H. Rept. 111-424 - 111th Congress (2009-2010)
February 26, 2010, As Reported by the Science and Technology Committee

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House Report 111-424 - NATURAL HAZARDS RISK REDUCTION ACT OF 2009




[House Report 111-424]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


111th Congress                                            Rept. 111-424
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 1

======================================================================



 
               NATURAL HAZARDS RISK REDUCTION ACT OF 2009

                                _______
                                

 February 26, 2010.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3820]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 3820) to reauthorize Federal natural hazards 
reduction programs, and for other purposes, having considered 
the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and 
recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

   I. Bill............................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill............................................13
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation........................13
  IV. Hearing Summary................................................15
   V. Committee Actions..............................................16
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill........................17
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis....................................18
VIII. Committee Views................................................21
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................22
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................23
  XI. Compliance with Public Law 104-4...............................24
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............24
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........24
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................25
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................25
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................25
XVII. Earmark Identification.........................................25
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........25

 XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported..........25
  XX. Committee Recommendations......................................54
 XXI. Exchange of Committee Correspondence...........................55
XXII. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................57

                                I. Bill

      The amendment is as follows:
      Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 
2009''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) The United States faces significant risks from many types 
        of natural hazards, including earthquakes, hurricanes, 
        tornadoes, wildfires, and floods. Increasing numbers of 
        Americans are living in areas prone to these hazards.
          (2) Earthquakes occur without warning and can have 
        devastating effects. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, 
        two recent earthquakes, the Northridge Earthquake in 1994, and 
        the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989, killed nearly 100 people, 
        injured 12,757, and caused $33 billion in damages. Nearly all 
        States face some level of seismic risk. Twenty-six urban areas 
        in 14 States have a significant seismic risk.
          (3) Severe weather is the most costly natural hazard, 
        measured on a per year basis. According to data from the 
        National Weather Service over the last 10 years, tornadoes, 
        thunderstorms, and hurricanes have caused an average of 226 
        fatalities and $16 billion of property damage per year. The 
        2005 hurricane season was one of the most destructive in United 
        States history, killing 1,836 people, and causing $80 billion 
        in damage.
          (4) The United States Fire Administration reports that 38 
        percent of new home construction in 2002 was in areas adjacent 
        to, or intermixed with, wildlands. Fires in the wildland-urban 
        interface are costly. For example, the 2007 California Witch 
        fire alone caused $1.3 billion in insured property losses, 
        according to the Insurance Services Office (ISO). In addition, 
        Government Accountability Office reported in 2007 that the 
        Federal spending for wildfire suppression between 2001 and 2005 
        was, on average, $2.9 billion per year.
          (5) Developing better knowledge about natural hazard 
        phenomena and their effects is crucial to assessing the risks 
        these hazards pose to communities. Instrumentation, monitoring, 
        and data gathering to characterize earthquakes and wind events 
        are important activities to increase this knowledge.
          (6) Current building codes and standards can mitigate the 
        damages caused by natural hazards. The Institute for Business 
        and Home Safety estimated that the $19 billion in damage caused 
        by Hurricane Andrew in 1994 could have been reduced by half if 
        such codes and standards were in effect. Research for the 
        continuous improvement of building codes, standards, and design 
        practices--and for developing methods to retrofit existing 
        structures--is crucial to mitigating losses from natural 
        hazards.
          (7) Since its creation in 1977, the National Earthquake 
        Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) has supported research to 
        develop seismic codes, standards, and building practices that 
        have been widely adopted. The NEHRP Recommended Provisions for 
        Seismic Regulations for New Buildings and Other Structures and 
        the Guidance for Seismic Performance Assessment of Buildings 
        are two examples.
          (8) Research to understand the institutional, social, 
        behavioral, and economic factors that influence how households, 
        businesses, and communities perceive risk and prepare for 
        natural hazards, and how well they recover after a disaster, 
        can increase the implementation of risk mitigation measures.
          (9) A major goal of the Federal natural hazards-related 
        research and development effort should be to reduce the loss of 
        life and damage to communities and infrastructure through 
        increasing the adoption of hazard mitigation measures.
          (10) Research, development, and technology transfer to secure 
        infrastructure is vitally important. Infrastructure that 
        supports electricity, transportation, drinking water, and other 
        services is vital immediately after a disaster, and their quick 
        return to function speeds the economic recovery of a disaster-
        impacted community.

                          TITLE I--EARTHQUAKES

SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

  This title may be cited as the ``National Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Program Reauthorization Act of 2009''.

SEC. 102. FINDINGS.

  Section 2 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 
7701) is repealed.

SEC. 103. DEFINITIONS.

  Section 4 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 
7703) is amended by striking paragraphs (8) and (9).

SEC. 104. NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  Section 5 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 
7704) is amended--
          (1) in subsection (a)--
                  (A) by amending paragraph (2) to read as follows:
          ``(2) Program activities.--The activities of the Program 
        shall be designed to--
                  ``(A) research and develop effective methods, tools, 
                and technologies to reduce the risk posed by 
                earthquakes to the built environment, especially to 
                lessen the risk to existing structures and lifelines;
                  ``(B) improve the understanding of earthquakes and 
                their effects on households, businesses, communities, 
                buildings, structures, and lifelines, through 
                interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research that 
                involves engineering, natural sciences, and social 
                sciences; and
                  ``(C) facilitate the adoption of earthquake risk 
                reduction measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State, and Federal governments, 
                national standards and model building code 
                organizations, architects and engineers, building 
                owners, and others with a role in planning for 
                disasters and planning, constructing, retrofitting, and 
                insuring buildings, structures, and lifelines through--
                          ``(i) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                        agreements, and technical assistance;
                          ``(ii) development of standards, guidelines, 
                        voluntary consensus standards, and other design 
                        guidance for earthquake hazards risk reduction 
                        for buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                          ``(iii) outreach and information 
                        dissemination to communities on location-
                        specific earthquake hazards and methods to 
                        reduce the risks from those hazards; and
                          ``(iv) development and maintenance of a 
                        repository of information, including technical 
                        data, on seismic risk and hazards reduction.''; 
                        and
                  (B) by striking paragraphs (3) through (5);
          (2) by amending subsection (b) to read as follows:
  ``(b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          ``(1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology (in this section referred to as the `Institute') 
        shall be responsible for planning and coordinating the Program. 
        In carrying out this paragraph, the Director of the Institute 
        shall--
                  ``(A) ensure that the Program includes the necessary 
                components to promote the implementation of earthquake 
                hazards risk reduction measures by households, 
                businesses, communities, local, State, and Federal 
                governments, national standards and model building code 
                organizations, architects and engineers, building 
                owners, and others with a role in preparing for 
                disasters, or the planning, constructing, retrofitting, 
                and insuring of buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                  ``(B) support the development of performance-based 
                seismic engineering tools, and work with the 
                appropriate groups to promote the commercial 
                application of such tools, through earthquake-related 
                building codes, standards, and construction practices;
                  ``(C) ensure the use of social science research and 
                findings in informing research and technology 
                development priorities, communicating earthquake risks 
                to the public, developing earthquake risk mitigation 
                strategies, and preparing for earthquake disasters;
                  ``(D) coordinate all Federal post-earthquake 
                investigations; and
                  ``(E) when warranted by research or investigative 
                findings, issue recommendations for changes in model 
                codes to the relevant code development organizations, 
                and report back to Congress on whether such 
                recommendations were adopted.
          ``(2) National institute of standards and technology.--In 
        addition to the lead agency responsibilities described under 
        paragraph (1), the Institute shall be responsible for carrying 
        out research and development to improve building codes and 
        standards and practices for buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines. In carrying out this paragraph, the Director of the 
        Institute shall--
                  ``(A) work, in conjunction with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies, to support the development of 
                improved seismic standards and model codes;
                  ``(B) in coordination with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies, work closely with standards and model code 
                development organizations, professional societies, and 
                practicing engineers, architects, and others involved 
                in the construction of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, to promote better building practices, 
                including by--
                          ``(i) developing technical resources for 
                        practitioners on new knowledge and standards of 
                        practice; and
                          ``(ii) developing methods and tools to 
                        facilitate the incorporation of earthquake 
                        engineering principles into design and 
                        construction practices;
                  ``(C) develop tools, technologies, methods, and 
                practitioner guidance to feasibly and cost-effectively 
                retrofit existing buildings and structures to increase 
                their earthquake resiliency; and
                  ``(D) work closely with national standards 
                organizations, and other interested parties, to develop 
                seismic safety standards and practices for new and 
                existing lifelines.
          ``(3) Federal emergency management agency.--
                  ``(A) In general.--The Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency (in this paragraph referred to as the `Agency') 
                shall be responsible for facilitating the development 
                and adoption of standards, model building codes, and 
                better seismic building practices, developing tools to 
                assess earthquake hazards, promoting the adoption of 
                hazard mitigation measures, and carrying out a program 
                of direct assistance to States and localities to 
                mitigate earthquake risks to buildings, structures, 
                lifelines, and communities.
                  ``(B) Director's duties.--The Director of the Agency 
                shall--
                          ``(i) work closely with other relevant 
                        Federal agencies, standards and model building 
                        code development organizations, architects, 
                        engineers, and other professionals, to 
                        facilitate the development and adoption of 
                        standards, model codes, and design and 
                        construction practices to increase the 
                        earthquake resiliency of new and existing 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines in the--
                                  ``(I) preparation, maintenance, and 
                                wide dissemination of design guidance, 
                                model building codes and standards, and 
                                practices to increase the earthquake 
                                resiliency of new and existing 
                                buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                                  ``(II) development of performance-
                                based design guidelines and 
                                methodologies supporting model codes 
                                for buildings, structures, and 
                                lifelines; and
                                  ``(III) development of methods and 
                                tools to facilitate the incorporation 
                                of earthquake engineering principles 
                                into design and construction practices;
                          ``(ii) develop tools, technologies, and 
                        methods to assist local planners, and others, 
                        to model and predict the potential impact of 
                        earthquake damage in seismically hazardous 
                        areas; and
                          ``(iii) support the implementation of a 
                        comprehensive earthquake education and public 
                        awareness program, including the development of 
                        materials and their wide dissemination to all 
                        appropriate audiences, and support public 
                        access to locality-specific information that 
                        may assist the public in preparing for, 
                        mitigating against, responding to, and 
                        recovering from earthquakes and related 
                        disasters.
                  ``(C) State assistance grant program.--The Director 
                of the Agency shall operate a program of grants and 
                assistance to enable States to develop mitigation, 
                preparedness, and response plans, compare inventories 
                and conduct seismic safety inspections of critical 
                structures and lifelines, update building and zoning 
                codes and ordinances to enhance seismic safety, 
                increase earthquake awareness and education, and 
                encourage the development of multistate groups for such 
                purposes. In order to qualify for assistance under this 
                subparagraph, a State must--
                          ``(i) demonstrate that the assistance will 
                        result in enhanced seismic safety in the State;
                          ``(ii) provide 50 percent of the costs of the 
                        activities for which assistance is being given, 
                        except that the Director may lower or waive the 
                        cost-share requirement for these activities in 
                        exceptional cases of economic hardship; and
                          ``(iii) meet such other requirements as the 
                        Director of the Agency shall prescribe.
          ``(4) United states geological survey.--The United States 
        Geological Survey (in this paragraph referred to as the 
        `Survey') shall conduct research and other activities necessary 
        to characterize and identify earthquake hazards, assess 
        earthquake risks, monitor seismic activity, and provide real-
        time earthquake information. In carrying out this paragraph, 
        the Director of the Survey shall--
                  ``(A) conduct a systematic assessment of the seismic 
                risks in each region of the Nation prone to 
                earthquakes, including, where appropriate, the 
                establishment and operation of intensive monitoring 
                projects on hazardous faults, detailed seismic hazard 
                and risk studies in urban and other developed areas 
                where earthquake risk is determined to be significant, 
                and engineering seismology studies;
                  ``(B) work with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are knowledgeable about 
                the specific seismic risks in their areas;
                  ``(C) develop standard procedures, in consultation 
                with the Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, for issuing earthquake alerts, including 
                aftershock advisories;
                  ``(D) issue when justified, and notify the Director 
                of the Federal Emergency Management Agency of, an 
                earthquake prediction or other earthquake advisory, 
                which may be evaluated by the National Earthquake 
                Prediction Evaluation Council;
                  ``(E) operate, as integral parts of the Advanced 
                National Seismic Research and Monitoring System, a 
                National Earthquake Information Center and a national 
                seismic network, together providing timely and accurate 
                information on earthquakes world-wide;
                  ``(F) support the operation of regional seismic 
                networks in areas of higher seismic risk;
                  ``(G) develop and support seismic instrumentation of 
                buildings and other structures to obtain data on their 
                response to earthquakes for use in engineering studies 
                and assessment of damage;
                  ``(H) monitor and assess Earth surface deformation as 
                it pertains to the evaluation of earthquake hazards and 
                impacts;
                  ``(I) work with other Program agencies to maintain 
                awareness of, and where appropriate cooperate with, 
                earthquake risk reduction efforts in other countries, 
                to ensure that the Program benefits from relevant 
                information and advances in those countries;
                  ``(J) maintain suitable seismic hazard maps in 
                support of building codes for structures and lifelines, 
                including additional maps needed for performance-based 
                design approaches;
                  ``(K) conduct a competitive, peer-reviewed process 
                which awards grants and cooperative agreements to 
                complement and extend related internal Survey research 
                and monitoring activities; and
                  ``(L) operate, in cooperation with the National 
                Science Foundation, a Global Seismographic Network for 
                detection of earthquakes around the world and research 
                into fundamental earth processes.
          ``(5) National science foundation.--The National Science 
        Foundation shall be responsible for funding basic research that 
        furthers the understanding of earthquakes, earthquake 
        engineering, and community preparation and response to 
        earthquakes. In carrying out this paragraph, the Director of 
        the National Science Foundation shall--
                  ``(A) support multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary 
                research that will improve the resiliency of 
                communities to earthquakes, including--
                          ``(i) research that improves the safety and 
                        performance of buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines, including the use of the large-scale 
                        experimental and computational facilities of 
                        the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for 
                        Engineering Earthquake Simulation;
                          ``(ii) research to support more effective 
                        earthquake mitigation and response measures, 
                        such as developing better knowledge of the 
                        specific types of vulnerabilities faced by 
                        segments of the community vulnerable to 
                        earthquakes, addressing the barriers they face 
                        in adopting mitigation and preparation 
                        measures, and developing methods to better 
                        communicate the risks of earthquakes and to 
                        promote mitigation; and
                          ``(iii) research on the response of 
                        communities, households, businesses, and 
                        emergency responders to earthquakes;
                  ``(B) support research to understand earthquake 
                processes, earthquake patterns, and earthquake 
                frequencies;
                  ``(C) encourage prompt dissemination of significant 
                findings, sharing of data, samples, physical 
                collections, and other supporting materials, and 
                development of intellectual property so research 
                results can be used by appropriate organizations to 
                mitigate earthquake damage;
                  ``(D) work with other Program agencies to maintain 
                awareness of, and where appropriate cooperate with, 
                earthquake risk reduction research efforts in other 
                countries, to ensure that the Program benefits from 
                relevant information and advances in those countries; 
                and
                  ``(E) include to the maximum extent practicable 
                diverse institutions, including Historically Black 
                Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-serving 
                institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska 
                Native-serving institutions, and Native Hawaiian-
                serving institutions.''; and
          (3) in subsection (c)(1) by inserting ``on Natural Hazards 
        Risk Reduction established under section 301 of the Natural 
        Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009'' after ``Interagency 
        Coordinating Committee''.

SEC. 105. POST-EARTHQUAKE INVESTIGATIONS PROGRAM.

  Section 11 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 
7705e) is amended by striking ``There is established'' and all that 
follows through ``conduct of such earthquake investigations.'' and 
inserting ``The Program shall include a post-earthquake investigations 
program, the purpose of which is to investigate major earthquakes so as 
to learn lessons which can be applied to reduce the loss of lives and 
property in future earthquakes. The lead Program agency, in 
consultation with each Program agency, shall organize investigations to 
study the implications of the earthquakes in the areas of 
responsibility of each Program agency. The investigations shall begin 
as rapidly as possible and may be conducted by grantees and 
contractors. The Program agencies shall ensure that the results of the 
investigations are disseminated widely.''.

SEC. 106. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--Section 12 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act 
of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 7706) is amended--
          (1) by adding at the end of subsection (a) the following:
  ``(9) There are authorized to be appropriated to the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency for carrying out this Act--
          ``(A) $10,238,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(B) $10,545,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(C) $10,861,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(D) $11,187,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(E) $11,523,000 for fiscal year 2014.'';
          (2) by adding at the end of subsection (b) the following:
  ``(3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the United States 
Geological Survey for carrying out this Act, including the Advanced 
National Seismic Research and Monitoring System--
          ``(A) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(B) $72,100,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(C) $74,263,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(D) $76,491,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(E) $78,786,000 for fiscal year 2014.'';
          (3) by adding at the end of subsection (c) the following:
  ``(3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the National Science 
Foundation for carrying out this Act--
          ``(A) $64,125,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(B) $66,049,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(C) $68,030,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(D) $70,071,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(E) $72,173,000 for fiscal year 2014.''; and
          (4) by adding at the end of subsection (d) the following:
  ``(3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology for carrying out this Act--
          ``(A) $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(B) $7,700,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(C) $7,931,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(D) $8,169,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(E) $8,414,000 for fiscal year 2014.''.
  (b) Conforming Amendment.--Section 14 of the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 7708) is amended--
          (1) by striking ``(a) Establishment.--''; and
          (2) by striking subsection (b).

                             TITLE II--WIND

SEC. 201. SHORT TITLE.

  This title may be cited as the ``National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Act Reauthorization of 2009''.

SEC. 202. PURPOSE.

  Section 202 of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 
(42 U.S.C. 15701) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 202. PURPOSE.

  ``It is the purpose of the Congress in this title to achieve a major 
measurable reduction in losses of life and property from windstorms 
through the establishment and maintenance of an effective Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program. The objectives of such Program shall 
include--
          ``(1) the education of households, businesses, and 
        communities about the risks posed by windstorms, and the 
        identification of locations, structures, lifelines, and 
        segments of the community which are especially vulnerable to 
        windstorm damage and disruption, and the dissemination of 
        information on methods to reduce those risks;
          ``(2) the development of technologically and economically 
        feasible design and construction methods and procedures to make 
        new and existing structures, in areas of windstorm risk, 
        windstorm resilient, giving high priority to the development of 
        such methods and procedures for lifelines, structures 
        associated with a potential high loss of life, and structures 
        that are especially needed in times of disasters, such as 
        hospitals and public safety and shelter facilities;
          ``(3) the implementation, in areas of major windstorm risk, 
        of instrumentation to record and gather data on windstorms and 
        the characteristics of the wind during those events, and 
        continued research to increase the understanding of windstorm 
        phenomena;
          ``(4) the development, publication, and promotion, in 
        conjunction with State and local officials and professional 
        organizations, of model building codes and standards and other 
        means to encourage consideration of information about windstorm 
        risk in making decisions about land use policy and construction 
        activity; and
          ``(5) the facilitation of the adoption of windstorm risk 
        mitigation measures in areas of windstorm risk by households, 
        businesses, and communities through outreach, incentive 
        programs, and other means.''.

