H. Rept. 111-220 - 111th Congress (2009-2010)
July 22, 2009, As Reported by the Appropriations Committee

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House Report 111-220 - DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2010




[House Report 111-220]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]


111th Congress }                                             {   Report
  1st Session  }         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES            {  111-220                                                      _______________________________________________________________________
 
  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2010 

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 3293]

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


 July 22, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed
















  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2010














111th Congress  }                                           {    Report
  1st Session   }         HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES          {   111-220                                                                _______________________________________________________________________

  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2010

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [TO ACCOMPANY H.R. 3293]

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


 July 22, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                               ----------

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51-123                         WASHINGTON : 2009 

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111th Congress  }                                            {   Report
  1st Session   }           HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES         {  111-220
                                                    
======================================================================

  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2010

                                _______
                                

  July 22, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Obey, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3293]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services (except the Food and Drug Administration, the Agency 
for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry and the Indian Health 
Service), Education, Committee for Purchase From People Who Are 
Blind or Severely Disabled, Corporation for National and 
Community Service, Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service, Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Review Commission, Institute of Museum and Library 
Services, Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, National 
Council on Disability, National Labor Relations Board, National 
Mediation Board, Occupational Safety and Health Review 
Commission, Railroad Retirement Board, and the Social Security 
Administration for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2010, 
and for other purposes.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Summary of Estimates and Appropriations....................
                                                                      3
General Summary of the Bill................................
                                                                      4
Title I--Department of Labor:
        Employment and Training Administration.............     2
                                                                     18
        Employee Benefits Security Administration..........    15
                                                                     32
        Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...............    15
                                                                     32
        Employment Standards Administration................    16
                                                                     33
        Occupational Safety and Health Administration......    21
                                                                     36
        Mine Safety and Health Administration..............    24
                                                                     38
        Bureau of Labor Statistics.........................    25
                                                                     39
        Office of Disability Employment Policy.............    26
                                                                     40
        Departmental Management............................    26
                                                                     40
                Veterans Employment and Training...........    28
                                                                     43
                Office of Inspector General................    29
                                                                     44
        General Provisions.................................    29
                                                                     45
Title II--Department of Health and Human Services:
        Health Resources and Services Administration.......    33
                                                                     46
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.........    38
                                                                     75
        National Institutes of Health......................    42
                                                                    106
        Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
            Administration.................................    49
                                                                    140
        Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.........    51
                                                                    150
        Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.........    51
                                                                    156
        Administration for Children and Families...........    55
                                                                    160
        Administration on Aging............................    64
                                                                    179
        Office of the Secretary............................    65
                                                                    184
                Office of Inspector General................    68
                                                                    190
                Public Health and Social Services Emergency 
                    Fund...................................    69
                                                                    191
        General Provisions.................................    72
                                                                    197
Title III--Department of Education:
        Education for the Disadvantaged....................    81
                                                                    198
        Impact Aid.........................................    83
                                                                    204
        School Improvement Programs........................    84
                                                                    205
        Indian Education...................................    86
                                                                    209
        State Fiscal Stabilization Fund....................
                                                                    221
        Innovation and Improvement.........................    86
                                                                    210
        Safe Schools and Citizenship Education.............    90
                                                                    221
        English Language Acquisition.......................    91
                                                                    225
        Special Education..................................    91
                                                                    225
        Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research....    92
                                                                    228
        Special Institutions for Persons with Disabilities.    92
                                                                    232
        Career, Technical and Adult Education..............    93
                                                                    233
        Student Financial Assistance.......................    96
                                                                    236
        Student Aid Administration.........................    96
                                                                    238
        Higher Education...................................    97
                                                                    239
        Howard University..................................   100
                                                                    252
        College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans......   100
                                                                    252
        Historically Black College and University Capital 
            Financing......................................   100
                                                                    252
        Institute of Education Sciences....................   101
                                                                    253
        Departmental Management............................   101
                                                                    255
        Office for Civil Rights............................   102
                                                                    257
        Office of the Inspector General....................   102
                                                                    257
        General Provisions.................................   102
                                                                    258
Title IV--Related Agencies:
        Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or 
            Severely Disabled..............................   104
                                                                    258
        Corporation for National and Community Service.....   104
                                                                    258
        Corporation for Public Broadcasting................   108
                                                                    263
        Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service.........   110
                                                                    264
        Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission...   111
                                                                    264
        Institute of Museum and Library Services...........   111
                                                                    265
        Medicare Payment Advisory Commission...............   112
                                                                    267
        National Council on Disability.....................   112
                                                                    268
        National Labor Relations Board.....................   112
                                                                    268
        National Mediation Board...........................   113
                                                                    268
        Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission...   113
                                                                    269
        Railroad Retirement Board..........................   113
                                                                    269
        Social Security Administration.....................   115
                                                                    270
Title V--General Provisions:
        House of Representatives Report Requirements.......
                                                                    273

                Summary of Estimates and Appropriations

    The following table compares on a summary basis the 
appropriations, including trust funds for fiscal year 2009, the 
budget request for fiscal year 2010, and the Committee 
recommendation for fiscal year 2010 in the accompanying bill. 
All references to fiscal year 2009 funding exclude 
appropriations enacted under the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), Public Law 111-5, 
unless the Recovery Act funds are referenced.

                                         2010 LABOR, HHS, EDUCATION BILL
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Fiscal year--                2010 Committee
                                                     ------------------------------------      compared to--
                                                                                         -----------------------
                                                         2009        2010        2010        2009        2010
                                                      Comparable    Budget     Committee  Comparable    Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor.................................     $17,077     $15,981     $15,959     -$1,118        -$22
    Advances........................................       2,519       2,508       2,508         -11           0
Department of Health and Human Services.............     536,715     586,246     588,274     +51,559      +2,028
    Advances........................................      74,500      89,739      89,739     +15,239           0
Department of Education.............................      61,619      67,777      67,759      +6,140         -18
    Advances........................................      21,906      21,906      21,906           0           0
Related Agencies....................................      54,804      60,729      60,689      +5,885         -40
    Advances........................................      15,830      16,440      16,440        +610           0
Grand Total, current year...........................     670,215     730,733     732,681     +62,466      +1,948
    Advances........................................     114,755     130,593     130,593     +15,838           0
Current year total using 302(b) scorekeeping........     671,515     728,547     730,460     +58,945      +1,913
    Mandatory.......................................     518,768     566,995     567,060     +48,292         +65
    Discretionary...................................     152,747     161,552     163,400     +10,653      +1,848
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Note.--For comparability, an adjustment should be made for 
the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), which 
was funded in the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, 
and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2009. After the LIHEAP 
adjustment, the fiscal year 2010 funding level for the 
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is 
$46,459,000,000 more than the comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level. In addition, as requested, the Committee bill 
includes a one-time transfer of all remaining balances in the 
Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund from the Department of 
Homeland Security to HHS. The amount to be transferred is 
currently estimated to be $1,569,000,000.
    As a result of the LIHEAP comparability adjustment for HHS 
described above, the fiscal year 2010 Grand Total, current year 
for the Committee bill is $57,366,000,000 more than the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level. Further, the Current 
year total using 302(b) scorekeeping for the fiscal year 2010 
Committee bill is $56,165,000,000 more than the comparable 
fiscal year 2009 funding level. The discretionary amount within 
the Current year total using 302(b) scorekeeping for the fiscal 
year 2010 Committee bill is $7,873,000,000 more than the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level.

                                           PROGRAM LEVEL DISCRETIONARY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Fiscal year--                2010 Committee
                                                     ------------------------------------      compared to--
                                                                                         -----------------------
                                                         2009        2010        2010        2009        2010
                                                      Comparable    Budget     Committee  Comparable    Budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor.................................     $12,411     $13,280     $13,257       +$846        -$23
Department of Health and Human Services.............      66,285      71,758      73,721      +7,436      +1,963
Department of Education.............................      63,533      64,692      64,674      +1,141         -18
Related Agencies....................................      12,748      14,028      13,989      +1,241         -39
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
    Subtotal Program Level..........................     154,977     163,758    $165,641    +$10,664     +$1,883
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Note.--As a result of the LIHEAP comparability adjustment 
for HHS described in the previous table's note, the fiscal year 
2010 discretionary program level for HHS is $2,336,000,000 more 
than the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level. Further, 
the Subtotal Program Level for the fiscal year 2010 Committee 
bill is $5,564,000,000 more than the comparable fiscal year 
2009 funding level.

