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111th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    111-187

======================================================================



 
 STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 
                                  2010

                                _______
                                

 June 26, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mrs. Lowey, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                     MINORITY AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3081]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of State, foreign operations, 
and related programs, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2010, and for other purposes.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Summary of the Bill........................................
                                                                      1
Committee Recommendations..................................
                                                                      3
Title I--Department of State and Related Agency:
        Department of State................................     2
                                                                      5
        Administration of Foreign Affairs..................     2
                                                                      5
        Diplomatic and Consular Programs...................     2
                                                                      5
        Civilian Stabilization Initiative..................     6
                                                                     11
        Capital Investment Fund............................     7
                                                                     12
        Office of Inspector General........................     7
                                                                     13
        Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.........     8
                                                                     13
        Representation Allowances..........................     8
                                                                     17
        Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials.......     8
                                                                     17
        Embassy Security, Construction, and Maintenance....     8
                                                                     18
        Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service.     9
                                                                     20
        Buying Power Maintenance Account...................    10
                                                                     21
        Repatriation Loans Program Account.................    10
                                                                     21
        Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan........    10
                                                                     21
        Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
            Disability Fund................................    10
                                                                     22
International Organizations:
                Contributions to International 
                    Organizations..........................    11
                                                                     22
                Contributions for International 
                    Peacekeeping Activities................    12
                                                                     25
        International Commissions:
                International Boundary and Water 
                    Commission, United States and Mexico...    13
                                                                     27
                American Sections, International 
                    Commissions............................    14
                                                                     28
                International Fisheries Commissions........    14
                                                                     28
        Related Agency:
                Broadcasting Board of Governors............    15
                                                                     29
        Related Programs:
                The Asia Foundation........................    16
                                                                     32
                United States Institute of Peace...........    16
                                                                     32
                Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue 
                    Trust Fund.............................    17
                                                                     32
                Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program.....    17
                                                                     33
                Israeli Arab Scholarship Program...........    18
                                                                     33
                East-West Center...........................
                                                                     33
                National Endowment for Democracy...........    18
                                                                     33
        Other Commissions:
                Commission for the Preservation of 
                    America's Heritage Abroad..............    19
                                                                     34
                Commission on International Religious 
                    Freedom................................    19
                                                                     34
                Commission on Security and Cooperation in 
                    Europe.................................    19
                                                                     35
                Congressional-Executive Commission on the 
                    People's Republic of China.............    20
                                                                     35
                United States-China Economic and Security 
                    Review Commission......................    20
                                                                     36
Title II--United States Agency for International 
    Development:
        Operating Expenses.................................    21
                                                                     36
        Civilian Stabilization Initiative..................    23
                                                                     39
        Capital Investment Fund............................    24
                                                                     39
        Office of Inspector General........................    24
                                                                     40
Title III--Bilateral Economic Assistance:
        Global Health and Child Survival...................    25
                                                                     40
        Development Assistance.............................    31
                                                                     48
        International Disaster Assistance..................    33
                                                                     56
        Transition Initiatives.............................    33
                                                                     58
        Development Credit Authority.......................    34
                                                                     58
        Economic Support Fund..............................    35
                                                                     59
        Democracy Fund.....................................    38
                                                                     70
        International Fund for Ireland.....................    39
                                                                     71
        Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia....    39
                                                                     71
        Department of State:
                International Narcotics Control and Law 
                    Enforcement............................    41
                                                                     74
                Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining 
                    and Related Programs...................    43
                                                                     82
                Migration and Refugee Assistance...........    45
                                                                     84
                United States Emergency Refugee and 
                    Migration Assistance Fund..............    46
                                                                     88
        Independent Agencies:
                Peace Corps................................    46
                                                                     88
                Millennium Challenge Corporation...........    47
                                                                     89
                Inter-American Foundation..................    49
                                                                     91
                African Development Foundation.............    49
                                                                     91
        Department of the Treasury:
                International Affairs Technical Assistance.    50
                                                                     91
                Debt Restructuring.........................    50
                                                                     91
Title IV--International Security Assistance:
        Peacekeeping Operations............................    53
                                                                     92
        International Military Education and Training......    54
                                                                     94
        Foreign Military Financing Program.................    55
                                                                     96
Title V--Multilateral Assistance:
        International Organizations and Programs:
        International Financial Institutions:
                Global Environment Facility................    60
                                                                    103
                Contribution to the International 
                    Development Association................    60
                                                                    103
                Contribution to the Clean Technology Fund..    60
                                                                    103
                Contribution to the Strategic Climate Fund.    61
                                                                    104
                Contribution to the Inter-American 
                    Development Bank.......................    61
                                                                    105
                Contribution to the Enterprise for the 
                    Americas Multilateral Investment Fund..    61
                                                                    105
                Contribution to the Asian Development Fund.    61
                                                                    105
                Contribution to the African Development 
                    Fund...................................    62
                                                                    105
                Contribution to the International Fund for 
                    Agricultural Development...............    62
                                                                    106
Title VI--Export and Investment Assistance:
        Export-Import Bank of the United States............    62
                                                                    106
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation............    66
                                                                    107
        Trade and Development Agency.......................    68
                                                                    108
Title VII--General Provisions:
        House of Representatives Reporting Requirements....    75
                                                                    114

                                OVERVIEW

    The Committee recommendation for the fiscal year 2010 
budget for the activities under the jurisdiction of the 
Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs 
is $48,843,000,000 in new discretionary budget authority, which 
is $1,156,713,000 below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level, 
including supplemental appropriations and $3,201,063,000 below 
the fiscal year 2010 request. The Committee notes that in 
fiscal year 2009, there was $3,679,500,000 in supplemental 
appropriations provided in Public Law 110-252, and 
$9,700,213,000 provided in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 
2009 (Public Law 111-32). The President's FY2010 request and 
the Committee's recommendation, seeks to avoid reliance on 
supplemental appropriations and seeks to provide an upfront, 
honest and transparent accounting of the resources needed to 
fund our foreign policy and national security interests. The 
Committee recommendation, as detailed in this bill and 
accompanying report reflects the four priorities of the 
Committee:
          1. Rebuilding our Diplomatic and Development Capacity 
        to meet 21st Century Requirements
          2. Protecting National Security, Combating Terrorism 
        and Drug-trafficking
          3. Responding to HIV/AIDS, Food Security, Education 
        and Other Global Challenges
          4. Conducting Appropriate Oversight of Foreign 
        Assistance Programs

             REBUILDING DIPLOMATIC AND DEVELOPMENT CAPACITY

    The Committee is aware that the lack of sufficient capacity 
in our civilian agencies has resulted in an increased reliance 
on American troops to carry out essentially diplomatic and 
development missions. The Committee is also aware of the 
statements by the Secretaries of State and Defense as well as 
the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff calling for a 
strengthening of the capacity of the Department of State and 
the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). 
Therefore, the Committee provides sufficient resources in 
fiscal year 2010 to increase by approximately 1,000 the number 
of State Department personnel and by 300 the number of USAID 
personnel as well as the requisite training, support and 
security costs associated with these positions.

   NATIONAL SECURITY, COUNTERTERRORISM AND COUNTERNARCOTICS PROGRAMS

    The Committee's fiscal year 2010 recommendation includes a 
total of $13,419,309,000 for programs that protect our national 
security and combat terrorism under the ``Economic Support 
Fund'', ``Foreign Military Financing Program'', ``International 
Counternarcotics and Law Enforcement'', ``Nonproliferation, 
Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related Programs'', 
``International Military Education and Training'' and 
``Peacekeeping Operations'' account headings. Of these amounts, 
$4,698,000,000 is for assistance to frontline states of 
Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq; $4,557,000,000 is to meet our 
commitments to our allies and partners in the Middle East; and 
$986,677,000 is to support counter narcotics and alternative 
development programs in Mexico, Central American, the Caribbean 
Basin, Colombia and Peru.

 GLOBAL HIV/AIDS, FOOD SECURITY, EDUCATION AND OTHER GLOBAL CHALLENGES

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$7,684,000,000 for global health programs, including 
$5,709,000,000 for programs to combat HIV/AIDS. The Committee 
believes that funding to address pandemics and other health 
concerns overseas before they reach our shores is one of the 
best investments that the United States can make to protect 
American citizens while at the same time saving lives overseas. 
To this end, the Committee provides $75,000,000 to address 
pandemic preparedness and response in this bill and an 
additional $50,000,000 in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 
2009 (Public Law 111-32). The Committee also provides 
$1,000,000,000 for basic education to improve access to quality 
education and provide alternatives to madrassas. In light of 
the increased food shortages experienced by many developing 
countries and exacerbated by the global financial crisis, the 
Committee provides $1,000,000,000 for food security and 
agricultural development programs. Finally, the Committee 
provides increased resources for humanitarian assistance to 
regularize funding provided in supplemental appropriations in 
past years and to meet growing humanitarian needs, including in 
Pakistan and Afghanistan.

                OVERSIGHT OF FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

    The Committee continues to be committed to full oversight 
of the funds provided in this bill and includes a number of 
provisions in the bill and report aimed at improving 
accountability and oversight of assistance and operations 
funding. Furthermore, the Committee provides a total of 
$146,500,000 for the oversight activities of the Inspectors 
General of the Department of State and USAID as well as for the 
Special Inspectors General for Iraq and Afghanistan 
Reconstruction.

               TERMINATIONS, REDUCTIONS AND OTHER SAVINGS

    In order to invest in the critical priorities identified in 
this bill, and in an effort to build an economy on a solid 
foundation for growth and put the Nation on a path toward 
prosperity, the Committee has proposed herein a number of 
program terminations, reductions, and other savings from the 
fiscal year 2009 level totaling over $705,000,000. In addition, 
the recommendation includes nearly $2,400,000,000 in program 
reductions and other savings from the budget request. These 
adjustments, no matter their size, are important to setting the 
right priorities within the spending allocation, for getting 
the deficit under control, and creating a government that is as 
efficient as it is effective.

            TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY


                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE


                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

    The Committee's fiscal year 2010 recommendation for the 
Department of State supports ongoing efforts to strengthen 
diplomatic, embassy and border security functions, and to 
institutionalize management reforms. The Committee recommends a 
total of $11,173,849,000 for the Department of State's 
Administration of Foreign Affairs activities. Of the total 
amount provided, $11,014,949,000 is derived from general-
purpose discretionary funds and $158,900,000 is scored as 
mandatory spending.

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $7,063,108,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     8,960,016,000
Committee recommendation..............................     8,229,000,000
    Change from request...............................      -731,016,000
    Change from enacted level.........................    1,165,892,000

\1\The enacted level includes $1,702,790,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $704,900,000 from
  Public Law 110-252 and $997,890,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $8,229,000,000 for 
the Diplomatic and Consular Programs, including $1,577,427,000 
to continue funding for Worldwide Security Protection, and 
$519,875,000 for public diplomacy, staffing, and international 
information programs.
    The recommendation is $1,165,892,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 enacted level and $731,016,000 below the request. Within 
this total, the recommendation includes $1,577,427,000 for 
Worldwide Security Upgrades, which is $235,669,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $70,573,000 below the 
request. Security funding increases are described under the 
Worldwide Security Upgrades section below.

Enhancing diplomatic staffing and readiness

    The Committee recommendation continues the build-up of 
civilian diplomatic personnel begun in the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 2008 (Public Law 110-252). The Committee 
concurs with the view of the Secretary of State that 
investments in well-trained diplomatic and development 
personnel will yield great dividends over time. The Committee 
also understands that an investment in diplomacy and 
development is much less expensive, and often yields longer 
lasting results, than military operations for achieving 
sustainable peace and stability. To this end, the Committee 
recommendation includes $541,543,000 under this heading, and 
1,030 new positions, to further expand the Department's core 
diplomatic capacity, including both personnel and essential 
physical infrastructure, and to address growing security 
requirements. The amount recommended is $126,642,000 below the 
request, after accounting for $38,500,000 already made 
available in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public 
Law 111-32) for Afghanistan air mobility assets and security 
training facilities consolidation. Coupled with the 527 new 
positions funded under this heading in fiscal year 2009, the 
Committee recommendation helps to achieve the Secretary's goal 
of increasing the Foreign Service workforce at the Department 
of State by 25 percent by the end of 2013. The Committee urges 
the Secretary of State to give priority to overseas 
requirements when allocating new positions. The Committee also 
directs the Department of State to provide quarterly reports to 
the Committees on Appropriations on the status of hiring, 
training, and deploying new personnel to domestic and overseas 
posts. The table below outlines the position increases assumed 
in the recommendation.

                        SUMMARY OF NEW POSITIONS--DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS (D&CP;)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                       Category                             FY2009             Request         recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Resources Initiative.........................            520                 565                  565
Other Overseas Programs............................              0                 123                   84
    Public Diplomacy (non-add).....................             20                  20                   20
Diplomatic Policy and Support......................              0                 114                   88
    Worldwide Security Protection..................              7                 340                  293
                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------
        Subtotal--D&CP.............................;            527               1,142                1,030
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Funds made available under the heading shall be allocated 
as follows and are subject to the terms and conditions of 
section 7019 concerning allocations and notifications.

                    DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                Committee
           Activity               Request    recommendation     Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Resources...............    2,676,087      2,667,130        -8,957
    Public Diplomacy (non-add)      138,075        138,075             0
    Worldwide Security              229,797        220,840        -8,957
     Protection (non-add).....
Overseas Programs.............    2,777,479      2,497,158      -280,321
    Public Diplomacy and            381,800        381,800             0
     International Information
     Programs (non-add).......
Diplomatic Policy and Support.      917,917        892,012       -25,905
Security Programs.............    2,588,533      2,172,700      -415,833
    Worldwide Security            1,418,203      1,356,587       -61,616
     Protection (non-add).....
                               -----------------------------------------
        Total, Diplomatic and     8,960,016      8,229,000      -731,016
         Consular Programs....
        Total, Worldwide          1,648,000      1,577,427       -70,573
         Security Protection..
        Total, Public               519,875        519,875             0
         Diplomacy............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fees and transfers

    The Committee recommendation also includes the language 
requested which: (1) permits not to exceed $10,000,000 to be 
transferred to the Emergencies in the ``Diplomatic and Consular 
Service'' account for emergency evacuations and terrorism 
rewards; (2) provides $1,653,305 in fees collected from other 
Executive Branch agencies and $490,000 from reserves for lease 
or use of facilities at the International Center Complex, as 
authorized by law; (3) provides not to exceed $15,000 from 
reimbursements, surcharges, and fees for use of Blair House 
facilities in accordance with the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956; (4) requires notification of Congress 
before processing licenses for the export of satellites to 
China; and (5) makes not to exceed $6,000,000 in fee 
collections available until expended for various activities.

Border Security Program

    In addition to the funds appropriated under this heading, 
an estimated $1,657,515,000 will become available through 
authorized fees and surcharges for the Department's Border 
Security program, of which $858,000,000 is available through 
collection of Machine Readable Visa (MRV) fees, $374,415,000 is 
available through the collection of the Western Hemisphere 
Travel Surcharge, $40,000,000 is available through Fraud 
Prevention fees, and $385,100,000 is available through the 
Enhanced Border Security Program fees and Visa Fraud fees. The 
total amount is an increase of $45,034,000 above the projected 
fiscal year 2009 level and will accommodate 45 additional fee-
funded positions.

Worldwide Security Protection

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,577,427,000, for 
Worldwide Security Protection within the Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs account, which is $235,669,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $70,573,000 below the 
request. Funding is provided for ongoing security activities 
for diplomatic and development personnel, including guard 
services, physical security equipment, armored vehicles, 
chemical and biological programs, personnel, training, and 
wireless communications.
    The Worldwide Security Protection (WSP) program provides 
the core funding for the protection of life, property, and 
information of the Department of State. WSP funding supports a 
worldwide guard force protecting overseas diplomatic missions, 
residences, and domestic facilities. Security staffing of more 
than 1,500 personnel are deployed worldwide to protect United 
States Government staff and facilities. In addition, the WSP 
program appropriation supports the protection of national 
security information and the integrity of the Department of 
State's network of information systems.
    Within the amount provided, $1,364,288,000 is to fund 
ongoing activities, including the regularization of 106 
positions for Iraq and Afghanistan that were initially funded 
through supplemental appropriations. In addition, the 
recommendation includes $213,139,000 for an estimated 293 
additional security positions to help the Department respond to 
the growing challenges in the security environments at posts 
around the world, including up to 31 additional positions to 
support Mission requirements worldwide and 115 additional 
positions for the second year of the Visa and Passport Security 
Plan. Funds also are provided for program increases in overseas 
protective operations, the local guard program, emergency 
preparedness, personnel training, security training and 
technology, and other initiatives to support the worldwide 
security infrastructure.

Funding Directives

    Human Resource Initiative.--Within the funds provided under 
this heading, $124,923,000, and 565 positions, are for phase II 
of the Human Resources Initiative, which is the same as the 
request. The majority of the new positions funded in 2009 were 
for building a training capacity, or complement, to avoid 
significant vacancies at posts while employees are in training 
for periods of up to two years. The fiscal year 2010 funds 
provided for the Initiative will continue the expansion of the 
training capacity, increase the Department's representation on 
interagency and Defense staffs, and augment the overseas 
diplomatic presence at strategic posts worldwide.
    Overseas Programs, and Diplomatic Policy and Support.--The 
recommendation also includes $203,481,000, and 172 positions, 
for the expansion of diplomatic capacity and resources at posts 
in Africa, East Asia and Pacific, Europe and Eurasia, the Near 
East, South Central Asia, and the Western Hemisphere and to 
begin to address the nearly 26 percent vacancy rate in domestic 
Foreign and Civil Service positions. The Committee recognizes 
the need for additional domestic positions, but urges the 
Secretary to give priority to overseas assignments in 
allocating these new positions. Funds are made available in the 
recommendation to expand the ongoing work of the offices and 
bureaus of the Department, including: expanded operations at 
the National Foreign Affairs Training Center; the ongoing 
operation and maintenance costs for the Department-managed air 
transport in Afghanistan; expanded public diplomacy programs; 
the United States assessment for participation in the 2010 
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference; 
increased activities of the Office of the Coordinator for 
Counterterrorism; and the Office of the Secretary.
    Minority recruitment and hiring.--The Committee supports 
the continuation of the educational partnerships developed 
between the Department of State and community colleges and 
universities that focus on recruiting and preparing students 
from various institutions with large minority populations for 
positions in the United States Foreign Service. These programs 
assist the Department of State's ongoing efforts to increase 
minority hiring and diversity by facilitating the preparation 
of non-traditional and minority students for careers in the 
Foreign Service and the Department of State. The Committee 
expects the Department of State to prioritize the building of 
diversity in both the Foreign and Civil Services.
    Intelligence and research.--The Committee recommendation 
includes the full request of $62,879,000 for the Bureau of 
Intelligence and Research, which is $3,061,000, and 15 
positions, above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level.
    Iraq operations.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$1,149,000,000 for diplomatic operations in Iraq. This is in 
addition to $366,000,000 made available in the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-32) for operations in 
fiscal year 2010.
    Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (G/
TIP).--The Committee recommendation includes the requested 
level of $5,010,000 and two new positions for the Office to 
Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons.
    Public Diplomacy programs.--The Committee again has 
prioritized public diplomacy programs within the Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs account. For fiscal year 2010, the 
recommendation provides $519,875,000 for Public Diplomacy 
programs under this account, which is $125,069,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 level and the same as the request. The 
Committee recognizes the importance of the professionalization 
of Foreign Service Officers with skills in public diplomacy and 
encourages the Department to expand training and opportunities 
for advancement within the Department of State for individuals 
with these skills. In addition, the Committee appreciates the 
work of the United States Advisory Commission on Public 
Diplomacy and their work to improve the Department of State's 
capacity to conduct effective public diplomacy activities.
    The recommended increase should support at least 20 new 
public diplomacy positions overseas and domestically, as well 
as allow for an increase in the number of locally-engaged 
overseas staff positions.
    The amounts provided will fund an expansion of targeted 
outreach programs, including youth enrichment programs designed 
to reach underprivileged children between the ages of 8 and 14 
in key countries in order to thwart the spread of extremism. 
Funds also will continue programs begun with emergency 
supplemental appropriations provided in fiscal year 2007, 
including the Department of State's public diplomacy video 
production team, the counterterrorism communication center, and 
the digital outreach team focused on engaging Arabic language 
websites to impart accurate information and counter 
misinformation about the United States.
    Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues.--The Committee 
recognizes the important role played by the Special Coordinator 
for Tibetan Issues in implementing Tibet programs and policies. 
The Committee urges the Secretary to continue to provide 
support for the Coordinator to carry out the broad 
responsibilities detailed in section 621(d) of Public Law 107-
228, as well as for convening coordinating meetings for 
appropriate United States Government agencies, nongovernmental 
organizations, and representatives of the Tibetan leadership.

Other Issues and Directives

    Compensation for victims of terrorism.--The Committee 
shares the abiding concern voiced by victims of terrorism and 
their families of the need for the United States Government to 
provide timely compensation. As a first step in addressing this 
concern, the Committee appropriated $4,000,000 in fiscal year 
2008 to be available until expended, for compensation to the 
families of members of the Foreign Service or other United 
States Government employees, or their dependents, who were 
killed in terrorist attacks since 1979. The obligation of that 
funding, however, is subject to the enactment of authorizing 
legislation. The eligibility, structure, and amounts of a 
compensation program need to be considered carefully prior to 
the provision of the funds. The Committee notes that 
notwithstanding prior direction to the Department of State to 
provide a legislative proposal, no such legislation has been 
brought forward to date. The Committee again directs the 
Department of State to develop a comprehensive legislative 
proposal and forward it to the committees of jurisdiction to 
provide just and equitable compensation for victims of 
international terrorism and their surviving family members, 
including United States Foreign Service, military, Foreign 
Service nationals, and civil servants.
    Hague Convention.--The Committee recommendation includes 
bill language requiring the Secretary of State, consistent with 
existing law and regulation, to notify the member of the House 
of Representatives representing the district of a left-behind 
parent when the parent reports an international child abduction 
to the Department of State and requiring the Department to 
maintain a computerized data tracking system for such reported 
abduction cases. The language also provides that the 
requirements shall not apply to cases where the reporting 
parent does not consent to the use of the information for 
notification and data tracking purposes.
    International Adoptions.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the high number and indefinite status of pending 
international adoptions, particularly of Guatemalan and 
Vietnamese children. The Committee is troubled that it has not 
yet received the report on this subject requested in the 
Explanatory Statement accompanying the Department of State, 
Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 
2009 (Public Law 111-8) and urges the Secretary to submit such 
report expeditiously. The Committee also encourages the 
Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States 
Agency for International Development to continue to support 
efforts to build capacity in countries, such as Guatemala, to 
implement and enforce existing adoption laws and regulations.
    Non-immigrant visa renewals.--The Committee understands 
that a significant number of non-immigrant visas issued during 
1998-2002 will expire over the next few years and that the 
Department of State is expected to face a surge in visa 
renewals. The Committee directs that the Secretary of State 
prepare and submit to the Committees on Appropriations, not 
later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, a plan for 
handling nonimmigrant visa renewals, with particular focus on 
the southwest border, especially those border regions that do 
not have a United States consulate.
    North Korea.--The Committee urges the Special 
Representative on North Korea Policy, as the senior official 
handling North Korea issues, to prioritize the issues involving 
Korean divided families, and to, if necessary, appoint a 
coordinator for such families.
    Science programs.--The Committee commends the Secretary of 
State for sustaining a variety of science fellowship programs 
in the Department of State, including the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science science-diplomacy fellows, the 
professional society fellows, and the recently established 
Jefferson Fellows Program. The Committee urges continued 
support for these valuable programs, which attract qualified, 
non-traditional employees into the Department.
    The Committee also applauds the Office of Science and 
Technology Advisor to the Secretary of State for continuing to 
promote the essential role of science and technology in 
diplomacy, and encourages the Department of State to continue 
to increase science and technology capacity and literacy within 
the Department of State as well as the role of science and 
technology in our nation's foreign policy. The Committee 
requests that the Secretary of State be prepared to report 
during the hearings on the fiscal year 2011 request on the 
progress made during fiscal year 2010 to increase science and 
technology capacity and literacy within the Department.
    Secure passports.--The Committee supports the Department of 
State's aim to issue United States passports that secure the 
user's identity in accordance with International Civil Aviation 
Organization (ICAO) standards. The Committee urges the 
Department of State to begin implementation at the earliest 
date possible of next generation passports that further secure 
an individual's information by two way authentication with the 
passport reader so that the information remains locked and 
secure from fraudulent readers.
    Special Envoy for Sudan.--The Committee supports the work 
of the Special Envoy for Sudan and provides sufficient funding 
for staffing needs.

                   CIVILIAN STABILIZATION INITIATIVE




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................       $45,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       323,272,000
Committee recommendation..............................       125,000,000
    Change from request...............................      -198,272,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       80,000,000

\1\In addition to the amount above, $30,000,000 was appropriated in
  title II of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related
  Programs Appropriations Act, 2009 (division H of Public Law 111-8) for
  USAID's portion of the Civilian Stabilization Initiative (CSI) and
  $65,000,000 was appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriations Act,
  2008 (Public Law 110-161) to begin the stand-up of CSI.

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$155,000,000 for Civilian Stabilization Initiative (CSI), of 
which $125,000,000 is made available under this heading and 
$30,000,000 is made available under the same heading in title 
II of this Act for the United States Agency for International 
Development's (USAID) portion of the CSI. The recommendation is 
consistent with the funding structure for fiscal years 2008 and 
2009. The fiscal year 2010 budget requested $323,272,000 for 
CSI, all under this heading.
    The CSI creates an interagency civilian response capability 
with active, standby and reserve components, in order to ensure 
readiness for national security challenges of reconstruction 
and stabilization. As of June 2009, there were 40 members of 
the Active Response Corps and 366 members of the Standby 
Response Corps. The Department projects that the full 250 
member Active Response Corps will be on board by the end of the 
calendar year. Funds made available under the heading shall be 
allocated as follows and are subject to the terms and 
conditions of section 7019 concerning allocations and 
notifications.

                    CIVILIAN STABILIZATION INITIATIVE
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Committee
           Activity             Request     recommendation      Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Salaries, benefits and other      32,320             22,784       -9,536
 personnel costs for Active
 Response Corps..............
Training for Active and           21,813             17,033       -4,780
 Standby Response Corps......
Civilian Reserve Corps.......     52,389                  0      -52,389
Equipment Acquisition........     70,191             25,318      -44,873
Deployments..................    103,396             28,550      -74,846
Deployment Center............      7,187                  0       -7,187
CRC Operations Support.......     11,234              8,023       -3,211
S/CRS Policy and Planning....     24,742             23,292       -1,450
                              ------------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Civilian           323,272            125,000     -198,272
     Stabilization
     Initiative--Department
     of State................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As with fiscal year 2009, funds made available for CSI in 
fiscal year 2010 are to be allocated only for the 250 member 
Active Response Corps and the Standby Response Corps, to 
support the training, equipment acquisition, deployments and 
operations of such corps, and for the Office of the Coordinator 
for Reconstruction and Stabilization. The Committee 
recommendation does not include funding to implement the 
civilian reserve corps portion of the Initiative. The Committee 
believes that the first priority is to build up the internal 
reconstruction and stabilization capabilities of the Department 
of State and USAID before undertaking an expansion of the 
Initiative to include nongovernmental personnel. The 
recommendation also continues a proviso requiring the Secretary 
of State and the USAID Administrator to submit a coordinated 
joint spending plan and integrated strategy for funds made 
available for CSI in this Act. The Committee recommendation 
does not include either the enhanced transfer authority or the 
expanded personnel authority requested under the heading for 
fiscal year 2010. Finally, the Secretary of State is directed 
to notify the Committees on Appropriations in writing, within 
fifteen days following the deployment of a unit of the civilian 
response corps, regarding the destination, size, composition, 
and expected duration of deployment of the unit.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................       $71,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       160,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       160,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       89,000,000

\1\In addition to the amount above, $290,000,000 was made available for
  fiscal year 2009 in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of
  2009, Public Law 111-5.

    The Committee recommendation includes $160,000,000 for 
Capital Investment Fund, which is $89,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request. These 
funds are in addition to an estimated $120,000,000 in expedited 
passport fees which will be used to support the information 
technology modernization effort, for a total of $280,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2010 for support of the Department of State's 
Information Technology Strategic Plan. The Committee notes that 
the significant increase in direct appropriations is necessary 
due to a 58 percent reduction in the estimated passport fee 
revenue between fiscal years 2008 and 2010. In addition, the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included 
$290,000,000 for critical investments and job creation under 
this heading.
    The funds made available will be used to provide: greater 
integration and collaboration among more than 40 civilian 
agencies with overseas operations; improvements in efficiency 
and customer service through the consolidation and 
centralization of information technology services; modernized 
critical administrative and financial management systems; 
increased access to critical information resources for 
Department personnel; and strengthened information technology 
security.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $118,122,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       100,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       100,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................      -18,122,000

\1\The enacted level includes $83,122,000 in supplemental appropriations
  for fiscal year 2009, including $57,000,000 from Public Law 110-252,
  $2,000,000 from Public Law 111-5, and $24,122,000 from Public Law 111-
  32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $100,000,000 under 
this heading for support of the oversight personnel and 
activities of Office of Inspector General at the Department of 
State (OIG), the Special Inspector General for Iraq 
Reconstruction (SIGIR), and the Special Inspector General for 
Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), which is $18,122,000 below 
the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request. 
Within the total, the recommendation includes $54,000,000 for 
the OIG, $23,000,000 for the SIGIR and $23,000,000 for the 
SIGAR. The Committee notes that $7,000,000 was included in the 
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-XXX) for 
both the SIGIR and the SIGAR, which is available for obligation 
through fiscal year 2010.
    The Committee recommendation includes language, as in 
previous years, waiving the statutory requirement that every 
post be inspected every five years, in order to provide greater 
flexibility to the Inspector General to use resources in the 
most critical areas.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $538,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       633,243,000
Committee recommendation..............................       600,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -33,243,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        62,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $600,000,000 for 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs, which is 
$62,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$33,243,000 below the request.
    Funding provided under this heading supports international 
educational, professional, and cultural exchange programs, 
including the Fulbright student and scholar exchanges and the 
International Visitor Leadership Program, as well as related 
staff and administrative costs. These exchanges are a critical 
investment in our nation's public diplomacy effort. They 
involve one-on-one contact between American citizens and 
foreign nationals and help foster understanding and 
appreciation of other peoples and cultures.
    Funds made available under the heading shall be allocated 
as follows and are subject to the terms and conditions of 
section 7019 concerning allocations and notifications.

               EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  Committee
         Program/Activity            Request   recommendation    Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
         Academic Programs
Fulbright Program.................    253,826       250,599       -3,227
Global Academic Exchanges
    Educational Advising and           12,908        12,908            0
     Student Services.............
    English Language Programs.....     50,207        42,207       -8,000
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal--Global Academic      63,115        55,115       -8,000
         Exchanges................
Special Academic Exchanges
    Regional Graduate Fellowships.     22,660        22,660            0
    American Overseas Research          4,145         4,145            0
     Centers......................
    South Pacific Exchanges.......        500           500            0
    Timor-Leste Exchanges.........        500           500            0
    Mobility (Disability) Exchange        500           500            0
     Clearinghouse................
    Benjamin Gilman International      10,420         9,200       -1,220
     Scholarship Program..........
    George Mitchell Fellowship            500           500            0
     Program......................
    University of Miami                   500           500            0
     Hemispheric Program..........
    Tibet Fund....................        750           750            0
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal--Special Academic     40,475        39,255       -1,220
         Exchanges................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total--Academic Programs..    357,416       344,969      -12,447
     Professional and Cultural
             Exchanges
International Visitor Leadership       96,308        90,211       -6,097
 Program..........................
Citizen Exchange Programs.........    103,805        82,377      -21,428
 Special Professional and Cultural
             Exchanges
Congress Bundestag Youth Exchange       4,166         3,700         -466
 Program..........................
Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program.      1,902         1,902            0
Irish Institute...................      1,020         1,020            0
Ngwang Choephel Fellows (Tibet)...        650           650            0
Youth Science Leadership Institute        150           150            0
 of the Americas..................
Institute for Representative              496           496            0
 Government.......................
Pakistan Literacy Training Program        375           375            0
                                   -------------------------------------
        Subtotal--Special               8,759         8,293         -466
         Professional and Cultural
         Exchanges................
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total--Professional and       208,872       180,881      -27,991
         Cultural Exchanges.......
One-Time Grants Program...........          0         8,000        8,000
Program Evaluation................      6,374         5,569         -805
Exchanges Support.................     60,581        60,581            0
                                   -------------------------------------
        Total--Educational and        633,243       600,000      -33,243
         Cultural Exchange
         Programs.................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee urges the Secretary of State to continue 
funding of the Future Leaders Exchange programs, the American-
Serbia and Montenegro Youth Leadership Exchange, the Junior 
Faculty Development program, the Youth Exchange and Study-
Afghanistan program, the Language, Technology, Math and Science 
Exchange, the Educational Advising Centers, the Teachers of 
Critical Languages program, the National Security Language 
Initiative Youth Program, and Educational Advising in Eurasia.
    The Committee urges the Department to continue to support 
the citizen exchange activities of Sister Cities International, 
including efforts to increase exchanges with communities in 
Africa and in countries with significant Muslim populations. 
The Committee also urges the Department to continue the ongoing 
partnership with Special Olympics through the Eunice Kennedy 
Shriver Fellowship Program.

Exchanges with the Caribbean

    The Committee continues its strong support for expanded 
cultural, educational, and professional exchanges between the 
United States and the Caribbean. The Committee recognizes that 
such people-to-people exchanges with the region are an 
important tool for developing understanding between communities 
and enhancing regional security. The Committee also encourages 
the Department of State to consider supporting international 
exchange programs with students and professionals from Cuba.

Exchanges with Tibet

    The Tibetan Fulbright Scholarship Program has provided 
support to almost 300 Tibetan students and professionals 
seeking higher education and professional training at United 
States universities. The Committee strongly supports these 
exchanges with Tibet and has included the $750,000 requested 
for the Tibetan Scholarship Program in fiscal year 2010. In 
addition, the Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$650,000 for the Ngwang Choephel Fellows program, which is the 
same as the request.

Fee limitation

    The Committee recommendation includes a limitation of not 
to exceed $5,000,000 on the use of fees or other payments 
received from or in connection with English teaching, 
educational advising and counseling, and exchange visitor 
programs as authorized by law. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 level and the request.

International Visitor Leadership Program (IVLP)

    The Committee recommendation includes $90,211,000 for the 
International Visitor Leadership Program, which is $11,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 program level. Each year, more than 
4,000 emerging leaders from over 180 countries participate in 
this program. The Committee recommendation includes an increase 
in funding in response to the request of United States missions 
worldwide to expand the number of strategically important 
leaders who participate in IVLP exchanges.

Professional and cultural exchange programs

    Within the increase provided for Professional and Cultural 
Exchanges, the Committee intends that at least $5,000,000 be 
allocated to expand exchange programs and activities in the 
visual arts, performing arts, film, arts education, arts 
management, and cultural studies. The Committee encourages the 
Department of State to consider the cultural exchange programs 
of Carnegie Hall.

Paul Simon Study Abroad Foundation

    The Committee is aware that legislation to authorize 
several of the recommendations of the Congressionally-chartered 
Commission on the Abraham Lincoln Study Abroad Fellowship 
Program passed the House of Representatives. The Committee will 
review funding for these activities once the new authorities 
are enacted into law, including authorities authorizing 
appropriations for the Senator Paul Simon Study Abroad 
Foundation.

Spending plan

    The Committee expects that a proposal for the programmatic 
and geographic distribution of available resources (including 
unobligated balances and recoveries) will be submitted through 
the normal reprogramming process not later than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act. The Committee expects that the overall 
funding distribution will conform to the programmatic guidance 
above.

Special Grants--One-time Grants Program

    In addition to funding provided to support academic and 
cultural exchanges requested in the budget or those funded 
annually by the Committee, the Committee recommendation 
includes $8,000,000 for the one-time special educational, 
professional, and cultural exchange grants program begun in 
fiscal year 2008. Exchange proposals should be for funding to 
support the actual exchange of people, and not for operational 
support of an organization or institution.
    The Department of State should review and award proposals 
on a competitive basis that meet appropriate guidelines and 
qualifications established by the Department of State that are 
consistent with the underlying statutory authority for exchange 
programs. Grants may be supported for up to $500,000 for each 
award. The Department of State should prepare and issue the 
solicitation for proposals not later than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act.
    The Secretary is encouraged to consider the following 
proposals for this competitive program:
     Arkansas State University for exchanges with the 
Middle East and East Asian countries;
     Associated Colleges of the South for faculty and 
student exchange programs in critical languages and cultures;
     Monmouth University School of Social Work for 
exchange programs in Africa around anti-trafficking issues;
     Project Children for exchange programs with 
Ireland;
     Roosevelt University South Africa Campus, for 
cultural and historical exchanges;
     South African Washington Internship Programs for 
exchanges with higher education institutions in South Africa;
     Spelman College for critical language academic 
exchanges with China;
     Strengthening America's Image for citizen exchange 
programs with cities in Muslim majority countries;
     United Planet for exchanges in Africa, the Middle 
East, and South Asia;
     University of Iowa for an international writing 
exchange program;
     University of Kentucky College of Law for faculty 
and student exchanges; and
     Levin Institute for a United States-China 
environmental exchange program.

                       REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $8,175,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         8,175,000
Committee recommendation..............................         8,175,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $8,175,000 for 
Representation Allowances authorized by section 905 of the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 level and the request. These funds are used to 
reimburse Foreign Service Officers for expenditures incurred in 
their official capacities abroad in establishing and 
maintaining relations with officials of foreign governments and 
appropriate members of local communities. The Department of 
State shall submit a quarterly report to the Committees on 
Appropriations containing detailed information on the allotment 
and expenditure of this appropriation.

              PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $22,814,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        27,159,000
Committee recommendation..............................        28,500,000
    Change from request...............................         1,341,000
    Change from enacted level.........................         5,686,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $28,500,000 for 
Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials, which is 
$5,686,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$1,341,000 above the request.
    This account reimburses local governments and communities 
for the extraordinary costs incurred in providing protection 
for international organizations, foreign missions and 
officials, and foreign dignitaries under certain circumstances. 
To be eligible for reimbursement under the regular program, the 
costs must be incurred in a city with 20 or more consular or 
diplomatic missions staffed by accredited personnel and all 
costs must be certified as eligible by the Department of 
State's Bureau of Diplomatic Security. In addition, funds may 
be used for reimbursement for an extraordinary event in a 
jurisdiction that does not meet the regular program eligibility 
requirements, once funds are made available for that purpose. 
The Committee expects the Department of State to treat all 
submissions diligently and provide reimbursement to local 
jurisdictions on a timely basis if claims are fully justified.
    Included is $25,830,000 for the reimbursement of eligible 
costs of providing extraordinary protection of the United 
Nations, other international organizations, foreign missions 
and officials in New York. In addition, $2,670,000 is for the 
reimbursement of eligible costs associated with the special 
security requirements born by municipalities hosting diplomatic 
delegations and officials, and visiting foreign dignitaries 
throughout the rest of the United States. The Committee 
encourages the Department to give consideration to the 
reimbursement of the eligible costs associated with the 
Organization of American States 35th General Assembly Session 
in June 2005 when allocating these funds.
    The Committee requests that the Department of State prepare 
and submit to the Committees on Appropriations a report on the 
amount of claims for extraordinary protective services that 
have been submitted by eligible jurisdictions and certified as 
meeting the program requirements and the amount of unobligated 
funds available to pay such claims. The report should be 
submitted not later than 60 days after enactment of this Act 
and every six months thereafter.

            EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION, AND MAINTENANCE




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................    $2,669,369,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,815,050,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,724,150,000
    Change from request...............................       -90,900,000
    Change from enacted level.........................     -945,219,000

\1\The enacted level includes $962,800,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $41,300,000 from Public
  Law 110-252 and $921,500,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes a total appropriation 
of $1,724,150,000 for Embassy Security, Construction, and 
Maintenance, which is $945,219,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and $90,900,000 below the request. The Committee 
notes that $90,900,000 of the fiscal year 2010 request was made 
available in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public 
Law 111-32) in an effort to accelerate the completion of safe 
and secure office and housing for diplomatic and development 
personnel in Peshawar, Pakistan.
    The recommendation designates $847,300,000 as available 
only for priority worldwide security upgrades, acquisition, and 
construction and $876,850,000 for other maintenance, 
construction, and operations costs.
    This account provides funds to manage United States 
Government real property overseas, maintain Government-owned 
and long-term leased properties at approximately 265 posts, and 
to lease office and functional facilities and residential 
units, not only for the Department of State, but also for all 
United States Government employees overseas.
    Worldwide Security Upgrades (WSU).--The Committee 
recommendation includes $752,800,000 for capital security 
construction. The funds made available for WSU projects will 
continue the multi-year capital security program of 
constructing new secure replacement facilities for the 
Department of State's most vulnerable embassies and consulates 
and providing additional compound security measures and 
upgrades. In addition to these funds, $921,500,000 was 
appropriated in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 
(Public Law 111-32) for the worldwide security upgrade program 
for construction of safe and secure facilities in Pakistan, of 
which $90,900,000 is contained in the fiscal year 2010 budget 
request for housing and offices in Peshawar.
    The Committee expects that projects undertaken under this 
program will address the security needs of the highest priority 
facilities consistent with the top priority security 
vulnerabilities as identified by the Bureau of Diplomatic 
Security and all projects should result, when complete, in a 
facility that meets existing security standards. The Committee 
expects that worldwide security upgrade funds will be used only 
for projects that meet these specifications.
    Since 2001, 64 new facilities have been constructed under 
the program and another 32 facilities are under design or 
construction. These 96 facilities represent almost half of the 
195 facilities identified for replacement following the 
bombings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam in 1998.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $94,500,000, 
which is the same as the request, to continue the compound 
security upgrade program. The Committee understands that this 
program includes the installation of forced entry/ballistic 
resistant roof hatches, vault doors and power-assisted vehicle 
barriers, and other similar measures. The Committee expects 
that this funding will also provide physical security 
improvements to residential compounds and other locations where 
American citizens gather. Priority should be given to 
residential and compound security.
    The Committee recommendation includes a provision (Sec. 
7004), requiring all agencies and departments to fully meet 
their capital cost sharing obligations under subsection (e) of 
section 604 of the Secure Embassy Construction and 
Counterterrorism Act of 1999 in order to be allocated office 
space or other accommodations in newly constructed or renovated 
diplomatic facilities.
    Capital Security Cost Sharing Program.--The Committee 
continues to support the Capital Security Cost Sharing Program. 
Under this program, all agencies that have staff overseas under 
Chief of Mission authority pay a fair share of the cost of 
urgent, security-driven capital projects undertaken to replace 
embassies and consulates at the most vulnerable posts. The 
goals of this program are twofold. First, the program 
accelerates the replacement of unsafe, unsecured, and outdated 
diplomatic facilities that are used overseas by United States 
Government agencies. This is planned as a 14-year effort to 
replace vulnerable embassy and consulate facilities with new 
compounds that fully comply with statutory security 
requirements. Second, the program creates incentives within all 
government departments and agencies to scrutinize and ``right-
size'' their overseas presence to avoid unnecessary costs and 
security risks. Each agency with staff overseas under Chief of 
Mission authority has built into their fiscal year 2010 budget 
request, an annual contribution towards construction of new 
secure diplomatic facilities based on the number of positions 
overseas and the type of space occupied. These contributions do 
not take the place of Department of State contributions, which 
are also growing, but create a larger, shared funding pool to 
accelerate replacement.
    The recommendation assumes a total program level of 
$1,309,100,000 in fiscal year 2010 for Capital Security 
Construction, including $752,800,000 under this account, and 
$556,300,000 from other reimbursements, including $454,593,000 
from non-State agencies, based on positions worldwide. The 
Committee believes that strong interagency coordination and 
cooperation is critical to the achievement of program goals and 
encourages the Department of State to ensure that the 
management of this program is inclusive, cooperative, and 
transparent.
    Operation and maintenance.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $876,850,000 for operations and maintenance 
activities, which is $75,506,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and the same as the request.
    Spending plan.--The Committee requests the Secretary of 
State to submit a spending plan for authorized activities under 
this heading in fiscal year 2010, not later than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act. The plan should include all resources 
available to the Department in fiscal year 2010 for operations, 
maintenance, and construction.
    Assets management.--The Committee understands that the 
Department of State expects to realize an estimated 
$570,265,000 in assets management funds over the fiscal year 
2009 and 2010 period. The Committee expects that these funds 
will be used for opportunity purchases to replace uneconomical 
leases and for other priority capital acquisition purposes. In 
addition, as in previous years, the Committee expects that 
assets management funds will continue to be allocated, to the 
maximum extent practicable, to address security construction 
needs. Any use of these or additional assets management funds 
in fiscal year 2010 is subject to reprogramming. In addition, 
with respect to the requirement that a reprogramming for any 
major new start be submitted, the Committee understands that 
requirement to mean that any rehabilitation or construction 
projects involving an Ambassador's residence will be subject to 
the requirement. In addition to regular reporting provided to 
the Committee on acquisition and disposal of overseas property, 
the Department of State shall include in the spending plan for 
fiscal year 2010 a listing of all properties disposed of, or in 
process for disposal, along with the associated actual or 
anticipated proceeds of sale.
    The recommendation continues language carried in the bill 
in previous years that prohibits funds from being used for 
acquisition of furniture, furnishings, and generators for other 
departments and agencies.

           EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $9,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        10,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        10,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         1,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 to enable 
the Secretary of State to meet unforeseen emergencies arising 
in the Diplomatic and Consular Service, which is $1,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the 
request. Funding provided in this account is available until 
expended.
    The Committee recommendation carries forward the authority 
to transfer up to $1,000,000 from this account to the 
Repatriation Loans Program Account that was included in the 
fiscal year 2009 Act and requested in the budget. This 
authority will ensure an adequate level of resources for loans 
to American citizens through the Repatriation Loans Program 
Account should that account require additional funds in fiscal 
year 2010 due to an unanticipated increase in the number of 
loans.
    This appropriation provides resources for the Department of 
State to meet emergency requirements in the conduct of foreign 
affairs. The Committee recommendation provides funds for: (1) 
travel and subsistence expenses for relocation of American 
employees of the United States Government and their families 
from troubled areas to the United States and/or safe-haven 
posts; (2) allowances granted to Department of State employees 
and their dependents evacuated to the United States for the 
convenience of the Government; and (3) payment of rewards for 
information concerning terrorist activities.

                    BUYING POWER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $5,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        10,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................         7,500,000
    Change from request...............................        -2,500,000
    Change from enacted level.........................         2,500,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $7,500,000 for Buying 
Power Maintenance Account, which is $2,500,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and $2,500,000 below the request. Funds 
in this account are available until expended and are to assist 
the Department of State in the management of exchange rate 
losses in the cost of overseas operations.

                   REPATRIATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $1,353,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         1,450,000
Committee recommendation..............................         1,450,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................            97,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $1,450,000 for the 
Repatriation Loans Program Account, of which $739,000 for the 
subsidy cost of repatriation loans and $711,000 for 
administrative costs of the program as authorized by 22 U.S.C. 
2671, which is a combined $97,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and the same as the request.
    This account provides emergency loans to assist destitute 
Americans abroad who have no other source of funds to return to 
the United States.

              PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $16,840,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        21,174,000
Committee recommendation..............................        21,174,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         4,334,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $21,174,000 for 
Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan, which is 
$4,334,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
same as the request. The recommendation, combined with funds 
derived from visa fee revenues and other reimbursements will 
provide the amount needed to cover direct and indirect 
operating expenses. Any remaining funds will be set aside for 
special projects and consular service upgrades.
    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the American Institute in Taiwan and 
authorizes funds to be appropriated to the Secretary of State 
to carry out the provisions of the Act. The Institute 
administers programs in the areas of economic and commercial 
services, cultural affairs, travel services, and logistics. The 
Department of State contracts with the American Institute in 
Taiwan to carry out these activities.

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $157,100,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       158,900,000
Committee recommendation..............................       158,900,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         1,800,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $158,900,000 for 
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund, 
which is $1,800,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level 
and the same as the request.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
budget scorekeeping purposes, is authorized by the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980, and provides for an appropriation to the 
Fund in 30 equal annual installments of the amount required for 
the unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries, or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed. The Retirement Fund is maintained through 
contributions made by participants, matching government 
contributions, special government contributions (including this 
account), interest on investments, and voluntary contributions.

                      International Organizations


              CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $1,604,400,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,797,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,697,000,000
    Change from request...............................      -100,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       92,600,000

\1\The enacted level includes $75,000,000 in supplemental appropriations
  for fiscal year 2009 from Public Law 110-252.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,697,000,000 for 
Contributions to International Organizations, which is 
$92,600,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$100,000,000 below the request.
    The amount provided in the bill is intended for payment of 
obligations incurred as a result of United States membership in 
international organizations as authorized by conventions, 
treaties, or specific Acts of Congress for fiscal year 2010. 
The amount provides funding for the assessed costs of the 45 
international organizations, including the United Nations (UN) 
and affiliated agencies, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) and the related North Atlantic Assembly, the 
Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the 
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Organization for 
Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the World Trade 
Organization (WTO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the 
International War Crimes Tribunals for Rwanda and the former 
Yugoslavia, the Organization of American States (OAS), and the 
Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

Synchronization of deferred payments

    The Committee recommendation includes $75,049,000 for 
synchronization of deferred payments, which is $100,000,000 
below the request. The Committee directs the Department to 
provide a report not later than 45 days after enactment of this 
Act on the status of United States deferred payments for each 
of the organizations funded under this heading. The Committee 
encourages the Department to allocate funding provided for 
synchronization efforts in fiscal year 2010 to organizations 
whose missions are critical to protecting United States 
national security interests, including NATO, the Organization 
for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the IAEA, and PAHO.

Reform and budget discipline

    The Committee continues to support the comprehensive 
reassessment of United States membership in each of the 45 
international organizations supported by this account and 
continues to insist on reform and budget discipline as a 
priority for all of the international organizations for which 
the United States is a participant, including the development 
of processes to evaluate, prioritize, and, when necessary, 
terminate programs. The Committee believes that the onus is on 
each international organization and the Department of State 
representatives to those organizations to reduce overall 
budgets by eliminating duplicative activities, excessive 
administrative costs, and inefficient operations. The Committee 
expects the Department to take immediate action to evaluate and 
prioritize United States participation in, and funding for, 
international organizations in accordance with policy goals. 
The Committee directs the Department to refrain from entering 
into new commitments without a commensurate increase in 
resources.

United Nations reform

    The Committee continues to encourage the Department of 
State and the United States Mission to the UN to keep all 
aspects of UN reform high on the agenda, and to work in 
conjunction with other UN member states to achieve the most 
effective and efficient UN possible. The Committee continues to 
monitor closely the management reform efforts initiated by the 
Secretary-General to identify overlapping and outdated mandates 
to make the UN more efficient, accountable and transparent. The 
Committee commends the Secretary-General's policy of placing 
financial disclosure information for senior UN officials on the 
UN's public website. The Committee considers this initiative to 
be an important step toward improving accountability and 
transparency, and strengthening the focus on managing for 
results. The Committee understands that the functions of the 
Procurement Task Force have been absorbed under the Office of 
Internal Oversight Services (OIOS). The Committee expects the 
Department of State to encourage and support the UN's 
commitment to build a strong and lasting capability to 
investigate waste, fraud and abuse. The Committee strongly 
encourages continued support for an independent OIOS to improve 
internal controls, efficiency and effectiveness of the UN.

United Nations regular budget

    The Committee has continued prior year language requiring 
that any proposal to increase funding for any UN program 
without identifying an offsetting decrease in the UN budget be 
communicated to the Committees on Appropriations in advance of 
the formal notification, consideration, and adoption of such a 
proposal in the General Assembly.

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

    The Committee notes, with approval, the efforts of the 
Department of State and the United States delegation to 
establish a cap on the cost of the NATO Headquarters project, 
but the Committee is concerned that costs continue to increase 
and the schedule for completion continues to slip. The 
Committee directs the Department of State to control the costs 
of this facility and to ensure the facility meets the necessary 
security requirements. The Committee understands that an 
agreement between the Department of Defense and the Department 
of State as to the allocation of construction costs of the 
United States contribution to the project has been completed 
and directs that these departments complete a similar agreement 
on the allocation of costs for the ``fit-out'' of United States 
Mission space within the new Headquarters building. To date, 
the Committee has provided $74,000,000 for the NATO 
Headquarters project. The Department of State is directed to 
keep the Committee apprised of progress on this matter.

International Atomic Energy Agency

    The Committee recommendation includes the full requested 
funding for the United States assessment for the IAEA in fiscal 
year 2010.

UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

    The Committee recommendation includes the full requested 
funding for the United States assessment for UNESCO in fiscal 
year 2010. The Committee supports UNESCO's work related to the 
quality of basic education, in particular the development and 
testing of globally acceptable standards. The Committee 
commends USAID and the Department of State for their continued 
cooperation with UNESCO on priority areas, including education 
and literacy, teacher training particularly in sub-Saharan 
Africa, clean water, natural disaster preparedness, including 
tsunami warning systems, civic education, and press freedom.

Pan American Health Organization

    The Committee recommendation includes the full requested 
funding for the United States assessment for PAHO. The 
Committee notes that PAHO plays an important role in addressing 
health issues in the Western Hemisphere, such as the H1N1 
influenza virus, that have a direct and indirect impact on the 
health and well-being of the citizens of the United States.

Voting practices of the United Nations

    The Committee directs the Department of State to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations on the voting practices of UN 
member states for the current and past three years on matters 
regarding Iran, Israel, Sudan, and Zimbabwe, as well as on UN 
reform. The Committee expects this report not later than 120 
days after enactment of this Act.

Americans working in the United Nations

    The Committee encourages the Department of State to 
continue efforts to increase the number of qualified Americans 
employed by the UN and other international organizations. The 
Committee recognizes that Americans provide many skills that 
can contribute to making the UN more efficient, effective, and 
accountable. The Committee remains dismayed that the 
representation of Americans in UN posts, in relation to 
geographic distribution, has remained relatively flat since 
2001.

        CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level1.......................    $2,388,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     2,260,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,125,000,000
    Change from request...............................      -135,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................     -263,500,000

\1\The enacted level includes $871,500,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $150,500,000 from
  Public Law 110-252 and $721,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,125,000,000 for 
Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities, which 
is $263,500,000 below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$135,000,000 below the request. The Committee provides funding 
for the Somalia logistics package within the voluntary 
peacekeeping account.
    The Committee continues to underscore the importance of UN 
peacekeeping missions, which preserve peace and stability in 
troubled regions of the world for a fraction of what it would 
cost the United States Armed Forces to undertake. The Committee 
urges the Department of State to give priority funding 
consideration for the UN peacekeeping mission in the Central 
African Republic and Chad (MINURCAT) and the United Nations 
Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) during 
allocation of resources.
    The Committee continues language requiring certification 
that American manufacturers and suppliers are provided equal 
procurement opportunities, and language making a portion of 
appropriations under this account available for two fiscal 
years.

Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS)

    The Committee continues to support the efforts of the UN's 
OIOS to identify waste, fraud and abuse, including sexual abuse 
in peacekeeping operations, and to recommend specific reforms 
to ensure that such practices are brought to an end. The 
Committee directs the Department of State to provide the 
necessary support to ensure that OIOS oversight is 
systematically brought to bear on every UN peacekeeping 
mission, including through the presence of resident auditors. 
The Committee directs the Department to request a performance 
report on the efforts of this Office to root out the causes of 
such waste, fraud, and abuse.

Trafficking in persons and illegal sexual exploitation

    The Committee notes that despite the Secretary-General's 
considerable efforts to implement a policy of zero tolerance, 
cases of UN peacekeepers abusing the people they have been sent 
to protect are an ongoing concern. The Committee stresses that 
the UN needs to press troop contributing countries to seek 
justice for such transgressions when the UN removes the 
offending peacekeepers. The Committee continues to include 
language requiring that the UN take appropriate measures to 
prevent UN employees, contractor personnel, and peacekeeping 
forces serving in any UN peacekeeping mission from trafficking 
in persons, exploiting victims of trafficking, or committing 
acts of illegal sexual exploitation, and that the UN hold 
accountable individuals who engage in such acts while 
participating in the peacekeeping mission, including the 
prosecution in their home countries of such individuals in 
connection with such acts.

Peacekeeping cap

    The Committee recommendation includes a provision (Sec. 
7051) adjusting the authorized level of United States 
assessments for peacekeeping activities during calendar year 
2010 from 25 percent to 27.1 percent. The Committee does not 
include requested language setting the same cap for calendar 
year 2011, and encourages the Department to negotiate a lower 
assessment.

Cyprus

    The Committee encourages the Department of State to 
continue the United States support for the UN peacekeeping 
operation in Cyprus (UNFICYP) at an amount not less than that 
made available to meet obligations in fiscal year 2009.

Sudan and Darfur

    The Committee recommendation fully funds the United States 
assessed contribution of $512,000,000 for African Union/United 
Nations Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) and $257,350,000 for United 
Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) and urges the Department of 
State to work with the UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations 
to enhance the effectiveness of UNAMID and UNMIS to defuse 
conflict before it occurs as well as improving its ability to 
protect civilian populations.

Post-conflict

    The Committee notes the importance of integrating 
environmental considerations into peacekeeping operations and 
the need to ensure adequate funding for such efforts, including 
by implementing policies and guidelines that minimize the 
environmental footprint of such operations, monitoring illegal 
trade in natural resources, building national capacity for 
management of natural resources, and promoting sustainable use 
of natural resources within reintegration projects. The 
Committee notes the particular importance of such initiatives 
as part of the MONUC mission.

                       International Commissions


 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level1.......................       $75,506,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        76,250,000
Committee recommendation..............................        76,250,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................          744,000

\1\In addition, $220,000,000 was made available for fiscal year 2009 in
  the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Public Law 111-5
  to the IBWC for construction.

    The Committee recommendation includes $76,250,000 for 
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and 
Mexico (IBWC), which is $744,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and the same as the request. The amount provided 
includes $33,000,000 for Salaries and Expenses and $43,250,000 
for construction. The recommendation also includes language 
authorizing not to exceed $6,000 for representation expenses, 
as requested.
    The Committee notes that the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-5) included 
$220,000,000 for critical investments and job creation under 
this heading.

Salaries and expenses

    The Committee recommendation for the Salaries and Expenses 
account is $33,000,000, which is $744,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 enacted level, excluding supplemental appropriations, and 
the same as the request. The amount recommended includes 
$6,825,000 for the administration activity, $2,605,000 for the 
engineering activity and $23,570,000 for the operations and 
maintenance activity.

Construction

    The Committee recommendation for IBWC construction includes 
$43,250,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 enacted 
level and the request. Funds for construction should be 
allocated in accordance with the table below and are subject to 
section 7019 of this Act.

  INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO
                              CONSTRUCTION
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Project/Activity              Request     House      Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water Quality Program Subtotal.........      6,750      6,750          0
    Nogales International Outfall              750        750          0
     Interceptor.......................
    Secondary Treatment of Tijuana           6,000      6,000          0
     Sewage............................
                                        --------------------------------
Water Quantity Program Subtotal........     29,800     29,800          0
    Colorado River Boundary & Capacity.        400        400          0
    Preservation Reconstruction of the       3,000      3,000          0
     American Canal....................
    Rio Grande Flood Control System         21,400     21,400          0
     Rehabilitation--Texas.............
    Safety of Dams Rehabilitation......      5,000      5,000          0
                                        --------------------------------
Resource & Asset Management Program          6,700      6,700          0
 Subtotal..............................
    Facilities Renovation..............      3,400      3,400          0
    Heavy Equipment Replacement........      1,000      1,000          0
    Critical Infrastructure Protection.      2,300      2,300          0
                                        --------------------------------
        Total--Construction............     43,250     43,250          0
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the Rio 
Grande Flood Control System Rehabilitation Project to continue 
and maintain levee projects along the Rio Grande River, as well 
as funding for environmental, hydrologic and hydraulic studies 
to evaluate and assess the low water weirs along the Rio Grande 
Valley.
    The Committee directs the IBWC to provide a consolidated 
spending plan for funds appropriated in fiscal years 2009 and 
2010, including supplemental appropriations, to the Committees 
on Appropriations not later than 45 days after the enactment of 
this Act. Every 90 days thereafter, the IBWC is directed to 
provide a progress report on the activities outlined in the 
consolidated spending plan until such funds have been expended.

              AMERICAN SECTIONS, INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $11,649,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        12,608,000
Committee recommendation..............................        12,608,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................           959,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $12,608,000 for 
American Sections, International Commissions, which is $959,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the 
request. Funds will support the United States share of expenses 
of the International Boundary Commission, the International 
Joint Commission (IJC), United States and Canada, and the 
Border Environment Cooperation Commission for fiscal year 2010. 
Within the total: $8,000,000 is for the IJC; $2,359,000 is for 
the International Boundary Commission; and $2,249,000 is for 
the Border Environment Cooperation Commission.

                  INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $29,925,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        43,576,000
Committee recommendation..............................        48,576,000
    Change from request...............................         5,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        18,651,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $48,576,000 for 
International Fisheries Commissions, which is $18,651,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $5,000,000 above the 
request. Funds made available under this heading support the 
United States share of the expenses of International Fisheries 
Commissions or related organizations, as well as the travel 
expenses of the United States commissioners.
    Funds made available under the heading shall be allocated 
as follows and are subject to the terms and conditions of 
section 7019 concerning allocations and notifications.

                   INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 Committee
           Commission              Request    recommendation     Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Great Lakes Fishery Commission..     17,800            22,800      5,000
    Water Quality Improvements            0                 0          0
     and Lamprey Control........
Inter-American Tropical Tuna          1,800             1,800          0
 Commission.....................
Pacific Salmon Commission.......      3,250             3,250          0
Pacific Salmon Treaty Commitment     15,000            15,000          0
International Pacific Halibut         3,250             3,250          0
 Commission.....................
Other Marine Conservation             2,476             2,476          0
 Organizations..................
                                 ---------------------------------------
    Total--International             43,576            48,576      5,000
     Fisheries Commissions......
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Funds made available for the activities of the Great Lakes 
Fishery Commission are to fulfill the bi-national obligations 
with Canada over the management of Great Lakes fisheries, 
including sea lamprey control, fisheries research, and support 
for multi-state/provincial/tribal management. The 
recommendation includes the $15,000,000 requested for meeting 
United States obligations to Canada under the Pacific Salmon 
Treaty. This is the first of two equal payments to Canada under 
the terms of the 2008 agreement.
    The Committee requests that the Department of State submit 
a proposed spending plan for the total amount provided under 
this heading not later than 60 days after enactment of this 
Act.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................      $715,483,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       745,450,000
Committee recommendation..............................       746,450,000
    Change from request...............................         1,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       30,967,000

\1\The enacted level includes $6,000,000 in supplemental appropriations
  for fiscal year 2009 made available in Public Law 110-252.

    The Committee recommendation includes $746,450,000 to carry 
out United States international communications activities and 
operations overseen by the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
(BBG), which is $30,967,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted 
level and $1,000,000 above the request. Within the total, 
$733,788,000 is for international broadcasting operations and 
$12,662,000 is for broadcasting capital improvements.

                 INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommendation for International Broadcasting 
Operations is $733,788,000, which is $29,601,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $1,601,000 above the 
request. This account funds the operating and engineering costs 
of Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio 
Free Asia, the Middle East Broadcasting Networks, Radio and TV 
Marti, and the BBG. The recommendation also includes funding 
for Broadcasting to Cuba under this account. Funds made 
available under the heading should be allocated in the 
following manner and are subject to the reprogramming and 
notification requirements of section 7019:

                  INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                 Committee
        Program/Activity           Request    recommendation     Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   International Broadcasting
           Operations
Voice of America................    201,828           204,547      2,719
Radio and TV Marti..............     32,474            32,474          0
Engineering and Technical           188,541           189,399        858
 Services.......................
Agency Direction................     28,247            28,247          0
International Broadcasting           39,809            39,809          0
 Bureau Management and Support..
                                 ---------------------------------------
    Subtotal, International         490,899           494,476      3,577
     Broadcasting Operations....
       Independent Grantee
          Organizations
Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.     91,063            91,063          0
Radio Free Asia.................     36,648            36,648          0
Middle East Broadcasting            113,577           111,601     -1,976
 Networks.......................
                                 ---------------------------------------
    Subtotal, Independent           241,288           239,312     -1,976
     Grantee Organizations......
                                 ---------------------------------------
    Total, International            732,187           733,788      1,601
     Broadcasting Operations
     Appropriation in Bill......
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Voice of America (VOA)

    The Committee recommendation includes $204,547,000 for VOA, 
which is $10,269,000 above the fiscal year 2009 program plan 
level and $2,719,000 above the request. The Committee 
recognizes VOA for its essential contribution to United States 
public diplomacy.
    The VOA's English-language radio programming is especially 
important since it provides accurate, objective, and 
comprehensive news to a potential English-speaking audience of 
1.6 billion people worldwide. The Committee recommendation 
includes a total of $15,112,000 for the VOA English Division, 
which is $1,166,000 above the fiscal year 2009 program level 
and the same as the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding to maintain 
through fiscal year 2010 the language services supported in 
fiscal year 2009. The Committee does not support the proposals 
in the request to end VOA broadcasts in Croatian and Greek and 
to discontinue radio rebroadcasts of PNN television programming 
and one hour original VOA Persian radio.

Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL)

    The Committee recommendation includes $91,063,000 for RFE/
RL, which is $883,000 above the fiscal year 2009 program level 
and the same as the request. Within these amounts, $6,506,000 
is for Radio Farda, $4,769,000 is for Radio Free Afghanistan, 
and $1,975,000 is for Radio Free Iraq. The Committee 
recommendation includes the requested funding to launch an RFE/
RL Russian-language internet platform for audiences in Central 
Asia.

Radio Free Asia (RFA)

    The Committee recommendation includes $36,648,000 for Radio 
Free Asia, which is $729,000 above the fiscal year 2009 program 
level and the same as the request. The Committee strongly 
supports the broadcasting efforts to China, Tibet, Burma, 
Vietnam, North Korea, Laos, and Cambodia. The Committee 
commends the BBG and Radio Free Asia for the surge in VOA and 
RFA Tibetan broadcasts undertaken in fiscal years 2008 and 2009 
and includes the funds requested to maintain those broadcast 
levels through fiscal year 2010.

Shortwave

    Short- and medium-wave radio broadcasts continue to serve a 
unique and important role in America's public diplomacy 
strategy by providing wide public access to information in 
countries where foreign governments actively block other radio, 
television and internet transmissions and in countries where 
rural and urban populations depend on this inexpensive 
technology. The BBG should continue to allocate funds to 
sustain current levels of shortwave broadcasts for VOA, RFA, 
and RFE/RL and is encouraged to explore the potential of 
digital shortwave technology to deliver high-quality 
transmissions at low cost to millions of more listeners around 
the world. Further, the BBG should re-examine the capabilities 
and deploy it where it is determined to be most effective, 
particularly to countries where there is limited or no access 
to independent media.

Broadcasting to Cuba

    The Committee recommendation includes $32,474,000 for radio 
and television broadcasting to Cuba, which is $2,342,000 below 
the fiscal year 2009 program level and the same as the request. 
The Committee is concerned with the recent findings by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) that despite efforts by 
the BBG, there is still a lack of reliable data on how much of 
the radio and television signals can be heard and seen in Cuba 
and that there is a need to improve the Office of Cuba 
Broadcasting's (OCB's) strategy and operations. Towards this 
end, the Committee concurs in the proposal to change the news 
format for TV Marti by replacing the two evening news programs 
with news updates on the half hour and to convert Radio Marti 
to an all news format. The Committee further urges the BBG to 
ensure that all the issues raised by the GAO are addressed by 
OCB. The Committee understands that there may be downsizing in 
the Cuba Broadcasting workforce due to the restructuring of 
programming and urges the Director of Office of Cuba 
Broadcasting to find alternative opportunities, offer job 
retraining, or utilize buy-out and voluntary early-out 
authority for those affected employees.

Middle East Broadcasting Networks

    The Committee recommendation includes $111,601,000 for 
television and radio broadcasting in Arabic, including Alhurra, 
Alhurra-Iraq, and Alhurra Europe, as well as radio Sawa, which 
is $1,038,000 above the fiscal year 2009 program level and 
$1,976,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding to continue 
through fiscal year 2010 the initiative begun in fiscal year 
2008 to provide for 24/7 streaming and 60-day archiving on the 
station's website of all original programs for the Alhurra 
stream. The Committee believes that these steps should enhance 
the transparency and accountability of Alhurra.

Broadcasting accountability

    The Committee recommendation includes a provision (Sec. 
7006) withholding certain amounts from obligation until the BBG 
reports to the Committees on Appropriations on policies and 
management controls to ensure that broadcast content adheres to 
statutory standards and principles.

                   BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes $12,662,000 for 
broadcasting capital improvements, which is $1,366,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $601,000 below the 
request. The recommendation will provide for the continuation 
of base costs for maintenance, improvements, replacements and 
repairs, digital production capability development, and 
security upgrades at transmitting stations overseas.

                            RELATED PROGRAMS


                          The Asia Foundation





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $16,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        16,230,000
Committee recommendation..............................        19,000,000
    Change from request...............................         2,770,000
    Change from enacted level.........................         3,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $19,000,000 for The 
Asia Foundation, which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
level and $2,770,000 above the request.

                    United States Institute of Peace





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $31,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        49,220,000
Committee recommendation..............................        49,220,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        18,220,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $49,220,000 for 
United States Institute of Peace (USIP), which is $18,220,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the 
request. The Committee includes $15,000,000 for facility 
construction and the Committee expects that any further USIP 
facility construction requirements will be financed with 
private funds.

               Center for Middle Eastern-Western Dialogue





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................          $875,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................           875,000
Committee recommendation..............................           875,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2010 of interest and earnings from the Center for Middle 
Eastern-Western Dialogue Trust Fund, expected to total 
$875,000.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................          $500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................           500,000
Committee recommendation..............................           500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2010 of interest and earnings from the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund, expected to total $500,000.

                    Israeli Arab Scholarship Program





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................          $375,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................           375,000
Committee recommendation..............................           375,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommends an appropriation for fiscal year 
2010 of interest and earnings from the Israeli Arab Scholarship 
Endowment Fund, expected to total $375,000.

                            East-West Center





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $21,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        11,730,000
Committee recommendation..............................                 0
    Change from request...............................       -11,730,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       -21,000,000


    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
the East-West Center, which is $21,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 level and $11,730,000 below the request.

                    National Endowment for Democracy





Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $115,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       100,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       100,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       -15,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $100,000,000 for the 
National Endowment for Democracy (NED), which is $15,000,000 
below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the 
request.
    Within the total, funding is included for activities to 
support democracy promotion, human rights, worker rights, and 
the rule of law in China, Burma, and Vietnam, as well as 
funding for the International Forum for Democratic Studies, 
Reagan-Fascell Fellows Program, the World Movement for 
Democracy, and the Center for International Media Assistance. 
In addition, $250,000 shall be made available for the training 
and education of Tibetans in democracy activities and for 
monitoring the human rights situation in Tibet. The Committee 
supports the use of these funds for activities that have their 
primary impact inside Tibet, to the extent practicable. The 
Committee recommends that NED consult with the Special 
Coordinator for Tibetan Issues at the Department of State on 
implementation of its programs related to Tibet.
    The President of NED is directed to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act on the proposed uses of these funds on a 
regional and country basis. The report should include a 
description of programmatic goals for each region and country, 
and how the planned use of funds will meet such goals. This 
grant to the Department of State is a pass-through directly to 
NED. Thus, funds under this heading shall not be subject to 
prior approval by the Department of State or USAID or to 
administrative or management surcharges, and minimal expenses, 
if any, should be charged to general Department of State 
operating expenses. Further, the NED should not be precluded 
from competitively bidding on other grant solicitations.

                           Other Commissions


      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................          $599,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................           635,000
Committee recommendation..............................           635,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................            36,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $635,000 for 
Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad, 
which is $36,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
the same as the request.
    The Commission protects and preserves endangered cultural 
sites in Eastern and Central Europe important to the heritage 
of United States citizens, including cemeteries, monuments, and 
historic buildings. One of its primary tasks is to obtain 
protection and preservation assurances from the governments of 
the region. The Committee recommendation will allow the 
Commission to fund its administrative expenses through 
appropriated funds while relying on other sources of funding 
for actual purchase and restoration of property.

             Commission on International Religious Freedom


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $4,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         4,300,000
Committee recommendation..............................         4,300,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................           300,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $4,300,000 for 
Commission on International Religious Freedom, which is 
$300,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same 
as the request.
    The Commission, established pursuant to the International 
Religious Freedom Act of 1998, conducts independent reviews, 
reports on facts and circumstances of violations of religious 
freedom abroad, and recommends options for United States 
policies with respect to foreign countries engaging in or 
tolerating violations of religious freedom.
    The Committee commends the Commission for submitting its 
Congressional Budget Justification for fiscal year 2010 within 
the requested timeframe.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $2,610,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         2,610,000
Committee recommendation..............................         2,610,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $2,610,000 for 
Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the request.
    The Commission was established in 1976 to monitor the acts 
of the signatories which reflect compliance with or violation 
of the articles of the Final Act of the Conference on Security 
and Cooperation in Europe, with particular regard to provisions 
relating to human rights and cooperation in humanitarian 
fields.
    The Committee commends the Commission for submitting its 
Congressional Budget Justification for fiscal year 2010 within 
the requested timeframe.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $2,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         2,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................         2,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $2,000,000 for 
Congressional-Executive Commission on China, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the request. The 
recommendation also includes a limitation of not more than 
$3,000 for the purpose of official representation, the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 level.
    Created in the China Relations Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-
286), the Commission's mission is to monitor the Chinese 
government's compliance with international human rights 
standards and to track the development of the rule of law in 
China. The Commission reports annually on these issues to the 
President and the Congressional leadership, making 
recommendations for policy action and legislation, when 
appropriate.
    The Committee expects the Commission to submit its 
Congressional Budget Justification within 30 days of the 
submission date of the President's budget recommendations for 
fiscal year 2011. All submissions shall include at minimum a 
five-year history of appropriations, the appropriations 
language requested, and a summary of both the built-in and 
programmatic changes recommended in the request.

      United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $4,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         3,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................         3,500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................          -500,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $3,500,000 for United 
States-China Economic and Security Review Commission, which is 
$500,000 below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same 
as the request. The Committee understands that projected 
carryover funds will enable the Commission to absorb the 
$500,000 reduction and still maintain their level of activity 
in fiscal year 2010. The recommendation also includes a 
limitation of not more than $4,000 for the purpose of official 
representation, the same as the fiscal year 2009 level.
    Created in the National Defense Authorization Act, 2001 
(Public Law 106-398), the Commission's mission is to monitor, 
investigate, and assess the ``national security implications of 
the bilateral trade and economic relationship'' between the 
United States and the People's Republic of China. The 
Commission reports annually on these issues to Congress, making 
recommendations for policy action and legislation when 
appropriate.
    The Committee recommendation carries forward the following 
provisos from the fiscal year 2009 Act concerning the 
Commission's authorities: a proviso relating to the 
compensation level for the Commission's Executive Director; a 
proviso treating travel by Commission members and staff under 
the same rules and procedures that apply to travel by Members 
and staff of the House of Representatives; a proviso related to 
performance-based cash awards; a proviso related to regular 
employee performance appraisals; and a proviso relating to the 
treatment of employees and printing and binding costs that are 
in the statute governing the activities of the Congressional-
Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China.

      TITLE II--UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                           OPERATING EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $1,059,184,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,438,800,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,388,800,000
    Change from request...............................       -50,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      329,616,000

\1\The enacted level includes $250,600,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $93,000,000 in Public
  Law 110-252 and $157,600,000 in Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,388,800,000 for 
Operating Expenses, which is $329,616,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 enacted level and $50,000,000 below the request. The 
Committee recognizes the need to strengthen USAID and has 
provided adequate funds to support the hiring of at least an 
additional 300 new Foreign Service Officers. These additional 
Foreign Service Officers will complement the investments made 
in the Department of State to strengthen the civilian workforce 
in order to respond to national security priorities. The 
Committee continues prior year language related to the signing 
of leases, construction and the opening or closing of overseas 
missions.