SEC. 203. DEFINITIONS.

  Section 203(1) of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 
(42 U.S.C. 15702(1)) is amended by striking ``Director of the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy'' and inserting ``Director of the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology''.

SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  Section 204 of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004 
(42 U.S.C. 15703) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  ``(a) Establishment.--There is established the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program.
  ``(b) Program Activities.--The activities of the Program shall be 
designed to--
          ``(1) research and develop cost-effective, feasible methods, 
        tools, and technologies to reduce the risks posed by windstorms 
        to the built environment, especially to lessen the risk to 
        existing structures and lifelines;
          ``(2) improve the understanding of windstorms and their 
        impacts on households, businesses, communities, buildings, 
        structures, and lifelines, through interdisciplinary and 
        multidisciplinary research that involves engineering, natural 
        sciences, and social sciences; and
          ``(3) facilitate the adoption of windstorm risk reduction 
        measures by households, businesses, communities, local, State 
        and Federal governments, national standards and model building 
        code organizations, architects and engineers, building owners, 
        and others with a role in planning for disasters and planning, 
        constructing, retrofitting, and insuring buildings, structures, 
        and lifelines through--
                  ``(A) grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, and 
                technical assistance;
                  ``(B) development of hazard maps, standards, 
                guidelines, voluntary consensus standards, and other 
                design guidance for windstorm risk reduction for 
                buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                  ``(C) outreach and information dissemination to 
                communities on site specific windstorm hazards and ways 
                to reduce the risks from those hazards; and
                  ``(D) development and maintenance of a repository of 
                information, including technical data, on windstorm 
                hazards and risk reduction;
  ``(c) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          ``(1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology (in this section referred to as the `Institute') 
        shall be responsible for planning and coordinating the Program. 
        In carrying out this paragraph, the Director of the Institute 
        shall--
                  ``(A) ensure that the Program includes the necessary 
                components to promote the implementation of windstorm 
                risk reduction measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State, and Federal governments, 
                national standards and model building code 
                organizations, architects and engineers, building 
                owners, and others with a role in planning and 
                preparing for disasters, and planning constructing, and 
                retrofitting, and insuring buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines;
                  ``(B) support the development of performance-based 
                engineering tools, and work with the appropriate groups 
                to promote the commercial application of such tools, 
                through wind-related building codes, standards, and 
                construction practices;
                  ``(C) ensure the use of social science research and 
                findings in informing the development of technology and 
                research priorities, in communicating windstorm risks 
                to the public, in developing windstorm risk mitigation 
                strategies, and in preparing for windstorm disasters;
                  ``(D) coordinate all Federal post-windstorm 
                investigations; and
                  ``(E) when warranted by research or investigative 
                findings, issue recommendations for changes in model 
                codes to the relevant code development organizations, 
                and report back to Congress on whether such 
                recommendations were adopted.
          ``(2) National institute of standards and technology.--In 
        addition to the lead agency responsibilities described under 
        paragraph (1), the Institute shall be responsible for carrying 
        out research and development to improve model codes, standards, 
        design guidance and practices for the construction and retrofit 
        of buildings, structures, and lifelines. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  ``(A) support the development of instrumentation, 
                data processing, and archival capabilities, and 
                standards for the instrumentation and its deployment, 
                to measure wind, wind loading, and other properties of 
                severe wind and structure response;
                  ``(B) coordinate with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to make the data described in subparagraph (A) 
                available to researchers, standards and code 
                developers, and local planners;
                  ``(C) support the development of tools and methods 
                for the collection of data on the loss of and damage to 
                structures, and data on surviving structures after 
                severe windstorm events;
                  ``(D) improve the knowledge of the impact of severe 
                wind on buildings, structures, lifelines, and 
                communities;
                  ``(E) develop cost-effective windstorm impact 
                reduction tools, methods, and technologies;
                  ``(F) work, in conjunction with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies, to support the development of wind 
                standards and model codes; and
                  ``(G) in conjunction with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies, work closely with standards and model code 
                development organizations, professional societies, and 
                practicing engineers, architects, and others involved 
                in the construction of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, to promote better building practices, 
                including by--
                          ``(i) supporting the development of technical 
                        resources for practitioners to implement new 
                        knowledge; and
                          ``(ii) supporting the development of methods 
                        and tools to incorporate wind engineering 
                        principles into design and construction 
                        practices.
          ``(3) Federal emergency management agency.--The Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency shall support the development of 
        risk assessment tools and effective mitigation techniques, 
        assist with windstorm-related data collection and analysis, and 
        support outreach, information dissemination, and implementation 
        of windstorm preparedness and mitigation measures by 
        households, businesses, and communities, including by--
                  ``(A) working to develop or improve risk-assessment 
                tools, methods, and models;
                  ``(B) work closely with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to develop and facilitate the adoption of 
                windstorm impact reduction measures, including by--
                          ``(i) developing cost-effective retrofit 
                        measures for existing buildings, structures, 
                        and lifelines to improve windstorm performance;
                          ``(ii) developing methods, tools, and 
                        technologies to improve the planning, design, 
                        and construction of new buildings, structures, 
                        and lifelines;
                          ``(iii) supporting the development of model 
                        wind codes and standards for buildings, 
                        structures, and lifelines; and
                          ``(iv) developing technical resources for 
                        practitioners that reflect new knowledge and 
                        standards of practice; and
                  ``(C) develop and disseminate guidelines for the 
                construction of windstorm shelters.
          ``(4) National oceanic and atmospheric administration.--The 
        National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall support 
        atmospheric sciences research and data collection to improve 
        the understanding of the behavior of windstorms and their 
        impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines, including by--
                  ``(A) working with other appropriate Federal agencies 
                to develop and deploy instrumentation to measure speed 
                and other characteristics of wind, and to collect, 
                analyze, and make available such data;
                  ``(B) working with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are knowledgeable 
                about, and prepared for, the specific windstorm risks 
                in their area;
                  ``(C) supporting the development of suitable wind 
                speed maps and other derivative products that support 
                building codes and other hazard mitigation approaches 
                for buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                  ``(D) conducting a competitive, peer-reviewed process 
                which awards grants and cooperative agreements to 
                complement the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
                Administration's wind-related and storm surge-related 
                research and data collection activities;
                  ``(E) working with other appropriate Federal agencies 
                and State and local governments to develop or improve 
                risk-assessment tools, methods, and models; and
                  ``(F) working with other appropriate Federal agencies 
                to develop storm surge models to better understand the 
                interaction between windstorms and bodies of water.
          ``(5) National science foundation.--The National Science 
        Foundation shall be responsible for funding basic research that 
        furthers the understanding of windstorms, wind engineering, and 
        community preparation and response to windstorms. In carrying 
        out this paragraph, the Director of the National Science 
        Foundation shall--
                  ``(A) support multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary 
                research that will improve the resiliency of 
                communities to windstorms, including--
                          ``(i) research that improves the safety and 
                        performance of buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines;
                          ``(ii) research to support more effective 
                        windstorm mitigation and response measures, 
                        such as developing better knowledge of the 
                        specific types of vulnerabilities faced by 
                        segments of the community vulnerable to 
                        windstorms, addressing the barriers they face 
                        in adopting mitigation and preparation 
                        measures, and developing methods to better 
                        communicate the risks of windstorms and to 
                        promote mitigation; and
                          ``(iii) research on the response of 
                        communities to windstorms, including on the 
                        effectiveness of the emergency response, and 
                        the recovery process of communities, 
                        households, and businesses;
                  ``(B) support research to understand windstorm 
                processes, windstorm patterns, and windstorm 
                frequencies;
                  ``(C) encourage prompt dissemination of significant 
                findings, sharing of data, samples, physical 
                collections, and other supporting materials, and 
                development of intellectual property so research 
                results can be used by appropriate organizations to 
                mitigate windstorm damage;
                  ``(D) work with other Program agencies to maintain 
                awareness of, and where appropriate cooperate with, 
                windstorm risk reduction research efforts in other 
                countries, to ensure that the Program benefits from 
                relevant information and advances in those countries; 
                and
                  ``(E) include to the maximum extent practicable 
                diverse institutions, including Historically Black 
                Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-serving 
                institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska 
                Native-serving institutions, and Native Hawaiian-
                serving institutions.''.

SEC. 205. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  Section 207 of the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program of 
2004 (42 U.S.C. 15706) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  ``(a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are authorized to 
be appropriated to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for carrying 
out this title--
          ``(1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(2) $9,972,500 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(3) $10,271,600 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(4) $10,579,800 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(5) $10,897,200 for fiscal year 2014.
  ``(b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying out this 
title--
          ``(1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(2) $9,972,500 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(3) $10,271,600 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(4) $10,579,800 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(5) $10,897,200 for fiscal year 2014.
  ``(c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology for carrying out this title--
          ``(1) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(2) $4,243,600 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(3) $4,370,900 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(4) $4,502,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(5) $4,637,100 for fiscal year 2014.
  ``(d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration for carrying out this title--
          ``(1) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(2) $2,334,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          ``(3) $2,404,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          ``(4) $2,476,100 for fiscal year 2013; and
          ``(5) $2,550,400 for fiscal year 2014.''.

 TITLE III--INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE ON NATURAL HAZARDS RISK 
                               REDUCTION

SEC. 301. INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE ON NATURAL HAZARDS RISK 
                    REDUCTION.

  (a) In General.--There is established an Interagency Coordinating 
Committee on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction, chaired by the Director of 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology.
          (1) Membership.--In addition to the chair, the Committee 
        shall be composed of--
                  (A) the directors of--
                          (i) the Federal Emergency Management Agency;
                          (ii) the United State Geological Survey;
                          (iii) the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
                        Administration;
                          (iv) the National Science Foundation;
                          (v) the Office of Science and Technology 
                        Policy; and
                          (vi) the Office of Management and Budget; and
                  (B) the head of any other Federal agency the 
                Committee considers appropriate.
          (2) Meetings.--The Committee shall not meet less than 2 times 
        a year at the call of the Director of the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology.
          (3) General purpose and duties.--The Committee shall oversee 
        the planning and coordination of the National Earthquake 
        Hazards Reduction Program and the National Windstorm Impact 
        Reduction Program, and shall make proposals for planning and 
        coordination of any other Federal research for natural hazard 
        mitigation that the Committee considers appropriate.
          (4) Strategic plans.--The Committee shall develop and submit 
        to Congress, not later than one year after the date of 
        enactment of this Act--
                  (A) a Strategic Plan for the National Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction Program that includes--
                          (i) prioritized goals for such Program that 
                        will mitigate against the loss of life and 
                        property from future earthquakes;
                          (ii) short-term, mid-term, and long-term 
                        research objectives to achieve those goals;
                          (iii) a description of the role of each 
                        Program agency in achieving the prioritized 
                        goals;
                          (iv) the methods by which progress towards 
                        the goals will be assessed;
                          (v) an explanation of how the Program will 
                        foster the transfer of research results onto 
                        outcomes, such as improved building codes;
                          (vi) a description of the role of social 
                        science in informing the development of the 
                        prioritized goals and research objectives; and
                          (vii) a description of how the George E. 
                        Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering 
                        Simulation and the Advanced National Seismic 
                        Research and Monitoring System will be used in 
                        achieving the prioritized goals and research 
                        objectives; and
                  (B) a Strategic Plan for the National Windstorm 
                Impact Reduction Program that includes--
                          (i) prioritized goals for such Program that 
                        will mitigate against the loss of life and 
                        property from future windstorms;
                          (ii) short-term, mid-term, and long-term 
                        research objectives to achieve those goals;
                          (iii) a description of the role of each 
                        Program agency in achieving the prioritized 
                        goals;
                          (iv) the methods by which progress towards 
                        the goals will be assessed;
                          (v) an explanation of how the Program will 
                        foster the transfer of research results onto 
                        outcomes, such as improved building codes; and
                          (vi) a description of the role of social 
                        science in informing the development of the 
                        prioritized goals and research objectives.
          (5) Progress reports.--Not later than one year after the date 
        of enactment of this Act, and at least once every two years 
        thereafter, the Committee shall submit to the Congress--
                  (A) a report on the progress of the National 
                Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program that includes--
                          (i) a description of the activities funded 
                        for the previous two years of the Program, a 
                        description of how these activities align with 
                        the prioritized goals and research objectives 
                        established in the Strategic Plan, and the 
                        budgets, per agency, for these activities;
                          (ii) the outcomes achieved by the Program for 
                        each of the goals identified in the Strategic 
                        Plan;
                          (iii) a description of any recommendations 
                        made to change existing building codes that 
                        were the result of Program activities; and
                          (iv) a description of the extent to which the 
                        Program has incorporated recommendations from 
                        the Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards 
                        Reduction; and
                  (B) a report on the progress of the National 
                Windstorm Impact Reduction Program that includes--
                          (i) a description of the activities funded 
                        for the previous two years of the Program, a 
                        description of how these activities align with 
                        the prioritized goals and research objectives 
                        established in the Strategic Plan, and the 
                        budgets, per agency, for these activities;
                          (ii) the outcomes achieved by the Program for 
                        each of the goals identified in the Strategic 
                        Plan;
                          (iii) a description of any recommendations 
                        made to change existing building codes that 
                        were the result of Program activities; and
                          (iv) a description of the extent to which the 
                        Program has incorporated recommendations from 
                        the Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact 
                        Reduction.
          (6) Coordinated budget.--The Committee shall develop a 
        coordinated budget for the National Earthquake Hazards 
        Reduction Program and a coordinated budget for the National 
        Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. These budgets shall be 
        submitted to the Congress at the time of the President's budget 
        submission for each fiscal year.
  (b) Advisory Committees on Natural Hazards Reduction.--
          (1) In general.--The Director of the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology shall establish an Advisory Committee 
        on Earthquake Hazards Reduction, an Advisory Committee on 
        Windstorm Impact Reduction, and other such advisory committees 
        as the Director considers necessary to advise the Institute on 
        research, development, and technology transfer activities to 
        mitigate the impact of natural disasters.
          (2) Advisory committee on earthquake hazards reduction.--The 
        Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction shall be 
        composed of at least 11 members, none of whom may be employees 
        of the Federal Government, including representatives of 
        research and academic institutions, industry standards 
        development organizations, State and local government, and 
        business communities who are qualified to provide advice on 
        earthquake hazards reduction and represent all related 
        scientific, architectural, and engineering disciplines. The 
        recommendations of the Advisory Committee shall be considered 
        by Federal agencies in implementing the National Earthquake 
        Hazards Reduction Program.
          (3) Advisory committee on windstorm impact reduction.--The 
        Advisory Committee on Windstorm Impact Reduction shall be 
        composed of at least 7 members, none of whom may be employees 
        of the Federal Government, including representatives of 
        research and academic institutions, industry standards 
        development organizations, State and local government, and 
        business communities who are qualified to provide advice on 
        windstorm impact reduction and represent all related 
        scientific, architectural, and engineering disciplines. The 
        recommendations of the Advisory Committee shall be considered 
        by Federal agencies in implementing the National Windstorm 
        Impact Reduction Program.
          (4) Assessments.--The Advisory Committee on Earthquake 
        Hazards Reduction and the Advisory Committee on Windstorm 
        Impact Reduction shall offer assessments on--
                  (A) trends and developments in the natural, social, 
                and engineering sciences and practices of earthquake 
                hazards or windstorm impact mitigation;
                  (B) the priorities of the Programs' Strategic Plans;
                  (C) the coordination of the Programs; and
                  (D) and any revisions to the Programs which may be 
                necessary.
          (5) Reports.--At least every two years, the Advisory 
        Committees shall report to the Director of the National 
        Institute of Standards and Technology on the assessments 
        carried out under paragraph (4) and their recommendations for 
        ways to improve the Programs. In developing recommendations for 
        the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, the Advisory 
        Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction shall consider the 
        recommendations of the United States Geological Survey 
        Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee.
  (c) Coordination of Federal Disaster Research, Development, and 
Technology Transfer.--Not later than 2 years after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the 
Committee on Environment and Natural Resources of the National Science 
and Technology Council shall submit a report to the Congress 
identifying--
          (1) current Federal research, development, and technology 
        transfer activities that address hazard mitigation for natural 
        disasters, including earthquakes, hurricanes, tornados, 
        wildfires, floods, and the current budgets for these 
        activities;
          (2) areas of research that are common to two or more of the 
        hazards identified in paragraph (1); and
          (3) opportunities to create synergies between the research 
        activities for the hazards identified in paragraph (1).

       TITLE IV--NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT AMENDMENTS

SEC. 401. NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT AMENDMENTS.

  The National Construction Safety Team Act (15 U.S.C. 7301 et seq.) is 
amended--
          (1) in section 2(a)--
                  (A) by striking ``a building or buildings'' and 
                inserting ``a building, buildings, or infrastructure''; 
                and
                  (B) by striking ``To the maximum extent practicable, 
                the Director shall establish and deploy a Team within 
                48 hours after such an event.'' and inserting ``The 
                Director shall make a decision whether to deploy a Team 
                within 72 hours after such an event.'';
          (2) in section 2(b)(1), by striking ``buildings'' and 
        inserting ``buildings or infrastructure'';
          (3) in section 2(b)(2)(A), by striking ``building'' and 
        inserting ``building or infrastructure'';
          (4) in section 2(b)(2)(D), by striking ``buildings'' and 
        inserting ``buildings or infrastructure'';
          (5) in section 2(c)(1), by striking ``the United States Fire 
        Administration and'';
          (6) in section 2(c)(1)(G), by striking ``building'' and 
        inserting ``building or infrastructure'';
          (7) in section 2(c)(1)(J)--
                  (A) by striking ``building'' and inserting ``building 
                or infrastructure''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``and the National Windstorm Impact 
                Reduction Act of 2004'' after ``Act of 1977'';
          (8) in section 4(a), by striking ``investigating a building'' 
        and inserting ``investigating building and infrastructure'';
          (9) in section 4(a)(1)--
                  (A) by striking ``a building'' and inserting ``a 
                building or infrastructure''; and
                  (B) by striking ``building'' both of the other places 
                it appears and inserting ``building or 
                infrastructure'';
          (10) in section 4(a)(3), by striking ``building'' both places 
        it appears and inserting ``building or infrastructure'';
          (11) in section 4(b), by striking ``building'' both places it 
        appears and inserting ``building or infrastructure'';
          (12) in section 4(c)(1) and (2), by striking ``building'' 
        both places it appears and inserting ``building or 
        infrastructure'';
          (13) in section 4(d)(3) and (4), by striking ``building'' 
        both places it appears and inserting ``building or 
        infrastructure'';
          (14) in section 7(a), by striking ``on request and at 
        reasonable cost'';
          (15) in section 7(c), by striking ``building'' and inserting 
        ``building or infrastructure'';
          (16) in section 8(1) and (4), by striking ``building'' both 
        places it appears and inserting ``building or infrastructure'';
          (17) in section 9, by striking ``the United States Fire 
        Administration and'';
          (18) in section 9(2)(C), by striking ``building'' and 
        inserting ``building or infrastructure'';
          (19) in section 10(3), by striking ``building'' and inserting 
        ``building and infrastructure'';
          (20) in section 11(a), by striking ``the United States Fire 
        Administration and''; and
          (21) by striking section 12.

