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111th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    111-206

======================================================================



 
PROVIDING FOR A PROGRAM OF RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION ON 
                          NATURAL GAS VEHICLES

                                _______
                                

 July 14, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1622]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 1622) to provide for a program of research, 
development, and demonstration on natural gas vehicles, having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment 
and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................2
 III.  Background and Need for the Legislation........................2
  IV. Summary of Committee Actions....................................3
   V. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill, As Reported............3
  VI.  Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill, As Reported...........4
 VII. Committee Views.................................................5
VIII. Cost Estimate...................................................5
  IX. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate.......................5
   X. Compliance with Public Law 104-4................................6
  XI. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations................6
 XII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives...........6
XIII. Constitutional Authority Statement..............................7
 XIV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement............................7
  XV. Congressional Accountability Act................................7
 XVI. Earmark Identification..........................................7
XVII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law..........7
XVIII.Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported...........7

 XIX. Committee Recommendations.......................................7
  XX. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup..........................8
 XXI. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................19

                              I. AMENDMENT

    The amendment is as follows:
    Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. NATURAL GAS VEHICLE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION 
                    PROJECTS.

  (a) In General.--The Secretary of Energy shall conduct a 5-year 
program of natural gas vehicle research, development, and 
demonstration. The Secretary shall coordinate with the Administrator of 
the Environmental Protection Agency, as necessary.
  (b) Purpose.--The program under this section shall focus on--
          (1) the continued improvement and development of new, 
        cleaner, more efficient light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy-duty 
        natural gas vehicle engines;
          (2) the integration of those engines into light-duty, medium-
        duty, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles for onroad and 
        offroad applications;
          (3) expanding product availability by ensuring that 
        technologies researched and developed assist engines and 
        vehicles in meeting Federal and State requirements and 
        standards;
          (4) the demonstration and proper operation and use of the 
        vehicles described in paragraph (2) under all operating 
        conditions;
          (5) the development and improvement of nationally recognized 
        codes and standards for the continued safe operation of natural 
        gas vehicles and their components;
          (6) improvement in the reliability and efficiency of natural 
        gas fueling station infrastructure;
          (7) the certification of natural gas fueling station 
        infrastructure to nationally recognized and industry safety 
        standards;
          (8) the improvement in the reliability and efficiency of 
        onboard natural gas fuel storage systems;
          (9) the development of new natural gas fuel storage 
        materials;
          (10) the certification of onboard natural gas fuel storage 
        systems to nationally recognized and industry safety standards;
          (11) the use of natural gas engines in hybrid vehicles; and
          (12) researching and developing technologies and processes so 
        as to improve and streamline the process by which natural gas 
        conversion systems meet Federal and State requirements and 
        standards.
  (c) Cooperation and Coordination With Industry.--In developing and 
carrying out the program under this section, the Secretary shall 
coordinate with the natural gas vehicle industry to ensure cooperation 
between the public and the private sector.
  (d) Conduct of Program.--The program under this section shall be 
conducted in accordance with sections 3001 and 3002 of the Energy 
Policy Act of 1992.
  (e) Report.--Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of 
this Act, the Secretary shall provide a report to Congress on the 
implementation of this section.
  (f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary $30,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 
2010 through 2014 to carry out this section.
  (g) Definition.--For purposes of this section, the term ``natural 
gas'' means compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, biomethane, 
and mixtures of hydrogen and methane or natural gas.

                        II. PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of this bill is to provide for a program of 
research, development, and demonstration on natural gas 
vehicles and related technologies.

                III. BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION

    Natural gas vehicles have the potential to address 
important energy security and environmental issues. While the 
United States imports the majority of the petroleum it uses, 
most natural gas is domestically produced. As a result, 
increased use of natural gas vehicles may reduce dependence on 
foreign oil imports and promote U.S. energy security. In 
addition, natural gas vehicles in general have lower pollutant 
and greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline vehicles.
    The Energy Information Administration estimates that there 
were roughly 116,000 compressed natural gas vehicles in the 
United States in 2006, and roughly 3,000 liquefied natural gas 
vehicles. Roughly two-thirds of natural gas vehicles are light-
duty (i.e., passenger) vehicles. This compares to roughly 230 
million conventional (mostly gasoline) light-duty vehicles. 
Furthermore, of the roughly 16.5 million new light-duty 
vehicles sold in 2006, only about 2,000 (0.01%) were natural 
gas vehicles.
    The Vehicle Technologies program at the Department of 
Energy funds a wide range of research activities on passenger 
vehicles and heavy-duty trucks. The program's mission is to 
``develop `leap frog' technologies that will provide Americans 
with greater freedom of mobility and energy security, while 
lowering costs and reducing impacts on the environment.'' The 
Department of Energy is currently addressing these research 
needs through two public-private research programs: the 21st 
Century Truck Partnership, which conducts research and 
development through collaborations with the heavy-duty trucking 
industry, and the FreedomCar and Hydrogen Fuel Initiative 
programs which examine the pre-competitive, high-risk research 
needed to develop technologies that will apply to a range of 
affordable cars and light trucks. Though the Department has 
funded natural gas vehicle R&D; in the past there are currently 
no activities in this area.

                    IV. SUMMARY OF COMMITTEE ACTIONS

    The Subcommittee on Energy and Environment met to consider 
H.R. 1622 on June 16, 2009, with no amendments to the bill. The 
Subcommittee agreed by voice vote to favorably report the bill, 
H.R. 1622, to the Full Committee on Science and Technology.
    The Committee on Science and Technology met on June 24, 
2009, to consider H.R. 1622 as reported by the Subcommittee. 
One amendment was offered by Representative Hall and was 
adopted by voice vote.
    The Committee favorably reported the bill, H.R. 1622, as 
amended, by a voice vote.