Acquisitions and assistance notifications

    The Committee is concerned by USAID's increasing reliance 
on the use of sole source contract awards and Indefinite 
Quantity Contracts (IQC) as it undermines competitive 
contracting processes, inhibits the participation of smaller 
organizations which bring niche expertise, and limits creative 
and innovative approaches to development. The Committee notes 
that lack of sufficient administrative resources is partly 
responsible for this loss of diversity in implementing 
organizations and expects that the additional resources 
provided for staffing will diminish the reliance on umbrella 
grants, sole source contracts, and IQCs. USAID is directed to 
notify the Committees on Appropriations fifteen days prior to 
any procurement action that involves awarding of a sole source 
contract in excess of $15,000,000; awarding a non-competitive 
grant or contract (other than sole source) in an amount greater 
than $75,000,000; raising the ceiling on an existing IQC by an 
amount greater than $35,000,000; issuing a new IQC in excess of 
$75,000,000; awarding an umbrella grant in excess of 
$25,000,000; or raising the ceiling on an existing umbrella 
grant in excess of $25,000,000. With regards to assistance in 
critical priority countries and assistance for humanitarian 
response or post-conflict situations, this requirement does not 
apply but USAID is directed to consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations biannually on its grant and contract portfolio.

Contracting and procurement opportunities for minority, small, and 
        disadvantaged business enterprises

    The Committee instructs USAID to take action to ensure that 
United States small, minority-owned, and disadvantaged business 
enterprises are able to fully participate in the provision of 
goods and services. USAID is directed to provide an annual 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on specific actions 
taken and the success of these efforts.

Development Leadership Initiative (DLI)

    Decades of cuts to USAID's operating budget have resulted 
in an agency that lacks the technical expertise and management 
capacity necessary to administer foreign assistance effectively 
in an increasingly complex global environment. In the past two 
fiscal years, the Committee has supported implementation of the 
DLI and has provided resources to support the hiring of an 
additional 420 Foreign Service Officers.
    The fiscal year 2010 request would support the hiring of 
not less than 300 new Foreign Service Officers, continuing the 
effort to double the USAID Foreign Service workforce by 2012. 
The Committee directs USAID to prioritize the hiring of 
employees who have experience and technical expertise in the 
areas of greatest demand at the agency, including basic 
education, agriculture, climate change/clean energy, democracy 
and governance, gender integration, safe water and sanitation, 
and health. Efforts should be undertaken to reach out to 
individuals in groups that are underrepresented in the Foreign 
and Civil Service. The Committee directs USAID to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations at the end of each fiscal quarter 
on the status of hiring, training, and deploying new personnel 
employed through the DLI.

Overseas capital space expansion

    As USAID continues to expand its Foreign Service workforce, 
more must be done to ensure that there is adequate space in 
missions and embassies abroad for these new employees. The 
Committee provides $245,000,000 for this purpose in fiscal year 
2010. This funding will allow USAID to create an additional 900 
desks over the next four years. This effort should be 
undertaken in close coordination with the Bureau of Overseas 
Buildings Operations at the Department of State. The Committee 
on Appropriations directs USAID to provide the Committee with 
regular updates on progress to obtain adequate and secure space 
for its employees abroad.

Partner vetting system

    The Committee is aware of USAID's efforts to develop better 
controls and screening systems to ensure that United States 
government funds are not diverted to terrorist organizations. 
While the overwhelming majority of implementing partners are 
performing admirably, often in difficult environments, 
screening systems can help to ensure that American interests 
are adequately protected. The Committee expects USAID to work 
constructively with implementing organizations, including 
contractors and nongovernmental organizations, to frame a 
commonsense system, without undermining foreign policy and 
development goals. As the system is established, USAID is 
directed to consult regularly with the Committees on 
Appropriations and to provide a quarterly status report on 
implementing a comprehensive partner vetting system.
    The Committee is aware of the partner vetting system in the 
West Bank and Gaza that strengthens USAID's ability to prevent 
any United States financial assistance from being provided to a 
private entity, educational institution, or nongovernmental 
organization that provides financial support for terrorist 
activity. USAID is directed to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 120 days after enactment of this 
Act on lessons learned from the partner vetting system's 
implementation in the West Bank and Gaza.
    The Committee notes that United States financial 
institutions currently perform due diligence of their potential 
clients under rules known as ``Know Your Customer (KYC),'' with 
a primary goal of thwarting terrorist financing and money 
laundering. The Committee directs USAID to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations as to whether the principles and 
concepts of this program could be incorporated into the vetting 
system that is being considered.

                   CIVILIAN STABILIZATION INITIATIVE




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $30,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................        30,000,000
    Change from request...............................        30,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$155,000,000 for the Civilian Stabilization Initiative (CSI), 
of which $30,000,000 is provided under this heading and 
$125,000,000 is made available under the same heading in Title 
I of this Act. All funding for CSI was requested under Title I.
    Funds provided under this heading are intended to support 
USAID's expenses related to the CSI, including salaries, 
expenses, and training of USAID personnel; costs associated 
with establishment and implementation of the Civilian 
Deployment Center; funding for the Office of Civilian Response; 
and deployment. The bill continues a proviso requiring the 
Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator to submit a 
coordinated joint spending plan and integrated strategy for 
funds made available for CSI in this Act.

                        CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................       $84,275,000
Fiscal year 2009 request..............................       213,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       213,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................      128,725,000

\1\The enacted level includes $48,500,000 in supplemental appropriations
  for fiscal year 2009 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $213,000,000 for 
Capital Investment Fund, which is $128,725,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request. All funds 
made available for the Capital Investment Fund, including the 
obligation of offsetting collections, are subject to the 
regular notification procedures of the Committees on 
Appropriations. In addition, the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 included a transfer of $38,000,000 
into this account to support implementation of the Global 
Acquisition System.

Information technology

    The Committee provides $78,500,000 for information 
technology, which should be used for system upgrades, 
information technology infrastructure enhancement, and planning 
purposes.

Capital Security Cost-Sharing Program

    Of the total provided for the Capital Investment Fund, 
$134,500,000 is provided for the Capital Security Cost-Sharing 
program. USAID is directed to provide a report not later than 
90 days after enactment of this Act that provides specific 
detail on the criteria used to assess contributions to the 
program and the amounts, by mission, in fiscal year 2009 and 
assumed in the fiscal year 2010 request.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................       $46,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        46,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................        46,500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                0

\1\The enacted level includes $4,500,000 in supplemental appropriations
  in fiscal year 2009, including $1,000,000 from Public Law 110-252 and
  $3,500,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $46,500,000 for 
Office of Inspector General, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and the request. In addition, the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included 
$500,000 for oversight under this heading.
    The Office of Inspector General is directed to provide a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations not later than 45 
days after enactment of this Act that summarizes the oversight 
work that will be undertaken in fiscal year 2010.

                Title III--Bilateral Economic Assistance


                  Funds Appropriated to the President

    The bill directs funding for certain sectors in the amounts 
allocated in the following table and subject to the 
requirements of section 7019 of this Act.

                         PROGRAMMATIC DIRECTIVES
                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             Committee
                  Activity                     Request    recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Food Security and Agricultural Development.    1,362,765      1,000,000
Basic Education............................      980,648      1,000,000
Biodiversity...............................      183,431        200,000
Climate Change.............................      536,000        485,000
Higher Education...........................      188,044        200,000
Microenterprise............................      165,593        265,000
Water......................................      172,807        310,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    GLOBAL HEALTH AND CHILD SURVIVAL

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $7,339,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     7,595,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................     7,784,000,000
    Change from request...............................       189,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      445,000,000

\1\The enacted level includes $225,000,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $75,000,000 from 110-
  252 and $150,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $7,784,000,000 for 
Global Health and Child Survival, which is $445,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $189,000,000 above the 
request. Within the total, the Committee recommendation 
includes $5,759,000,000 in this Act for HIV/AIDS, including not 
less than $750,000,000 for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, 
Tuberculosis and Malaria. Funds in this account are allocated 
in the following table and subject to the requirements of 
section 7019 of this Act.

                    GLOBAL HEALTH AND CHILD SURVIVAL
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               Committee
          Activity              Request     recommendation      Change
------------------------------------------------------------------------
USAID Child Survival and          523,500           528,000        4,500
 Maternal Health............
    Polio...................       27,117            32,000        4,883
    Micronutrients..........       30,000            30,000            0
        Vitamin A...........       20,000            20,000            0
        Iodine Deficiency               0             2,000        2,000
         Disorder...........
    GAVI Fund...............       58,494            77,000       18,506
USAID Vulnerable Children...       13,000            15,000        2,000
    Blind children..........            0             2,000        2,000
USAID Family Planning/            475,000           520,000       45,000
 Reproductive Health........
USAID Other Infectious            974,500           962,000      -12,500
 Diseases...................
    Avian Influenza &             125,000            75,000      -50,000
     pandemic preparedness..
    Malaria.................      585,000           585,000            0
    Neglected Diseases......       70,000            50,000      -20,000
    Tuberculosis............      173,000           252,000       79,000
        Global TB Drug             15,000            15,000            0
         Facility...........
    Unallocated.............       21,500                 0      -21,500
USAID HIV/AIDS..............      350,000           350,000            0
    Microbicides............       45,000            45,000            0
Department of State HIV/AIDS    5,259,000         5,409,000      150,000
    UNAIDS..................       35,000            43,000        8,000
    Global Fund.............      600,000           750,000      150,000
            Subtotal USAID      2,336,000         2,375,000       39,000
             Child Survival
             and Health.....
            Subtotal            5,259,000         5,409,000      150,000
             Department of
             State HIV/AIDS.
                             -------------------------------------------
            Total--Global       7,595,000         7,784,000      189,000
             Health and
             Child Survival.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Global health funding

    The Committee applauds the global health integration 
initiative being undertaken by the Administration. Using global 
health resources effectively and efficiently will result in 
more comprehensive programs that address the myriad of health 
needs of men, women and children in the developing world. The 
Department of State and USAID should consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on the implementation of this 
program as well as on the outcome indicators.
    Given the significant funding the United States has 
invested in global health programs, the Committee is concerned 
that as programs are implemented by multiple Federal agencies 
and offices, there has been no comprehensive evaluation of the 
effectiveness of these programs across health sectors. The 
Committee directs the Secretary of State, in coordination with 
USAID, the Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) and 
other Federal agencies as appropriate, to issue a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 180 days after 
enactment of this Act that includes a description and 
examination of all ongoing global health programs by country 
funded in this and other appropriations acts; the impact and 
outcomes of these programs and how effective the programs are 
in meeting their objectives and goals; specific information 
about complementary work by other private and public donors; 
and recommendations for changes to such programs to improve 
results and enhance effectiveness. The report should discuss 
the program level impact as well as the overall impact on key 
health indicators. The Committee directs the Secretary of State 
to consult with the Committees on Appropriations on the 
report's development on an ongoing basis.

Child survival and maternal health

    The Committee recommendation includes $528,000,000 for 
child survival and maternal health programs, which is 
$4,500,000 above the request. The Committee continues to 
support the implementation of USAID's new child survival 
strategy, which provides resources to countries where it can 
reduce child mortality and morbidity most significantly. USAID 
should consider the work of Operation Smile, and the Fred 
Hutchison Cancer Research Center Work at the Uganda Cancer 
Institute.
    Dengue fever.--The Committee is concerned with the spread 
of dengue fever in the Western Hemisphere and urges USAID to 
take greater action in this area. USAID, in consultation with 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is directed to 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on the current state 
and expected future trends of the epidemiology of dengue fever, 
a summary of current United States government programs related 
to dengue fever, and recommendations for expanding these 
programs.
    Maternal health.--The Committee is concerned that USAID has 
not sufficiently focused on maternal health programs. These 
programs are a key component to child survival, with more than 
4 million newborn deaths each year in the developing world. 
Maternal health should be a key component of the global health 
program and USAID is directed to provide a detailed summary of 
its maternal health portfolio to the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    The Committee is concerned about the debilitating effects 
of obstetric fistula and believes that programs that combine 
immediate health services with long-term training can make a 
lasting difference. The Committee notes Ethiopia's leading role 
in this area.
    Measles.--The Committee recognizes that measles outbreaks 
outside the United States threaten the health and well-being of 
American children. USAID is encouraged to collaborate with the 
Department of Health and Human Services, as well as the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention, on efforts that support the 
Global Measles Initiative.
    Micronutrients.--The Committee recommendation includes not 
less than $30,000,000 for USAID's micronutrient program of 
which at least $20,000,000 should be for Vitamin A deficiency 
programs. In addition, the Committee supports programs that 
address iodine deficiency disorder, which is the leading 
preventable cause of mental retardation in children, and 
$2,000,000 is included to support these efforts, including 
through the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) 
partnership.
    Polio eradication.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$32,000,000 for USAID's polio eradication program. The global 
partnership to eradicate polio has had significant success, but 
some of the most difficult work remains in a limited number of 
countries.
    Vaccines and immunizations.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $77,000,000 for The GAVI Fund, which provides vaccines 
to children in the poorest countries, increases access to 
immunization, and strengthens health systems needed to deliver 
these basic services.

Health care workforce and infrastructure programs

    The Committee recognizes that weak health systems and the 
lack of trained health care workers undermine the effectiveness 
of global health programs. United States Government global 
health programs should invest in strengthening the 
infrastructure needed to support a sustainable health care 
system. USAID should consider the work of the Global Institute 
for Community Health and Development, African Diaspora Health 
Initiative, African Humanitarian Medical Outreach Program to 
Prevent Child Mortality, Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambar, 
Gabon, the Institute for Global Health at the University of 
Massachusetts Amherst, the Loma Linda University, the Pacific 
Island Health Officers Association, Stand for Africa, and 
Project C.U.R.E.

Vulnerable children

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,000,000 for 
vulnerable children. Assistance for children affected by HIV/
AIDS is addressed elsewhere in the bill. USAID should consider 
the work of Fabretto Children's Foundation. Of the total, 
$2,000,000 is included for child blindness programs to be 
administered in a manner that the maximum amount of funds are 
delivered to the field. USAID should consider the work of Helen 
Keller International and the Christian Blind Mission.

HIV/AIDS

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$5,759,000,000 for global HIV/AIDS activities in the ``Global 
Health and Child Survival'' account. Of the total, $350,000,000 
is allocated to USAID and $5,409,000,000 is allocated to OGAC 
at the Department of State.
    Blood safety.--The Committee is encouraged that OGAC has 
made blood safety programs a central part of its strategy and 
recommends continued funding for such programs, especially in 
Africa. USAID should consider the work of Safe Blood for 
Africa.
    Education.--The Committee recognizes the important linkages 
between expanding access to HIV/AIDS prevention, care and 
treatment and education. The Committee directs OGAC to 
collaborate with basic education initiatives, including the 
``Communities of Learning'' Initiative in fiscal year 2010.
    Human capacity issues.--The Committee recognizes the impact 
that the rapid expansion of HIV/AIDS programs has had on the 
health care infrastructure and workforce in areas most impacted 
by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. OGAC has undertaken significant 
efforts to train community health care workers, doctors, 
nurses, and other health professionals. The Committee supports 
the continuation and expansion of these programs to include 
pediatric training, training in prevention education, and in 
counseling and testing. The Committee expects that short, 
medium and long-term training and retention strategies will be 
put in place. OGAC should consider the work of the Ethiopian 
North American Health Professionals Association, and the Tel 
Aviv University Center for AIDS and Related Infectious 
Diseases.
    Media programs.--The Committee understands that local and 
national media is an effective HIV/AIDS prevention tool. The 
Committee recommends that USAID, in collaboration with OGAC, 
continue HIV-related media prevention programs in Africa and, 
India, and other Asian countries. USAID should consider the 
work of Local Voices.
    Microbicides.--In accordance with Public Law 108-25, as 
amended, OGAC is directed to consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations on how it will play a larger role in supporting 
microbicides development and eventual product access.
    Nutritional support.--Food and nutrition are important 
components of a comprehensive approach to HIV/AIDS. The 
Committee intends that $130,000,000 of OGAC resources be used 
to support short and long-term approaches to food security as 
components of a comprehensive approach. Programs that address 
the development and implementation of nutrition support, 
guidelines, and care services for people living with HIV/AIDS 
should also be supported. These programs shall be coordinated 
with USAID's food security and agricultural development 
initiative.
    Operations research.--The Committee expects OGAC to 
continue to allocate funding for operations research and impact 
evaluation research activities. OGAC should consult with 
stakeholders, including HIV/AIDS implementing organizations, in 
determining the appropriate priorities for operations research, 
impact evaluation research, and program monitoring activities. 
Program monitoring activities should ensure that interventions 
and approaches to service delivery and prevention are evidence-
based and continuously improved over time.
    Orphans and vulnerable children.--The Committee urges OGAC 
to meet the ten percent statutory mandate in accordance with 
Public Law 108-25, as amended, for orphans and other children 
affected by, or vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Funds should be used to 
build the long-term capacity of local organizations, including 
faith-based organizations, and communities to support and 
deliver services in an innovative and multifaceted manner to 
families, orphans, and vulnerable children affected by HIV/
AIDS.
    Pediatric treatment.--OGAC should continue efforts to 
expand access to treatment for children. The Committee 
recommends that the Coordinator include early diagnosis and 
initiation of antiretroviral treatment for infants and children 
as a priority in country operating plans.
    Pre-exposure Prophylaxis.--Currently, there are seven 
clinical trials testing the safety and effectiveness of Pre-
Exposure Prophylaxis, one of the most promising HIV prevention 
interventions now being studied. The Committee directs OGAC to 
provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations on how 
this strategy could be implemented in the PEPFAR context if it 
is found to be effective.
    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission.--The Committee 
understands that the fiscal year 2010 request includes a 
significant expansion of prevention of mother-to-child 
transmission (PMTCT) programs in order to meet the 80 percent 
coverage target. The Committee encourages OGAC to continue 
efforts to reach women in rural settings, to improve the 
ability of programs to offer the most effective drug regimens, 
and to encourage stronger linkages between PMTCT and care and 
treatment programs. These efforts should be undertaken in 
consultation and coordination with USAID's global health 
programs.
    Regional programs.--HIV/AIDS knows no borders and OGAC 
should expand support for regional efforts, which are central 
to the overall effort. USAID should consider the work of TREAT 
Asia.
    Sexual transmission prevention programs.--The Committee 
urges OGAC to continue to prioritize the prevention of HIV/AIDS 
in all of its program activities. The Committee encourages OGAC 
to support innovative prevention programs, such as integrating 
prevention interventions into treatment service delivery, 
providing creative messaging to young people through 
population-based prevention interventions, working with high-
risk populations, and including people living with HIV/AIDS in 
program development, planning and decision-making. Not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this Act, OGAC is directed to 
provide a prevention strategy to the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    OGAC shall update the Committee on Appropriations on 
efforts in place to ensure the sharing of prevention best 
practices across the United States Government implementing 
agencies and their partners as well as with the Global Fund for 
HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria. Efforts to expand access to 
prevention messaging and programming should be done in such a 
way as to leverage the knowledge and funding of other donors in 
order to reduce duplication of effort.
    Technical assistance.--Technical assistance will be 
critical as we enter the next phase of PEPFAR. Of the funding 
provided for OGAC, $43,000,000 should be provided to UNAIDS to 
support critical in-country donor coordination, capacity 
development, and monitoring and education activities. In 
addition, OGAC should work with the World Health Organization, 
where appropriate.
    TB/HIV co-infection.--The Committee notes that tuberculosis 
(TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV/AIDS, and urges 
OGAC to continue to prioritize TB/HIV co-infection programs in 
country operating plans. OGAC should work to ensure that TB 
screening and treatment is provided to co-infected individuals 
in all focus countries, and work with host country officials to 
ensure that their countries have national strategies to address 
tuberculosis. Efforts undertaken in this area should complement 
USAID's TB programs. The Committee directs OGAC to provide 
$160,000,000 for such programs in fiscal year 2010.
    Women and girls.--The Committee is concerned that OGAC has 
not taken adequate steps to address the disproportionate impact 
HIV/AIDS is having on women and girls. In particular, the 
Committee urges OGAC to ensure that women and girls have 
adequate access through their existing health providers to HIV/
AIDS prevention, care and treatment services. In particular, 
efforts should be undertaken to collaborate with existing USAID 
maternal and child health and family planning programs.

Voluntary contribution to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, 
        and Malaria

    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$750,000,000 from the HIV/AIDS funds allocated to the 
Department of State for the Global Fund, which is $150,000,000 
above the request.
    Future of the Global Fund.--The Committee remains committed 
to supporting a performance-based, results-oriented, 
multilateral financing instrument to combat HIV/AIDS, TB, and 
malaria. The Committee directs OGAC to notify the Committees on 
Appropriations of any proposal and/or action that would move 
the Global Fund from project support to budget support, erode 
the Global Fund's results-based disbursement structure, or 
lessen the role of the technical review panel.
    The Committee is aware of the establishment of the 
``Working Group to Manage the Tension between Demand and Supply 
in a Resource Constrained Environment'' at the November 2008 
Board meeting. The Committee commends the Global Fund for 
exploring options to manage its demand pipeline. The Committee 
believes that all necessary steps must be taken to ensure that 
Global Fund resources are being used effectively and 
efficiently, including establishing benchmark costs for 
commodities and services, re-evaluating country eligibility and 
matching criteria to ensure the most effective use of Global 
Fund resources, and increased transparency across country 
grants of program implementation costs. The Committees on 
Appropriations expect OGAC to update them regularly on the 
discussions of the Working Group and to consult with the 
Committee on decision points as appropriate.
    Reporting requirement.--OGAC shall monitor and evaluate 
Global Fund programs and encourage the implementation of 
evidence-based programs in grant proposals. Oversight of the 
Global Fund remains a high priority for the Committee on 
Appropriations. The Secretary of State is directed to provide a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations not later than 120 
days after enactment of this Act that contains the most recent 
Global Fund audit information, commitment and disbursement 
data, and a summary of the recipient and sub-recipient 
expenditures as reported to the United States Government. Due 
to the passage of Public Law 110-293, this reporting 
requirement and the related funding limitation have been 
removed from legislative language.
    Technical assistance.--The Committee is pleased with 
interagency coordination and cooperation in the provision of 
technical assistance to Global Fund recipients. The Committee 
continues its support for this program and encourages OGAC to 
continue efforts to sustain Country Coordinating Mechanisms and 
Principal Recipients, monitor grant performance, and otherwise 
improve the results of Global Fund grants. The Committee 
includes authority for OGAC to use up to five percent of the 
funds made available in this Act for a contribution to the 
Global Fund to provide technical assistance to Global Fund 
grants.

Infectious diseases

    The Committee recommendation includes $962,000,000 for 
other infectious diseases in this Act, including TB and 
malaria, which is $12,500,000 below the request.
    Avian influenza and pandemic preparedness.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $75,000,000 for pandemic preparedness 
and to combat avian influenza. The Supplemental Appropriations 
Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-32) included an additional 
$50,000,000 for pandemic preparedness in order to address the 
H1N1 influenza virus and to continue existing programs. The 
Committee is aware of the ongoing collaboration between USAID 
and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to monitor 
the role of wild bird populations in transmission of the avian 
influenza virus and encourages USAID to continue this important 
partnership, including the Global Avian Influenza Network for 
Surveillance program.
    Malaria.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$585,000,000 to continue the President's Malaria Initiative, 
which comprehensively addresses malaria prevention, care, and 
treatment.
    Neglected diseases.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$50,000,000 for programs and activities to continue and expand 
support for an integrated response to neglected diseases 
including intestinal parasites, schistosomiasis, lymphatic 
filariasis, onchocerciasis, and trachoma. The Committee also 
encourages USAID to support leprosy control. Funds for this 
program should be administered in a manner such that the focus 
is on scale up in the field. The Committee also requests that 
USAID provide a report on the implementation of this program 
since its initiation in 2006.
    Tuberculosis.--TB continues to be a major cause of 
morbidity and mortality in the developing world. The Committee 
recommendation includes a total of $426,262,000 for TB 
treatment, prevention, and care in this Act. Of this total, 
$252,000,000 is included in funds administered by USAID, 
$160,000,000 is for TB/HIV co-infection programs implemented by 
OGAC, and $14,262,000 is included in the ``Assistance for 
Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia'' account. Technical 
assistance including through the development and implementation 
of prevention, care and treatment guidelines should continue to 
be part of USAID's TB program.
    The Committee is concerned about the continued emergence of 
drug resistant strains of TB, including XDR-TB or extremely 
drug resistant TB, especially linked to HIV in Africa and Asia. 
The Committee believes that funding should be used to provide 
care and treatment, to strengthen basic TB care and treatment 
programs, to expand laboratories, and to strengthen infection 
control efforts in medical settings.
    The Committee recommendation includes $15,000,000 for the 
Global TB Drug Facility, which expands access to high-quality 
TB drugs.

Reproductive health/voluntary family planning

    The Committee recommendation includes $648,457,000 for 
reproductive health and voluntary family planning in this Act, 
which is $45,000,000 above the request. Of the total, 
$520,000,000 is provided in this account. Voluntary family 
planning programs are a key component of a comprehensive global 
health and development effort. Unfortunately, an estimated one 
in seven women in the developing world still lack access to 
modern contraceptives. Funds made available for family planning 
and reproductive health should be used to support programs in 
areas where population growth threatens biodiversity or 
endangered species.
    Funding restrictions.--The Committee has continued prior 
year language that requires that none of the funds appropriated 
in this Act, or any unobligated balances, be made available to 
any organization or program, which as determined by the 
President, supports or participates in the management of a 
program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization. 
Prior year language stating that funds cannot be used to pay 
for the performance of abortions as a method of family planning 
or to motivate or coerce any person to practice abortion; 
indicating that population funds shall be available only to 
voluntary family planning projects that offer, either directly 
or through referral, information about access to a broad range 
of family planning methods and services; requiring that in 
awarding grants for natural family planning under section 104 
of the Foreign Assistance Act, no applicant shall be 
discriminated against because of such applicant's religious or 
conscientious commitment to offer only natural family planning; 
and requiring the provision of accurate information related to 
condoms is continued. New language related to the procurement 
of condoms is included.

Research and development

    The Committee supports USAID's research and development 
portfolio. The Committee is supportive of efforts to 
collaborate with foundations, private corporations, and other 
country governments, including European donors, in efforts to 
develop new medicines, diagnostics, and vaccines for diseases 
that affect the developing world. Support for public-private 
partnerships that promote research and development on 
infectious diseases, including malaria and TB should be a 
component of the research agenda. The Committee also encourages 
increased funding for operational research. USAID should 
consider the work of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, 
PATH's HealthTech partnership, the Malaria Vaccine Initiative, 
and the Aeras Global TB Vaccine Foundation. The Committee 
directs USAID to continue to provide the annual research and 
development report to the Committees on Appropriations.
    The Committee directs that not less than $45,000,000 be 
made available to support the development of microbicides and 
for product preparedness in recognition of the need for woman-
initiated HIV prevention technologies. The Committee continues 
to support external consultations regarding program priorities 
and strategies to ensure effective use of these funds. USAID is 
directed to provide a report to the Committee on Appropriations 
not later than 90 days after enactment of this Act on its 
strategic work plan for microbicides development detailing its 
plans for current and next generation products. USAID should 
coordinate its research program with the National Institutes of 
Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and 
other relevant agencies. USAID should consider the work of the 
International Partnership for Microbicides.

                         DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $2,000,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     2,733,803,000
Committee recommendation..............................     2,465,000,000
    Change from request...............................      -268,803,000
    Change from enacted level.........................      465,000,000

\1\The enacted level includes $200,000,000 in supplemental
  appropriations in fiscal year 2009 from Public Law 110-252.

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,465,000,000 for 
Development Assistance, which is $465,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and $268,803,000 below the request. The 
Committee supports the Administration's request by providing 
significant increases in critical development areas, including 
food security and agricultural development, basic education, 
and climate change.

                              AGRICULTURE

    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$1,000,000,000 in this Act to sustain and expand agricultural 
development and food security activities initiated in the 
previous fiscal year. Increased investments in food security, 
specifically in agricultural development activities, produce 
long-term gains in poverty alleviation, income enhancement and 
broad-based economic growth. USAID shall continue 
implementation of a multi-faceted program strategy that 
provides immediate relief to vulnerable populations in the 
short-term while also supporting long-term, environmentally and 
economically sustainable agricultural practices in food 
insecure countries to reduce the dependence on food aid. This 
strategy must integrate with other bilateral and multilateral 
programs and should prioritize programs for small-holder 
farmers, women farmers and other vulnerable populations. 
Programs that provide support to vulnerable populations, such 
as those in Ethiopia, should be considered. The Committee is 
concerned with the emergence of agricultural lease agreements 
between developed countries and food-insecure countries in 
Africa and Asia that have the potential to significantly 
undermine food availability in developing countries and further 
distort global agricultural trade markets.
    Agricultural research.--Agricultural research should remain 
a key component of USAID's food security and long term 
agriculture programs. For the past thirty years, the 
Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research 
(CGIAR) has played a central role in USAID's research program 
and the Committee recommendation includes $40,000,000 for the 
CGIAR programs in fiscal year 2010.
    Collaborative Research Support Programs.--The Collaborative 
Research Support Programs (CRSPs) are important investments and 
USAID should expand CRSP activities in Africa and South Asia. 
The Committee recommendation includes $32,000,000 for CRSPs in 
fiscal year 2010.
    Dairy development.--The Committee believes that programming 
to expand access to livestock and dairy activities should be a 
key component of the overall strategy. USAID should dedicate 
not less than $30,000,000 in fiscal year 2010 to dairy and 
livestock development. USAID should consider the work of the 
Global Animal Health Laboratory.
    Global Crop Diversity Trust.--The Global Crop Diversity 
Trust was established by the International Treaty on Plant 
Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture to ensure the long-
term viability of agriculture worldwide by conserving and 
making available important collections of crop diversity. The 
Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 for a United 
States contribution to the Trust's endowment.

                            ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Cooperative development programs--The Committee recognizes 
the important role that United States electric, telephone, 
housing, and agricultural cooperatives and credit unions play 
in overseas development assistance programs as a means to lift 
low-income people out of poverty through their own efforts. The 
Committee urges USAID to consider funding the Cooperative 
Development Program at the level directed in fiscal year 2009.
    Financial market assistance.--The Committee applauds 
USAID's work to expand financial markets in transition 
countries. USAID should continue its programs that provide 
technical assistance to build and develop stock exchanges, 
central banks, financial regulatory institutions, and private 
financial intermediaries. These programs should be designed to 
fit the unique needs of the country in which they are working. 
USAID should consider the work of non-profit organizations that 
specialize in this sector.
    Microfinance.--Microenterprise and microfinance programs 
can fundamentally change the economic framework of a country 
through lifting people out of poverty. The Committee 
recommendation includes $265,000,000 in this Act for 
microenterprise and microfinance development programs. The 
Committee encourages investment in a variety of financial 
services that allows the poor to save, borrow, and access 
insurance, remittances, and other key services. USAID should 
target half of all microfinance and microenterprise funds to 
the poor, including women. USAID should consider the work of 
Esperanza.
    Property rights.--The Committee supports the expansion of 
programs that address property rights, create private real 
estate markets, and improve the regulation of land. These 
programs are critical to providing economic opportunity for the 
poorest of the poor and women. USAID should consider the work 
of the International Real Property Foundation.
    Trade capacity building.--The Committee recommendation 
includes funding for trade capacity building programs. In 
particular, $10,000,000 is provided for trade capacity building 
related to the Central American Free Trade Agreement, and 
$16,000,000 is provided for Peru Free Trade Agreement labor law 
capacity building, and for implementation of the environmental 
chapter of the United States-Peru Free Trade Agreement. USAID 
should consider the work of the University of Georgia, and 
Clark Atlanta University.

                               EDUCATION

American schools and hospitals abroad

    The Committee recommendation includes $24,000,000 for the 
American Schools and Hospitals Abroad program. The Committee 
recognizes the important contributions made by institutions 
funded by this program, particularly its programs in the Middle 
East. USAID should consider the work of EARTH University, 
Robert College of Istanbul, the American University of Beirut, 
Uganda Cancer Center, Hadassah University Medical Center, and 
Ashdod Medical Center. The Committee endorses ASHA support for 
new applicants that demonstrate the best of American ideas and 
practices in the regions they serve.

Basic education

    The Committee believes education should be a key component 
of the United States Government's development strategy in 
developing countries. An educated citizenry will result in 
sustained economic growth, strengthened democratic 
institutions, and decreased extremism. The Committee 
recommendation includes a total of $1,000,000,000 for basic 
education programs in this Act, of which $365,000,000 is 
provided in this account.
    Communities of Learning Initiative.--The Committee believes 
that schools can be centers of learning and development for an 
entire community. Health and development programs, school 
feeding programs, adult literacy, community gardens, 
entrepreneurial training, agricultural extension work and 
housing programs should be integrated with schools and 
educational programs as much as possible. Treating communities 
holistically and using education as the foundation for 
development will ensure that communities are empowered to 
create the conditions for which they can best address their own 
development needs. USAID should prioritize technical assistance 
for local governments to ensure the sustainability of 
``Communities of Learning''. Additionally, USAID should 
encourage recipient countries and other donors to pursue 
comprehensive development efforts to support ``Communities of 
Learning''. The Committee directs USAID to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on this Initiative and to provide 
a strategy for program implementation not later than 120 days 
after enactment of this Act.
    Education in emergencies.--The Committee notes with concern 
that over 42 million children are living in countries in 
conflict or with extremely weak governments. These children 
have little to no access to quality education and the Committee 
urges USAID to continue to expand efforts to educate children 
in insecure environments.
    Fast Track Initiative and the Global Fund for Education.--
The Committee notes the need to expand the basic education 
program by supporting multilateral mechanisms as well as 
bilateral programs. The Committee appreciates USAID's 
engagement with the Fast Track Initiative (FTI) and directs 
USAID to continue to provide regular updates on this and other 
education coordination efforts to the Committees on 
Appropriations. Ensuring coordination of donor funding is 
critical and funding should be used to implement assistance in 
developing countries that have an FTI-endorsed national 
education plan. This designation of funds is a continuation of 
the program included in the prior year reports. The Committee 
notes the growing support for a Global Fund for Education and 
encourages the Administration to consider how United States 
Government resources and leadership can support the attainment 
of the Education for All goals in any multilateral mechanism, 
taking into consideration the importance of coordination, host 
country ownership, education quality, and support for children 
in countries with failing or weak governments.
    Increasing quality of basic education.--Basic education 
programs should include a focus on expanding access to 
education as well as improving quality in order to attain the 
Education for All goals. USAID programs should continue to make 
teacher training a priority in order to improve quality, 
improve monitoring and evaluation capacity, and expand 
institutional capacity within developing countries' Ministries 
of Education. USAID should ensure that its programs are in 
alignment with the country national education plans where they 
exist and encourage other donors to coordinate their programs 
with host governments.
    Basic education in Africa.--The Committee notes the need to 
expand access to education opportunities for African youth and 
is concerned that barriers to access and quality continue. Of 
particular concern is the acute shortage of teachers that has 
resulted from the spread of HIV/AIDS. The Committee directs 
USAID to prioritize investments in comprehensive basic 
education programs aimed at eliminating these barriers in 
Africa, including teacher recruitment and training, ensuring a 
safe and secure learning environment, and providing adequate 
educational materials.
    USAID should consider the work of Alfalit, the University 
of Iowa's Center for Digital Communications in Development and 
Education, Digital Library for Disability Rights, the Three 
Hills Primary School, and the Torrijos-Carter Social Contract 
Training.

Higher education

    The Committee is concerned that USAID has reduced its 
support for higher education and long-term training over the 
past twenty years. The Committee supports efforts to begin to 
reprioritize long-term training in USAID programs and 
$200,000,000 is included in this Act for this purpose. 
Ultimately, those who have received higher education training 
are able to improve and implement policy at local and national 
levels. Of this total, not less than $20,000,000 should be used 
to expand higher education activities in Africa. Priority 
should be given to expanding higher educational opportunities 
in key programmatic areas, including agriculture and education. 
Programs that establish higher education partnerships between 
American universities and community colleges and host country 
higher education institutions should be supported as well. 
USAID should consider the work of Scholarships for Education 
and Economic Development and SIFE Africa Development Program.

Women's literacy

    The Committee notes that the low literacy rate of women and 
girls in Afghanistan and Pakistan can constrain economic growth 
and opportunity in these countries. The Committee directs the 
Department of State and USAID to make literacy, especially for 
women and girls, a top priority for programs in Afghanistan and 
Pakistan.

                     ENVIRONMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Biodiversity

    The Committee strongly endorses USAID's continued 
investment in conservation, biodiversity, and environmental 
programs, and provides a total of $200,000,000 in this Act for 
this purpose. Programs that support tropical forests and the 
habitats of endangered species, as well as wetlands and marine 
ecosystems, should be prioritized. The Committee commends 
USAID's Amazon Basin Conservation Initiative, the Congo Basin 
Forest Partnership and the work of the United States Fish and 
Wildlife Service in great ape conservation efforts in Central 
Africa. USAID should consider the work of Greener Ethiopia and 
the St. Louis Zoo.

Climate Change

    The Committee applauds the Administration's effort to 
clarify the programs included under this initiative. Under the 
new framework, the Committee recommendation includes 
$485,000,000 in this Act for the three programmatic pillars of 
this initiative--sustainable landscapes, clean energy and 
adaption. The Committee encourages strong coordination between 
USAID's biodiversity, adaptation, clean energy, and other 
environmental and climate change-related programs.
    Clean energy.--The Committee applauds the renewed focus on 
providing new technologies to developing countries to reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions and the Committee recommendation 
includes $180,000,000 for clean energy programs. These programs 
should focus on efforts that promote energy efficiency, expand 
use and access to low- or zero-emissions technologies, and 
reduce demand and energy use through efficiencies.
    Solar Energy Microfinance Initiative.--Solar-powered 
renewable energy technologies have been found to be an 
effective tool to empower communities and provide electricity 
to rural communities. Of the funding provided for clean energy 
programs, not less than $10,000,000 shall be used to establish 
the ``Solar Village Initiative.'' This Initiative shall support 
programs and activities that promote the establishment of small 
and micro-businesses that provide sustainable solar-powered 
renewable energy technologies in developing countries, with a 
primary focus on solar-powered handheld lanterns. The 
Initiative should target outreach and business development to 
women and rural communities and the program should build upon 
efforts begun by the United States National Renewable Energy 
Laboratory. USAID shall consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations prior to the obligation of funds for this 
purpose and on the current state of technology as it relates to 
expanding this Initiative to include solar food cookers.
    Tropical deforestation.--Tropical deforestation and forest 
degradation is responsible for approximately 20 percent of all 
global greenhouse gas emissions annually. International efforts 
must prioritize programs that reduce emissions from tropical 
forest destruction and degradation (commonly called REDD) to 
avoid the worst affects of global climate change. There is 
potential in new public- and private-sector funding mechanisms 
for REDD to generate significant new revenues for developing 
countries. The Committee recommendation includes funding to 
expand programs that assist developing countries in building 
their institutional and governance capacity to manage their 
forest resources in order to demonstrate measurable, reportable 
and verifiable emissions reductions; develop strong forest 
governance laws; and improve law enforcement against illegal 
logging. These programs should be transparent and should 
respect the rights of indigenous and forest dependent people. 
The Department of State and USAID are directed to consult with 
the Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act on the United States government strategy 
related to REDD and the capacity of developing countries to 
implement these programs. USAID should work with the United 
States Forest Service in implementing these programs, where 
appropriate.