                      General Summary of the Bill

    The country is experiencing the longest and deepest 
economic downturn since the Great Depression, with more than 
seven million jobs lost during the current recession. In June 
2009, the unemployment rate reached 9.5 percent as there were 
nearly 15 million unemployed workers in the United States, 
according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This represents a 
97 percent increase in unemployed workers since the beginning 
of the recession in December, 2007. More than four million, or 
29 percent, of the unemployed had been out of work for six 
months or more--the highest proportion of long-term joblessness 
on record. Many families cannot pay their bills or mortgage 
payments, and trillions of dollars of wealth have been stripped 
from Americans' retirement accounts.
    Moreover, the recession has caused an economic crisis for 
many States. According to the Center on Budget and Policy 
Priorities, some 47 States are facing fiscal stress. Budget 
shortfalls for State fiscal years 2010 and 2011 may exceed 
$350,000,000,000. To close their budget gaps, at least 36 
States are reducing vital services, including services to some 
of their most vulnerable families and individuals. In addition, 
according to several analyses, State budget shortfalls could 
result in a severe loss of jobs, including approximately 
600,000 jobs in the education sector alone.
    In response to this crisis, this Committee led the way 
toward enactment of the Recovery Act in February 2009, which 
provided an unprecedented $124,150,000,000 to save and create 
jobs, invest in health care and education, provide fiscal 
relief to States and communities, and establish a foundation 
for long-term fiscal stability. The Recovery Act is beginning 
to save or create more than 3.5 million jobs over the next two 
years and deliver relief to millions of struggling families.
    The funds provided in this bill are intended to supplement 
the assistance provided in the Recovery Act to address 
continuing needs and priorities, and support essential 
activities that did not receive funding in the Recovery Act.

Terminations and Reductions

    In order to invest in the critical priorities identified in 
this bill, and in an effort to build an economy that is on a 
solid foundation for growth to put the nation on a path toward 
prosperity, the Committee makes a number of hard choices by 
proposing in this bill a number of program terminations, 
reductions, and other savings from the fiscal year 2009 
totaling $1,284,385,000. In addition, $3,426,565,000 in other 
savings from the budget request is recommended. These 
adjustments, no matter their size, are important to setting the 
right priorities within the spending allocation, for getting 
the deficit under control, and creating a government that is as 
efficient as it is effective.

Program Integrity Provisions

    The Congress has an obligation to meet the needs of persons 
who qualify for the programs in this bill. In addition, the 
Congress has an obligation to ensure that taxpayer funds are 
utilized in a manner that provides the most effective use of 
those precious resources, avoids waste, and protects the 
taxpayer. Accordingly, this bill includes $1,129,000,000 for 
program integrity activities designed to reduce improper 
payments, fraud, and abuse, which is nearly double the fiscal 
year 2009 level and the amount requested by the Administration. 
These funds will allow the Department of Labor to conduct 
additional eligibility assessments and improper payment reviews 
under the Unemployment Insurance Program, expand the Department 
of Health and Human Services Health Care Fraud and Abuse 
Control Program, and enable the Social Security Administration 
to work down a backlog of continuing disability reviews to 
determine whether benefits are properly paid. These efforts 
could result in over $48,000,000,000 in savings and increased 
revenues over the next ten years. Moreover, the Committee fully 
funds the amounts requested for the various Inspectors General 
with audit and oversight responsibilities for the agencies 
included in the bill.

Committee Priorities and Initiatives

            Employment and training investments
    American workers have spent the past 30 years contributing 
to national economic growth without receiving their fair share 
of the economic benefits in return. According to recent 
testimony to the Committee by Nobel Prize-winning economist 
Paul Krugman, median family income has grown by less than half 
a percent annually since 1979--and median family income 
actually decreased from 2000 to 2007. The Economic Policy 
Institute (EPI) reports that more than 90 percent of all income 
growth in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years went 
to the top 10 percent of income earners; and EPI's more recent 
figures show that although worker productivity increased by 19 
percent from 2000 to 2007, the real median hourly wage rose by 
a mere 37 cents during the same period. The situation is even 
worse for the most vulnerable members of society. According to 
Dr. Krugman, ``none--none--of America's economic growth over 
the past generation has trickled down to the poor.''
    The Committee believes that middle-class Americans simply 
are not receiving the fruits of their hard work. Employee 
benefits have eroded as union membership has fallen to only 12 
percent of the workforce, and the rising annual incomes that 
were the common--though by no means universal--experience of 
middle-class workers a generation ago are now a thing of the 
past to all but the most fortunate ten percent at the top. The 
broadly shared national prosperity that existed after World War 
II has been replaced by job, health, housing, and retirement 
insecurity. In short, the economic rules have changed, leaving 
millions of hard-working families caught in a struggle for 
economic survival.
    In this bill, the Committee puts a high priority on re-
invigorating the Department of Labor (DOL), which is the key 
Federal agency charged with increasing the competitiveness of 
America's workforce, strengthening worker rights and free 
collective bargaining, protecting safety and health for nearly 
150 million workers, improving worker economic security by 
protecting retirement and health care benefits, and producing 
accurate and reliable employment, price and other national 
economic information.
    Key investments in this bill will help put unemployed youth 
and adults to work in this economic downturn through intensive 
employment assistance and case management, investment in skills 
training for displaced workers, and new approaches to helping 
the disadvantaged obtain decent and good-paying jobs:
          
 Dislocated Worker Employment and Training 
        Activities: $1,398,891,000, which is $57,000,000 above 
        the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
        $14,109,000 below the budget request, to provide 
        training and supportive services to workers affected by 
        mass layoffs and plant closures. More than 500,000 
        workers lost their jobs in the first three months of 
        2009 due to mass layoffs. These workers will also be 
        assisted by $1,450,000,000 in the Recovery Act.
          
 YouthBuild: $100,000,000, which is 
        $30,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
        and $14,476,000 below the budget request, to expand 
        YouthBuild so that nearly 7,000 at-risk youth can gain 
        high school credentials and construction skills 
        training while building affordable housing for homeless 
        families. The Recovery Act provided $50,000,000 for 
        YouthBuild.
          
 Transitional Jobs: $50,000,000 for a new 
        initiative based on a proven employment strategy to 
        help noncustodial parents and workers with substantial 
        barriers to entering the workforce. This is the amount 
        of the Administration's request.
          
 Green Jobs: $50,000,000 to prepare workers 
        for careers in energy efficiency and renewable energy, 
        which is the same as the budget request. This new 
        Administration initiative will support pre-
        apprenticeship programs, career pathways, and other 
        gateways for more than 8,000 workers to enter careers 
        in emerging green industries. The Recovery Act provided 
        $500,000,000 for green jobs.
          
 Career Pathways Innovation Fund: 
        $135,000,000 for new competitive grants to community 
        colleges and partnerships with local adult education 
        providers for career pathways to prepare workers for 
        careers in high-demand and emerging industries, which 
        is $10,000,000 above the combined fiscal year 2009 
        funding levels in the Departments of Labor and 
        Education. The Committee directs that approximately 
        half of these funds, $65,000,000, must be used to train 
        workers for careers in the health care sector, with a 
        focus on nursing professions. The Recovery Act provided 
        $250,000,000 for training programs in high-growth 
        industries.
          
 Older Workers: $615,425,000, which is 
        $43,500,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
        and $40,000,000 above the budget request, to provide 
        community service opportunities for nearly 100,000 low-
        income seniors. The Recovery Act provided $120,000,000 
        for the Title V older workers program.
          
 Unemployment Insurance Operations: 
        $3,245,645,000, which is $423,500,000 above the fiscal 
        year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
        request, to help States process unemployment insurance 
        claims.
          