                     TITLE V--FIRE RESEARCH PROGRAM

SEC. 501. FIRE RESEARCH PROGRAM.

  Section 16(a)(1) of the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology Act (15 U.S.C. 278f(a)(1)) is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (D), by inserting ``fires at the 
        wildland-urban interface,'' after ``but not limited to,''; and
          (2) in subparagraph (E), by inserting ``fires at the 
        wildland-urban interface,'' after ``types of fires, 
        including''.

                        II. Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of this bill is to reauthorize the National 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) and the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP). In addition, this 
bill strengthens the National Construction Safety Team Act 
(NCSTA) by giving the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST) more flexibility in implementing the Act.

              III. Background and Need for the Legislation

    The United States faces serious threats to public safety 
and property from natural disasters. Major California 
earthquakes in 1989 and 1994, Loma Prieta and Northridge 
respectively, killed over 100 people, injured thousands, and 
cost the country nearly $30 billion from property losses and 
economic disruption. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita most recently 
demonstrated that severe weather can cause death, injury, and 
billions of dollars in damage. Developing and implementing 
measures to reduce the toll of earthquakes, severe weather, 
wildfires, and other natural disasters is critical as more 
Americans move to hazard-prone regions of the country. H.R. 
3820 reauthorizes and amends programs to improve knowledge of 
the physical processes of natural hazards and their effects, 
develop methods to prepare for and mitigate the impacts of 
natural hazards on the built environment and communities, and 
to facilitate the implementation of mitigation measures to stem 
the mounting losses from these disasters.

The National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP)

    Since the creation of NEHRP in 1977, the program has been a 
key contributor to the development of earthquake knowledge, 
seismic building codes, and increased awareness of the threat 
of earthquakes among public officials and the general public. 
The NEHRP legislation directs four federal agencies--NIST, the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), the United States Geological 
Survey (USGS), and the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA)--to coordinate efforts according to the agencies' 
expertise. The NSF funds basic research to study earthquakes 
and earthquake engineering; NIST and FEMA support and 
facilitate the development and implementation of safer 
earthquake building practices; and the USGS, in addition to 
supporting research to improve the understanding of 
earthquakes, also provides critical seismic monitoring through 
the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) and the Global 
Seismographic Network (GSN). In addition to its role in 
building research and development, NIST is also the lead agency 
for NEHRP, responsible for ensuring coordination, including a 
coordinated budget and strategic plan.

The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP)

    Congress created NWIRP in 2004, directing NIST, NSF, FEMA, 
and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 
to develop a coordinated R&D agenda to mitigate the impact of 
windstorms. In 2006, the National Science and Technology 
Council (NSTC) identified a number of priorities to achieve the 
goals of the program, including research to improve knowledge 
about windstorms and the characteristics of wind, advancing 
wind-resilient design and construction methods for buildings 
and other structures, and spurring mitigation action among the 
public. However, the program did not receive attention or 
funding. Consequently, very little federal attention has been 
paid to R&D to increase the resiliency of the built environment 
to windstorms.

National Construction Safety Team Act

    The National Construction Safety Team Act (NCSTA) (P.L. 
107-231), signed into law on October 1, 2002, authorizes NIST 
to establish teams to investigate building failures. The 
purpose of the Act is to improve the structural integrity of 
buildings and evacuation and emergency response procedures by 
investigating building failures and recommending specific 
improvements to building standards, codes, and practices, as 
well as to evacuation and emergency response procedures. The 
Act establishes NIST as the lead federal agency for building 
failures.

Wildfires at the Wildland-Urban Interface

    Fires at the wildland-urban interface are a growing problem 
as more communities develop around forested land. For instance, 
between 2003 and 2007, such fires destroyed over 8,000 
structures in California. NIST is developing tools for reducing 
community losses in wildland-urban interface fires.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    The Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation of the 
Committee on Science and Technology held three hearings related 
to natural hazards mitigation in the 110th and 111th 
Congresses.
    On June 11, 2009 in the 111th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
Technology and Innovation held a hearing entitled The 
Reauthorization of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program: R&D for Resilient Communities. The purpose of the 
hearing was to review NEHRP since the last reauthorization in 
2004, and to discuss areas where more multi-hazard coordination 
would be beneficial Five witnesses testified: Dr. Jack Hayes, 
Director of NEHRP at NIST; Mr. Kenneth Murphy, Director of the 
Oregon Office of Emergency Management and Immediate Past 
President of the National Emergency Management Association; Dr. 
Michael Lindell, Director of the Hazards Reduction and Recovery 
Center and Professor of Landscape Architecture & Urban Planning 
at Texas A&M University; Professor Thomas O'Rourke, Thomas R. 
Briggs Professor of Engineering of the School of Civil & 
Environmental Engineering at Cornell University; and Dr. Jim 
Harris, P.E., President of J. R. Harris & Company. Chairman Wu 
discussed the importance of the program to promoting earthquake 
mitigation measures, and stated that he would be interested to 
learn how NEHRP could be improved in the reauthorization. The 
witnesses discussed NEHRP activities and coordination efforts, 
challenges to increase earthquake preparedness and the adoption 
of mitigation measures, and the need to prioritize research on 
securing infrastructure and other lifelines, as well for 
retrofitting existing structures for earthquake resilience. 
They all agreed that program coordination had improved since 
the last reauthorization. The witnesses also agreed that NEHRP 
should pursue social science research that will result in 
adoption of earthquake mitigation measures by the public. They 
noted that particularly in the social science area, there were 
opportunities to coordinate R&D across all hazards. Finally, 
the witnesses noted the important benefits of the USGS' 
earthquake monitoring efforts and that more funding could be 
used to hasten the deployment of the ANSS and increase other 
NEHRP activities.
    On July 24, 2008, in the 110th Congress, the Subcommittee 
on Technology and Innovation held a hearing entitled The 
National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program: Strengthening 
Windstorm Hazard Mitigation. The purpose of the hearing was to 
review the activities of NWIRP and examine the role of R&D in 
mitigating the impact of windstorms. Four witnesses testified: 
Dr. Sharon Hays, Associate Director of the White House Office 
of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP); Dr. Marc Levitan, 
Director of the Hurricane Center at Louisiana State University 
(LSU) and Associate Professor of the LSU Department of Civil 
and Environmental Engineering; and Ms. Leslie Chapman-
Henderson, President and CEO of the Federal Alliance for Safe 
Home, Inc. (FLASH). Chairman Wu emphasized the devastating 
effects of windstorms, and expressed frustration at the 
Administration's lack of attention and funding for NWIRP. 
Witnesses also expressed concern over the low level of funding 
for wind-hazard mitigation R&D, particularly in light of the 
escalating costs of windstorms. They also noted that funding 
for wind-hazard mitigation R&D was significantly less than the 
amount spent on research to improve weather forecasting. The 
non-governmental experts were also concerned that the program's 
structure was an ineffective approach for interagency 
coordination and they recommended a structure more like NEHRP 
with NIST as the lead agency. The witnesses also discussed 
advances in wind hazard mitigation and methods of transferring 
the results of research into practice for code developers, 
builders, and property owners.
    On Tuesday, October 2, 2007, in the 110th Congress, the 
Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation held a hearing 
entitled, The United States Fire Administration 
Reauthorization: Addressing the Priorities of the Nation's Fire 
Service H.R. 4847. The purpose of this hearing was to address 
the United States Fire Administration (USFA) reauthorization. 
Six witnesses testified: (1) Chief Gregory B. Cade, the U.S. 
Fire Administrator, Director of USFA; (2) Dr. Sivaraj Shyam 
Sunder, Director of the Building and Fire Research Laboratory 
(BRFL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST); (3) Chief Steven P. Westermann, President and Chief 
Fire Officer, International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC); 
(4) Captain Robert Livingston, Captain in the Salem, Oregon 
Fire Department and representative to the Oregon State Council 
of Firefighters of the International Association of 
Firefighters (IAFF); (5) Chief Gordon Henderson, Deputy Chief 
of Operations, Rome-Floyd County Fire Department, Georgia, Past 
President of the Georgia State Firefighters' Association of the 
National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC); and (6) Dr. John R. 
Hall, Assistant Vice President, Fire Analysis and Research, 
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). The hearing 
included discussion by all of the witnesses of the growing 
problem of fires in the wildland-urban interface. Dr. Sunder 
described NIST's research on fire and fire safety, including 
work on mitigating the risks of wildland-urban interface fires.

                          V. Committee Actions

    On October 15, 2009, Technology and Innovation Subcommittee 
Chairman David Wu, for himself, Technology and Innovation 
Ranking Member Adrian Smith, Mr. Alan Grayson, and Mr. Dennis 
Moore, introduced H.R. 3820, the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction 
Act of 2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Science 
and Technology, and in addition to the Committees on Natural 
Resources, and Transportation and Infrastructure.
    The Committee on Science and Technology met to consider 
H.R. 3820 on October 21, 2009. The Committee considered the 
following amendments:
    1. Mr. Wu and Mr. Smith (NE) offered a manager's amendment 
which made minor and technical changes. The amendment: changed 
the NSF social science authorization language in Titles I and 
II to give NSF more flexibility; and, under Title II, clarified 
that NOAA's development of hazard assessment models and tools 
should be done in cooperation with both Federal agencies and 
State and local governments, and that NOAA's responsibility 
under this program will be the development of wind-speed maps, 
but not their maintenance. The amendment was agreed to by voice 
vote.
    2. Mr. Grayson offered an amendment to include provisions 
in Title II authorizing NOAA to study storm surge events and 
develop storm surge models. The amendment was agreed to by 
voice vote.
    Representative Tonko moved that the Committee favorably 
report H.R. 3820, as amended, to the House. The motion was 
agreed to by voice vote.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    Title I of H.R. 3820 reauthorizes the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP), the purpose of which is to 
mitigate earthquake hazards through research, development, 
technology transfer, and outreach activities. Title I directs 
NIST to be the lead agency, responsible for ensuring a 
coordinated budget, strategic plan, and program report. It also 
directs: the NIST to perform research and development to 
improve earthquake building codes and practices; the FEMA to 
facilitate the adoption of earthquake mitigation measures, 
through code development and outreach; the USGS to study 
earthquake hazards and phenomena and to deploy and operate 
seismic monitoring systems; and the NSF to study earthquakes, 
earthquake engineering, and the social science aspect of 
preparing and recovering from earthquakes. Title I of H.R. 3820 
authorizes a total of $805,656,000 for the NEHRP agencies 
(NIST, FEMA, USGS, and NSF) for fiscal years 2010 through 2014.
    Title II of H.R. 3820 reauthorizes the National Windstorm 
Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP), the purpose of which is to 
mitigate the impact of windstorms through research, 
development, and outreach activities. Title II directs NIST to 
be the lead agency for the program, responsible for ensuring a 
coordinated budget, strategic plan, and program report. It also 
directs: the NIST to perform research and development to 
improve wind building codes and practices; the FEMA to 
facilitate the adoption of windstorm mitigation measures, 
through code development and outreach; the NOAA to study and 
collect data on windstorms, to aid in the development of wind-
speed maps for standards, and to engage in outreach and 
awareness raising about windstorms; and the NSF to study 
windstorms, windstorm engineering, and the social science 
aspect of preparing and recovering from windstorms. Title II of 
H.R. 3820 authorizes a total of $136,710,300 for the NEHRP 
agencies (NIST, FEMA, NOAA, and NSF) for fiscal years 2010 
through 2014.
    Title III of H.R. 3820 establishes an Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction 
chaired by the Director of the NIST, and including the 
directors of FEMA, USGS, NOAA, NSF, OMB, and OSTP. Title III 
directs the Committee to oversee the planning and coordination 
of NEHRP and NWIRP, including coordinated budgets and strategic 
plans for both programs. Is also requires the Director of NIST 
to establish advisory committees for both programs, composed of 
non-federal employee experts. Title III also directs the 
Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction of the Committee on 
Environment and Natural Resources of the National Science and 
Technology Council to issue a report to Congress identifying 
current federal R&D in natural disaster mitigation and areas 
where such research may be better coordinated.
    Title IV of H.R. 3820 amends the National Construction 
Safety Team Act (P.L. 107-231), by authorizing NIST to include 
infrastructure within the Act, and by allowing the Director of 
NIST to decide whether to deploy a construction safety team 72 
hours after the failure of a structure.
    Title V of H.R. 3820 amends the activities of the NIST 
Building and Fire Research Lab to include research relating to 
protecting homes and communities from fires at the wildland-
urban interface.

                    VII. Section-by-Section Analysis


Sec. 1. Short title

    The Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009

Sec. 2. Findings

    Describes the findings of this Act.

                          TITLE I. EARTHQUAKES


Sec. 101. Short title

    National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program 
Reauthorization Act of 2009

Sec. 102. Findings

    Repeals section 2 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act 
of 1977 (42 U.S.C. 7701), which were the original ``Findings''.

Sec. 103. Definitions

    Removes the definitions of the ``Interagency Coordination 
Committee'' and the ``Advisory Committee'' from section 4 of 
the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977.

Sec. 104. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    Defines the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program's 
(NEHRP) activities; identifies the four agencies that make up 
NEHRP: the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the 
United States Geological Survey (USGS), and the National 
Science Foundation (NSF); defines NIST as the lead agency; and 
assigns responsibilities to the different agencies.
    Program activities include: research and development to 
reduce the risks of earthquakes to the built environment; 
research to improve the understanding of earthquakes and their 
impact on the built environment and society; and facilitation 
of the adoption of earthquake risk reduction measures through 
grants, technical assistance, development of building standards 
and guidelines, outreach to practitioners and community 
members, and other means.
    In addition to lead agency responsibilities, NIST shall 
also support research and development to improve codes, 
standards, and practices for new and existing buildings and 
lifelines. Such activities also include the development of 
tools and technical resources to help practitioners use new 
knowledge to mitigate earthquakes.
    FEMA activities include: facilitating the development and 
adoption of codes, standards and practices for new and existing 
structures and lifelines; the development of tools and methods 
to predict earthquake damage; and support a public earthquake 
education and public awareness program. FEMA also has the 
responsibility of a state assistance grant program to assist 
states in implementing various mitigation activities.
    USGS activities shall include research and other means to 
characterize earthquake hazards, assess earthquake risks, 
monitor seismic activity, and provide real-time earthquake 
information. These activities include the continued development 
of the Advanced National Seismic System and the Global 
Seismographic Network.
    NSF activities shall include the support of basic research 
to further the understanding of earthquake, earthquake 
engineering and community preparation and response to 
earthquakes. Such activities will also include support of the 
George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Engineering and Earthquake 
Simulation.

Sec. 105. Post-earthquake investigations program

    NEHRP shall be responsible for a post-earthquake 
investigations program. The lead agency shall be responsible 
for coordinating such investigations after earthquakes, in 
order to gather information and data to learn lessons that may 
be applied to reduce future earthquake losses.

Sec. 106. Authorization of appropriations

    Total authorization for FEMA from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$54,354,000
    Total authorization for USGS, including the Advanced 
National Seismic Research and Monitoring System from FY2010 to 
FY2014: $371,640,000
    Total authorization for NSF from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$286,275,000
    Total authorization for NIST from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$39,214,000

                             TITLE II. WIND


Sec. 201. Short title

    The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization 
of 2009

Sec. 202. Purpose

    The purpose of the program is to support research, 
development, and technology transfer activities that will lead 
to a reduction in the loss of life and property from 
windstorms.

Sec. 203. Definitions

    Amends the Act to define ``Director'' as the Director of 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Sec. 204. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

    Defines the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program's 
(NWIRP) activities; identifies the four agencies that make up 
NWIRP: the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the 
National Science Foundation (NSF); defines NIST as the lead 
agency; and assigns responsibilities to the different agencies.
    Program activities include: research and development on 
methods and technologies to reduce the risk of windstorms to 
the built environment; research to improve the understanding of 
windstorms and their impacts on the built environment and 
communities; and the facilitation of the adoption of windstorm 
risk reduction measures, through development of codes and 
standards, outreach, and other means.
    In addition to lead agency responsibilities, NIST 
activities shall also include research and development to: 
improve codes, standards, and design guidance for the 
construction and retrofit of new and existing structures; 
support the development of wind measurement tools; and the 
development of methods to collect data after severe wind 
events.
    FEMA activities include the development of: windstorm 
impact assessment tools; windstorm impact mitigation 
techniques; data collection and analysis after windstorm 
events; and outreach to facilitate mitigation measures in 
communities and among building practitioners.
    NOAA activities include the support of: atmospheric science 
research and data collection to better understand windstorms 
and their impacts.
    NSF activities include: research to improve the 
understanding of windstorms, their impact on the built 
environment, and on households, businesses, and communities.

Sec. 205. Authorization of appropriations

    Total authorization for FEMA from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$51,403,100
    Total authorization for NSF from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$51,403,100
    Total authorization for NIST from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$21,873,600
    Total authorization for NOAA from FY2010 to FY2014: 
$12,030,500

 TITLE III. INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE ON NATURAL HAZARDS RISK 
                               REDUCTION


Sec. 301. Interagency Coordinating Committee on Natural Hazards Risk 
        Reduction

    Establishes an Interagency Committee (ICC) on Natural 
Hazards Risk Reduction, chaired by the Director of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and comprised also 
of the Directors of the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the 
National Science Foundation (NSF), the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy (OSTP), the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB), and the head of any other Federal agency the Committee 
considers appropriate. Gives the ICC the responsibility of 
developing strategic plans, progress reports, and coordinated 
budgets for both the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program (NEHRP) and the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Program (NWIRP).
    Establishes Advisory Committees for NEHRP and NWIRP of 
relevant non-Federal employee experts to offer guidance and 
recommendations on program activities.
    Requires the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction, of the 
Committee on Environment and Natural Resources of the National 
Science and Technology Council, to submit a report to Congress 
identifying the current Federal research, development, and 
technology transfer activities that address mitigation for all 
types of natural hazards, and opportunities to create synergies 
among the various research activities.