        V. SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE BILL, AS REPORTED

    Under H.R. 1622, the Secretary of Energy must conduct a 5-
year program of natural gas vehicle research, development, and 
demonstration. The bill defines ``natural gas'' as ``compressed 
natural gas, liquefied natural gas, biomethane, and mixtures of 
hydrogen and methane or natural gas''.
    In carrying out this natural gas vehicle program, the 
Secretary shall coordinate as necessary with the Administrator 
of the Environmental Protection Agency and with the natural gas 
vehicle industry.
    The bill specifies that the program must focus on: (1) the 
continued improvement and development of new, cleaner, more 
efficient light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy-duty natural gas 
vehicle engines; (2) the integration of those engines into 
light-duty, medium-duty, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles 
for on-road and off-road applications; (3) expanding product 
availability by ensuring that technologies researched and 
developed assist engines and vehicles in meeting Federal and 
State requirements and standards; (4) the demonstration and 
proper operation and use of the vehicles under all operating 
conditions; (5) the development and improvement of nationally 
recognized codes and standards for the continued safe operation 
of natural gas vehicles and their components; (6) improvement 
in the reliability and efficiency of natural gas fueling 
station infrastructure; (7) the certification of natural gas 
fueling station infrastructure to nationally recognized and 
industry safety standards; (8) the improvement in the 
reliability and efficiency of onboard natural gas fuel storage 
systems; (9) the development of new natural gas fuel storage 
materials: (10) the certification of onboard natural gas fuel 
storage systems to nationally recognized and industry safety 
standards; (11) the use of natural gas engines in hybrid 
vehicles; and (12) researching and developing technologies and 
processes so as to improve and streamline the process by which 
natural gas conversion systems meet Federal and State 
requirements.
    The Secretary is required to provide a report to Congress 
on the implementation of the program within 2 years of 
enactment.
    H.R. 1622 authorizes $30 million for each of the fiscal 
years 2010 through 2014 to carry out this program.

        VI. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS OF THE BILL, AS REPORTED

Section 1. Natural Gas Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration 
        Projects

    Section 1(a) directs the Secretary of Energy, in 
coordination with the Administrator of the Environmental 
Protection Agency as necessary, to conduct a five-year program 
of natural gas vehicle research, development and demonstration.
    Section 1(b) lays out the purpose of the program which is 
to focus on the continued improvement and development of new, 
cleaner, more efficient light-, medium- and heavy-duty natural 
gas vehicle engines; the integration of those engines into 
light-, medium-, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles for on-
road and off-road applications; expanding product availability 
by ensuring technologies researched and developed assist 
engines and vehicles in meeting Federal and State requirements 
and standards; the demonstration and proper operation and use 
of the vehicles; the development and improvement of nationally 
recognized codes and standards for natural gas vehicles; 
improvement in the reliability and efficiency of natural gas 
fueling station infrastructure; the certification of natural 
gas fueling station infrastructure; the improvement in the 
reliability and efficiency of onboard natural gas fuel storage 
systems; the development of new natural gas fuel storage 
materials; the certification of onboard natural gas fuel 
storage systems; the use of natural gas engines in hybrid 
vehicles; and researching and developing technologies and 
processes to streamline the process by which natural gas 
conversion systems meet Federal and State requirements and 
standards.
    Section 1(c) directs the Secretary to coordinate with the 
natural gas vehicle industry to ensure cooperation between the 
public and private sector.
    Section 1(d) requires the program to be conducted in 
accordance with sections 3001 and 3002 of the Energy Policy Act 
of 1992.
    Section 1(e) requires the Secretary to provide a report to 
Congress on the implementation of Section 1 of the Act not 
later than two years after the date of enactment.
    Section 1(f) authorizes the appropriation of $30 million 
for each of the fiscal years 2010 through 2014.
    Section 1(g) defines the term ``natural gas'' to mean 
compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, biomethane, and 
mixtures of hydrogen and methane or natural gas.

                          VII. COMMITTEE VIEWS

    The Committee believes that natural gas vehicles (NGVs) can 
play an important role in reducing transportation sector 
reliance on petroleum. In 2008 alone, NGVs displaced almost 300 
million gallons of petroleum in the United States. Natural gas 
is domestically available and less susceptible than oil to 
global price shocks. Though demand for natural gas will rise if 
more vehicles use it as a fuel, a recently released study by 
the Potential Gas Committee concluded that U.S. natural gas 
reserves are 35% higher than previously estimated. Furthermore, 
natural gas vehicles exhibit drastically lower emissions 
profiles than comparable gasoline or diesel vehicles. With 
these factors taken into account the Committee believes that as 
the U.S. transportation sector transitions to a more diverse 
range of fuels, natural gas will play an increasingly important 
role in meeting our nation's energy and environmental needs. 
Further advances from federally-funded research and development 
activities will serve to improve the state of NGV technology 
and allow the country to realize its benefits sooner.

                          VIII. COST ESTIMATE

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section IX of this report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 1622 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
1622 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section IX of this report.

             IX. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE COST ESTIMATE

H.R. 1622--A bill to provide for a program of research, development, 
        and demonstration on natural gas vehicles

    Summary: H.R. 1622 would direct the Secretary of Energy, in 
coordination with the Environmental Protection Agency, to carry 
out research, development, and demonstration projects on 
natural gas vehicles. Assuming appropriation of the authorized 
amounts, CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 1622 would cost 
the federal government $132 million over the 2010-2014 period 
and $18 million after 2014. Enacting the bill would not affect 
direct spending or revenues.
    H.R. 1622 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 1622 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 250 
(science, space, and technology).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       2010      2011      2012      2013      2014    2010-2014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level................................        30        30        30        30        30        150
Estimated Outlays..................................        17        25        30        30        30        132
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes the bill 
will be enacted near the end of 2009 and that the authorized 
amounts will be appropriated each year. Estimated outlays are 
based on historical spending patterns for research programs 
carried out by the Department of Energy.
    H.R. 1622 would authorize the appropriation of $150 million 
over the 2010-2014 period to conduct research, development, and 
demonstration programs on natural gas vehicles. The programs 
would focus on developing natural gas engines for on-road and 
off-road vehicles and on enhancing regulations, standards, and 
infrastructure to support the use of those vehicles. H.R. 1622 
also would require that projects carried out under the program 
be partially funded by nonfederal sources.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 1622 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs: Jeff LaFave; Impact on 
state, local, and tribal governments: Ryan Miller; Impact on 
the private sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  X. COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 104-4

    H.R. 1622 contains no unfunded mandates.