 Veterans Employment and Training: 
        $265,127,000 to maximize employment and training 
        opportunities for veterans transitioning to the 
        civilian workforce, and to protect their employment 
        rights, which is an increase of $25,688,000 over the 
        fiscal year 2009 funding level and $10,000,000 over the 
        request. This amount includes $257,127,000 in DOL and 
        $8,000,000 in the Department of Education for a new 
        Centers of Excellence for Veterans Success initiative 
        to establish college- and university-based support 
        centers for veterans seeking to obtain a postsecondary 
        education.

Worker Safety and Health

    Investing in America's workers also requires maintaining 
safe and secure workplaces. Almost 40 years ago the Congress 
passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) to improve 
conditions for our nation's workers. The Bureau of Labor 
Statistics estimates that, since its passage, OSHA-related 
activities have saved the lives of nearly 400,000 workers. 
However, there is still much work to be done. Since the passage 
of the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the number of 
workplaces and workers has more than doubled, while at the same 
time, the number of OSHA inspectors has been reduced. In 1992, 
OSHA could inspect workplaces under its jurisdiction once every 
84 years. Now, it's once every 137 years. In 2007, 5,657 
workers died as a result of job-related injuries--an average of 
more than 15 deaths per day. As many as 8 to 12 million workers 
sustain job-related injuries or illnesses each year--many of 
which went unreported during the past eight years because of 
weak enforcement policies by the previous administration. 
Approximately 50,000 workers die each year from illnesses in 
which workplace exposures are a contributing factor. These 
fatalities, injuries and illnesses are estimated to cost 
$145,000,000,000 to $290,000,000,000 in direct and indirect 
costs. Yet despite these consequences, regulatory action to 
protect American workers virtually halted at DOL under the 
prior Administration. Constant delays in the issuance of worker 
protection standards have resulted in workplaces that are less 
safe and created a backlog of health and safety issues that 
must be addressed immediately by the new Administration.
    Key investments in this bill will strengthen retirement 
benefit security, wage enforcement, and workplace safety, 
reversing years of erosion in funding for labor law enforcement 
agencies:
          
  Labor Law Enforcement: $1,548,629,000 to 
        support up to 600 new full-time equivalent enforcement 
        and compliance positions (an increase of 13 percent) at 
        the Employment Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), 
        Employment Standards Administration (ESA), the 
        Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), 
        and the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MHSA), 
        which is $104,898,000 over the fiscal year 2009 funding 
        level and $28,200,000 below the request. The Recovery 
        Act provided an additional $80,000,000 for labor law 
        enforcement activities.

Health and Human Services Investments

    There is a health care crisis in America today. Nearly 50 
million Americans are without health coverage and 16 million 
more are underinsured, putting necessary and lifesaving health 
care out of reach for far too many families. Moreover, the weak 
economy, with rising unemployment, is causing even more people 
to lose their health insurance. More than 100 million Americans 
do not have dental insurance--at least twice as many as those 
without health insurance.
    In addition, the nation has done a poor job of promoting 
health and preventing disease. According to a 2008 report by 
the Commonwealth Fund, the U.S. places last among 19 
industrialized countries on deaths that might have been 
prevented with timely and effective medical care. Up to 101,000 
fewer people would die prematurely if the U.S. could achieve 
leading, benchmark country rates. The four leading causes of 
death are chronic conditions: heart disease, cancer, stroke, 
and chronic lower respiratory disease, which are largely 
preventable, yet account for 75 percent of U.S. health care 
costs.
    The personal and economic consequences of the government's 
failure to invest in America's health are apparent. U.S. health 
care expenditures totaled over $2 trillion in 2007--16 percent 
of the gross domestic product. According to the Institute of 
Medicine, the societal cost of the lost productivity of 
uninsured Americans is estimated at $65,000,000,000 to 
$130,000,000,000 each year. Americans are demanding a better 
return on their health care investment.
    The Committee puts a high priority on health system reform 
and preparing the nation for universal health coverage. The 
Committee recognizes that the health care issues confronting 
the country are some of the largest pieces of unfinished 
business on the national agenda. One of the great causes of 
economic insecurity in this society is the fact that health 
care coverage can evaporate--average working families are just 
one pink slip, one divorce, or one serious illness away from 
bankruptcy.
    The Committee continues the investments begun in the 
Recovery Act to expand the capacity of the health care system 
to handle the increased demand that will come from health care 
reform and accelerate our knowledge base for better treatments 
and patient care. The key investments include:
          
  Community Health Centers: $2,190,022,000, 
        which is the same as the comparable fiscal year 2009 
        funding level and the budget request. This funding will 
        provide primary health care to 17 million patients, of 
        whom 40 percent are uninsured, in 7,500 service 
        delivery sites. These centers are likely to become 
        medical homes for patients newly enfranchised by health 
        care reform. They provide high quality care in both 
        urban and rural underserved areas across the country. 
        Patients will also be assisted by $2,000,000,000 
        provided in the Recovery Act for community health 
        centers in fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
          
  Health Professions Workforce Shortages: 
        $529,708,000, which is $136,982,000 above the 
        comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
        $1,610,000 above the budget request. These programs 
        were fortified by $200,000,000 provided in the Recovery 
        Act for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. These funds will 
        support the training of students across the health 
        professions and nursing fields. Some of the programs 
        are specifically targeted to disadvantaged, underserved 
        populations. These students will provide the backbone 
        of the health care system for underserved areas, 
        especially if health care reform expands coverage.
          Within this total, the bill includes a $92,372,000 
        increase for nurse training. This substantial increase 
        is essential because the U.S. is in the midst of a 
        nursing shortage that is expected to intensify as baby 
        boomers age and the need for health care grows. The 
        Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 
        estimates that the nation's nursing shortage will grow 
        to more than one million nurses by the year 2020, a 
        number that is sure to skyrocket if health care reform 
        brings millions of uninsured people into the health 
        care system.
          The Committee directs HRSA and DOL to jointly 
        establish a strategic plan to address emerging needs in 
        the health care sector through a joint DOL-HRSA 
        interagency task force.
          
  State Health Access Grants: $75,000,000, 
        which maintains the comparable fiscal year 2009 level 
        and is the same as the budget request. A second year of 
        grants for this new program is an important transition 
        to national health care reform. States can use this 
        funding to expand coverage for subgroups of their 
        population to test ideas before a national coverage 
        system takes effect.
          
  National Institutes of Health (NIH): 
        $31,258,788,000, which is $941,764,000 above the 
        comparable fiscal year 2009 level and $500,000,000 
        above the budget request. Along with the unprecedented 
        $10,400,000,000 provided for NIH in the Recovery Act 
        for fiscal years 2009 and 2010, these funds will make 
        it possible for biomedical research to improve health 
        and reduce health care expenditures. NIH research will 
        help doctors move away from today's costly and 
        predominantly curative model to a presumptive model 
        intervening before disease occurs. Further, NIH 
        research will enhance the quality of health care as 
        health system reform addresses universal access to it.
          
  Public Health: $6,681,895,000 for the 
        discretionary public health programs administered by 
        the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 
        which is $67,294,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
        program level and $38,435,000 more than the budget 
        request. Increases are provided for a number of CDC 
        programs, including: a $53,054,000 increase to support 
        testing of up to 600,000 persons for HIV and to link 
        HIV positive individuals with health services; a 
        $13,982,000 increase to ensure continued collection of 
        accurate core data on the health status of the U.S. 
        population and the use of health services in order to 
        gauge the success of health systems reform; an 
        $11,102,000 increase for public health research and 
        surveillance to reduce the approximately 170,000 deaths 
        per year in the U.S. caused by infectious disease; a 
        $10,149,000 increase for global immunization, which CDC 
        estimates will lead to 25,000 fewer global measles-
        related deaths in fiscal year 2010; and, a $7,500,000 
        increase to double CDC's Climate Change initiative.
          