       TITLE IV. NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT AMENDMENTS


Sec. 401. National Construction Safety Team Act Amendments

    Amends the National Construction Safety Team Act (P.L. 107-
231) to: include infrastructure, as well as buildings and to 
give the Director of the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST) 72 hours to decide to deploy a Construction 
Safety Team.

                     TITLE V. FIRE RESEARCH PROGRAM


Sec. 501. Fire Research Program

    To add to the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology's existing fire research authority, research on 
``fires at the wildland-urban interface.''

                         VIII. Committee Views


NEHRP

    NEHRP is an important resource for improving public safety. 
The research and development efforts that have led to improved 
understanding of the location and effects of earthquake 
hazards, as well as how to build and design structures to 
withstand earthquakes should continue. Because in many 
earthquake-prone communities, the existing built environment 
would not withstand a strong earthquake, developing tools and 
methods to retrofit existing structures should be a high 
priority for NERHP. In addition, NEHRP should also support 
research and development to improve the resiliency of 
infrastructure and other lifelines (like emergency and medical 
services) since functioning infrastructure is crucial to the 
recovery of a community after an earthquake. Finally, the most 
important step in protecting communities from earthquake 
hazards is the adoption of earthquake mitigation measures. 
NEHRP should facilitate and promote the adoption of these 
measures, through such activities as creating tools to help 
practitioners use the latest earthquake engineering knowledge 
and engaging the public about earthquake hazards. Social 
science research is important in understanding how communities 
and individuals perceive their risk and in effectively 
convincing people to adopt mitigation measures. NEHRP should 
therefore include social science research and knowledge in its 
efforts.

NWIRP

    Because of the lack of implementation and coordination for 
NWIRP since the creation of the program in 2004, NIST should 
lead efforts to ensure coordinated efforts for wind-hazard 
mitigation research, development, and technology transfer. This 
program should develop better wind standards and helping to 
facilitate the use of existing knowledge. As with the 
earthquake program, developing measures to cost-effectively 
retrofit existing structures is of high importance, as is 
developing methods to mitigate the impacts of windstorms on 
infrastructure and lifelines. Since social science is an 
important tool for understanding how communities prepare and 
react to disasters, and how to effectively convince people to 
adopt mitigation measures, it should also be an important 
component of this program.

Coordination

    The Interagency Coordinating Committee for NEHRP has been 
effective and should continue to ensure the agencies' 
activities are well coordinated and inline with the strategic 
plan. The members of this committee should give the same 
attention and consideration the NWIRP as well. Federal agencies 
should take advantage of opportunities for more coordination of 
R&D across different natural hazards. An important initial step 
is to specific types of R&D efforts, such as social science and 
data collection, where coordination and collaboration across 
different natural hazards is possible. The Committee believes 
that the National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee 
on Disaster Reduction can build on its previous efforts in the 
Grand Challenges for Disaster Reduction and identify areas 
where current federal natural hazards R&D efforts can be better 
coordinated.

NCSTA

    The National Construction Safety Team Act (NCSTA) is an 
important tool for improving public safety. The Director of 
NIST should, whenever appropriate, use the authorities in this 
Act to make recommendations to improve the safety of buildings 
and structures. The changes made to the NCSTA by H.R. 3820 give 
the Director of NIST greater flexibility in implementing the 
Act. The Director will now have 72 hours after a building 
failure (or failures) to decide whether to pursue an NCSTA 
investigation, rather than only 48 hours to actually send a 
team. H.R. 3820 also gives greater flexibility by including 
``infrastructure'' failures under the Act. The Committee does 
not find that there is any language within NIST's current 
authorities that prevents the agency from studying and 
gathering information about buildings that survive disasters, 
or from issuing building safety recommendations based on those 
findings.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section X of this report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 3820 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
3820 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate


H.R. 3820--Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009

    Summary: H.R. 3820 would reauthorize federal programs aimed 
at developing methods to reduce damages caused by earthquakes 
and windstorms. The bill also would reauthorize several 
committees that advise federal agencies on implementing those 
programs. Assuming appropriation of the authorized and 
necessary amounts, CBO estimates that implementing the 
legislation would cost $747 million over the 2010-2014 period 
and $125 million after 2014. Enacting H.R. 3820 would not 
affect direct spending or revenues.
    H.R. 3820 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or local 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 3820 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget functions 250 
(general science, space, and technology), 300 (natural 
resources and environment), 370 (commerce and housing credit), 
and 450 (community and regional development).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
                                                           2010     2011     2012     2013     2014    2010-2014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Title I: National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program:
    Authorization Levela...............................       80      157      161      165      171         734
    Estimated Outlays..................................       28      125      148      161      168         630
Title II: National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program:
    Authorization Level................................       26       26       26       29       30         137
    Estimated Outlays..................................       13       21       25       28       29         116
Title III: Advisory Committees:
    Estimated Authorization Level......................        *        *        *        *        *           1
    Estimated Outlays..................................        *        *        *        *        *           1
        Total Changes:.................................
            Authorization Level........................      106      183      187      194      201         872
            Estimated Outlays..........................       41      146      173      189      197        747
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: * = less than $500,000. Amounts may not sum to totals due to rounding.
aH.R. 3820 would authorize the appropriation of $151 million for the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program in
  2010. A total of $71 million has been appropriated to the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S.
  Geological Survey for 2010. Other agencies involved with this program have not yet received a full-year
  appropriation for 2010.

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that H.R. 
3820 will be enacted early in calendar year 2010 and that the 
authorized and necessary amounts will be appropriated for each 
fiscal year. Estimated outlays are based on historical spending 
patterns for similar activities.
    Over the 2010-2014 period, title I would authorize 
appropriations totaling $371 million for the United States 
Geological Survey, $340 million for the National Science 
Foundation (NSF), $55 million for the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA), and $39 million for the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to carry out the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. (Over the 2005-
2009 period, those agencies spent $616 million for the 
program.) Assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO 
estimates that implementing the provisions of title I would 
cost $630 million over the 2010-2014 period and $104 million 
after 2014. That estimate excludes $71 million that has already 
been appropriated for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program in 2010.
    Over the 2010-2014 period, title II would authorize 
appropriations totaling $52 million for NSF, $52 million for 
FEMA, $22 million for NIST, and $11 million for the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to carry out the 
National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. (Those agencies 
spent about $88 million on related activities over the 2005-
2009 period.) Assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts, 
CBO estimates that implementing the provisions of title II 
would cost $116 million over the 2010-2014 period and $21 
million after 2014.
    Title III would reauthorize several committees that advise 
federal agencies on implementing the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Program and the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Program. Based on information from NIST regarding 
administrative costs for similar committees, CBO estimates that 
the agency would spend about $150,000 a year to maintain those 
committees. In total, CBO estimates that implementing the 
provisions of title III would cost $750,000 over the 2010-2014 
period, assuming appropriation of the necessary amounts.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 3820 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
local governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Jeff LaFave; Impact on 
State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Melissa Merrell; Impact 
on the Private Sector: Sam Wice.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 3820 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c) of House Rule XIII, the goal of 
H.R. 3820 is to reauthorize the National Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Program (NEHRP) and the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Program (NWIRP).

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 3820.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    The functions of the advisory committees authorized in H.R. 
3820 are not currently being nor could they be performed by one 
or more agencies or by enlarging the mandate of another 
existing advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 3820 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. Earmark Identification

    H.R. 3820 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9 of Rule XXI.

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

       XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

                EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ACT OF 1977




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
[SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  [The Congress finds and declares the following:
          [(1) All 50 States are vulnerable to the hazards of 
        earthquakes, and at least 39 of them are subject to 
        major or moderate seismic risk, including Alaska, 
        California, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, 
        Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, 
        Utah, and Washington. A large portion of the population 
        of the United States lives in areas vulnerable to 
        earthquake hazards.
          [(2) Earthquakes have caused, and can cause in the 
        future, enormous loss of life, injury, destruction of 
        property, and economic and social disruption. With 
        respect to future earthquakes, such loss, destruction, 
        and disruption can be substantially reduced through the 
        development and implementation of earthquake hazards 
        reduction measures, including (A) improved design and 
        construction methods and practices, (B) land-use 
        controls and redevelopment, (C) prediction techniques 
        and early-warning systems, (D) coordinated emergency 
        preparedness plans, and (E) public education and 
        involvement programs.
          [(3) An expertly staffed and adequately financed 
        earthquake hazards reduction program, based on Federal, 
        State, local, and private research, planning, 
        decisionmaking, and contributions would reduce the risk 
        of such loss, destruction, and disruption in seismic 
        areas by an amount far greater than the cost of such 
        program.
          [(4) A well-funded seismological research program in 
        earthquake prediction could provide data adequate for 
        the design, of an operational system that could predict 
        accurately the time, place, magnitude, and physical 
        effects of earthquakes in selected areas of the United 
        States.
          [(5) The geological study of active faults and 
        features can reveal how recently and how frequently 
        major earthquakes have occurred on those faults and how 
        much risk they pose. Such long-term seismic risk 
        assessments are needed in virtually every aspect of 
        earthquake hazards management, whether emergency 
        planning, public regulation, detailed building design, 
        insurance rating, or investment decision.
          [(6) The vulnerability of buildings, lifelines, 
        public works, and industrial and emergency facilities 
        can be reduced through proper earthquake resistant 
        design and construction practices. The economy and 
        efficacy of such procedures can be substantially 
        increased through research and development.
          [(7) Programs and practices of departments and 
        agencies of the United States are important to the 
        communities they serve; some functions, such as 
        emergency communications and national defense, and 
        lifelines, such as dams, bridges, and public works, 
        must remain in service during and after an earthquake. 
        Federally owned, operated, and influenced structures 
        and lifelines should serve as models for how to reduce 
        and minimize hazards to the community.
          [(8) The implementation of earthquake hazards 
        reduction measures would, as an added benefit, also 
        reduce the risk of loss, destruction, and disruption 
        from other natural hazards and man-made hazards, 
        including hurricanes, tornadoes, accidents, explosions, 
        landslides, building and structural cave-ins, and 
        fires.
          [(9) Reduction of loss, destruction, and disruption 
        from earthquakes will depend on the actions of 
        individuals, and organizations in the private sector 
        and governmental units at Federal, State, and local 
        levels. The current capability to transfer knowledge 
        and information to these sectors is insufficient. 
        Improved mechanisms are needed to translate existing 
        information and research findings into reasonable and 
        usable specifications, criteria, and practices so that 
        individuals, organizations, and governmental units may 
        make informed decisions and take appropriate actions.
          [(10) Severe earthquakes are a worldwide problem. 
        Since damaging earthquakes occur infrequently in any 
        one nation, international cooperation is desirable for 
        mutual learning from limited experiences.
          [(11) An effective Federal program in earthquake 
        hazard reduction will require input from and review by 
        persons outside the Federal Government expert in the 
        sciences of earthquake hazards reduction and in the 
        practical application of earthquake hazards reduction 
        measures.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

