle, and $1,018,515,000 for Orion, the Crew Exploration 
Vehicle.
    Ares V.--The Committee is supportive of the funding levels 
for the next exploration vehicle, but is also concerned that 
the heavy lift component, Ares V, is not receiving adequate 
support. The unmanned Ares V is critical to the plan for 
extending our Nation's space program beyond low Earth orbit. In 
order to define requirements for design, as well as improve 
research and development work for a systems requirement review, 
the Committee provides a programmatic increase of $30,021,000 
for these activities, for a total of $37,000,000. The 
definition of requirements and the research and development 
work that will be done early on in this critical program will 
help lower risk and future program costs. These additional 
funds will allow NASA to achieve its goal of furthering space 
exploration from beyond low Earth orbit to the Moon and beyond.
    Lunar Precursor Robotic Program.--The Committee provides 
$56,300,000 for the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program [LPRP]. The 
Committee believes that the program, management offices, and 
missions associated with LPRP are essential to the success of 
the manned missions to the Moon. Within these funds, 
$16,400,000 shall be for the LPRP management office and 
$39,954,000 shall be for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The 
Committee reiterates that the management office associated with 
LPRP shall be directly involved in the planning and oversight 
of future lunar robotic missions, integrating lunar data from 
NASA and other international missions, oversee technology 
development, support the Lunar Architecture Team, and lead 
NASA's public outreach and education activities for 
understanding the lunar environment.

                            SPACE OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2008....................................           (\1\)
Budget estimate, 2009...................................  $5,774,710,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,774,710,000

\1\The fiscal year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to 
modify the agency's fiscal year 2009 appropriations account structure. 
This act reflects the new structure. For comparability purposes, 
$5,526,157,000 was allocated for such activities in fiscal year 2008.

    The Space Operations account funds the Space Shuttle, the 
International Space Station, and the supporting functions 
required to conduct operations in space. The Space Shuttle has 
been the workhorse for human spaceflight for 27 years. The 
International Space Station is a complex of research 
laboratories in low Earth orbit in which American, Russian, 
Canadian, European, and Japanese astronauts are conducting 
unique scientific and technological investigations in a 
microgravity environment.

                            SPACE OPERATIONS
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Space Shuttle..........................................        2,981,724
    Program Integration................................          489,618
    Flight and Ground Operations.......................        1,031,220
    Flight Hardware....................................        1,460,886
International Space Station............................        2,060,162
    ISS Operations.....................................        1,755,362
    ISS Cargo Crew Services............................          304,800
Space and Flight Support (SFS).........................          732,824
    Space Communications and Navigation................          582,923
        Space Communications Networks..................          363,521
        Space Communications Support...................           65,402
        TDRS Replenishment.............................          154,000
    Launch Services....................................           99,558
    Rocket Propulsion Testing..........................           41,772
    Crew Health & Safety...............................            8,571
                                                        ----------------
      TOTAL, SPACE OPERATIONS..........................        5,774,710
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Space Shuttle.--The Committee provides the full budget 
request of $2,981,724,000 for the Space Shuttle. The Committee 
remains concerned about the serious impact of Space Shuttle 
transition and retirement on the workforce at NASA facilities, 
and directs NASA to submit a plan to maximize utilization of 
enhanced use-lease authority for all facilities, as well as 
possible partnerships with other Federal agencies, that will 
assist NASA in maintaining its skilled workforce. NASA should 
submit this plan no later than 90 days after enactment of this 
act.
    Space Station.--The Committee provides the full budget 
request of $2,060,162,000 for the Space Station.
    Science Experiments in Microgravity.--The Committee notes 
that experiments in a microgravity environment hold much 
promise for the development of vaccines against infectious 
diseases, and directs NASA to submit a plan no later than 
October 1, 2008, to ensure immediate access of these and other 
potentially life-saving experiments to a microgravity 
environment.

                               EDUCATION

Appropriations, 2008....................................           (\1\)
Budget estimate, 2009...................................    $115,600,000
Committee recommendation................................     130,012,000

\1\The fiscal year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to 
modify the agency's fiscal year 2009 appropriations account structure. 
This act reflects the new structure. For comparability purposes, 
$146,776,000 was allocated for such activities in fiscal year 2008.

    The Education account funds science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics education activities to educate 
and inspire our next generation of explorers and innovators.

                                EDUCATION
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Elementary and Secondary Education.....................           30,000
E-Education............................................            5,000
MUREP..................................................           28,000
Higher Education.......................................            9,000
EPSCoR.................................................            8,280
NASA Space Grant.......................................           28,732
Informal Education.....................................            1,000
Science Museums and Planetarium Grants.................           10,000
NASA Visitor Centers...................................           10,000
                                                        ----------------
      TOTAL, EDUCATION.................................          130,012
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Classroom of the Future.--The Committee has provided the 
full budget request of $2,300,000 for the Classroom of the 
Future, which focuses on educational research, curriculum 
design, teacher development and educational outreach in the 
STEM disciplines.
    Museums, Science Centers, and Planetariums.--The Committee 
recommends $10,000,000 for a competitive grant program as 
authorized by section 616 of Public Law 109-155.
    Educational Activities at NASA Centers.--The Committee 
provides $10,000,000 for the development of educational 
activities at NASA's centers and direct NASA to distribute this 
amount in equal $1,000,000 increments to each center's official 
visitor center for the development of educational activities in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, including 
exhibits.

                          CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT

Appropriations, 2008....................................           (\1\)
Budget estimate, 2009...................................  $3,299,902,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,320,404,000

\1\The fiscal year 2008 Omnibus Appropriations Act directed NASA to 
modify the agency's fiscal year 2009 appropriations account structure. 
This act reflects the new structure. For comparability purposes, 
$3,242,900,000 was allocated for such activities in fiscal year 2008.

    The Cross-Agency Support account funds Agency management, 
including headquarters and each of the nine NASA field centers, 
as well as the design and execution of non-programmatic 
Construction of Facilities and Environmental Compliance and 
Restoration activities.

                          CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                                          recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Center Management and Operations.......................        2,026,486
    Facility Services..................................          480,000
    Environmental Management...........................           28,316
    Institutional Administration.......................          585,000
    Safety and Mission Assurance.......................           43,527
    SMA Technical Authority............................           25,378
    Science & Engineering..............................          206,387
    Center Investments Account.........................           81,322
    Test Services......................................           16,905
    Information Services...............................          255,747
    Security Program...................................          110,787
    Other Personnel Costs..............................           76,118
    Technical Excellence...............................          116,999
Agency Management and Operations.......................          905,253
Agency Management......................................          390,000
Safety and Mission Success.............................          163,428
    Safety and Mission Assurance.......................           42,942
    Chief Engineer.....................................           87,027
    Chief Health and Medical Officer...................            4,112
    Independent Verification and Validation............           29,347
Agency IT Services (AITS)..............................          156,095
    IT Management......................................           24,168
    Applications.......................................           61,370
    Infrastructure.....................................           70,557
Innovative Partnerships Program........................          167,730
    Small Business Innovative Research.................          117,857
    Small Business Technology Transfer Research........           14,143
    Partnership Development............................           24,096
    SBIR-STTR--Program Support.........................            9,134
    FAST...............................................            1,000
    Investment Seed Fund...............................            1,000
    Innovation Transfusion.............................              500
Strategic Capabilities Assets Program..................           28,000
    Simulators.........................................           11,500
    Thermal Vacuum Chambers............................            7,209
    Arc Jets...........................................            9,291
Institutional Investments..............................          308,665
    Institutional Construction of Facilities...........          233,901
    Environmental Compliance and Restoration...........           74,764
Congressionally Directed Projects......................           80,000
                                                        ----------------
      TOTAL, CROSS-AGENCY SUPPORT......................        3,320,404
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Censorship of Scientific Information.--The Committee 
continues to be concerned that there is openness in 
communication of federally supported science results. 
Government scientists must be able to research and report their 
findings to the public without fear of censorship or 
intimidation, and American taxpayers have the right to know the 
facts. A recent Inspector General report found that NASA 
officials acted ``in a manner that reduced, marginalized, and 
mischaracterized the scientific information'' about climate 
change. The Committee directs NASA to immediately implement all 
of the recommendations contained in the IG report to ensure 
that NASA's policies and practices protect openness in 
reporting of scientific information. The Agency shall report to 
the Committee on this issue no later than October 31, 2008.
    Independent Verification and Validation [IV&V;) Program.-- 
Within the amounts provided for cross-agency support, the 
Committee recommends the full budget request of $31,100,000 for 
NASA's IV&V; Program.
    National Technology Transfer Center [NTTC].--Within the 
funds provided for Innovative Partnership Programs, the 
Committee provides $4,000,000 for the continued operations of 
the NASA NTTC.
    Ames Security Fence.--The Committee is aware of the need to 
construct a new perimeter fence to increase security for the 
research center while allowing for certain public access. The 
Committee provides $1,500,000 for this effort within the funds 
provided for institutional investments.
    Marshall Security Gates.--The Committee is aware of the 
need for upgrading the security gates that provide access to 
Marshall Space Flight Center. The Committee provides $1,500,000 
for this effort within the funds provided for institutional 
investments.
    Congressionally Directed Projects.--The Committee provides 
funding for the following congressionally directed projects, 
directs NASA to refrain from charging administrative costs to 
these grants, and expects that NASA will provide appropriate 
management and oversight of each grant:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Project                              Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A partnership of Coppin State University, Towson               1,000,000
 University, and University of Maryland Biotechnology
 Institute, MD, to increase the number and quality of
 science, technology, engineering and mathematics teachers
 in the region's public schools...........................
Alabama A&M; University Research Institute, Madison, AL,          500,000
 for high temperature materials research..................
Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, to develop a              500,000
 focused research and development initiative on large area
 flexible solar cell modules..............................
Burlington Technical Center, Burlington, VT, to upgrade        1,000,000
 and improve the post-secondary aviation program..........
Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT, for       350,000
 recruitment and retention for an aerospace engineering
 academic program.........................................
Charles County Public Schools, Charles County, MD, for a         500,000
 digital classroom project................................
Chesapeake Information Based Aeronautics Consortium, for a     3,000,000
 partnership of Morgan State University, University of
 Maryland Eastern Shore, and Bowie State University, MD,
 for continued aviation safety research and development...
Discovery Center Museum, Rockford, IL, for science               300,000
 education for rural and underserved children.............
Flight Research Training Center, Roswell, NM, to continue        250,000
 development and operation of the Flight Research Training
 Center...................................................
Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile, AL, for             500,000
 educational exhibits.....................................
Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaii, Hilo, HI, for the           2,000,000
 promotion of astronomy in Hawaii.........................
Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, for research and               500,000
 development of nanomaterials.............................
Manned Space Flight Education Foundation, Houston, TX, to        500,000
 create a virtual space community for stu-  dents.........
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for robotic        750,000
 exploration and Lunar material utilization...............
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for material       750,000
 and structural evaluations for composites................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for the            550,000
 development of the sensor technologies and integration
 algorithms necessary for on-orbit assembly and other AR&D;
 missions.................................................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for remote         500,000
 engine health and maintenance diagnosis..................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for the            400,000
 Virtual Learning Magnet for Space Science and Math
 program as outlined in the Gathering Storm Report and
 NASA will make any award for this program on a
 competitive basis........................................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, to develop a       500,000
 cost effective nuclear power system to support the long-
 range objectives of NASA.................................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for a multi-       500,000
 propellant plume diagnostic testbed......................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, to support         500,000
 the ongoing technology maturation program for liquid
 oxygen/liquid methane propulsion.........................
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for missions       475,000
 systems recording, archival and retrieval................
McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL, for education and         400,000
 science literacy programs................................
Michigan Research Institute, Ann Arbor, MI, for aerospace      1,000,000
 research on joining tubular support structures at low
 cost and high reliability................................
Mid-Atlantic Broadband Cooperative, South Boston, VA, for      2,000,000
 the counties of Accomack and Northampton for broadband
 deployment...............................................
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for research       625,000
 and development of advanced technologies that represent
 departures from current manufacturing methods............
Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, for a collaborative       200,000
 distance science and technology education program........
National Federation of the Blind, Baltimore, MD, to              600,000
 develop and apply assistive technology approaches and
 techniques that enhance participation of blind youth in
 STEM education...........................................
New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, for a program       200,000
 to improve K-12 science, engineering, math, and aerospace
 education................................................
Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative, Pittsburgh, PA,        500,000
 for a regenerative therapy delivery initiative...........
Science Center of Iowa, Des Moines, IA, to encourage             400,000
 children to go into science and technology through skills-
 based learning exhibits..................................
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO,         500,000
 for enhancement of K-12 teaching and learning of
 sciences, math, and technology among schools, teachers,
 and students.............................................
Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL, for high            750,000
 temperature materials....................................
Space Dynamics Laboratory, Logan, UT, to provide technical       500,000
 support to the satellite sensor calibration team for the
 Global Climate Observing System..........................
St. Louis Community College BioBench and Training                500,000
 Facility, St. Louis, MO, to provide specialized career
 and technical training to students for work in the life
 sciences.................................................
Teach for America, New York, NY, to engage teachers in         2,500,000
 science, technology, engineering and mathe-  matics......
Texas A&M; University, College Station, TX, to develop new        500,000
 robotic technologies.....................................
The Delaware Aerospace Education Foundation, Bear, DE, to        500,000
 create a community model for formal and informal Earth
 and space education......................................
The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ, for an interactive platform       500,000
 for education of astronomy, space, and planetary science.
Thurgood Marshall College Fund, New York, NY, to recruit       2,200,000
 minority students who will pursue careers in the sciences
University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, for         700,000
 optical system...........................................
University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, for      1,000,000
 a public-private partnership promoting innovation in the
 fields of biotechnology, information technology, and
 nanotechnology...........................................
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, to research            750,000
 factors that hinder the wound healing process............
University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, for     1,000,000
 the Advanced Study Institute for Environmental Prediction
 to study climate impacts and adaptation in the Mid-
 Atlantic region..........................................
University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, for remote sensing,     3,000,000
 geospatial, space and aviation legal research, materials,
 education, and outreach..................................
University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, to help make      3,000,000
 data received from NASA satellite images more easily
 accessible to the public.................................
University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, to create a        950,000
 national institute to improve science, technology,
 engineering and mathematics education by focusing on
 young children...........................................
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for composite           200,000
 materials lab............................................
University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, for the Complex           500,000
 Systems Center for Informed Decision-Making and Design to
 develop intelligent systems design and adaptive robotics.
U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, AL, for museum         500,000
 exhibits.................................................
Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC,       140,000
 for the Institute for Regenerative Medicine..............
West Virginia State University, Institute, WV, for a           2,000,000
 science, engineering, mathematics and aerospace academy
 (SEMAA)..................................................
Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV, to expand an         3,000,000
 electronic medical records system adapted from the
 military's award-winning HEALTHeFORCES program...........
Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, to continue the           250,000
 development and operation of the National Center for
 Advanced Materials Performance (NCAMP) located at the
 National Institute for Aviation Research  (NIAR).........
Xavier University New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for            1,000,000
 science, technology, engineering and mathematics programs
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $32,600,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      35,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      35,500,000