  Mental Health Services: $1,008,182,000 for 
        mental health services programs administered by the 
        Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
        Administration (SAMHSA), which is $39,030,000 more than 
        the fiscal year 2009 program level and $22,363,000 more 
        than the budget request. Increases are provided for a 
        number of mental health services programs, including: a 
        $16,943,000 increase for Children's Mental Health to 
        provide 11,000 additional children who have mental, 
        emotional, and behavioral disorders with community-
        based care and supports; an $8,360,000 increase for 
        State homelessness grants to provide an estimated 
        11,000 additional homeless and seriously mentally ill 
        individuals with community-based support services; and, 
        a $7,000,000 increase to double an initiative that 
        integrates primary and behavioral health care for an 
        estimated three million Americans with severe mental 
        illnesses.
          
  Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment: 
        $2,440,099,000 for substance abuse prevention and 
        treatment programs administered by SAMHSA, which is 
        $46,163,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 program 
        level and $3,193,000 more than the budget request. 
        Increases are provided for SAMHSA's criminal justice 
        portfolio, as follows: a $35,000,000 increase for 
        treatment drug courts to provide 5,200 additional 
        individuals involved in juvenile, family, or adult drug 
        courts with needed substance abuse treatment and 
        recovery support services, including the provision of 
        social services for an estimated 870 children with 
        methamphetamine-addicted parents; and a $15,000,000 
        increase for the ex-offender re-entry program to 
        provide 1,800 additional ex-offenders with substance 
        abuse treatment services upon their return to the 
        community.
          
  Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs): 
        $203,533,000 to continue an aggressive campaign to 
        dramatically reduce these life-threatening infections 
        that patients acquire while receiving treatment for 
        medical or surgical conditions. This amount is a 
        $33,848,000 increase over the fiscal year 2009 level 
        and $22,746,000 over the request. HAIs are among the 
        top ten leading causes of death in the U.S., accounting 
        for nearly 100,000 deaths, 1.7 million infections, and 
        $28,000,000,000 to $33,000,000,000 in excess healthcare 
        costs annually. The Committee bill includes $5,000,000 
        for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) 
        Office of the Secretary to coordinate and integrate 
        HAI-related activities across the Department and 
        continue a national media campaign for health care 
        providers and consumers launched in fiscal year 2009. 
        New activities funded in this bill include increases of 
        $17,696,000 in AHRQ for nationwide implementation of 
        evidence-based HAI prevention training in over 5,000 
        hospitals and $5,050,000 in CDC to expand the National 
        Healthcare Safety Network for increased HAI 
        surveillance in hospitals. An $11,102,000 increase is 
        provided for CDC's emerging infectious diseases 
        portfolio, which includes HAIs, for expanded 
        surveillance, public health research, and prevention 
        activities. Finally, an increase of $53,772,000 over 
        fiscal year 2009 is provided within Centers for 
        Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for enhanced State 
        inspections in nursing homes and other medical 
        facilities where HAI's are rising, giving inspectors 
        greater opportunities to identify infection control 
        problems. The Committee also directs CMS to include 
        additional infection control measures in Hospital 
        Compare and its ``pay for performance'' and ``pay for 
        reporting'' systems.

Protecting Vulnerable Populations

    Although some people in this country may be doing well, it 
is clear that many others are falling behind. The economic 
climate has made an already challenging situation worse for 
American families. Before the economic downturn, in 2007, over 
37 million people in the U.S. lived in poverty, including 13 
million children. In prior recessions the number of people 
living in poverty has significantly increased. If this 
recession is like previous ones--and all indications are that 
this recession is the worst in three-quarters of a century--the 
number of people living in poverty could increase by over 25 
percent, which would leave almost 50 million people living in 
poverty. This will put added stress on families caring for 
young children and aging parents. Currently 14 million children 
are left home alone after school to care for themselves, while 
26 percent of individuals over age 60 live alone.
    The Committee bill sustains critical support for America's 
most vulnerable families, makes investments in high quality 
early childhood education, and increases services for an aging 
population:
          
  Low Income Home Energy Assistance (LIHEAP): 
        $5,100,000,000 to ensure that approximately 7.5 million 
        low-income households continue to receive the home 
        energy assistance they need in a volatile energy 
        market, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
        funding level. The Administration proposed legislation 
        to create a trigger mechanism that would make 
        additional mandatory funding available if energy prices 
        spike. Nonetheless, the Administration's discretionary 
        request would cut LIHEAP by $1,900,000,000, eliminating 
        the number of households receiving assistance by 
        approximately 1.7 million.
          
  Head Start: $7,234,783,000 to sustain high-
        quality, comprehensive early childhood services, 
        including educational, health, nutritional, and social 
        services, to approximately 978,000 low-income children 
        before they enter school, nearly 70,000 over the fiscal 
        year 2008 level. This amount is $121,997,000 above the 
        fiscal year 2009 level and the same as the request. The 
        Recovery Act included $2,100,000,000 for Head Start and 
        Early Head Start.
          
 Foster Care Innovation: $20,000,000 for a 
        new initiative to improve outcomes for children in 
        foster care by providing incentives to States to 
        develop evidence-based improvements, which is the same 
        amount as the request.
          
 Nutrition and Other Services for Seniors: 
        $1,530,881,000 to boost nutrition, transportation, and 
        other supportive services for elderly Americans, which 
        is $37,038,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
        and the budget request. This funding will support 
        nearly 239 million meals to 2.5 million seniors, an 
        increase of approximately three million meals. The 
        Recovery Act provided $100,000,000 for senior 
        nutrition.

Reducing the Need for Abortion

    The Committee includes $7,839,336,000 for programs that may 
help reduce the number of abortions in America by alleviating 
the economic pressures and other real life conditions that can 
sometimes cause women to decide not to carry their pregnancies 
to term. This amount is $134,848,000 over the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $61,207,000 over the budget request.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $114,455,000 for a 
new evidence-based teenage pregnancy prevention initiative in 
the HHS Administration for Children and Families to address a 
rise in teenage births, following a 34 percent decline between 
1991 and 2006. The overwhelming majority of teenage pregnancies 
are unplanned; therefore, reducing the incidence of teenage 
pregnancy can have untold individual and societal benefits, 
including reducing poverty, improving education outcomes, 
improving child well-being, and reducing the need for 
abortions.

                                         REDUCING THE NEED FOR ABORTIONS
                                             [Dollars in Thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                              FY 2010      -------------------------------------
                    Budget Activity                          Committee                           FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:
    Young Parents Training Pilot Program...............              5,500               +500             +5,500
    Transitional Jobs..................................             35,000            +35,000            -15,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
Subtotal Department of Labor...........................             40,500            +35,500             -9,500
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Health Resources and Services Administration:
        Community Health Centers.......................          2,190,022                  0                  0
        Maternal and Child Health Block Grant..........            665,000             +2,879             +2,879
            Increasing Public Awareness and Resources                4,956                  0                  0
             For Women Preparing for Birth [nonadd]....
        Healthy Start..................................            105,000             +2,628             +2,628
        Family Planning (Title X)......................            317,491            +10,000                  0
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:
        Teen Pregnancy Prevention......................             15,800             +5,000                  0
    Administration for Children and Families:
        Child Care Development Block Grant.............          2,127,081                  0                  0
        Runaway and Homeless Youth.....................             98,234             +1,000             +1,000
        Prevention Grants to Reduce Abuse of Runaway                18,721             +1,000             +1,000
         Youth.........................................
        Home Visitation Program........................             15,000             +1,500             +1,500
        Infant Adoption Awareness......................             12,953                  0                  0
        Community Services Block Grant.................            700,000                  0                  0
        Family Violence Prevention Program.............            133,776             +6,000             +6,000
        Teen Pregnancy Prevention/Abstinence Education.            114,455            +15,341                  0
    Office of the Secretary:
        Adolescent Family Life (Title XX)..............             29,778                  0                  0
        Health Provider Domestic Violence Education....              2,325                  0             +1,700
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal Department of Health & Human                6,545,636            +45,348            +16,707
             Services..................................
Department of Education:
    21st Century After School Centers..................          1,181,166            +50,000            +50,000
    Elementary and Secondary School Counselors.........             55,000             +3,000             +3,000
    Child Care Access for Student Parents..............             17,034             +1,000             +1,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
            Subtotal Department of Education...........          1,253,200            +54,000            +54,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
                Total..................................          7,839,336           +134,848           +61,207
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\The Administration's fiscal year 2010 budget also includes a legislative proposal for a new mandatory Home
  Visitation Program.