  As used in this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          [(8) The term ``Interagency Coordinating Committee'' 
        means the Interagency Coordinating Committee on 
        Earthquake Hazards Reduction established under section 
        5(a).
          [(9) The term ``Advisory Committee'' means the 
        Advisory Committee established under section 5(a)(5).]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 5. NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  (a) Establishment.--
          (1) * * *
          [(2) Program activities.--The activities of the 
        Program shall be designed to--
                  [(A) develop effective measures for 
                earthquake hazards reduction;
                  [(B) promote the adoption of earthquake 
                hazards reduction measures by Federal, State, 
                and local governments, national standards and 
                model code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in planning and constructing buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines through--
                          [(i) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                        agreements, and technical assistance;
                          [(ii) development of standards, 
                        guidelines, and voluntary consensus 
                        codes for earthquake hazards reduction 
                        for buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines;
                          [(iii) development and maintenance of 
                        a repository of information, including 
                        technical data, on seismic risk and 
                        hazards reduction; and
                  [(C) improve the understanding of earthquakes 
                and their effects on communities, buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines, through 
                interdisciplinary research that involves 
                engineering, natural sciences, and social, 
                economic, and decisions sciences; and
                  [(D) develop, operate, and maintain an 
                Advanced National Seismic Research and 
                Monitoring System established under section 13 
                of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 
                (42 U.S.C. 7707), the George E. Brown, Jr. 
                Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation 
                established under section 14 of that Act (42 
                U.S.C. 7708), and the Global Seismographic 
                Network.
          [(3) Interagency coordinating committee on earthquake 
        hazards reduction.--
                  [(A) In general.--There is established an 
                Interagency Coordinating Committee on 
                Earthquake Hazards Reduction chaired by the 
                Director of the National Institute of Standards 
                and Technology (referred to in this subsection 
                as the ``Director'').
                  [(B) Membership.--The committee shall be 
                composed of the directors of--
                          [(i) the Federal Emergency Management 
                        Agency;
                          [(ii) the United States Geological 
                        Survey;
                          [(iii) the National Science 
                        Foundation;
                          [(iv) the Office of Science and 
                        Technology Policy; and
                          [(v) the Office of Management and 
                        Budget.
                  [(C) Meetings.--The Committee shall meet not 
                less than 3 times a year at the call of the 
                Director.
                  [(D) Purpose and duties.--The Interagency 
                Coordinating Committee shall oversee the 
                planning, management, and coordination of the 
                Program. The Interagency Coordinating Committee 
                shall--
                          [(i) develop, not later than 6 months 
                        after the date of enactment of the 
                        National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
                        Program Reauthorization Act of 2004 and 
                        update periodically--
                                  [(I) a strategic plan that 
                                establishes goals and 
                                priorities for the Program 
                                activities described under 
                                subsection (a)(2); and
                                  [(II) a detailed management 
                                plan to implement such 
                                strategic plan; and
                          [(ii) develop a coordinated 
                        interagency budget for the Program that 
                        will ensure appropriate balance among 
                        the Program activities described under 
                        subsection (a)(2), and, in accordance 
                        with the plans developed under clause 
                        (i), submit such budget to the Director 
                        of the Office of Management and Budget 
                        at the time designated by that office 
                        for agencies to submit annual budgets.
          [(4) Annual report.--The Interagency Coordinating 
        Committee shall transmit, at the time of the 
        President's budget request to Congress, an annual 
        report to the Committee on Science and the Committee on 
        Resources of the House of Representatives, and the 
        Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of 
        the Senate. Such report shall include--
                  [(A) the Program budget for the current 
                fiscal year for each agency that participates 
                in the Program, and for each major goal 
                established for the Program activities under 
                subparagraph (3)(A);
                  [(B) the proposed Program budget for the next 
                fiscal year for each agency that participates 
                in the Program, and for each major goal 
                established for the Program activities under 
                subparagraph (3)(A);
                  [(C) a description of the activities and 
                results of the Program during the previous 
                year, including an assessment of the 
                effectiveness of the Program in furthering the 
                goals established in the strategic plan under 
                (3)(A);
                  [(D) a description of the extent to which the 
                Program has incorporated the recommendations of 
                the Advisory Committee;
                  [(E) a description of activities, including 
                budgets for the current fiscal year and 
                proposed budgets for the next fiscal year, that 
                are carried out by Program agencies and 
                contribute to the Program, but are not included 
                in the Program; and
                  [(F) a description of the activities, 
                including budgets for the current fiscal year 
                and proposed budgets for the following fiscal 
                year, related to the grant program carried out 
                under subsection (b)(2)(A)(i).
          [(5) Advisory committee.--
                  [(A) In general.--The Director shall 
                establish an Advisory Committee on Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction of at least 11 members, none 
                of whom may be an employee (as defined in 
                subparagraphs (A) through (F) of section 
                7342(a)(1) of title 5, United States Code, 
                including representatives of research and 
                academic institutions, industry standards 
                development organizations, State and local 
                government, and financial communities who are 
                qualified to provide advice on earthquake 
                hazards reduction and represent all related 
                scientific, architectural, and engineering 
                disciplines. The recommendations of the 
                Advisory Committee shall be considered by 
                Federal agencies in implementing the Program.
                  [(B) Assessment.--The Advisory Committee 
                shall assess--
                          [(i) trends and developments in the 
                        science and engineering of earthquake 
                        hazards reduction;
                          [(ii) effectiveness of the Program in 
                        carrying out the activities under 
                        (a)(2);
                          [(iii) the need to revise the 
                        Program; and
                          [(iv) the management, coordination, 
                        implementation, and activities of the 
                        Program.
                  [(C) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the 
                date of enactment of the National Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization Act 
                of 2004 and at least once every 2 years 
                thereafter, the Advisory Committee shall report 
                to the Director on its findings of the 
                assessment carried out under subparagraph (B) 
                and its recommendations for ways to improve the 
                Program. In developing recommendations, the 
                Committee shall consider the recommendations of 
                the United States Geological Survey Scientific 
                Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee.
                  [(D) Federal advisory committee act 
                application.--Section 14 of the Federal 
                Advisory Committee Act (5 App. U.S.C. 14) shall 
                not apply to the Advisory Committee.]
          (2) Program activities.--The activities of the 
        Program shall be designed to--
                  (A) research and develop effective methods, 
                tools, and technologies to reduce the risk 
                posed by earthquakes to the built environment, 
                especially to lessen the risk to existing 
                structures and lifelines;
                  (B) improve the understanding of earthquakes 
                and their effects on households, businesses, 
                communities, buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, through interdisciplinary and 
                multidisciplinary research that involves 
                engineering, natural sciences, and social 
                sciences; and
                  (C) facilitate the adoption of earthquake 
                risk reduction measures by households, 
                businesses, communities, local, State, and 
                Federal governments, national standards and 
                model building code organizations, architects 
                and engineers, building owners, and others with 
                a role in planning for disasters and planning, 
                constructing, retrofitting, and insuring 
                buildings, structures, and lifelines through--
                          (i) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                        agreements, and technical assistance;
                          (ii) development of standards, 
                        guidelines, voluntary consensus 
                        standards, and other design guidance 
                        for earthquake hazards risk reduction 
                        for buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines;
                          (iii) outreach and information 
                        dissemination to communities on 
                        location-specific earthquake hazards 
                        and methods to reduce the risks from 
                        those hazards; and
                          (iv) development and maintenance of a 
                        repository of information, including 
                        technical data, on seismic risk and 
                        hazards reduction.
  [(b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          [(1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology shall have the primary 
        responsibility for planning and coordinating the 
        Program. In carrying out this paragraph, the Director 
        of the Institute shall--
                  [(A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary steps to promote the implementation 
                of earthquake hazard reduction measures by 
                Federal, State, and local governments, national 
                standards and model building code 
                organizations, architects and engineers, and 
                others with a role in planning and constructing 
                buildings and lifelines;
                  [(B) support the development of performance-
                based seismic engineering tools, and work with 
                appropriate groups to promote the commercial 
                application of such tools, through earthquake-
                related building codes, standards, and 
                construction practices;
                  [(C) request the assistance of Federal 
                agencies other than the Program agencies, as 
                necessary to assist in carrying out this Act; 
                and
                  [(D) work with the Federal Emergency 
                Management Agency, the National Science 
                Foundation , and the United States Geological 
                Survey, to develop a comprehensive plan for 
                earthquake engineering research to effectively 
                use existing testing facilities and 
                laboratories (existing at the time of the 
                development of the plan), upgrade facilities 
                and equipment as needed, and integrate new, 
                innovative testing approaches to the research 
                infrastructure in a systematic manner.
  [(2) Department of homeland security; federal emergency 
management agency.--
          [(A) Program responsibilities.--The Under Secretary 
        of Homeland Security for Emergency Preparedness and 
        Response (the Director of the Federal Emergency 
        Management Agency)--
                  [(i) shall work closely with national 
                standards and model building code 
                organizations, in conjunction with the National 
                Institute of Standards and Technology, to 
                promote the implementation of research results;
                  [(ii) shall promote better building practices 
                within the building design and construction 
                industry including architects, engineers, 
                contractors, builders, and inspectors;
                  [(iii) shall operate a program of grants and 
                assistance to enable States to develop 
                mitigation, preparedness, and response plans, 
                prepare inventories and conduct seismic safety 
                inspections of critical structures and 
                lifelines, update building and zoning codes and 
                ordinances to enhance seismic safety, increase 
                earthquake awareness and education, and 
                encourage the development of multi-State groups 
                for such purposes;
                  [(iv) shall support the implementation of a 
                comprehensive earthquake education and public 
                awareness program, including development of 
                materials and their wide dissemination to all 
                appropriate audiences and support public access 
                to locality-specific information that may 
                assist the public in preparing for, mitigating 
                against, responding to and recovering from 
                earthquakes and related disasters;
                  [(v) shall assist the National Institute of 
                Standards and Technology, other Federal 
                agencies, and private sector groups, in the 
                preparation, maintenance, and wide 
                dissemination of seismic resistant design 
                guidance and related information on building 
                codes, standards, and practices for new and 
                existing buildings, structures, and lifelines, 
                and aid in the development of performance-based 
                design guidelines and methodologies supporting 
                model codes for buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines that are cost effective and 
                affordable;
                  [(vi) shall develop, coordinate, and execute 
                the National Response Plan when required 
                following an earthquake, and support the 
                development of specific State and local plans 
                for each high risk area to ensure the 
                availability of adequate emergency medical 
                resources, search and rescue personnel and 
                equipment, and emergency broadcast capability;
                  [(vii) shall develop approaches to combine 
                measures for earthquake hazards reduction with 
                measures for reduction of other natural and 
                technological hazards including performance-
                based design approaches;
                  [(viii) shall provide preparedness, response, 
                and mitigation recommendations to communities 
                after an earthquake prediction has been made 
                under paragraph (3)(D); and
                  [(ix) may enter into cooperative agreements 
                or contracts with States and local 
                jurisdictions and other Federal agencies to 
                establish demonstration projects on earthquake 
                hazard mitigation, to link earthquake research 
                and mitigation efforts with emergency 
                management programs, or to prepare educational 
                materials for national distribution.
          [(B) State assistance program criteria.--In order to 
        qualify for assistance under subparagraph (A)(i), a 
        State must--
                  [(i) demonstrate that the assistance will 
                result in enhanced seismic safety in the State;
                  [(ii) provide a share of the costs of the 
                activities for which assistance is being given, 
                in accordance with subparagraph (C); and
                  [(iii) meet such other requirements as the 
                Director of the Agency shall prescribe.
          [(C) Non-federal cost sharing.--
                  [(i) In the case of any State which has 
                received, before October 1, 1990, a grant from 
                the Agency for activities under this Act which 
                included a requirement for cost sharing by 
                matching such grant, any grant obtained from 
                the Agency for activities under subparagraph 
                (A)(i) after such date shall not include a 
                requirement for cost sharing in an amount 
                greater than 50 percent of the cost of the 
                project for which the grant is made.
                  [(ii) In the case of any State which has not 
                received, before October 1, 1990, a grant from 
                the Agency for activities under this Act which 
                included a requirement for cost sharing by 
                matching such grant, any grant obtained from 
                the Agency for activities under subparagraph 
                (A)(i) after such date--
                          [(I) shall not include a requirement 
                        for cost sharing for the first fiscal 
                        year of such a grant;
                          [(II) shall not include a requirement 
                        for cost sharing in an amount greater 
                        than 25 percent of the cost of the 
                        project for which the grant is made for 
                        the second fiscal year of such grant, 
                        and any cost sharing requirement may be 
                        satisfied through in-kind 
                        contributions;
                          [(III) shall not include a 
                        requirement for cost sharing in an 
                        amount greater than 35 percent of the 
                        cost of the project for which the grant 
                        is made for the third fiscal year of 
                        such grant, and any cost sharing 
                        requirement may be satisfied through 
                        in-kind contributions; and
                          [(IV) shall not include a requirement 
                        for cost sharing in an amount greater 
                        than 50 percent of the cost of the 
                        project for which the grant is made for 
                        the fourth and subsequent fiscal years 
                        of such grant.
          [(3) United states geological survey.--The United 
        States Geological Survey shall conduct research and 
        other activities necessary to characterize and identify 
        earthquake hazards, assess earthquake risks, monitor 
        seismic activity, and improve earthquake predictions. 
        In carrying out this paragraph, the Director of the 
        United States Geological Survey shall--
                  [(A) conduct a systematic assessment of the 
                seismic risks in each region of the Nation 
                prone to earthquakes, including, where 
                appropriate, the establishment and operation of 
                intensive monitoring projects on hazardous 
                faults, seismic microzonation studies in urban 
                and other developed areas where earthquake risk 
                is determined to be significant, and 
                engineering seismology studies;
                  [(B) work with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about the specific seismic risks 
                in their areas;
                  [(C) develop standard procedures, in 
                consultation with the Director of the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency and the Director of 
                the National Institute of Standards and 
                Technology, for issuing earthquake predictions, 
                including aftershock advisories;
                  [(D) issue when necessary, and notify the 
                Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency and the Director of the National 
                Institute of Standards and Technology of, an 
                earthquake prediction or other earthquake 
                advisory, which may be evaluated by the 
                National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation 
                Council, which shall be exempt from the 
                requirements of section 10(a)(2) of the Federal 
                Advisory Committee Act when meeting for such 
                purposes;
                  [(E) operate, using the National Earthquake 
                Information Center, a forum for the 
                international exchange of earthquake 
                information which shall--
                          [(i) promote the exchange of 
                        information on earthquake research and 
                        earthquake preparedness between the 
                        United States and other nations;
                          [(ii) maintain a library containing 
                        selected reports, research papers, and 
                        data produced through the Program;
                          [(iii) answer requests from other 
                        nations for information on United 
                        States earthquake research and 
                        earthquake preparedness programs; and
                          [(iv) direct foreign requests to the 
                        agency involved in the Program which is 
                        best able to respond to the request;
                  [(F) operate a National Seismic System;
                  [(G) support regional seismic networks, which 
                shall complement the National Seismic Network; 
                and
                  [(H) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, and the National Institute of Standards 
                and Technology to develop a comprehensive plan 
                for earthquake engineering research to 
                effectively use existing testing facilities and 
                laboratories (in existence at the time of the 
                development of the plan), upgrade facilities 
                and equipment as needed, and integrate new, 
                innovative testing approaches to the research 
                infrastructure in a systematic manner.
                  [(I) work with other Program agencies to 
                coordinate Program activities with similar 
                earthquake hazards reduction efforts in other 
                countries, to ensure that the Program benefits 
                from relevant information and advances in those 
                countries; and
                  [(J) maintain suitable seismic hazard maps in 
                support of building codes for structures and 
                lifelines, including additional maps needed for 
                performance-based design approaches.
          [(4) National science foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        research on earth sciences to improve the understanding 
        of the causes and behavior of earthquakes, on 
        earthquake engineering, and on human response to 
        earthquakes. In carrying out this paragraph, the 
        Director of the National Science Foundation shall--
                  [(A) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate 
                earthquake damage;
                  [(B) in addition to supporting individual 
                investigators, support university research 
                consortia and centers for research in 
                geosciences and in earthquake engineering;
                  [(C) work closely with the United States 
                Geological Survey to identify geographic 
                regions of national concern that should be the 
                focus of targeted solicitations for earthquake-
                related research proposals;
                  [(D) support research that improves the 
                safety and performance of buildings, 
                structures, and lifeline systems using large-
                scale experimental and computational facilities 
                of the George E. Brown Jr. Network for 
                Earthquake Engineering Simulation and other 
                institutions engaged in research and the 
                implementation of the National Earthquake 
                Hazards Reduction Program;
                  [(E) emphasize, in earthquake engineering 
                research, development of economically feasible 
                methods to retrofit existing buildings and to 
                protect lifelines to mitigate earthquake 
                damage;
                  [(F) support research that studies the 
                political, economic, and social factors that 
                influence the implementation of hazard 
                reduction measures;
                  [(G) include to the maximum extent 
                practicable diverse institutions, including 
                Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
                and those serving large proportions of 
                Hispanics, Native Americans, Asian-Pacific 
                Americans, and other underrepresented 
                populations; and
                  [(H) develop, in conjunction with the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency, the National 
                Institute of Standards and Technology, and the 
                United States Geological Survey, a 
                comprehensive plan for earthquake engineering 
                research to effectively use existing testing 
                facilities and laboratories (in existence at 
                the time of the development of the plan), 
                upgrade facilities and equipment as needed, and 
                integrate new, innovative testing approaches to 
                the research infrastructure in a systematic 
                manner.
          [(5) National institute of standards and 
        technology.--In addition to the lead agency 
        responsibilities described under paragraph (1), the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology shall be 
        responsible for carrying out research and development 
        to improve building codes and standards and practices 
        for structures and lifelines. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology shall--
                  [(A) work closely with national standards and 
                model building code organizations, in 
                conjunction with the Agency, to promote the 
                implementation of research results;
                  [(B) promote better building practices among 
                architects and engineers;
                  [(C) work closely with national standards 
                organizations to develop seismic safety 
                standards and practices for new and existing 
                lifelines;
          [(D) support the development and commercial 
        application of cost effective and affordable 
        performance-based seismic engineering by providing 
        technical support for seismic engineering practices and 
        related building code, standards, and practices 
        development; and
                  [(E) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, and the United States Geological Survey 
                to develop a comprehensive plan for earthquake 
                engineering research to effectively use 
                existing testing facilities and laboratories 
                (in existence at the time of the development of 
                the plan), upgrade facilities and equipment as 
                needed, and integrate new, innovative testing 
                approaches to the research infrastructure in a 
                systematic manner.]
  (b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          (1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology (in this section referred to as the 
        ``Institute'') shall be responsible for planning and 
        coordinating the Program. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  (A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary components to promote the 
                implementation of earthquake hazards risk 
                reduction measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State, and Federal 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in preparing for disasters, or the 
                planning, constructing, retrofitting, and 
                insuring of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines;
                  (B) support the development of performance-
                based seismic engineering tools, and work with 
                the appropriate groups to promote the 
                commercial application of such tools, through 
                earthquake-related building codes, standards, 
                and construction practices;
                  (C) ensure the use of social science research 
                and findings in informing research and 
                technology development priorities, 
                communicating earthquake risks to the public, 
                developing earthquake risk mitigation 
                strategies, and preparing for earthquake 
                disasters;
                  (D) coordinate all Federal post-earthquake 
                investigations; and
                  (E) when warranted by research or 
                investigative findings, issue recommendations 
                for changes in model codes to the relevant code 
                development organizations, and report back to 
                Congress on whether such recommendations were 
                adopted.
          (2) National institute of standards and technology.--
        In addition to the lead agency responsibilities 
        described under paragraph (1), the Institute shall be 
        responsible for carrying out research and development 
        to improve building codes and standards and practices 
        for buildings, structures, and lifelines. In carrying 
        out this paragraph, the Director of the Institute 
        shall--
                  (A) work, in conjunction with other 
                appropriate Federal agencies, to support the 
                development of improved seismic standards and 
                model codes;
                  (B) in coordination with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies, work closely with standards 
                and model code development organizations, 
                professional societies, and practicing 
                engineers, architects, and others involved in 
                the construction of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, to promote better building 
                practices, including by--
                          (i) developing technical resources 
                        for practitioners on new knowledge and 
                        standards of practice; and
                          (ii) developing methods and tools to 
                        facilitate the incorporation of 
                        earthquake engineering principles into 
                        design and construction practices;
                  (C) develop tools, technologies, methods, and 
                practitioner guidance to feasibly and cost-
                effectively retrofit existing buildings and 
                structures to increase their earthquake 
                resiliency; and
                  (D) work closely with national standards 
                organizations, and other interested parties, to 
                develop seismic safety standards and practices 
                for new and existing lifelines.
          (3) Federal emergency management agency.--
                  (A) In general.--The Federal Emergency 
                Management Agency (in this paragraph referred 
                to as the ``Agency'') shall be responsible for 
                facilitating the development and adoption of 
                standards, model building codes, and better 
                seismic building practices, developing tools to 
                assess earthquake hazards, promoting the 
                adoption of hazard mitigation measures, and 
                carrying out a program of direct assistance to 
                States and localities to mitigate earthquake 
                risks to buildings, structures, lifelines, and 
                communities.
                  (B) Director's duties.--The Director of the 
                Agency shall--
                          (i) work closely with other relevant 
                        Federal agencies, standards and model 
                        building code development 
                        organizations, architects, engineers, 
                        and other professionals, to facilitate 
                        the development and adoption of 
                        standards, model codes, and design and 
                        construction practices to increase the 
                        earthquake resiliency of new and 
                        existing buildings, structures, and 
                        lifelines in the--
                                  (I) preparation, maintenance, 
                                and wide dissemination of 
                                design guidance, model building 
                                codes and standards, and 
                                practices to increase the 
                                earthquake resiliency of new 
                                and existing buildings, 
                                structures, and lifelines;
                                  (II) development of 
                                performance-based design 
                                guidelines and methodologies 
                                supporting model codes for 
                                buildings, structures, and 
                                lifelines; and
                                  (III) development of methods 
                                and tools to facilitate the 
                                incorporation of earthquake 
                                engineering principles into 
                                design and construction 
                                practices;
                          (ii) develop tools, technologies, and 
                        methods to assist local planners, and 
                        others, to model and predict the 
                        potential impact of earthquake damage 
                        in seismically hazardous areas; and
                          (iii) support the implementation of a 
                        comprehensive earthquake education and 
                        public awareness program, including the 
                        development of materials and their wide 
                        dissemination to all appropriate 
                        audiences, and support public access to 
                        locality-specific information that may 
                        assist the public in preparing for, 
                        mitigating against, responding to, and 
                        recovering from earthquakes and related 
                        disasters.
                  (C) State assistance grant program.--The 
                Director of the Agency shall operate a program 
                of grants and assistance to enable States to 
                develop mitigation, preparedness, and response 
                plans, compare inventories and conduct seismic 
                safety inspections of critical structures and 
                lifelines, update building and zoning codes and 
                ordinances to enhance seismic safety, increase 
                earthquake awareness and education, and 
                encourage the development of multistate groups 
                for such purposes. In order to qualify for 
                assistance under this subparagraph, a State 
                must--
                          (i) demonstrate that the assistance 
                        will result in enhanced seismic safety 
                        in the State;
                          (ii) provide 50 percent of the costs 
                        of the activities for which assistance 
                        is being given, except that the 
                        Director may lower or waive the cost-
                        share requirement for these activities 
                        in exceptional cases of economic 
                        hardship; and
                          (iii) meet such other requirements as 
                        the Director of the Agency shall 
                        prescribe.
          (4) United states geological survey.--The United 
        States Geological Survey (in this paragraph referred to 
        as the ``Survey'') shall conduct research and other 
        activities necessary to characterize and identify 
        earthquake hazards, assess earthquake risks, monitor 
        seismic activity, and provide real-time earthquake 
        information. In carrying out this paragraph, the 
        Director of the Survey shall--
                  (A) conduct a systematic assessment of the 
                seismic risks in each region of the Nation 
                prone to earthquakes, including, where 
                appropriate, the establishment and operation of 
                intensive monitoring projects on hazardous 
                faults, detailed seismic hazard and risk 
                studies in urban and other developed areas 
                where earthquake risk is determined to be 
                significant, and engineering seismology 
                studies;
                  (B) work with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about the specific seismic risks 
                in their areas;
                  (C) develop standard procedures, in 
                consultation with the Director of the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency, for issuing 
                earthquake alerts, including aftershock 
                advisories;
                  (D) issue when justified, and notify the 
                Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency of, an earthquake prediction or other 
                earthquake advisory, which may be evaluated by 
                the National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation 
                Council;
                  (E) operate, as integral parts of the 
                Advanced National Seismic Research and 
                Monitoring System, a National Earthquake 
                Information Center and a national seismic 
                network, together providing timely and accurate 
                information on earthquakes world-wide;
                  (F) support the operation of regional seismic 
                networks in areas of higher seismic risk;
                  (G) develop and support seismic 
                instrumentation of buildings and other 
                structures to obtain data on their response to 
                earthquakes for use in engineering studies and 
                assessment of damage;
                  (H) monitor and assess Earth surface 
                deformation as it pertains to the evaluation of 
                earthquake hazards and impacts;
                  (I) work with other Program agencies to 
                maintain awareness of, and where appropriate 
                cooperate with, earthquake risk reduction 
                efforts in other countries, to ensure that the 
                Program benefits from relevant information and 
                advances in those countries;
                  (J) maintain suitable seismic hazard maps in 
                support of building codes for structures and 
                lifelines, including additional maps needed for 
                performance-based design approaches;
                  (K) conduct a competitive, peer-reviewed 
                process which awards grants and cooperative 
                agreements to complement and extend related 
                internal Survey research and monitoring 
                activities; and
                  (L) operate, in cooperation with the National 
                Science Foundation, a Global Seismographic 
                Network for detection of earthquakes around the 
                world and research into fundamental earth 
                processes.
          (5) National science foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        basic research that furthers the understanding of 
        earthquakes, earthquake engineering, and community 
        preparation and response to earthquakes. In carrying 
        out this paragraph, the Director of the National 
        Science Foundation shall--
                  (A) support multidisciplinary and 
                interdisciplinary research that will improve 
                the resiliency of communities to earthquakes, 
                including--
                          (i) research that improves the safety 
                        and performance of buildings, 
                        structures, and lifelines, including 
                        the use of the large-scale experimental 
                        and computational facilities of the 
                        George E. Brown, Jr. Network for 
                        Engineering Earthquake Simulation;
                          (ii) research to support more 
                        effective earthquake mitigation and 
                        response measures, such as developing 
                        better knowledge of the specific types 
                        of vulnerabilities faced by segments of 
                        the community vulnerable to 
                        earthquakes, addressing the barriers 
                        they face in adopting mitigation and 
                        preparation measures, and developing 
                        methods to better communicate the risks 
                        of earthquakes and to promote 
                        mitigation; and
                          (iii) research on the response of 
                        communities, households, businesses, 
                        and emergency responders to 
                        earthquakes;
                  (B) support research to understand earthquake 
                processes, earthquake patterns, and earthquake 
                frequencies;
                  (C) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate 
                earthquake damage;
                  (D) work with other Program agencies to 
                maintain awareness of, and where appropriate 
                cooperate with, earthquake risk reduction 
                research efforts in other countries, to ensure 
                that the Program benefits from relevant 
                information and advances in those countries; 
                and
                  (E) include to the maximum extent practicable 
                diverse institutions, including Historically 
                Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-
                serving institutions, Tribal Colleges and 
                Universities, Alaska Native-serving 
                institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving 
                institutions.
  (c) Budget Coordination.--
          (1) Guidance.--The Interagency Coordinating Committee 
        on Natural Hazards Risk Reduction established under 
        section 301 of the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act 
        of 2009 shall each year provide guidance to the other 
        Program agencies concerning the preparation of requests 
        for appropriations for activities related to the 
        Program, and shall prepare, in conjunction with the 
        other Program agencies, an annual Program budget to be 
        submitted to the Office of Management and Budget.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 11. POST-EARTHQUAKE INVESTIGATIONS PROGRAM.