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

Child marriage

    The Committee recognizes that the practice of child 
marriage undermines investments of the United States and the 
international community in programs that seek to improve 
education, health, economic, and legal status for women and 
girls in some developing countries. The Committee urges USAID 
to consider the prevalence of child marriage when developing 
country operating plans and encourages USAID to increase 
programmatic focus on this issue. USAID is directed to consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations on efforts to expand 
programs in this area. In addition, the Department of State 
should include information related to child marriage in its 
annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.

Gender integration

    The Committee directs USAID to take steps to better 
integrate gender considerations into its economic and 
agricultural development portfolio. USAID is directed to report 
to the Committees on Appropriations not later than 180 days 
after enactment of this Act on the steps taken to implement 
this priority, and the current and future planned programming 
that promote women's economic opportunities, including the 
outcomes associated with these programs disaggregated by 
gender. The Committee intends that the needs of women and girls 
shall continue to be a priority in health and development 
programs funded by this Act.

Reconciliation programs

    The Committee recommendation includes $27,000,000 in this 
Act to continue support for USAID's reconciliation programs, 
which shall be awarded through a competitive grant program. The 
Committee intends that these funds should be used to support 
people-to-people reconciliation programs in all regions of the 
world, and of the total $15,000,000 is included under the 
``Economic Support Fund'' heading. USAID should consider the 
work of Empower Peace Foundation, Non Violent Peaceforce, Peace 
Research Institute in the Middle East, the Raphael Lemkin 
Center, Cooperation Ireland, the Center for Civic Education in 
the United States, and Seeds of Peace.

Safe water

    Competition for scarce fresh water will continue to be a 
major source of international conflict during the twenty-first 
century. Lack of access to safe drinking water and adequate 
sanitation is the leading preventable cause of death in the 
world and causes billions of dollars worth of global losses in 
economic activity annually. The Committee recommendation 
includes $310,000,000 in this Act for long-term safe water and 
water management programs. This funding should be provided 
pursuant to the Senator Paul Simon Water for the Poor Act 
(Public Law 109-121). Increasing access to safe drinking water 
and sanitation should continue to be the highest priority 
including through university partnership programs. USAID should 
consult with the Committee on Appropriations on the programming 
of these funds and priority should be given to addressing safe 
water issues in sub-Saharan Africa. The Committee expects USAID 
to obligate prior year funds and funds provided in this Act in 
a timely manner.

University programs

    USAID should expand its work with American institutions of 
higher education. The Committee expects that proposals from 
higher education institutions will be considered through the 
regular competitive process and that priority will be given to 
proposals that have sound technical merit, well-planned 
budgets, and realistic objectives. USAID should consider the 
work of the American University of Kosovo, Monmouth University, 
Ramapo College, the City of Hope University project, Daystar 
University, Flathead Valley Community College, University of 
San Diego's Sustainable Development Practice Initiative, Morgan 
State University, Marquette University, University of Montana, 
and Virginia Military Institute.
    USAID is directed to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 120 days after enactment of this 
Act on the status of activities undertaken with institutions of 
higher learning, including competitive as well as non-
competitive awards. The report shall include the status of 
funding proposals from each institution of higher education; 
the degree to which each proposal is consistent with United 
States development assistance and foreign policy goals for the 
country or region in which the activity would take place; the 
degree to which the institution of higher education would 
provide matching funds; to the extent known at the time, any 
funding decisions, including the proposed funding level; and 
any other relevant information. In addition, the Committee 
requests that USAID identify a primary contact to which 
inquiries on university programs can be directed.

Victims of torture

    The Committee recommendation includes $13,000,000 for 
programs and activities that address the needs of victims of 
torture. Programs funded with these funds should be consistent 
with the goals of the Torture Victims Relief Reauthorization 
Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-87). In addition, USAID should 
support foreign torture treatment centers and programs that 
provide culturally appropriate care. USAID should consider the 
work of the Center for Victims of Torture.

Volunteers for Prosperity

    The Committee is aware of the authorization legislation 
that was signed into law for the Volunteers for Prosperity 
program. The Committee directs USAID to consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act on implementation of this program.

Women's leadership capacity

    The Committee notes that empowering women to be leaders in 
their communities has economic and social benefits. The 
Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for women's 
leadership training programs. USAID should consider the work of 
Women's Campaign International.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI)

    The Committee recommendation includes $8,000,000 within the 
Caribbean regional account for the new CBSI as proposed by the 
Administration. The Committee intends that these funds will be 
used to support social justice and education programs to 
address the issue of poorly educated, unemployed, and crime-
prone youth. Funds may be used for remedial education, 
workforce development, selected youth entrepreneurship 
programs, and juvenile justice, including diversion and 
rehabilitation programs for young offenders and at-risk youth 
in the Caribbean.

El Salvador

    El Salvador is an important regional partner. The Committee 
recommends that the country operating plan should include a 
focus on technical training and capacity building to advance 
good governance, consensus building and the rule of law. The 
Committee intends that an emphasis be placed on capacity 
building in the areas of public administration, executive 
branch governance, fiscal management, tax compliance, 
regulatory management, and effective administration of anti-
poverty programs.

Guatemala

    The Committee continues to be concerned with the 
pervasiveness of human rights abuses against women and girls in 
Guatemala. The Committee notes that since 2001, more than 3,800 
women and girls have been violently killed and that the 
Guatemalan legal system has been slow to bring the responsible 
parties to justice. The Committee recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 to support legal reform initiatives and programs to 
combat crimes of violence that specifically target women and 
girls in order to bring Guatemalan law in line with 
international standards on violence and discrimination against 
women.

Tibetan refugee settlement revitalization

    The Tibetan refugee community includes long-staying 
refugees, many of whom left Tibet in 1959, and new refugees 
from Tibet, which have historically numbered about 2,500 
annually. To support the policy of the United States to assist 
in the protection of the unique Tibetan identity, language, 
culture, and religion, the Committee recommendation includes 
$2,300,000 for revitalization of the refugee communities in 
India, Nepal, and Bhutan with a focus on workforce development 
and organic agriculture.

Timor-Leste

    The Committee recommendation includes $20,535,000 for 
assistance for Timor-Leste, which is $10,000,000 above the 
request.

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................      $820,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       880,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       830,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -50,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       10,000,000

\1\The enacted level includes $470,000,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $200,000,000 from
  Public Law 110-252 and $270,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $830,000,000 for the 
International Disaster Assistance account, which is $10,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $50,000,000 below 
the request.
    This account funds humanitarian relief, rehabilitation, and 
reconstruction in countries affected by natural and man-made 
disasters, as well as support for disaster mitigation, disaster 
risk reduction, prevention, and preparedness. This includes the 
purchase of commodities, such as temporary shelter, blankets, 
supplementary and therapeutic food, potable water, medical 
supplies, and agricultural rehabilitation. Program 
beneficiaries include disaster victims, conflict victims, and 
internally displaced persons (IDPs).

Displaced Women and Girls

    The Committee has long been concerned about assaults on 
displaced women and girls during firewood collection and 
welcomes the newly approved guidance produced by the Inter-
Agency Standing Committee's Task Force on Safe Access to 
Firewood and Alternative Energy in Humanitarian Settings. The 
Committee commends the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance 
for its support of this initiative and urges the Secretary of 
State to continue to work closely with the humanitarian 
community to ensure global implementation of the Task Force's 
guidance.

Local and regional procurement

    The Committee recommendation includes $200,000,000, which 
is $100,000,000 below the request, for local and regional 
procurement (LRP) of food assistance to address food insecurity 
in emergency situations. The Committee emphasizes that this in 
no way supplants the United States emergency food assistance 
strategy built upon the provision of in-kind commodities 
produced in the United States. The Committee understands that 
local and regional procurement represents less than 13% of 
United States-funded food aid assistance. The Committee also 
directs that LRP shall be employed on a case-by-case basis when 
in-kind food aid is unavailable or impractical, and only when 
compelling evidence exists of an urgent need where LRP in place 
of other options will save lives, reduce suffering, or serve 
substantially more people in need. In implementing these 
purchases, USAID is urged to ensure that such purchases do not 
distort, but instead bolster and develop local agricultural 
markets in developing countries. This complementary mechanism 
increases the United States capacity to save lives by reducing 
food delivery time and filling pipeline gaps in certain 
specific conflicts, disasters, and complex emergencies. USAID 
is directed to report to the Committees on Appropriations not 
later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, and every six 
months, on the cases in which LRP was employed, including the 
circumstances, specifics of implementation, and brief 
justification for exercising LRP in lieu of other food 
assistance options.

Somalia

    While recognizing the difficulty of humanitarian operations 
in Somalia, the Committee notes the exceptional need in 
Southern Somalia for humanitarian assistance and urges USAID to 
continue to support this effort as an important and necessary 
priority.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $50,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       126,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       100,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -26,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        50,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $100,000,000 for 
Transition Initiatives, which is $50,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and $26,000,000 below the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes $50,000,000 for a 
Rapid Response Fund, a new mechanism requested by the 
Administration in order to provide flexible funding to respond 
to emerging opportunities to divert conflict in new and fragile 
democracies. The bill includes language requiring consultation 
with the Committees on Appropriations prior to the obligation 
and disbursement of these funds on a country-by-country basis. 
The Committee intends that programs funded with resources from 
the Rapid Response Fund will be implemented by the Office of 
Transition Initiatives.

                      DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Program Account:
Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $25,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        25,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        25,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0
Administrative Expenses:
Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $8,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         8,600,000
Committee recommendation..............................         8,600,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................           600,000


    The Committee recommendation includes a ceiling of 
$25,000,000, on the amount that may be transferred from 
bilateral economic assistance accounts for the subsidy cost of 
loan guarantees under the Development Credit Authority program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
request. The Committee recommendation includes $8,600,000 for 
administrative expenses, which is $600,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 level and the same as the request.
    The Development Credit Authority should prioritize efforts 
that expand the availability of commercially viable and 
affordable clean energy sources, including solar energy-based 
services and technologies, and clean water and sanitation 
services. USAID is directed to consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 180 days after enactment of this 
Act on the implementation of this program.

                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $7,105,401,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     6,504,096,000
Committee recommendation..............................     6,370,096,000
    Change from request...............................      -134,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................     -735,305,000

\1\The enacted level includes $4,098,401,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $1,124,800,000 from
  Public Law 110-252, and $2,973,601,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $6,370,096,000 for 
Economic Support Fund, which is $735,305,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and $134,000,000 below the request. 
Funds in this account are allocated in the following table, 
subject to the requirements of section 7019 of this Act.

                          ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND
               [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
         Activity/Program                Request         recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Africa

Democratic Republic of the Congo..             59,100             60,000
Liberia...........................            148,670            158,670
Sierra Leone......................             18,000             18,000
    Special Court.................                               [7,500]
Somalia...........................             28,270             30,000
Sudan.............................            296,034            296,034
Zimbabwe..........................             67,500             67,500
    State of Africa Regional (AF).             24,660             16,567

     East Asia and the Pacific

Burma.............................             34,750             32,000
Cambodia..........................              5,000             15,000
Indonesia.........................                300             32,000
Philippines.......................  .................             20,000
Tibet.............................              5,000              7,300
Timor-Leste.......................  .................              2,700
    State East Asia and Pacific                14,520             10,000
     Regional.....................

        Europe and Eurasia

Cyprus............................             11,000             11,000

             Near East

Egypt.............................            250,000            250,000
Iraq..............................            415,700            400,000
Jordan............................            363,000            363,000
Lebanon...........................            109,000            109,000
MEPI..............................             86,000             70,000
MERC..............................              3,000              5,000
Morocco...........................              3,000              3,000
NERD..............................             40,000             40,000
West Bank/Gaza....................            400,400            400,400
Yemen.............................  .................             25,000
Trans-Sahara Counter-Terrorism                  6,000              6,000
 Partnership (TSCTP)..............

      South and Central Asia

Afghanistan.......................          2,157,932          2,106,000
    of which Afghan Civilian                                    [15,000]
     Assistance...................
    of which NSP..................                             [175,000]
    of which Women and Girls......                             [175,000]
Pakistan..........................          1,074,295          1,070,000
Regional (SCA)....................              9,500              7,000

        Western Hemisphere

Colombia..........................            200,660            200,660
Cuba..............................             20,000             20,000
Guatemala.........................              2,000              5,000
Haiti.............................            124,951            165,000
Mexico............................              3,000             20,000
State Western Hemisphere Regional              91,106             62,000
 (WHA)............................
        Caribbean Basin Security    .................           [13,100]
         Initiative...............

          Global Programs

G/TIP--Office to Monitor and
 Combat Trafficking in Persons....
    State Office to Monitor and                 7,183             12,000
     Combat Trafficking in Persons
     (G/TIP)......................
OES--Oceans and International
 Environmental and Scientific
 Affairs..........................
    Civilian Science Research       .................              5,000
     Initiative...................
    World Bank Carbon Facility....  .................              5,000
    OES/CC Climate Change.........            150,300            130,300
    OES/FTA-E FTA Environment.....              5,000              5,000
    OES/OESP OES Partnerships.....              2,350              2,350
    OES/SPFF South Pacific Forum               18,000             18,000
     Fisheries....................
    OES/W Water...................              2,000              2,000

       Other Global Programs

Reconciliation Programs...........  .................             15,000
East Europe & the Independent       .................              5,000
 States--Title VIII Program.......
Trade Capacity Building--Central    .................             10,000
 America..........................
Wheelchairs.......................  .................             10,000
Extractive Industries Transparency  .................              3,000
House Democracy Assistance Program  .................              2,000
Kimberley Process.................  .................              3,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                 AFRICA

Conflict resolution in Africa

    The Committee believes that opportunities exist to resolve 
some of the African continent's most entrenched conflicts. The 
Committee recommends the creation of a Conflict Resolution, 
Prevention, and Democracy Promotion Inter-Agency Task Force to 
help resolve, prevent, and strengthen democracy institutions in 
Africa.

Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)

    The Committee recommendation includes $60,000,000 for 
assistance for the DRC, which is $900,000 above the request. 
Priority should be given to programs that strengthen the rule 
of law, extend governance, assist victims of conflict, 
including child soldiers, women and girls, and address the 
psycho-social needs of those impacted by violence. The 
Committee continues to be concerned about violence associated 
with the exploitation of natural resources and urges the 
Department of State and USAID to support efforts of the 
Government of the DRC to demilitarize the mining sector.

Liberia

    The Committee recommendation includes $158,670,000 for 
assistance for Liberia, which is $10,000,000 above the request. 
USAID should support efforts to increase access to electricity, 
and should expand programs that promote and strengthen the rule 
of law, consistent with country plans. USAID programs should 
also focus on the strengthening of internal infrastructure in 
Liberia, including upgrading existing roads and bridges.

Sierra Leone

    The Committee recommendation includes $18,000,000 for 
assistance for Sierra Leone, which includes $7,500,000 for the 
Special Court for Sierra Leone. The Committee commends the 
Court for the efforts it has undertaken to protect the key 
witnesses in the trial of former Liberian president Charles 
Taylor. The Court intends to complete this trial in 2010 and it 
has had to overcome substantial obstacles in order to bring 
justice to the victims of the conflict.

Somalia

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for 
assistance for Somalia, which is $1,730,000 above the request. 
The Committee believes that United States policy should seek to 
consolidate and build upon areas of relative stability in 
Somalia, including in Somaliland and Puntland. Programs in 
these areas should enable economic growth, address youth 
idleness and underemployment, foster community-based peace-
building and conflict mitigation, and support alternative 
livelihoods.

Sudan

    The Committee recommendation includes $296,034,000 for 
assistance for Sudan, which is the same as the request. The 
Committee notes the importance of fully implementing the 
Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in Sudan and directs USAID 
to continue to support programs that implement the vision of 
the CPA, including support for local governance, judicial 
strengthening and rule of law, law enforcement professionalism 
and commitment to human rights, anti-corruption, and community 
level reintegration programs in southern Sudan. Special 
attention should be paid to supporting traditionally 
marginalized groups. Programs that expand access to health, 
basic education, agriculture, voter education, and economic 
growth should also be included.
    The Committee is favorably impressed with the International 
Criminal Court's handling to date of the proceedings involving 
Sudan President Omar al-Bashir and expects that despite this 
verdict humanitarian, development and governance programs in 
Sudan will continue. The Department of State is directed to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on its road map 
for peace and justice in Sudan in cooperation with regional, 
international, and Sudanese allies, including specifically the 
People's Republic of China, the League of Arab States, and the 
African Union. All programs in Sudan shall be implemented in 
coordination with the Special Envoy for Sudan.
    In spite of the international sanctions regime, the 
Government of the People's Republic of China remains one of 
Sudan's principal trading partners. The Committee firmly 
believes that the Government of the People's Republic of China 
must join the rest of the international community and increase 
its exertion of influence, including political and financial 
pressure, on the Government of Sudan to stop the violence and 
end the genocide. The Secretary of State is directed to report 
to the Committees on Appropriations not later than 90 days 
after enactment of this Act on the actions of the Government of 
the People's Republic of China in Sudan, including any efforts 
they have undertaken to impede international sanctions, dilute 
international condemnation of the Sudanese government or 
otherwise assist the government of Sudan in avoiding their 
obligations to comply with existing United Nations resolutions; 
any efforts undertaken by the Government of the People's 
Republic of China to place pressure on the Sudanese government 
to end the genocide in Darfur; and a brief description of the 
efforts of the Department of State since the start of the 
genocide to engage the Government of the People's Republic of 
China on the issue of Darfur.

Zimbabwe

    The Committee recommendation includes $67,500,000 for 
assistance for Zimbabwe, which is the same as the request. 
Funding provided in this bill shall support programs that 
strengthen the rule of law and democratic principles, 
strengthen civil society organizations, and support basic 
emergency needs during and after the conflict. The Committee 
continues a provision (Sec. 7069) that clarifies that none of 
the funds in this Act, except for funds for macroeconomic 
growth activities, can be used to directly support the 
Government of Zimbabwe until the Secretary of State certifies 
that a democratically-elected government has been put in place 
and that government respects human rights and the rule of law.

                           EUROPE AND EURASIA

Cyprus

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,000,000 for 
assistance for Cyprus for scholarships, administrative support 
of the scholarship program, bi-communal projects, and measures 
aimed at reunification of the island. There are concerns that 
some projects on Cyprus have been funded without advance 
consultation with the Government of the Republic of Cyprus. 
Such consultations should occur whenever practicable in the 
interest of transparency in the allocation of funds. The 
requirements of the Democracy Fund shall apply with respect to 
the provision of assistance to nongovernmental organizations.

                               NEAR EAST

Egypt

    The Committee recommendation includes $250,000,000 for 
assistance for Egypt, which is the same as the request. Within 
the amount provided for project assistance, not less than 
$25,000,000 shall be made available for democracy, governance, 
and human rights programs and not less than $25,000,000 shall 
be for education programs. The requirements of the Democracy 
Fund shall apply with respect to the provision of assistance to 
nongovernmental organizations.
    USAID should consider the work of the ``United States 
Congress-Majlis El-Shaab Exchange Program'' with the People's 
Assembly of Egypt. The Committee notes recent steps by the 
Government of Egypt to address human rights concerns and urges 
continued attention to these issues, including the rights of 
religious minority communities such as the Baha'i. The 
Committee also notes with concern the continued incarceration 
of Abdel Kareem Nabil Soliman, an Egyptian human rights 
activist and blogger.

Jordan

    The Committee recommendation includes $363,000,000 for 
assistance for Jordan, which is the same as the request. The 
Committee notes, with appreciation, Jordan's strong support for 
the United States and recognizes Jordan's leadership and 
commitment to advancing efforts to bring peace between Israelis 
and Palestinians.

Iraq

    The Committee recommendation includes $400,000,000 for 
assistance for Iraq, which is $15,700,000 below the President's 
request. The Committee intends for not less than $50,000,000 to 
continue the Civilian Assistance Program in Iraq and 
$126,000,000 is to continue democracy and civil society 
strengthening activities in Iraq, including ongoing support to 
the United States Institute for Peace.
    The Committee urges the Department of State and USAID to 
continue efforts to encourage the incorporation of women in 
stabilizing Iraq and creating its government institutions and 
up to $5,000,000 of the funds provided under this heading for 
Iraq and for the Middle East Partnership Initiative are 
directed to be used to support an Iraqi women's democracy 
initiative.
    The Committee is concerned about the plight of women and 
religious minorities, including Iraqi Christians, amongst 
displaced and refugee populations and provides not less than 
$20,000,000 for programs that support religious minorities, 
including through assistance for displaced and refugee 
populations, to address the needs of these minority groups.

Lebanon

    The Committee recommendation includes $109,000,000 for 
assistance for Lebanon, as requested, of which not less than 
$15,000,000 is for scholarships for students in Lebanon with 
high financial need, including at American educational 
institutions. These funds are to be awarded through an open and 
competitive process.

Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI)

    The Committee recommendation includes $70,000,000 for 
programs managed by MEPI, of which $10,000,000 should be used 
to continue a scholarship program to educate students from 
countries with significant Muslim populations, including at 
American educational institutions in those countries. These 
funds are to be awarded through an open and competitive 
process. The Department of State is directed to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on coordination with other offices 
responsible for funding similar programs as MEPI, including 
USAID and other offices within the Department of State. The 
Department of State and USAID should consider the work of 
Street Law. The Committee supports Shaare Zedek's Medical 
Center partnership creating a breast and ovarian cancer 
genetics service infrastructure in the West Bank and commends 
efforts such as these that produce tangible benefits from peace 
and cooperation among Israelis and Palestinians.

Middle East Regional Cooperation Program

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the 
Middle East Regional Cooperation Program to promote technical 
cooperation between Arab and Israeli scientists, students, and 
communities on topics relevant to development in the Middle 
East.

West Bank and Gaza

    The Committee recommendation includes $400,400,000 for 
programs in the West Bank and Gaza, of which not more than 
$200,000,000 shall be for cash transfer assistance. The 
Department of State and USAID should continue to support 
efforts of the Palestinian Authority. Up to $2,000,000 of the 
funds provided under this heading may be used to augment 
administrative expenses of USAID to facilitate program 
administration and not less than $3,000,000 should be 
designated for local non-governmental organizations operating 
in the West Bank to strengthen civil society and improve social 
services for the Palestinian people. The Committee supports 
expanded opportunities for eligible Palestinian students to 
participate in scholarship, study abroad and exchange programs, 
particularly in the United States, and directs the Secretary of 
State to report to the Committees on Appropriations on efforts 
to expand these programs and any potential obstacles. The 
Committee believes that for the Palestinian Authority to be a 
strong and viable partner for peace, it must receive the 
economic and political backing of the international community, 
most particularly of Arab states. The Committee therefore 
directs the Secretary of State to report not later than 90 days 
after the enactment of this Act and every 180 days thereafter 
on the status and progress of efforts to gain Arab 
participation in the economic development of the West Bank and 
support for the Palestinian Authority. The Secretary shall 
report to the Committee on Appropriations on the facts 
surrounding the injury sustained by Tristan Anderson, an 
American citizen from Oakland, California, on March 13, 2009 in 
the West Bank village of Nilin. The Committee is aware of the 
work of Hebrew University and urges USAID to support efforts 
that build partnerships between Israeli and Palestinian medical 
institutions.

Yemen

    The Committee recommendation includes $25,000,000 for 
assistance for Yemen under this heading. The Committee is 
concerned about the stability of Yemen and notes that the 
country requires focused international attention. The Committee 
recognizes that Yemen is an emerging democracy and expresses 
continued support for democracy and governance programs to 
assist the country's nascent democratic institutions as well as 
support for health and education programs to provide 
opportunity to the country's youth. An additional $15,000,000 
is provided under the ``Development Assistance'' account.

                         SOUTH AND CENTRAL ASIA

Afghanistan

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$2,106,000,000 for assistance for Afghanistan, which is 
$51,932,000 below the request. USAID should intensify efforts 
to address widespread corruption and heavy dependence on 
illicit crops that fuel the economy and continue to erode 
public confidence in the Afghan government. As in the past, a 
portion of the funding for Afghanistan is withheld from 
obligation, until the Secretary of State certifies to the 
Committees on Appropriations that the Government of Afghanistan 
at both the national and provincial levels is cooperating fully 
with United States-funded eradication and interdiction efforts 
in Afghanistan. A national security waiver is included. The 
Committee recommendation includes not less than $175,000,000 
for the National Solidarity Programme. The Committee recognizes 
the training and medical education performed at the CURE 
International Hospital and Family Health Center in Kabul and 
encourages consideration of their work in fiscal year 2010.
    Afghan women and girls.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $175,000,000 for programs for women and girls, of 
which $20,000,000 is provided for training and equipment to 
improve the capacity of women-led Afghan nongovernmental 
organizations, and to support the activities of such 
organizations. USAID is directed to more aggressively conduct 
outreach to such organizations, particularly those in remote 
areas, to inform them of USAID programs and procedures. USAID 
should make building the capacity of women's organizations a 
priority. The Committee further intends that not less than 
$25,000,000 should target maternal and child health programs in 
Afghanistan. The Department of State shall submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations not later than September 30, 
2010 describing the use of funds provided in fiscal years 2009 
and 2010 to address the needs of Afghan women and girls.
    The Committee is concerned about the new Shia Personal 
Status Law and the law's impact on the personal freedoms and 
human rights of women in Afghanistan. The Committee expects 
that the Department of State will work with those within the 
Government of Afghanistan, including women Parliamentarians and 
civil society organizations, to update this law. The Committee 
directs the Department of State to update the Committees on 
Appropriations on a regular basis on the changes made to this 
law.
    Independent Human Rights Commission.--USAID should continue 
support for the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission and 
other Afghan human rights organizations.
    Civilian Assistance Program.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $15,000,000 for continued support for USAID's Afghan 
Civilian Assistance Program, to assist victims of military 
operations.

Pakistan

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,070,000,000 for 
assistance for Pakistan. The Committee recognizes that funds 
may be considered for direct budget support for the Government 
of Pakistan, and directs that a bilateral agreement be in place 
prior to the provision of any direct budget support. Such an 
agreement should be structured to provide maximum 
accountability and oversight, and should contain conditions for 
disbursement of funds and detailed monitoring and reporting 
requirements. Funds should be deposited in a separate, 
traceable account and be allocated toward operations in 
specific sectors. The Secretary of State is directed to consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations prior to the provision of 
any budget support, including on the amounts, uses and 
oversight of such funds as well as on the bilateral agreement.
    The Committee intends that the majority of the assistance 
for Pakistan be used to support programs that counter the 
influence of violent extremists through local initiatives, 
including infrastructure, health, education, governance, rule 
of law, and employment opportunities. USAID's Office of 
Transition Initiatives should be utilized to the maximum extent 
practicable in implementing such programs in conflict prone 
areas. The Committee supports continued development of an 
independent and free media in Pakistan and encourages USAID and 
the State Department to support such programs.
    The Committee directs the USAID Administrator to consult 
with the Committees on Appropriations on the use of up to 
$10,000,000 to continue a program in Pakistan modeled on the 
Afghan Civilian Assistance Program, to assist families and 
communities that suffer losses as a result of military 
operations.

                           WESTERN HEMISPHERE

Western Hemisphere regional

    The Committee recommendation includes $62,000,000 for the 
Western Hemisphere regional account, which is $29,106,000 below 
the request. These funds should be jointly administered by the 
Department of State and USAID. Of the total, $13,100,000 is for 
the new CBSI. The Department of State and USAID are directed to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations prior to the 
obligation of these funds.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI)

    The Committee includes $13,100,000 within the Western 
Hemisphere regional account for the new CBSI as proposed by the 
Administration. The Committee intends that these funds will be 
used to support vocational training, science education, and 
English language programs. Funds may be used to support senior 
teacher training, a science network that includes exchanges and 
a virtual library, and micro scholarships to students in the 
Caribbean.

Colombia

    The Committee recommendation includes $200,660,000 for 
economic assistance programs in Colombia apportioned directly 
to USAID for continued support of new and ongoing development 
programs. Within the total, $36,000,000 shall be available to 
support internally displaced persons, refugees and other 
indigenous vulnerable groups and $4,500,000 shall be 
transferred to the ``Migration and Refugee Assistance'' account 
for emergency relief through nongovernmental organizations for 
Colombian refugees in neighboring countries. Additionally, up 
to $15,000,000 of the funds made available for Colombia under 
this heading are directed to be used for programs that 
specifically benefit Afro-Colombian and indigenous communities.

Haiti

    The Committee recommendation includes $165,000,000 for 
assistance for Haiti, which is $40,049,000 above the request. 
The Committee encourages and supports efforts to bring about 
systemic and holistic positive change for the people of Haiti. 
USAID should consider the work of Mercy & Sharing and the 
Florida Association of Volunteer Action in the Caribbean and 
Americas.

Mexico

    The Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for 
assistance for Mexico for economic assistance, judicial reform, 
civil society strengthening, and institution building. The 
Committee intends funds provided for assistance for Mexico 
under this heading to support the efforts of government and 
nongovernmental institutions in Mexico to enhance governance, 
including judicial reform, and strengthen civil society. An 
additional $10,000,000 is included for Mexico under the 
``Development Assistance'' account.

                                  ASIA

Burma

    The Committee recommendation includes $32,000,000 for 
assistance for Burma, of which $12,000,000 is for continuing 
humanitarian assistance to Cyclone Nargis-affected areas and 
democracy programs inside Burma and $20,000,000 is for 
continuing programs and activities along the Thai-Burma border, 
including the continuation of newspapers, publications and 
media activities. The Committee directs the Department of State 
and USAID to ensure that no assistance flows to, or through, 
the Burmese government, its bureaucracy, or regime-affiliated 
organizations, such as government-organized nongovernmental 
organizations.

Cambodia

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,000,000 for 
assistance for Cambodia under this heading and an additional 
$19,000,000 under the ``Development Assistance'' heading.

Indonesia

    The Committee recommendation includes $32,000,000 for 
assistance for Indonesia under this heading, and an additional 
$101,230,000 under the ``Development Assistance'' heading. 
USAID should continue its programs in Aceh and maintain a 
presence there. The Department of State should work with the 
Government of Indonesia to ensure that the UN and other 
humanitarian organizations have free access to people in need 
in Papua.

Philippines

    The Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for 
assistance for the Philippines under this heading, and an 
additional $50,310,000 under the ``Development Assistance'' 
heading. USAID should continue support for conflict resolution 
activities in Mindanao and expand judicial training programs.

Tibet

    The Committee recommendation includes $7,300,000 for 
assistance for programs that preserve cultural traditions and 
promote economic development and environmental conservation in 
Tibetan communities, to be administered by USAID. The Special 
Coordinator for Tibetan Issues should play an active role in 
the allocation of funds for programs and activities in Tibet, 
as authorized by Public Law 107-223. USAID should consider the 
work of The Bridge Fund.

Timor-Leste

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,700,000 for 
assistance for Timor-Leste under this heading, for higher 
education scholarships including vocational training, 
undergraduate, and graduate studies. An additional $20,535,000 
is provided for Timor-Leste under the ``Development 
Assistance'' account.

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

Civilian Research and Development Foundation

    The Committee recommendation includes $5,000,000 for 
programs that engage scientists in the establishment of new 
international partnerships through cooperative research and 
development activities to provide former weapons scientists the 
opportunity to participate in scientific research with their 
civilian counterparts to develop skills relevant for sustained 
civilian employment.

Extractive industries

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for a 
United States contribution to the Extractive Industries 
Transparency Initiative Trust Fund.

Health programs

    The Committee notes the need to continue programs that 
address child, maternal, reproductive, and environmental health 
as well as the increasing incidence of tuberculosis and HIV/
AIDS in this account. The Committee includes not less than 
$208,383,000 for health activities. Of this amount, the 
Committee recommendation includes $127,409,000 for child 
survival and maternal health; $58,849,000 for family planning/
reproductive health programs; and $22,125,000 for infectious 
diseases and other public health threats.

Kimberley Process

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for the 
Kimberley Process Certification Scheme, with an emphasis on 
regional efforts to combat cross-border smuggling and to 
strengthen the role and capacity of civil society groups in the 
Kimberley Process.

Office of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs 
        (OES)

    The Committee supports the efforts of this Office to expand 
engagement in the climate change negotiations. Of the funding 
provided to OES, not less than $50,000,000 should be provided 
to the Least Developed Countries Fund and to the Special 
Climate Change Fund to support both the adaptation and the 
technology mandates. The Committees on Appropriations shall be 
consulted prior to the obligation of these funds. The Committee 
is aware of efforts to restructure the Asia Pacific Partnership 
and applauds these efforts.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for the 
Forest Carbon Partnership Facility at the World Bank. The 
Committee understands that the facility is working with 
countries to develop readiness strategies to ensure that 
countries are prepared to take part in international forest 
carbon markets. The OES Office is directed to ensure that these 
efforts are undertaken with the full and active participation 
of civil society and indigenous communities.
    The OES Office should continue to expand its efforts, in 
coordination with other relevant United States Government 
agencies, to conduct outreach, capacity building activities, 
and improved plant identification and wood tracking techniques 
with priority timber producing countries as part of its 
implementation of the provisions of the Lacey Act, as amended.

Parliamentary exchanges

    The Committee recommendation includes $2,000,000 for the 
House Democracy Assistance Commission. This program is not 
included in the fiscal year 2010 justification material and is 
therefore subject to the notification requirements of section 
7015. The Commission maintains ongoing partnerships with 12 
legislatures in Afghanistan, Colombia, Georgia, Haiti, 
Indonesia, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Macedonia, Mongolia, Timor-
Leste, and Ukraine. Funding will support operating costs for 
fiscal year 2010, including an array of outbound programs 
conducted in partner nations and inbound programs conducted in 
the United States Congress.

Reconciliation programs

    The Committee recommendation includes $15,000,000 under 
this heading to continue support for USAID's reconciliation 
programs, which shall be awarded through a competitive grant 
program. The Committee provides an additional $12,000,000 under 
the ``Development Assistance'' heading for a total of 
$27,000,000 in this Act for reconciliation programs. The 
Committee intends that $16,000,000 should be used to support 
people-to-people reconciliation programs in all regions of the 
world, and not less than $11,000,000 is for such programs in 
the Middle East to foster reconciliation between Arab and 
Israeli populations.

Trafficking in persons

    The Committee directs that not less than $38,352,000 in 
this Act should be used for activities to combat trafficking in 
persons internationally, to be implemented in a coordinated 
fashion by the Department of State and USAID. Within this 
amount, $12,000,000 is allocated for programs managed by the 
Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons consistent 
with the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000. Programs 
should include efforts that help countries meet minimum 
standards to combat human trafficking, prevent trafficking, 
protect victims, and prosecute perpetrators, as well as 
research initiatives. Funding is included for long-term 
residential rehabilitation facilities for trafficking victims 
to be implemented by USAID. USAID and the Department of State 
should consider the work of the Sanctuary of Moses.
    The Committee recognizes and supports the Administration's 
ongoing effort to develop an interagency strategy that 
encompasses all United States Government-funded international 
anti-trafficking efforts, and monitors results cohesively. The 
Department of State is directed to consult with the Committees 
on Appropriations not later than 90 days after enactment of 
this Act on progress in developing such an interagency 
strategy, any preliminary conclusions, and how such a strategy 
would impact program implementation.
    The Committee recommendation includes increased funding for 
sub-Saharan Africa, and up to $2,000,000 for India, to provide 
assistance to victims of trafficking, rape and sexual violence, 
and to support programs to prevent and combat these crimes 
against women. The Committee recommendation includes up to 
$2,000,000 for programs to improve the capacity of institutions 
in Cambodia, including the judiciary, law enforcement, and 
civil society organizations, to combat human trafficking and 
violence against women and children.

Wheelchair programs

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,000,000 for 
wheelchair programs in developing countries to be allocated 
through a fully open and competitive process. Programs should 
provide quality, low-cost wheelchairs that utilize appropriate 
technologies, and are sustainable.

                             DEMOCRACY FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $116,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................       120,000,000
    Change from request...............................       120,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................         4,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $120,000,000 for 
Democracy Fund, which is $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and $120,000,000 above the request. Democracy 
funds included under this heading were requested under the 
``Development Assistance'' and ``Economic Support Fund'' 
headings. Of the funds provided, $70,000,000 shall be for the 
Human Rights and Democracy Fund of the Bureau of Democracy, 
Human Rights, and Labor (DRL) at the Department of State; and 
$50,000,000 shall be for the Office of Democracy and Governance 
of the Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian 
Assistance at USAID.
    The Committee considers both DRL and USAID's Office of 
Democracy and Governance centers of excellence in global 
democracy promotion that provide strategic leadership, 
technical expertise, and flexible mechanisms to respond quickly 
and effectively to events on the ground and to create both 
short-term and long-term strategies to strengthen democracy. 
The Committee does not intend to establish either USAID or the 
Department of State as the lead on United States democracy 
promotion programs. Rather, by providing funding to both, it 
seeks to fill funding gaps in critical areas of democracy 
programming and continue coordination in this area in order to 
avoid duplication and ensure efficiency in program 
implementation. In addition to funds provided under this 
heading, the Committee notes that funds for democracy programs 
are included in other accounts.
    Of the amounts provided to USAID, not less than $32,500,000 
shall be for the Elections and Political Process Fund, which 
provides timely and targeted funding to respond to snap 
elections, democratic breakthroughs, and threats to democratic 
governance, $7,500,000 is provided to USAID international 
labor-related programs which contribute to democratic 
development, good governance, and economic growth; and 
$10,000,000 is provided for institutional support for 
organizations that provide assistance in human rights, media, 
and the rule of law.
    Of the amounts provided to DRL, $15,000,000 shall be for 
democracy promotion activities in Hong Kong, China and Taiwan; 
$15,000,000 shall be for internet freedom activities; including 
providing unmonitored and uncensored access to the internet for 
a large number of unique users in order to expand access to 
information in closed societies which are hostile to the free 
flow of information through the internet, including in the 
Middle East and Asia and $10,000,000 shall be for democracy 
promotion activities in countries located outside the Middle 
East region with a significant Muslim population. DRL should 
provide funding for programs that promote international 
religious freedom through groups that are able to develop legal 
protections and promote cultural and societal understanding of 
international norms of religious freedom. Funding provided for 
the promotion of human rights and democracy should be used to 
promote human rights protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and 
transgender individuals in countries where the annual 
Department of State Human Rights Reports have documented human 
rights violations against these communities.