    The Committee recommendation provides the full budget 
request of $35,500,000 for the Office of Inspector General 
[IG]. The recommendation is $2,900,000 above the fiscal year 
2008 enacted level. The Office is responsible for promoting 
efficiency and preventing and detecting crime, fraud, waste, 
and mismanagement.
    Costs of Conferences.--The Committee continues to be 
interested in costs related to conferences, travel, and 
meetings funded by NASA. As part of Public Law 110-161, the 
Committee directed the Inspector general to review costs and 
contracting procedures when the combined cost to the Government 
was in excess of $20,000. NASA was also directed to report to 
the Committee a report for all travel related to conferences 
attended, or sponsored, by NASA and its employees. The 
Committee directs NASA and the NASA Inspector General to follow 
the direction given in Public Law 110-161 for fiscal year 2009. 
The quarterly review of costs for conferences, meetings, and 
related travel should include recommendations by the Inspector 
General on how to make such spending more cost effective, and 
an assessment on the implementation of any recommendations. 
NASA and the Inspector General shall provide a report to the 
Committee for these activities on October 1, 2009.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee includes bill language regarding the 
availability of funds for construction of facilities, 
environmental compliance and restoration activities, and 
certain prizes. The Committee also includes bill language 
regarding: transfers of funds between accounts, reductions in 
forces, and the availability of expired funds.
    Appropriations Liaisons.--The Committee would like to 
reiterate its preference to channel the majority of its 
inquiries and requests for information and assistance through 
the budget offices or comptroller offices of the departments 
and agencies which it oversees, but reserves the right to call 
upon any individual or organization within any agency under its 
jurisdiction in order to effectively accomplish the work of the 
Committee.
    Budget Justifications.--The Committee continues to be 
disappointed in the lack of detail provided in NASA's fiscal 
year 2009 congressional budget justification document. Budget 
justifications are critical to the Committee's ability to make 
informed decisions concerning the administration's funding 
requests and must be submitted in a format with the greatest 
level of detail possible. NASA has made an incremental change 
in providing additional details in their budget justification, 
but the agency has not complied fully with the direction in 
Public Law 110-161 which specifically asked for funding levels 
by directorate, theme, program, project, and activity. NASA has 
yet to disclose such data in its budget material provided to 
the Committee as prescribed in the law, and the Committee 
insists that NASA comply with the law in future budget 
submissions.
    For fiscal year 2009 and each year thereafter, the 
Committee directs NASA to include the out-year budget impacts 
in all reprogramming requests. Future operating plans, 
reprogramming requests, and all budget resubmissions also shall 
include a separate accounting of all program/mission reserves 
and impacts on estimated carry over funds.
    Reprogrammings.--In previous years, NASA has chosen to make 
major programmatic decisions through comprehensive operating 
plans. While such changes are allowed, it is the view of the 
Committee that this should not be a regular occurrence. 
Instead, after an initial operating plan has been submitted, 
individual reprogramming letters should be utilized for minor 
adjustments in programs as they arise and only in exceptional 
circumstances should comprehensive measures be taken. Any 
reprogramming or operating plan request submitted to the 
Committee shall contain a detailed explanation of where each 
adjustment of funds is proposed to be taken from and the exact 
destination of those funds. This direction has not been 
followed in the past and NASA has only provided summary 
information that does not adequately detail item by item 
destinations of funds. Funding provided to NASA for its 
activities are not fungible amounts for NASA to use as it sees 
fit unless changes are approved by this Committee through the 
appropriate justification in each request. Funding provided to 
NASA shall not be arbitrarily allocated with vague references 
to large operating plans. NASA should follow the example of 
every other agency under the jurisdiction of this subcommittee 
in following reprogramming direction and execution.
    Contract Costs.--The Committee is concerned that NASA has 
not utilized independent cost verification early in the process 
of estimating costs for its programs and missions, or in 
assessing the appropriate funding levels of sole-source 
contracts. In allocating resources for current and future 
needs, effective cost estimation is crucial. NASA is directed 
to incorporate independent cost verification as part of the 
process by which contracts are selected and monitored. 
Utilization of independent cost verification shall be used as a 
guide for assessing when costs have exceeded expectations and 
to help identify projects for termination. NASA shall report to 
the Committee of its plans and progress in implementing this 
directive within 60 days of enactment.
    Once again the Committee directs NASA that it shall notify, 
in writing, the Committee 30 days prior to allocating funds, 
modifying, or extending existing contracts that are in excess 
of 15 percent of the original contract value. Within this 
notification NASA shall also justify the additional expenditure 
of funds, and NASA shall identify the source of any necessary 
additional funds. It is absolutely critical that NASA be able 
to control the costs of its activities. The Committee notes 
with interest that it has received no such notifications over 
the past 2 years. Therefore, the Committee directs NASA to 
provide the Committee a report, no later than 45 days after 
enactment, providing the original baseline amount and schedule 
for all current programs with a life cycle cost of $100,000,000 
or more, as well as the current baseline amount, confidence 
level, and schedule for the same programs.
    The Committee reiterates the bill-wide direction of annual 
reviews by GAO. NASA shall provide access to all necessary 
data, as determined by GAO, in order for the reviews to be 
completed and provided in a timely manner to the Committee. As 
these reviews will be recurring, NASA shall provide appropriate 
office space for GAO staff to conduct their reviews.

                      National Science Foundation

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $6,065,000,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   6,854,100,000
Committee recommendation................................   6,854,100,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $6,854,100,000. The 
recommendation is $789,100,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The National Science Foundation [NSF] was established as an 
independent agency by the National Science Foundation Act of 
1950 (Public Law 81-507) and is authorized to support research 
and education programs that promote the progress of science and 
engineering in the United States. The Foundation supports 
research and education in all major scientific and engineering 
disciplines through grants, cooperative agreements, contracts, 
and other forms of assistance in all parts of the United 
States. The Foundation also supports unique, large-scale 
research facilities and international facilities.
    NSF is the principal Federal agency charged with promoting 
science and engineering education from pre-kindergarten through 
career development. This helps ensure that the United States 
has world-class scientists, mathematicians and engineers, and 
well-prepared citizens for today and the future. In today's 
global economy, continued progress in science and engineering 
and the transfer of the knowledge developed is vital if the 
United States is to maintain its competitiveness. NSF is at the 
leading edge of the research and discoveries that will create 
the jobs and technologies of the future.
    The Committee reiterates its long-standing requirement that 
NSF request reprogrammings when initiating new programs or 
activities or reorganizing components. The Committee expects to 
be notified of reprogramming actions which involve less than 
the above-mentioned amount if such actions would have the 
effect of changing the agency's funding requirements in future 
years, or if programs or projects specifically cited in the 
Committee's reports are affected.

                    RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

Appropriations, 2008....................................  $4,821,474,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................   5,593,990,000
Committee recommendation................................   5,593,990,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,593,990,000. The 
recommendation is $772,516,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The Research and Related Activities appropriation addresses 
the Foundation's three strategic goals: people--developing a 
diverse, internationally competitive and globally engaged 
workforce of scientists, engineers, and well-prepared citizens; 
ideas--enabling discovery across the frontiers of science and 
engineering, connected to learning, innovation, and service to 
society; and tools--providing broadly accessible, state-of-the-
art science and engineering facilities and shared research and 
education tools. Research activities will contribute to the 
achievement of these outcomes through expansion of the 
knowledge base; integration of research and education; 
stimulation of knowledge transfer among academia and public and 
private sectors; and international activities, and will bring 
the perspectives of many disciplines to bear on complex 
problems important to the Nation. The Foundation's discipline-
oriented Research and Related Activities account include: 
Biological Sciences; Computer and Information Science and 
Engineering; Engineering; Geosciences; Mathematical and 
Physical Sciences; Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences; 
U.S. Polar Research Programs; U.S. Antarctica Logistical 
Support Activities; and Integrative Activities.
    The Committee recommendation provides significant increases 
for investments to advance the frontiers of research and 
education in science and engineering. The recommendation 
provides a nearly 14 percent increase over the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level. The Congress conveyed its clear determination to 
build on America's success as a world leader in discovery and 
innovation through the passage of the America COMPETES Act last 
year. The Committee's fiscal year 2008 recommendation for NSF 
was to have been the first phase of delivering on the promises 
and policies outlined by this landmark legislation. 
Unfortunately, as the fiscal year 2008 appropriation cycle 
progressed, it was clear that the administration was unwilling 
to compromise with the Congress. This intransigence forced the 
Congress to reluctantly reduce the proposed increases for NSF 
in order to avoid devastating consequences to other domestic 
programs.
    The Committee's fiscal year 2009 recommendation renews its 
commitment to Federal long-term basic research that has the 
potential to be transformative to our economy and our way of 
life. As such, the recommendation provides the full funding 
requested for the four major cross-foundation investments of 
Cyber-enabled Discovery and Innovation, Science and Engineering 
Beyond Moore's Law, Adaptive Systems Technology, and Dynamics 
of Water Processes in the Environment. Each of these programs 
aim to have a transformative impact across science and 
engineering, especially in areas of national priority first 
outlined by the National Academies Report ``Rising Above the 
Gathering Storm.''
    Science and Technology Policy Institute.--The Committee is 
concerned about the strength of the Experimental Program to 
Stimulate Competitive Research [EPSCoR] program, and its 
effectiveness in reaching its goals of building a broad, 
nationwide university research base. EPSCoR was established 
within NSF in 1979 in order to focus on those States that have 
historically received lesser amounts of Federal research and 
development funding. In addition, since the establishment of 
EPSCoR at NSF, EPSCoR programs have been instituted within 
NASA, the Departments of Agriculture and Energy; the 
Environmental Protection Agency; the National Institutes of 
Health; and other Federal agencies. Over time many States have 
been added to these EPSCoR programs, but not a single State has 
yet to graduate. The Committee directs the Science and 
Technology Policy Institute [STPI] to conduct a review of the 
EPSCoR program in all Federal agencies with the funding 
provided to STPI in the fiscal year 2009 budget request. As 
part of this review, STPI should include recommendations as to 
how the program could be made more effective; a review of what 
policies are in place to ensure States are made aware of 
graduation thresholds, and whether bridge programs should be 
instituted to enable success and make certain that graduating 
States do not simply slide back into the EPSCoR program at a 
later date; recommendations should be provided as to what the 
proper criteria should be for graduation; and also to address 
the relative effectiveness within EPSCoR of the Research 
Infrastructure Grants versus cost sharing. This report shall be 
provided to the Committee on Appropriations no later than May 
15, 2009.
    Improved Science in the U.S. Antarctic Program [USAP].--The 
Committee notes the substantial investment in the development 
and construction of critical infrastructure for operations in 
the Antarctic over the last decade. As renewed attention is now 
paid to this region of the world because of the effect of 
climate change upon it, the Committee believes that the USAP's 
logistical support activities should now focus on guaranteeing 
the maximum scientific utilization of these renewed assets. For 
this reason, the Committees on Appropriation, in their joint 
April 15 letter in response to the fiscal year 2008 operating 
plan, directed NSF to prepare a plan within 60 days ``on 
diversifying logistical support activities to provide enhanced 
delivery of technology solutions in support of science based 
activities in the Antarctic, including information and research 
on global climate change.'' Regrettably, just 2 weeks after the 
Committee's letter to the Foundation was sent, the NSF issued a 
statement of objectives for the upcoming Antarctic logistics 
acquisition which made no mention of this directive. The 
Committee is troubled by this glaring omission and believes it 
to be inconsistent with the agency's own upcoming 10-year 
agency-wide plan which makes high speed capacity to transmit 
data a priority. As a result, the Committee fully expects any 
final selection criteria related to a competitive logistics 
procurement to include as a key measure of evaluation the 
ability to provide a path for innovative technology insertion 
to guarantee high speed communication of data to scientists, as 
well as demonstrated experience in supporting Federal programs 
whose primary objective includes scientific research and 
dissemination of data. Such an evaluation should include 
factors such as: technology based logistics and supply chain 
methods; the ability to coordinate and integrate Polar Program 
stakeholders to promote optimal research data acquisition and 
delivery methods; and the capacity to expand research 
activities in remote locations for the purpose of collecting, 
evaluating, promoting, and disseminating new information 
related to major climate global systems and changes to them.
    Mathematical Science Research Institutes.--The Committee 
recommendation provides an additional $3,000,000 above the 
request to establish a mathematical institute devoted to the 
identification and development of mathematical talent and to 
advance mathematical topics critical to the national interest.
    Astronomical Sciences.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $252,510,000 for Astronomical Sciences. The $2,500,000 
increase above the request is specifically provided for the 
Advanced Technology Solar Telescope project in order to fund 
the design work requested, and denied, in a separate account. 
The Committee expects all design work, from any Major Research 
project to be funded out of this account.
    National Radio Astronomy Observatory.--The Committee 
recommendation provides the full budget request of $49,790,000. 
This level of funding will provide adequate funding for 
operations of the Green Bank Observatory with its now 
operational radio telescope, science center, and associated 
student dormitory.
    EPSCoR.--The Committee recommendation provides $125,000,000 
for EPSCoR, which has the mission to strengthen research and 
education throughout the United States and to avoid undue 
concentration of such research and education. This is 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted level and 
$11,500,000 above the request.
    Plant Genome Research Program.--The Committee recommends 
$101,220,000 for the Plant Genome Research Program. The 
Committee remains a strong supporter of this important program 
due to its potential impact on improving economically 
significant crops. The Committee also recognizes its vast 
potential in combating hunger in poor countries.

          MAJOR RESEARCH EQUIPMENT AND FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $220,740,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     147,510,000
Committee recommendation................................     152,010,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $152,010,000. The 
recommendation is $68,730,000 below the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $4,500,000 above the budget request.
    The major research equipment and facilities construction 
appropriation supports the acquisition, procurement, 
construction, and commissioning of unique national research 
platforms and facilities as well as major research equipment. 
Projects supported by this appropriation will push the 
boundaries of technology and offer significant expansion of 
opportunities, often in new directions, for the science and 
engineering community. Preliminary design and development 
activities, on-going operations, and maintenance costs of the 
facilities are provided through the research and related 
activities appropriation account.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding at the 
requested level for the following three ongoing projects: the 
Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory 
[AdvLIGO]; the Atacama Large Millimeter Array [ALMA]; and the 
IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
    Advanced Technology Solar Telescope [ATST].--The Committee 
recommendation provides a total of $9,500,000 for the ATST. The 
Committee having denied, without prejudice, the proposed 
statute change related to late-stage design work in the MREFC 
appropriation account, has provided $2,500,000 for ATST design 
work in the budget of Astronomical Sciences within the Research 
and Related Activities appropriation account. The Committee is, 
however, pleased to see the ATST's inclusion in NSF's request 
for this account and provides $7,000,000 for the project. The 
Committee is very interested in the success of the ATST project 
and expects regular updates on the progress of the project from 
NSF.
    Alaska Regional Research Vehicle [ARRV].--The Committee 
remains supportive of the ARRV project and has been assured 
that the construction of the AARV remains a top priority to NSF 
within the MREFC appropriation account. The Committee expects 
NSF to request the remaining funds necessary to complete 
construction of the AARV after the successful completion of a 
final design review for the vessel.
    Ocean Observatories Initiative [OOI].--The Committee 
remains supportive of the OOI project which will provide 
scientists with a unique opportunity to study multiple, 
interrelated processes over timescales ranging from seconds to 
decades. The Committee understands NSF decision for not 
requesting funding in fiscal year 2009 but expects NSF to seek 
funding for this valuable project once the project's cost is 
accurately determined at the Final Design Review.
    Proposed Statute Change.--The requested statute change for 
the MREFC appropriation account to include late-stage design 
work is denied at this time, without prejudice. As the NSF 
budget justification itself notes, ``The use of MREFC funding 
for design and other preconstruction activities is a principal 
focus of ongoing reviews of NSF's MREFC processes by NSF 
management and the NSB'' and it would be imprudent of the 
Committee to make such a change until those reviews are 
completed and presented to the Committee for consideration.

                     EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $725,600,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     790,410,000
Committee recommendation................................     790,410,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $790,410,000. The 
recommendation is $64,810,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and the same as the budget request.
    The education and human resources appropriation supports a 
comprehensive set of programs across all levels of education in 
science, technology, engineering and mathematics [STEM]. The 
appropriation supports activities that unite school districts 
with institutions of higher learning to improve precollege 
education. Other precollege activities include the development 
of the next generation of precollege STEM education leaders; 
instructional materials; and the STEM instructional workforce. 
Undergraduate activities support curriculum, laboratory, and 
instructional improvement; expand the STEM talent pool; attract 
STEM participants to teaching; augment advanced technological 
education at 2-year colleges; and develop dissemination tools. 
Graduate support is directed to research and teaching 
fellowships and traineeships and instructional workforce 
improvement by linking precollege systems with higher 
education. Programs also seek to broaden the participation of 
groups underrepresented in the STEM enterprise, build State and 
regional capacity to compete successfully for research funding, 
and promote informal science education. Ongoing evaluation 
efforts and research on learning strengthen the base for these 
programs.
    The Committee strongly encourages NSF to continue support 
for undergraduate science and engineering education. At a time 
when enrollment in STEM fields of study continues to decline, 
it is important that NSF use its position to support students 
working towards degrees in these areas.
    Creating a strong science and engineering workforce for the 
future is vital to maintaining the Nation's competitive edge. 
As the recent National Academies Report ``Above the Gathering 
Storm,'' and before that, the Hart-Rudman report on ``Road Map 
for National Security: Imperative for Change'' so 
illustratively point out--the future of U.S. competitiveness 
rests on our ability to train the next generation of scientists 
and engineers.
    Robert Noyce Fellowship Program.--Encourages talented 
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
undergraduates and professionals to become K-12 mathematics and 
science teachers through scholarships and stipends. The 
Committee recommendation provides a total of $55,000,000 for 
the Noyce program of which $45,000,000 shall be for activities 
authorized by section 10A of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n-1a).

                 AGENCY OPERATIONS AND AWARD MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $281,790,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     305,560,000
Committee recommendation................................     300,560,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $300,560,000. The 
recommendation is $18,770,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $4,500,000 below the budget request.
    The salaries and expenses appropriation provides funds for 
staff salaries, benefits, travel, training, rent, advisory and 
assistance services, communications and utilities expenses, 
supplies, equipment, and other operating expenses necessary for 
management of the National Science Foundation's [NSF] research 
and education activities.

                  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $3,969,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       4,030,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,030,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $4,030,000. The 
recommendation is $61,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The National Science Board is the governing body of the 
National Science Foundation. The Board is composed of 24 
members, appointed by the President and confirmed by the 
Senate. The Board is also charged with serving as an 
independent adviser to the President and Congress on policy 
matters related to science and engineering research and 
education.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $11,427,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      13,100,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,100,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $13,100,000. The 
recommendation is $1,673,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Office of Inspector General appropriation provides 
audit and investigation functions to identify and correct 
deficiencies that could create potential instances of fraud, 
waste, or mismanagement.
    The funds provided will allow the OIG to further its 
efforts in several priority areas that pose the greatest risk 
to the agency: financial management, acquisition, information 
technology, human capital, award administration, awardee 
financial accountability and compliance, and the management of 
agency programs and projects.