  [There is established within the United States Geological 
Survey a post-earthquake investigations program, the purpose of 
which is to investigate major earthquakes, so as to learn 
lessons which can be applied to reduce the loss of lives and 
property in future earthquakes. The United States Geological 
Survey, in consultation with each Program agency, shall 
organize investigations to study the implications of the 
earthquake in the areas of responsibility of each Program 
agency. The investigations shall begin as rapidly as possible 
and may be conducted by grantees and contractors. The Program 
agencies shall ensure that the results of investigations are 
disseminated widely. The Director of the Survey is authorized 
to utilize earthquake expertise from the Agency, the National 
Science Foundation, the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, other Federal agencies, and private contractors, on 
a reimbursable basis, in the conduct of such earthquake 
investigations.] The Program shall include a post-earthquake 
investigations program, the purpose of which is to investigate 
major earthquakes so as to learn lessons which can be applied 
to reduce the loss of lives and property in future earthquakes. 
The lead Program agency, in consultation with each Program 
agency, shall organize investigations to study the implications 
of the earthquakes in the areas of responsibility of each 
Program agency. The investigations shall begin as rapidly as 
possible and may be conducted by grantees and contractors. The 
Program agencies shall ensure that the results of the 
investigations are disseminated widely. At a minimum, 
investigations under this section shall include--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 12. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a)(1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (9) There are authorized to be appropriated to the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency for carrying out this Act--
          (A) $10,238,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (B) $10,545,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (C) $10,861,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (D) $11,187,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (E) $11,523,000 for fiscal year 2014.
  (b) Geological Survey.--(1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the United 
States Geological Survey for carrying out this Act, including 
the Advanced National Seismic Research and Monitoring System--
          (A) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (B) $72,100,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (C) $74,263,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (D) $76,491,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (E) $78,786,000 for fiscal year 2014.
  (c) National Science Foundation.--(1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the National 
Science Foundation for carrying out this Act--
          (A) $64,125,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (B) $66,049,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (C) $68,030,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (D) $70,071,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (E) $72,173,000 for fiscal year 2014.
  (d) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--(1) * * 
*

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology for carrying out this 
Act--
          (A) $7,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (B) $7,700,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (C) $7,931,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (D) $8,169,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (E) $8,414,000 for fiscal year 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 14. NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION.

  (a) * * *
  [(b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
appropriated under section 12(c), there are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for the George 
E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation--
          [(1) $28,200,000 for fiscal year 2001;
          [(2) $24,400,000 for fiscal year 2002;
          [(3) $4,500,000 for fiscal year 2003;
          [(4) $17,000,000 for fiscal year 2004;
          [(5) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 2005, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance;
          [(6) $20,400,000 for fiscal year 2006, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance;
          [(7) $20,870,000 for fiscal year 2007, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance;
          [(8) $21,390,000 for fiscal year 2008, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance; and
          [(9) $21,930,000 for fiscal year 2009, all of which 
        shall be available for operations and maintenance.]
                              ----------                              


            NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION ACT OF 2004



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
                  TITLE II--WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION

SEC. 201. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited ast the ``National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Act of 2004''.

[SEC. 202. FINDINGS.

  [The Congress finds the following:
          [(1) Hurricanes, tropical storms, tornadoes, and 
        thunderstorms can cause significant loss of life, 
        injury, destruction of property, and economic and 
        social disruption. All States and regions are 
        vulnerable to these hazards.
          [(2) The United States currently sustains several 
        billion dollars in economic damages each year due to 
        these windstorms. In recent decades, rapid development 
        and population growth in high-risk areas has greatly 
        increased overall vulnerability to windstorms.
          [(3) Improved windstorm impact reduction measures 
        have the potential to reduce these losses through--
                  [(A) cost-effective and affordable design and 
                construction methods and practices;
                  [(B) effective mitigation programs at the 
                local, State, and national level;
                  [(C) improved data collection and analysis 
                and impact prediction methodologies;
                  [(D) engineering research on improving new 
                structures and retrofitting existing ones to 
                better withstand windstorms, atmospheric-
                related research to better understand the 
                behavior and impact of windstorms on the built 
                environment, and subsequent application of 
                those research results; and
                  [(E) public education and outreach.
          [(4) There is an appropriate role for the Federal 
        Government in supporting windstorm impact reduction. An 
        effective Federal program in windstorm impact reduction 
        will require interagency coordination, and input from 
        individuals, academia, the private sector, and other 
        interested non-Federal entities.]

SEC. 202. PURPOSE.

  It is the purpose of the Congress in this title to achieve a 
major measurable reduction in losses of life and property from 
windstorms through the establishment and maintenance of an 
effective Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. The objectives of 
such Program shall include--
          (1) the education of households, businesses, and 
        communities about the risks posed by windstorms, and 
        the identification of locations, structures, lifelines, 
        and segments of the community which are especially 
        vulnerable to windstorm damage and disruption, and the 
        dissemination of information on methods to reduce those 
        risks;
          (2) the development of technologically and 
        economically feasible design and construction methods 
        and procedures to make new and existing structures, in 
        areas of windstorm risk, windstorm resilient, giving 
        high priority to the development of such methods and 
        procedures for lifelines, structures associated with a 
        potential high loss of life, and structures that are 
        especially needed in times of disasters, such as 
        hospitals and public safety and shelter facilities;
          (3) the implementation, in areas of major windstorm 
        risk, of instrumentation to record and gather data on 
        windstorms and the characteristics of the wind during 
        those events, and continued research to increase the 
        understanding of windstorm phenomena;
          (4) the development, publication, and promotion, in 
        conjunction with State and local officials and 
        professional organizations, of model building codes and 
        standards and other means to encourage consideration of 
        information about windstorm risk in making decisions 
        about land use policy and construction activity; and
          (5) the facilitation of the adoption of windstorm 
        risk mitigation measures in areas of windstorm risk by 
        households, businesses, and communities through 
        outreach, incentive programs, and other means.

SEC. 203. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the 
        [Director of the Office of Science and Technology 
        Policy] Director of the National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  [(a) Establishment.--There is established the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.
  [(b) Objective.--The objective of the Program is the 
achievement of major measurable reductions in losses of life 
and property from windstorms. The objective is to be achieved 
through a coordinated Federal effort, in cooperation with other 
levels of government, academia, and the private sector, aimed 
at improving the understanding of windstorms and their impacts 
and developing and encouraging implementation of cost-effective 
mitigation measures to reduce those impacts.
  [(c) Interagency Working Group.--Not later than 90 days after 
the date of enactment of this Act, the Director shall establish 
an Interagency Working Group consisting of representatives of 
the National Science Foundation, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and 
other Federal agencies as appropriate. The Director shall 
designate an agency to serve as Chair of the Working Group and 
be responsible for the planning, management, and coordination 
of the Program, including budget coordination. Specific agency 
roles and responsibilities under the Program shall be defined 
in the implementation plan required under subsection (e). 
General agency responsibilities shall include the following:
          [(1) The National Institute of Standards and 
        Technology shall support research and development to 
        improve building codes and standards and practices for 
        design and construction of buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines.
          [(2) The National Science Foundation shall support 
        research in engineering and the atmospheric sciences to 
        improve the understanding of the behavior of windstorms 
        and their impact on buildings, structures, and 
        lifelines.
          [(3) The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration shall support atmospheric sciences 
        research to improve the understanding of the behavior 
        of windstorms and their impact on buildings, 
        structures, and lifelines.
          [(4) The Federal Emergency Management Agency shall 
        support the development of risk assessment tools and 
        effective mitigation techniques, windstorm-related data 
        collection and analysis, public outreach, information 
        dissemination, and implementation of mitigation 
        measures consistent with the Agency's all-hazards 
        approach.
  [(d) Program Components.--
          [(1) In general.--The Program shall consist of three 
        primary mitigation components: improved understanding 
        of windstorms, windstorm impact assessment, and 
        windstorm impact reduction. The components shall be 
        implemented through activities such as data collection 
        and analysis, risk assessment, outreach, technology 
        transfer, and research and development. To the extent 
        practicable, research activities authorized under this 
        title shall be peer-reviewed, and the components shall 
        be designed to be complementary to, and avoid 
        duplication of, other public and private hazard 
        reduction efforts.
          [(2) Understanding of windstorms.--Activities to 
        enhance the understanding of windstorms shall include 
        research to improve knowledge of and data collection on 
        the impact of severe wind on buildings, structures, and 
        infrastructure.
          [(3) Windstorm impact assessment.--Activities to 
        improve windstorm impact assessment shall include--
                  [(A) development of mechanisms for collecting 
                and inventorying information on the performance 
                of buildings, structures, and infrastructure in 
                windstorms and improved collection of pertinent 
                information from sources, including the design 
                and construction industry, insurance companies, 
                and building officials;
                  [(B) research, development, and technology 
                transfer to improve loss estimation and risk 
                assessment systems; and
                  [(C) research, development, and technology 
                transfer to improve simulation and 
                computational modeling of windstorm impacts.
          [(4) Windstorm impact reduction.--Activities to 
        reduce windstorm impacts shall include--
                  [(A) development of improved outreach and 
                implementation mechanisms to translate existing 
                information and research findings into cost-
                effective and affordable practices for design 
                and construction professionals, and State and 
                local officials;
                  [(B) development of cost-effective and 
                affordable windstorm-resistant systems, 
                structures, and materials for use in new 
                construction and retrofit of existing 
                construction; and
                  [(C) outreach and information dissemination 
                related to cost-effective and affordable 
                construction techniques, loss estimation and 
                risk assessment methodologies, and other 
                pertinent information regarding windstorm 
                phenomena to Federal, State, and local 
                officials, the construction industry, and the 
                general public.
  [(e) Implementation Plan.--Not later than 1 year after date 
of enactment of this title, the Interagency Working Group shall 
develop and transmit to the Congress an implementation plan for 
achieving the objectives of the Program. The plan shall 
include--
          [(1) an assessment of past and current public and 
        private efforts to reduce windstorm impacts, including 
        a comprehensive review and analysis of windstorm 
        mitigation activities supported by the Federal 
        Government;
          [(2) a description of plans for technology transfer 
        and coordination with natural hazard mitigation 
        activities supported by the Federal Government;
          [(3) a statement of strategic goals and priorities 
        for each Program component area;
          [(4) a description of how the Program will achieve 
        such goals, including detailed responsibilities for 
        each agency; and
          [(5) a description of plans for cooperation and 
        coordination with interested public and private sector 
        entities in each program component area.
  [(f) Biennial Report.--The Interagency Working Group shall, 
on a biennial basis, and not later than 180 days after the end 
of the preceding 2 fiscal years, transmit a report to the 
Congress describing the status of the windstorm impact 
reduction program, including progress achieved during the 
preceding two fiscal years. Each such report shall include any 
recommendations for legislative and other action the 
Interagency Working Group considers necessary and appropriate. 
In developing the biennial report, the Interagency Working 
Group shall consider the recommendations of the Advisory 
Committee established under section 205.]

SEC. 204. NATIONAL WINDSTORM IMPACT REDUCTION PROGRAM.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established the National 
Windstorm Impact Reduction Program.
  (b) Program Activities.--The activities of the Program shall 
be designed to--
          (1) research and develop cost-effective, feasible 
        methods, tools, and technologies to reduce the risks 
        posed by windstorms to the built environment, 
        especially to lessen the risk to existing structures 
        and lifelines;
          (2) improve the understanding of windstorms and their 
        impacts on households, businesses, communities, 
        buildings, structures, and lifelines, through 
        interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research that 
        involves engineering, natural sciences, and social 
        sciences; and
          (3) facilitate the adoption of windstorm risk 
        reduction measures by households, businesses, 
        communities, local, State and Federal governments, 
        national standards and model building code 
        organizations, architects and engineers, building 
        owners, and others with a role in planning for 
        disasters and planning, constructing, retrofitting, and 
        insuring buildings, structures, and lifelines through--
                  (A) grants, contracts, cooperative 
                agreements, and technical assistance;
                  (B) development of hazard maps, standards, 
                guidelines, voluntary consensus standards, and 
                other design guidance for windstorm risk 
                reduction for buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines;
                  (C) outreach and information dissemination to 
                communities on site specific windstorm hazards 
                and ways to reduce the risks from those 
                hazards; and
                  (D) development and maintenance of a 
                repository of information, including technical 
                data, on windstorm hazards and risk reduction;
  (c) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          (1) Lead agency.--The National Institute of Standards 
        and Technology (in this section referred to as the 
        ``Institute'') shall be responsible for planning and 
        coordinating the Program. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  (A) ensure that the Program includes the 
                necessary components to promote the 
                implementation of windstorm risk reduction 
                measures by households, businesses, 
                communities, local, State, and Federal 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, building owners, and others with a 
                role in planning and preparing for disasters, 
                and planning constructing, and retrofitting, 
                and insuring buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines;
                  (B) support the development of performance-
                based engineering tools, and work with the 
                appropriate groups to promote the commercial 
                application of such tools, through wind-related 
                building codes, standards, and construction 
                practices;
                  (C) ensure the use of social science research 
                and findings in informing the development of 
                technology and research priorities, in 
                communicating windstorm risks to the public, in 
                developing windstorm risk mitigation 
                strategies, and in preparing for windstorm 
                disasters;
                  (D) coordinate all Federal post-windstorm 
                investigations; and
                  (E) when warranted by research or 
                investigative findings, issue recommendations 
                for changes in model codes to the relevant code 
                development organizations, and report back to 
                Congress on whether such recommendations were 
                adopted.
          (2) National institute of standards and technology.--
        In addition to the lead agency responsibilities 
        described under paragraph (1), the Institute shall be 
        responsible for carrying out research and development 
        to improve model codes, standards, design guidance and 
        practices for the construction and retrofit of 
        buildings, structures, and lifelines. In carrying out 
        this paragraph, the Director of the Institute shall--
                  (A) support the development of 
                instrumentation, data processing, and archival 
                capabilities, and standards for the 
                instrumentation and its deployment, to measure 
                wind, wind loading, and other properties of 
                severe wind and structure response;
                  (B) coordinate with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to make the data described in 
                subparagraph (A) available to researchers, 
                standards and code developers, and local 
                planners;
                  (C) support the development of tools and 
                methods for the collection of data on the loss 
                of and damage to structures, and data on 
                surviving structures after severe windstorm 
                events;
                  (D) improve the knowledge of the impact of 
                severe wind on buildings, structures, 
                lifelines, and communities;
                  (E) develop cost-effective windstorm impact 
                reduction tools, methods, and technologies;
                  (F) work, in conjunction with other 
                appropriate Federal agencies, to support the 
                development of wind standards and model codes; 
                and
                  (G) in conjunction with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies, work closely with standards 
                and model code development organizations, 
                professional societies, and practicing 
                engineers, architects, and others involved in 
                the construction of buildings, structures, and 
                lifelines, to promote better building 
                practices, including by--
                          (i) supporting the development of 
                        technical resources for practitioners 
                        to implement new knowledge; and
                          (ii) supporting the development of 
                        methods and tools to incorporate wind 
                        engineering principles into design and 
                        construction practices.
          (3) Federal emergency management agency.--The Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency shall support the 
        development of risk assessment tools and effective 
        mitigation techniques, assist with windstorm-related 
        data collection and analysis, and support outreach, 
        information dissemination, and implementation of 
        windstorm preparedness and mitigation measures by 
        households, businesses, and communities, including by--
                  (A) working to develop or improve risk-
                assessment tools, methods, and models;
                  (B) work closely with other appropriate 
                Federal agencies to develop and facilitate the 
                adoption of windstorm impact reduction 
                measures, including by--
                          (i) developing cost-effective 
                        retrofit measures for existing 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines to 
                        improve windstorm performance;
                          (ii) developing methods, tools, and 
                        technologies to improve the planning, 
                        design, and construction of new 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines;
                          (iii) supporting the development of 
                        model wind codes and standards for 
                        buildings, structures, and lifelines; 
                        and
                          (iv) developing technical resources 
                        for practitioners that reflect new 
                        knowledge and standards of practice; 
                        and
                  (C) develop and disseminate guidelines for 
                the construction of windstorm shelters.
          (4) National oceanic and atmospheric 
        administration.--The National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
        Administration shall support atmospheric sciences 
        research and data collection to improve the 
        understanding of the behavior of windstorms and their 
        impact on buildings, structures, and lifelines, 
        including by--
                  (A) working with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to develop and deploy instrumentation 
                to measure speed and other characteristics of 
                wind, and to collect, analyze, and make 
                available such data;
                  (B) working with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about, and prepared for, the 
                specific windstorm risks in their area;
                  (C) supporting the development of suitable 
                wind speed maps and other derivative products 
                that support building codes and other hazard 
                mitigation approaches for buildings, 
                structures, and lifelines;
                  (D) conducting a competitive, peer-reviewed 
                process which awards grants and cooperative 
                agreements to complement the National Oceanic 
                and Atmospheric Administration's wind-related 
                and storm surge-related research and data 
                collection activities;
                  (E) working with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies and State and local governments to 
                develop or improve risk-assessment tools, 
                methods, and models; and
                  (F) working with other appropriate Federal 
                agencies to develop storm surge models to 
                better understand the interaction between 
                windstorms and bodies of water.
          (5) National science foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        basic research that furthers the understanding of 
        windstorms, wind engineering, and community preparation 
        and response to windstorms. In carrying out this 
        paragraph, the Director of the National Science 
        Foundation shall--
                  (A) support multidisciplinary and 
                interdisciplinary research that will improve 
                the resiliency of communities to windstorms, 
                including--
                          (i) research that improves the safety 
                        and performance of buildings, 
                        structures, and lifelines;
                          (ii) research to support more 
                        effective windstorm mitigation and 
                        response measures, such as developing 
                        better knowledge of the specific types 
                        of vulnerabilities faced by segments of 
                        the community vulnerable to windstorms, 
                        addressing the barriers they face in 
                        adopting mitigation and preparation 
                        measures, and developing methods to 
                        better communicate the risks of 
                        windstorms and to promote mitigation; 
                        and
                          (iii) research on the response of 
                        communities to windstorms, including on 
                        the effectiveness of the emergency 
                        response, and the recovery process of 
                        communities, households, and 
                        businesses;
                  (B) support research to understand windstorm 
                processes, windstorm patterns, and windstorm 
                frequencies;
                  (C) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate windstorm 
                damage;
                  (D) work with other Program agencies to 
                maintain awareness of, and where appropriate 
                cooperate with, windstorm risk reduction 
                research efforts in other countries, to ensure 
                that the Program benefits from relevant 
                information and advances in those countries; 
                and
                  (E) include to the maximum extent practicable 
                diverse institutions, including Historically 
                Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-
                serving institutions, Tribal Colleges and 
                Universities, Alaska Native-serving 
                institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving 
                institutions.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  [(a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $8,700,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying 
out this title--
          [(1) $8,700,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $9,400,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $4,000,000 for fiscal year 2008.
  [(d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for carrying out this title--
          [(1) $2,100,000 for fiscal year 2006;
          [(2) $2,200,000 for fiscal year 2007; and
          [(3) $2,200,000 for fiscal year 2008.]