          XI. COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

       XII. STATEMENT ON GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House Rule XIII, the goal of 
H.R. 1622 is to advance technologies that promote increased 
usage of natural gas vehicles which may reduce dependence on 
foreign oil imports, promote U.S. energy security and reduce 
emissions.

                XIII. CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 1622.

               XIV. FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    H.R. 1622 does not establish nor authorize the 
establishment of any advisory committee.

                  XV. CONGRESSIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

    The Committee finds that H.R. 1622 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVI. EARMARK IDENTIFICATION

    H.R. 1622 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of Rule XXI.

      XVII. STATEMENT ON PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL, OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

      XVIII. CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW MADE BY THE BILL, AS REPORTED

    H.R. 1622, as reported, makes no changes in existing law.

                     XIX. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    On June 24, 2009, the Committee on Science and Technology 
favorably reported H.R. 1622, as amended, by a voice vote and 
recommended its passage by the House of Representatives.



    XX. PROCEEDINGS OF THE MARKUP BY THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND 
    ENVIRONMENT ON H.R. 1622, TO PROVIDE FOR A PROGRAM OF RESEARCH, 
         DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NATURAL GAS VEHICLES

                              ----------                              


                         TUESDAY, JUNE 16, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
            Subcommittee on Energy and Environment,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 10:00 a.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Brian 
Baird [Chair of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chair Baird. Good morning to everyone. Our committee will 
now come to order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Subcommittee on Energy and 
Environment meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 
2693, the Federal Oil Pollution Research Program Act; H.R. 
2729, To authorize the designation of National Environment 
Research Parks by the Secretary of Energy and for other 
purposes; and H.R. 1622, To provide for a program of research, 
development and demonstration on natural gas vehicles. We will 
now proceed with the markup.
    This morning the Energy and Environment Subcommittee meets 
to consider, as mentioned, three pieces of legislation: the 
Federal Oil Pollution Research Program Act, which is H.R. 2693; 
also H.R. 2729, the bill to authorize the Department of 
Energy's National Environment Research Parks; and H.R. 1622, a 
bill to provide for a program of research and development of 
vehicles that operate using natural gas as a fuel.
    First, the Subcommittee will consider H.R. 2693 authorized 
by Ms. Woolsey from California, which amends the federal 
interagency research and development program created in the Oil 
Pollution Act of 1990. This bill would improve the Federal 
Government's research and development efforts to prevent, 
detect or mitigate oil discharges. Through this 
reauthorization, federal agencies will be better equipped to 
respond to oil discharges wherever they occur.
    We will also mark up H.R. 2729, the bill introduced by Mr. 
Lujan from New Mexico to authorize the Department of Energy's 
seven National Environmental Research Parks. These parks are 
truly a national treasure, providing large tracts of land that 
represent nearly all of the major eco-regions in the United 
States and are a valuable resource for examining the transport 
of DOE-related contaminants, the long-term impacts of climate 
change and the various ways carbon is captured and released 
within the ecosystem. I am pleased to be a co-sponsor of both 
H.R. 2693 and H.R. 2729, and I encourage colleagues on both 
sides of the aisle to join in supporting those important bills.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider H.R. 1622, a bill 
introduced by Mr. Sullivan of Oklahoma and co-sponsored by Full 
Committee Ranking Member Mr. Hall. This bill reauthorizes the 
Department of Energy's research, development and demonstration 
program in natural gas-powered vehicles and related 
infrastructure. To transform our nation's energy sector, we 
must explore a diverse range of fuels and vehicle technologies. 
While only a piece in a very complex puzzle, natural gas can 
potentially provide us with an option that is both cleaner than 
petroleum and more domestically available. I look forward to 
the discussion on the bill and moving it towards a Full 
Committee markup.
    I thank the Members for their participation this morning 
and look forward to a productive markup.
    I now recognize Mr. Inglis to present opening remarks.
    [The prepared statement of Chair Baird follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chair Brian Baird
    This morning the Energy and Environment Subcommittee meets to 
consider three pieces of legislation: H.R. 2693, the Federal Oil 
Pollution Research Program Act; H.R. 2729, A bill to authorize the 
Department of Energy's National Environmental Research Parks; and H.R. 
1622, A bill to provide for a program of research and development of 
vehicles that operate using natural gas as a fuel.
    First, the Subcommittee will consider H.R. 2693, authored by Ms. 
Woolsey, which amends the federal interagency research and development 
program created in the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. This bill would 
improve the Federal Government's research and development efforts to 
prevent, detect, or mitigate oil discharges. Through this 
reauthorization, federal agencies will be better equipped to respond to 
oil discharges wherever they occur.
    We will also be marking up H.R. 2729, a bill introduced by Mr. 
Lujan to authorize the Department of Energy's seven National 
Environmental Research Parks. These parks are truly a national 
treasure, providing large tracts of land that represent nearly all of 
the major eco-regions in the United States. They are a valuable 
resource for examining the transport of DOE-related contaminants, long-
term impacts of climate change, and the various ways carbon is captured 
and released within ecosystems.
    I am pleased to be a co-sponsor of both H.R. 2693 and H.R. 2729, 
and I encourage my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to join me in 
supporting these important bills.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider H.R. 1622, a bill 
introduced by Mr. Sullivan of Oklahoma and co-sponsored by the Full 
Committee Ranking Member, Mr. Hall. This bill reauthorizes the 
Department of Energy's research, development, and demonstration program 
in natural gas powered vehicles and related infrastructure.
    To transform our nation's energy sector we must explore a diverse 
range of fuels and vehicle technologies. While only a piece in very 
complex puzzle, natural gas can potentially provide us with an option 
that is both cleaner than petroleum and domestically available. I look 
forward to the discussion on the bill and moving it towards a Full 
Committee markup.
    I thank the Members for their participation this morning, and I 
look forward to a productive markup.