                                TITLE IV

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Commission on Civil Rights

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $8,460,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       8,800,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,800,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $8,800,000 for the 
salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights. The 
recommendation is $340,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and is the same as the budget request.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $329,300,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     341,925,000
Committee recommendation................................     341,925,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $341,925,000. The 
recommendation is $12,625,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and is the same as the budget request.
    The Committee remains concerned at rising of backlog 
charges of employment discrimination at the Equal Employment 
Opportunity Commission [EEOC]. The Committee is disturbed that 
this issue has not been addressed in a systematic or strategic 
manner. The Committee is concerned that there is a lack of 
leadership and will at the EEOC to adequately address this 
problem and it could affect the ability of EEOC to meets is 
mission and mandate to promote equal opportunity at the 
workplace.
    A recent GAO study conducted at the request of the 
Committee, found that not only is the EEOC's workload 
increasing but that the EEOC has not taken any actions to 
identify best practices for prioritizing and investigation 
charges. GAO found that over the past 4 years EEOC's private 
sector workload has increased by 10 percent and found that 
multiple factors contribute to the growing workload including 
growth of new charges and a decline in investigative staff. The 
GAO study concluded that if EEOC cannot keep pace with its 
growing private sector workload its mission and mandate to 
promote equal opportunity in the workplace could be 
compromised. The Committee directs the EEOC to report to the 
Committee on the steps the EEOC is taking to make sure its 
mission and mandate is not compromised.
    The Committee is also concerned with EEOC lagging in 
filling frontline staff including investigators. Many of these 
FTE positions have remained unfilled for over 1 year despite 
increased need and growing backlog. The Committee further 
directs EEOC to submit a plan within 60 days of enactment of 
this act to the Committee outlining what steps the EEOC is 
taking to filling those positions, reasons for the delay in 
filling these positions and how these delays can be prevented 
in the future.
    The GAO study also found that EEOC has not taken the 
necessary steps to fully address future workforce needs in 
their draft Strategic Workforce Plan. Specifically, EEOC's 
workforce planning has not been approached strategically or 
systematically. The EEOC has not based workforce planning on 
mission needs, customer expectations workload or current 
workforce. The study concluded that EEOC could better address 
its growing caseload if it made better use of strategic 
planning than it is currently doing.
    The Committee directs the EEOC to implement the GAO 
recommendations and report back to the Committee 60 days within 
enactment of this act on how the EEOC is implementing GAO 
recommendations.

                     International Trade Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $68,400,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      73,600,000
Committee recommendation................................      75,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $75,000,000. The 
recommendation is $6,600,000 above the fiscal year 2008 level 
and $1,400,000 above the budget request.
    The ITC is an independent, quasi-judicial agency 
responsible for conducting trade-related investigations, 
providing Congress and the President with independent technical 
advice relating to United States international trade policy. 
The increased funding will allow the Commission to address 
pressing hiring needs in the area of intellectual property 
caseload.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               PAYMENT TO THE LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2008....................................    $350,490,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................     311,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     390,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $390,000,000. The 
recommendation is $39,510,000 above the fiscal year 2008 
enacted level and $79,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation provides $369,000,000 for 
basic field programs, to be used for competitively awarded 
grants and contracts, $13,000,000 for management and 
administration, $3,800,000 for client self-help and information 
technology, $3,200,000 for the Office of the Inspector General 
and $1,000,000 is for loan repayment assistance.
    The Committee notes that the recent national foreclosure 
crisis has significantly impacted the Legal Services 
Corporation [LSC] ability to serve its client base. LSC has 
seen a dramatic increase in the number of individuals seeking 
assistance with housing and predatory lending matters. In 2007 
alone, LSC turned away 250,000 housing cases because they did 
not have the resources they needed to address this increased 
need. The Committee also recognizes that substantive legal 
tools are part of the best defense against the threat of 
mounting foreclosures.
    Therefore, within the available funds provided to the Legal 
Services Corporation $30,000,000 shall be directed to provide 
legal assistance related to home ownership preservation, home 
foreclosure prevention, and tenancy associated with home 
foreclosure. The Committee also directs that LSC shall give 
priority in awarding grants to eligible entities and 
individuals that provide legal assistance in the 100 
metropolitan statistical areas (as defined by the Director of 
the Office of Management and Budget) with the highest 
foreclosure rates.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommendation continues the administrative 
provisions contained in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations act 
(Public Law 105-119) regarding operation of this program to 
provide basic legal services to disadvantaged individuals and 
the restrictions on the use of Legal Services Corporation [LSC] 
funds.
    Grantees must agree not to engage in litigation and related 
activities with respect to a variety of matters including: (1) 
redistricting; (2) class action suits; (3) representation of 
illegal aliens; (4) political activities; (5) collection of 
attorney fees; (6) abortion; (7) prisoner litigation; (8) 
welfare reform; (9) representation of charged drug dealers 
during eviction proceedings; and (10) solicitation of clients. 
The exception to the restrictions occurs in a case where there 
is imminent threat of physical harm to the client or 
prospective client remains in place.
    The manner in which the LSC grantees are audited through 
contracts with certified public accountants for financial and 
compliance audits are continued, along with the provisions on 
recompetition and debarment.
    The Committee recognizes that the Legal Service Corporation 
[LSC] current percentage locality pay represents reasonable 
compensation for LSC officers and employees. The Committee 
expects that any locality pay will continue to be paid at that 
percentage.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $2,820,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................       2,400,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,400,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $2,400,000. The 
recommendation is $420,000 below the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level and the same as the budget request.
    The Marine Mammal Commission and its Committee of 
Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals provide oversight and 
recommend actions on domestic and international topics to 
advance policies and provisions of the Marine Mammal Protection 
Act. The Commission provides precise, up-to-date scientific 
information to Congress on issues related to the safety of 
marine mammals.

            Office of the United States Trade Representative


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................     $44,120,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................      46,272,000
Committee recommendation................................      46,272,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $46,272,000 for the 
Office of the United States Trade Representative [USTR]. The 
recommendation is $2,152,000 above the fiscal year 2008 level 
and the same as the budget request.
    The USTR is responsible for developing and leading 
international negotiations for the United States on policies 
regarding international trade, direct investment, and 
commodities. Its areas of responsibility include all matters 
relating to the World Trade Organization, trade, commodity, and 
direct investment matters dealt with by certain international 
institutions; industrial, agricultural and services trade 
policy; and trade-related protection of intellectual property 
and the environment.
    The Committee directs the Office of the U.S. Trade 
Representative to report to the Committee on the status of U.S. 
equipment industry access to the European Community's [EC] 
Galileo program and European markets for related goods and 
services no later than April 1, 2009 in order to assess EC 
compliance with the 2004 United States-EU Agreement on GPS-
Galileo Cooperation.
    World Trade Organization.--The Committee is aware of the 
World Trade Organization [WTO] Appellate Body's January 16, 
2003, ruling regarding the Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset 
Act (Public Law 106-387). The Committee directs USTR, in 
consultation with the Department of Commerce, to continue to 
negotiate within the WTO to seek express recognition of the 
existing right of WTO members to distribute monies collected 
from antidumping and countervailing duties. The agency shall 
consult with and provide regular reports to the Senate 
Committee on Appropriations on this matter every 60 days upon 
enactment of this act.
    In addition, the Committee directs that negotiations be 
conducted within the WTO consistent with the negotiating 
objectives contained in the Trade Act of 2002, Public Law 107-
210, to maintain strong U.S. trade remedies laws, prevent 
overreaching by WTO Panels and the WTO Appellate Body, and 
prevent the creation of obligations never negotiated or agreed 
to by the United States.

                        State Justice Institute


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2008....................................      $3,760,000
Budget estimate, 2009...................................................
Committee recommendation................................       5,000,000

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,000,000. The 
recommendation is $1,240,000 above the fiscal year 2008 enacted 
level. The budget request did not include funding for this 
account.
    The Institute was created in 1984 to further the 
development and adoption of improved judicial administration in 
State courts.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments, agencies and commissions funded in the 
accompanying bill. All of these provisions have been included 
in previous acts.
    Section 501 prohibits the use of appropriations for certain 
publicity and propaganda purposes.
    Section 502 prohibits any appropriations contained in this 
act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly provided.
    Section 503 limits funds for certain consulting purposes.
    Section 504 provides that should any provision of the act 
be held to be invalid, the remainder of the act would not be 
affected.
    Section 505 stipulates the policy by which funding 
available to the agencies funded under this act may be 
reprogrammed for other purposes.
    Section 506 prohibits funds in the bill from being used to 
implement, administer, or enforce any guidelines of the Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission [EEOC] similar to proposed 
guidelines covering harassment based on religion published by 
the EEOC in October 1993.
    Section 507 provides for a penalty for persons found to 
have falsely mislabeled products.
    Section 508 requires agencies to provide quarterly reports 
to the Appropriations Committees regarding unobligated 
balances.
    Section 509 requires agencies and departments funded in 
this act to absorb any necessary costs related to downsizing or 
consolidation within the amounts provided to the agency or 
department.
    Section 510 limits funds for the sale or export of tobacco 
or tobacco products.
    Section 511 prohibits user fees for background checks 
conducted pursuant to the Brady Handgun Control Act of 1993, 
and prohibits implementation of a background check system which 
does not require or result in destruction of certain 
information.
    Section 512 stipulates obligation of receipts available 
under the Crime Victims Fund.
    Section 513 prohibits the use of Department of Justice 
funds for programs that discriminate against, denigrate, or 
otherwise undermine the religious beliefs of students 
participating in such programs.
    Section 514 limits transfers of funds between agencies.
    Section 515 provides that funding for E-government 
initiatives are subject to reprogramming guidelines established 
by this act.
    Section 516 specifies requirements for certain firearms 
tracing studies.
    Section 517 requires the Inspectors General of the 
Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, the National Science Foundation, and 
the Legal Services Corporation to conduct reviews of activities 
funded in this act; prohibits the use of funds for certain 
banquets and conferences; and requires certifications regarding 
conflicts of interest.
    Section 518 prohibits funds to issue certain patents.
    Section 519 prohibits the use of funds to support or 
justify the use of torture.
    Section 520 limits funds pertaining to certain activities 
related to the export of firearms.
    Section 521 limits funds to process permits to import 
certain products.
    Section 522 prohibiting funds to include certain language 
in new trade agreements.
    Section 523 prohibits funds to authorize a national 
security letter in contravention of the statutes authorizing 
the FBI to issue national security letters.
    Section 524 requires notification to the Committees in the 
event of cost overruns.
    Section 525 limits reprogrammings and transfers after June 
30 to extraordinary circumstances.
    Section 526 authorizes funds appropriated for intelligence 
activities for the Department of Justice during fiscal year 
2009 until the enactment of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2009.
    Section 527 directs that the Departments, agencies, and 
commissions funded under this act, shall establish and maintain 
on the homepages of their Internet websites a link to their 
Offices of Inspectors General and a method by which individuals 
may anonymously report cases of waste, fraud, or abuse.
    Section 528 prohibits funds to enter into a contract in an 
amount greater than $5,000,000 or to award a grant in excess of 
such amount unless the prospective contractor or grantee has 
filed certain Federal tax returns.
    Section 529 prohibits the use of funds in a manner that is 
inconsistent with the principal negotiating objective of the 
United States with respect to trade remedy laws.
    Section 530 prohibits the use of funds to purchase first 
class or premium airline travel in contravention of current 
regulations.
    Section 531 prohibits the use of funds to send or otherwise 
pay for the attendance of more than 50 employees from a Federal 
department or agency at any single conference occurring outside 
the United States.

                             (RESCISSIONS)

    Section 532 specifies rescissions of prior appropriations.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
items of appropriation not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    The Committee recommends funding for the following programs 
or activities that currently lack an authorization for fiscal 
year 2009, either in whole or in part, and therefore fall under 
this rule:
Department of Commerce:
    Economic Development Administration
    International Trade Administration
    Bureau of Industry and Security
    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    National Telecommunications and Information Administration
Department of Justice:
    General Legal Activities
        Vaccine Injury Compensation
    Office of Justice Programs
        Justice Assistance Programs
        National Institute of Justice
        Bureau of Justice Statistics
        Regional Information Sharing System
        Crime Victims Fund Management and Administration
        Juvenile Justice Programs
    Juvenile Justice Programs
        Part A--Coordination of Federal Efforts--Management
        Part B--State Formula--Delinquency Prevention
        Part E--Challenge Grants--Demonstration Projects
        Youth Mentoring Program
        Tribal Youth
        Gang Prevention
        Victims of Child Abuse Programs
    Community Oriented Policing Services
        COPS Hiring Program
        Tribal Law Enforcement
        COPS Law Enforcement Technology and Interoperability
        Criminal Records Upgrade
        DNA Backlog Reduction/Crime Labs
        Training and Technical Assistance
    State and Local Law Enforcement
        Byrne Public Safety and Protection Program
        Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program [JAG]
        State and Local Antiterrorism Training [SLATT]
    Discretionary Grants
    Prescription Drug Monitoring
    Indian Programs
        Tribal Courts
        Alcohol and Substance Abuse
        Indian Prison Grants
    Drug Courts
Science:
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Related Agencies:
    Commission on Civil Rights
    International Trade Commission
    Payment to the Legal Services Corporation
    Marine Mammal Commission
    Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 19, 2008, 
the Committee ordered reported an original bill (S. 3182) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and 
Justice, and Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2009, subject to amendment and subject to 
the budget allocations, and authorized the chairman of the 
committee or the chairman of the subcommittee to offer the text 
of the Senate-reported bill as a committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute to the House companion measure, by a 
recorded vote of 29-0, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Ms. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Lautenberg
Mr. Nelson
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Stevens
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Craig
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. Brownback
Mr. Allard
Mr. Alexander

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of the rule XXVI requires that Committee 
reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the Committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by this bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

TITLE 16--CONSERVATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



CHAPTER 56A--PACIFIC SALMON FISHING

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 3645. Northern Boundary and Transboundary Rivers Restoration and 
                    Enhancement Fund and Southern Boundary Restoration 
                    and Enhancement fund

(a) Northern Fund and Southern Fund

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(d) Authorization of appropriations

    (1) Pacific Salmon Treaty

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (2) Pacific coastal salmon recovery

            (A) For salmon habitat restoration, salmon stock 
        enhancement, and salmon research, including the 
        construction of salmon research and related facilities, 
        there is authorized to be appropriated for each of 
        fiscal years[1] 2005, $90,000,000 to the States of 
        Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, and 
        California. Amounts appropriated pursuant to this 
        subparagraph shall be made available as direct 
        payments. The State of Alaska may allocate a portion of 
        any funds it receives under this subsection to eligible 
        activities outside Alaska.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE 42--THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



CHAPTER 46--JUSTICE SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SUBCHAPTER XII-M--MATCHING GRANT PROGRAM FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ARMOR

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 3796ll. Program authorized

(a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(f) Matching funds

    (1) In general

            The portion of the costs of a program provided by a 
        grant under subsection (a) of this section--
                    (A) may not exceed 50 percent; and
                    (B) shall equal 50 percent, if--
                            (i) such grant is to a unit of 
                        local government with fewer than 
                        100,000 residents;
                            (ii) the Director of the Bureau of 
                        Justice Assistance determines that the 
                        quantity of vests to be purchased with 
                        such grant is reasonable; and
                            (iii) such portion does not cause 
                        such grant to violate the requirements 
                        of subsection (e) of this section.

    (2) Indian assistance

            Any funds appropriated by Congress for the 
        activities of any agency of an Indian tribal government 
        or the Bureau of Indian Affairs performing law 
        enforcement functions on any Indian lands may be used 
        to provide the non-Federal share of a matching 
        requirement funded under this subsection.
            (3) Waiver.--The Director may waive in whole or in 
        part, the requirement of paragraph (1) in the case of 
        fiscal hardship, as determined by the Director.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CHAPTER 112--VICTIM COMPENSATION AND ASSISTANCE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 10603. Crime victim assistance

(a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(c) * * *
    (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (3) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (E) use funds made available to the Director under 
        this subsection--
                    (i) for fellowships and clinical 
                internships and for grants under subparagraphs 
                (1)(A) and (B), pursuant to rules or guidelines 
                that generally establish a publicly-announced, 
                competitive process; and
                    (ii) to carry out programs of training and 
                special workshops for the presentation and 
                dissemination of information resulting from 
                demonstrations, surveys, and special projects.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount of    Committee    Amount of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of budget totals for 2009:
 Subcommittee on Commerce and Justice, Science, and Related
 Agencies:
    Mandatory...............................................          221          221          224       \1\224
    Discretionary...........................................       57,900       57,900           NA    \1\57,235
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2009....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........    \2\37,256
    2010....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........       15,095
    2011....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        4,532
    2012....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        2,149
    2013 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,010
Financial assistance to State and local governments for                NA        1,190           NA          -70
 2009.......................................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.

         DISCLOSURE OF CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING ITEMS

    The Constitution vests in the Congress the power of the 
purse. The Committee believes strongly that Congress should 
make the decisions on how to allocate the people's money.
    As defined in Rule XLIV of the Standing Rules of the 
Senate, the term ``congressional directed spending item'' means 
a provision or report language included primarily at the 
request of a Senator, providing, authorizing, or recommending a 
specific amount of discretionary budget authority, credit 
authority, or other spending authority for a contract, loan, 
loan guarantee, grant, loan authority, or other expenditure 
with or to an entity, or targeted to a specific State, locality 
or congressional district, other than through a statutory or 
administrative, formula-driven, or competitive award process.
    For each item, a Member is required to provide a 
certification that neither the Member nor the Senator's 
immediate family has a pecuniary interest in such 
congressionally directed spending item. Such certifications are 
available to the public on the website of the Senate Committee 
on Appropriations (www.appropriations.senate.gov/senators.cfm).
    Following is a list of congressionally directed spending 
items included in the Senate recommendation discussed in this 
report, along with the name of each Senator who submitted a 
request to the Committee of jurisdiction for each item so 
identified. Neither the Committee recommendation nor this 
report contains any limited tax benefits or limited tariff 
benefits as defined in rule XLIV.