Education investments

    The Condition of Education, 2009, shows that the country 
has made some progress in educational achievement, particularly 
for younger students, but significant challenges remain in 
educating a growing and increasingly diverse student 
population. Our nation must create a public school system--
enrolling more than 50 million students in 2009 and growing to 
nearly 54 million students by 2018--that adequately prepares 
its students for college and careers. Current statistics 
indicate, however, that approximately 1.2 million students fail 
to graduate from high school every year, destined for dead end 
jobs with daunting odds of success in a challenging labor 
market that rewards higher-order skills.
    In today's economy, a college degree matters more than ever 
before. Young adults with a bachelor's degree earn about twice 
as much as those who do not earn a high school diploma. 
Although college enrollment rates increased from 1972 to 2007 
for students at all income levels, the nation has yet to 
achieve the goal whereby a student's brain, rather than bank 
account, is the only determinant of whether he or she can 
obtain a postsecondary education. Today, a low-achieving 
student from a wealthy family has about the same chance of 
attending college as a high-achieving student from a poor 
family. Moreover, for the country to remain a global competitor 
not only must low- and middle-income students enroll in college 
at higher rates, they must also actually complete their 
education and earn a college degree. In 2007, only 58 percent 
of college students earned a degree within six years. The 
country is falling behind its global competitors regarding 
college completion, having dropped from number two in the world 
to number eleven.
    The Committee believes that the Department of Education has 
a critical and compelling mission--to ensure that all Americans 
have the educational opportunity that is our most powerful tool 
in helping the poor and middle class climb up the economic 
ladder. The under-utilization of the human potential in the 
United States imposes heavy consequences on our society--lower 
productivity, lower earnings, poorer health, higher rates of 
incarceration, and less civic involvement. Key investments in 
this bill include:
          
 Title I Grants for Low-Income Children: 
        $14,492,401,000 for Title I grants to school districts, 
        which restores the proposed $1,500,000,000 cut to the 
        program, in order to ensure that approximately 20 
        million disadvantaged children in nearly 55,000 public 
        schools obtain the educational skills they need to 
        compete in a global economy. The Recovery Act provided 
        $10,000,000,000 for Title I eligible schools. School 
        districts may use any portion or all of these funds to 
        support early childhood education activities and, thus, 
        the bill does not include a separate funding stream for 
        early childhood programs requested by the 
        Administration.
          
 School Improvement: $545,633,000 for 
        assistance to approximately 13,000 schools across the 
        country with chronically poor academic performance, 
        which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
        level. With the funds in this bill and Recovery Act 
        funds, States will receive approximately $4,000,000,000 
        in total during fiscal year 2010 to assist these 
        struggling schools.
          
 Teacher Incentive Fund: $445,864,000 for the 
        Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF), which supports school 
        districts and States that aim to reward effective 
        teaching through compensation systems that reward 
        entire high-need schools for raising student 
        achievement. This amount is $348,594,000 above the 
        fiscal year 2009 funding level and $41,406,000 below 
        the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
        $200,000,000 for the Teacher Incentive Fund.
          
 Charter Schools: $256,031,000 to support the 
        start-up of over 1,300 new charter schools in fiscal 
        year 2010. This amount is $40,000,000 above the fiscal 
        year 2009 funding level and $12,000,000 below the 
        budget request. The bill also includes new 
        accountability measures to ensure that charter schools 
        are successful.
          
 Striving Readers: $146,000,000 for Striving 
        Readers, which is more than a four-fold increase over 
        the fiscal year 2009 funding level, to help struggling 
        adolescents build their literacy skills, start a new 
        early reading comprehensive initiative, and improve the 
        integration of reading initiatives across the 
        Department.
          
 High School Graduation Initiative: 
        $50,000,000 for a new High School Graduation Initiative 
        to target assistance on high school ``dropout 
        factories''--schools that disproportionately contribute 
        to the nation's dropout crisis, as proposed by the 
        Administration.
          
 Individuals With Disabilities Act: the 
        Committee provided a historic $11,300,000,000 for part 
        B Grants to States in the Recovery Act to support a 
        high quality education for 6.7 million students with 
        disabilities. These funds, together with the 
        $11,505,211,000 in this bill, will support a record 25 
        percent Federal contribution toward special education 
        in each of fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This bill 
        provides the same amount for Part B Grants to States 
        that is requested by the Administration.
          
 Adult Education: $628,221,000 for Adult 
        Basic Literacy Education State Grants, which is 
        $74,099,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
        and the same as the budget request. These State formula 
        grants will enable over three million adults to acquire 
        basic literacy skills, complete a secondary education, 
        and become more employable, productive, and responsible 
        citizens--316,000 more than in fiscal year 2009.
          
 Pell Grants: in fiscal year 2009, the 
        Committee led the effort to provide an historic $619 
        increase in the maximum Pell award, to $5,350. Pell 
        Grants are the foundation of the Federal commitment to 
        ensure access to higher educational opportunities for 
        low- and middle-income students by providing need-based 
        financial assistance that helps them pay for college 
        costs. This bill maintains the discretionary portion of 
        the maximum Pell Grant award at $4,860, which, combined 
        with a mandatory supplement of $690, will support a 
        $5,550 maximum Pell Grant in fiscal year 2010, an 
        increase of $200 over the 2009 award level. In total, 
        7.6 million students will receive Pell awards. The 
        Recovery Act provided $17,114,000,000 for Pell Grants.
          
 Support for Developing Institutions: 
        $652,943,000 to strengthen the capacity of Historically 
        Black and Predominantly Black Colleges and 
        Universities, Hispanic-serving Institutions, Tribal 
        Colleges and Universities and Native American-serving 
        Institutions, Asian Pacific Islander, and Native 
        American institutions--a 29 percent increase over the 
        fiscal year discretionary funding level and 
        $110,000,000 over the budget request. In addition, the 
        bill provides for $178,221,000 in new loan guarantees 
        for Historically Black College and University 
        facilities--nearly triple the fiscal year 2009 level.
          
 TRIO and GEAR UP: $868,089,000 for the TRIO 
        programs and $333,212,000 for GEAR UP to assist 
        approximately 1.7 million disadvantaged and first-
        generation college students to prepare for, enter, and 
        complete college--an increase of 51,000 students over 
        fiscal year 2009. The Committee investments are 
        $20,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
        and the budget request for each program.

Volunteerism and Service to America

    The Committee strongly supports the President's call for 
Americans to serve their communities and country by providing a 
19 percent increase for implementation of the new Edward M. 
Kennedy Serve America Act. The bill includes $1,059,016,000 for 
the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), 
which is $169,150,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $90,000,000 below the budget request. This funding, 
together with Recovery Act funds, will increase the number of 
AmeriCorps members by 15,000 volunteers, from 74,000 to nearly 
89,000, and the number of Senior Corps Volunteers by more than 
9,000, from 473,000 to 482,000. In addition, the bill provides 
funds to support 2,000 students for a new Summer of Service 
program. Included within the total is an initial investment of 
$35,000,000 to launch a new Social Innovation Fund that will 
scale up proven programs and invest in promising new ideas in 
low-income communities. The Recovery Act provided $201,000,000 
for CNCS.

Corporation for Public Broadcasting

    The Committee provides a total of $541,000,000 for the 
Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which is $51,767,000 more 
than provided in the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 and 
$40,000,000 more than the budget request. This amount includes: 
a fiscal year 2012 advance appropriation of $440,000,000, 
$36,000,000 for digital conversion grants, and $25,000,000 to 
complete the public radio satellite replacement and 
interconnection project. In recognition of the financial 
challenges confronting more than 1,000 public broadcasting 
stations in the current economic downturn, one-time fiscal 
stabilization grants totaling $40,000,000 are included in the 
bill to forestall layoffs and cutbacks in essential 
programming.