    Mr. Inglis. Good morning, and thank you, Mr. Chair, for 
this hearing today. We will address several pieces of 
legislation that highlight the diversity of federal research 
initiatives into pressing environmental and energy-related 
problems. It is an opportunity to reflect on our broad 
jurisdiction and to ensure that federal research dollars are 
focused and well spent.
    The first bill before us, the Federal Oil Spill Research 
Program Act, will revitalize the federal research efforts 
focused on the prevention, detection and mitigation of oil 
spills. While this is critical research and I commend Ms. 
Woolsey's dedication to this important issue, I am not 
confident that H.R. 2693 is necessary to improve the 
interagency commitment to oil spill research. The testimony we 
heard on this topic two weeks ago indicated that the 
interagency process seems to be working. The witnesses 
indicated that the most significant problems were related to 
limited funding and poor communication with the states. 
Further, this bill makes NOAA the Chair of the interagency 
research committee though other federal agencies seem better 
geared toward leading this particular research effort.
    The second bill is H.R. 2729, a bill to permanently 
authorize the National Environmental Research Parks. I 
appreciate Mr. Lujan's leadership in this area. These 
facilities are a unique environmental research asset. The 
Environmental Research Park at the Savannah River site, for 
example, has provided South Carolina and Georgia students with 
the opportunity to engage in research in our local ecologies. 
Especially as we develop new energy alternatives, our 
Environmental Research Parks will help us understand how our 
energy choices impact our distinct ecosystems.
    I would also like to speak in support of H.R. 1622 and 
commend Mr. Sullivan for his leadership in promoting the 
development of natural gas vehicles. As long as we rely on oil 
to power our transportation sector, the U.S. will be dependent 
on hostile foreign nations and will continue to fund both sides 
of the War on Terror. H.R. 1622 will utilize American ingenuity 
to increase competition and fuel choices in the transportation 
sector and spur innovation economy and increasing our national 
security.
    Thank you again, Mr. Chair. I look forward to developing 
legislation that truly improves our diverse federal research 
efforts.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Inglis follows:]
            Prepared Statement of Representative Bob Inglis
    Good morning and thank you for holding this hearing, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we will address several pieces of legislation that highlight 
the diversity of federal research initiatives into pressing 
environmental and energy related problems. It's an opportunity to 
reflect on our broad jurisdiction and to ensure that federal research 
dollars are focused and well spent.
    The first bill before us, the Federal Oil Spill Research Program 
Act will revitalize the federal research effort focused on the 
prevention, detection, and mitigation of oil spills. While this is 
critical research and I commend Ms. Woolsey's dedication to this 
important issue, I am not confident that H.R. 2693 is necessary to 
improve the interagency commitment to oil spill research. The testimony 
we heard on this topic two weeks ago indicated that the interagency 
process seems to be working. The witnesses indicated that the most 
significant problems were related to limited funding and poor 
communication with the states. Further, this bill makes NOAA the Chair 
of the interagency research committee, though other federal agencies 
are better geared toward leading this particular research effort.
    The second bill is H.R. 2729, a bill to permanently authorize 
National Environmental Research Parks. I appreciate Mr. Lujan's 
leadership in this area. These facilities are a unique environmental 
research asset. The environmental research park at the Savannah River 
Site has provided South Carolina's research universities and students 
with the unique opportunity to engage in research on our local ecology. 
Especially as we develop new energy alternatives, our National 
Environmental Research Parks will help us understand how our energy 
choices impact our distinct ecosystems.
    I'd also like to speak in support of H.R. 1622 and commend Mr. 
Sullivan for his leadership in promoting the development of natural gas 
vehicles. So long as we rely on oil to power our transportation sector, 
the U.S. will be dependent on hostile foreign nations and we will 
continue to fund both sides of the war on terror. H.R. 1622 will 
utilize American ingenuity to increase competition and fuel choice in 
the transportation sector, spurring our innovation economy and 
increasing our national security.
    Thank you again, Mr. Chairman, and I look forward to developing 
legislation that truly improves our diverse federal research efforts.