                                                                                            EARMARKS
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             Account                                                               Project                                                       Funding                    Member
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
DOC--ITA........................  Auburn University, Auburn, AL, for novel polymeric material research at Auburn University...............        $1,000,000  Shelby
DOC--ITA........................  State of Vermont Department of Commerce and Community Development, Montpelier, VT, to assist small                 400,000  Leahy
                                   businesses to participate in trade missions.
DOC--NIST.......................  Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for construction for a research and technology park.......         6,500,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOC--NIST.......................  The University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, for developing a biotechnology research park.         6,500,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOC--NIST.......................  The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, to create, develop, and commercialize new               1,000,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   technology for advanced materials.
DOC--NIST.......................  University at Albany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Albany, NY, for a nanoscale                   1,000,000  Schumer
                                   fabrication and measurement project.
DOC--NIST.......................  University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, for an interdisciplinary science and engineering teaching and            30,000,000  Shelby
                                   research corri-  dor.
DOC--NIST.......................  University of Maryland, Baltimore County and College Park, College Park, MD, for ultrafast dynamics for          2,000,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                   next generation nanotechnology research and development.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Acadia Partners for Science and Learning, Winter Harbor, ME, for natural science research and education.           500,000  Snowe, Collins
DOC--NOAA.......................  Alaska Sea Grant, Fairbanks, AK, for research on stock enhancement for rehabilitation of depleted king           1,000,000  Stevens
                                   crab stocks in Alaska.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward, AK, for pinniped research, marine mammal rescue, and Resurrection Bay             3,750,000  Stevens
                                   salmon enhancement.
DOC--NOAA.......................  American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, for a partnership to advance environmental literacy              250,000  Schumer
                                   through public education and research.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Auburn University, Auburn, AL, for research.............................................................         1,500,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  Baldwin County Commission, Bay Minette, AL, to fund a flood evaluation study............................           700,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  Bering Sea Fishermen's Assoc., Anchorage, AK, for salmon research and restoration projects in Western              190,000  Stevens
                                   Alaska and interior river systems and ongoing marine productivity research.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, to monitor cyanobacteria blooms in the Great Lakes...           250,000  Voinovich, Brown
DOC--NOAA.......................  City of Dauphin Island, Dauphin Island, AL, for shoreline restoration...................................           750,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  City of Mobile, AL, Mobile, AL, for NOAA museum exhibits................................................           500,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  City of Mobile, Mobile, AL, for public education........................................................           500,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  City of Orange Beach, Orange Beach, AL, for study of Perdido Pass Inlet.................................           250,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  City of Port Aransas, Port Aransas, TX, to preserve endangered wetlands and help stop severe erosion in            300,000  Hutchison
                                   Port Aransas and along the Corpus Christi Ship Channel.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Mobile, AL, for fish management.................................................         1,250,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, Leon County, FL, to collect accurate, reliable data on red snapper         1,000,000  Bill Nelson
                                   catch, bycatch and mortality.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Great Bay Resource Protection Partnership, Portsmouth, NH, for continued protection and acquisition of           3,000,000  Gregg, Sununu
                                   critical habitats and lands around Great Bay.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Gulf of Alaska Coastal Communities Coalition, Anchorage, AK, for the organization to serve as an                   150,000  Stevens
                                   advocate for small boat community-based fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Gulf of Maine Lobster Foundation, Kennebunk, ME, to provide economic relef to Maine lobstermen..........           100,000  Snowe, Collins
DOC--NOAA.......................  Hawaii Coral Reef Initiative, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to support monitoring and research               700,000  Inouye
                                   activities on Hawaii coral reefs.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Kaneohe, HI, for research in the Hawaiian              2,000,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                   Archipelago to guide ecosystem based management.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Henderson County Fiscal Court, Henderson County, KY, to purchase severe weather warning sirens in                  110,000  McConnell, Bunning
                                   populated areas of Henderson County, where no systems currently exist.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Hubbs-Sea World Research Institute, Orange County, FL, to maintain the diminished domestic fish stock...           200,000  Bill Nelson, Martinez
DOC--NOAA.......................  Institute for Marine Mammal Studies, Gulfport, MS, to complete construction of a facility dedicated to           1,500,000  Cochran
                                   rehabilitating, conservation, and education on marine mammals with a focus on dolphins.
DOC--NOAA.......................  International Pacific Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to conduct systematic and             1,750,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                   reliable climatographic research of the Pacific region.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Iowa State University, Ames, IA, for a research initiative to improve understanding of surface winds and           850,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                   their damaging effects.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, to establish dispersion forecasting modeling for the Gulf Coast           1,500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   Region.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to conduct              1,250,000  Inouye
                                   research on open ocean fisheries in the Pacific Ocean.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Lakes Region Planning Commission, Meredith, NH, to continue efforts to develop a comprehensive watershed           100,000  Gregg
                                   management plan for Lake Winnipesaukee.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Louisiana State University A&M;, Baton Rouge, LA, to provide more information for a geodetic reference              700,000  Landrieu
                                   system to aid land planning in Louisiana.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Maine Department of Marine Resources, Augusta, ME, for the Maine groundfish industry in the form of                300,000  Snowe, Collins
                                   Emergency Economic Assistance.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Institute, New Bedford, MA, for continued research into the New England           1,000,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                   scallop fishery, to promote sustainability.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Mississippi Center for Conservation and Biodiversity, Jackson, MS, for construction of a research                1,600,000  Cochran
                                   facility.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, to more effectively link local, State, regional, and               4,500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   national organizations concerned with Northern Gulf wetlands issues and management.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Mississippi University for Women, Columbus, MS, provide quality scientific, inquiry-based learning for             375,000  Cochran
                                   grades K-12 in-service and pre-service teachers.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Anchorage, AK, to enhance research on ice seal populations...           950,000  Stevens
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, for the sustainable use of Pacific pelagic              1,500,000  Inouye
                                   fishery resources and the production of healthy, safe domestic seafood.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, for the NOAA Pacific Services Center to meet            4,500,000  Inouye
                                   the coastal management needs of Pacific Island communities.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, for the deployment of two oceanographic buoys             500,000  Inouye
                                   to monitor ocean currents near Ordnance Reef.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, for the conservation and recovery of endangered         7,100,000  Inouye
                                   Hawaiian sea turtle populations.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, for the conservation and recovery of the                2,600,000  Inouye, Akaka
                                   critically endangered monk seal population and conservation of Pacific cetaceans.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, to create and implement an integrated system-           1,500,000  Inouye
                                   wide ocean science education program piloted in Hawaii's schools.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, HI, to help the Integrated Data and Environmental           2,500,000  Inouye
                                   Applications Center meet critical regional needs for ocean, climate, and ecosystem information.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Ocean Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD, to develop a program to map the seafloor           1,500,000  Feinstein, Boxer
                                   of California's coastal waters, inland bays and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta.
DOC--NOAA.......................  National Weather Service, Silver Spring, MD, for a Doppler radar station in Washington State............         2,000,000  Murray, Cantwell
DOC--NOAA.......................  New England Aquarium, Boston, MA, for research of environmentally sensitive gear technologies designed           1,250,000  Kennedy, Kerry, Sununu
                                   to reduce bycatch.
DOC--NOAA.......................  New Hampshire Lakes Association, Concord, NH, to prevent the spread of exotic aquatic weeds, such as               100,000  Gregg
                                   milfoil and others, in NH lakes.
DOC--NOAA.......................  NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office, Annapolis, MD, for a network of environmental observation platforms.........           500,000  Mikulski, Cardin, Warner
DOC--NOAA.......................  NOAA National Weather Service Pacific Region Headquarters, Honolulu County, HI, to purchase, install,              360,000  Akaka
                                   and maintain rain gages.
DOC--NOAA.......................  NOAA, Huntsville, AL, for NOAA UAS research with the Army...............................................         1,000,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  Oceanic Institute, Waimanalo, HI, for research to make marine finfish culture technologies economically            750,000  Inouye
                                   viable for commercial operation.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Oregon State University (in collaboration with University of California-Davis, Humboldt State                      250,000  Smith, Wyden
                                   University, Klamath River tribal agencies and the USFWS), Corvallis, OR, to reduce disease in salmon on
                                   the Klamath River.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Partnership for Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Science, Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ, to address the most urgent               1,000,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   scientific problems limiting successful management of summer flounder in the Mid-Atlantic region.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Plymouth State University, Plymouth, NH, for continued weather technology and observation at Plymouth              200,000  Gregg
                                   State University.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Regional Climate Centers, Reno, NV; Chapel Hill, NC; Baton Rouge, LA; Ithaca, NY; Champaign, IL;                 3,000,000  Reid, Ben Nelson, Schumer, Ensign
                                   Lincoln, NE; Funding for climate research at nationwide sites.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Rhode Island Coastal Resource Management Council, Wakefield, RI, for the development of a comprehensive          1,000,000  Reed
                                   habitat restoration and protection plan for Narragansett Bay and nearby water bodies.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Save the Bay, Providence, RI, for a middle-school youth program to study, cleanup, and preserve                  1,000,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                   Narragansett Bay.
DOC--NOAA.......................  School for Marine Science and Technology, New Bedford, MA, for continued research and development of new         3,000,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                   methods to protect, preserve, and improve the health of multi-species fisheries in New England.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Sea Otter & Steller Sea Lion Commission, Anchorage, AK, to support an ongoing research program with                210,000  Stevens
                                   local communities for sea lion conservation and management.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, Concord, NH, to continue a program to proactively             100,000  Gregg, Sununu
                                   conserve undeveloped river frontage and upland watershed.
DOC--NOAA.......................  State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, to support private industry participation in two international fishery                150,000  Stevens
                                   advisory groups.
DOC--NOAA.......................  State of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, LA, to conduct priority research and provide science support for the              250,000  Vitter
                                   restoration of the Pontchartrain Basin through the Pontchartrain Restoration Act (PRA) of 2000, the
                                   Coast Wetland Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) of 1990, and the Federal/State Coast
                                   2050 Initiative.
DOC--NOAA.......................  States of Maryland and Virginia, to aid watermen in the Chesapeake Bay with new work opportunities,             20,000,000  Mikulski, Warner, Cardin, Webb
                                   including but not limited to aquaculture, restoration and research.
DOC--NOAA.......................  States of Maryland and Virginia, to restore oyster habitat and plant disease free oysters in                     4,600,000  Mikulski, Warner, Cardin, Webb
                                   scientifically selected sites throughout the Chesapeake Bay.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Susquehanna River Basin Commission, Harrisburg, PA, for operations and maintenance of a flood forecast           2,000,000  Mikulski
                                   and warning system.
DOC--NOAA.......................  The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, for nanotoxicology research....................           700,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, to build decision support tools related to                500,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   flooding and/or storm surge that provide a 3D visualization for emergency management officials to plan,
                                   train, and coordinate relief efforts.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Thunder Bay Marine Sanctuary, Alpena, MI, for exhibits and telepresence technology......................           500,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOC--NOAA.......................  Thunder Bay Marine Sanctuary, Alpena, MI, for the lease for the Great Lakes Maritime Heritage Center....         1,000,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Alabama at Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, for cooperative institute..........................         1,000,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Alabama at Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, for weather research in the Gulf of Mexico.........         1,000,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, for weather research in the Gulf of Mexico.......................         5,500,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, for advanced submarine surveys to establish new U.S. claims for               500,000  Stevens
                                   seabed resources.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, for research on coastal vulnerability to climate change............           940,000  Stevens
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Delaware, Dover, DE, for a real-time satellite receiving station..........................           750,000  Biden, Carper
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Cambridge, MD, to rebuild the Horn Point                2,000,000  Mikulski
                                   laboratory.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL, to improve and expedite hurricane forecasts through rapid              250,000  Bill Nelson, Martinez
                                   transition of results to NOAA operations.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, for a research project on the public safety applications of               1,500,000  Cochran, Inouye, Wicker
                                   infrasound.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, for training, education and research.............................           850,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOC--NOAA.......................  Sea Grant Law Center, Oxford, MS, to integrate biotechnology and undersea technology development with              750,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   cutting edge research for the advancement of marine science.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, to integrate biotechnology and undersea technology development            5,000,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   with cutting edge research for the advancement of marine science and discovering new products from the
                                   sea.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, for continued weather and air quality research.................           300,000  Gregg
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of North Alabama, Florence, AL, for geospatial analysis......................................           500,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, for assessing the water quality, ecology, fish, and fisheries          1,000,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                   of Narragansett Bay.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, for equipment for the Pell Library and Undersea Exploration            1,200,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                   Center.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for hurricane monitoring in the Gulf of Mexico.................           750,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for oyster rehabilitation......................................         1,000,000  Shelby
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Tennessee Space Institute--Atmospheric Science Research, Tullahoma, TN, for airborne                 200,000  Alexander
                                   science research to enhance understanding of global warming, pollution, and climate change.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, for researching, targeting, understanding and mitigating invasive           250,000  Leahy
                                   species, toxic blue algae and new contaminants of concern.
DOC--NOAA.......................  University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, for research on water quality, ecosystem health and the transport           350,000  Leahy
                                   of pollu-  tants.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Von Braun Center for Science & Innovation--Not for Profit, Huntsville, AL, for research Gulf Coast               1,000,000  Shelby
                                   research.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA, for citizen-driven environmental protection........         1,600,000  Murray, Cantwell
DOC--NOAA.......................  Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY, to complete the development of a monitoring system that            700,000  McConnell
                                   will collect real-time weather observations through a statewide grid of stations in Kentucky.
DOC--NOAA.......................  Yukon River Drainage Fisheries, Anchorage, AK, to continue monitoring, research, and educational efforts           380,000  Stevens
                                   for subsistence and commercial fisheries along the Yukon River.
DOJ--Byrne......................  A Child Is Missing, Fort Lauderdale, FL, for law enforcement assistance for missing and abducted                   100,000  Crapo
                                   children in Kan-  sas.
DOJ--Byrne......................  A Child is Missing, Fort Lauderdale, FL, to support A Child is Missing efforts in South Dakota..........           100,000  Thune
DOJ--Byrne......................  A Child is Missing, Fort Lauderdale, FL, to upgrade telephony technology and satellited mapping systems            100,000  Roberts
                                   to assist in locating missing children in Idaho.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Advanced Science and Technology Adjudication Resource Center, Washington, DC, to train judges in                   500,000  Mikulski
                                   forensic science and other technically complex areas of the law.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Alabama Center for Law and Civic Education, Birmingham, AL, to continue a community oriented,                      400,000  Shelby
                                   interdisciplinary team to design, implement and test solutions to the most pressing problems of
                                   violence effecting families.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences, Montgomery, AL, for forensics research and operations..........         1,000,000  Shelby
DOJ--Byrne......................  Alabama Department of Public Safety, Montgomery, AL, for law enforcement purposes.......................           500,000  Shelby
DOJ--Byrne......................  Alaska Native Justice Center, Anchorage, AK, for funding to provide attorney referrals, information and            900,000  Stevens
                                   resources to support Natives involved in legal issues.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Allegheny County, Allegheny County, PA, for security cameras and a threat viewer emergency management              750,000  Specter
                                   visualization system.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Alaska, Anchorage, AK, funds for a statewide at-risk youth mentoring program           750,000  Stevens
                                   involving faith based organization, schools, and non-profit entities.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Boys Town, Las Vegas, NV, for expansion of services in Las Vegas to assist at-risk girls and boys.......           200,000  Reid, Ensign
DOJ--Byrne......................  Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, CriMNet Program (MN Department of Public Safety), St. Paul, MN, for the           200,000  Coleman, Klobuchar
                                   statewide rollout of two major criminal justice information integration services.
DOJ--Byrne......................  CARITAS, Inc., Pawtucket, RI, for comprehensive case management services for adolescents receiving                 200,000  Reed
                                   substance abuse treatment.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Central Mountain Training Foundation, Canon City, CO, for interoperable communications equipment                   300,000  Salazar
                                   procurement and training.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court                      750,000  Johnson
                                   operations, prosecutors, the public defender's office, and detention programs.
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Albuquerque Police Department, Albuquerque, NM, for a family advocacy center supporting forensic           200,000  Bingaman
                                   training and a crisis support team.
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Allentown, Allentown, PA, for an anti-youth gang initiative in Allentown........................           200,000  Casey
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Baltimore Police Department, Baltimore, MD, to reduce illegal gun trafficking and gun violence..         1,100,000  Mikulski, Cardin
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, for gang prevention and intervention training, project marketing, and            250,000  Dole
                                   outreach to hotspots.
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Fernley, Nevada, Fernley, NV, for law enforcement equipment.....................................           300,000  Reid, Ensign
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL, to decrease crime and murders in Jacksonville...................           500,000  Martinez
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, for copper wire theft prevention efforts..............................           400,000  Reid
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Luverne, Luverne, AL, for police equipment......................................................           150,000  Shelby
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of New Haven, New Haven, CT, to develop a prisoner reentry initiative in collaboration with local             300,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                   law enforcement and homeless, behavioral, physical health, and family service providers.
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Oakland, Oakland, CA, to recruit and hire additional police officers from within the Oakland               300,000  Boxer
                                   community.
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Richmond, Richmond, VA, to upgrade security at the Courts Building..............................           400,000  Warner, Webb
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Saginaw Police Department, Saginaw, MI, to acquire a gunshot locating system....................           200,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Salem Police Department, Salem, OR, to create an automated citation system......................            75,000  Smith, Wyden
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of San Jose, San Jose, CA, to assess the city's gang intervention and preventions programs.........           250,000  Feinstein
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of San Bernardino, San Bernardino, CA, for a school-based partnership to provide gang resistance              500,000  Boxer
                                   education and training.
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of St. Paul, St. Paul, MN, to replace the warning siren system that is used to warn the public                250,000  Coleman, Klobuchar
                                   about tornadoes, terrorism, and hazardous material emergencies..