Social Security Administration

    The Committee is dedicated to helping the Social Security 
Administration (SSA) address several challenges, including 
processing a rising number of retirement and disability claims, 
reducing the backlog of disability claims, and improving 
service to the public. Thus, the bill includes an 
$11,446,500,000 limitation on administrative expenses for SSA, 
which provides a $993,000,000 increase over the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and is the same as the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided $1,000,000,000 for SSA.

Significant Policy Provisions

    The bill continues all prior restrictions on the use of 
funds in the Act for abortion.
    The bill continues a prohibition on the use of funds in the 
Act for research that creates or destroys human embryos.
    The bill continues a prohibition on the use of funds in the 
Act to process Social Security Benefits based on a fraudulent 
Social Security number.
    The bill includes a prohibition on the use of funds to 
implement a Social Security totalization agreement with Mexico.
    The bill includes a prohibition on the use of funds that 
contravene the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work 
Opportunity Reconciliation Act.
    The bill includes a provision that prohibits the use of 
funds in the Act for needle exchange programs that are located 
within 1,000 feet of a public or private day care center, 
elementary school, vocational school, secondary school, 
college, junior college, or university, or any public swimming 
pool, park, playground, video arcade, or youth center, or an 
event sponsored by any such entity.

Bill Total

    Total funding, including offsets, for the Departments of 
Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010 is $730,460,039,000. For 
comparability, adjustments should be made for LIHEAP, which was 
funded in the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and 
Continuing Appropriations Act, 2009. In addition, there is a 
one-time Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund transfer in the 
fiscal year 2010 budget request and the Committee bill.
    Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--The budget 
resolution allows for upward adjustments totaling 
$2,746,000,000 to the Subcommittee's discretionary allocation 
as follows: $846,000,000 for making investments in the program 
integrity activities related to unemployment insurance, 
Medicare and Medicaid, and Social Security benefits and 
$1,900,000,000 to provide funding for LIHEAP above the 
discretionary fiscal year 2010 budget request since a mandatory 
trigger has not been enacted. The discretionary funding totals 
listed here and detailed throughout the Committee report 
include this additional funding.
    After deducting these cap adjustments and making the LIHEAP 
comparability adjustment, the fiscal year 2010 discretionary 
total for the Committee bill is $5,604,836,000 and 3.6 percent 
more than the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level.
    Discretionary programs.--For discretionary accounts for 
fiscal year 2010, the bill provides $163,400,000,000, including 
offsets. This is $10,652,508,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
comparable funding level. For comparability, an adjustment 
should be made for LIHEAP, which was funded in the Consolidated 
Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations 
Act, 2009. After the LIHEAP adjustment, the fiscal year 2010 
discretionary total for the Committee bill is $7,872,836,000 
and 5.1 percent more than the comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level.
    Mandatory programs.--The bill provides $567,060,039,000 for 
mandatory programs in fiscal year 2010. This is $48,292,012,000 
and 9.3 percent above the fiscal year 2009 comparable level. 
Funding requirements for entitlement programs are determined by 
the basic authorizing statutes. Mandatory programs include 
general fund support for the Medicare and Medicaid programs, 
Supplemental Security Income, Trade Adjustment Assistance, and 
Black Lung payments. The following chart indicates the funding 
levels for the major mandatory programs in fiscal years 2009 
and 2010.

                                                    MANDATORY
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Program                           Fiscal year 2009   Fiscal year 2010        Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:
    Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances.......           $958,800         $1,818,400          +$859,600
    Advances to the UI and other trust funds...........            422,000            120,000           -302,000
    Special Benefits...................................            163,000            187,000            +24,000
    Special Benefits for Disabled Coal Miners..........            188,130            169,180            -18,950
    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation              49,654             51,197             +1,543
     Fund..............................................
    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund...................          2,822,683            300,099         -2,522,584
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.............            113,115            115,908             +2,793
    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation              55,358             55,358                  0
     Fund..............................................
    Medicaid current law benefits......................        241,748,640        276,957,508        +35,208,868
    Medicaid State and local administration............         12,021,152         12,381,233           +360,081
    Vaccines for Children..............................          3,377,911          3,323,770            -54,141
    Medicare Payments to Healthcare Trust Funds........        197,744,000        207,296,070         +9,552,070
    Welfare Payments...................................             34,000             34,000                  0
    Child Support Enforcement..........................          4,282,699          4,537,509           +254,810
    Social Services Block Grant........................          1,700,000          1,700,000                  0
    Promoting Safe and Stable Families.................            345,000            345,000                  0
    Payments for Foster Care and Permanency............          5,409,000          5,532,000           +123,000
    Medical Benefits for Commissioned Officers.........            434,694            474,557            +39,863
Department of Education:
    Vocational Rehabilitation..........................          2,974,635          3,084,696           +110,061
Related Agencies:
    Federal Payments to the Railroad Retirement Account                150                150                  0
    Payments to Social Security Trust Funds............             20,406             20,404                 -2
    Supplemental Security Income.......................         42,065,000         46,700,000         +4,635,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

    The Committee recommends a discretionary program level 
total of $13,256,746,000, which is $845,737,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $22,871,000 below the budget 
request. More than half of the increase above fiscal year 
2009--a total of $423,500,000--is to enable States to process 
millions of additional unemployment claims. The substantial 
funding increase is a necessary response to unemployment levels 
that have doubled since the onset of the recession in December 
2007. In addition, the Recovery Act provided a total of 
$4,806,000,000 in discretionary funding for workforce 
development programs, community service opportunities for 
seniors, and unemployment services operations. The Committee 
commends the Administration for renewing the Department's 
commitment to workforce development and workforce protection by 
focusing additional funds on these core priorities.
    As the nation begins to deal with the worst economic 
downturn since the Great Depression, the Department of Labor 
will play an integral role in the economic recovery by 
providing job training or employment services for nearly 20 
million workers; offering apprenticeships, mentoring and career 
training for 350,000 low-income and at-risk youth; overseeing 
and enforcing health and safety standards in the workplace for 
137 million private-sector workers and 10 million public-sector 
workers; and protecting retirement and health benefits for more 
than 150 million workers, retirees and their families.

                 Employment and Training Administration


                    TRAINING AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $3,802,961,000 for this account, 
which provides funding authorized primarily by the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). This amount is $176,513,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $30,602,000 below the 
budget request. The increase above fiscal year 2009 provides a 
strong response to the deep economic downturn by boosting the 
national reserve fund that cushions local communities against 
the effects of mass layoffs; increasing funds to train at-risk 
youth that are disproportionally affected by recent job losses; 
and initiating a program to train workers for careers in the 
emerging green energy sector. These targeted investments are 
necessary to support the ongoing economic recovery and to 
provide a foundation for stable and long-term economic growth. 
The Recovery Act provided an additional $3,950,000,000 for 
workforce training activities in the Training and Employment 
Services account in program years 2008 and 2009.
    The Training and Employment Services account is comprised 
of programs that enhance the employment and earnings of those 
in need of such services, operated through a decentralized 
system of skill training activities and related services. The 
account is mostly forward-funded on a July to June program 
cycle, with funds provided for fiscal year 2010 supporting 
activities from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011.
    The Committee repeats a provision allowing local boards to 
transfer up to 30 percent of funds made available for 
dislocated workers and adult activities between these funding 
streams, upon approval by the Governor. The Committee also 
includes a provision from the Recovery Act that provides 
flexibility for workforce investment boards to use Adult and 
Dislocated Worker formula funds to award contracts to 
institutions of higher education and other eligible training 
providers.