    Chair Baird. Thank you, Mr. Inglis. Members may place any 
statements for the record at this point.
    We now consider H.R. 1622, To provide for a program of 
research, development and demonstration on natural gas 
vehicles. I recognize Mr. Inglis to discuss his bill--this 
bill.
    Mr. Inglis. I thought I grabbed authorship here. This is 
pretty great.
    Chair Baird. Anything else you want to discuss, have it. 
You have five minutes.
    Mr. Inglis. Thank you, Mr. Chair. As I had mentioned 
earlier, I am very happy to be supportive of this bill, and I 
think Mr. Sullivan is doing good work here by promoting the 
development of natural gas vehicles. This technology we know 
works and is available to us, has been used and is being used. 
It just hopefully will increase the competitive position of 
natural gas and introduce this concept of fuel choice in the 
transportation sector because one of the ways--the best way to 
break the strategic value of crude oil is to introduce 
competition and effective fuel choice. And so that is what this 
bill is about and so I am happy to be supportive and I think 
there will be great support on this side of the aisle for that 
concept, and I yield back, Mr. Chair. Thank you.
    Chair Baird. I thank the gentleman and I think the bill is 
well summarized. I want to thank Mr. Hall and Ranking Member 
Sullivan and Mr. Inglis for their work on it. I offer my 
support and we take this bill to the Full Committee.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized? Mr. Davis is 
recognized for five minutes.
    Mr. Davis. Mr. Chair, thank you very much. I think as we 
look at our portfolio today of transportation, I think we have 
ignored too long the use of natural gas in our automobiles. It 
is my understanding that natural gas burns much cleaner, some 
say as much as 75 to 80 percent cleaner than the fossil fuels 
that we derive from the other source, that being crude oil. And 
as I look at our retooling today and revamping the auto 
industry, especially as we look at the two that are in 
bankruptcy, it would seem to be very logical that these new 
automobile companies with the old names should start looking at 
maybe integrating a storage capacity in the actual structure of 
those automobiles to where we could get 250 to 300 miles on a 
fill-up, and I am not hearing much encouragement as I watch 
this debate that we have today on climate change. I am not 
hearing much debate that this should be one of the major 
alternatives that we look at that would replace the fuels that 
we get today from crude oil, most of which is being imported.
    I was excited the last 12 to 14 months as I heard 
conversations during the campaigns that natural gas should be 
and could be the replacement, in many cases, of fuels derived 
from crude oil, so it is my hope that as we pass this 
legislation. I am not sure that the amount of dollars we are 
talking about is even adequate, but I think that we have today, 
in this country, a valuable resource that is under-utilized 
that can in fact play a major role in helping reduce the 
climate change that we are seeing and can help reduce carbon 
emissions. And it is my hope that this legislation passes and 
that we even start exerting more interest in seeing this as an 
alternative to crude oil.
    Chair Baird. I thank the gentleman for his comments, and I 
share his interest in the issue of storage technology. There 
has been some fascinating work done recently using carbon 
nanotubes to enhance storage technology of gas and perhaps we 
can explore that at a future date.
    Ms. Woolsey had indicated a--Ms. Woolsey, did you want to 
offer comments?
    Ms. Woolsey. No.
    Chair Baird. Are there any additional Members wishing to 
offer comments? If no, I ask unanimous consent that the bill is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    Are there any amendments to this legislation? If no, then 
the vote will occur on the bill, H.R. 1622. All in favor, say 
aye. All those opposed, no. In the opinion of the Chair, the 
ayes have it.
    I recognize myself to offer a motion. I move that the 
Subcommittee favorably report H.R. 1622 to the Full Committee. 
Furthermore, I move that the staff be instructed to prepare the 
Subcommittee report and make necessary technical and conforming 
changes to the bill in accordance with the recommendations of 
the Subcommittee.
    The question is on the motion to report the bill favorably. 
Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye. 
Opposed, no. The ayes have it. The bill is favorably reported. 
Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the 
table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days in which 
to submit supplemental Minority or additional views on the 
measure.
    I want to thank Members for their attendance. This 
concludes our Subcommittee markup.
    [Whereupon, at 10:58 a.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


                 H.R. 1622, Section-by-Section Analysis



                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
                 H.R. 1622, To provide for a program of
                research, development, and demonstration
                        on natural gas vehicles
Section 1. Natural Gas Vehicle Research, Development, and Demonstration 
        Projects

Section 1(a) directs the Secretary of Energy, in coordination with the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency as necessary, to 
conduct a five-year program of natural gas vehicle research, 
development and demonstration.

Section 1(b) lays out the purpose of the program which is to focus on 
the continued improvement and development of new, cleaner, more 
efficient light-, medium- and heavy-duty natural gas vehicle engines; 
the integration of those engines into light-, medium-, and heavy-duty 
natural gas vehicles for on-road and off-road applications; expanding 
product availability by assisting manufacturers with the certification 
of the engines; the demonstration and proper operation and use of the 
vehicles; the development and improvement of nationally recognized 
codes and standards for natural gas vehicles; improvement in the 
reliability and efficiency of natural gas fueling station 
infrastructure; the certification of natural gas fueling station 
infrastructure; the improvement in the reliability and efficiency of 
on-board natural gas fuel storage systems; the development of new 
natural gas fuel storage materials; the certification of on-board 
natural gas fuel storage systems; and the use of natural gas engines in 
hybrid vehicles.

Section 1(c) deals with certification of conversion systems and directs 
The Secretary to coordinate with the EPA Administrator on issues 
related to streamlining the certification of natural gas conversion 
systems to the appropriate federal certification requirement and in-use 
emission standards.

Section 1(d) directs the Secretary to coordinate with the natural gas 
vehicle industry to ensure cooperation between the public and private 
sector.

Section 1(e) requires the program to be conducted in accordance with 
sections 3001 and 3002 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

Section 1(f) requires the Secretary to provide a report to Congress on 
the implementation of Section 1 of the Act not later than two years 
after the date of enactment.

Section 1(g) authorizes the appropriation of $30 million for each of 
the fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

Section 1(h) defines the term ``natural gas'' to mean compressed 
natural gas, liquefied natural gas, biomethane, and mixtures of 
hydrogen and methane or natural gas.



XXI. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 1622, TO PROVIDE 
FOR A PROGRAM OF RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION ON NATURAL GAS 
                                VEHICLES