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Stockton, Stockton, CA, to support the positions of six youth gang outreach workers.............           200,000  Boxer
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Trenton Police Department, Trenton, NJ, for a gunshot locating system...........................           200,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of Vancouver, Vancouver, WA, for a new records management system...................................           500,000  Murray, Cantwell
DOJ--Byrne......................  City of York, York, PA, for a crime response and coordination project...................................           300,000  Casey
DOJ--Byrne......................  Clark County Sheriff's Department, Clark County, KY, to purchase equipment, including portable radios...            90,000  McConnell
DOJ--Byrne......................  Clark County, Las Vegas, NV, to operate a therapeutic foster care facility..............................           500,000  Reid
DOJ--Byrne......................  Clearfield City, Clearfield City, UT, for technology to combat gang activity............................           200,000  Bennett, Hatch
DOJ--Byrne......................  Community Renewal International, Shreveport, LA, to use a CRI Model for neighborhood terrorism and                 100,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                   disaster preparedness.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Coos County Sheriff's Office, Coquille, OR, for personnel and operational costs.........................           100,000  Wyden
DOJ--Byrne......................  Criminal Information Sharing Alliance, Folsom, CA, for a law enforcement information sharing network in            400,000  Hutchison
                                   Texas.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Criminal Justice Institute, University of Arkansas System, Little Rock, AR, for a national training              1,000,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   center for rural law enforcement executives.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Dauphin County, Harrisburg, PA, for family group and at-risk youth counseling...........................           250,000  Specter
DOJ--Byrne......................  Daviess County Sheriff's Department, Daviess County, KY, to purchase mobile data terminals and other               180,000  McConnell
                                   communication equipment.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Dona Ana County, Las Cruces, NM, to implement a jail diversion program..................................           180,000  Bingaman
DOJ--Byrne......................  Downriver Community Conference, Southgate, MI, for equipment upgrades to improve public safety                     500,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                   interoperability among member communities.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Eastern Shore of Maryland Educational Consortium, Centreville, MD, to maintain and expand the Eastern              250,000  Cardin
                                   Shore dropout prevention programs.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Essex County Prosecutor's Office, Newark, NJ, to expand the program to more witnesses and victims.......           150,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
DOJ--Byrne......................  Forrest County Court Team for Maltreated Infants and Toddlers, Forrest Co., MS, to address the critical            150,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   needs of maltreated infants and toddlers through the specialized Forrest County Court Team for
                                   Maltreated Infants and Toddlers.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Fort Belknap Indian Community, Fort Belknap, MT, for additional staff, updated electronic data systems,            300,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   equipment and training to ensure quality judicial services in the tribal court.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Genesee County, Genesee County, MI, for assistance for those transitioning from prison..................           100,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Byrne......................  Grambling State University, Grambling, LA, for a workforce education and reentry program for the                   200,000  Landrieu
                                   formerly incarcerated.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Grant Sawyer Center, University of Reno, NV, for Grant Sawyer Center at University of Nevada, Reno, for            200,000  Reid
                                   judicial education.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Haymarket Center, Chicago, IL, for a workforce development program for those with past criminal justice            250,000  Durbin
                                   involvement, substance abuse, and economic and employment instability.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Heartland Family Service, Council Bluffs, IA, for family based treatment of drug-addicted mothers.......           600,000  Harkin, Grassley
DOJ--Byrne......................  Hennepin County, Hennepin County, MN, to facilitate the sharing of juvenile records between criminal               250,000  Coleman, Klobuchar
                                   justice agen-  cies.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Illinois Sheriff's Association, Springfield, IL, for law enforcement and clean-up of meth production and           250,000  Durbin
                                   abuse.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, Indianapolis, IN, to enhance public safety and increase               150,000  Lugar
                                   patrol time on the street.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Inner Harbour for Children and Families, Douglasville, GA, to advance neurofeedback treatment to help              100,000  Isakson, Chambliss
                                   troubled youths overcome deficits, avoid trouble, and become highly functioning members of society.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Iowa Department of Public Health, Des Moines, IA, to provide methamphetamine abuse treatment for inmates           850,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                   in Polk, Scott, and Story counties.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Iowa Legal Aid, Des Moines, IA, for continued collaboration between the medical and legal communities in           300,000  Harkin
                                   servicing low-income Iowans.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Jackson Medical Mall, Jackson, MS, for prevention programs for at-risk youth............................           400,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOJ--Byrne......................  Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, for emergency responder software development.....................         1,000,000  Cochran
DOJ--Byrne......................  Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Birmingham, AL, for law enforcement record integration...............           200,000  Shelby
DOJ--Byrne......................  John A. Logan College, Carterville, IL, to expand a pilot program that electronically tracks purchases             100,000  Durbin
                                   of methamphetamine precursors.
DOJ--Byrne......................  King County Sheriff's Office, Seattle, WA, for the School Resource Officers Program.....................           350,000  Murray
DOJ--Byrne......................  Kings County District Attorney's Office, Kings County, NY, for the investigation and prosecution of deed           875,000  Schumer
                                   theft, mortgage fraud, and related real estate-based crimes.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Latin America Youth Center, Langley Park, MD, to serve at risk youth and promote gang prevention........           500,000  Mikulski
DOJ--Byrne......................  Local Initiatives and Support Corporation-Community Saftey Initiative, Jackson, MS, to promote strategic           750,000  Cochran
                                   alliance between community developers and law enforcement, which will reduce crime and spur
                                   revitalization in troubled neighborhoods.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Lorain Police Department, Lorain, OH, to purchase in-car video cameras for law enforcement patrol                  500,000  Brown
                                   vehicles.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, Monterey Park, CA, to upgrade an anti-gang data and analysis              300,000  Feinstein
                                   database.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Louisiana District Attorney's Association, Baton Rouge, LA, to support an early intervention program for           800,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                   at-risk elementary students.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, Lower Brule Indian Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court operations,                500,000  Johnson
                                   prosecutors, public defenders office, and detention equipment and operations.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Luna County Sheriff's Department, Deming, NM, to address border-related criminal activity...............           375,000  Bingaman
DOJ--Byrne......................  Luzerne County Community College, Luzerne County, PA, for training and equipment acquisition............           150,000  Specter
DOJ--Byrne......................  Madison County Commission, Huntsville, AL, for integrated law enforcement records.......................         1,500,000  Shelby
DOJ--Byrne......................  Marshall County Sheriff's Department, Marshall County, KY, to purchase and upgrade law enforcement                 400,000  McConnell
                                   equipment.
DOJ--Byrne......................  McKinley County, Gallup, NM, for operations at a comprehensive juvenile services center.................           200,000  Bingaman
DOJ--Byrne......................  Memorial Hermann Healthcare System, Houston, TX, for emergency communications equipment.................           300,000  Hutchison
DOJ--Byrne......................  Menifee County Sheriff's Department, Menifee County, KY, to purchase law enforcement technology                     30,000  McConnell
                                   equipment.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Mercer County, Trenton, NJ, to provide a comprehensive case management system for prisoners returning to           200,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   the community.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Metropolitan Crime Commission, New Orleans, LA, to eliminate public corruption and reduce white collar             450,000  Vitter
                                   crime.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for digital forensic training.............................         2,500,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOJ--Byrne......................  Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for law enforcement intelligence..........................         1,500,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOJ--Byrne......................  Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for training and research.................................         1,000,000  Cochran
DOJ--Byrne......................  Montana Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association, Helena, MT, for enhanced offender monitoring, tracking            200,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   and notification to ensure public safety.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Montana State University at Billings, Billings, MT, for an academic program at the Montana Women's                 200,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   Prison that offers inmates general education coursework toward certificate or Associate degrees.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Multnomah County, Troutdale and Gresham, OR, to create a position in the Multnomah County District                 275,000  Smith, Wyden
                                   Attorney's Office to investigate and prosecute cases involving the victimization and exploitation of
                                   the elderly.
DOJ--Byrne......................  National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC), Washington, DC, for a national hotline that provides                  500,000  Mikulski, Shelby
                                   information and services to crime victims.
DOJ--Byrne......................  National Judicial College, Reno, NV, for judicial education and scholarship of judges...................           800,000  Reid, Ensign
DOJ--Byrne......................  Nevada Dept. of Public Safety, Carson City, NV, to assist probationers with diagnosed substance abuse              250,000  Reid
                                   problems and financial need in receiving treatment.
DOJ--Byrne......................  New Hampshire Attorney General's Office, Concord, NH, to combat street-level drug trafficking...........           750,000  Gregg
DOJ--Byrne......................  New Hampshire State Police, Concord, NH, to combat gang and drug-related violence and crime.............         1,500,000  Gregg
DOJ--Byrne......................  New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, to develop technology to reduce accidental shootings,              250,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   teen suicides, unauthorized use of firearms by family members, and illegal secondary trade of weapons.
DOJ--Byrne......................  New Mexico Administrative Office of the Courts, Santa Fe, NM, to continue drug court programs...........           400,000  Bingaman
DOJ--Byrne......................  North Carolina Sheriffs' Association, Raleigh, NC, for the North Carolina Sheriffs' Association to equip           250,000  Dole
                                   a training facility.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Northern Regional Laboratory Group, Greeley, CO, to build a full service crime lab in Northern Colorado.           500,000  Allard, Salazar
DOJ--Byrne......................  Northwest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville, AR, for a training center to reduce cases of child              500,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   abuse and improve support for victims of child abuse.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court operations, prosecutors,                750,000  Johnson, Thune
                                   public defenders office, and detention equipment and operations on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Oklahoma Department of Public Safety, Oklahoma City, OK, to continue replacement of Oklahoma's aging               150,000  Inhofe
                                   communication system.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, Oklahoma City, OK, for information-sharing within and between              100,000  Inhofe
                                   State and local law enforcement agencies.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Oneida County District Attorney's Office, Utica, NY, for an information-sharing database to analyze gang           215,000  Schumer
                                   related  crime.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Operation Our Town, Altoona, PA, for drug enforcement and gang prevention programs......................           250,000  Specter
DOJ--Byrne......................  Orlando Regional Healthcare, Orlando, FL, for operations of the Sexual Trauma Recovery Center...........           125,000  Martinez
DOJ--Byrne......................  Our Children's Homestead, Rockford, IL, for the tutoring of at-risk youth in the foster system..........           200,000  Durbin
DOJ--Byrne......................  Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, Cumberland County, PA, for a program that engages adults in                   250,000  Casey
                                   reporting and intervening in child sexual abuse in Pennsylvania.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Phoenix House Florida, Hillsborough County, FL, to upgrade health record technology.....................           300,000  Bill Nelson
DOJ--Byrne......................  Phoenix House, Providence, RI, to upgrade a clinical management system..................................         1,000,000  Reed, Whitehouse
DOJ--Byrne......................  Providence Police Department, Providence, RI, for a community-policing initiative to reduce drugs and            1,000,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                   drug-related crime.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), Washington, DC, for national anti-sexual assault                  500,000  Mikulski, Shelby
                                   programs.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Rapides Parish Sheriff's Office, Alexandria, LA, for equipment and technology upgrades..................           200,000  Vitter
DOJ--Byrne......................  Safe and Sound, Inc., Milwaukee, WI, for personnel and after-school programs............................           600,000  Kohl
DOJ--Byrne......................  Safe Streets Campaign, Tacoma, WA, to implement comprehensive gang prevention, intervention and                    500,000  Cantwell, Murray
                                   suppression strategies.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, for crime lab technologies................................           800,000  Hutchison, Cornyn
DOJ--Byrne......................  Sheriffs Youth Programs of Minnesota, Inver Grove Heights, MN, to be used by the Sheriffs Youth Program            100,000  Coleman, Klobuchar
                                   to expand programming at SYP's horse farm.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Simon Wiesenthal Center, Los Angeles, CA, to provide sensitivity training to law enforcement when                1,000,000  Mikulski, Shelby
                                   investigating hate crimes and civil rights abuses.
DOJ--Byrne......................  South Royalton Legal Clinic at Vermont Law School, South Royalton, VT, to provide legal aid to                     300,000  Leahy
                                   economically disadvantaged and vulnerable populations in Vermont.
DOJ--Byrne......................  St. Croix County District Attorney, Hudson, WI, for a specialized methamphetamine prosecution unit......            60,000  Kohl
DOJ--Byrne......................  Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Standing Rock Indian Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court operations,            250,000  Johnson, Thune
                                   prosecutors, the public defender's office, and detention programs.
DOJ--Byrne......................  State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, for alcohol interdiction for investigation and prosecution of bootlegging           1,000,000  Stevens
                                   crimes as part of a statewide effort to reduce Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.
DOJ--Byrne......................  State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, for the training of VPSO's, and the acquisition of emergency response and           2,000,000  Stevens
                                   search and rescue equipment for rural communities.
DOJ--Byrne......................  State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, to develop a network to allow remote access to the criminal justice                   235,000  Stevens
                                   information, from a single point of access, thus allowing law enforcement and others Courts within the
                                   State to access court records.
DOJ--Byrne......................  State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, to support coordinator and train law enforcement officers to teach drug               210,000  Stevens
                                   abuse resistance education.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Tallahassee Community College, Leon County, FL, to expand intelligence training programs................           200,000  Bill Nelson
DOJ--Byrne......................  TEAM 2000 Community Development Corporation, Elizabeth, NJ, to provide an integrated system of case                300,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   management, education, and job development services for ex-offenders in the area.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, for emergency communications equipment...............................           400,000  Hutchison
DOJ--Byrne......................  Texas Team Focus, Morgan, TX, to establish a youth mentoring program....................................           350,000  Hutchison
DOJ--Byrne......................  The Marcus Institute, Atlanta, GA, to provide remediation for the potential consequences of childhood              100,000  Isakson, Chambliss
                                   abuse and neglect.
DOJ--Byrne......................  The Providence Center, Providence, RI, to help address barriers that incarcerated men and women face as            500,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                   they re-enter their communities.
DOJ--Byrne......................  The University of Southern Mississippi, Gulfport, MS, for statewide public safety information sharing...         1,000,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOJ--Byrne......................  The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for forensic science technology................         1,000,000  Cochran
DOJ--Byrne......................  The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, for law enforcement training purposes..........           400,000  Cochran
DOJ--Byrne......................  The University of Tennessee Law Enforcement Innovation Center, Knoxville, TN, for training and technical           350,000  Alexander
                                   assistance under the Safe Streets Act.
DOJ--Byrne......................  The Women's Sports Foundation, East Meadow, NY, to prevent delinquency and promote wellbeing among young           250,000  Cantwell
                                   women by involving them in physical activity.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Town of Brantley, Brantley, AL, for law enforcement equipment...........................................            75,000  Shelby
DOJ--Byrne......................  Troy University, Troy, AL, for forensics research and operations........................................           350,000  Shelby, Sessions
DOJ--Byrne......................  Uhlich Children's Advantage Network and YouthBuild Lake County, Chicago, IL, for the expansion of a                250,000  Durbin
                                   violence prevention service network.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Baltimore School of Law, Baltimore, MD, for a mentoring program for at-risk youth to                 500,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                   reduce truancy.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK, to equip the University of Central Oklahoma and Oklahoma               150,000  Inhofe
                                   State Bureau of Investigation Forensic Institution.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, for community-based gun violence prevention and                    500,000  Durbin
                                   intervention.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, to develop scientific, objective and reliable methods for                500,000  McConnell
                                   detecting physical child abuse.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, to expand the regional biocontainment laboratory..............           150,000  Bunning
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, to University of Memphis, Shelby County, the City of Memphis and the         1,000,000  Alexander, Corker
                                   State District Attorney General jointly working on combining resources to deal with growing gang
                                   numbers and increased violent crime.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of Mississippi, University, MS, to provide legal training for judges, prosecutors, lawyers,           2,250,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   and law students and develops model programs and publications.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, to continue to advance law enforcement research and development           750,000  Gregg
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of North Dakota School of Law, Grand Forks, ND, for the recruitment and retention of American           300,000  Dorgan, Conrad
                                   Indian law students.
DOJ--Byrne......................  University of South Carolina Law School, Columbia, SC, to support efforts of its law clinics............           100,000  Graham
DOJ--Byrne......................  Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT, to combat increased illegal drug activities.........         1,000,000  Leahy
DOJ--Byrne......................  Vermont State's Attorney's Office, Montpelier, VT, for the Special Investigation Unit's task forces.....           100,000  Sanders
DOJ--Byrne......................  Wasco County, Wasco County, OR, for relocation costs and new equipment for a new interoperable 9-1-1               300,000  Smith, Wyden
                                   Emergency Dispatch Center.
DOJ--Byrne......................  West Valley City, West Valley City, UT, for a state-of-the -art crime forensics lab.....................           250,000  Bennett, Hatch
DOJ--Byrne......................  West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, to support a forensic science initiative......................         4,000,000  Byrd
DOJ--Byrne......................  William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to support a collaborative                500,000  Akaka
                                   effort of law schools to provide cost-effective review of potentially viable cases of wrongful
                                   convictions.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Winona State University, Winona, MN, to provide training, technical assistance and publications to child           700,000  Coleman, Klobuchar
                                   protection professionals.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Wisconsin Department of Administration, Madison, WI, to support assistant district attorney positions in         1,200,000  Kohl
                                   Milwaukee County and other counties that are scheduled to be laid off within the next year.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Women's Center and Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, to provide a comprehensive range of              200,000  Casey
                                   services for victims of domestic violence and their children.
DOJ--Byrne......................  Youth Service Bureau of Illinois Valley, Ottawa, IL, for programming to assist troubled youth and their            175,000  Durbin
                                   families.
DOJ--Byrne......................  YWCA of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, to expand services for victims of domestic violence.........           300,000  Voinovich, Brown
DOJ--Byrne......................  Zero to Three, Des Moines, IA, for coordinated care for abused and neglected infants and toddlers.......           300,000  Harkin, Grassley
DOJ--IWN........................  Washington State Patrol, Mt. Sumas, WA, to complete IWN site at Mt. Sumas, WA...........................           500,000  Murray
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Alabama 4-H Foundation, Auburn, AL, for juvenile justice prevention programs............................           500,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs..           150,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  An Achievable Dream, Newport News, VA, to continue and expand assistance programs for at-risk youth.....           300,000  Warner, Webb
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Baptist Child and Family Services, San Antonio, TX, to prevent juvenile delinquency.....................           250,000  Hutchison
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Baton Rouge Bar Foundation, Baton Rouge, LA, for the operations of a teen court with a peer jury trial             250,000  Landrieu
                                   system.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Big Brothers Big Sisters of Louisiana, Lake Charles, LA, to increase programming for at-risk children in           200,000  Landrieu
                                   southwestern Louisiana.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Bolder Options, Minneapolis, MN, to continue Bolder Options' unique model of one-on-one mentoring to               150,000  Coleman
                                   reduce truancy and raise academic standards of Twin Cities youth.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Boys and Girls Club of Central Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA, for a mentoring-based gang prevention                 100,000  Specter
                                   program.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, to provide crime prevention and outreach services to rural          1,000,000  Inouye
                                   youth.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Boys and Girls Clubs of the Grand River in South Dakota, McLaughlin, SD, to provide services and                   150,000  Johnson