Adult Employment and Training Activities

    For Adult Employment and Training Activities, the Committee 
recommends $861,540,000, which is the same amount as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Of the amount 
recommended, $712,000,000 will become available on October 1, 
2010. The Recovery Act provided an additional $500,000,000 for 
adult training in program years 2008 and 2009.
    These funds are allocated by formula to States and further 
distributed to local Workforce Investment Boards. Services for 
adults are provided through the One-Stop Career Center system 
and most customers receiving training use individual training 
accounts to determine which programs and providers fit their 
needs. WIA authorizes core services available to all adults 
with no eligibility requirements and intensive and training 
services for unemployed individuals who are not able to find 
jobs through core services alone.

Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities

    For Dislocated Worker Employment and Training Activities, 
the Committee recommends $1,398,891,000, which is $57,000,000 
above the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$14,109,000 below the budget request. Of the amount 
recommended, $1,060,000,000 will become available on October 1, 
2010. Of the total, $1,183,840,000 is designated for State 
formula grants that provide core and intensive services, 
training, and supportive services for dislocated workers. In 
addition, States use these funds for rapid response assistance 
to help workers affected by mass layoffs and plant closures. 
The Recovery Act provided an additional $1,450,000,000 for 
these grants in program years 2008 and 2009.
    The Committee recommendation includes $215,051,000 for the 
Dislocated Worker Assistance National Reserve, which is 
$57,000,000 above the comparable fiscal 2009 level and 
$14,109,000 below the budget request. The National Reserve 
supports National Emergency Grants to respond to mass layoffs, 
plant and/or military base closings, and natural disasters, 
since the need for such funds cannot be anticipated in formula 
allocations. National Reserve funds also support Statewide and 
multiple sector activities, as well as technical assistance and 
pilot and demonstration projects. The Committee recommends that 
these activities be coordinated with area economic development 
needs.
    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), more 
than 500,000 workers lost their jobs in the first three months 
of 2009 due to mass layoffs. A mass layoff occurs when at least 
50 workers are separated from a single employer. Since BLS 
began tracking this data in 1996, the mass layoffs are the 
worst ever recorded in the first quarter--including all-time 
highs in each of the four regions of the country. The Committee 
recognizes that many economic sectors, including manufacturing, 
will continue to experience mass layoffs even after the economy 
begins to recover. This bill increases the Dislocated Worker 
National Reserve by nearly 30 percent to provide necessary 
resources for displaced workers to receive job training for 
careers in emerging and high-growth industries.
    As in prior years, the bill provides that dislocated worker 
funds available under section 171(d) may be used for 
demonstration projects that provide assistance to new entrants 
in the workforce and incumbent workers.

Youth Employment and Training Activities

    For Youth Employment and Training Activities, the Committee 
recommends $924,069,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $1,200,000,000 for youth activities, 
including summer employment, in program years 2008 and 2009.
    WIA consolidated the Summer Youth Employment and Training 
Program and Youth Training Grants under the Job Training 
Partnership Act into a single youth training activity. The 
funds are allocated by formula to States and further 
distributed to local workforce investment areas in accordance 
with WIA. Youth funds are made available one quarter earlier 
than the adult and dislocated worker funds to allow for summer 
jobs programming.

Native Americans

    For the Indian and Native Americans Program, the Committee 
recommends $52,758,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. This program, 
authorized by WIA, is designed to improve the economic well 
being of Native Americans (Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native 
Hawaiians) through the provision of training, work experience, 
and other employment-related services and opportunities that 
are intended to aid the participants in securing permanent, 
unsubsidized jobs. The Department of Labor allocates formula 
grants to Indian tribes and other Native American groups whose 
eligibility for such grants is established in accordance with 
Department regulations.

Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

    For the National Farmworkers Jobs Program (NFJP), the 
Committee recommends $84,620,000, which is $2,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
Authorized by WIA, this program is designed to serve members of 
economically disadvantaged families whose principal livelihood 
is derived from migratory and other forms of seasonal farm 
work, fishing, or logging activities. Enrollees and their 
families are provided with training and related services 
intended to prepare them for stable, year-round employment 
within and outside of the agriculture industry.
    The Committee continues language providing that not less 
than 70 percent of program funds be spent on employment and 
training services, together with language that prohibits the 
Department from restricting the provision of ``related 
assistance'' services by grantees. These provisions ensure that 
the program primarily addresses the employment and training 
needs of the target population while allowing grantees to 
provide related services, such as child care and 
transportation, that are often critical to the stabilization 
and availability of the farm labor workforce.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee bill includes 
$5,500,000 for migrant and seasonal farmworker housing grants 
and $510,000 for other discretionary purposes, which include 
training and technical assistance, and migrant rest center 
activities. The bill further directs that not less than 70 
percent of the amount provided for housing grants be used for 
permanent housing. The Committee remains interested in the use 
of funds for temporary housing and the conditions under which 
these funds are used. The Committee directs the Department of 
Labor to submit a summary report for the last complete program 
year, and quarterly reports thereafter, to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
documenting the use of farmworker housing funds. In particular, 
the Department should provide information on the amount of 
funds used for permanent and temporary housing activities, 
respectively; a list of the communities served; a list of the 
grantees and the States in which they are located; the total 
number of individuals and families served; and a list of 
allowable temporary housing activities.

YouthBuild

    For YouthBuild, the Committee recommends $100,000,000, 
which is $30,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $14,476,000 below the budget request. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $50,000,000 to expand the number of 
YouthBuild grantees in program years 2009 and 2010.
    YouthBuild is an approach to workforce development that 
supports disadvantaged young people at risk of long-term 
unemployment, and effectively connects them with basic, 
secondary, and post-secondary education; employment training 
and job placement; and personal counseling. Participants split 
time between the classroom and the construction site--earning 
high school diplomas while providing a valuable community 
service by constructing or rehabilitating affordable housing in 
their communities. YouthBuild grants are awarded on a 
competitive basis. However, the Committee believes continuity 
in funding is important for the long-term stability of the 
YouthBuild program and encourages the Department to consider 
three-year grants instead of the current policy of two-year 
grants.
    In June 2009, the Labor Department announced grants to 183 
YouthBuild communities across the country, including 50 
grantees receiving awards for the first time. The awards 
included 108 grants funded through the Omnibus Appropriations 
Act, 2009, and another 75 grants funded through the Recovery 
Act. The Committee bill includes sufficient funding in fiscal 
year 2010 to provide continuation grants for each of the 183 
grantees and also allows for the provision of additional 
YouthBuild awards, expanding the program to serve nearly 7,000 
youth. The YouthBuild program is conducting a rigorous 
nationwide evaluation of program year 2009 grantees and the 
Committee looks forward to receiving the results of the 
evaluation.
    The Committee bill permanently extends a provision that 
allows YouthBuild grantees to serve youth who have dropped out 
of school and re-enrolled in an alternative school.

Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional Occupations

    For the Women in Apprenticeship and Non-Traditional 
Occupations program, the Committee recommends $1,000,000, which 
is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program finances grants to employers, 
unions, and community-based organizations in support of 
activities to train, retrain, and place women in non-
traditional jobs and occupations so as to provide expanded 
access to careers with family-sustaining wages.