                     INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR IRELAND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $15,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................                 0
Committee recommendation..............................        18,000,000
    Change from request...............................        18,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................         3,000,000


    The Committee recommends a total of $18,000,000 for 
International Fund for Ireland in support of the Anglo-Irish 
Accord, which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted 
level and $18,000,000 above the request. The Committee 
encourages the Fund to address the important issue of social 
reintegration by promoting long-term development and education.

            ASSISTANCE FOR EUROPE, EURASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................      $922,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       762,253,000
Committee recommendation..............................       722,253,000
    Change from request...............................       -40,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................     -199,747,000

\1\The enacted level includes $272,000,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $722,253,000 for 
Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia, which is 
$199,747,000 below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$40,000,000 below the request.
    The Committee continues language providing the Department 
of State notwithstanding authority for additional flexibility 
in reprogramming prior-year unobligated and unexpired funds 
within the account. The Committee notes that such 
reprogrammings are still subject to the regular notification 
requirements, and the terms and conditions previously attached 
to the prior-year funds continue to apply.
    The following table compares the President's request for 
fiscal year 2010 and the Committee recommendation and is 
subject to the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning 
allocations and notifications.

                                 ASSISTANCE FOR EUROPE, EURASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                        Country                               Request         recommendation         Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Central Asia:
    Kazakhstan.........................................             10,400             10,400                  0
    Kyrgyz Republic....................................             41,465             37,000             -4,465
    Tajikistan.........................................             46,500             40,000             -6,500
    Turkmenistan.......................................             13,025             11,000             -2,025
    Uzbekistan.........................................              8,250              8,250                  0
    Regional--Central Asia.............................             12,000              9,000             -3,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Central Asia.....................            131,640            115,650            -15,990
Europe and Eurasia:
    Albania............................................             24,000             22,000             -2,000
    Armenia............................................             30,000             48,000             18,000
    Azerbaijan.........................................             22,120             18,500             -3,620
    Belarus............................................             15,000             15,000                  0
    Bosnia and Herzegovina.............................             38,565             36,000             -2,565
    Office of the High Representative (OHR)............            [4,000]            [4,000]                [0]
    Bulgaria...........................................                800                800                  0
    Georgia............................................             62,050             58,000             -4,050
    Kosovo.............................................            100,000            100,000                  0
    Macedonia..........................................             23,065             22,000             -1,065
    Moldova............................................             20,300             18,000             -2,300
    Montenegro.........................................              9,000              8,000             -1,000
    Russia.............................................             56,100             52,000             -4,100
    Serbia.............................................             51,000             47,000             -4,000
    Ukraine............................................             90,125             89,000             -1,125
    Regional--Europe and Eurasia.......................             88,488             72,050            -16,438
        OSCE...........................................           [47,180]           [47,180]                [0]
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal, Europe and Eurasia...............            630,613            606,350            -24,263
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total, Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia........            762,253            722,000            -40,253
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bosnia and Herzegovina

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,000,000 to support 
the Office of the High Representative (OHR) in Bosnia and 
Herzegovina.

Russia-Iran

    The Committee continues a provision (Sec. 7073) restricting 
assistance for the Government of Russia due to its support for 
the Iranian nuclear program.

Minsk Process

    The Committee reaffirms that Section 907 of the FREEDOM 
Support Act is still in effect, pending a settlement of the 
ongoing dispute between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the status 
of Nagorno-Karabakh. The Committee supports the so-called 
``Minsk Process'' that provides a forum for negotiations toward 
a peaceful settlement of the conflict, and encourages the 
Department of State to continue its efforts to reenergize the 
negotiating process this year. As this process moves forward, 
the Committee believes that all parties to the conflict must 
refrain from threats, incitement to the use of force, or other 
inflammatory rhetoric. Recognizing that the Congress gave the 
President broad waiver authority with respect to Section 907 in 
the fiscal year 2002 Appropriations Act and that this waiver 
authority has been exercised in every fiscal year since then, 
the Committee directs that the Department of State consult with 
the Committees on Appropriations before exercising this waiver 
for fiscal year 2010 to ensure that all conditions under the 
waiver provision are being fully met.

Support for peaceful resolution of South Caucasus conflicts

    The Committee continues its support for confidence-building 
measures among the parties to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. 
The Committee expects the Department of State to use its 
authority under section 498B of the Foreign Assistance Act as 
necessary to carry out such programs. The Committee continues 
to be concerned about the plight of the victims of the Nagorno-
Karabakh conflict, and recommends that up to $10,000,000 should 
be made available to address ongoing humanitarian needs in 
Nagorno-Karabakh.

Religious and ethnic discrimination in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus

    The Committee is concerned that anti-Semitism and religious 
persecution, from both sanctioned and non-sanctioned sources, 
is on the rise in the former Soviet Union and continues to 
threaten the safety of ethnic and religious minorities, 
primarily in the Russian Federation, Ukraine and Belarus. The 
Committee notes that the principal ``at risk'' groups include 
migrants from Central Asia and the Caucasus, black African 
students, Armenians, Muslims, Roman Catholics, Evangelical 
Christians and Jews. The Committee encourages support for 
programs that address these concerns, including consideration 
of the work of the Union of Councils for Jews in the Former 
Soviet Union. The Coordinator of United States Assistance to 
Europe and Eurasia is directed to report not later than 120 
days after enactment of this Act on assistance provided by the 
United States to address these concerns.

Democracy and human rights

    The Committee recognizes the work of the Henry M. Jackson 
Foundation in promoting human rights and religious freedom in 
Russia. The Committee is also aware of the work of the Eurasian 
Medical Education Program of the American College of 
Physicians, and Miramed. Additionally, the Committee continues 
to recognize the work of the Eurasia Foundation in promoting 
democratic development at the grassroots level throughout the 
independent states of the former Soviet Union. The Committee 
encourages the Coordinator of United States Assistance to 
Europe and Eurasia to consider the activities noted above in 
fiscal year 2010.

Civilian science and education

    The Committee continues to support the efforts of the 
Civilian Research and Development Foundation (CRDF) and 
encourages continued funding for CRDF from within this account. 
The CRDF works to build scientific capabilities, economic 
development, and ultimately job creation in the countries in 
which it has a presence. The Committee encourages the CRDF to 
take advantage of its unique capabilities to further United 
States foreign policy objectives abroad by fostering 
partnerships through travel grants, workshops, research grants, 
virtual science libraries, higher education reform, and 
targeted training opportunities. Additionally, the Committee is 
aware of the work of the Science Education for New Civic 
Engagements and Responsibilities in science and education in 
the region and encourages the Coordinator of United States 
Assistance to Europe and Eurasia to consider such activities in 
fiscal year 2010.

Rule of law

    The Committee views efforts to advance the rule of law 
worldwide as a critical component of United States foreign 
policy. The Committee strongly supports the public service 
programs of the American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative 
in promoting democracy and sustainable development around the 
globe through implementation of legal reform initiatives and 
urges consideration of such programs in other regions.

Child survival, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, and other infectious 
        diseases

    The Committee notes the need to continue programs that 
address child, maternal, reproductive, and environmental health 
as well as the increasing incidence of tuberculosis and HIV/
AIDS co-infection in the countries of Eastern Europe, Russia, 
Ukraine, and the Central Asian Republics. The Committee has 
allocated not less than $51,592,000 for health activities. Of 
this amount, the Committee recommendation includes $13,939,000 
for child survival and maternal health; $9,608,000 for family 
planning/reproductive health programs; and $28,045,000 for 
infectious diseases and other public health threats.

Regional accounts

    The Committee recommendation provides $81,050,000 for 
regional programs, of which $32,352,000 is for the Europe 
regional account, $39,698,000 is for the Eurasia regional 
account and $9,000,000 is for the Central Asia regional 
account. The Committee intends that of these funds, $47,180,000 
is available to support the activities of the Organization for 
Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). Funding is also 
provided for environmental infrastructure, independent media 
support, civil society, rule of law, health promotion and care, 
economic development, and other programs.

                          Department of State


          INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $1,561,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,947,451,000
Committee.............................................     1,630,000,000
recommendation........................................
    Change from request...............................      -317,451,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       68,500,000

\1\The enacted level includes $686,500,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $199,000,000 from
  Public Law 110-252 and $487,500,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,630,000,000 for 
International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement (INCLE), 
which is $68,500,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level 
and $317,451,000 below the request. The Committee has merged 
the ``Andean Counterdrug Program'' account under INCLE and, 
subject to the regular notification procedures of the 
Committees on Appropriations, has exempted funds provided in 
INCLE from the application of section 482(b) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961. The Committee has not included the 
requested provision that would allow funds previously 
appropriated to the Andean region to be reprogrammed without 
regard to geographic or purpose limitations. The Committee 
intends that funds previously appropriated to the Andean region 
be used in that region.
    The Committee continues the requirement in the bill that 
the Secretary of State shall provide to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 45 days after enactment of this 
Act and prior to the initial obligation of funds appropriated 
under this heading, a report on the proposed uses of all funds 
on a country-by-country basis for each proposed program, 
project, or activity.
    The Committee notes that under certain extraordinary 
circumstances, the Department of State is required to exercise 
``notwithstanding'' authority. However, this authority has 
sometimes been used without notification to the Committees on 
Appropriations. Therefore, the Secretary of State is directed 
to notify the Committees on Appropriations in writing within 5 
days each time such authority is used, including providing a 
justification for such action.
    The following table compares the President's request for 
fiscal year 2010 and the Committee recommendation and is 
subject to the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning 
allocations and notifications.

                               INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                   Country/Program                           Request         recommendation          Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Country/Region:
    Indonesia........................................             11,570              11,570                   0
    Iraq.............................................             52,000              52,000                   0
    Lebanon..........................................             20,000              15,670              -4,330
    Afghanistan......................................            450,000             420,000             -30,000
    Pakistan.........................................            155,200             125,200             -30,000
    Bolivia..........................................             26,000              20,000              -6,000
    Colombia.........................................            237,760             251,150              13,390
    Costa Rica.......................................                500                 500                   0
    Dominican Republic...............................              1,950               4,450               2,500
    Guatemala........................................              5,850               7,500               1,650
    Haiti............................................             18,500              21,107               2,607
    Mexico...........................................            459,325             205,325            -254,000
    Peru.............................................             40,000              40,000                   0
    West Bank and Gaza...............................            100,000             100,000                   0
    Western Hemisphere Regional......................             81,665              81,670                 -58
        Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI)...             [5,900]             [5,900]                [0]
        Central America Regional Security Initiative             [75,000]            [75,000]                [0]
         (CARSI).....................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            GLOBAL PROGRAMS

    Unless otherwise indicated, funding for global programs 
under this heading is presumed to be at the request level.

Criminal youth gangs

    The Committee remains concerned about collaboration between 
criminal groups and drug traffickers and the impact these 
groups have on the daily lives of those citizens, especially 
the poor, who are the most frequent victims of violent crime. 
The Committee recommendation provides $8,000,000 for programs 
to combat transnational crime and criminal youth gangs, which 
is $1,000,000 above the request.

International demand reduction programs

    The Committee strongly supports demand reduction programs. 
The Committee directs that from funds within this heading, in 
addition to the funds provided for such programs in Mexico and 
Central America, $15,000,000 shall be provided for the drug 
demand reduction program, which is $2,500,000 above the 
request. The Committee commends the Department of State on 
efforts and encourages expansion of the program into more 
communities.

Trafficking in persons

    The Committee recommendation includes $9,262,000 in INCLE 
funding for activities to prevent trafficking in persons, which 
is the same as the request.

Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Initiative

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,500,000 for the 
Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Initiative, which is the same as 
the request.

Human rights

    The Committee calls on the Department of State to ensure 
that all United States laws regarding human rights, including 
section 620J of the Foreign Assistance Act, are strictly 
applied in every country program.

Police training

    The Committee recognizes that the United States plays an 
important role in training and professionalizing foreign police 
around the world. United States training promotes high quality, 
standardized civilian police, justice sector and corrections 
training in operating procedures, code of conduct, ethics 
standards, and human and civil rights. The Committee notes that 
such training is critical to eliminating the mistreatment and 
violence that occurs to those in need of protection. 
Furthermore, the Committee is gravely concerned with the 
treatment of women and girls and urges the Department of State 
to focus training on how to prevent and respond to gender-based 
violence against women and girls. The Committee directs the 
Secretary of State to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than March 1, 2010 on efforts to 
provide United States assistance to foreign police to address 
gender-based violence. This report should include: (1) an 
overview of all the Department's efforts to develop and provide 
such assistance to foreign police on gender-based violence; (2) 
information on the curriculum/training developed to provide or 
incorporate into said assistance; (3) the specific types of 
United States assistance provided to foreign police forces; (4) 
the number of countries/security forces that have received 
training and the cost of these trainings; and (5) the 
challenges encountered in pursuing this policy. The Committee 
is aware of the work of the Leitner Center in Ghana and 
encourages the Department of State to consider support for such 
activities in fiscal year 2010.

                     COUNTRY AND REGIONAL PROGRAMS

Afghanistan

    The Committee continues to include a limitation in the bill 
on the use of funds for aerial eradication through the spraying 
of herbicides in Afghanistan, unless the Secretary of State 
determines and reports to the Committees on Appropriations that 
the President of Afghanistan has requested such assistance and 
directs that if such a determination is made the Secretary of 
State shall consult with the Committees on Appropriations prior 
to the obligation of funds. The Committee directs the 
Department of State to report not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act on the status of arrests of known Afghan 
drug traffickers, cartel leaders, and narco-terrorists; the 
destruction of Afghan heroin laboratories; local Afghan 
prosecutions of heroin-related crimes; and illegal border 
crossings by foreign nationals from Pakistan into Afghanistan.

Colombia

    The Committee acknowledges that Colombia is a vital partner 
and ally of the United States. The Committee recommendation 
includes $251,150,000, which is $13,390,000 above the request, 
for rule of law, interdiction and eradication activities in 
Colombia. The Committee continues to recognize the strategic 
importance of Colombia, and acknowledges the successes in 
Colombia and the measurable improvements that have resulted in 
the everyday lives of the Colombian people.
    The Committee notes that increasing levels of assistance 
for Colombia are supporting Integrated Action programs (Fusion 
Centers), which aim to bring the government into ungoverned 
territories by combining military security and civilian 
development strategies. The Committee views this model as 
innovative, but notes that success hinges on civilian 
government institutions' full participation, inter-agency 
coordination, strict respect for human rights and local 
populations' inclusion. The Committee urges the Department of 
State and the United States Embassy in Colombia to work with 
the Government of Colombia to ensure that during implementation 
of such Fusion Centers, the development of non-military 
capacity is a top priority.
    Colombia rule of law, judicial, and human rights 
programs.--The Committee recommendation provides $44,500,000 in 
funding for justice and rule of law activities and continues a 
prior-year prohibition on providing funding for budget support 
or cash payments to the Government of Colombia.
    The Committee encourages that funding provided for 
judicial, human rights, and rule of law activities may be 
available to assist investigations and prosecutions of crimes 
against labor union members and human rights defenders.
    The Committee is concerned with the timeliness of judicial 
assistance to Colombia and directs the Department of State in 
consultation with the Department of Justice to provide a report 
to the Committees on Appropriations not later than 45 days 
after enactment of this Act describing the implementation of 
assistance for the Colombian justice system. This report shall 
include a timeline of allocation of funds.
    The following table compares the President's request for 
fiscal year 2010 and the Committee recommendation and is 
subject to the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning 
allocations and notifications.

                            COLOMBIA RULE OF LAW, JUDICIAL, AND HUMAN RIGHTS PROGRAMS
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                     Program/Activity                              Request            Committee recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Human Rights.............................................                        0                         8,000
Judicial Reforms Programs................................                    7,000                         8,000
Procuraduria General de la Nacion........................                        0                         4,000
Defensoria del Pueblo....................................                        0                         2,000
Office of the Attorney General...........................                   13,234                            --
    Human Rights Unit....................................                        0                         5,000
    Justice and Peace Unit...............................                        0                         5,000
    Witness/Victims Protection Program...................                        0                         5,000
    Investigations and Mass graves.......................                        0                         1,500
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights....................                        0                           500
Carabineros..............................................                    5,000                         3,000
Individual Deserter Program..............................                      500                           500
Demand Reduction.........................................                      500                           500
Culture of Lawfulness....................................                        0                             0
Money Laundering.........................................                      500                         1,500
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Colombia Rule of Law Programs......                   26,734                        44,500
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Colombia human rights.--The Committee is concerned with 
official reports from the Government of Colombia which estimate 
that in the past 15 years up to 6.8 million hectares of land 
belonging to Afro-Colombians were illegally expropriated by 
paramilitary groups. The Committee notes that, despite the 
presence of Colombian armed forces, there continues to be 
paramilitary control over large tracts of land and the natural 
resources found on such lands.
    The Committee is aware of reports that in the case of the 
Afro-Colombian and mestizo communities of Jiguamiando and 
Curvarado, the Government of Colombia has recognized that the 
Afro-Colombian community councils are the rightful owners of 
these lands. The Secretary of State is directed to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act on the actions taken by the Government of 
Colombia to return to the Afro-Colombian community councils all 
lands unlawfully expropriated.
    The Committee continues to be concerned with the plight of 
internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Colombia. The Committee 
notes that the Colombian Constitutional Court has ruled that a 
registry of lands should be established chronicling the 
property claims of internally displaced individuals and 
families and identify who currently holds the land in order to 
restore the rights of IDPs and return that land to the rightful 
owners or provide appropriate reparation. The Committee 
encourages the Government of Colombia to complete this registry 
to facilitate national reconciliation.
    The Committee is concerned with reports of malicious or 
baseless prosecutions of human rights defenders, journalists, 
and political or social leaders who have criticized government 
policies, and urges the Government of Colombia to establish 
mechanisms to provide judicial review and oversight to prevent 
such misuse of the judicial process. The Committee has modified 
a provision (Sec. 7046(b)(1)(B)(iv)) to include a reporting 
requirement.
    Colombia interdiction, eradication and support.--The 
Committee supports voluntary manual coca eradication efforts in 
Colombia and directs USAID to continue to support the 
Government of Colombia in expanding these programs. The 
Committee directs the Department of State to provide a report 
not later than 45 days after enactment of this Act, on United 
States Government support of voluntary manual eradication 
efforts in Colombia.
    The Committee continues a prior-year provision (Sec. 7046) 
requiring that the Secretary of State certify that certain 
human rights conditions have been met before 30 percent of 
funds may be made available for assistance for the Colombian 
Armed Forces.
    The following table compares the President's request for 
fiscal year 2010 and the Committee recommendation and is 
subject to the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning 
allocations and notifications.

                                 COLOMBIA--INTERDICTION, ERADICATION AND SUPPORT
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                     Program/Activity                              Request            Committee recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Support to the Colombian Military:
    Army Counterdrug Mobile Brigade......................                    2,000                         2,000
    Army Aviation Support................................                   36,000                        36,000
    Air Bridge Denial Program............................                    1,000                         1,000
    Navy Maritime Interdiction Support...................                    5,000                         5,000
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Support to the Colombian Military..                   44,000                        44,000
Support to Colombian National Police:
    Aviation Support.....................................                   55,106                        50,000
    Support For Eradication..............................                   60,000                        55,000
    Support For Interdiction.............................                   16,000                        25,000
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Support to the Colombian National                    131,106                       130,000
             Police......................................
Program, Development and Support:
    United States Personnel..............................                    2,089                         2,029
    Locally Engaged Staff (LES)..........................                    2,391                         1,911
    ICASS Costs..........................................                    1,010                         1,010
    Program Support......................................                    1,750                         1,750
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Program, Development and Support...                    7,240                         6,700
Critical Flight Safety Program:
    Huey-II Engines......................................                    1,800                         1,800
    Huey-II procurement..................................                    3,500                         3,500
    Spray Aircraft procurement...........................                    2,730                             0
    Huey II wiring.......................................                    1,500                         1,500
    C208 Depot...........................................                      700                           700
    UH-60L Depot.........................................                    6,000                         6,000
    Huey-II Depot........................................                    4,000                         4,000
    C-27 Depot...........................................                    2,600                         2,600
    AT-802 Depot.........................................                    2,600                         2,600
    Aircraft/Aircrew Safety of Flight....................                    3,250                         3,250
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Critical Flight Safety Program.....                   28,680                        25,950
                                                          ------------------------------------------------------
        Total--Interdiction, Eradication and Support.....                  211,026                       206,650
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mexico

    The Committee recommendation includes $205,325,000 for 
Mexico. Although $459,325,000 was requested in fiscal year 2010 
through the INCLE account, the Committee forward funded a total 
of $254,000,000 in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 
(Public Law 111-32), of which $160,000,000 was provided through 
the ``Foreign Military Financing Program'' account. Taken 
together with the funding provided in this Act, the Committee 
has fully funded the fiscal year 2010 request for Mexico, which 
includes the Administration's request for the Merida program.
    The Committee provides funding to enable the Mexican 
National Migration Institute to expand and modernize its 
database and document verification system; procure mobile gamma 
ray non-intrusive inspection equipment and canine detection 
training to support the Federal Police and Customs' 
interdiction efforts; provide assistance to augment 
institution-building efforts; and provide support for anti-gang 
and anti-organized crime units, victim/witness protection, and 
extradition training.
    The Committee applauds the Government of Mexico's efforts 
in its war against organized crime and drug-trafficking along 
our shared border. However, this problem cannot be solved 
through police and military actions alone. The Committee 
believes that more must be done to invest in society and to 
provide alternative livelihoods, education, and opportunities 
for youth. While enforcement by police and military is 
important, security forces must institutionalize mechanisms to 
ensure transparency and accountability as well as respect for 
the rights of citizens. The Committee remains concerned with 
reports of corruption and human rights violations committed by 
some elements of federal and local police and military 
personnel. The Committee urges the continuation of justice 
sector and institutional reforms to ensure greater respect for 
human rights and rule of law.
    The Committee is concerned about violence against women in 
Mexico. The Committee encourages the Department of State to 
support ongoing efforts to identify unknown women murder 
victims in Ciudad Juarez and Chihuahua, Mexico, through 
forensic analysis, including DNA testing, conducted by 
independent, impartial experts already working in the state who 
are sensitive to the special needs and concerns of the victims' 
families. Support should also be provided for efforts to 
encourage families from Chihuahua and other Mexican states that 
have women or girls missing in their families to report these 
cases to the Attorney General's office in Chihuahua and the 
federal Special Prosecutor's Office for violent crimes against 
women.
    The Committee remains concerned about reports of firearms 
flowing across the border, which contributes to the increased 
level of violence, and strongly supports a coordinated strategy 
to address the mutual concerns between the United States and 
Mexico. The Committee urges creation of a joint high level 
United States-Mexico commission to facilitate bi-national 
cooperation and innovative solutions to reducing border 
violence, including increasing the interoperability of 
communications between United States and Mexico emergency and 
first responders along the southern border. The Committee 
believes such a commission would encourage coordination in 
curbing the illegal flow of contraband across the United 
States-Mexico border, including firearms, chemical precursors 
and bulk cash. The Committee has included language that 
requires any equipment purchased with funds in this Act to be 
interoperable and compatible with equipment utilized by Federal 
law enforcement agencies in the United States.

Peru

    The Committee recommendation includes $40,000,000 for 
assistance for Peru, which is the same as the request. The 
Committee continues to believe that there is a very real danger 
of increased coca production and of drug trafficking through 
Peru and notes with concern a small but significant rise in 
incursions by Mexican and Colombian drug cartels and other 
narco-terrorist organizations despite United States-supported 
eradication efforts. The Committee is concerned that the 
terrorist organizations have openly identified with the coca 
growers.
    The Committee is aware of the coca interdiction and 
eradication activities in the Cordillera Azul National Park in 
central Peru and encourages USAID to consider such work in 
fiscal year 2010. The Committee understands that this 
alternative community development and conservation education 
project has already demonstrated effective use of funds to 
prevent coca cultivation and urges USAID to consider entering 
into similar agreements elsewhere in the region.

Central America Regional Security Initiative (CARSI)

    The Committee includes $75,000,000 within the INCLE Western 
Hemisphere regional account for the countries of Central 
America, which includes the Administration's request for the 
Merida Initiative--Central America. The Committee believes that 
funding and cooperation within the region is a long-term 
proposal and therefore is transitioning the three-year Merida 
Initiative-Central America to a longer-term Central America 
Regional Security Initiative (CARSI). The Committee believes 
that the Administration must take a comprehensive approach to 
the myriad of problems such as youth violence and gangs, 
organized crime, drug trafficking and other forms of 
criminality and violence in Central America. The Committee 
notes that a range of United States Government agencies, 
including the Department of State, USAID, the Department of 
Justice, and others need to be involved in working with Central 
American governments and regional bodies to develop and 
implement a regional security initiative. The Committee expects 
that the Administration, as it develops and implements CARSI 
will ensure that it includes significant funding for 
prevention, for institutional strengthening of police, 
prosecutors, and judicial systems, and for prison programs.
    The Committee provides funding to combat drug trafficking, 
related violence, and organized crime. Funding is also provided 
for judicial reform, institution building, gang prevention, 
anti-corruption, and rule of law activities. The Committee 
supports increased coordination between the police forces of 
different countries and provides funds for information 
collection and sharing, enhancement of crime and fingerprint 
databases, communication equipment, and expansion of sensitive 
investigation police units, as well as funding to provide 
specialized police training and equipment, including vehicles, 
and communication equipment. Funding for CARSI maritime 
security is provided under the ``Foreign Military Financing 
Program'' account.

Caribbean Basin Security Initiative (CBSI)

    The Committee includes $5,900,000 within the INCLE Western 
Hemisphere regional account for the new CBSI as proposed by the 
Administration. The Committee intends that these funds will be 
used to support programs to enhance rule of law, provide 
equipment and training to counternarcotics forces, assist 
efforts to strengthen anti-crime legislation, and support 
information sharing among the customs, law enforcement and 
border control agencies in the Caribbean.

Shared Security Partnership (SSP)

    The Committee supports the Administration's proposed cross-
cutting initiative to coordinate regional and global law 
enforcement and anti-terrorist efforts. The recommendation 
includes $21,200,000 from funds made available under this 
heading for this purpose.

    NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................      $631,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       765,430,000
Committee recommendation..............................       717,430,000
    Change from request...............................       -48,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       85,930,000

\1\The enacted level includes $106,500,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $4,500,000 from Public
  Law 110-252 and $102,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $717,430,000 for 
Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related 
Programs, which is $85,930,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and $48,000,000 below the request.
    The Committee notes that under certain extraordinary 
circumstances, the Department of State is required to exercise 
``notwithstanding'' authority. However, this authority has 
sometimes been used without notification to the Committees on 
Appropriations. Therefore, the Secretary of State is directed 
to notify the Committees on Appropriations in writing within 5 
days each time such authority is used, including providing a 
justification for such action.
    The following table compares the President's request for 
fiscal year 2010 and the Committee recommendation and is 
subject to the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning 
allocations and notifications.

                         NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING AND RELATED PROGRAMS
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                        Programs                              Request         recommendation         Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nonproliferation Programs:
    Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund..............             75,000             75,000                  0
    Export Control and Related Border Security                      54,960             50,000             -4,960
     Assistance........................................
    Global Threat Reduction (formerly NWMDE)...........             68,615             66,000             -2,615
    IAEA Voluntary Contribution........................             65,000             65,000                  0
    CTBT International Monitoring System...............             26,000             30,000              4,000
    Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism..............              2,000              2,000                  0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Nonproliferation Programs........            291,575            288,000             -3,575
Anti-Terrorism Programs:
    Anti-terrorism Assistance..........................            228,385            200,000            -28,385
    Terrorist Interdiction Program.....................             54,550             54,550                  0
    Counterterrorism Engagement with Allies............              6,000              3,000             -3,000
    Counterterrorism Financing.........................             21,865             20,805             -1,060
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Anti-Terrorism Programs..........            310,800            278,355            -32,445
Regional Stability & Humanitarian Assistance:
    Humanitarian Demining Program......................             73,575             73,575                  0
    International Trust Fund...........................              7,500             12,500              5,000
    Small Arms/Light Weapons Destruction...............             81,980             65,000            -16,980
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Regional Stability & Humanitarian            163,055            151,075            -11,980
             Assistance................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total..........................................            765,430            717,430            -48,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nonproliferation activities

    The Committee has provided $288,000,000 under this heading 
for nonproliferation activities. The Committee emphasizes that 
nonproliferation programs of the Departments of State, Energy, 
Defense, and Homeland Security are critical components to 
protecting the United States and urges close coordination among 
these agencies. The Committee has included language requiring 
prior consultation on all Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund 
activities.

Pakistan

    The Committee notes the urgency in helping Pakistan secure 
its nuclear arsenal, prevent proliferation of nuclear 
technology, and combat terrorism.

Voluntary contribution to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    The Committee recommends $65,000,000, which is the same as 
the request, for the IAEA.

Counterterrorism financing

    The Committee recognizes that efforts to stop 
counterterrorism financing are a valuable asset and continues 
to support the work of the Departments of State, Justice and 
Treasury in assisting foreign countries' efforts to identify, 
freeze, and prevent the use of financial institutions, 
businesses, and charitable organizations as conduits for money 
to terrorist organizations, including giving countries an 
investigative ability to follow the money trail and arrest 
terrorists preemptively.

International Trust Fund

    The Committee is aware of the activities of the 
International Trust Fund in demining and mine victim assistance 
programs in Southeastern Europe and recognizes the significance 
of the assistance provided by the Trust Fund. The Committee 
recommendation includes $12,500,000, which is $5,000,000 above 
the request.

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty International Monitoring System

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000, which is 
$4,000,000 above the request, for a contribution to the 
Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty International Monitoring System.

Small arms/light weapons destruction

    The Committee supports the Small Arms/Light Weapons 
Destruction program for its clear and effective results in 
aiding participants in the elimination of grenades, guns, and 
Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS). The Committee 
recommendation includes $65,000,000 for this program. The 
Committee notes that this reduction was taken without prejudice 
and due solely to budget constraints.

Shared Security Partnership (SSP)

    The Committee supports the Administration's proposed cross-
cutting initiative to coordinate regional and global law 
enforcement and anti-terrorist efforts. The recommendation 
includes $49,400,000 from funds made available under this 
heading for border security, nonproliferation of weapons of 
mass destruction, and anti-corruption and anti-terrorism 
efforts.

                    MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE




Fiscal year 2009 supplemental appropriations\1\.......   $ 1,671,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,480,444,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,480,444,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................     -190,556,000

\1\The enacted level includes $740,000,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $350,000,000 from
  Public Law 110-252 and $390,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$1,480,444,000 for Migration and Refugee Assistance, which is 
$190,556,000 below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
same as the request. The Committee will continue to monitor the 
obligation and expenditure of these no-year funds to ensure 
there is adequate funding for these essential humanitarian 
assistance activities.

                                 AFRICA

Darfuri refugees

    The Committee understands the Department of State has begun 
the processing of Darfuri refugees for resettlement. The 
Committee requests the Department of State to keep it apprised 
of the security situation in Chad and the progress on 
processing of refugees from Darfur in Chad and from other 
locations.

Somali refugees

    The Committee remains concerned about the plight of 
refugees from Somalia. Due to over 17 years of political 
instability in Somalia, tens of thousands of refugees have been 
confined to camps for well over a decade and denied any freedom 
of movement or right to work. The Committee urges the 
Department of State to continue providing strong support for 
humanitarian assistance programs in Kenya and other countries 
that host large numbers of Somalis. In addition, the Committee 
recommends that the Secretary continue to work with the Office 
of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), 
and all other relevant international partners and governments, 
to seek appropriate and durable solutions for Somali refugees.

Women affected by conflict

    The Committee encourages the Department of State to 
continue to strengthen protection and assistance for women and 
girls, who make up the majority of refugees and conflict-
affected populations. The Committee is aware of the work of 
Women for Women International in this area and encourages the 
Secretary to give consideration to supporting their work, where 
appropriate.

Zimbabwean refugees

    The Committee urges the Department of State to continue to 
work closely with the Government of South Africa, UNHCR and 
other international organizations, and nongovernmental 
organizations to ensure that the South African government can 
move ahead with the timely identification, documentation, and 
status determination of refugees and asylum seekers. The 
Department of State also should work with the international 
community to ensure that sufficient resources are available to 
meet the protection and humanitarian assistance needs of 
vulnerable Zimbabweans in South Africa.

                               NEAR EAST

Iraqi refugees

    The Committee commends the Department of State for 
undertaking in-country processing of Iraqis allied with the 
United States who are applying for resettlement. The Committee 
urges the Secretary to ensure that adequate resources are made 
available to keep pace with processing demands and to explore 
expeditious, cost-effective alternatives for processing, if 
warranted. Finally, the Committee encourages the Department of 
State to continue to pay attention to the special circumstances 
of particularly vulnerable populations in Iraq, including 
religious minorities and those facing persecution due to their 
sexual orientation.
    The Committee is aware of concerns raised by international 
nongovernmental organizations working with Iraqi refugees in 
Syria that their humanitarian efforts are impeded by the United 
States sanctions imposed on Syria. The Committee has been 
informed, for example, that restrictions on technology make it 
difficult for aid workers to bring or use computers and other 
routine information technology in Syria and requires them to 
purchase new and more costly computing equipment in Syria. The 
Committee encourages the Secretary of State to examine the 
advisability of granting a limited humanitarian exemption from 
these restrictions to nongovernmental organizations funded by 
the United States and operating in Syria and to forward any 
recommendations for changes to existing law to the relevant 
committees of jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and 
the Senate.
    The Committee is also concerned that in addition to Iraqi 
refugees in Jordan and Syria, there are thousands of internally 
displaced persons of Palestinian descent in Iraq who are not 
being welcomed in any country in the region and are living in 
desperate circumstances just inside the border. The Committee 
understands that UNHCR considers Palestinians living in the 
border camps to be extremely vulnerable and urges the 
Department of State to accelerate efforts to address the needs 
of this vulnerable population.

Resettlement in Israel

    The Committee recommendation includes not less than 
$25,000,000 for refugees from the former Soviet Union and 
Eastern Europe and other refugees resettling in Israel, the 
same as the request.

United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) accountability

    The Committee is cognizant of concerns over whether UNRWA 
is taking all reasonable steps to prevent United States 
assistance from supporting terrorists, terrorist organizations 
or other extremists, particularly in the West Bank and Gaza and 
is operating in an open and transparent manner. While a May 
2009 Government Accountability Office report found UNRWA has 
``strengthened policies and procedures to conform with 
conditions of United States contributions'', they also noted 
that ``weaknesses remain''. Therefore, the Committee 
recommendation includes a provision (Sec. 7085) requiring the 
Secretary of State to submit an accountability report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act. The report requirements, which are 
similar to those included in the conference report on the 
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-XX), are 
as follows:
    Whether UNRWA is:
      (1) continuing to utilize Operations Support Officers in 
the West Bank and Gaza to inspect UNRWA installations and 
report any inappropriate use;
      (2) dealing promptly with any staff or beneficiary 
violations of its own policies (including the policies on 
neutrality and impartiality of employees) and the legal 
requirements under section 301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961;
      (3) taking necessary and appropriate measures to ensure 
it is operating in compliance with the conditions of section 
301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961;
      (4) continuing regular reporting to the Department of 
State on actions it has taken to ensure conformance with the 
conditions of section 301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961;
      (5) taking steps to improve the transparency of all 
educational materials currently in use in UNRWA-administered 
schools;
      (6) continuing to use curriculum materials in UNRWA-
supported schools and summer camps designed to promote 
tolerance, non-violent conflict resolution and human rights;
      (7) not engaging in operations with financial 
institutions or related entities in violation of relevant 
United States law and is enhancing its transparency and 
financial due diligence and working to diversify its banking 
operations in the region; and
      (8) in compliance with the United Nations Board of 
Auditors' biennial audit requirements and is implementing in a 
timely fashion the Board's recommendations.
    Textbooks.--The Committee is concerned about reports of 
host-country textbooks used in UNRWA schools that include 
inflammatory and inaccurate information about the United States 
and the State of Israel, anti-Semitic teaching, as well as the 
glorification of terrorists. The Committee requests the 
Department of State undertake a sample review of educational 
materials used in UNRWA schools and to report to the Committees 
on Appropriations on the findings of the review, efforts by 
UNRWA and the Department of State to mitigate the use of such 
material and any recommendations for improving transparency and 
accuracy of such materials.

                               SOUTH ASIA

Thai-Burma border

    The Committee continues to be concerned about refugees and 
internally displaced persons along the Thai-Burma border. The 
Committee expects the Department of State to continue and 
expand programs along the border where possible.

Tibetan refugees

    The Committee recommends not less than $2,500,000 from this 
account for Tibetan refugees in Nepal and India. The Committee 
remains concerned about the plight of Tibetan refugees 
transiting through Nepal to resettlement in India, and in 
particular the decision by the Government of Nepal to bar the 
reopening of the Tibetan-run offices in Kathmandu that provide 
vital services to refugees. The Committee welcomes efforts by 
the Department of State and the United States Embassy in 
Kathmandu to work multilaterally with other governments on 
Tibetan issues in Nepal and urges the Secretary to press the 
Government of Nepal to ensure the safe transit of Tibetan 
refugees and to respect the full rights of, and provide legal 
protections to, Tibetans residing in Nepal.

Western Hemisphere

    The Committee urges the Secretary to provide a strong and 
fair share contribution to UNHCR's request for the Western 
Hemisphere. Special consideration should be made to UNHCR's 
Latin America, North America and Caribbean appeals. The 
Committee notes with concern the humanitarian crisis in 
Ecuador, and urges the Department of State to provide robust 
support for Colombian refugee programs through both 
international and nongovernmental organizations, as well as 
continued support for Colombian IDP needs.