                                   programming.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Boys and Girls Home of Nebraska, South Sioux City, NE, for a treatment and services program to serve               250,000  Ben Nelson
                                   child and teenaged victims of trauma.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Boys Town New England, Portsmouth, RI, to increase services for at-risk girls and boys in the juvenile             161,000  Reed, Whitehouse
                                   justice sys-  tem.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, Baltimore, MD, for youth mentoring programs for at-risk children............         1,000,000  Mikulski, Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Cherokee County Family Resource Center, Heflin, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs...           100,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Children and Families First, Wilmington, DE, to provide service intervention to girls ages 12-18........           400,000  Biden, Carper
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Chippewa Cree Tribe, Rocky Boy's Reservation, MT, to restore a detention facility to house juvenile                250,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   offenders, provide in-house education and offer treatment services.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Citizenship Trust at American Village, Montgomery, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs           450,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of Boston, Boston, MA, to implement a comprehensive community-based youth crime reduction program..           750,000  Kennedy, Kerry
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of Brockton, Brockton, MA, for the expansion of after-school programs designed to reduce youth                250,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                   crime.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of Chesapeake, Chesapeake, VA, for a gang deterrence program.......................................           100,000  Warner, Webb
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of Jackson, Jackson, MS, for prevention programs for at-risk teens.................................           250,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of Omaha, Omaha, NE, for the expansion of after school educational programming.....................           500,000  Ben Nelson
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, for the Youth Violence Reduction Partnership....................         1,000,000  Specter
DOJ--Juv Just...................  City of South Salt Lake, South Salt Lake, UT, for after school program expansions.......................           100,000  Bennett, Hatch
DOJ--Juv Just...................  County of Fresno, Fresno, CA, for a collaborative gang prevention program...............................           300,000  Boxer
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Friends of CASA of Los Angeles County, Los Angeles, CA, for intervention and permanent placement for               375,000  Boxer
                                   infants and toddlers in the foster care system.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Generations, Inc., Camden, NJ, for services to assist families and communities in reducing juvenile                150,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   violence.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Girl Scouts USA, Baltimore, MD, for a youth mentoring program for at-risk children of adult offenders...         1,000,000  Mikulski, Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition, Philadelphia, PA, for the National Comprehensive Center              250,000  Specter
                                   for Fathers for a mentoring-based, fatherhood initiative.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Jobs For Delaware Graduates, Inc., Dover, DE, to expand services delivered to at-risk students in middle         1,353,000  Biden, Carper
                                   and high school.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Juvenile Justice Program for University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile               125,000  Shelby
                                   justice  programs.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Linking Learning to Life At-Risk Youth Training Program, Burlington, VT, to prepare at-risk high school            500,000  Leahy
                                   students for successful employment and post-secondary education.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI, to continue the operations of safe summer sites................           350,000  Kohl
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Morgan County System of Services, Decatur, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs........           125,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department, Santa Fe, NM, to implement a pilot juvenile crime              300,000  Bingaman
                                   prevention program.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Nez Perce Tribe, Lapwai, ID, to help reduce child neglect and abuse at the Nez Perce Tribe..............           100,000  Craig, Crapo
DOJ--Juv Just...................  OliveCrest, Las Vegas, NV, to expand therapeutic foster care operations.................................           200,000  Reid
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Pawtucket Police Department, Pawtucket, RI, for youth education programs designed to decrease truancy...           493,000  Reed, Whitehouse
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Phoenix House, Dallas, TX, for residential substance abuse treatment for adolescents....................           250,000  Hutchison
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Police Athletic League of New Jersey, Freehold, NJ, to coordinate a statewide after-school program with            250,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   the goal of deterring juvenile crime.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Reconcile New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for a workforce construction project to provide at-risk youth              300,000  Landrieu
                                   with the skills for successful entry into the hospitality and construction industries.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Rose Brooks Center, Kansas City, MO, to provide services to victims of domestic violence and their                 300,000  Bond
                                   children.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Rosebud Boys and Girls Club, Mission, SD, for services, programming, equipment and supplies.............           100,000  Johnson
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Save the Children, Westport, CT, for after-school and summer literacy programs in Arkansas..............           500,000  Pryor, Lincoln
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Sea Research Foundation, Inc., Mystic, CT, to expand academic course offerings in science and technology           300,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                   to an additional 100,000 students each year.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Fort Yates, ND, for equipment, staffing, and for operations of a youth                1,200,000  Dorgan, Conrad
                                   detention center.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Suffolk University, Boston, MA, for the development of comprehensive juvenile justice programs aimed at            500,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                   reducing recidivism.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Team Focus, Inc., Mobile, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs.........................           600,000  Shelby, Sessions
DOJ--Juv Just...................  TuskMac CDC, Tuskegee, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs............................           100,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Union Springs YMCA, Union Springs, AL, for youth mentoring and juvenile justice programs................           100,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  United Way of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, PA, for a youth crime prevention and intervention                      400,000  Specter
                                   initatiative.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, to provide planning, training and assistance to schools            350,000  Salazar
                                   to help them prevent and manage violence.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  University of Delaware's Center for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Newark, DE, to continue a statewide survey            65,000  Biden, Carper
                                   of youth that provides estimates of student substance abuse, crime and gambling.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  University of Montana, Missoula, MT, for teacher training, curriculum development and awareness                    400,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   initiatives to combat bullying as well as the development of emergency protocol for school shootings.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for youth mentoring and domestic violence prevention programs..           400,000  Shelby
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Vermont Department of Children and Families, Waterbury, VT, for state-wide at-risk youth assistance                700,000  Sanders
                                   programs.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Village of Richton Park, Richton Park, IL, for the development of a youth intervention program..........           300,000  Durbin
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Visiting Nurse Association of Omaha, Omaha, NE, for a comprehensive crime intervention program for                 300,000  Ben Nelson, Hagel
                                   vulnerable women, infants, children, and teens.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Wisconsin Office of Justice Assistance, Madison, WI, for a grant program to reduce disproportionate                700,000  Kohl
                                   minority juvenile contact.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Wittenberg University, Springfield, OH, for a coordinated, evidence-based approach to serve at-risk                300,000  Brown
                                   youth in the local community.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  YWCA Center for Families, Salt Lake City, UT, to provide equipment for new Center for Families, which              300,000  Bennett
                                   aims to end domestic violence through prevention, intervention and accountability.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  YWCA Columbus, Columbus, OH, to expand After-School Programs for At-Risk Youth and Programs for Homeless           750,000  Voinovich, Brown
                                   Families.
DOJ--Juv Just...................  YWCA Madison, Madison, WI, to expand a neighborhood and school-based crime reduction program............           500,000  Kohl
DOJ--Juv Just...................  Zero to Three, Omaha, NE, to educate juvenile and family court judges in early childhood development in            150,000  Ben Nelson, Hagel
                                   order to improve the child welfare system for maltreated infants and toddlers.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Alabama District Attorney's Association, Montgomery, AL, to combat the methamphetamine problem and               1,100,000  Shelby, Sessions
                                   educated citizens of its dangers.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Arkansas State Police, Little Rock, AR, to certify and equip officers assigned to investigate, seize,              500,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   dismantle, and direct the clean-up of clandestine methamphetamine labs.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Cape Girardeau County Sheriff's Office, Cape Girardeau, MO, to provide funding for competitive grants to         1,000,000  Bond
                                   sheriff's offices and multi-jurisdiction drug task forces to address specifically methamphetamine
                                   production and trafficking.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Carson City, Carson City, NV, for efforts in combating methamphetamine in Northern Nevada...............           300,000  Reid, Ensign
DOJ--Meth.......................  City of Montrose, Montrose, CO, for communications and safety equipment to assist a drug task force and            150,000  Salazar
                                   for an educational outreach program.
DOJ--Meth.......................  City of Rochester, Rochester, NY, to intensify patrols, improve the tracking of narcotics shipments,               675,000  Schumer
                                   provide technical support and enhance local crime prevention programs for at-risk youth.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Clackamas County, Oregon City, OR, to continue the operations of the Clackamas County Meth Enforcement             100,000  Smith, Wyden
                                   Team.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Criminal Justice Institute, University of Arkansas System, Little Rock, AR, to continue providing                  500,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   methamphetamine-focused courses for the Arkansas law enforcement community.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Heartland Family Service, Omaha, NE, for the Methamphetamine Treatment Program for Omaha, NE............           100,000  Ben Nelson, Hagel
DOJ--Meth.......................  Idaho Meth Project, Boise, ID, for the Idaho Meth Project will support a statewide effort to combat the            300,000  Craig, Crapo
                                   use of meth.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Iowa Office of Drug Control Policy, Des Moines, IA, for a multi-tier interdiction initiative to combat             500,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                   drug distribution networks.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Iowa Office of Drug Control Policy, Des Moines, IA, for an electronic database to assist efforts to                750,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                   enforce limits on sales of pseudoephedrine.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Iowa Office of Drug Control Policy, Des Moines, IA, for coordinated regional meth investigations........           600,000  Harkin, Grassley
DOJ--Meth.......................  Minot State University, Minot, ND, for methamphetamine research and public education....................           500,000  Dorgan, Conrad
DOJ--Meth.......................  Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics, Jackson, MS, to combat methamphetamines................................         1,500,000  Cochran
DOJ--Meth.......................  Montana Meth Project, Missoula, MT, to prevent the use of methamphetamines and the related social                1,000,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   problems, especially among teenagers.
DOJ--Meth.......................  National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, CO, for a study that addresses the clean-up and               100,000  Allard, Salazar
                                   risks of former methamphetamine laboratories and smokehouses pose to people, including children.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Nebraska Meth Project, Lincoln, NE, to support a campaign to significantly reduce the prevalence of                500,000  Ben Nelson
                                   methamphetamine use in Nebraska.
DOJ--Meth.......................  New Mexico Attorney General, Albuquerque, NM, to implement a state-wide anti-methamphetamine campaign...           500,000  Bingaman
DOJ--Meth.......................  Orange County Government, Orlando, FL, to remediate environmental dangers of methamphetamine labs in               100,000  Martinez
                                   Orange County.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Pierce County Alliance, Tacoma, WA, for an anti-methamphetamine initiative..............................         1,000,000  Murray, Cantwell
DOJ--Meth.......................  Pierce County Alliance, Tacoma, WA, for an information clearinghouse and technical training center to            1,200,000  Murray
                                   aid in the fight against methamphetamine.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Rockdale County Sheriff's Office, Rockdale County, GA, to identify, seize, and clean up clandestine                 50,000  Chambliss, Isakson
                                   methamphetamine drug labs and assist in the eradication of meth use.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud Indian Reservation, SD, for law enforcement, court operations, prosecutors,           850,000  Johnson, Thune
                                   the public defenders office and detention programs.
DOJ--Meth.......................  State of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM, for a statewide meth eradication program.............................         1,000,000  Domenici
DOJ--Meth.......................  Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force, Chattanooga, TN, for a statewide program that supports law                 1,250,000  Alexander, Corker
                                   enforcement, training, intelligence and public awareness in dealing with meth and meth cleanup.
DOJ--Meth.......................  The Colorado Meth Project, Denver, CO, for an anti-methamphetamine campaign.............................           500,000  Salazar
DOJ--Meth.......................  The Wyoming Meth Project, Casper, WY, for fighting the methamphetamine problem..........................            75,000  Enzi, Barrasso
DOJ--Meth.......................  The Wyoming Meth Project, Cheyenne, WY, to reduce youth meth use........................................           100,000  Barasso
DOJ--Meth.......................  University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE, to implement a project to improve Nebraska's community                 600,000  Ben Nelson, Hagel
                                   corrections and methamphetamine abuse treatment services.
DOJ--Meth.......................  University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, to address gaps in substance abuse treatment and transitional                   50,000  Barasso
                                   services in the State.
DOJ--Meth.......................  University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, to address the need for transitional services for recovering addicts            75,000  Enzi, Barrasso
                                   in Wyoming.
DOJ--Meth.......................  Wisconsin Department of Justice, Madison, WI, for the continuation of a statewide anti-methamphetamine           1,000,000  Kohl
                                   initiative.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Alabama Criminal Justice Information Center (ACJIC), Montgomery, AL, for law enforcement data gathering            500,000  Shelby
                                   and dissemination.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Arkansas State Police, Little Rock, AR, to implement an interoperable system to provide an interactive             200,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   picture of law enforcement resources in route and at the scene of critical incidents or natural
                                   disasters.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation, Poplar, MT, for the operation of a 9-1-1 call           100,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   center.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Baltimore County, Baltimore County, MD, for technology upgrades.........................................         1,500,000  Mikulski
DOJ--Tech.......................  Berkeley Township Police Department, Bayville, NJ, for a comprehensive video security system............           500,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
DOJ--Tech.......................  Caddo Parish District Attorney, NW Louisiana, LA, to equip a sexual predator task force.................           200,000  Vitter
DOJ--Tech.......................  Calhoun County Sheriff, Anniston, AL, for law enforcement data gathering and dissemination..............           350,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  Calvert County, Calvert County, MD, to purchase equipment...............................................           500,000  Mikulski
DOJ--Tech.......................  Centenary College, Shreveport, LA, for improvement of campus security...................................           500,000  Landrieu, Vitter
DOJ--Tech.......................  Center for Technology Commercialization, Westborough, MA, for the continued development of law                     750,000  Kennedy, Kerry
                                   enforcement technology and training programs.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Cherry Hill Township, Cherry Hill, NJ, for law enforcement communications...............................           250,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
DOJ--Tech.......................  Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, SD, for upgrades and maintenance to the 9-          250,000  Johnson
                                   1-1 system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Allentown, Allentown, PA, for security camera acquisition and installation......................           400,000  Specter
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Astoria, Astoria, OR, to enhance public safety radio systems....................................           325,000  Smith, Wyden
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Bayonne, Bayonne, NJ, to purchase equipment for a new centralized command and control operations           600,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   center.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Billings, Billings, MT, to purchase digital video cameras, a tactical blanket system and a                 269,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   tactical armored security vehicle.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Brewton, Escambia, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades....................................           200,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Burien, Burien, WA, for emergency communications upgrades.......................................           150,000  Murray
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Calera, Calera, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.......................................           250,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  Alabama--Tombigbee Regional Commission, Camden, AL, for traffic safety technology and law enforcement              400,000  Shelby
                                   equipment.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Camden, Camden, NJ, for the purchase of equipment to more effectively fight crime...............         1,000,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, to implement 800MHz radios for non-public safety agencies...........           200,000  Voinovich, Brown
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Dothan, Dothan, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.......................................           300,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Fayetteville, Fayetteville, AR, to purchase, install and implement a simulcast radio system.....           500,000  Pryor, Lincoln
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Flint, Flint, MI, for in-car computers and in-car cameras.......................................           500,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Flora, Flora, MS, for equipment upgrades and improvements for the police department.............           250,000  Cochran
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Gadsden, Gadsden, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.....................................           250,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Greenville Police Department, Greenville, SC, for mobile data terminals.........................           150,000  Graham
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Gulf Shores, Gulf Shores, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.............................           350,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Hartford, Hartford, CT, for equipment at a new public safety complex............................           750,000  Lieberman, Dodd
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Hartford, Hartford, CT, to purchase first responder and emergency equipment for a new municipal            300,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                   public safety complex.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Houston, Houston, TX, for interoperability......................................................           125,000  Cornyn
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Inglewood Police Department, Inglewood, CA, to upgrade the Inglewood Police Department's radio             500,000  Boxer
                                   system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Iowa City, Iowa City, IA, for integrated emergency resources....................................           125,000  Grassley
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Jackson, Jackson, MS, for crime fighting technology.............................................           750,000  Cochran, Wicker
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Kalispell, Kalispell, MT, to create a public safety training and testing facility for first                750,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   responders.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Kaysville, Kaysville, UT, for police station equipment..........................................           100,000  Bennett, Hatch
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Kenosha Police Department, Kenosha, WI, for technology upgrades.................................           100,000  Kohl
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, for law enforcement equipment.............................................           130,000  Hagel
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Little Rock, Arkansas, Little Rock, AR, to upgrade an 800 MHz communications network and                   500,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   complete its conversion to a digital system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, to expand the City of Los Angeles mass notification system........           500,000  Feinstein
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Medford, Medford, OR, to provide for the merging of two existing 9-1-1 dispatch centers into one           700,000  Smith, Wyden
                                   facility.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Miami, Miami-Dade County, FL, to improve the ability to process and store photographic evidence            400,000  Bill Nelson
                                   for investigations and emergencies.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Milwaukee Police Department, Milwaukee, WI, to install a gunshot location system for high crime            650,000  Kohl
                                   areas.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, MN, for the purchase of car cameras and mobile data centers for police           300,000  Coleman, Klobuchar
                                   officers.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Missoula, Missoula, MT, for a new police headquarters...........................................           300,000  Baucus, Tester
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Modesto, Modesto, CA, for law enforcement communications equipment..............................           500,000  Feinstein
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Montgomery and Montgomery County, Montgomery, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.........           650,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Newark Police Department, Newark, DE, for the purchase of video surveillance cameras in the                115,420  Biden, Carper
                                   downtown  area.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of North Las Vegas Police Department, N. Las Vegas, NV, for a records management system............           300,000  Reid
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Oakland, Oakland, CA, to provide law enforcement equipment......................................           500,000  Feinstein, Boxer
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for deployment of security cameras in 15 different business                    250,000  Casey
                                   districts.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Prattville, Prattville, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades...............................           400,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Radford, Radford, VA, for the transition into a new police department facility..................           250,000  Warner, Webb
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Seattle, Seattle, WA, for a multi-agency database accessible to police officers in the field....           500,000  Murray
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Sioux City, Sioux City, IA, for meth related training...........................................           100,000  Grassley