                              ----------                                



                        WEDNESDAY, JUNE 24, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:00 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chair of the Committee] presiding.
    Chair Gordon. The Committee will come to order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science and Technology 
meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 2965, the 
Enhancing Small Business Research and Innovation Act of 2009; 
H.R. 2729, To authorize the designation of National Environment 
Research Parks by the Secretary of Energy and for other 
purposes; and H.R. 1622, To provide for the programs of 
research, development and demonstration on natural gas 
vehicles.
    Today the Committee is going to mark up three good 
bipartisan pieces of legislation. The first bill, H.R. 2965, 
the Enhancing Small Business Research and Innovation Act, is 
one of the most significant bills the Committee will likely 
address in this Congress. The Small Business Innovation 
Research Program (SBIR) is a more than $2.3 billion federal 
investment in small high-tech businesses that assist them in 
developing commercial products and assist agencies in their 
mission related to research agendas. It is the single largest 
federal program supporting the private sector research 
activities.
    Since its beginning more than 25 years ago, we have learned 
about the significant contributions small high-tech startup 
companies can have to our economy and employment growth. AmGen, 
Apple, Microsoft, Genetech, Research-in-Motion all started as 
small high-tech entrepreneurial firms. In the current economic 
environment, we need to do everything possible to support small 
high-tech entrepreneurs in the United States, which is the goal 
of the SBIR program.
    There is no stronger supporter of the SBIR program than 
Representative David Wu. H.R. 2965 is largely the result of 
hard work by Representative Wu. In the 110th and 111th 
Congress, he has held three Subcommittee hearings on the 
program and he has worked closely with the Small Business 
Committee in crafting this legislation. H.R. 2965 is 
substantially the same bill which passed the House last year 
with only 43 no votes. H.R. 2965 was introduced with strong 
bipartisan support.
    Unfortunately, the SBIR program is operating under rules 
more than 25 years old. H.R. 2965 makes major improvements to 
the SBIR program which reflects the current set of challenges 
confronting our small high-tech entrepreneurs. I strongly 
support this legislation and will work with my counterpart on 
the Small Business Committee to bring it to the Floor as 
quickly as possible. This program is set to expire on July 31, 
so time is of the essence.
    Today we will also consider H.R. 2729, a bill introduced by 
Representative Lujan that will formally authorize the seven 
National Environmental Research Parks supported by the 
Department of Energy (DOE). These parks are a truly unique 
national resource. They provide large tracks of undisturbed 
land that enable long-term research in environmental sciences, 
climate change and for the development and testing of methods 
to clean up past pollutions. The parks are located on DOE sites 
in states across the country. They have had bipartisan 
cooperation in making this a good bill, and I hope that you 
will all join me in supporting it.
    Finally, the Committee will consider H.R. 1622, a bill 
introduced by Mr. Sullivan of Oklahoma and co-sponsored by my 
friend from Texas, Mr. Hall, as well as Mr. Lujan and Mr. 
Lucas. This bill reauthorizes the Department of Energy's 
research, development and demonstration program in natural gas-
powered vehicles and related infrastructure. The vehicle fleet 
of the future will include a diverse range of fuels and vehicle 
technologies, and since it is both cleaner than petroleum and 
domestically available, natural gas will likely play an 
important role in a more sustained transportation sector.
    I hope we can continue to improve these bills in a 
bipartisan manner today, and I look forward to moving to the 
Floor for their final passage.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.
    [The prepared statement of Chair Gordon follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chair Bart Gordon
    Today the Committee is going to markup three good, bipartisan 
pieces of legislation. The first bill, H.R. 2965, the Enhancing Small 
Business Research and Innovation Act, is one of the most significant 
bills the Committee will likely address in this Congress.
    The Small Business Innovation Research Program (SBIR) is a more 
than 2.3 billion dollar federal investment in small high-tech 
businesses that assists them in developing commercial products and 
assists agencies in their mission-related research agendas.
    It is the single largest federal program supporting private-sector 
research activities.
    Since its beginning more than 25 years ago, we have learned about 
the significant contributions small high-tech start-up companies can 
have to our economic and employment growth--AmGen, Apple, Microsoft, 
Genetech, and Research-in-Motion all started as small high-tech 
entrepreneurial firms. In the current economic environment we need to 
do everything possible to support small high-tech entrepreneurs in the 
United States, which is the goal of the SBIR program.
    There is no stronger supporter of the SBIR program than 
Representative David Wu. H.R. 2965 is largely the result of hard work 
by Representative Wu. In the 110th and 111th Congresses he has held 
three Subcommittee hearings on the program and has worked closely with 
the Small Business Committee in crafting this legislation. H.R. 2965 is 
substantially the same bill which passed the House last year with only 
43 no votes. H.R. 2965 was introduced with strong bipartisan support.
    Unfortunately, the SBIR program is operating under rules more than 
25 years old. H.R. 2965 makes major improvements to the SBIR program 
which reflect the current set of challenges confronting our small high-
tech entrepreneurs. I strongly support this legislation and will work 
with my counterpart on the Small Business Committee to bring it to the 
Floor as quickly as possible. This program is set to expire on July 31, 
so time is of the essence.
    Today we will also consider H.R. 2729, a bill introduced by Mr. 
Lujan that will formally authorize the seven National Environmental 
Research Parks supported by the Department of Energy. These parks are a 
truly unique national resource.
    They provide large tracts of undisturbed land that enable long-term 
research in environmental sciences, climate change, and for the 
development and testing of methods to clean up past pollution.
    The Parks are located on DOE sites in states across the country, 
including my home State of Tennessee. We've had bipartisan cooperation 
in making this a good bill, and I hope you will all join me in 
supporting it.
    Finally, the Subcommittee will consider H.R. 1622, a bill 
introduced by Mr. Sullivan of Oklahoma and co-sponsored by my friend 
from Texas, Mr. Hall, as well as Mr. Lujan and Mr. Lucas. This bill 
reauthorizes the Department of Energy's research, development, and 
demonstration program in natural gas powered vehicles and related 
infrastructure.
    The vehicle fleet of the future will include a diverse range of 
fuels and vehicle technologies.
    And since it is both cleaner than petroleum and domestically 
available, Natural gas will likely play an important role in a more 
sustainable transportation sector.
    I hope we can continue to improve these bills in a bipartisan 
manner today, and I look forward to moving to the Floor for final 
passage.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.