                                 OTHER

Unaccompanied alien children

    Cognizant of the requirement in the William Wilberforce 
Trafficking Victim Reauthorization Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-
457), the Committee urges the Department of State to work with 
the Departments of Health and Human Services and Homeland 
Security to develop a pilot program, to be implemented by a 
reputable international and/or nongovernmental organization 
with relevant expertise, to repatriate unaccompanied alien 
children.

     UNITED STATES EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $40,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 Request..............................        75,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        75,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        35,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $75,000,000 for 
Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund, which is 
$35,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 level and the same as 
the request. The Committee will continue to monitor the 
obligation and expenditure of these no-year funds to ensure 
there is adequate reserve in this emergency account.

                          Independent Agencies


                              PEACE CORPS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $340,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       373,440,000
Committee recommendation..............................       450,000,000
    Change from request...............................        76,560,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       110,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $450,000,000 for 
Peace Corps, which is $110,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and $76,560,000 above the request.

Management considerations in expansion of the Peace Corps

    In light of Congressional support for expansion of the 
Peace Corps, the Committee urges the Peace Corps to review its 
management practices in order to accommodate increased numbers 
of volunteers. The Committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the Government Accountability Office to conduct an assessment 
of Peace Corps recruitment, selection, field placement, 
retention and management practices, as well as steps required 
to expand the number of volunteers while ensuring volunteer and 
management quality. This comprehensive review should assess and 
include recommendations for improvement in: the Agency's 
ability to recruit, train, equip, deploy, retain and sustain 
skilled volunteers for the duration of their service term; the 
Agency's mechanisms for recruiting qualified skilled volunteers 
and matching those with country requested skills; the process 
for evaluating the performance of its managers in accordance 
with federally accepted standards; and the Agency's ability to 
absorb an increase in volunteers.

Volunteer recruitment and processing

    The Committee applauds the Peace Corps' work to shift to 
electronic processing of volunteer applications, clearance and 
placement in order to reduce the time between nomination and 
deployment of volunteers. The Committee urges the Peace Corps 
to increase and broaden recruitment efforts in order to 
accommodate a volunteer increase and to increase the ratio of 
the number of applicants to volunteers deployed, to ensure the 
highest quality of volunteers.

Domestic offices

    The bill includes a provision requiring the Peace Corps to 
follow the regular notification procedures of the Committees on 
Appropriations when deciding to open, close, or significantly 
reduce the number of personnel of any domestic office. In light 
of the decision to increase the number of Peace Corps 
volunteers and the corresponding need to intensify applicant 
recruitment, the Committee recommends that the Peace Corps 
consider re-establishing domestic offices in Denver, Colorado 
and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, while encouraging the 
Peace Corps to retain the community-based nature of those 
operations.

Renewable energy projects

    The Committee urges the Peace Corps to find ways to channel 
the efforts of its volunteers to help increase access to 
renewable energy sources, including solar-energy based options. 
The Peace Corps Director should be prepared to report on plans 
to integrate this into the Peace Corps program at the fiscal 
year 2011 hearing and should consult with the Committees on 
Appropriations prior to implementing its plan.

Geographic distribution of volunteers

    The Peace Corps' strategy guiding its geographic 
distribution of volunteers should be examined in light of 
shifting strategic interests, increasing costs of programs, and 
limited resources. The Peace Corps shall submit a report on 
this strategy to the Committees on Appropriations not later 
than 90 days after enactment of this Act. The report shall 
include a detailed description of the criteria used to assign 
volunteers on a country-by-country basis. The Committee 
encourages Peace Corps to consider expansion into Indonesia and 
Liberia in fiscal year 2010.

                    MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE CORPORATION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $875,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,425,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,400,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -25,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       525,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $1,400,000,000 for 
the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC), which is 
$525,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$25,000,000 below the request. The Committee directs that not 
more than $95,000,000 shall be for administrative expenses and 
not more than $100,000 may be for representational and 
entertainment expenses.
    The Committee includes prior year language that requires 
the MCC to only enter into compacts for which it has complete 
funding available from existing appropriations; and language 
that requires lower middle-income countries to make an 
incremental contribution relative to their national budget in 
support of the poverty reduction objectives of the compact is 
also continued. The Committee expects this information to be 
detailed in each compact. Language requiring notification prior 
to signing any new country compact or new threshold country 
program; terminating or suspending any country compact or 
threshold country program; or commencing negotiations for any 
new compact or threshold country program is included.

Compact completion

    The MCC must put in place clear guidelines for the post-
compact country transition to ensure proper maintenance and 
continuation of all investments made in the country. The MCC is 
directed to consult with the Committees on Appropriations on 
the transition plan and its implementation for those compacts 
coming to completion in fiscal year 2010.

Compact implementation

    The Committee is aware that several compacts are scheduled 
to be complete in fiscal years 2010 and 2011. Due to 
implementation delays, there are concerns that several 
countries may not be able to complete their programs within the 
five-year compact time limit. The MCC shall consult with the 
Committees on Appropriations on the timeline for completion of 
the compact projects, the status of the projects, and progress 
on the projects on a regular basis. The MCC shall notify the 
Committees on Appropriations immediately if a compact program 
will not be complete within the five year compact time limit.

Contracting and procurement opportunities for minority, small, and 
        disadvantaged business enterprises

    The Committee directs the MCC to take action to ensure that 
United States small, minority-owned, and disadvantaged business 
enterprises are able to fully participate in the provision of 
goods and services that are financed with funds made available 
to the MCC. The MCC is directed to provide a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 120 days after 
enactment of this Act on the actions taken by the MCC to meet 
this objective and the success of those efforts.

Private equity funds

    The Committee remains concerned about the use of limited 
resources for the establishment of private equity funds, 
investment funds, or so-called development funds given the 
Committee's past experience and their historically low impact 
on the development of a country. Additionally, as required by 
the Millennium Challenge Act of 2003, compact funds may only be 
disbursed on a grant basis, thereby further distorting the 
investment incentives of a fund. The MCC is directed to keep 
the Committees on Appropriations fully informed about the 
operation of funds currently in ongoing compacts, and to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations if such a fund is 
being discussed during compact development.

Reporting requirements

    The MCC is directed to provide a spending plan to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 45 days after 
enactment of this Act on the proposed uses on a country-by-
country basis of the funds appropriated in this account. On a 
semi-annual basis, the spending plan should be updated and 
should include the status of negotiations and the approximate 
range of value of proposed compacts; a summary of compacts in 
implementation, including the projected expenditure and 
disbursement of compact funds during fiscal year 2010 and 
subsequent fiscal years as determined by the country compact; a 
summary of threshold country programs in implementation and 
development, including the approximate range of value of the 
threshold country agreements; major programmatic changes to 
existing compacts funded by this Act or prior Acts; and the use 
of administrative funds.

                       INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $22,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        22,760,000
Committee recommendation..............................        22,760,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................           260,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $22,760,000 for 
Inter-American Foundation, which is $260,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request.

                     AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $32,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        30,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        30,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        -2,500,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for 
African Development Foundation, which is $2,500,000 below the 
fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request.

                       Department of the Treasury


               INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $25,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        31,440,000
Committee recommendation..............................        25,000,000
    Change from request...............................        -6,440,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $25,000,000 for 
International Affairs Technical Assistance by the Department of 
the Treasury, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 enacted 
level and $6,440,000 below the request.

                           DEBT RESTRUCTURING




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $60,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       110,630,000
Committee recommendation..............................        60,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -50,630,000
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $60,000,000 for Debt 
Restructuring by the Department of the Treasury, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $50,630,000 
below the request.
    The Committee makes $20,000,000 under this heading 
available for Tropical Forest Conservation Act programs. Funds 
in this account are subject to the regular notification 
procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.
    The Department of the Treasury is directed to provide a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on potential debt 
reduction/restructuring initiatives for any unallocated 
balances remaining at the end of fiscal year 2009.

                                TITLE IV


                   INTERNATIONAL SECURITY ASSISTANCE


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                        PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................      $530,200,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       296,400,000
Committee recommendation..............................       331,500,000
    Change from request...............................        35,100,000
    Change from enacted level.........................     -198,700,000

\1\The enacted level includes $280,000,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $95,000,000 from Public
  Law 110-252 and $185,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $331,500,000 for 
Peacekeeping Operations (PKO), which is $198,700,000 below the 
fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $35,100,000 above the 
request.
    The PKO account funds United States assistance to 
international efforts to monitor and maintain the peace in 
areas of special concern to the United States, and provides 
funds to other related programs carried out in furtherance of 
the national security interests of the United States. In fiscal 
year 2010, contributions are planned for programs in Africa, 
the Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) Mission in the 
Sinai, the Global Peacekeeping Operations Initiative (GPOI), 
and other activities.
    The Committee provides a limited notwithstanding of section 
660 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to enable the 
Department of State to: (1) support the International Center of 
Excellence for Stability Police Units (COESPU) and other 
similar capacity building efforts of gendarme units to increase 
the capabilities and interoperability of stability police for 
peacekeeping purposes, and (2) provide training, equipping and/
or transportation support of formed police unit/gendarmes to 
peacekeeping operations and support them in peacekeeping 
operations. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to 
notify the Committees on Appropriations in writing each time 
this authority is used, including providing a justification for 
such action.
    The following table compares the President's request for 
fiscal year 2010 and the Committee recommendation and is 
subject to the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning 
allocations and notifications.

                                             PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                    Country/Program                           Request         recommendation         Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Africa:
    Democratic Republic of the Congo...................             21,000             16,000             -5,000
    Liberia............................................             10,000             12,000              2,000
    Somalia............................................             67,000            102,000             35,000
    Sudan..............................................             42,000             45,000              3,000
    Trans-Sahara Counter Terrorism Program.............             20,000             20,000                  0
    STATE Africa Regional..............................             13,600             13,600                  0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Africa...........................            173,600            208,600             35,000
Global:
    Global Peace Operations Initiative.................             96,800             96,800                  0
    Multinational Force and Observers..................             26,000             26,000                  0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal--Global...........................            122,800            122,800                  0
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total--PKO.....................................            296,400            331,400             35,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Darfur

    The Committee intends that funding for continued training 
of UNAMID troops up to UN Department of Peacekeeping Operations 
standards for the mission in Darfur shall be provided from 
funds made available for Sudan and the Global Peace Operations 
Initiative (GPOI).

Somalia

    The Committee recommendation provides $102,000,000 for 
assistance for Somalia. The Committee continues to provide 
extraordinary authority allowing $55,000,000 to be used to pay 
assessed expenses of international peacekeeping activities for 
logistical support to the African Union Mission in Somalia 
(AMISOM). Additionally, the Committee recommendation provides 
$47,000,000 for security sector reform. The Committee supports 
efforts to provide security sector reform with robust 
accounting and monitoring mechanisms. Additionally, such 
support should be provided within a framework of a 
comprehensive effort to advance the rule of law and respect for 
human rights within the Transitional Federal Government of The 
Republic of Somalia and Somali society.

Shared Security Partnership (SSP)

    The Committee supports the Shared Security Partnership, the 
Administration's proposed cross-cutting initiative to 
coordinate regional and global law enforcement and anti-
terrorist efforts. The recommendation includes $9,400,000 from 
funds made available under this heading.

Trans-Sahara Counter Terrorism Program (TSCTP)

    The Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for the 
Trans-Sahara Counter Terrorism Program, which is the same as 
the request. Of the funds, $3,300,000 is intended for the SSP.

Multinational Force Observers (MFO)

    The Committee recommendation includes $26,000,000 for the 
MFO mission in the Sinai, which is the same as the request.

             INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $ 93,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       110,283,000
Committee recommendation..............................       110,283,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................       17,283,000

\1\The enacted level includes $2,000,000 in supplemental appropriations
  for fiscal year 2009 from Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $110,283,000 for 
International Military Education and Training (IMET), which is 
$17,283,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
same as the request.
    The Committee acknowledges that IMET is a valuable part of 
the overall United States security assistance program. The 
Committee appreciates that in addition to providing training, 
this program also exposes foreign students to American 
democratic values, particularly military respect for civilian 
control of the military and the government, and for 
internationally recognized standards of individual and human 
rights.

Expanded International Military Education and Training

    Expanded-IMET or ``E-IMET'' focuses on training foreign 
civilian and military officials in three areas: managing and 
administering military establishments and budgets; creating and 
maintaining effective military judicial systems and military 
codes of conduct; and fostering greater respect for the 
principle of civilian control of the military. The Committee 
recommends E-IMET assistance only for Angola, Cameroon, the 
Central African Republic, Chad, Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, 
Zimbabwe, Sri Lanka and Nepal.

Funding levels

    The Committee recommendation assumes full funding of the 
request with the exception of the funding proposed for 
Azerbaijan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Equatorial Guinea, Somalia, 
East Asia and Pacific Regional, Pakistan, and Administrative 
Costs. The Committee recommendation does not include funding 
for Equatorial Guinea IMET programs, which is $40,000 below the 
request; Somalia IMET programs, which is $40,000 below the 
request; and East Asia and Pacific Regional IMET programs, 
which is $920,000 below the request.

IMET Administrative Costs

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,120,000 for 
administrative costs, which is $15,000 above the request.

Egypt

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,900,000 for IMET 
programs for Egypt, which is $500,000 above the request. The 
Committee directs that the additional $500,000 shall be used 
for a combined military training program to include students 
from Egypt and Israel.

Pakistan

    The Committee recommendation provides $5,000,000 for IMET 
programs for Pakistan, which is $1,000,000 above the request. 
The Committee intends that this funding shall be used to expand 
the number of Pakistani officers currently participating in 
United States training programs.

Armenia and Azerbaijan

    The Committee recommendation continues the policy of parity 
in military assistance provided to Armenia and Azerbaijan. The 
Committee recommendation includes IMET assistance levels of 
$450,000 for each of the countries of Armenia and Azerbaijan.

Turkey

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,000,000 for IMET 
programs for Turkey, which is the same as the request.

Argentina

    The Committee notes that although Argentina is subject to 
Brooke sanctions and unable to receive other military 
assistance, section 638(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act 
provides authority for training activities. Therefore, the 
Committee recommendation includes $900,000 for IMET programs 
for Argentina, which is the same as the request.
    The Committee is aware that the Government of Argentina has 
not implemented Federal Court orders including two default 
judgments and daily sanctions rendered by the United States 
District Court of Northern Illinois. Should the Government of 
Argentina fail to comply with these court orders in a timely 
fashion, the Department of State, in consultation with the 
Department of Defense, should withhold funds provided for 
Argentina's IMET program.

Colombia

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,695,000 for IMET 
programs for Colombia, which is the same as the request.

Guatemala

    The Committee recommendation includes $850,000 for regular 
IMET programs for Guatemala. The Committee continues a 
provision (Sec. 7045(d)(2)) that provides training, other than 
E-IMET, only for the Guatemalan Air Force and Navy and also 
provides IMET training for the Guatemalan Army Corps of 
Engineers entirely for training to improve disaster response 
capabilities and to participate in international peacekeeping 
operations. The Committee notes that this assistance may only 
be provided if the Secretary of State certifies that the 
Guatemalan Air Force, Navy, and Army Corps of Engineers are 
respecting human rights and are fully cooperating with the 
International Commission Against Impunity (CICIG); and that 
civilian judicial authorities are investigating and 
prosecuting, with the military's cooperation, military 
personnel who have been implicated in gross violations of human 
rights.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Government of 
Guatemala cannot maintain and field an effective force against 
narcotics trafficking and other illicit activity, or protect 
their borders without this training. IMET for the Guatemalan 
Navy is critical to enhancing its professional development and 
interdiction capability. Such training will strengthen the 
Guatemalan Navy's ability to disrupt narcotics trafficking 
along the riverine network, as well as along the Pacific and 
Atlantic coastlines that are increasingly heavy transit zones 
for drugs.

                   FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level\1\.....................    $6,231,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     5,274,390,000
Committee recommendation\2\...........................     4,260,000,000
    Change from request...............................    -1,014,390,000
    Change from enacted level.........................   -1,971,500,000

\1\The enacted level includes $1,596,500,000 in supplemental
  appropriations for fiscal year 2009, including $302,500,000 from
  Public Law 110-252 and $1,294,000,000 from Public Law 111-32.
\2\$1,125,000,000 in fiscal year 2010 requested funding was provided in
  Public Law 111-32.

    The Committee recommendation includes $4,260,000,000 for 
Foreign Military Financing Program (FMF), which is 
$1,971,500,000 below the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$1,014,390,000 below the request. In the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-32), the Committee 
forward-funded $1,125,000,000 of requested fiscal year 2010 
FMF. The Committee notes that when the forward-funding is added 
to the recommended funding, the total fiscal year 2010 level is 
$110,610,000 above the request.
    The FMF program provides grants for the acquisition of 
United States defense equipment, services, and training. Such 
assistance enables key allies and friendly nations to improve 
defensive capabilities, and fosters bilateral military 
relationships with the United States and interoperability with 
United States forces. The Committee provides legislative 
language granting the Secretary of State authority to initiate 
the procurement of defense articles or services for foreign 
security forces.
    The following table compares the President's fiscal year 
2010 request and the Committee recommendation and is subject to 
the terms and conditions of section 7019 concerning allocations 
and notifications.

                                       FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAMS
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                    Country/Program                          Request         recommendation          Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Armenia...............................................              3,000              3,000                   0
Azerbaijan............................................              4,000              3,000              -1,000
Colombia..............................................             66,390             60,000              -6,390
Dominican Republic....................................              1,000              1,000                   0
Ethiopia..............................................              3,000                843              -2,157
Egypt.................................................          1,300,000          1,040,000            -260,000
Egypt (forward-funding)...............................  .................           [260,000]           +260,000
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
            FY 2010 Subtotal--Egypt...................  .................         [1,300,000]  .................
Georgia...............................................             16,000             16,000                   0
Indonesia.............................................             20,000             20,000                   0
Israel................................................          2,775,000          2,220,000            -555,000
    Israel (forward-funding)..........................  .................           [555,000]           +555,000
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
            FY 2010 Subtotal--Israel..................  .................         [2,775,000]  .................
Jordan................................................            300,000            150,000            -150,000
    Jordan (forward-funding)..........................  .................           [150,000]           +150,000
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
            FY 2010 Subtotal--Jordan..................  .................           [300,000]  .................
Kazakhstan............................................              2,400              4,000               1,600
Kyrgyz Republic.......................................              2,900              4,000               1,100
Lebanon...............................................            100,000            100,000                   0
Malta.................................................                  0                455                 455
Mexico................................................             10,500             10,500                   0
    Mexico (forward-funding)..........................  .................           [160,000]           +160,000
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
            FY 2010 Subtotal--Mexico..................  .................           [170,500]  .................
Morocco...............................................              9,000              9,000                   0
Pakistan..............................................            298,000            268,000             -30,000
Poland................................................             47,000             47,000                   0
Thailand..............................................              1,060              1,600                 540
Tunisia...............................................             15,000             20,000               5,000
Tajikistan............................................              1,500              2,000                 500
Turkmenistan..........................................              1,500              2,000                 500
Ukraine...............................................             16,000             16,000                   0
Western Hemisphere Maritime Cooperation...............             18,000             18,000                   0
FMF, Administrative Expenses..........................             54,464             54,464                   0
FMF Unallocated.......................................            208,676            189,138             -19,538
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
            Total--FMF................................          5,274,390          4,260,000          -1,014,390
                                                       ---------------------------------------------------------
        Total with Forward Funding....................          5,274,390          5,385,000            +110,610
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Administrative expenses

    The Committee recommends $54,464,000 for FMF administrative 
expenses as requested for Defense Security Cooperation Agency 
administrative costs.

Shared Security Partnership (SSP)

    The Committee supports the SSP, a cross-cutting initiative 
to coordinate regional and global law enforcement and anti-
terrorist efforts proposed by the Administration. The 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 from funds made available 
under this heading for air and maritime equipment, training, 
and C3 (command, control, and communications) to more fully 
integrate Caribbean regional security and law enforcement 
agencies.

Maritime Security Assistance (Western Hemisphere Regional)

    The Committee recommendation includes $18,000,000 for 
maritime security assistance, which is the same as the request. 
The Committee intends these funds to continue the naval 
cooperation program in the Caribbean and provides $10,000,000 
as part of the new CBSI and $8,000,000 for the countries of 
Central America as part of the CARSI to maintain the ongoing 
maritime security assistance program.

Armenia and Azerbaijan

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for each 
of the FMF programs for the countries of Armenia and 
Azerbaijan.

Israel

    The Committee recommendation provides $2,200,000,000 in 
grants for military assistance to Israel, in addition to 
$555,000,000 provided in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 
2009 (Public Law 111-32), for a combined total of 
$2,775,000,000 for fiscal year 2010. The Committee notes that 
of the total $2,775,000,000 provided for Israel in fiscal year 
2010, $729,825,000 is for offshore procurement of military 
equipment, of which $583,860,000 shall be applied to funds from 
this Act. The Committee continues prior-year language that 
funds shall be made available within 30 days of enactment of 
this Act.
    The Committee notes that this is the second year of a ten 
year Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed on August 16, 
2007, between the Department of State and Israel's Ministry of 
Foreign Affairs which established the framework for United 
States military assistance to Israel and calls for 
$2,775,000,000 in fiscal year 2010. This MOU reflects the 
unshakable commitment of the United States to Israel's security 
and provides for an increased level of military assistance to 
help Israel with its security requirements in light of the 
increased threats it faces in the region. The Committee 
continues to support this framework agreement as a continuation 
of a valuable strategic relationship and a commitment to the 
security of the state of Israel as well as the United States.
    The Committee remains committed to helping Israel maintain 
sovereignty and security. Therefore, the Committee is convinced 
that the United States must make every effort to carry out its 
long-standing policy of assisting our ally Israel to maintain 
its technological advantage.

Egypt

    The Committee recommendation includes $1,040,000,000 for 
Egypt, which is $260,000,000 below the request. The Committee 
provided $260,000,000 in military assistance for Egypt for 
fiscal year 2010 in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 
(Public Law 111-32) for a combined total of $1,300,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2010. The Committee continues prior-year language 
which provides that funds shall be transferred within 30 days 
of enactment of this Act to an interest bearing account in the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Jordan

    The Committee recommendation includes $150,000,000 for 
assistance for Jordan, which is $150,000,000 below the request. 
The Committee provided $150,000,000 in military assistance for 
Jordan for fiscal year 2010 in the Supplemental Appropriations 
Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-32) for a combined total of 
$300,000,000 in fiscal year 2010. The Committee notes with 
appreciation the critical role that Jordan has played in 
advancing peace and stability in the region.

Tunisia

    The Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for FMF 
programs for Tunisia, which is $5,000,000 above the request. 
Tunisia is an important ally of the United States and a valued 
partner in combating global terrorism. The Committee 
understands that the Tunisian Armed Forces are relying on 
outdated equipment, and supports efforts to transform its 
military to focus on counter-terrorism and international 
peacekeeping. The Committee remains concerned with reports of 
incidents of security forces imposing restrictions on freedom 
of speech, press, assembly, and association.

Lebanon

    The Committee recommendation provides $100,000,000 for FMF 
programs for Lebanon, which is the same as the request. The 
bill includes a provision (Sec. 7044) making funds available to 
professionalize the Lebanese Armed Forces, strengthen border 
security, interdict arms shipments and combat terrorism in 
Lebanon. The Committee recommendation includes language that 
none of the funds are available for obligation until the 
Secretary of State provides a detailed spending plan and 
strategy to achieve such goals.

Central Asian Republics

    The Committee notes the strategic importance of this region 
and urges the Departments of State and Defense to review the 
security assistance need for the countries of this region. 
Efforts should be undertaken to increase the capabilities of 
these regional players to contribute to multinational stability 
operations, participate in peacekeeping operations and disaster 
relief situations, and respond to threats, such as counter-
terrorism and drug-trafficking, within the region. The 
Committee provides additional funding for Kazakhstan, the 
Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan. The Committee 
recommends that these additional funds be programmed toward 
helicopter refurbishment for Caspian Sea Defense, border 
security, paratroop training, ground surveillance radar, 
tactical vehicles, mobility assets, air traffic control systems 
and radars, individual soldier equipment, and English language 
training.

Pakistan

    The Committee recommendation includes $268,000,000, which 
is $30,000,000 below the request. The Committee intends this 
assistance for Pakistan only for strengthening border security 
along the border with Afghanistan, combating terrorism, and 
bolstering law enforcement activities directed against Al 
Qaeda, the Taliban, and associated terrorist groups. The 
Committee further directs that of the assistance for Pakistan 
under this heading, up to $50,000,000 may be used to provide 
assistance to the Frontier Corps to strengthen and build its 
capacity to secure the border, combat terrorism, and prevent 
the use of the Federally Administered Tribal Areas of Pakistan 
as a safe haven for terrorist groups.

Philippines

    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for FMF 
programs for the Philippines, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 level and $14,350,000 above the request. The 
Committee understands that in a follow-up visit to the 
Philippines earlier this year, the UN Special Rapporteur on 
extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions found that the 
number of killings has fallen dramatically in the past two 
years and that Philippines Human Rights Commission had been 
reinvigorated. The Committee commends the Government of the 
Philippines for this progress. However, the Special Rapporteur 
also called upon the Government to ``take more energetic steps 
to implement the needed structural reforms, and especially to 
make a more concerted effort to prosecute those responsible for 
the killings.'' For this reason, the Committee recommendation 
continues a provision (Sec. 7071(g)) withholding from 
obligation $2,000,000 of the funds provided until the Secretary 
of State reports to the Committees on Appropriations that the 
Philippines has met the requirements of the subsection.

Indonesia

    The Committee appreciates the reform efforts taken by the 
Government of Indonesia in addressing human rights violations 
committed by security force personnel. Nevertheless, the 
Committee remains concerned by continued reports of violations 
of human rights by some elements of the security forces and the 
need for further accountability and transparency measures as 
well as prosecutions of military officials of all ranks who 
have been involved in gross violations of human rights and 
criminal activity. The Committee urges the Department of State 
to continue pressing the Government of Indonesia to take steps 
to investigate and prosecute members of the security forces who 
have been credibly alleged to have committed gross human rights 
violations, ensuring the Armed Forces cooperate with civilian 
judicial authorities and international efforts to resolve past 
cases involving violations by military personnel, increasing 
transparency and accountability of the Armed Forces' operations 
and financial management; and allowing public access to Papua.
    The Committee recommendation includes $20,000,000 for FMF 
programs for Indonesia. Within that amount, section 7071(c) 
requires that $2,000,000 be withheld from obligation until the 
Secretary of State submits a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations pursuant to section 7071 (c) that contains the 
following information:
          (1) Steps taken by the Government of Indonesia to 
        revise the Code of Military Justice, Uniform Criminal 
        Code and other relevant statutes, to permit trying of 
        members of the military alleged to have committed human 
        rights abuses in Timor-Leste and elsewhere in civilian 
        courts and to deny promotion, suspend from active 
        service, and/or pursue prosecution of military officers 
        indicted for serious crimes and to modernize and 
        professionalize the management of the Government of 
        Indonesia's defense forces, improve transparency and 
        accountability in defense spending and operations 
        respectively, refine further the mission of the Armed 
        Forces and develop an appropriate national defense 
        budget to execute that mission;
          (2) Efforts by the Armed Forces to cooperate with 
        civilian judicial authorities and with international 
        efforts to resolve cases of gross violations of human 
        rights;
          (3) Efforts by the Government to implement reforms 
        that increase the transparency and accountability of 
        the Armed Forces' operations and financial management 
        and concrete steps taken to achieve divestment of all 
        military businesses; and
          (4) Whether the Government of Indonesia is allowing 
        public access to Papua, including for foreign 
        diplomats, nongovernmental organizations, and 
        journalists.

Colombia

    The Committee recommendation includes $60,000,000 for FMF 
programs for Colombia, which is $6,390,000 below the request. 
The Committee includes bill language providing $12,500,000 to 
support maritime interdiction and riverine operations.

Mexico

    The Committee recommendation includes $10,500,000 for FMF 
programs for Mexico. The Committee continues a provision (Sec. 
7045(e)) that includes a limitation of 15 percent of the 
funding provided under this heading until the Secretary of 
State reports that certain requirements have been met.

Guatemala

    The Committee recommendation provides $1,000,000 for FMF 
programs for Guatemala. The Committee continues a provision 
(Sec. 7045(d)(3)) that provides FMF for the Air Force and Navy 
to obtain spare parts only if the Secretary of State certifies 
that the Guatemalan Air Force, Navy, and Army Corps of 
Engineers are respecting human rights, and civilian judicial 
authorities are investigating and prosecuting, with the 
military's cooperation, military personnel who have been 
implicated in gross violations of human rights. The Committee 
supports FMF funding, particularly for spare parts for the 
Guatemalan Air Force and Navy, to combat transnational crime on 
the sea, on the rivers, and in the air. The Committee notes 
that Guatemala is a strategic chokepoint for the flow of drugs 
and other threats towards the United States. Funding will also 
strengthen the Navy's ability to halt counter narcotics 
trafficking along the riverine network, as well as along the 
coastline of the Pacific and Atlantic sides that are 
increasingly heavy transit zones for drugs. FMF funding will 
also increase Guatemala's disaster response and peacekeeping 
capabilities. The Committee continues to call attention to the 
fact that the language still restricts funding from the 
Guatemala Army. Funds are subject to the notification 
requirements in Section 7015(f) of this Act.

                                TITLE V


                        MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE


                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $352,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       356,550,000
Committee recommendation..............................       395,091,000
    Change from request...............................        38,541,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        42,591,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $395,091,000 for 
International Organizations and Programs, which is $42,591,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and $38,541,000 above 
the request. Funds in this account are allocated in the 
following table, subject to the requirements of section 7019 of 
this Act.

                                    INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS
                                   [Budget authority in thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Committee
                        Program                               Request         recommendation         Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Center for Human Settlements (UN--HABITAT).............              2,000              2,000                  0
International Civil Aviation Organization..............                950                950                  0
International Conservation Programs....................              7,000              7,000                  0
International Contributions for Scientific, Educational              1,000              1,000                  0
 & Cultural Activities.................................
International Development Law Organization.............                600                600                  0
IMO Maritime Security Programs.........................                400                400                  0
International Panel of Climate Change/UN Framework                  12,500             12,500                  0
 Convention on Climate Change..........................
Montreal Protocol Multilateral Fund....................             25,500             25,500                  0
OAS Development Assistance Programs....................              5,000              5,000                  0
OAS Fund for Strengthening Democracy...................              3,000              3,000                  0
UN Capital Development Fund............................              5,000              1,000             -4,000
UN Children's Fund.....................................            128,000            132,000              4,000
UN Democracy Fund......................................             14,000              4,741             -9,259
UN Development Program.................................             75,300            100,000             24,700
UN Environment Program.................................             11,000             11,000                  0
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights..................                  0              5,000              5,000
UN Office of Coordinator of Humanitarian Affairs.......              3,000              3,000                  0
UN Population Fund.....................................             50,000             60,000             10,000
UN Voluntary Fund for Technical Cooperation in the                   1,400              1,400                  0
 Field of Human Rights.................................
UN Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture...............              6,000              7,000              1,000
UN Women's Fund........................................              1,500              6,000              4,500
UNIFEM Trust Fund......................................                  0              3,000              3,000
World Meteorological Organization......................              2,200              2,000               -200
World Trade Organization Technical Assistance..........              1,200              1,000               -200
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
        Total..........................................            356,550            395,091             38,541
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)

    UNICEF is an essential United States partner in reducing 
child and maternal mortality, particularly in increasing access 
to immunization, responding to the impact of HIV/AIDS on 
children, and expanding access to early childhood development 
programs. The funding for UNICEF provided under this heading 
does not preclude USAID from providing additional funding for 
specific projects as appropriate.

United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)

    UNIFEM is a key player in global efforts to provide 
economic, social, and political opportunities to women. UNIFEM 
contributes to building more stable societies, particularly in 
the Middle East and Afghanistan, and manages the UN Trust Fund 
to End Violence Against Women, a multilateral grant-making fund 
that supports efforts to combat violence against women. The 
Committee believes that programs should be expanded to respond 
to rising demand.

United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)

    UNFPA programs complement USAID family planning programs by 
working in a total of 154 countries, including in 97 countries 
where USAID does not have a presence. UNFPA plays a key role in 
expanding access to contraceptives, obstetric fistula treatment 
programs, maternal health programs, and access to such services 
for women in emergency settings.

                  INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

                      GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $80,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        86,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................        86,500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         6,500,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $86,500,000 for 
Global Environment Facility (GEF), which is $6,500,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request. 
This is the final installment of a four-year commitment for the 
fourth replenishment of the GEF. Of the total provided, 
$6,500,000 is intended to cover a portion of arrears to the 
GEF, which currently total $169,500,000.
    The Committee is aware of the upcoming replenishment 
negotiations and directs the Department of the Treasury to 
consult with the Committees on Appropriations on the 
discussions.

       CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................    $1,115,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................     1,320,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................     1,235,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -85,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       120,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $1,235,000,000 for 
Contribution to the International Development Association 
(IDA), which is $120,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted 
level and $85,000,000 below the request. This is the second 
installment of a three-year commitment under the IDA-15 
replenishment. United States arrears to IDA total $505,600,000.

Vaccine Commitment Fund

    The Committee is aware that the World Bank established an 
Advance Market Commitment for Vaccines Fund that will support a 
pilot program for pneumococcal vaccines. Although the United 
States is not a donor to this initiative, the Committee 
encourages the Administration to explore participating in 
future programs of the Fund.

Budget support

    The Committee is concerned about the trend of providing 
World Bank loans and grants through budget support in lieu of 
project level support. The Committee directs the Secretary of 
the Treasury to consult with the Committees on Appropriations 
before any changes in budget support ceilings are adopted by 
any of the multilateral development banks.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE CLEAN TECHNOLOGY FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................                $0
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       500,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................       225,000,000
    Change from request...............................      -275,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................       225,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $225,000,000 for 
Contribution to the Clean Technology Fund (CTF), which is 
$225,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$275,000,000 below the request.
    The Committee notes that although other donors have pledged 
$2,800,000,000 to the CTF, only $382,000,000 has been received. 
The Department of the Treasury is directed to update the 
Committees on Appropriations on a regular basis on the status 
of other donor contributions in order to ensure that the United 
States does not become the primary donor. In addition, the 
Committee understands that the CTF will sunset following 
conclusion of the United Nations Framework Convention on 
Climate Change negotiations.
    The Committee believes that the CTF should support only 
zero carbon, new renewable (including solar, biomass, 
geothermal, and hydropower), and energy efficiency 
technologies. In addition, the Committee expects that the CTF 
will define ``clean and efficient energy technology'' as a 
renewable energy supply; or an energy supply that when compared 
over its life cycle to coal or petroleum-derived fuels used for 
similar applications in widespread commercial use in a 
recipient country, will reduce by at least 85% the emission of 
greenhouse gases, when measured on a full life cycle basis, 
including all stages of production, distribution, and direct 
and indirect emissions from land use change; or an end-use 
technology that, compared to a similar technology already in 
widespread commercial use in a recipient country, will reduce 
primary energy use by at least 33%. The Committee notes that 
clean and efficient energy technologies do not include those 
that are major sources of greenhouse gas emissions, including 
coal, oil, natural gas and unconventional fossil fuels such as 
tar sands, oil shale and coal-to-liquids; hydropower over 10 
MW; and those that use or produce fissile materials, such as 
uranium-235, plutonium-239 or uranium-233, in the course of 
their operation. The Committee further notes that prior to the 
provision of funds to the CTF, the Secretary of the Treasury 
shall report to the Committees on Appropriations on the 
progress that the World Bank is making in implementing a carbon 
accounting mechanism for all of its relevant projects, that 
reflects the global economic, social and environmental costs of 
a unit of carbon emissions. These funds are subject to the 
regular notification requirements of the Committees on 
Appropriations and are subject to the enactment of authorizing 
legislation.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE STRATEGIC CLIMATE FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................                $0
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       100,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        75,000,000
    Change from request...............................       -25,000,000
    Change from enacted level.........................        75,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $75,000,000 for 
Contribution to the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is 
$75,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and 
$25,000,000 below the request.
    The Committee notes that the SCF has three programs--the 
Pilot Program for Climate Resilience, the Forest Investment 
Program and the Program for Scaling-Up Renewable Energy in Low 
Income Countries. Of the three programs, the Committee expects 
that the United States contribution to the SCF will be provided 
to programs that complement United States bilateral programs, 
rather than duplicating efforts. The Department of the Treasury 
shall consult with the Committees on Appropriations prior to 
the obligation of funds to these three programs. The Committee 
understands that the SCF will sunset following conclusion of 
the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 
negotiations. These funds are subject to the enactment of 
authorizing legislation.

          CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................                $0
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         4,670,000
Committee recommendation..............................         4,670,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         4,670,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $4,670,000 for 
Contribution to the Inter-American Investment Corporation, 
which is $4,670,000 above the fiscal year 2009 level and the 
same as the request. This funding is intended to cover a 
portion of the United States arrears to the Inter-American 
Investment Corporation, which total $46,100,000.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ENTERPRISE FOR THE AMERICAS MULTILATERAL INVESTMENT 
                                  FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $25,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        25,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        25,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $25,000,000 for 
Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral 
Investment Fund, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and the same as the request. This amount is for 
the fourth installment of a six-year commitment under the MIF-2 
replenishment. United States arrears to the Fund total 
$50,300,000.

               CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $105,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       115,250,000
Committee recommendation..............................       115,250,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        10,250,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $115,250,000 for 
Contribution to the Asian Development Fund, which is 
$10,250,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
same as the request. This amount is for the first installment 
of a four-year commitment under the agreement for the tenth 
replenishment of the Asian Development Fund. United States 
arrears to the Asian Development Fund total $185,600,000.

              CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................      $150,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................       159,885,000
Committee recommendation..............................       159,885,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         9,885,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $159,885,000 for 
Contribution to the African Development Fund, which is 
$9,885,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
same as the request. This amount is for the second installment 
of a three-year commitment under the agreement for the eleventh 
replenishment of the African Development Fund. United States 
arrears to the African Development Fund and the Bank total 
$40,100,000.

  CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $18,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        30,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        30,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        12,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $30,000,000 for 
Contribution to the International Fund for Agricultural 
Development (IFAD), which is $12,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 level and the same as the request. This amount is for the 
first installment of a three-year commitment under the 
agreement for the eighth replenishment of IFAD. United States 
arrears to the Fund total $3,700,000.