SEC. 207. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) Federal Emergency Management Agency.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for carrying out this title--
          (1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (2) $9,972,500 for fiscal year 2011;
          (3) $10,271,600 for fiscal year 2012;
          (4) $10,579,800 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (5) $10,897,200 for fiscal year 2014.
  (b) National Science Foundation.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for carrying 
out this title--
          (1) $9,682,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (2) $9,972,500 for fiscal year 2011;
          (3) $10,271,600 for fiscal year 2012;
          (4) $10,579,800 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (5) $10,897,200 for fiscal year 2014.
  (c) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology for carrying out this title--
          (1) $4,120,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (2) $4,243,600 for fiscal year 2011;
          (3) $4,370,900 for fiscal year 2012;
          (4) $4,502,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (5) $4,637,100 for fiscal year 2014.
  (d) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated to the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for carrying out this title--
          (1) $2,266,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (2) $2,334,000 for fiscal year 2011;
          (3) $2,404,000 for fiscal year 2012;
          (4) $2,476,100 for fiscal year 2013; and
          (5) $2,550,400 for fiscal year 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                 NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
SEC. 2. NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS.

  (a) Establishment.--The Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (in this Act referred to as the 
``Director'') is authorized to establish National Construction 
Safety Teams (in this Act referred to as a ``Team'') for 
deployment after events causing the failure of [a building or 
buildings] a building, buildings, or infrastructure that has 
resulted in substantial loss of life or that posed significant 
potential for substantial loss of life. [To the maximum extent 
practicable, the Director shall establish and deploy a Team 
within 48 hours after such an event.] The Director shall make a 
decision whether to deploy a Team within 72 hours after such an 
event. The Director shall promptly publish in the Federal 
Register notice of the establishment of each Team.
  (b) Purpose of Investigation; Duties.--
          (1) Purpose.--The purpose of investigations by Teams 
        is to improve the safety and structural integrity of 
        [buildings] buildings or infrastructure in the United 
        States.
          (2) Duties.--A Team shall--
                  (A) establish the likely technical cause or 
                causes of the [building] building or 
                infrastructure failure;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (D) recommend any research and other 
                appropriate actions needed to improve the 
                structural safety of [buildings] buildings or 
                infrastructure, and improve evacuation and 
                emergency response procedures, based on the 
                findings of the investigation.
  (c) Procedures.--
          (1) Development.--Not later than 3 months after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act, the Director, in 
        consultation with [the United States Fire 
        Administration and] other appropriate Federal agencies, 
        shall develop procedures for the establishment and 
        deployment of Teams. The Director shall update such 
        procedures as appropriate. Such procedures shall 
        include provisions--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (G) to ensure that investigations under this 
                Act do not impede and are coordinated with any 
                search and rescue efforts being undertaken at 
                the site of the [building] building or 
                infrastructure failure;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (J) providing for coordination with Federal, 
                State, and local entities that may sponsor 
                research or investigations of [building] 
                building or infrastructure failures, including 
                research conducted under the Earthquake Hazards 
                Reduction Act of 1977 and the National 
                Windstorm Impact Reduction Act of 2004; and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 4. AUTHORITIES.

  (a) Entry and Inspection.--In [investigating a building] 
investigating building and infrastructure failure under this 
Act, members of a Team, and any other person authorized by the 
Director to support a Team, on display of appropriate 
credentials provided by the Director and written notice of 
inspection authority, may--
          (1) enter property where [a building] a building or 
        infrastructure failure being investigated has occurred, 
        or where [building] building or infrastructure 
        components, materials, and artifacts with respect to 
        the [building] building or infrastructurefailure are 
        located, and take action necessary, appropriate, and 
        reasonable in light of the nature of the property to be 
        inspected to carry out the duties of the Team under 
        section 2(b)(2) (A) and (B);

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) inspect and test any [building] building or 
        infrastructure components, materials, and artifacts 
        related to the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure; and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (b) Avoiding Unnecessary Interference and Preserving 
Evidence.--An inspection, test, or other action taken by a Team 
under this section shall be conducted in a way that--
          (1) does not interfere unnecessarily with services 
        provided by the owner or operator of the [building] 
        building or infrastructure components, materials, or 
        artifacts, property, records, process, or facility; and
          (2) to the maximum extent feasible, preserves 
        evidence related to the [building] building or 
        infrastructure failure, consistent with the ongoing 
        needs of the investigation.
  (c) Coordination.--
          (1) With search and rescue efforts.--A Team shall not 
        impede, and shall coordinate its investigation with, 
        any search and rescue efforts being undertaken at the 
        site of the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure.
          (2) With other research.--A Team shall coordinate its 
        investigation, to the extent practicable, with 
        qualified researchers who are conducting engineering or 
        scientific (including social science) research relating 
        to the [building] building or infrastructure failure.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (d) Interagency Priorities.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Criminal acts.--If the Attorney General, in 
        consultation with the Director, determines, and 
        notifies the Director, that circumstances reasonably 
        indicate that the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure being investigated by a Team may have been 
        caused by a criminal act, the Team shall relinquish 
        investigative priority to the appropriate law 
        enforcement agency. The relinquishment of investigative 
        priority by the Team shall not otherwise affect the 
        authority of the Team to continue its investigation 
        under this Act.
          (4) Preservation of evidence.--If a Federal law 
        enforcement agency suspects and notifies the Director 
        that a [building] building or infrastructurefailure 
        being investigated by a Team under this Act may have 
        been caused by a criminal act, the Team, in 
        consultation with the Federal law enforcement agency, 
        shall take necessary actions to ensure that evidence of 
        the criminal act is preserved.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 7. DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION.

  (a) General Rule.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
section, a copy of a record, information, or investigation 
submitted or received by a Team shall be made available to the 
public [on request and at reasonable cost].

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Protection of Voluntary Submission of Information.--
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a Team, the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, and any agency 
receiving information from a Team or the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, shall not disclose voluntarily 
provided safety-related information if that information is not 
directly related to the [building] building or infrastructure 
failure being investigated and the Director finds that the 
disclosure of the information would inhibit the voluntary 
provision of that type of information.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 8. NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM REPORT.

  Not later than 90 days after completing an investigation, a 
Team shall issue a public report which includes--
          (1) an analysis of the likely technical cause or 
        causes of the [building] building or infrastructure 
        failure investigated;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) recommendations for research and other 
        appropriate actions needed to help prevent future 
        [building] building or infrastructure failures.

SEC. 9. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY ACTIONS.

  After the issuance of a public report under section 8, the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology shall 
comprehensively review the report and, working with [the United 
States Fire Administration and] other appropriate Federal and 
non-Federal agencies and organizations--
          (1) * * *
          (2) promote (consistent with existing procedures for 
        the establishment of building standards, codes, and 
        practices) the appropriate adoption by the Federal 
        Government, and encourage the appropriate adoption by 
        other agencies and organizations, of the 
        recommendations of the Team with respect to--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (C) other actions needed to help prevent 
                future [building] building or infrastructure 
                failures.

SEC. 10. NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY ANNUAL REPORT.

  Not later than February 15 of each year, the Director shall 
transmit to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate a report that includes--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) a description of the actions taken to improve 
        [building] building and infrastructure safety and 
        structural integrity by the National Institute of 
        Standards and Technology during the prior fiscal year 
        in response to reports issued under section 8.

SEC. 11. ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

  (a) Establishment and Functions.--The Director, in 
consultation with [the United States Fire Administration and] 
other appropriate Federal agencies, shall establish an advisory 
committee to advise the Director on carrying out this Act and 
to review the procedures developed under section 2(c)(1) and 
the reports issued under section 8.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 12. ADDITIONAL APPLICABILITY.

  [The authorities and restrictions applicable under this Act 
to the Director and to Teams shall apply to the activities of 
the National Institute of Standards and Technology in response 
to the attacks of September 11, 2001.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


           NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY ACT



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
  Sec. 16. (a) There is hereby established within the 
Department of Commerce a Fire Research Center which shall have 
the mission of performing and supporting research on all 
aspects of fire with aim of providing scientific and technical 
knowledge applicable to the prevention and control of fires. 
The content and priorities of the research program shall be 
determined in consultation with the Administrator of the United 
States Fire Administration. In implementing this section, the 
Secretary is authorized to conduct, directly or through 
contracts or grants, a fire research program, including--
          (1) basic and applied fire research for the purpose 
        of arriving at an understanding of the fundamental 
        processes underlying all aspects of fire. Such research 
        shall include scientific investigations of--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (D) the early stages of fires in buildings 
                and other structures, structural subsystems and 
                structural components in all other types of 
                fires, including, but not limited to, fires at 
                the wildland-urban interface, forest fires, 
                brush fires, fires underground, oil blowout 
                fires, and waterborne fires, with the aim of 
                improving early detection capability;
                  (E) the behavior of fires involving all types 
                of buildings and other structures and their 
                contents (including mobile homes and highrise 
                buildings, construction materials, floor and 
                wall coverings, coatings, furnishings, and 
                other combustible materials), and all other 
                types of fires, including  fires at the 
                wildland-urban interface, forest fires, brush 
                fires, fires underground, oil blowout fires, 
                and waterborne fires;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     XX. Committee Recommendations

    On October 21, 2009, the Committee on Science and 
Technology favorably reported H.R. 3820 by voice vote and 
recommended its enactment.

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   XXII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 3820, THE 
               NATURAL HAZARDS RISK REDUCTION ACT OF 2009

                              ----------                              


                      WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:18 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Gordon. Good morning. The Committee will come to 
order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science and Technology 
meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 3791, the Fire 
Grants Reauthorization Act of 2009, and H.R. 3820, the Natural 
Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009.
    As I just noted today, the Committee will consider two 
important bills. Both of these bills address pressing national 
needs, and both are the product of bipartisan cooperation and 
stakeholder input.
    The first bill the Committee will consider today is H.R. 
3791. This bill reauthorizes the Assistance to Firefighters 
Grant [AFG] Program and the Staffing for Adequate Fire and 
Emergency Response [SAFER] Program. Over the past nine years, 
these programs have provided over $5 billion to purchase 
firefighting equipment and training for communities and to hire 
additional firefighters. The federal support is even more 
important in this tough economy as local officials struggle to 
provide services in the face of decreasing budgets.
    H.R. 3791 is the product of much hard work by the 
International Association of Fire Chiefs, the International 
Association of Fire Fighters, the National Volunteer Fire 
Council and the National Fire Protection Association, as well 
as the Congressional Fire Services Institute. It represents the 
consensus of these organizations on how these programs should 
be improved. I am pleased that the bill has been endorsed by so 
many of these groups, and I look forward to working with them 
as we move to get this bill enacted.
    The second bill the Committee will consider today, H.R. 
3820, reauthorizes two important programs that support 
research, development and technology transfer activities to 
mitigate against the potential damage caused by earthquakes and 
severe windstorms. The impact of natural hazards on communities 
can be devastating. In the past two years in my district in 
Middle Tennessee, tornadoes have killed 24 people and injured 
over 100. Making households, businesses, and communities 
resistant to these forces of nature can save lives and billions 
of dollars.
    H.R. 3820 reauthorizes the National Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Program and the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Program. The National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, 
known as NEHRP, has been responsible for development of a 
variety of codes and standards to enable buildings and other 
infrastructures to withstand earthquakes. This reauthorization 
addresses some of the biggest challenges in earthquake 
mitigation: developing methods to retrofit existing structures, 
secure infrastructure, and, most importantly, convince people 
in earthquake-prone areas to invest in preparedness and 
mitigation measures.
    H.R. 3820 also reauthorizes the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Program. The goal of this reauthorization is to 
enable this program, created in 2004, to achieve the same 
success. Support for R&D for wind hazard mitigation has lagged 
behind that for other hazards. The activities authorized in 
this bill can lead to improved building practices that will 
protect life, and contain the ever-increasing costs of 
hurricanes, tornadoes, and other severe windstorms.
    At a Technology and Innovation Subcommittee hearing this 
June, witnesses testified that much of the challenge in natural 
disaster mitigation was not in more research, but in 
implementing the knowledge that already exists. This bill 
includes a strong focus on the lessons learned from the 
different natural hazards and encourages implementation of 
those lessons.
    I strongly support both of these bills and I would urge a 
yes vote.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Gordon follows:]
               Prepared Statement of Chairman Bart Gordon
    The Committee on Science and Technology meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 3791, the Fire Grants Reauthorization Act of 
2009, and H.R. 3820, the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009.
    Both of these bills address pressing national needs, and both are 
the product of bipartisan cooperation and stakeholder input.
    The first bill the Committee will consider today is H.R. 3791. This 
bill reauthorizes the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program and the 
Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response Program. Over the 
past nine years, these programs have provided over $5 billion to 
purchase firefighting equipment and training for communities and to 
hire additional firefighters. The federal support is even more 
important in this tough economy as local officials struggle to provide 
services in the face of decreasing budgets.
    H.R. 3791 is the product of much hard work by the International 
Association of Fire Chiefs, the International Association of Fire 
Fighters, the National Volunteer Fire Council and the National Fire 
Protection Association, as well as the Congressional Fire Services 
Institute. It represents the consensus of these organizations on how 
these programs should be improved. I am pleased that the bill has been 
endorsed by so many of these groups, and I look forward to working with 
them as we move to get this bill enacted.
    The second bill the Committee will consider today, H.R. 3820, 
reauthorizes two important programs that support research, development 
and technology transfer activities to mitigate against the potential 
damage caused by earthquakes and severe windstorms. The impact of 
natural hazards on communities can be devastating. In the past two 
years in my district in Middle Tennessee, tornadoes have killed 24 
people and injured over 100. Making households, businesses, and 
communities resistant to these forces of nature can save lives and 
billions of dollars.
    H.R. 3820 reauthorizes the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program and the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program. The 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, known as NEHRP, has been 
responsible for development of a variety of codes and standards to 
enable buildings and other infrastructures to withstand earthquakes. 
This reauthorization addresses some of the biggest challenges in 
earthquake mitigation: developing methods to retrofit existing 
structures, secure infrastructure, and, most importantly, convince 
people in earthquake-prone areas to invest in preparedness and 
mitigation measures.
    H.R. 3820 also reauthorizes the National Windstorm Impact Reduction 
Program. The goal of this reauthorization is to enable this program, 
created in 2004, to achieve the same success. Support for R&D for wind 
hazard mitigation has lagged behind that for other hazards. The 
activities authorized in this bill can lead to improved building 
practices that will protect life, and contain the ever-increasing costs 
of hurricanes, tornadoes, and other severe windstorms.
    At a Technology and Innovation Subcommittee hearing this June, 
witnesses testified that much of the challenge in natural disaster 
mitigation was not in more research, but in implementing the knowledge 
that already exists. This bill includes a strong focus on the lessons 
learned from the different natural hazards and encourages 
implementation of those lessons.
    I strongly support both of these bills and I would urge a yes vote.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.