    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chair, I thank you, and as you say, today we 
are marking up three bills: H.R. 2965, and the other two bills 
authorizing the designation of National Research Parks by the 
Secretary of Energy and for H.R. 1622 that provides a program 
of research, development and demonstration on natural gas 
vehicles.
    As you ably pointed out, H.R. 2965 extends and makes 
important changes to the Small Business Innovation Research 
Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer Program, 
which as their names indicate, fund innovation and technology 
development of America's small businesses. One of the basic 
purposes of my parroting what you are saying is that I speak 
for myself when I say I support this bill and note that both 
the Committee and the Full House passed a bill very similar to 
this version last year, as you ably pointed out, and I am 
pleased that we are again able to advance this bill in a 
bipartisan fashion, working closely with the Majority as well 
as our counterparts on the Small Business Committee. This has 
allowed us to build a strong legislative record on this program 
which will serve us well as we aim to complete Floor action and 
conference negotiations before the program expires on July 31.
    H.R. 2729 will authorize and make permanent the existing 
seven National Environmental Research Parks across the country. 
The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor 
laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental 
studies on protected lands that act as buffers around the 
Department of Energy facilities. I commend Mr. Lujan for his 
dedication on the Parks and for authorizing this legislation. I 
will be offering an amendment to the bill that came about as a 
result of consultation with the Parks and with the Majority 
staff to clarify that the Parks and the sites they are located 
on shall continue to be run as they currently are.
    H.R. 1622 reauthorizes the natural gas vehicle R&D; program 
that was created in the 1992 Energy Policy Act. This bill was 
introduced by Representative John Sullivan of Oklahoma and I 
co-sponsored as does Representative Lucas on this committee. On 
a well-to-wheels basis, natural gas vehicles produce 22 percent 
less greenhouse gases than comparable diesel vehicles and 29 
percent less gasoline vehicles. In 2007, natural gas vehicles 
displaced 250 million gallons of petroleum in the United 
States. In the next 17 years, the industry's goal is to grow 
that to 10 billion gallons. Over 60 percent of the petroleum 
used in America is imported. Much of it is from countries that 
are unstable and do not have the best interests of the United 
States in mind. Meanwhile, almost 98 percent of the natural gas 
used in America is produced in North America, 85 percent in the 
U.S. and the rest in Canada. Just last Thursday the report by 
the Potential Gas Committee, the authority on gas supplies, 
shows that the United States holds far larger reserves than 
previously thought, 35 percent more than the previous report 
showed in 2006. Natural gas makes sense as a transition fuel, 
and this bill will help us get more natural gas vehicles on the 
road. I will be offering an amendment to H.R. 1622 that will 
simply clear up some wording in order to avoid potential 
jurisdictional issues.
    And since I have just a little bit of time left, I want to 
yield the balance of my time to Congressman Adrian Smith for 
additional comments on H.R. 2965.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Thank you Mr. Chairman. Today we're marking up three bills, H.R. 
2965, the Enhancing Small Business Research and Innovation Act of 2009; 
H.R. 2729, To authorize the designation of National Environmental 
Research Parks by the Secretary of Energy, and for other purposes; and 
H.R. 1622, To provide for a program of research, development, and 
demonstration on natural gas vehicles.
    H.R. 2965 extends and makes important changes to the Small Business 
Innovation Research program (SBIR) and the Small Business Technology 
Transfer program (STTR), which, as their names indicate, fund 
innovation and technology development at America's small businesses. I 
support this bill, and note that both the Committee and the Full House 
passed a very similar version last year. I'm pleased that we're again 
able to advance this bill in a bipartisan fashion, working closely with 
the Majority as well as our counterparts on the Small Business 
Committee. This has allowed us to build a strong legislative record on 
this program, which will serve us well as we aim to complete Floor 
action and conference negotiations before the program expires on July 
31st.
    H.R. 2729 will authorize and make permanent the existing seven 
National Environmental Research Parks across the country. The National 
Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide 
opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as 
buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. I commend Mr. 
Lujan on his dedication to the Parks and for authoring this 
legislation. I will be offering an amendment to the bill that came 
about as a result of consultation with the parks and with the Majority 
staff to clarify that the parks and the sites they are located on shall 
continue to be run as they currently are.
    H.R. 1622 reauthorizes the natural gas vehicle RD&D; program that 
was created in the 1992 Energy Policy Act. This bill was introduced by 
Rep. John Sullivan of Oklahoma and is co-sponsored by myself and Rep. 
Lucas on this committee. On a well-to-wheels basis, natural gas 
vehicles produce 22 percent less greenhouse gases than comparable 
diesel vehicles and 29 percent less than gasoline vehicles. In 2007, 
natural gas vehicles displaced 250 million gallons of petroleum in the 
U.S. In the next 17 years, the industry's goal is to grow that to 10 
billion gallons. Over 60 percent of the petroleum used in America is 
imported--much of it from countries that are unstable or do not have 
the best interests of the U.S. in mind. Meanwhile, almost 98 percent of 
the natural gas used in America is produced in North America--85 
percent in the U.S. and the rest in Canada.
    Just last Thursday, the report by the Potential Gas Committee, the 
authority on gas supplies, shows the United States holds far larger 
reserves than previously thought--35 percent more that the previous 
report showed in 2006. Natural gas makes sense as a transition fuel, 
and this bill will help us get more natural gas vehicles on the road. I 
will be offering an amendment to H.R. 1622 that will simply clear up 
some wording in order to avoid potential jurisdictional issues.
    With that I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Gordon. Members may place statements in the record at 
this point.
    We will now consider H.R. 1622, To provide for the program 
of research, development and demonstration of natural gas 
vehicles. I recognize Mr. Hall to present any remarks on the 
bill.
    Mr. Hall. Thank you, Mr. Chair.
    For natural gas vehicles to achieve their market potential, 
federally funded R&D; is needed to expand product offerings of 
engines to meet a wider range of applications. The process of 
integrating these natural gas engines into additional medium- 
and heavy-duty vehicle platforms has to be accelerated. These 
platforms include school buses, transit buses, trash trucks, 
delivery trucks and over-the-road trucks as well as marine and 
off-road applications. Natural gas hybrid electric platforms 
must be expedited too. In addition, the cost and weight of 
compressed and liquefied natural gas storage systems must be 
reduced. Finally, work must continue on improving NGV and NGV 
fueling safety codes and standards.
    H.R. 1622 authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to fund 
natural gas vehicle research, development and demonstration 
needs on natural gas vehicles and to coordinate this research 
with the Environmental Protection Agency and the private sector 
if necessary. I think it is a good bill at a good time and I 
urge my colleagues to vote in favor of the passage.
    With that, I yield back the balance of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Thank you Mr. Chairman. For natural gas vehicles to achieve their 
market potential, federally funded R&D; is needed to expand product 
offerings of engines to meet a wider range of applications. The process 
of integrating those natural gas engines into additional medium- and 
heavy-duty vehicle platforms must be accelerated. Those platforms 
include school buses, transit buses, trash trucks, delivery trucks and 
over-the-road trucks, as well as marine and off-road applications. 
Natural gas hybrid-electric platforms must be expedited, too. In 
addition, the cost and weight of compressed and liquefied natural gas 
storage systems must be reduced. Finally, work must continue on 
improving NGV and NGV fueling safety codes and standards.
    H.R. 1622 authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to fund natural 
gas vehicle research, development and demonstration needs on natural 
gas vehicles and to coordinate this research with the Environmental 
Protection Agency and the private sector if necessary.
    I think this is a good bill at a good time and I urge my colleagues 
to vote in favor of passage. With that I yield back the balance of my 
time.