                                TITLE VI


                    EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE


                Export-Import Bank of the United States


                           INSPECTOR GENERAL




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................        $2,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................         2,500,000
Committee recommendation..............................         2,500,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $2,500,000 for 
Inspector General, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
enacted level and the same as the request.

                         SUBSIDY APPROPRIATION




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $41,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        58,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        58,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................        17,000,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $58,000,000 for 
Subsidy Appropriation, which is $17,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $81,500,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        83,880,000
Committee recommendation..............................        83,880,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         2,380,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $83,880,000 for 
Administrative Expenses, which is $2,380,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request.

Renewable energy and clean environment

    The Export-Import Bank is uniquely positioned to enable 
United States environmental exporters to take advantage of 
increased need and demand for renewable energy projects 
worldwide. Therefore, not less than 10 percent of the aggregate 
loan, guarantee, and insurance authority available to the 
Export-Import Bank should be used for renewable energy and 
environmentally beneficial products and services. The Export-
Import Bank shall submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than 90 days after enactment of this 
Act detailing all financing carried out in fiscal year 2009 for 
these purposes. The Committee urges the Export-Import Bank to 
implement any recommendations emerging from the forthcoming GAO 
assessment on improving Export-Import Bank's programming on 
renewable energy and environmentally beneficial products and 
services, and to consult with the Committees on Appropriations 
on plans to do so.

Credit Export Facility for the Palestinian Authority

    The Committee notes the forthcoming Export-Import Bank 
report to the Committees on Appropriations on the potential for 
establishing a credit export facility for the Palestinian 
Authority.

Financial crisis

    The Committee is aware of both the increased demand and 
increased risk for the Export-Import Bank's services in the 
context of the financial crisis, and urges the Bank to take 
steps necessary to ensure that oversight is sufficient in this 
fluid economic environment.
    The Export-Import Bank shall submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriation not later than 90 days after 
enactment of this Act on the effect of the global financial 
crisis on the work of the Bank, as well as any resulting 
opportunities or vulnerabilities.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation


                           NONCREDIT ACCOUNT




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $50,600,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        52,310,000
Committee recommendation..............................        52,310,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         1,710,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $52,310,000 for the 
Noncredit Account for administrative expenses, which is 
$1,710,000 above the fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the 
same as the request.

                            PROGRAM ACCOUNT




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $29,000,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        29,000,000
Committee recommendation..............................        29,000,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................                 0


    The Committee recommendation includes $29,000,000 for the 
subsidy appropriation for the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation (OPIC)'s direct and guaranteed loan credit 
programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 enacted 
level and the same as the request.
    As in prior years, the Committee directs OPIC to continue 
to provide on a semi-annual basis written reports including the 
following information for each investment fund: the identity, 
selection process, and professional background of current and 
past managers; the fees and compensation currently provided to 
senior management; the amount of OPIC guarantees and actual 
investments made at the end of the previous six months; and any 
additional observations that OPIC may want to include.
    The Committee directs OPIC to consult with the Committees 
on Appropriations before exercising local currency loan 
guaranty authority, and to provide to the Committees on 
Appropriations, prior to the consultation, justification for 
the need to exercise such authority, the use of OPIC subsidy 
required, the degree to which the United States would be 
exposed to additional risk as a result of such transactions, 
and which other United States Government agencies have been 
consulted.
    The Committee directs the President of OPIC to consult with 
the Committees on Appropriations before any future financing 
for nongovernmental organizations or private and voluntary 
organizations is approved.

Renewable energy

    The Committee recognizes and supports OPIC's prioritization 
of renewable energy and environmentally sustainable investment 
projects in the developing world, including the commitment to 
an aggregated emissions cap for approved projects. OPIC should 
endeavor to continue and expand its policies that steer 
investors toward environmentally clean choices, as well as 
making environmental impact data for proposed projects 
available on the Internet. Not later than 90 days following the 
end of fiscal year 2010, OPIC shall submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations detailing all financing, 
guarantees, insurance, and other OPIC activities carried out in 
fiscal year 2010 for these purposes. In addition, OPIC should 
explore further opportunities for investment in solar energy in 
India.

Financial crisis

    The Committee is aware of both the increased demand and 
increased risk for OPIC's services in the context of the 
financial crisis, and urges OPIC to take steps necessary to 
ensure that oversight is sufficient in this fluid economic 
environment. OPIC shall submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriation not later than 90 days after enactment of this 
Act on the effect of the global financial crisis on OPIC's 
work, as well as any resulting opportunities or 
vulnerabilities.

                  Funds Appropriated to the President


                      TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY




Fiscal year 2009 enacted level........................       $50,800,000
Fiscal year 2010 request..............................        55,200,000
Committee recommendation..............................        55,200,000
    Change from request...............................                 0
    Change from enacted level.........................         4,400,000


    The Committee recommendation includes $55,200,000 for Trade 
and Development Agency (TDA), which is $4,400,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 enacted level and the same as the request.
    The Committee encourages TDA to emphasize projects that 
increase long-term food security and that promote clean energy 
and environmentally-sustainable development in developing 
countries. TDA should periodically update the Committees on 
Appropriations on work in these areas, as well as its work in 
Afghanistan and Pakistan, especially in infrastructure 
development and rehabilitation.

                     TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONS


      GENERAL PROVISIONS--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    The Committee recommends 9 of the general provisions 
carried in the fiscal year 2009 Act be deleted. These 
provisions (sections 7006, 7041, 7057, 7075, 7086, 7087, 7089, 
7090, and 7092) are either addressed elsewhere in permanent 
law, have been considered by the appropriate authorizing 
committee, or are no longer necessary.
    The Committee recommends the following new and revised 
provisions:
    Sec. 7006, ``International Broadcasting'', is a new general 
provision establishing a 10 percent limitation on funding for 
broadcasting in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan until 
certain requirements are met.
    Sec. 7009, ``Transfer Authority'', is modified by striking 
language in subsection (d) that required the President to 
notify a transfer between appropriations accounts in this bill 
and replaces with language that 5 days prior to any transfer 
the President must consult with and provide a written policy 
justification to the Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 7015, ``Reprogramming Notification Requirements'', is 
modified by changing the reprogramming level in subsection (b); 
in subsection (c) striking ``Andean Counterdrug Programs'' and 
inserting ``Civilian Stabilization Initiative''; and striking 
in subsection (d) language requiring periodic financial audits 
of funds transferred from the Department of Defense to the 
Department of State. Subsection (f) is modified by adding 
Colombia, and the countries of the Caribbean Basin Security 
Initiative to the list of countries requiring funding 
notification.
    The Committee clarifies that provisions (1), (2), (4), (6), 
and (7) of subsection (a) apply to any program, activity, or 
office of any special envoy, special representative, 
coordinator, or similar position.
    Sec. 7019, ``Allocations'', is similar to section 7019 in 
the fiscal year 2009 Act.
    Sec. 7030, ``International Financial Institutions'', is 
modified by striking subsection (c); and including a new 
subsection (c) that requires the United States Executive 
Director of the Fund to use the voice and vote of the United 
States to oppose any loan, project, agreement, or other 
activity that imposes budget constraints, and do not support 
social spending in countries.
    The Committee notes the direction included in the 
Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-32) 
related to the International Monetary Fund (IMF). In addition 
to this, the Committee expects the United States Executive 
Director of the IMF to seek to put in place a policy at the IMF 
that ensures that loans, projects, agreements, memoranda, 
instruments, plans or other programs of the IMF do not include 
contractionary conditions in the case of a country that is 
experiencing an economic downturn. The Committee further 
expects that the United States Executive Director of the IMF 
will work to expand transparency of the IMF Board decisions and 
discussions, by seeking the establishment of policies that 
disclose minutes and transcripts of IMF Board meetings, draft 
country documents in order to facilitate input from country 
constituencies, and all other documents of the Board in 
relevant languages for public viewing.
    Sec. 7034, ``Special Authorities'', is modified by 
including authority to notwithstand section 660 of the Foreign 
Assistance Act and striking the provision relating to a Deputy 
Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights 
and Labor; by deleting subsections (i), (k), (m), and (o); and 
by adding a new subsection (l) regarding Inter-parliamentary 
exchanges.
    Sec. 7040, ``Limitation on Assistance for the Palestinian 
Authority'', is modified to prohibit assistance to Hamas or any 
entity effectively controlled by Hamas, and further prohibit 
assistance to any power-sharing government of which Hamas is a 
member unless the President certifies that such government, 
including all of its ministers or such equivalent, has met 
certain conditions.
    Sec. 7041, ``Saudi Arabia'', is a new provision that 
prohibits any assistance from this Act unless the President 
certifies full cooperation with efforts to combat international 
terrorism.
    Sec. 7042, ``Iraq'', is modified by striking subsections 
(a), (b), and (c); and adding certain conditions and 
limitations relating to assistance for Iraq, including matching 
funds.
    Sec. 7043, ``Iran'', is modified by changing the reporting 
date; adds a new reporting requirement on diplomatic efforts to 
prevent Iranian acquisition of nuclear weapons technology; and 
includes a limitation on Export-Import Bank as it relates to 
Iran.
    The Committee supports continued diplomatic efforts, 
including sanctions, to prevent the Government of the Islamic 
Republic of Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons capability and 
requires the Secretary of State to report on the status and 
progress of such efforts not later than 90 days after the date 
of enactment of this Act. The Committee is concerned that 
current United States law does not prevent the Export-Import 
Bank of the United States from providing credit, insurance, or 
guarantees to benefit companies that contribute significantly 
to Iran's refined petroleum resources, including through 
imports or contributions to Iran's domestic production. As a 
result, the Committee includes bill language that takes 
critical steps to close any such loophole. The Committee 
intends ``significant'' to mean any amounts in excess of 
$20,000,000, consistent with the Iran Sanctions Act. The 
Committee understands that per its mandate, the Export-Import 
Bank of the United States and its Board of Directors approve or 
disapprove transactions based primarily on market 
considerations; thus, the Committee expects that the Department 
of State and Department of Treasury will be responsible for 
determining what companies meet the standard as outlined in 
bill language. Finally the Committee continues a reporting 
requirement on Iran Sanctions from the fiscal year 2009 bill.
    Sec. 7045, ``Western Hemisphere'', is modified by deleting 
subsection (c); changing the bill-wide funding level in 
subsection (b) for Haiti; adding a new subsection (c) providing 
$37,000,000 for a Caribbean Basin Security Initiative to combat 
drug trafficking, organized crime and for education, rule of 
law judicial reform and maritime security activities; providing 
$3,000,000 for International Commission Against Impunity in 
Guatemala (CICIG); continues by reference the prior-year 
funding restrictions and reporting requirements for Mexico and 
the countries of Central America, except strikes the 
requirement under Mexico for an analysis of alternatives; and 
changes the funding level in subsection (e) and (f).
    Sec. 7046, ``Colombia'', is modified by continuing by 
reference the prior-year funding restrictions and reporting 
requirements, except modifying condition (b)(1)(B)(iv) to 
include human rights defenders, journalists, and political or 
social leaders and changing the funding level in subsection (a) 
and making the cap applicable to funds from under the headings 
ESF, INCLE, NADR, IMET and FMF.
    Sec. 7049, ``War Crimes Tribunal Drawdown'', is modified by 
making all funds subject to the regular notification 
procedures.
    Sec. 7051, ``Peacekeeping Assessment'', is modified by 
adding calendar year 2010.
    Sec. 7052, ``United Nations Human Rights Council'', is 
modified by striking subsections (a) and (b), and inserting a 
reporting requirement on resolutions proposed and adopted in 
the council.
    Sec. 7058, ``United States Agency for International 
Development Management'', is modified by striking subsection 
(l); changing the funding level in (a); and modifying the 
personnel number and providing authority related to Afghanistan 
in (k).
    Sec. 7059, ``Global Health Activities'', is modified by 
changing the funding level in subsection (a); deleting 
subsection (b); and including language related to the 
environment. The reporting requirement previously included in 
subsection (b) is included under the ``Global Health and Child 
Survival'' heading.
    Sec. 7060, ``Development Grants Program'', is modified by 
providing $15,000,000 to organizations focused on building 
women's leadership capacity, development needs, or directly 
benefitting women and girls.
    Sec. 7061, ``Women in Development'', is modified by 
including a new subsection (c) requiring USAID to integrate 
gender issues into its programming.
    Sec. 7063, ``Education'', is modified by changing the 
funding levels for basic education and higher education; 
including a new section related to a ``Communities of 
Learning'' Initiative requiring integration of basic education 
and other health and development programs; and requiring the 
``Communities of Learning'' Initiative be included in the pilot 
program initiated in section 664 of division J of Public Law 
110-161.
    Sec. 7064, ``Reconciliation Programs'', is modified by 
revising the funding levels for reconciliation programs and 
providing for people to people reconciliation programs.
    Sec. 7069, ``Africa'', is modified by adding Zimbabwe to 
the list of countries eligible for E-IMET only training; 
prohibits IMET assistance to Somalia; striking subsection (c); 
and in subsection (e) exempting macroeconomic growth assistance 
to the central government of Zimbabwe.
    Sec. 7070, ``Asia'', is modified by changing funding levels 
in subsections (b), (c) and (e); deleting subsection (d); in 
subsection (e) requiring a determination and report that North 
Korea is fulfilling commitments of the ``Six Party Talks'' 
prior to fiscal year 2009 funds being made available for 
energy-related assistance; and striking paragraphs (1), (3), 
and (4) of subsection (f) relating to the People's Republic of 
China.
    Sec. 7075, ``Afghanistan'', is modified by striking the 
bill-wide funding level; directing that funds in title III for 
Afghanistan are to benefit women and girls; designating funding 
for National Solidarity Programme; restricting 10 percent of 
INCLE funding with regard to corruption; and restricting funds 
in this Act from being used to establish a permanent basing 
rights agreement.
    Sec. 7077, ``United Nations Population Fund'', is modified 
by restoring language in this section similar to the 2008 Act 
with changes to the funding levels, technical changes and 
striking subsection (f).
    Sec. 7079, ``OPIC'', is modified by striking subsection 
(a).
    Sec. 7081, ``Energy and Environment'', is modified by 
changing the funding levels in subsection (a); providing 
$10,000,000 for the ``Solar Energy Microfinance Initiative''; 
striking funding levels in subsection (b) and providing that 
funds in this Act may be available for the Special Climate 
Change Fund; and changing funding levels in subsection (c) and 
striking reference to United States Fish and Wildlife Service.
    Sec. 7084, ``Transparency and Accountability'', is modified 
by striking subsection (b).
    Sec. 7085, ``Sri Lanka'', is modified by striking 
subsections (a) and (b); provides funds from title III are used 
to promote reconciliation; directs funds from title IV are used 
for human rights training; provides $1,000,000 for demining in 
conflict affected areas; and requires a report on internally 
displaced persons.
    Sec. 7086, ``UNWRA Accountability'', is a new provision 
that requires the Secretary of State to submit a report to the 
Committees on Apropriations regarding the activities of UNRWA.
    Sec. 7087, ``Limitation on Funds Relating to Transfer or 
Release of Individuals Detained at Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba'', is a new provision imposing a limitation on funds 
to any country, including a state with a compact of free 
association with the United States, unless, not later than 5 
days after the conclusion of the agreement but prior to the 
implementation of an agreement to accept transfer of 
individuals detained at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the terms of the 
agreement are transmitted in writing to the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 7088, ``International Monetary Fund Provisions'', is a 
new provision related to United States participation in the 
International Monetary Fund (the Fund) that directs the 
Secretary of the Treasury to instruct the United States 
Executive Director to use the voice and vote of the United 
States to oppose the provision of hard currency by the Fund to 
any country found to be a government that has repeatedly 
provided support for acts of international terrorism; sunsets 
the authorization for the New Arrangements to Borrow program 
after five years; sets a 20% limitation on United States 
participation in the New Arrangements to Borrow program; and 
includes a reporting requirement on the use of New Arrangements 
to Borrow funds.
    Sec. 7089, ``Intellectual Property Rights Protections'', is 
a new provision directing the Secretary of State to report on 
actions taken to protect intellectual property rights during 
the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 
negotiations prior to the obligation of funds for the Clean 
Technology Fund and the Strategic Climate Fund.

             Provisions Retained From Fiscal Year 2009 Act

    The following general provisions from the fiscal year 2009 
Act were retained in the fiscal year 2010 Act unchanged except 
for technical corrections, references to prior fiscal years, 
and new section numbers where appropriate:
    Sec. 7001. Allowances and Differentials.
    Sec. 7002. Unobligated Balances Report.
    Sec. 7003. Consulting Services.
    Sec. 7004. Embassy Construction.
    Sec. 7005. Personnel Actions.
    Sec. 7007. Prohibition Against Direct Funding for Certain 
Countries.
    Sec. 7008. Military Coups.
    Sec. 7010. Reporting Requirement.
    Sec. 7011. Availability of Funds.
    Sec. 7012. Limitation on Assistance to Countries in 
Default.
    Sec. 7013. Prohibition on Taxation of United States 
Assistance.
    Sec. 7014. Reservations of Funds.
    Sec. 7016. Notification on Excess Defense Equipment.
    Sec. 7017. Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
International Organizations and Programs.
    Sec. 7018. Prohibition on Funding for Abortions and 
Involuntary Sterilization.
    Sec. 7020. Prohibition of Payment of Certain Expenses.
    Sec. 7021. Prohibition on Assistance to Foreign Governments 
that Export Lethal Military Equipment to Countries Supporting 
International Terrorism.
    Sec. 7022. Prohibition on Bilateral Assistance to Terrorist 
Countries.
    Sec. 7023. Authorization Requirements.
    Sec. 7024. Definition of Program, Project, and Activity.
    Sec. 7025. Authorities for the Peace Corps, Inter-American 
Foundation and African Development Foundation.
    Sec. 7026. Commerce, Trade and Surplus Commodities.
    Sec. 7027. Separate Accounts.
    Sec. 7028. Eligibility for Assistance.
    Sec. 7029. Impact on Jobs in the United States.
    Sec. 7031. Debt-for-Development.
    Sec. 7032. Authority to Engage in Debt Buybacks or Sales.
    Sec. 7033. Special Debt Relief for the Poorest.
    Sec. 7035. Arab League Boycott of Israel.
    Sec. 7036. Palestinian Statehood.
    Sec. 7037. Restrictions Concerning the Palestinian 
Authority.
    Sec. 7038. Prohibition on Assistance to the Palestinian 
Broadcasting Corporation.
    Sec. 7039. Assistance for the West Bank and Gaza.
    Sec. 7044. Lebanon.
    Sec. 7047. Community Based Police Assistance.
    Sec. 7048. Prohibition of Payments to United Nations 
Members.
    Sec. 7050. Peacekeeping Missions.
    Sec. 7053. Attendance at International Conferences.
    Sec. 7054. Restrictions on United Nations Delegations.
    Sec. 7055. Parking Fines and Real Property Taxes Owed by 
Foreign Countries.
    Sec. 7056. Landmines and Cluster Munitions.
    Sec. 7057. Limitation on Residence Expenses.
    Sec. 7062. Gender-Based Violence.
    Sec. 7065. Comprehensive Expenditures Report.
    Sec. 7066. Requests for Documents.
    Sec. 7067. Senior Policy Operating Group.
    Sec. 7068. Prohibition on Use of Torture.
    Sec. 7071. Serbia.
    Sec. 7072. Independent States of the Former Soviet Union.
    Sec. 7073. Repression in the Russian Federation.
    Sec. 7074. Uzbekistan.
    Sec. 7076. Enterprise Funds.
    Sec. 7078. Prohibition on Publicity or Propaganda.
    Sec. 7080. Extradition.
    Sec. 7082. Prohibition on Promotion of Tobacco.
    Sec. 7083. Commercial Leasing of Defense Articles.

            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

    The following items are included in accordance with various 
requirements of the Rules of the House of Representatives:

                        Constitutional Authority

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee on Appropriations bases 
its authority to report this legislation from clause 7 of 
section 9 of Article I of the Constitution of the United States 
of America which states:

          No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
        consequence of Appropriations made by law * * *

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is a statement of 
general performance goals and objectives for which this measure 
authorizes funding:
    The Committee on Appropriations considers program 
performance, including a program's success in developing and 
attaining outcome-related goals and objectives, in developing 
funding recommendations.

               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(l)(A) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following statements are 
submitted describing the effect of provisions in the 
accompanying bill that directly or indirectly change the 
application of existing law.
    Language is included in various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities in fiscal year 2010 which require 
annual authorization or additional legislation, which to date 
has not been enacted.
    The bill includes provisions which place limitations on the 
use of funds in the bill or change existing limitations and 
which might under some circumstances be construed as changing 
the application of existing law.
    The bill includes a number of provisions, which have been 
virtually unchanged for many years, which are technically 
considered legislation.
    The bill provides that several of the appropriations shall 
remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal year. 
In all cases it is deemed desirable to carry such language in 
order to provide for orderly administration of such programs 
and effective use of funds.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee recommendation 
continues the prior year practice of designating amounts within 
appropriation accounts in order to fund specific programs and 
has adjusted some designations.
    The bill contains a number of general provisions and other 
language provisos that have been carried in the bill in past 
years which include limitations and conditions on funding 
provided in the Act.
    Additional changes in the fiscal year 2009 bill, which may 
be construed as changing existing law, are as follows:
    Under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'' language is 
included designating funding, transfer authority, and 
limitations on certain programs, offices and activities.
    Under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'' language, 
carried in prior years, is included designating the 
availability and use of certain fees.
    Under ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'' language is 
included related to international child abduction requiring 
notification of the Member of Congress who represents a left-
behind parent and requires the State Department to maintain a 
database on such abductions.
    Under ``Civilian Stabilization Corps'' language is included 
allowing for the use of funds to provide administrative 
expenses for the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction 
and Stabilization at the Department of State.
    Under ``Civilian Stabilization Corps'' language is included 
allowing the Secretary of State to exercise certain authorized 
transfer authorities to support reconstruction and 
stabilization assistance activities.
    Under ``Capital Investment Fund'' language, carried in 
prior years, is included stating that section 135(e) of Public 
Law 103-236 shall not apply.
    Under ``Office of Inspector General'' language, carried in 
prior years, is included that notwithstands the application of 
section 209(a)(1) of Public Law 96-465.
    Under ``Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs'', 
language, carried in prior years, is included designating the 
availability and use of certain fees.
    Under ``Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular 
Service'' language, carried in prior years, is included 
permitting the transfer of not to exceed $1,000,000 to the 
``Repatriation Loans Program Account''.
    Under ``Contributions to International Organizations'' 
language, carried in prior years, is included requiring 
notification of any increase in the United Nations biennial 
budget and requiring that any payment of arrearages must be 
mutually agreed upon.
    Under ``Contributions to International Peacekeeping 
Activities'' language, carried in prior years, is included 
regarding extended availability of funds and prohibiting funds 
from being obligated for any new or expanded United Nations 
peacekeeping mission unless the United Nations has taken 
appropriate measures to prevent sexual exploitation and to hold 
accountable individuals who engage in such activity.
    Under ``International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
States and Mexico'' and ``American Sections, International 
Commissions'', language, carried in prior years, is included 
providing a limitation on the amount available for 
representation expenses.
    Under ``International Broadcasting Operations'', language, 
carried in prior years, setting limitations on funds available 
for certain expenses and receipts.
    Under ``Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's 
Republic of China'', language, carried in prior years, placing 
a limitation of $3,000 for official representation expenses.
    Under ``United States-China Economic and Security Review 
Commission'', several provisos are included relating to 
personnel and financial management authorities, similar to 
language carried in fiscal year 2009.

Title II

    Under ``Operating Expenses of the United States Agency for 
International Development'', language, carried in prior years, 
is included prohibiting USAID from entering into domestic 
leases, except when necessary for continuity of operations, 
requiring notification when opening, closing, or significantly 
reducing the size of a mission or office, allowing the transfer 
of funding into the ``Operating Expenses of the United States 
Agency for International Development'' account, designating 
funding, and limiting and placing restrictions on 
representation and entertainment expenses.
    Under ``Capital Investment Fund'', language is included 
designating funding.
    Under ``Operating Expenses of the United States Agency for 
International Development Office of Inspector General'', 
language is included designating funding.

Title III

    Under ``Global Health and Child Survival'' language, 
carried in prior years, is included placing restrictions and 
requirements related to family planning and abortion, 
designating funding, restricting the use of funds for non-
project assistance, and allowing the use of five percent of the 
contribution to the Global Fund for USAID technical assistance 
programs.
    Under ``Development Assistance'', language is included 
designating funding.
    Under ``Transition Initiatives'', language is included 
designating funding, outlining the use of the funds, requiring 
Congressional notification at least 5 days prior to the 
initiation of a country program, and allowing the use of 
$50,000,000 for a Rapid Response Fund.
    Under ``Development Credit Authority'', language is 
included authorizing transfers of up to $25,000,000, when added 
to the funds transferred pursuant to the authority contained 
under this heading in Public Law 107-115; defining the use of 
funds, and designating funding for administrative expenses.
    Under ``Economic Support Fund'', language is included that 
establishes funding levels for Egypt, Jordan, Cyprus, West 
Bank/Gaza and Colombia; authorizes funds provided for 
Afghanistan and Pakistan to be made available for cross-border 
stabilization and development programs notwithstanding any 
provision of law that restricts such assistance; limits 
$300,000,000 of the assistance for Afghanistan to be available 
for obligation only after certification on poppy eradication 
and interdiction efforts unless the President determines that 
such assistance is vital to the national security interest of 
the United States; limits funds for cash transfer assistance 
for the West bank and Gaza to not more than $150,000,000 and 
provides up to $2,000,000 to be used for administrative 
expenses for USAID; provides not less than $4,500,000 of the 
assistance for Colombia to be transferred to the ``Migration 
and Refugee Assistance'' account to aid Colombian refugees.
    Under ``Democracy Fund'' language is included that 
establishes funding levels for certain democracy assistance 
programs; provides for all funds in this Act that are for the 
promotion of democracy to be made available notwithstanding any 
other provision of law, or with regard to the National 
Endowment for Democracy, any regulation; and requires that the 
provision of assistance for democracy, human rights and 
governance activities in this Act not be subject to the prior 
approval of the government of any foreign country.
    Under ``Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia'' 
language, included in prior year, notwithstands geographic or 
purpose limitations on reprogramming of funds and allows funds 
intended for the Southern Caucasus region to be used for 
confidence-building measures.
    Under ``International Narcotics Control and Law 
Enforcement'', the Department of State is given the authority 
to use section 608 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to 
provide excess property to a foreign country; waives section 
482(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act, subject to notification; 
provides that prior to obligation of funds the Secretary of 
State, in consultation with the Administrator of USAID, shall 
provide to the Committee 45 days after the date of enactment a 
report on the proposed uses of all funds under this heading on 
a country-by-country basis for each proposed program, project 
or activity; provides a limitation on funds for aerial 
eradication programs in Afghanistan, unless requested by the 
President of Afghanistan; prohibits funds from being used for 
budget support or cash payments; requires a certification in 
order to provide assistance for the Bolivian military; and 
provides that funds available for Mexico for law enforcement 
communication equipment shall only be available if systems are 
interoperable.
    Under ``Migration and Refugee Assistance'', language is 
included providing $25,000,000 to resettle humanitarian 
migrants to Israel.
    Under ``Peace Corps'', language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, allowing the Director to transfer up to $5,000,000 
to help mitigate exchange rate losses and placing a limitation 
of $4,000 for entertainment expenses, and requiring certain 
notifications.
    Under ``Millennium Challenge Corporation'', language is 
included designating funding, allowing the use of up to 10 
percent of funds to carry out section 616 of the Millennium 
Challenge Act of 2003 upon the provision of a report to 
Congress, restricting the ability of the MCC to enter into 
compacts until certain conditions are met, and limiting and 
placing restrictions on entertainment and representation 
allowances.
    Under ``African Development Foundation'', language, carried 
in prior years, is included allowing for the investment of 
project funding by grantees, notwithstanding section 505(a)(2) 
of the African Development Foundation Act to allow the waiver 
of the $250,000 limitation and exceeding the limit of $10,000 
if the increase is due to currency fluctuation, and designating 
funding.
    Under ``International Affairs Technical Assistance'', 
language is included designating funding, and provides funding 
notwithstanding any other provision of law that restricts 
assistance to foreign countries.
    Under ``Debt Restructuring'', language is included 
outlining the use of funds in this account, designating 
funding, denying funding to countries that are found to be 
consistently violating human rights, requiring Congressional 
consultation and notification, providing that section 411 of 
the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 
shall not apply to funds under this heading, and denying 
funding from this account for Sudan or Burma until a 
determination is made that a democratically elected official 
has taken office.
    Under ``Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and 
Related Programs'' language, carried in prior years, sets a 
limitation of $75,000,000 until expended on funding for the 
Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund with authority to use 
such funds outside of the Independent States of the former 
Soviet Union and with international organizations when it is in 
the national security interests of the United States to do so 
and includes a prior consultation requirement; conditions a 
contribution to the IAEA on a determination that Israel is not 
denied the right to participate or otherwise being 
discriminated against in that Agency; establishes a cap of 
$500,000 for public-private partnerships; limits administrative 
expenses for operation and management of the demining program 
to $700,000; and extends availability of ``Anti-terrorism 
Assistance'' and ``Export Control and Border Security'' funding 
to 2011.

Title IV

    Under ``Peacekeeping Operations'' carries a limited 
notwithstanding of section 660 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961; establishes a funding floor for the contribution to the 
Multinational Force and Observers; provides that a portion of 
funds made available for Somalia may be used to pay assessed 
cost of international peacekeeping activities; provides that 
all funds are subject to regular notification procedures of the 
Committees on Appropriations.
    Under ``International Military Education and Training'' 
language, carried in prior years, is included which provides up 
to $4,000,000 may be available until expended; provides that 
civilian personnel may receive training if such participation 
will contribute to overall objectives of the program; provides 
that funding for certain countries is available only through 
the regular notification procedures; and establishes a cap on 
entertainment allowances.
    Under ``Foreign Military Financing Program'' language is 
included providing the Secretary of State with authority to 
initiate the procurement of defense articles or services to 
foreign security forces subject to prior consultation; 
establishes funding levels for Israel, Egypt, Jordan, and 
Colombia; provides that a portion of funds available for Israel 
shall be available for the procurement in Israel of defense 
articles and defense services and that all funds for Israel 
must be disbursed within 30 days of enactment of this Act; 
provides that funds for Egypt shall be transferred to an 
interest bearing account within 30 days of enactment; provides 
that funds for Pakistan may only be available for activities 
directed against terrorist groups; establishes a limitation on 
funds used to fulfill programs initiated under authorities from 
other Acts until programs are justified to the Committees on 
Appropriations; provides that funding for certain countries is 
available only through the regular notification procedures; 
sets a limitation of $54,464,000 for administrative expenses; 
provides not more than $550,000,000 from certain other funds 
may be obligated for expenses incurred pursuant to section 
43(b) of the Arms Export Control Act; and establishes a cap on 
entertainment allowances.

Title V

    Under ``International Organizations and Programs'', 
language is included designating funding, and indicating that 
section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 does not 
apply to contributions to the United Nations Democracy Fund.
    Under ``Global Environment Facility'', language is included 
designating funding.
    Under ``Contribution to the International Development 
Association'', language is included designating funding.
    Under ``Contribution to the Clean Technology Fund'', 
language is included designating funding and making such 
funding subject to subsequent authorizing legislation.
    Under ``Contribution to the Special Climate Fund'', 
language is included designating funding and making such 
funding subject to subsequent authorizing legislation.
    Under ``Contribution to the Inter-American Development 
Bank'', language is included designating funding.
    Under ``Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas 
Multilateral Fund'', language is included designating funding.
    Under ``Contribution to the Asian Development Fund'', 
language is included designating funding.
    Under ``Contribution to the African Development Fund'', 
language is included designating funding.
    Under ``Contribution to the International Fund for 
Agriculture Development'', language is included designating 
funding.

Title VI

    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, Program 
Account'', language is included setting a limitation on funds 
to countries having detonated nuclear explosives unless 
designated an eligible nuclear weapon state as defined in 
Article IX of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear 
Weapons; extends authority contained in sections 1(a) and (b) 
of Public Law 103-428; provides not less than 10 percent of the 
aggregate loan, guarantee, and insurance authority available to 
the Export-Import Bank should be used for renewable energy and 
energy efficient end-use technoligies.
    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, Subsidy 
Appropriation'', language is included designating funding 
levels; provides that funds are appropriated for the cost of 
direct loans, loan guarantees, insurance, and tied-aid grants 
as defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974 and may be used for the disbursement of direct loans, loan 
guarantees, insurance and tied-aid grants obligated in fiscal 
years 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013; funds are available for 
obligation until September 30, 2025 and subject to regular 
notification; funds are authorized notwithstanding section 
2(b)(2) of the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945 to conduct work 
in any Eastern European or Baltic state.
    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, 
Administrative Expenses'', authority is provided to extend 
subsection (a) of section 117 of the Export Enhancement Act of 
1992 until October 1, 2010.
    Under ``Export-Import Bank of the United States, Receipts 
Collected'', language is included providing that receipts 
collected pursuant to the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, as 
amended, and the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, as amended, 
will be credited as offsetting collections to the account, 
resulting in a $0 appropriation from the General Fund, and 
providing that up to $50,000,000 in receipts in excess of 
obligations are available from September 1, 2010 until 
September 30, 2013.
    Under ``Overseas Private Investment Corporation, Program 
Account'', language is included designating funding levels; 
funds are appropriated for the cost of direct and guaranteed 
loans, to be derived by transfer from the Overseas Private 
Investment Corporation Noncredit Account; provides such costs 
shall be as defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974 and may be used for direct loan and loan guaranty 
commitments incurred or made during fiscal years 2010, 2011, 
and 2012; funds are available for obligation until 2018, 2019, 
and 2020, depending on the initial date of obligation; 
authority is provided for OPIC to undertake programs in Iraq.
    Under ``Trade and Development Agency'', language is 
included setting representation and entertainment allowances.