    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, thank you, and I appreciate this 
markup, especially the very bipartisan spirit in which the 
bills before us today have been handled, so I can be brief.
    We are here of course to consider two bills that 
reauthorize four important programs that have been created by 
the Committee over the years. The common thread among these 
programs is leveraging federal resources to reduce our 
vulnerability to hazards, principally earthquakes, windstorms 
and fires. The first bill before us, H.R. 3820, makes modest 
changes to improve coordination among federal agencies 
responsible for earthquake and windstorm research and hazard 
mitigation. The second bill, H.R. 3791, reauthorizes the Fire 
Grants Program which I know have provided critical support to a 
lot of departments including in my district, and I am going to 
note my strong support for both of these bills and express my 
appreciation to Chairman Gordon and to his staff for working 
with our us and with outside stakeholders to get the details 
right on both of the bills. I look forward to the discussion of 
the proposed amendments and working with our colleagues to see 
these bills through the rest of the legislative process.
    I thank you, and I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Good morning, Mr. Chairman. I want to thank you for scheduling this 
markup and for the bipartisan spirit in which the bills before us today 
have been handled. I'll be brief.
    We are here to consider two bills that reauthorize four important 
programs that have been created by this committee over the years. The 
common thread among these programs is leveraging federal resources to 
reduce our vulnerability to hazards--primarily earthquakes, windstorms, 
and fires.
    The first bill before us, H.R. 3820, makes modest changes to 
improve coordination among federal agencies responsible for earthquake 
and windstorm research and hazard mitigation. The second bill, H.R. 
3791, reauthorizes the ``Fire Grants programs,'' which I know have 
provided critical support to fire departments in my district.
    I want to note my strong support for both of these bills, and 
express my appreciation to Chairman Gordon and his staff for working 
with us and with outside stakeholders to get the details right on both 
of these bills. I look forward to discussion on the proposed amendments 
and to working with our colleagues to see these bills through the rest 
of the legislative process. I yield back.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Hall. And Members may place 
statements in the record at this point.
    We will now consider H.R. 3820, the Natural Hazards Risk 
Reduction Act of 2009. I recognize the Chair of the Technology 
and Innovation Subcommittee, Mr. Wu, to describe his bill.
    Mr. Wu. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. As you know, 
timing is everything.
    This reauthorizes two important programs that address 
important hazards, earthquakes and windstorms, and establishes 
a framework to begin joining together a multi-hazards approach 
to mitigating natural disasters. I would like to thank the 
Ranking Member of the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee, 
the gentleman from Nebraska, Mr. Smith, and his staff, and also 
the Full Committee staff and Subcommittee staff for working 
closely with me in developing this legislation.
    In my home State of Oregon, we are very, very well aware of 
the threats posed by natural hazards. The Cascadia fault line 
off our coast could devastate Oregon with a 9.0 to 9.5 Richter 
Scale earthquake. Also, because it is offshore, the associated 
tsunami would affect the coastline or devastate a coastline 
that may have been cut off by the earthquake from the rest of 
the valley for aid and support. It is not just seismic activity 
or tsunami that has the potential for vast destruction in the 
Pacific Northwest. Two years ago, a windstorm with winds 
reported up to 140 miles an hour caused 18 deaths and nearly 
$200 million in damage in Oregon and Washington.
    Since 1977, the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program, or NEHRP, which this bill reauthorizes, has supported 
research and development to better understand earthquakes and 
their impact and to improve the seismic safety of buildings and 
other infrastructure. This work has led to improved seismic 
monitoring with the Advanced National Seismic System, better 
building practices in seismic regions and increased public 
awareness of the need to prepare for earthquakes. The success 
of such efforts can be seen in the recent California Shake Out 
in which 6.8 million Californians participated in earthquake 
drills. After widespread drills, people are often more driven 
to prepare for future earthquakes, purchasing double the 
earthquake mitigation materials at home improvement stores.
    H.R. 3820 also reauthorizes the National Windstorm Impact 
Reduction Program. At a hearing in June of the Technology and 
Innovation Subcommittee, testimony stated that wind hazard 
mitigation R&D has received much less attention than 
earthquakes and other hazards from the research community. It 
is because of the nature of the problem itself is not quite as 
technically challenging and also there is not as long a history 
of investigation. However, over 200 lives are lost each year 
and $16 billion are lost to severe weather events. The problem 
with windstorm damage is therefore no less important than that 
of earthquakes. A strong windstorm R&D program can enable 
faster development and implementation of codes, standards and 
practices to mitigate against windstorm damage.
    H.R. 3820 provides the windstorm program with the same 
coordination structure that created a successful NEHRP program. 
Based on hearings and recommendations from the stakeholder 
community, the Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009 also 
lays the foundation to consider natural hazards R&D in a multi-
hazard framework. The bill establishes the National Institute 
of Standards and Technology [NIST] as the lead agency for both 
the earthquake and wind programs and gives primary 
responsibility for ensuring interagency coordination to one 
committee of program agency directors. In addition, the bill 
requires that the National Science and Technology Council 
Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction prepare a report to Congress 
that identifies all the natural hazards R&D and technology 
transfer activities supported by the Federal Government. In 
addition to identifying the activities, the purpose of the 
report is to find commonalities among research activities for 
different hazards and to identify ways to coordinate this work.
    It is clear that the biggest impediment to mitigating 
natural disasters is encouraging people to actually adopt 
mitigation measures. Changes to codes, standards and building 
practices are an important component to addressing this 
challenge. To enable this, H.R. 3820 includes provisions to 
give NIST greater flexibility in implementing the National 
Construction Safety Team Act. This Act, passed after the 
collapse of the World Trade Center towers, gives NIST the 
authority to lead building failure investigations. The Act 
requires NIST to issue recommendations based on the 
investigation findings and to provide building practices and 
report to Congress on whether its recommendations were adopted 
by building code developers. The changes made to NIST's 
authorities in H.R. 3820 will give the agency the flexibility 
to lead investigations after all natural disasters to study the 
effects of these disasters on all types of structures. As was 
highlighted in two Subcommittee hearings on hazard-related 
programs, science and engineering research is important but it 
is the push to implement better building practices that will 
save lives and money. This provision is a key element to make 
sure this happens. I would also like to add that this bill has 
been endorsed by the American Society of Civil Engineers.
    I am pleased to offer this bill today, and I urge my 
colleagues to vote yes on its passage.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Wu, and I also want to 
thank you and Mr. Smith for the hard work that you put in on 
the Subcommittee. You have brought up some good bills and you 
put the work behind it to bring them to us.
    Mr. Hall is recognized.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I yield to the Ranking Member of 
the Subject Committee.
    Mr. Smith of Nebraska. Thank you, Mr. Hall. Thank you, Mr. 
Chairman.
    In the interest of time and not wanting to repeat anything 
that has already been said, the gentleman from the Pacific 
Northwest spoke as a Representative of that area, so as a 
Representative of the, I guess, heartland Midwest, I add my 
support to the amendment and I yield back. Thank you.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Smith follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Adrian Smith
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for including H.R. 3820, the Natural 
Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009, as part of today's markup. It is 
good legislation which will improve federal hazards mitigation efforts, 
and I am pleased to have joined Technology and Innovation Subcommittee 
Chairman Wu as an original co-sponsor.
    Natural hazards--floods, wildfires, tornadoes, hurricanes, and 
earthquakes--present a common mitigation challenge. While inevitable 
and potentially catastrophic events, they are infrequent and relatively 
unpredictable. They also share much from a mitigation perspective: 
overlapping research and development needs, similar challenges with 
respect to improving building codes and standards, and common emergency 
preparedness and response requirement objectives.
    Accordingly, it makes sense for us to leverage federal activities 
in this area, which this bill attempts to do. Building on the 
successful interagency coordination framework for earthquake hazards--
known as NEHRP--the bill moves toward a similar interagency structure 
for windstorm hazard reduction efforts. It also incorporates an 
additional coordination mechanism to improve the linkage between 
earthquake and windstorm hazards efforts in order to strengthen 
strategic planning and prioritization.
    I want to thank Chairman Wu for working closely with me in 
developing this legislation. I urge Members to support passage of the 
bill, and I hope we can see it through the rest of the legislative 
process in a timely manner.
    I yield back.

    Mr. Hall. I yield back.
    Chairman Gordon. Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Mr. Bilbray. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Bilbray.
    Mr. Bilbray. Mr. Chairman, I just ask that, one of the 
items that is going to go in here is when you get these 
studies, the recommendations or modifications of the Unified 
Building Code, probably one of the most successful government 
regulations ever formed anywhere. My biggest concern is that we 
keep in mind that as scientists look at that, that we look at 
alternative technologies. Too often, so much of this is figured 
out is in concrete and steel and brick but not looking at 
alternative constructions, renewable material and things like 
that. I would just like to make sure down the line we sensitize 
the scientists and the building inspectors to the fact that 
they should be looking at non-traditional building materials 
that may be very successful. An example that kind of shocked 
everybody was the fact that in the mission district of San 
Francisco, the one building that has survived all the 
earthquakes in the history of that city has been the Mission at 
San Francisco, which is unreinforced masonry technically but 
because it is adobe, it is able to work and survive, though 
under the building code you could not build that building today 
because it is perceived as being unsafe. I just think that as 
scientists look at this, that they should be looking at 
alternative construction as being an option they need to look 
deeper into. It may save a lot of money, may save a lot of 
lives and be able to give us a sustainable resource to be able 
to use for construction. So as we get in here, I really ask 
that we remember that as our scientists look at this and 
building inspectors look at this, they look at non-traditional 
building materials as being an option. And I am not 
specifically saying let us building adobe but I am saying there 
is a whole lot of other construction. As the gentleman from 
Nebraska pointed out, they actually developed a technique a 
hundred years ago called straw bale construction which is 
absolutely very resistant to earthquake and wind damage but it 
is one that is probably not legal anywhere in this country 
except for small segments that have gotten the research and 
improved it. So I yield back, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Bilbray.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized? If not, I ask 
unanimous consent that the bill is considered as read and open 
to amendment at any point and that the Members proceed with 
amendments in the order of the roster. Without objection, so 
ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is a Manager's Amendment 
offered by the gentleman from Oregon, Mr. Wu. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Wu. Yes, I am, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment number 205--025, amendment to H.R. 
3820 offered by Mr. Wu of Oregon and Mr. Smith of Nebraska.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain his 
amendment.
    Mr. Wu. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
    This amendment makes minor and technical changes to H.R. 
3820. It changes the language regarding the National Science 
Foundation's [NSF] social science research to authorize such 
research on the specific types of vulnerabilities faced by 
segments of the community vulnerable to natural hazards. This 
broadens the language from population groups and economic 
sectors to give the NSF more flexibility. The amendment also 
changes the NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration] portion of the bill under Title II to clarify 
that the development of hazard assessment models and tools 
should be done in collaboration with both federal agencies and 
state and local governments. It further clarifies that NOAA's 
responsibility under this program will be the development of 
wind speed maps but not their maintenance. The maintenance of 
these maps is handled by other agencies, and with that, Mr. 
Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Gordon. Is there further discussion on the 
amendment?
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Hall is recognized.
    Mr. Hall. We supported the amendment before Mr. Wu's 
explanation, and we still support it.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Wu appreciates that.
    If there is no further discussion, then the vote occurs on 
the amendment. All in favor, say aye. Those opposed, no. The 
ayes have it, and the amendment is agreed to.
    The second amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Florida, Mr. Grayson. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Grayson. Yes, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment number 034, amendment to H.R. 3820, 
offered by Mr. Grayson of Florida.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain his 
amendment.
    Mr. Grayson. Mr. Chairman, this is a technical amendment. 
This has to do with Section 204 of this bill, which establishes 
the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program and assigns 
certain activities to certain agencies under the Section C of 
Section 204. Specifically under paragraph 204(c)(4), NOAA is 
asked under this bill as drafted to improve understanding of 
windstorms and their impact on buildings, structures and 
lifelines. That list, buildings, structures and lifelines, does 
not include bodies of water. I believe it is important to have 
NOAA identify the impact of windstorms on bodies of water, 
particularly in coastal areas but also in areas like mine that 
have many, many lakes. So I am moving to amend the bill on the 
basis stated, which is to add the term ``interaction between 
windstorms and bodies of water'' to this list of assignments to 
NOAA to perform research.
    Thank you. I yield the rest of my time.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Grayson. Is there further 
discussion on the amendment?
    Mr. Broun. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Broun is recognized.
    Mr. Broun. I would like to ask Mr. Grayson if this is a 
bill of attainder. I yield back.
    Chairman Gordon. I think we all should.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment? If no, the 
vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor say aye. Opposed, 
no. The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed to.
    Are there any other amendments? If no, then the vote is on 
the bill, H.R. 3820 as amended. All in favor, say aye. All 
those opposed, no. In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes have 
it.
    I recognize Mr. Tonko to offer a motion.
    Mr. Tonko. Yes. Mr. Chair, I move that the Committee 
favorably report H.R. 3820 as amended to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill do pass. Furthermore, I move that 
the staff be instructed to prepare the legislative report and 
make necessary technical and conforming changes and that the 
Chair take all necessary steps to bring the bill before the 
House for consideration.
    Chairman Gordon. The question is now on the motion to 
report the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will 
signify by saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the 
bill is favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days in 
which to submit supplemental, Minority and additional views on 
the measure, and I want to thank all the Members for being here 
and taking part in this good markup. Thank you.
    [Whereupon, at 11:35 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


        H.R. 3820, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendment Roster





<GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>

                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
            H.R. 3820, A Bill to Reauthorize Federal Hazards
               Reduction Programs, and for other purposes

Sec. 1. Short Title

    The Natural Hazards Risk Reduction Act of 2009

Sec. 2. Findings

    The U.S. faces significant risks from many types of hazards, 
including earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, and floods. 
The risk to life and property will continue to grow as more people move 
to hazard-prone areas. Outlines the damage caused by natural disasters 
and explains that if stringent building codes were enforced, much less 
damage would occur. More research in other risk mitigation efforts need 
to be taken, specifically on communications, enhancing prediction 
abilities, resilient structures, and lifelines.

Title I. EARTHQUAKES

Sec. 101. Short Title

    National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization Act 
of 2009

Sec. 102. Findings

    Repeals Section 2 of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 
(42 U.S.C. 7701), which were the original `Findings'.

Sec. 103. Definitions

    Removes the definitions of the ``Interagency Coordination 
Committee'' and the ``Advisory Committee'' from Section 4 of the 
National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977.

Sec. 104. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program

    Defines the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program's (NEHRP) 
activities; identifies the four agencies that make up NEHRP: the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the United States Geological Survey 
(USGS), and the National Science Foundation (NSF); defines NIST as the 
lead agency; and assigns responsibilities to the different agencies.
    Program activities include: research and development to reduce the 
risks of earthquakes to the built environment; research to improve the 
understanding of earthquakes and their impact on the built environment 
and society; and facilitation of the adoption of earthquake risk 
reduction measures through grants, technical assistance, development of 
building standards and guidelines, outreach to practitioners and 
community members, and other means.
    In addition to lead agency responsibilities, NIST shall also 
support research and development to improve codes, standards, and 
practices for new and existing buildings and lifelines. Such activities 
also include the development of tools and technical resources to help 
practitioners use new knowledge to mitigate earthquakes.
    FEMA activities include: facilitating the development and adoption 
of codes, standards and practices for new and existing structures and 
lifelines; the development of tools and methods to predict earthquake 
damage; and support a public earthquake education and public awareness 
program. FEMA also has the responsibility of a State assistance grant 
program to assist states in implementing various mitigation activities.
    USGS activities shall include research and other means to 
characterize earthquake hazards, assess earthquake risks, monitor 
seismic activity, and provide real-time earthquake information. These 
activities include the continued development of the Advanced National 
Seismic System and the Global Seismographic Network,
    NSF activities shall include the support of basic research to 
further the understanding of earthquake, earthquake engineering and 
community preparation and response to earthquakes. Such activities will 
also include support if the George E. Brown, Jr. Network for 
Engineering and Earthquake Simulation.

Sec. 105. Post-Earthquake Investigations Program

    NEHRP shall be responsible for a post-earthquake investigations 
program. The lead agency shall be responsible for coordinating such 
investigations after earthquakes, in order to gather information and 
data to learn lessons that may be applied to reduce future earthquake 
losses.

Sec. 106. Authorization of Appropriations

    Total authorization for FEMA from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $54,354,000
    Total authorization for USGS, including the Advanced National 
Seismic Research and Monitoring System from FY 2010 to FY 2014: 
$371,640,000
    Total authorization for NSF from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $286,275,000
    Total authorization for NIST from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $39,214,000

Title II. WIND

Sec. 201. Short Title

    The National Windstorm Impact Reduction Act Reauthorization of 2009

Sec. 202. Purpose

    The purpose of the program is to support research, development, and 
technology transfer activities that will lead to a reduction in the 
loss of life and property from windstorms.

Sec. 203. Definitions

    Amends the Act to define ``Director'' a the Director of the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Sec. 204. National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program

    Defines the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program's (NWIRP) 
activities; identifies the four agencies that make up NWIRP: the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the National Science Foundation 
(NSF); defines NIST as the lead agency; and assigns responsibilities to 
the different agencies.
    Program activities include: research and development on methods and 
technologies to reduce the risk of windstorms to the built environment; 
research to improve the understanding of windstorms and their impacts 
on the built environment and communities; and the facilitation of the 
adoption of windstorm risk reduction measures, through development of 
codes and standards, outreach, and other means.
    In addition to lead agency responsibilities, NIST activities shall 
also include research and development to: improve codes, standards, and 
design guidance for the construction and retrofit of new and existing 
structures; support the development of wind measurement tools; and the 
development of methods to collect data after severe wind events.
    FEMA activities include: the development of: windstorm impact 
assessment tools; windstorm impact mitigation techniques; data 
collection and analysis after windstorm events; and outreach to 
facilitate mitigation measures in communities and among building 
practitioners.
    NOAA activities include the support of: atmospheric science 
research and data collection to better understand windstorms and their 
impacts.
    NSF activities include: research to improve the understanding of 
windstorms, their impact on the built environment, and on households, 
businesses, and communities.

Sec. 205. Authorization of Appropriations

    Total authorization for FEMA from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $51,403,100
    Total authorization for NSF from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $51,403,100
    Total authorization for NIST from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $21,873,600
    Total authorization for NOAA from FY 2010 to FY 2014: $12,030,500

Title III.  INTERAGENCY COORDINATING COMMITTEE ON NATURAL HAZARDS RISK 
                    REDUCTION

Sec. 301.  Interagency Coordinating Committee on Natural Hazards Risk 
                    Reduction

    Establishes an Interagency Committee (ICC) on Natural Hazards Risk 
Reduction, chaired by the Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) and comprised also of the Directors of 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the United States 
Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the 
Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB), and the head of any other federal agency 
the Committee considers appropriate. Gives the ICC the responsibility 
of developing strategic plans, progress reports, and coordinated 
budgets for both the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program 
(NEHRP) and the National Windstorm Impact Reduction Program (NWIRP).
    Establishes an Advisory Committees for NEHRP and NWIRP of relevant 
non-Federal employee experts to offer guidance and recommendations on 
program activities.
    Requires the Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction, of the Committee 
on Environment and Natural Resources of the National Science and 
Technology Council, to submit a report to Congress identifying the 
current federal research, development, and technology transfer 
activities that address mitigation for all types of natural hazards, 
and opportunities to create synergies among the various research 
activities.

Title IV.  NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAM ACT AMENDMENTS

Sec. 401. National Construction Safety Team Act Amendments

    Amends the National Construction Safety Team Act (P.L. 107-231) to: 
include infrastructure, as well as buildings and to give the Director 
of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 72 hours 
to decide to deploy a Construction Safety Team.

Title V. FIRE RESEARCH PROGRAM

Sec. 501. Fire Research Program

    To add to the National Institute of Standards and Technology's 
existing fire research authority, research on ``fires at the wildland-
urban interface.''

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