    Chair Gordon. Does anyone else wish to be recognized? Mr. 
Bilbray is recognized.
    Mr. Bilbray. Yes Mr. Chair.
    Mr. Chair, it is not often that those of us that are the 
clean air fanatics in California can agree with the drill-the-
ground fanatics in Texas. But I think natural gas fueling is 
really one of those things we can do. And I have to apologize 
to my colleagues here on the Committee. I have not forwarded 
you the new carbon standard on fuels and the ranking that the 
Air Resource Board in California has come out with and I will 
send you that copy because natural gas is a big winner on this, 
not only from the greenhouse gas point of view, but the fact 
that this system is a sealed system with natural gas which 
avoids a major problem that we have with emissions with a 
traditional system of either ethanol or gasoline, and that is 
evaporative emissions. By having the sealed emission, you avoid 
a whole emission problem that is overlooked. You always hear 
people talk about tailpipe emissions but not what is coming out 
in evaporation.
    The natural gas issue is a real untouched resource. In 
1992, I drove a natural gas vehicle, used it regularly as my 
county car and really was frustrated with the fact that maybe 
because there wasn't any real agenda being pushed or leadership 
in Washington, we didn't see that reflected, and I think that I 
would ask all of you to remember that one of our challenges of 
going to alternative fuels, as we call it, is the 
infrastructure. But in the suburban area, the overwhelming 
majority of homes are plumbed with natural gas today and one of 
the things I want to make sure is clear in the record that when 
we talk about refueling, we should not only be talking about 
centralized gas station type of refueling but also the 
development of technology for home dispensing so that 
individuals can actually fuel up their vehicle while the car is 
parked in the garage, which then gives the consumer the choice 
to be able to use that natural gas every morning rather than 
going off to the alternative fuel, which may be gasoline or 
ethanol or some other fuel. And so there is a real excitement 
here that there is an infrastructure there that goes to most 
homes. There is a technology that has the power to be able to 
generate the needs of light-duty and heavy-duty trucks and the 
fact that it is very cost-effective and we have over 300 or 400 
years' capacity of this fuel, and when you see the fuel at the 
index for greenhouse gases, you will be very impressed with how 
underestimated the benefits of natural gas are.
    So I just want to praise the authors of this bill and look 
forward to moving forward. Make sure that when we talk about 
federal standards we also, Mr. Chair, include the unified 
building code so that our building inspectors in our community 
are not only allowing but encouraging people to go to this 
technology for their home dispensing so that we don't have to 
rely on building alternative infrastructures, so I yield back 
and I want to thank you very much for bringing this forward to 
the authors.
    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Bilbray for that good input.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized? If not, let me 
again thank Mr. Sullivan and Ranking Member Hall for the good 
work on this bill and staff, the work of Elizabeth Chapel and 
Chris King, that brought us a good bill.
    I ask unanimous consent that the bill is considered as read 
and open to amendment at any point and that the Members proceed 
with the amendments in order of the roster. Without objection, 
so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Texas, Mr. Hall. Are you ready to proceed 
with your amendment?
    Mr. Hall. I am ready to proceed. I do have an amendment at 
the desk.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1622, amendment number 001, 
offered by Mr. Hall of Texas.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chair, I won't take that long. As I said in 
my opening statement, this amendment simply aims to ensure that 
this bill remains in the sole jurisdiction of the Science and 
Technology Committee by rewording one of the areas of focus and 
adding a clarifying area of focus. It does not make any 
legislation changes to the bill. I urge the passage.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Mr. Chairman, as I said in my opening statement, this amendment 
simply aims to ensure that this bill remains in the sole jurisdiction 
of the Science and Technology Committee by rewording one of the areas 
of focus, and adding a clarifying area of focus. It does not make any 
legislative changes to the bill.

    Chair Gordon. That was a good objective. Is there further 
discussion to the amendment? If no, the vote occurs on the 
amendment. All in favor, say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it 
and the amendment is agreed to.
    Are there any other amendments? If no, the vote is on the 
bill, H.R. 1622 as amended. All those in favor will say aye. 
All those opposed, no. In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes 
have it.
    I recognize Mr. Hall to offer a motion.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chair, I move that the Committee favorably 
report H.R. 1622 as amended to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill as amended do pass. Furthermore, I 
move that the staff be instructed to prepare the legislative 
report and make necessary technical and conforming changes and 
that the Chair take all necessary steps to bring the bill 
before the House for consideration. I yield back.
    Chair Gordon. The question is on the motion to report the 
bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify by 
saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it. The bill is 
favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days in 
which to submit supplemental Minority or additional views on 
the measure. And let me again in closing say that just because 
we didn't have a lot of rancor today does not mean that we did 
not have three very good bills. For some that came in a little 
after the opening statements, I want to remind you that our 
first bill was a $2.3 billion authorization for research in 
small business innovation. It is the largest such program in 
the Federal Government. When we are talking about creating new 
jobs for this country, it is going to go a long way, and so I 
thank you for helping. I want to thank the Members for their 
attendance. This concludes our Committee markup.
    [Whereupon, at 11:40 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


                            Amendment Roster