Title VII

    Under ``General Provisions'':
    Sec. 7001 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding allowances and differentials.
    Sec. 7002 includes language, carried in prior years, 
requiring the Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors to provide quarterly reports on the cumulative 
balances of any unobligated funds.
    Sec. 7003 includes language requiring that consulting 
service contracts shall be a matter of public record.
    Sec. 7004 includes language, carried in prior years, 
requiring inter-agency cost sharing with respect to the 
construction and use of diplomatic facilities.
    Sec. 7005 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding certain personnel actions and the authority to 
transfer funds between appropriations accounts.
    Sec. 7006 includes new language establishing a 10 percent 
limitation on the obligation of funding for broadcasting in the 
Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan until certain 
requirements are met.
    Sec. 7007 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting assistance to North Korea, Cuba, Iran and Syria.
    Sec. 7008 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting assistance for countries whose duly elected head of 
government is deposed by military coup or decree.
    Sec. 7009 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, setting limitations and conditions on transfers 
between appropriations accounts.
    Sec. 7010 includes language, carried in prior years, in 
directing the provision of specified quarterly reports.
    Sec. 7011 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding the availability of funds made available in the Act.
    Sec. 7012 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting assistance for countries in default, unless there 
is a Presidential determination that such assistance is in the 
national interest of the United States.
    Sec. 7013 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting assistance to a country in which the assistance is 
subject to taxation, unless the Secretary of State makes 
certain determinations.
    Sec. 7014 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding the reservation of funds and the 
designation of certain funding levels.
    Sec. 7015 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, establishing the reprogramming notification 
requirements regarding the funds made available in the Act.
    Sec. 7016 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding the notification requirements concerning the 
provision of excess Department of Defense articles.
    Sec. 7017 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding the availability of funds for international 
organizations and programs.
    Sec. 7018 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting funding for abortions and involuntary 
sterilization.
    Sec. 7019 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding certain funding allocations specified in 
report accompanying the Act.
    Sec. 7020 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting the use of assistance for entertainment expenses.
    Sec. 7021 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, prohibiting military assistance for countries that 
support international terrorism.
    Sec. 7022 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting bilateral assistance for countries that grant 
sanctuary from prosecution to any terrorist or terrorist group, 
or otherwise supports international terrorism, unless the 
President makes certain national security determinations.
    Sec. 7023 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, extending certain authorities necessary to expend 
funds made available under the Act.
    Sec. 7024 includes language, carried in prior years, 
defining the terms ``program'', ``project'' and ``activity''.
    Sec. 7025 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding certain authorities for the Peace Corps, Inter-
American Foundation and the African Development Foundation.
    Sec. 7026 includes limitation language, carried in prior 
years, relating to commerce, trade, and surplus commodities.
    Sec. 7027 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding the requirement that separate accounts be established 
for assistance that generates local currencies and establishing 
certain conditions on the use of those funds.
    Sec. 7028 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding assistance through nongovernmental 
organizations and assistance provided under the Public Law 480 
program.
    Sec. 7029 includes language, carried in prior years, 
establishing certain limitations on assistance which may impact 
jobs in the United States.
    Sec. 7030 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, establishing certain conditions on funds 
appropriated to international financial institutions.
    Sec. 7031 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding ``debt-for-development'' programs.
    Sec. 7032 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding ``debt buybacks or sales''.
    Sec. 7033 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding certain authorities for the President to provide 
special debt relief for poor countries.
    Sec. 7034 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, granting certain special authorities relating to 
funds made available under the Act.
    Sec. 7035 includes language, carried in prior years, 
expressing the sense of Congress related to the Arab League 
Boycott of Israel.
    Sec. 7036 includes language, carried in prior years, 
establishing limitations on the use of funds in support of a 
Palestinian state.
    Sec. 7037 includes language, carried in prior years, 
establishing restrictions on the use of funds for the purpose 
of conducting official United States Government business with 
the Palestinian Authority.
    Sec. 7038 includes language, carried in prior years, 
restricting assistance to the Palestinian Broadcasting 
Corporation.
    Sec. 7039 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, placing conditions on assistance for the West Bank 
and Gaza.
    Sec. 7040 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, placing limitations on any assistance for the 
Palestinian Authority and prohibiting assistance to Hamas.
    Sec. 7041 includes language prohibiting assistance to Saudi 
Arabia.
    Sec. 7042 includes language placing certain conditions on 
assistance for Iraq.
    Sec. 7043 includes language, similar to that carried in 
fiscal year 2009, placing certain reporting requirements on 
diplomatic and sanctions efforts regarding Iran and prohibiting 
Ex-Im Bank assisting petroleum projects in Iran.
    Sec. 7044 includes language, carried in fiscal year 2009, 
conditioning military assistance for Lebanon.
    Sec. 7045 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, conditioning assistance for certain countries in 
the Western Hemisphere; includes funding level and certain 
requirements for the new Caribbean Basin Security Initiative; 
and applies terms and conditions carried in fiscal year 2009 to 
funds for Mexico and Central America.
    Sec. 7046 includes language applying the terms and 
conditions carried in fiscal year 2009 to funds for Colombia.
    Sec. 7047 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, related to assistance made available for 
community-based policing programs.
    Sec. 7048 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting assistance provided in this Act from being used to 
pay for the costs of participation of a foreign country's at an 
international conference.
    Sec. 7049 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding authority for the President to drawdown certain funds 
to support the United Nations War Crimes tribunals or 
commissions.
    Sec. 7050 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding United States participation in United Nations 
peacekeeping missions.
    Sec. 7051 includes language amending the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act regarding Peacekeeping Assessments.
    Sec. 7052 includes language requiring a report on 
resolutions proposed and adopted by the United Nations Human 
Rights Council.
    Sec. 7053 includes language, carried in prior years, 
establishing limitations on funds available under the Act being 
used to support attendance at international conferences.
    Sec. 7054 includes language, carried in prior years, 
prohibiting funds from this Act to be used for the 
participation of a United States delegation to any United 
Nations commission if such commission is chaired by a country 
who supports terrorism.
    Sec. 7055 includes language, carried in prior years, 
relating to unpaid parking fines and real property taxes owed 
by foreign countries.
    Sec. 7056 includes language, carried in fiscal year 2009, 
relating to landmines and cluster munitions.
    Sec. 7057 includes language, carried in prior years, 
limiting the amount of funds made available under title II of 
the Act for residence expenses of the United States Agency for 
International Development.
    Sec. 7058 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding certain management conditions and 
authorities of the United States Agency for International 
Development.
    Sec. 7059 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding global health activities.
    Sec. 7060 includes language, similar to that carried in 
fiscal year 2009, regarding a development grants program.
    Sec. 7061 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding women in development programs.
    Sec. 7062 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, regarding gender-based violence programs.
    Sec. 7063 includes language, similar to that carried in 
fiscal year 2009, regarding assistance for basic education 
programs and activities.
    Sec. 7064 includes language, similar to that carried in 
fiscal year 2009, regarding reconciliation programs.
    Sec. 7065 includes language, carried in prior years, 
requiring a comprehensive expenditures report.
    Sec. 7066 includes language, carried in prior years, 
limiting assistance for nongovernmental organizations that do 
not provide documents necessary for auditing purposes.
    Sec. 7067 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding the Senior Policy Operating Group on Trafficking in 
Persons.
    Sec. 7068 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding torture and inhumane treatment.
    Sec. 7069 includes language conditioning assistance for 
certain countries in Africa.
    Sec. 7070 includes language, similar to that carried in 
fiscal year 2009, conditioning assistance for certain countries 
in Asia.
    Sec. 7071 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, conditioning assistance for Serbia.
    Sec. 7072 includes language, carried in fiscal year 2009, 
conditioning assistance for the independent states of the 
former Soviet Union.
    Sec. 7073 includes language, similar to that carried in 
fiscal year 2009, regarding repression of religion, political 
opposition and the media in the Russian Federation.
    Sec. 7074 includes language, carried in prior years, 
conditioning assistance for Uzbekistan.
    Sec. 7075 includes language conditioning assistance for 
Afghanistan.
    Sec. 7076 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, establishing restrictions on funds made available 
under titles III through VI of the Act to support enterprise 
funds.
    Sec. 7077 includes language, similar to that carried in the 
fiscal year 2008 Act, regarding funding levels and restrictions 
on contributions to the United Nations Population Fund.
    Sec. 7078 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, limiting funding for publicity or propaganda 
purposes within the United States.
    Sec. 7079 includes language, carried in prior years, 
granting the President certain transfer authorities with 
respect to funding for the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation.
    Sec. 7080 includes language, carried in prior years, 
limiting assistance to countries that have notified the 
Department of State of its refusal to extradite to the United 
States certain individuals indicted for committing a capital 
offense involving a law enforcement officer in the United 
States.
    Sec. 7081 includes language, similar to that carried in 
prior years, setting funding levels and conditions on climate 
change and environmental programs.
    Sec. 7082 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding the promotion of tobacco products.
    Sec. 7083 includes language, carried in prior years, 
regarding commercial leasing of defense articles.
    Sec. 7084 includes language, carried in prior years, 
requiring a report on United Nations reform efforts and 
limiting assistance to countries that do not make publicly 
available their annual national budgets.
    Sec. 7085 includes language requiring that funds for Sri 
Lanka are used to promote reconciliation, human rights 
training, demining in conflict affected areas; and requires a 
report on internally displaced persons.
    Sec. 7086 includes language establishing certain reporting 
requirements regarding UNWRA activities in the West Bank and 
Gaza.
    Sec. 7087 includes language imposing a limitation on funds 
to any country, regarding the transfer of individuals detained 
at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
    Sec. 7088 includes language related to United States 
participation in the International Monetary Fund.
    Sec. 7089 includes language regarding the protection of 
intellectual property rights during the United Nations 
Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized By Law

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(1)(B) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law for the period concerned:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                           Appropriations in
         Agency/activity               Last year         Authorization       last year of      Appropriations in
                                      authorized             level           authorization         the bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of State/              2003..............  $5,290,390,000....  $5,874,914,000....  $11,014,949,000
 Administration of Foreign
 Affairs.
Department of State/              2003..............  $1,529,702,000....  $1,672,000,000....  $3,822,000,000
 International Organizations.
Department of State/              2003..............  $71,385,000.......  $57,730,000.......  $137,434,000
 International Commissions.
Department of State/Related       2003..............  $72,000,000.......  $69,986,000.......  $120,750,000
 Programs.
Broadcasting Board of Governors.  2003..............  $644,486,000......  $599,560,000......  $746,450,000
Commission on International       2003..............  $3,000,000........  $3,000,000........  $4,300,000
 Religious Freedom.
U.S. Institute of Peace.........  2003..............  Such sums as may    $16,256,000.......  $49,220,000
                                                       be necessary.
Overseas Private Investment       2003..............  Such sums as may    $39,626,000.......  $52,310,000
 Corporation Administrative                            be necessary.
 Expenses.
Overseas Private Investment       2003..............  Such sums as may    $23,844,000.......  $29,000,000
 Corporation Noncredit Account.                        be necessary.
Global Health and Child Survival  Population (1987);  Population          Population          $2,375,000,000
 (see note below).                 Health and          ($290,000,000);     ($234,625,000);     (includes
                                   Disease             Health and          Health and          $520,000,000 for
                                   Prevention          Disease             Disease             Population)
                                   (1987); Child       Prevention          Prevention
                                   Survival Fund       ($180,000,000);     ($166,762,000);
                                   (1987).             Child Survival      Child Survival
                                                       Fund                Fund (75,000,000).
                                                       ($75,000,000).
Development Assistance (see note  Agriculture         Agriculture         Agriculture         $2,465,000,000
 below).                           (1987); Education   ($760,000,000);     ($693,613,000);     (includes:
                                   (1987); Energy      Education           Education           $365,000,000 for
                                   and selected        ($180,000,000);     ($155,000,000);     basic education;
                                   development         Energy and          Energy and          other programs
                                   activities (1987).  selected            selected            difficult to
                                                       development         development         determine due to
                                                       activities          activities          changing
                                                       ($207,000,000).     ($149,990,000).     definitions of
                                                                                               programs since
                                                                                               last authorized)
International Disaster            1987..............  $25,000,000.......  $70,000,000.......  $830,000,000
 Assistance (see note below).
Transition Initiatives..........  None (same          NA................  NA................  $100,000,000
                                   authorities as
                                   Inter-national
                                   Disaster
                                   Assistance).
Development Credit Authority....  None..............  NA................  NA................  $25,000,000 (by
                                                                                               transfer)
Development Credit Authority--    None..............  NA................  NA................  $8,600,000
 administrative expenses.
Operating Expenses of the United  1987..............  $387,000,000......  $340,600,000......  $1,388,800,000
 States Agency for International
 Development.
Capital Investment Fund.........  None..............  NA................  NA................  $213,000,000
Operating Expenses of the United  1987..............  $21,750,000.......  $21,000,000.......  $46,500,000
 States Agency for International
 Development--Inspector General.
Economic Support Fund...........  1987..............  $3,800,000,000....  $3,555,000,000....  $6,370,096,000
Assistance for Eastern Europe,    1993..............  $410,000,000......  $417,000,000......  $722,253,000
 Eurasia and Central Asia.
Inter-American Foundation.......  1993..............  $31,000,000.......  $30,960,000.......  $22,760,000
African Development Foundation..  1987..............  $3,872,000........  $6,500,000........  $30,000,000
Peace Corps.....................  2003..............  $365,000,000......  $295,069,000......  $450,000,000
Millennium Challenge Corporation  2005..............  Such sums as may    $1,488,000,000....  $1,400,000,000
                                                       be necessary.
International Narcotics Control   1994..............  $171,500,000......  $100,000,000......  $1,630,000,000
 and Law Enforcement.
Migration and Refugee Assistance  2003..............  $820,000,000......  $781,884,000......  $1,480,444,000
U.S. Emergency Refugee and        1962..............  Such amounts as     NA................  $75,000,000
 Migration Assistance Fund (see                        may be necessary.
 note below).
Nonproliferation, Anti-           2003..............  $226,200..........  NA................  $717,430,000
 terrorism, Demining and Related
 Programs (see note below).
Debt Restructuring..............  2004..............  Such sums.........  $94,440,000.......  $60,000,000
International Military Education  2003..............  $85,000,000.......  $79,480,000.......  $110,283,000
 and Training.
Foreign Military Financing......  2003..............  $4,107,000,000....  $6,104,632,000....  $4,260,000,000
Peacekeeping Operations.........  1999..............  $83,000,000.......  $76,500,000.......  $331,500,000
International Development         2008..............  $2,850,000,000....  $942,305,000......  $1,235,000,000
 Association (see note below).
Contribution to the               ..................  ..................  ..................  $225,000,000
 International Clean Technology
 Fund.
Contribution to the Strategic     ..................  ..................  ..................  $75,000,000
 Climate Fund.
African Development Fund (see     2008..............  $407,000,000......  $134,585,000......  $115,250,000
 note below).
Asian Development Fund..........  2005..............  $461,000,000......  $105,000,000......  $115,250,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: Programs recommended herein under ``Global Health and Child Survival'' and ``Development Assistance'' were
  last authorized under a different account structure than that recommended in this bill; the account structure
  included a number of functional accounts, as described above. Microenterprise programs were reauthorized in
  2004, covering the period through 2009.
Note: Programs recommended herein under ``Assistance for Eastern Europe and Eurasia'' are a combination of the
  programs previously funded under the headings ``Assistance for Eastem Europe and the Baltic States'' and
  ``Assistance for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union''. The programs of the former Assistance
  for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States'' account were last authorized in the Support for East European
  Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989; however, these funds were authorized for discrete programs aid not for the
  account as a whole. In fiscal year 1991, the first general appropriations act after enactment of the SEED Act
  included $369,675,000 for this account.
Note: Programs recommended herein under ``International Disaster Assistance'' account was formerly called the
  ``International Disaster and Famine Assistance'' account and was last authorized under that account name.
Note: Funds for the United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Program (ERMA) are authorized in
  such amounts as may be necessary; however, appropriations which would result in a balance in the fund of more
  than $100,000,000 are prohibited (22 U.S.C. 2601(c)) absent a waiver of this provision of law.
Note: Programs recommended herein under ``Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs''
  include some major programs for which authorizations of appropriations were provided for fiscal year 2002;
  these programs include $73,000,000 authorized for antiterrorism assistance and $142,000,000 authorized for
  nonproliferation activities. In addition, some programs now in this account were previously in accounts which
  had authorizations of appropriations in prior years.
Note: The authorized level indicated for the International Development Association and the African Development
  Fund is the total authorized for the three year period of fiscal years 2005 to 2008. The Supplemental
  Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public Law 111-xxx) includes authorization for these contributions through 2011.

                              Rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is submitted describing 
the rescissions recommended in the accompanying bill: The 
accompanying bill contains no rescissions.

                           Transfer of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
transfers of funds included in the accompanying bill:

            APPROPRIATIONS TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Account to which the transfer
    Account to which the transfer is made           Amount                  is made                   Amount
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diplomatic and Consular Programs.............     $137,600,000  Any other appropriation of any      $137,600,000
                                                                 department or agency of the
                                                                 United States . . . to carry
                                                                 out the provisions of the
                                                                 Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
Diplomatic and Consular Programs.............       10,000,000  Emergencies in the Diplomatic         10,000,000
                                                                 and Consular Service.
Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular           1,000,000  Repatriation Loans Program             1,000,000
 Service.                                                        Account.
Funds appropriated in the Act to carry out          25,000,000  Development Credit Authority...       25,000,000
 part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961
 and under ``Assistance for eastern Europe
 and the Baltic States''.
Economic Support Fund........................        4,500,000  Migration and Refugee                  4,500,000
                                                                 Assistance.
Peace Corps..................................        5,000,000  Foreign Currency Fluctuations          5,000,000
                                                                 Account.
Funds appropriated in title III of this Act..       93,000,000  Operating Expenses.............       93,000,000
Funds appropriated under title III of this          20,000,000  Overseas Private Investment           20,000,000
 Act.                                                            Corporation Program Account.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                Earmarks

    Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, neither the bill nor this report contain 
any congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited 
tariff benefits as defined in paragraphs (e), (f), or (g) of 
clause 9 of rule XXI.

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italics, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

 SECTION 594 OF THE FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED 
                   PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2005

                   (Division D of Public Law 108-447)

                          VIETNAMESE REFUGEES

  Sec. 594. (a) Eligibility for In-Country Refugee Processing 
in Vietnam.--For purposes of eligibility for in-country refugee 
processing for nationals of Vietnam during fiscal years 2004 
through [2010] 2011, an alien described in subsection (b) shall 
be considered to be a refugee of special humanitarian concern 
to the United States (within the meaning of section 207 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1157)) and shall be 
admitted to the United States for resettlement if the alien 
would be admissible as an immigrant under the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (except as provided in section 207(c)(3) of 
that Act).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1990

TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


       establishing categories of aliens for purposes of refugee 
                             determinations

    Sec. 599D. (a) * * *
    (b) Establishment of Categories.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Within the number of admissions of refugees 
        allocated for each of fiscal years 1990, 1991, and 1992 
        for refugees who are nationals of the Soviet Union 
        under section 207(a)(3) of the Immigration and 
        Nationality Act and within the number of such 
        admissions allocated for each of fiscal years 1993, 
        1994, 1995, and 1996 for refugees who are nationals of 
        the independent states of the former Soviet Union, 
        Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such section and 
        within the number of such admissions allocated for each 
        of fiscal years 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 
        1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 
        2008, [and 2009] 2009, and 2010 for refugees who are 
        nationals of the independent states of the former 
        Soviet Union, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania under such 
        section, notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
        the President shall allocate one thousand of such 
        admissions for such fiscal year to refugees who are 
        within the category of aliens described in paragraph 
        (2)(B).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (e) Period of Application.--
          (1) Subsections (a) and (b) shall take effect on the 
        date of the enactment of this Act and shall only apply 
        to applications for refugee status submitted before 
        October 1, [2009] 2010.
          (2) Subsection (c) shall apply to decisions made 
        after the date of the enactment of this Act and before 
        October 1, [2009] 2010.
          (3) Subsection (d) shall take effect on the date of 
        the enactment of this Act and shall only apply to 
        reapplications for refugee status submitted before 
        October 1, [2009] 2010.

    adjustment of status for certain soviet and indochinese parolees

    Sec. 599E. (a) * * *
    (b) Aliens Eligible for Adjustment of Status.--The benefits 
provided in subsection (a) shall only apply to an alien who--
          (1) * * *
          (2) was inspected and granted parole into the United 
        States during the period beginning on August 15, 1988, 
        and ending on September 30, [2009] 2010, after being 
        denied refugee status.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


   SECTION 7046 OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, FOREIGN OPERATIONS, AND 
               RELATED PROGRAMS APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2009

                    (Division H of Public Law 111-8)

                                colombia

  Sec. 7046. (a) * * *
  (b) Assistance for the Armed Forces.--
          (1) Funding.--Funds appropriated by this Act that are 
        available for assistance for the Colombian Armed 
        Forces, may be made available as follows:
                  (A) * * *
                  (B) Up to 15 percent of such funds may be 
                obligated only after the Secretary of State 
                consults with, and subsequently certifies and 
                submits a written report to, the Committees on 
                Appropriations that--
                          (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                          [(iv) The Government of Colombia is 
                        respecting the rights of Colombia's 
                        indigenous and Afro-Colombian 
                        communities, and the Colombian Armed 
                        Forces are implementing procedures to 
                        distinguish between civilians, 
                        including displaced persons, and 
                        combatants in their operations.]
                          (iv) That the Government of Colombia 
                        is respecting the rights of human 
                        rights defenders, journalists, trade 
                        unionists, political opposition and 
                        religious leaders, and indigenous and 
                        Afro-Colombian communities, and the 
                        Colombian Armed Forces are implementing 
                        procedures to distinguish between 
                        civilians, including displaced persons, 
                        and combatants in their operations.
          (2) The balance of such funds may be obligated after 
        July 31, [2009] 2010, if, prior to such obligation, the 
        Secretary of State consults with, and submits a written 
        certification to, the Committees on Appropriations that 
        the Government of Colombia is continuing to meet the 
        requirements described in paragraph (1) and is 
        conducting vigorous operations to strengthen civilian 
        institutions and respect for internationally recognized 
        human rights in areas under the influence of 
        paramilitary organizations or successor armed groups 
        and guerrilla organizations.
          (3) Certain funds exempted.--The requirement to 
        withhold funds from obligation shall not apply with 
        respect to funds made available under the heading 
        ``[Andean Counterdrug Programs] International Narcotics 
        Control and Law Enforcement'' in this Act for continued 
        support for the Critical Flight Safety Program or for 
        any alternative development programs in Colombia 
        administered by the Bureau of International Narcotics 
        and Law Enforcement Affairs of the Department of State.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Consultative Process.--Not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, and every 180 days thereafter 
until September 30, [2009] 2010, the Secretary of State shall 
consult with Colombian and internationally recognized human 
rights organizations regarding progress in meeting the 
requirements contained in subsection (b)(1).
  (d) Assistance for Reintegration of Former Combatants.--
          (1) Availability of funds.--Of the funds appropriated 
        in this Act under the heading ``Economic Support 
        Fund'', up to [$16,769,000] $18,606,000 may be made 
        available in fiscal year [2009] 2010 for assistance for 
        the reintegration of former members of foreign 
        terrorist organizations (FTOs) or other illegal armed 
        groups in Colombia, if the Secretary of State consults 
        with and makes a certification described in paragraph 
        (2) to the Committees on Appropriations prior to the 
        initial obligation of amounts for such assistance for 
        the fiscal year involved.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


 SECTION 404 OF THE FOREIGN RELATIONS AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 
                             1994 AND 1995

SEC. 404. ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS FOR UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING 
                    OPERATIONS.

  (a) * * *
  (b) Limitation on United States Contributions.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Subsequent fiscal years.--(A) * * *
                  (B) Reduction in united states share of 
                assessed contributions.--Notwithstanding the 
                percentage limitation contained in subparagraph 
                (A), the United States share of assessed 
                contributions for each United Nations 
                peacekeeping operation during the following 
                periods is authorized to be as follows:
                          (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(v) For assessments made during each of the calendar years 
2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009, 27.1 percent.]
                          (v) For assessments made during each 
                        of the calendar years 2005, 2006, 2007, 
                        2008, 2009, and 2010, 27.1 percent.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


             SECTION 17 OF THE BRETTON WOODS AGREEMENTS ACT

    Sec. 17. (a)(1) * * *
          (2) In order to carry out the purposes of a one-time 
        decision of the Executive Directors of the 
        International Monetary Fund (the Fund) to expand the 
        resources of the New Arrangements to Borrow, 
        established pursuant to the decision of January 27, 
        1997 referred to in paragraph (1) above, and to make 
        other amendments to the New Arrangements to Borrow to 
        achieve an expanded and more flexible New Arrangements 
        to Borrow as contemplated by paragraph 17 of the G-20 
        Leaders' Statement of April 2, 2009 in London, the 
        Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to instruct the 
        United States Executive Director to consent to such 
        amendments notwithstanding subsection (d) of this 
        section, and to make loans, in an amount not to exceed 
        the dollar equivalent of 75,000,000,000 Special Drawing 
        Rights, in addition to any amounts previously 
        authorized under this section and limited to such 
        amounts as are provided in advance in appropriations 
        Acts, except that prior to activation, the Secretary of 
        the Treasury shall report to Congress on whether 
        supplementary resources are needed to forestall or cope 
        with an impairment of the international monetary system 
        and whether the Fund has fully explored other means of 
        funding, to the Fund under article VII, section 1(i), 
        of the Articles of Agreement of the Fund: Provided, 
        That prior to instructing the United States Executive 
        Director to provide consent to such amendments, the 
        Secretary of the Treasury shall consult with the 
        appropriate congressional committees on the amendments 
        to be made to the New Arrangements to Borrow, including 
        guidelines and criteria governing the use of its 
        resources; the countries that have made commitments to 
        contribute to the New Arrangements to Borrow and the 
        amount of such commitments; and the steps taken by the 
        United States to expand the number of countries so the 
        United States share of the expanded New Arrangements to 
        Borrow is representative of its share as of the date of 
        enactment of this Act: Provided further, That any loan 
        under the authority granted in this subsection shall be 
        made with due regard to the present and prospective 
        balance of payments and reserve position of the United 
        States : Provided further, That the authority to make 
        loans under this section shall expire on the date that 
        is 5 years after the date of the enactment of this 
        proviso.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                      Five-Year Outlay Projections

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the following table contains 
five-year projections associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill as provided to the Committee 
by the Congressional Budget Office.

                        [In millions of dollars]

Budget Authority........................................          48,843
Projection of outlays associated with the 
    recommendation:
    2009................................................       \1\21,344
    2010................................................          14,268
    2011................................................           6,480
    2012................................................           3,391
    2013 and future years...............................           3,079

\1\Excludes outlays from prior year budget authority.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Financial Assistance To State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Congressional Budget 
Office has provided the following estimates of new budget 
authority and outlays provided by the accompanying bill for 
financial assistance to State and local governments.

                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                          This Bill
                                                   ---------------------
                                                      Budget
                                                    authority   Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Financial assistance to State and local                  \1\0          0
 governments......................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Excludes outlays from prior year budget authority.



                 Comparison With the Budget Resolution

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and section 308(a)(1)(A) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), the 
following table compares the levels of new budget authority 
provided in the bill with the appropriate allocation under 
section 302(b) of the Budget Act.

BUDGETARY IMPACT--PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET
      OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS AMENDED
                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                302(b) Allocation         This Bill
                             -------------------------------------------
                                Budget                Budget
                              authority   Outlays   authority   Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
General purpose                  48,843     47,945     48,843  \1\47,487
 discretionary..............
Mandatory...................        142        142        142       142
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior year budget authority.




              MINORITY VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE JERRY LEWIS

    I commend Chairwoman Lowey for her efforts to work with her 
Republican counterparts to include requests from Republican 
Members and work together in a bipartisan manner to craft this 
appropriations bill for the Department of State, foreign 
operations, and related programs. Nevertheless, I have three 
enduring concerns about this bill: the Democrat Majority's 
flawed methodology in calculating the growth of this bill; the 
lack of fiscal discipline in determining the size of the 
allocation; and efforts by the Administration to broker 
undisclosed deals with foreign countries to receive terrorists 
detained at Guantanamo Bay.

                          A FLAWED METHODOLOGY

    The State-Foreign Operations bill provides $48,843,000,000 
in discretionary budget authority, which is $3,201,063,000 
below the President's request and $12,223,000,000 above fiscal 
year 2009. By the Majority's own calculation, this bill's 
allocation is a 33% increase over fiscal year 2009, the largest 
increase of any regular appropriations bill the Committee will 
consider this year, and the largest increase in foreign aid in 
a decade. It is therefore misleading for the Chairwoman to 
state that the bill is ``upfront, honest, and transparent'' 
while contending that the bill is a reduction from the 
President's request and the fiscal year 2009 level when 
supplementals are included. This is a convoluted calculus for 
several reasons. 



    First, adding the entire supplemental funding for fiscal 
year 2009 to the allocation of this bill is deceptive. Less 
than one-quarter of supplemental war funding for the Department 
of State, foreign operations, and related programs directly 
funds ongoing operations and the security of diplomats in Iraq 
and Afghanistan, but this bill adds 100% of foreign assistance 
programs, including one-time emergency infusions to this bill's 
base. Conversely, the Majority only rolled military personnel 
costs into the Defense Appropriations base budget fo fiscal 
year 2010, a mere 6% of the supplemental funding for the 
Defense Department.
    Second, the calculations are based on a false assumption 
that the Obama Administration will live up to its promise of no 
more war supplementals for Iraq and Afghanistan. Before the ink 
was dry on the amended Full Committee report of this bill, 
Defense Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Murtha publicly 
stated that another supplemental is necessary to fund the 
troops because of the low fiscal year 2010 Defense allocation.
    Third, in the fiscal year 2009 supplemental, the Democrat 
Majority off-loaded $2,434,275,000 of fiscal year 2010 
spending. It is ironic that while the Chairwoman concurs with 
the Administration's goal of ending reliance on supplementals, 
a supplemental is used to fund programs that rightly belong in 
this bill. This duplicitous accounting obscures the true cost 
of this year's bill and will create false expectations for next 
year's budget process.
    Fourth, this bill avoids making hard fiscal choices about 
spending abroad while Americans face a financial crisis at 
home. The charts show a true comparison of the rate of increase 
for foreign affairs spending to that for Defense and domestic 
purposes. This straightforward comparison exposes the false 
logic of the Chairwoman's contention that the size of this bill 
is a decrease over fiscal year 2009. 



    With more Americans unemployed than at any time in the last 
twenty-five years, in the midst of unchecked deficits and 
mounting debt, and in light of the insufficient funding 
provided for U.S. troops employed in fighting terrorists on the 
front lines in places like Iraq and Afghanistan, the Democrat 
Majority's proposed rate of increase for foreign affairs 
spending is irresponsible. Unfortunately, the Committee 
defeated an amendment offered by Mr. Culberson of Texas to 
reduce the size of the bill by cutting a mere 1% of the 
allocation in funding for international financial institutions 
and banks to the fiscal year 2009 level. The rationale for 
adopting this amendment was even more compelling in light of 
the $108 billion in new loan authority provided to the 
International Monetary Fund (IMF) in the supplemental.
    More of the same false logic is evident in the terminations 
and reductions listed in the report. The so-called reductions 
in this bill from the 2009 enacted level, which occur in only 
nine accounts, only hold true if emergency spending is 
included. Similarly, reductions from the President's fiscal 
year 2010 request are meaningless when the President's request 
is a 42% overall increase. A proper comparison would show 
significant increases over the 2009 base bill level in all 
major accounts.



                          NO FISCAL DISCIPLINE

    Another way to view this bill is to evaluate the allocation 
of $48,843,000,000 within the larger context of the Nation's 
rapidly escalating debt and inflationary pressure. Could the 
302(b) and the amounts provided in this bill have been 
significantly lower without harming the programs? Was the 
allocation the minimum necessary to meet the needs of the 
programs while ensuring that the programs operate in the most 
cost effective way possible? I believe that the allocation 
fails both of those tests. I strongly support the Republican 
proposal to cap discretionary spending at 2% above the 2009 
enacted level--the level I proposed as an alternative 302(b) 
allocation. 



    According to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the 
Obama Administration is well on its way to doubling the 
national debt in five years. In so doing it will drive the 
Debt-to-GDP ratio from 41% today to a staggering 71%, and as 
the charts below show, by 2019 the ratio will hit 80% under the 
Administration's own current assumptions.




    Congress must begin to face the fact that the United States 
Treasury is building a mountain of debt and the Federal Reserve 
has issued another mountain of dollars in its attempt to 
sustain the credit markets in recent months. The possibility of 
much higher inflation, which will reduce the value of the 
payments to the holders of U.S. debt, is a very real, if not 
the single largest threat against the ability of the economy to 
recover.
    That rapid rise in debt is being fueled by unprecedented 
increases in the annual deficits. The deficits projected in the 
Obama Budget Blueprint, and adopted by the Democrats' 
Congressional Budget Resolution averages just shy of one 
trillion dollars--that is one hundred billion dollars annually 
for the next ten years--not including revenue shortfalls in 
Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, which will add even 
greater amounts to the annual deficit. In addition, the Budget 
Resolution--at the behest of the Administration--and a 
harbinger of more to come--raises taxes by 1.5 trillion dollars 
over the next ten years, withdrawing those funds from private 
production in the economy as well.
    Before the recession, federal spending totaled $24,000 per 
U.S. household. President Obama and the budget resolution that 
incorporates that plan would hike it to $32,000 per household 
by 2019--an inflation-adjusted $8,000-per-household expansion 
of government. Even the steep tax increases planned for all 
taxpayers would not finance all of this spending.
    Simply put, the President's budget and the budget 
resolution that adopted those spending levels would add 
trillions of dollars in new debt. In fact if enacted, the 
President's Budget Blueprint would, over time, dump an 
estimated $84,352 in new debt on every child and grandchild in 
the United States.
    That debt can only be paid for by borrowing even more. But 
the global demand for U.S. debt is not infinite and continued 
purchases of debt can only be induced by greater interest 
rates. We are already seeing that occur as treasury rates have 
soared recently in the face of government borrowing. For 
example, mortgage rates have jumped from 4.8% to 5.8% wiping 
out billions in potential savings for homeowners.
    This is not the time in our history to add permanently to 
the burden on taxpayers. It is the time to minimize that burden 
and hasten the recovery. The alternative budget blueprint that 
was proposed by the Republicans and the specific alternative 
302(b) allocation offered when the appropriations process 
began, do just that--by capping domestic discretionary spending 
in 2010 at 2% above the 2009 enacted levels and returns over 
$35 billion to the Treasury as compared to the Democrat 
discretionary spending blueprint.
    To protect credit and keep interest rates low, we must 
shrink the budget deficit in the near term and rein in the 
spending in appropriations bills, neither of which is occurring 
in this bill.

                 GUANTANAMO DEALS BY THE ADMINISTRATION

    Committee Republicans are deeply concerned by the 
Administration's recent spate of releases and transfers of 
detainees related to the plan to close the Guantanamo Bay 
Detention Facility. The Administration continues to withhold 
information from the Congress and the American public, and 
appears to be racing to move as many detainees as possible 
before the will of the Congress can be enacted into law. The 
recent transfers and releases of detainees to Bermuda, Chad, 
Iraq and Saudi Arabia were done without consultation with 
Congress, and specifically without the Congressional 
notifications that will be required once the President signs 
the pending Supplemental bill.
    A recent report by the Department of Defense indicates that 
of the Guantanamo detainees who have been transferred from 
Department of Defense custody, 27 were confirmed and 47 were 
suspected of reengaging in terrorist activity. The Department 
of Defense further found that various former Guantanamo 
detainees are known to have reengaged in terrorist activity 
associated with the Al Qaeda network, including facilitating 
the travel of terrorists into war zones, providing funds to Al 
Qaeda, and supporting and associating with known terrorists. 
Despite these findings, the Administration continues to release 
and transfer as many detainees as quickly as possible to meet 
the arbitrary deadline set by the President to close 
Guantanamo.
    Particularly troubling are reports that releases and 
transfers to other countries may involve commitments to provide 
U.S. Government funds to such countries in exchange for 
securing agreements to receive detainees. I am pleased that the 
Committee adopted my amendment prohibiting the use of funds in 
this or any other Act for any country that concludes an 
agreement to receive Guantanamo detainees, unless the Committee 
is notified of the terms of such an agreement in advance. 
Members of Congress and the American public deserve to know the 
deals that are being brokered and the taxpayer dollars that are 
being spent, in order to meet the President's arbitrary edict 
to close Guantanamo by January of 2010.

                               CONCLUSION

    It is true that the Majority has worked across the aisle 
with the Minority in crafting a bill that, within the given 
allocation, funds high priority programs. Yet the Minority also 
strongly believes that the total amount of discretionary funds 
provided in the bill could have been significantly reduced 
without harm to the programs, which would have exhibited fiscal 
restraint. As this country endures a severe financial crisis, 
more consideration must be given to the cost of government 
spending. In addition, Republican Members of the Committee 
remain concerned about secret deals brokered by the State 
Department to transfer or release Guantanamo detainees and are 
pleased that the bill now contains a requirement that the 
Committee is notified of such deals in advance of their 
implementation.
    In closing, it is my hope that as this bill moves to the 
House floor, Members of the Majority and the Minority parties 
will continue to be allowed to offer amendments. It is only 
through an open, democratic process that we fulfill our 
responsibilities to serve our constituents and our country. 
With this in mind, I look forward to moving this bill through 
the House floor.

             ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE KAY GRANGER

     As Ranking Member Lewis noted in the Minority Views, 
Americans are enduring a severe financial crisis necessitating 
thoughtful consideration of the cost of government spending. 
That is why I supported an amendment by Ranking Member Lewis 
altering the fiscal year 2010 302(b) allocations, which would 
have reduced discretionary spending by $35,200,000,000. 
Unfortunately, that amendment failed on a party-line vote of 
21-31. In Full Committee markup on this bill funding the State 
Department, foreign operations, and related programs, I also 
supported an amendment offered by Mr. Culberson of Texas to 
lower the cost of the bill by $505,896,000 by reducing 
multilateral assistance provided through international 
organizations and financial institutions. That amendment also 
failed on a party-line vote of 22-35. The adoption of these 
amendments would have demonstrated a positive step toward 
restoring fiscal balance.

                               OVERSIGHT

    Although disagreements may exist over the proper level of 
government spending, there is consensus that oversight of our 
tax dollars is a responsibility of the Appropriations Committee 
and the Congress. I am pleased, therefore, by the Subcommittee 
Chairwoman's willingness to work with me to incorporate 
important oversight provisions that will help ensure that funds 
in this bill are well-spent.
    The bill provides significant resources to hire new 
development officers and diplomatic staff, which will in turn 
allow our military men and women to re-focus on their core 
mission. As this hiring is completed, it is important that 
there be a commitment to reform equal to the funding commitment 
made in this bill. In that respect, there are many questions 
that arise. Do new recruits have the right skills to be 
successful? Are the State Department and the United States 
Agency for International Development (USAID) providing these 
staff with the appropriate training? Are staff being deployed 
into places where they are most needed, and are they able to 
work in a safe and secure environment? The Committee report 
therefore includes language requiring the State Department and 
USAID to notify the Committee on the status of hiring, 
training, and deploying these new staff.
    The Committee report also incorporates concerns I raised 
about the roughly $8 billion of global health funding provided 
in this bill, as well as other international health funds 
across government. The Subcommittee Chairwoman supported my 
call for a government-wide review of all U.S.-funded 
international health programs in order to determine what 
strategies and solutions work best.
    There are numerous other oversight provisions in the 
Committee report that will allow the Committee and the Congress 
to keep close watch over funding initiatives, including a 
requirement for the Government Accountability Office to assess 
and review the Peace Corps and a requirement for the State 
Department and USAID to report on the progress and use of the 
Civilian Stabilization Initiative.
    In addition, I offered an amendment to the bill in Full 
Committee markup, which was accepted by the Subcommittee 
Chairwoman and passed unanimously by voice vote, putting in 
place restrictions and additional oversight and control of the 
funds provided for the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in the 
fiscal year 2009 supplemental that was signed into law on June 
24, 2009. My amendment does four things: 1) directs the United 
States to use its voice and vote to oppose the provision of 
U.S. dollars and other hard currencies (as a result of the 
Special Drawing Rights increase included in the fiscal year 
2009 supplemental) to IMF member countries that are supporters 
of terrorism; 2) expires at the end of fiscal year 2014 the 
authority for the U.S. to make loans to the IMF's New 
Arrangements to Borrow (NAB) lending facility; 3) sets the U.S. 
contribution to the NAB lending facility at no more than 20 
percent of the total; and 4) requires the Secretary of the 
Treasury to issue a report every six months to the Committee on 
the activities related to NAB lending.
    The bill also includes an amendment offered by Mr. Simpson 
of Idaho, also accepted by the Subcommittee Chairwoman and 
approved by voice vote in the Full Committee, which conditions 
multilateral climate change funds on assurances that 
intellectual property rights of U.S. environment and energy 
technologies are protected in upcoming international climate 
change negotiations. Countries like China have proposed to copy 
or infringe on these patented technologies to the detriment of 
U.S. industries and their workers.

                            POLICY CONCERNS

    This bill provides a significant increase for voluntary 
family planning programs, but it should be noted that the 
Subcommittee Chairwoman listened to many Members' and my 
concerns and included language, closely mirroring the fiscal 
year 2008 bill, which will prevent U.S. tax dollars from going 
to organizations that support or participate in involuntary or 
coercive methods of family planning. There are serious concerns 
about family planning dollars that are sent abroad, and these 
legislative safeguards are necessary to maintain confidence in 
these programs.

                           FUNDING PRIORITIES

    This bill addresses high priority foreign policy and 
national security goals that I hope will be preserved as the 
bill continues through the legislative process. A signature 
accomplishment of this bill is the $1,400,000,000 included to 
expand the work of the Millennium Challenge Corporation, a 
$525,000,000 increase, which will support the prosperity and 
security of some of our key partners in the developing world. 
The bill includes full funding for the security assistance 
requests for strategic allies like Israel, Egypt and Jordan. 
Funds in the bill also continue the fight against illegal drug 
trafficking in this hemisphere by fully funding the pending 
request for Mexico and Central America and by providing 
$520,000,000, which is $7,000,000 above the request to continue 
the gains made in Colombia.

                               CONCLUSION

    It is my hope that all of the oversight concerns raised 
above, as well as the policy and funding priorities noted, will 
be maintained as this bill moves through the House floor and a 
conference agreement is reached with the Senate. It is 
important for the voices of all Members to be heard, through 
offering of amendments on the House floor, and for a conference 
agreement to be reached in an open and transparent manner. I 
look forward to continuing to work with the Subcommittee 
Chairwoman to ensure that regular order is maintained as this 
bill moves through the legislative process.