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of South Jordan, South Jordan, UT, for high-speed wireless hotspots for police to transfer data and           150,000  Bennett, Hatch
                                   share information.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Spokane, Spokane, WA, for new law enforcement technology........................................           500,000  Murray, Cantwell
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Stamford, Stamford, CT, to purchase critical console equipment for a new emergency                         300,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                   communications plat-  form.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Williamsport, Williamsport, PA, for a wireless digital video surveillance system................           450,000  Specter, Casey
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of Yonkers Police Department, Yonkers, NY, to reduce non-emergency 9-1-1 calls through the creation           250,000  Schumer
                                   of a new public hotline.
DOJ--Tech.......................  City of York, York, PA, for security camera acquisition and installation................................           200,000  Specter
DOJ--Tech.......................  Clarion County, Clarion County, PA, for an interoperable communications initiative......................           500,000  Specter
DOJ--Tech.......................  Cobb County Office of Economic Development, Cobb County, GA, for public safety first responder regional            100,000  Chambliss
                                   communications interoperability.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Colorado Association of Chiefs of Police, Denver, CO, for an electronic state-wide law enforcement                 400,000  Salazar
                                   information-sharing network.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Delaware State University, Dover, DE, to test and evaluate a mobile crime scene and evidence tracking            2,000,000  Biden, Carper
                                   application.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Delta County, Delta County, MI, for the installation of laptop computers in police patrol vehicles......           176,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  East Baton Rouge Parish, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA, to upgrade law enforcement technologies...........           100,000  Landrieu, Vitter
DOJ--Tech.......................  East Bay Regional Communications System Authority, Dublin, CA, to create an interoperable communications           500,000  Feinstein, Boxer
                                   sys-  tem.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Franklin County Emergency Services Alliance, Franklin County, PA, for an interoperable communications              500,000  Specter
                                   initiative.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Gallatin County Commission, Bozeman, MT, to construct a facility, update emergency response technology,            500,000  Baucus, Tester
                                   and ensure the protection of citizens and regional assets.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Goodhue County Sheriff's Office, Red Wing, MN, to purchase 800 MHz user end radios for all public safety           750,000  Klobuchar
                                   officials in Goodhue County.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Goodwater Police Department, Goodwater, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.......................            50,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  Harford County, Harford County, MD, for technology upgrades.............................................           365,000  Mikulski
DOJ--Tech.......................  Hawaii Criminal Justice Data Center, Honolulu, HI, to integrate State and local law enforcement                  1,500,000  Inouye
                                   databases for better access at all levels of the justice system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Henderson Nevada Police Department, Henderson, NV, to purchase a tactical robot and equip a law                    500,000  Reid
                                   enforcement training facility.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Hot Springs Police Department, Hot Springs, AR, to equip police vehicles with mobile data terminals and            512,000  Pryor, Lincoln
                                   enable their access to local, State and Federal databases.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Idaho State Police, Meridian, ID, for the Criminal Information Sharing Alliance Network to improve                 355,000  Craig, Crapo
                                   coordinated information sharing between participating State law enforcement agencies.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Ingham County Law Enforcement Technology Upgrades, Mason, MI, for equipment upgrades....................           500,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  Itasca County, Grand Rapids, MN, for the implementation of a new 800 MHz public safety radio system.....           300,000  Klobuchar
DOJ--Tech.......................  Johnson County Government, Olathe, KS, to provide a unified radio communication system for Johnson                 150,000  Roberts
                                   County officials and local jurisdictions within the county.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Johnson County, Franklin, IN, to upgrade the public safety communications system in Johnson County,                850,000  Lugar, Bayh
                                   Indiana.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Kanawha County Commission, Charleston, WV, for Kanawha County to purchase mobile and portable                    1,000,000  Byrd
                                   interoperable radios.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Kansas Adjutant General's Office, Topeka, KS, to establish a secure database that connects law                     250,000  Roberts
                                   enforcement and emergency management personnel to private sector resources needed in a catastrophic
                                   event.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Lafayette Police Department, Lafayette, LA, for interoperable communication.............................           200,000  Vitter, Landrieu
DOJ--Tech.......................  Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, Las Vegas, NV, for a Total Containment Vessel and other law              750,000  Reid
                                   enforcement equipment.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Lenoir Police Department, Lenoir, NC, for law enforcement communications technology.....................           200,000  Dole
DOJ--Tech.......................  Macomb County, Macomb County, MI, to establish an emergency operations center...........................           500,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  Marshall University, Huntington, WV, for a highly advanced state-of-the-art DNA laboratory..............         5,000,000  Byrd
DOJ--Tech.......................  Marshall University, Huntington, WV, to support a training initiative for personnel in the area of                 825,000  Byrd
                                   computer crime investigations.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Mason and Oceana Counties, Pentwater, MI, to operate a joint 9-1-1 emergency communications center......           300,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  Missoula County, Missoula, MT, to build a public safety operations and training center..................           750,000  Baucus, Tester
DOJ--Tech.......................  Mobile County Commission, Mobile, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades.............................           650,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  New Orleans Police Foundation, New Orleans, LA, for law enforcement technology integration and                     500,000  Landrieu, Vitter
                                   information shar-  ing.
DOJ--Tech.......................  North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, Raleigh, NC, for firearms and ballistics analysis                    100,000  Dole
                                   equipment.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Northwest Citizens Patrol, Baltimore, MD, for information technology system upgrades and support                   150,000  Cardin
                                   personnel.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Oakland County Sheriff, Oakland County, MI, to upgrade a biometric identification enhancement project...           200,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  Oglala Sioux Tribe, Pine Ridge Reservation, SD, for upgrades and maintenance to the tribal 9-1-1 system.           250,000  Johnson, Thune
DOJ--Tech.......................  Passaic County Prosecutor's Office, Paterson, NJ, for a regional fiber optic network and the                       200,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   construction of a countywide interoperable communications network.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Pleasant Grove Police Department, Pleasant Grove, UT, for police department's wireless network..........           200,000  Bennett, Hatch
DOJ--Tech.......................  Rockland County Office of Fire & Emergency Services, Pomona, NY, for a countywide interoperable public             250,000  Schumer
                                   safety communications system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Roseville Police Department, Macomb County, MI, to consolidate police, fire and emergency medical                  150,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                   service dispatch functions into one entity.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Russellville Police Department, Russellville, Logan County, KY, to purchase mobile data terminals and              125,000  McConnell
                                   other communications equipment.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Southern Kansas Multi-Jurisdictional SWAT, Cowley, Greenwood, Montgomery, and Sumner Counties, KS, for             150,000  Brownback
                                   the implementation of the Law Enforcement Visual Intelligence Tool for four Kansas counties.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Springfield Police Department, Springfield, VT, for equipment upgrades..................................           200,000  Sanders
DOJ--Tech.......................  St. Albans City Police Department, St. Albans, VT, to purchase equipment................................           100,000  Sanders
DOJ--Tech.......................  St. Clair County, St. Clair County, MI, to complete an 800 MHz communications system....................           250,000  Levin, Stabenow
DOJ--Tech.......................  State of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, for the phased build-out of a statewide interoperable communications             500,000  Cardin, Mikulski
                                   system for first responders.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Talladega County Commission, Talladega, AL, for radio upgrades..........................................           100,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  The City of Beech Grove, Beech Grove, IN, to enhance public safety with in-car cameras and at hot spots            100,000  Lugar
                                   in the City to provide real-time feeds to the police command center.
DOJ--Tech.......................  The City of Shelbyville, Shelbyville, IN, to complete the interoperable wireless public safety                     900,000  Lugar, Bayh
                                   communications system for first responders in Shelbyville, IN.
DOJ--Tech.......................  The Courage To Speak Foundation, Inc., Norwalk, CT, to expand, develop and evaluate substance abuse                950,000  Dodd
                                   prevention programs.
DOJ--Tech.......................  The Delaware State Police Department, Dover, DE, for preliminary engineering assessments before message            100,000  Biden, Carper
                                   switcher upgrades.
DOJ--Tech.......................  The Delaware State Police Department, Dover, De, for the purchase of a mobile gunshot locator system....           250,000  Biden, Carper
DOJ--Tech.......................  The Delaware State Police Department, Dover, DE, for the purchase and installation of in-car cameras and           500,000  Biden, Carper
                                   related equipment.
DOJ--Tech.......................  The New Castle County Police Department, New Castle, DE, for a program to increase the efficiency and              200,000  Biden, Carper
                                   effectiveness of license plate scanning technology for law enforcement.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Town of Anderson, Anderson, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades...................................            50,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  Town of Enfield, Enfield, CT, for interoperability communication upgrades and expert consultation.......            75,000  Lieberman, Dodd
DOJ--Tech.......................  Town of Enfield, Enfield, CT, to evaluate the local emergency communications system and identify areas              75,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                   in need of improvement.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Town of Kearny, Kearny, NJ, for the purchase and installation of a webcam buffer zone monitoring system            200,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
                                   to specifically monitor the Kuehne chemical plant and CSX rail yards.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Town of Secaucus, Secaucus, NJ, for interoperable law enforcement communications........................           100,000  Menendez, Lautenberg
DOJ--Tech.......................  Town of Somerville, Somerville, AL, for equipment and technology upgrades...............................            65,000  Shelby
DOJ--Tech.......................  University of Colorado, Denver, CO, to establish a forensics center.....................................           100,000  Allard
DOJ--Tech.......................  University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, for forensics research and operations.........................           250,000  Reed, Whitehouse
DOJ--Tech.......................  Upper Peninsula 15 County Consortium, Upper Peninsula, MI, for equipment to complete a statewide 800 MHz           500,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                   radio system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT, for the purchase of mobile computing units and                 500,000  Leahy
                                   necessary support staff for police vehicles.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Vermont Department of Public Safety, Waterbury, VT, to improve and increase the interoperability of                506,000  Sanders
                                   statewide radio communications systems.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Vermont State Police, Waterbury, VT, for a statewide digital in-car camera system, an automated vehicle            250,000  Sanders
                                   locator system and a replacement scanner.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Vermont Supreme Court, Court Administrator's Office, Montpelier, VT, for a judiciary case management and           250,000  Leahy
                                   electronic filing system.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Vernon Police Department, Vernon, CT, for police in-car video recording systems.........................            60,000  Lieberman
DOJ--Tech.......................  Virginia State Police, Wytheville, VA, to support the Virginia State Police Southwest Virginia Drug Task           250,000  Warner, Webb
                                   Forces in their efforts to stop methamphetamine and drug-related crimes.
DOJ--Tech.......................  Washoe County Sheriff's Office, Washoe, NV, to equip a DNA analysis lab and process DNA samples.........           800,000  Reid, Ensign
DOJ--Tech.......................  Wells County Sheriff's Office, Bluffton Police Department, Bluffton 9-1-1 Dispatch Center, Ossian Police           100,000  Lugar
                                   Department, Wells County, IN, to enhance interoperability between Wells County, the City of Bluffton
                                   and the Town of Ossian police and sheriff departments.
DOJ--Tech.......................  West Virginia Sheriffs' Association, Charleston, WV, to purchase visualization technology...............         3,400,000  Byrd
DOJ--Tech.......................  Will County, Will County, IL, for integrated criminal justice information systems.......................           300,000  Durbin
DOJ--VAWA.......................  State of Alaska, Juneau, AK, for sexual assault/domestic violence education, victim assistance, and              2,500,000  Stevens
                                   prosecution.
NASA............................  A partnership of Coppin State University, Towson University, and University of Maryland Biotechnology            1,000,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                   Institute, MD, to increase the number and quality of science, technology, engineering and mathematics
                                   teachers in the region's public schools.
NASA............................  Alabama A & M University Research Institute, Madison, AL, for high temperature materials research.......           500,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY, to develop a focused research and development initiative on large           500,000  Schumer
                                   area flexible solar cell modules.
NASA............................  Burlington Technical Center, Burlington, VT, to upgrade and improve the post-secondary aviation program.         1,000,000  Leahy
NASA............................  Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT, for recruitment and retention for an aerospace              350,000  Dodd, Lieberman
                                   engineering academic program.
NASA............................  Charles County Public Schools, Charles County, MD, for a digital classroom project......................           500,000  Mikulski
NASA............................  Chesapeake Information Based Aeronautics Consortium, for a partnership of Morgan State University,               3,000,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                   University of Maryland Eastern Shore, and Bowie State University, MD, for continued aviation safety
                                   research and development.
NASA............................  Discovery Center Museum, Rockford, IL, for science education for rural and under-served children........           300,000  Durbin
NASA............................  Flight Research Training Center, Roswell, NM, to continue development and operation of the Flight                  250,000  Domenici
                                   Research Training Center.
NASA............................  Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile, AL, for educational exhibits...............................           500,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaii, Hilo, HI, for the promotion of astronomy in Hawaii...................         2,000,000  Inouye
NASA............................  Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, for research and development of nanomaterials.........................           500,000  Specter
NASA............................  Manned Space Flight Education Foundation, Houston, TX, to create a virtual space community for students.           500,000  Hutchison
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for a multi-propellant plume diagnostic testbed...........           500,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for material and structural evaluations for composites....           750,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for missions systems recording, archival and retrieval....           475,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for remote engine health and maintenance diagnosis........           500,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for robotic exploration and Lunar material utilization....           750,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for the development of the sensor technologies and                   550,000  Shelby
                                   integration algorithms necessary for on-orbit assembly and other AR&D; missions.
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, for the Virtual Learning Magnet for Space Science and Math           400,000  Alexander
                                   program as outlined in the Gathering Storm Report and NASA will make any award for this program on a
                                   competitive basis.
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, to develop a cost effective nuclear power system to                  500,000  Shelby
                                   support the long-range objectives of NASA.
NASA............................  Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, to support the ongoing technology maturation program for             500,000  Shelby
                                   liquid oxygen/liquid methane propulsion.
NASA............................  McWane Science Center, Birmingham, AL, for education and science literacy programs......................           400,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Michigan Research Institute, Ann Arbor, MI, for aerospace research on joining tubular support structures         1,000,000  Levin, Stabenow
                                   at low cost and high reliability.
NASA............................  Mid-Atlantic Broadband Cooperative, South Boston, VA, for the counties of Accomack and Northampton for           2,000,000  Warner, Webb
                                   broadband deployment.
NASA............................  Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, for research and development of advanced technologies that           625,000  Cochran
                                   represent departures from current manufacturing methods.
NASA............................  Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, for a collaborative distance science and technology education               200,000  Tester
                                   program.
NASA............................  National Federation of the Blind, Baltimore, MD, to develop and apply assistive technology approaches              600,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                   and techniques that enhance participation of blind youth in STEM education.
NASA............................  New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, for a program to improve K-12 science, engineering, math,             200,000  Bingaman
                                   and aerospace education.
NASA............................  Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative, Pittsburgh, PA, for a regenerative therapy delivery initiative           500,000  Specter
NASA............................  Science Center of Iowa, Des Moines, IA, to encourage children to go into science and technology through            400,000  Harkin
                                   skills-based learning exhibits.
NASA............................  Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO, for enhancement of K-12 teaching and learning             500,000  Bond
                                   of sciences, math, and technology among schools, teachers, and students.
NASA............................  Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL, for high temperature materials.............................           750,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Space Dynamics Laboratory, Logan, UT, to provide technical support to the satellite sensor calibration             500,000  Bennett
                                   team for the Global Climate Observing System.
NASA............................  St. Louis Community College BioBench and Training Facility, St. Louis, MO, to provide specialized career           500,000  Bond
                                   and technical training to students for work in the life sciences.
NASA............................  Teach for America, New York, NY, to engage teachers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.         2,000,000  Mikulski
NASA............................  Texas A&M; University, College Station, TX, to develop new robotic technologies..........................           500,000  Hutchison
NASA............................  The Delaware Aerospace Education Foundation, Bear, DE, to create a community model for formal and                  500,000  Biden, Carper
                                   informal earth and space education.
NASA............................  The Newark Museum, Newark, NJ, for an interactive platform for education of astronomy, space, and                  500,000  Lautenberg, Menendez
                                   planetary science.
NASA............................  Thurgood Marshall College Fund, New York, NY, to recruit minority students who will pursue careers in            2,200,000  Cochran, Landrieu, Voinovich,
                                   the sciences.                                                                                                               Wicker
NASA............................  University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, for optical system.................................           700,000  Shelby
NASA............................  University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA, for a public-private partnership promoting                 1,000,000  Feinstein
                                   innovation in the fields of biotechnology, information technology, and nanotechnology.
NASA............................  University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, to research factors that hinder the wound healing process.....           750,000  McConnell
NASA............................  University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD, for the Advanced Study Institute for                      1,000,000  Mikulski, Cardin
                                   Environmental Prediction to study climate impacts and adaptation in the Mid-Atlantic region.
NASA............................  University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, for remote sensing, geospatial, space and aviation legal                  3,000,000  Cochran, Wicker
                                   research, materials, education, and outreach.
NASA............................  University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, to help make data received from NASA satellite images more          3,000,000  Dorgan, Conrad
                                   easily accessible to the public.
NASA............................  University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, to create a national institute to improve science,                   950,000  Harkin, Grassley
                                   technology, engineering and mathematics education by focusing on young children.
NASA............................  University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, for composite materials lab....................................           200,000  Shelby
NASA............................  University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, for the Complex Systems Center for Informed Decision-Making and             500,000  Leahy
                                   Design to develop intelligent systems design and adaptive robotics.
NASA............................  U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, AL, for museum exhibits.......................................           500,000  Shelby
NASA............................  Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC, for the Institute for Regenerative Medicine..           140,000  Dole
NASA............................  West Virginia State University, Institute, WV, for a science, engineering, mathematics and aerospace             2,000,000  Byrd
                                   academy (SEMAA).
NASA............................  Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV, to expand an electronic medical records system adapted from            3,000,000  Byrd
                                   the military's award-winning HEALTHeFORCES program.
NASA............................  Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, to continue the development and operation of the National Center            250,000  Brownback
                                   for Advanced Materials Performance (NCAMP) located at the National Institute for Aviation Research
                                   (NIAR).
NASA............................  Xavier University New Orleans, New Orleans, LA, for science, technology, engineering and mathematics             1,000,000  Landrieu
                                   programs.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2009
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or ^)
                                Item                                       2008       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2008
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                 International Trade Administration

Operations and administration......................................         413,172          429,870          429,870          +16,698   ...............
Offsetting fee collections.........................................          -8,000           -9,439           -9,439           -1,439   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................         405,172          420,431          420,431          +15,259   ...............

                  Bureau of Industry and Security

Operations and administration......................................          59,228           68,909           68,909           +9,681   ...............
CWC enforcement....................................................          13,627           14,767           14,767           +1,140   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Industry and Security.......................          72,855           83,676           83,676          +10,821   ...............

                Economic Development Administration

Economic development assistance programs...........................         249,100          100,000          200,000          -49,100         +100,000
Salaries and expenses..............................................          30,832           32,800           32,800           +1,968   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Economic Development Administration...................         279,932          132,800          232,800          -47,132         +100,000

Minority business development......................................          28,623           29,000           29,000             +377   ...............
Economic and Statistical Analysis..................................          81,075           90,621           90,621           +9,546   ...............

                        Bureau of the Census

Salaries and expenses..............................................         202,838          238,740          238,740          +35,902   ...............
Periodic censuses and programs.....................................       1,027,406        2,365,882        2,912,262       +1,884,856         +546,380
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of the Census..................................       1,230,244        2,604,622        3,151,002       +1,920,758         +546,380

     National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................          17,466           19,218           19,218           +1,752   ...............
Public telecommunications facilities, planning, and construction...          18,800   ...............          20,000           +1,200          +20,000
Technology opportunities program...................................  ...............  ...............          20,000          +20,000          +20,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Telecommunications and Information                     36,266           19,218           59,218          +22,952          +40,000
       Administration..............................................

             United States Patent and Trademark Office

Current year fee funding...........................................       1,915,500        2,074,773        2,074,773         +159,273   ...............
Offsetting fee collections.........................................      -1,915,500       -2,074,773       -2,074,773         -159,273   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Patent and Trademark Office...........................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............

           National Institute of Standards and Technology

Scientific and technical research and services.....................         440,517          535,000          489,499          +48,982          -45,501
    (Transfer out).................................................         (-6,580)        (-12,300)        (-12,300)         (-5,720)  ...............
Manufacturing extension partnerships/Industrial technology services         154,840            4,000          175,000          +20,160         +171,000
    Manufacturing Extension Partnerships...........................         (89,640)          (4,000)        (110,000)        (+20,360)       (+106,000)
    Technology Innovation Program..................................         (65,200)  ...............         (65,000)           (-200)        (+65,000)
Construction of research facilities................................         160,490           99,000          149,000          -11,490          +50,000
Working capital fund (by transfer).................................          (6,580)         (12,300)         (12,300)         (+5,720)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Institute of Standards and Technology........         755,847          638,000          813,499          +57,652         +175,499

          National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Operations, research, and facilities...............................       2,856,277        2,831,253        3,051,911         +195,634         +220,658
    (by transfer)..................................................         (77,000)         (79,000)         (79,000)         (+2,000)  ...............
    Promote and Develop Fund (transfer out)........................        (-77,000)        (-79,000)        (-79,000)         (-2,000)  ...............
    Coastal zone management transfer...............................           3,000            3,000            3,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal...................................................       2,859,277        2,834,253        3,054,911         +195,634         +220,658

Procurement, acquisition, and construction.........................         979,207        1,238,660        1,258,010         +278,803          +19,350
Pacific coastal salmon recovery....................................          67,000           35,000           90,000          +23,000          +55,000
Fisheries disaster mitigation fund.................................  ...............  ...............          50,000          +50,000          +50,000
Coastal zone management fund.......................................          -3,000           -3,000           -3,000   ...............  ...............
Fisheries finance program account..................................          -6,000           -1,000           -4,000           +2,000           -3,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.......       3,896,484        4,103,913        4,445,921         +549,437         +342,008

                      Departmental Management

Salaries and expenses..............................................          44,294           61,083           44,083             -211          -17,000
Herbert C. Hoover Building renovation and modernization............           3,722            7,367            7,367           +3,645   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          22,020           24,766           24,766           +2,746   ...............
National Intellectual Property Law Enforcement Coordination Council  ...............           1,021   ...............  ...............          -1,021
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental Management...............................          70,036           94,237           76,216           +6,180          -18,021
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Commerce.......................       6,856,534        8,216,518        9,402,384       +2,545,850       +1,185,866
          Appropriations...........................................      (6,856,534)      (8,216,518)      (9,402,384)     (+2,545,850)     (+1,185,866)
          (By transfer)............................................         (83,580)         (91,300)         (91,300)         (+7,720)  ...............
          (Transfer out)...........................................        (-83,580)        (-91,300)        (-91,300)         (-7,720)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                       General Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................          97,832          105,805           85,000          -12,832          -20,805
Justice information sharing technology.............................          85,540           93,868           86,000             +460           -7,868
Tactical law enforcement wireless communications...................          74,260          121,651          121,651          +47,391   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General Administration................................         257,632          321,324          292,651          +35,019          -28,673

Administrative review and appeals..................................         232,649          263,791          268,791          +36,142           +5,000
    Transfer from immigration examinations fee account.............  ...............          -4,000           -4,000           -4,000   ...............
    Administrative expenses (emergency)............................           8,000   ...............  ...............          -8,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................         240,649          259,791          264,791          +24,142           +5,000

Detention trustee..................................................       1,225,920        1,295,319        1,295,319          +69,399   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          70,603           75,681           75,681           +5,078   ...............

                  United States Parole Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          11,462           12,570           12,570           +1,108   ...............

                          Legal Activities

Salaries and expenses, general legal activities....................         735,549          804,007          804,007          +68,458   ...............
    Salaries and expenses (emergency)..............................          10,000   ...............  ...............         -10,000   ...............
Vaccine injury compensation trust fund.............................           6,833            7,833            7,833           +1,000   ...............
Antitrust Division, salaries and expenses..........................         147,819          150,591          150,591           +2,772   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections--current year.......................        -139,000         -150,591         -150,591          -11,591   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................           8,819   ...............  ...............          -8,819   ...............

United States Attorneys, salaries and expenses.....................       1,747,822        1,831,336        1,831,336          +83,514   ...............
    Salaries and expenses (emergency)..............................           7,000   ...............  ...............          -7,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, U.S. Attorneys, salaries and expenses.................       1,754,822        1,831,336        1,831,336          +76,514   ...............

United States Trustee System Fund..................................         209,763          217,416          217,416           +7,653   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections.....................................        -184,000         -160,000         -160,000          +24,000   ...............
    Interest on U.S. securities....................................          -5,000           -5,000           -5,000   ...............  ...............
    Prior year unobligated balances................................         -20,000   ...............  ...............         +20,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................             763           52,416           52,416          +51,653   ...............

Foreign Claims Settlement Commission...............................           1,606            1,823            1,823             +217   ...............
Fees and expenses of witnesses.....................................         168,300          168,300          168,300   ...............  ...............
Salaries and expenses, Community Relations Service.................           9,794            9,873            9,873              +79   ...............
Assets forfeiture fund.............................................          20,990           20,990           20,990   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total, Legal Activities........................................       2,717,476        2,896,578        2,896,578         +179,102   ...............

                   United States Marshals Service

Salaries and expenses..............................................         849,219          933,117          968,117         +118,898          +35,000
    Construction...................................................  ...............          (2,304)          (2,304)         (+2,304)  ...............
    Salaries and expenses (emergency)..............................          15,000   ...............  ...............         -15,000   ...............
Construction.......................................................           2,304   ...............  ...............          -2,304   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total, United States Marshals Service..........................         866,523          933,117          968,117         +101,594          +35,000

                     National Security Division

Salaries and expenses..............................................          73,373           83,789           83,789          +10,416   ...............

                    Interagency Law Enforcement

Interagency crime and drug enforcement.............................         497,935          531,581          511,741          +13,806          -19,840

                  Federal Bureau of Investigation

Salaries and expenses..............................................       4,041,370        4,339,690        4,359,690         +318,320          +20,000
    Salaries and expenses (emergency)..............................         143,539   ...............  ...............        -143,539   ...............
Counterintelligence and national security..........................       2,308,580        2,725,450        2,725,450         +416,870   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................       6,493,489        7,065,140        7,085,140         +591,651          +20,000

Construction.......................................................         164,200           42,991          184,991          +20,791         +142,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total, Federal Bureau of Investigation.........................       6,657,689        7,108,131        7,270,131         +612,442         +162,000

                  Drug Enforcement Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................       2,094,818        2,180,584        2,198,384         +103,566          +17,800
    Salaries and expenses (emergency)..............................           2,000   ...............  ...............          -2,000   ...............
    Diversion control fund.........................................        -239,249         -244,000         -244,000           -4,751   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Drug Enforcement Administration.......................       1,857,569        1,936,584        1,954,384          +96,815          +17,800

        Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives

Salaries and expenses..............................................         984,097        1,027,814        1,042,814          +58,717          +15,000
Construction.......................................................          23,500   ...............  ...............         -23,500   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives..       1,007,597        1,027,814        1,042,814          +35,217          +15,000

                       Federal Prison System

Salaries and expenses..............................................       5,050,440        5,435,754        5,435,754         +385,314   ...............
Buildings and facilities...........................................         372,720           95,807          535,807         +163,087         +440,000
Federal Prison Industries, incorporated (limitation on                        2,328            2,328            2,328   ...............  ...............
 administrative expenses)..........................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System.................................       5,425,488        5,533,889        5,973,889         +548,401         +440,000

             State and Local Law Enforcement Activities

Office of Violence Against Women: Prevention and prosecution                400,000          280,000          415,000          +15,000         +135,000
 programs

Office of Justice Programs:
    Justice assistance.............................................         196,184          134,647          240,000          +43,816         +105,353
    State and local law enforcement assistance.....................         908,136          404,000        1,387,000         +478,864         +983,000
        Presidential convention security (emergency)...............         100,000   ...............  ...............        -100,000   ...............
    Weed and seed program fund.....................................          32,100   ...............          25,000           -7,100          +25,000
    Juvenile justice programs......................................         383,513          185,000          400,000          +16,487         +215,000

Public safety officers benefits:
    Death benefits.................................................          66,000           60,000           60,000           -6,000   ...............
    Disability and education benefits..............................           8,834            9,100            9,100             +266   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................          74,834           69,100           69,100           -5,734   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Office of Justice Programs.........................       1,694,767          792,747        2,121,100         +426,333       +1,328,353

Community Oriented Policing Services...............................         587,233   ...............         600,000          +12,767         +600,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and local law enforcement activities............       2,682,000        1,072,747        3,136,100         +454,100       +2,063,353
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department of Justice.......................      23,591,916       23,088,915       25,778,555       +2,186,639       +2,689,640
          Appropriations...........................................     (23,306,377)     (23,088,915)     (25,778,555)     (+2,472,178)     (+2,689,640)
          Emergency appropriations.................................        (285,539)  ...............  ...............       (-285,539)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                         TITLE III--SCIENCE

                 Executive Office of the President

Office of Science and Technology Policy............................           5,184            5,303            5,184   ...............            -119

           National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Science............................................................  ...............       4,441,519        4,522,884       +4,522,884          +81,365
Aeronautics........................................................  ...............         446,500          500,000         +500,000          +53,500
Exploration........................................................  ...............       3,500,469        3,530,490       +3,530,490          +30,021
Space operations...................................................  ...............       5,774,710        5,774,710       +5,774,710   ...............
Education..........................................................  ...............         115,600          130,012         +130,012          +14,412
Cross-agency support...............................................  ...............       3,299,902        3,320,404       +3,320,404          +20,502
Science, aeronautics and exploration...............................      10,543,100   ...............  ...............     -10,543,100   ...............
Exploration capabilities...........................................       6,733,700   ...............  ...............      -6,733,700   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          32,600           35,500           35,500           +2,900   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.........      17,309,400       17,614,200       17,814,000         +504,600         +199,800

                    National Science Foundation

Research and related activities (non-defense)......................       4,754,474        5,526,990        5,526,990         +772,516   ...............
    Defense function...............................................          67,000           67,000           67,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.....................................................       4,821,474        5,593,990        5,593,990         +772,516   ...............

Major research equipment and facilities construction...............         220,740          147,510          152,010          -68,730           +4,500
Education and human resources......................................         725,600          790,410          790,410          +64,810   ...............
Agency operations and award management.............................         281,790          305,060          300,560          +18,770           -4,500
National Science Board.............................................           3,969            4,030            4,030              +61   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          11,427           13,100           13,100           +1,673   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Science Foundation...........................       6,065,000        6,854,100        6,854,100         +789,100   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, Science....................................      23,379,584       24,473,603       24,673,284       +1,293,700         +199,681
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES

Commission on Civil Rights.........................................           8,460            8,800            8,800             +340   ...............
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission............................         329,300          341,925          341,925          +12,625   ...............
International Trade Commission.....................................          68,400           73,600           75,000           +6,600           +1,400
Payment to the Legal Services Corporation..........................         350,490          311,000          390,000          +39,510          +79,000
Marine Mammal Commission...........................................           2,820            2,400            2,400             -420   ...............
National Veterans Business Development Corporation.................           1,410   ...............  ...............          -1,410   ...............
Office of the U.S. Trade Representative............................          44,120           46,272           46,272           +2,152   ...............
State Justice Institute............................................           3,760   ...............           5,000           +1,240           +5,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Related agencies............................         808,760          783,997          869,397          +60,637          +85,400
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Rescissions........................................................        -901,825         -634,000         -622,911         +278,914          +11,089
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title V, General Provisions...........................        -901,825         -634,000         -622,911         +278,914          +11,089
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Grand total........................................................      53,734,969       55,929,033       60,100,709       +6,365,740       +4,171,676
Appropriations.....................................................     (54,351,255)     (56,563,033)     (60,723,620)     (+6,372,365)     (+4,160,587)
Emergency appropriations...........................................        (285,539)  ...............  ...............       (-285,539)  ...............
Rescissions........................................................       (-901,825)       (-634,000)       (-622,911)       (+278,914)        (+11,089)
(By transfer)......................................................         (83,580)         (91,300)         (91,300)         (+7,720)  ...............
(Transfer out).....................................................        (-83,580)        (-91,300)        (-91,300)         (-7,720)  ...............
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------