National Activities

    Pilots, Demonstrations and Research.--The Committee 
recommends $66,990,000 for grants or contracts to conduct 
research, pilots, or demonstrations that improve techniques or 
demonstrate the effectiveness of programs. This is $18,209,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $9,490,000 above 
the budget request. These funds are made available from April 
1, 2010 through June 30, 2010 to accommodate those youth 
programs that include a summer component.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee bill designates 
$35,000,000 for a new competitive grant program to provide 
Transitional Jobs activities. Combined with $15,000,000 in the 
Reintegration of Ex-Offenders account, the total allocation for 
Transitional Jobs is the same as the budget request. 
Transitional Jobs programs are a proven employment strategy for 
workers with substantial barriers to entering the workforce. In 
addition, these programs have the potential to lower costs to 
local and State governments by reducing recidivism rates among 
ex-offenders, decreasing reliance on public assistance, and 
boosting tax receipts from participants that are able to 
maintain unsubsidized employment. An analysis conducted for the 
State of New York by the Fiscal Policy Institute estimated that 
cost savings for the State equaled more than $100,000,000 over 
three years after subtracting the State's initial funding 
investment in Transitional Jobs programs. The Committee also 
supports the Administration's intention to focus assistance on 
non-custodial parents and directs the Department of Labor to 
consult with the Department of Health and Human Services' 
Administration for Children and Families in designing the grant 
competition and awarding grants. In addition, the Committee 
stipulates that a sufficient portion of these funds shall be 
used for an evaluation of the program and directs the Secretary 
to consult with the Administration for Children and Families in 
designing and implementing the evaluation.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee also designates 
$5,500,000 to continue the Young Parents Demonstration Program. 
This set-aside was initiated in fiscal year 2008 in order to 
provide young parents (both mothers and fathers) and expectant 
mothers ages 16 to 24 with occupational skills training, 
education, and supportive services leading to family economic 
self-sufficiency. The Committee directs that the Department 
continue to award these competitive grants based on the 
criteria outlined in House Report 110-231.
    The bill includes $24,490,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Community Health Network, Chicago, IL for a              $400,000
 job training initiative.............................
Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, Talladega,             200,000
 AL for an employer training and job development
 initiative..........................................
Arkansas State University--Beebe, Searcy, AR for a               200,000
 training program for employment in the natural gas
 industry............................................
Atlanta Christian College, East Point, GA, for                   350,000
 curriculum development..............................
Beth Medrash Govoha, Lakewood, NJ for a job training             150,000
 initiative..........................................
Brevard Workforce Development Board, Rockledge, FL             1,000,000
 for a job training initiative.......................
Bridge to Independence & Career Opportunities,                   100,000
 Danbury, CT for job training and job placement......
Bristol Community College, Fall River, MA for job                100,000
 placement services for veterans.....................
Bucks County Community College, Newtown, PA for the              600,000
 Renewable Energy Academy............................
Campbellsville-Taylor County Industrial Development              500,000
 Authority, Campbellsville, KY for a job training
 initiative..........................................
Center for Employment Training, San Jose, CA for                 350,000
 training dislocated workers and out-of-school youth
 for green jobs......................................
Central Pennsylvania Institute of Science and                    250,000
 Technology, Pleasant Gap, PA for job training
 programs............................................
Chicago House and Social Service Agency, Chicago, IL             200,000
 for an employment training and transitional jobs
 program.............................................
City of Baltimore, Office of Employment Development,             400,000
 MD for its BRAC Employment Preparedness Program.....
City of Chesapeake, VA for a job training initiative.            250,000
City of Detroit, MI for its Summer Youth Services                500,000
 Program.............................................
City of East Palo Alto, CA for workforce training in             600,000
 green jobs..........................................
City of Grand Rapids, MI for the Our Community's                 350,000
 Children job training initiative....................
City of Petersburg, Clearwater, FL for an employment             200,000
 readiness program...................................
City of Richmond, CA for the Richmond BUILD Pre-                 500,000
 apprenticeship Construction Skills & Solar
 Installation Training Program.......................
City of St. Petersburg, FL for the Summer Youth                  300,000
 Internship/Green Workforce Readiness Training
 Program.............................................
City of West Palm Beach, FL for its Youth Empowerment            400,000
 Centers.............................................
Closing the Digital Gap, Lansing, MI for a computer-             250,000
 based job training initiative.......................
Coastal Enterprises, Inc., Wiscasset, ME to launch               250,000
 the CEI Green Business Investment and Job Creation
 Initiative..........................................
Columbia Gorge Community College, The Dalles, OR to              350,000
 develop a renewable energy training program,
 including purchase of equipment.....................
Community Learning Center, Inc., Ft. Worth, TX for a             500,000
 job training initiative.............................
Conservation Corps of Long Beach, Long Beach, CA for             225,000
 a job training program for at-risk youth............
Covenant House Florida, Fort Lauderdale, FL for job              550,000
 readiness training..................................
Cypress Mandela Training Center, Inc., Oakland, CA               275,000
 for pre-apprentice construction training for solar
 and green jobs......................................
Danville Community College, Danville, VA for training            100,000
 at its Wood Products Advanced Manufacturing Lab.....
Davinci Center for Community Progress, Providence, RI            200,000
 for workforce education and training................
DaytonDefense, Beavercreek, OH for a job training                300,000
 initiative..........................................
Des Moines Area Community College, Ankeny, IA for                350,000
 dislocated worker training and job placement in
 financial services, health care and construction....
Digital Workforce Academy, Austin, TX for a job                  300,000
 training initiative.................................
Duke Media Foundation, Hollywood, CA for career                  100,000
 exploration and training for at-risk youth for jobs
 in filmmaking.......................................
Easter Seals Arc of NE Indiana, Ft. Wayne, IN for a              100,000
 job training program for adults with disabilities...
Fighting Back Partnership, Vallejo, CA for workforce             250,000
 recidivism services for state parolees to reduce
 recidivism..........................................
Filipino-American Service Group, Los Angeles, CA for             250,000
 case management and job training for homeless
 individuals.........................................
Fordham Bedford Children's Services, Bronx, NY for               100,000
 job placement, training, and workforce development..
Germanna Community College, Fredericksburg, VA for               100,000
 nursing curriculum development......................
Give Every Child A Chance, Manteca, CA for employment            500,000
 mentoring...........................................
Guadalupe Centers, Inc., Kansas City, MO for its                 200,000
 Culinary Arts Institute job training and employment
 program.............................................
HARBEL Community Organization, Baltimore, MD for                 250,000
 unemployed and underemployed individuals............
Hard Hatted Women, Warren, OH for the Tradeswomen                200,000
 TOOLS program.......................................
Highline Community College, Des Moines, WA for a                 250,000
 workforce training, education, and outreach
 initiative..........................................
Homeboy Industries, Los Angeles, CA for solar panel              300,000
 installation training and certification for at-risk
 young individuals in Los Angeles....................
Hopkins House, Alexandria, VA for workforce                      250,000
 development and training in early childhood
 education...........................................
IndependenceFirst, Milwaukee, WI to provide                      100,000
 employment support services to persons with
 disabilities........................................
Innovative Productivity, Inc., Louisville, KY for a              150,000
 job training initiative.............................
Jacksonville Center for the Arts, Floyd, VA for                  150,000
 workforce training..................................
JobPath, Inc., Tucson, AZ for underserved adults job             200,000
 training............................................
Johnstown Area Regional Industries, Inc., Johnstown,             200,000
 PA for its workforce development program............
Lansing Community College, Lansing, MI for a job                 420,000
 training initiative focused on alternative
 automotive technologies.............................
Living Classrooms of the National Capital Region,                350,000
 Washington, DC for its youth workforce development
 program.............................................
Los Angeles Community College District/Valley                    300,000
 College, Valley Glen, CA for workforce development
 in energy efficiency and green technology fields....
Macomb Community College, Warren, MI for training                550,000
 displaced workers in the aerospace and defense
 industries..........................................
MAGNET, Cleveland, OH for veterans workforce                     200,000
 development, training, and job placement in the
 manufacturing industry..............................
Make the Road New York, Brooklyn, NY for English                 200,000
 language and economic literacy training in low-
 income, primarily immigrant communities.............
McHenry County, Woodstock, IL for short-term                     250,000
 occupational training...............................
Metropolitan Community Colleges, Kansas City, MO for             500,000
 its Sustainability Training Center..................
Michigan Works, Benton Harbor, MI for the basic                  250,000
 workforce transformation program....................
National Center for Family Literacy, Louisville, KY              100,000
 for integration of career awareness and job
 readiness activities into a family literacy program.
National Council of Negro Women, Washington, DC for a            350,000
 job readiness, life skills, and training program for
 disadvantaged women.................................
Northern Marianas Trade Institute, Saipan, MP for                200,000
 vocational and technical training programs..........
Ocean Bay Community Development Corporation, Averne,             100,000
 NY for a workforce preparation program for youth and
 young adults residing in public housing.............
Oklahoma City Community College, Oklahoma City, OK               200,000
 for a veterans job training initiative..............
People for the Parks, Venice, CA for a program to                165,000
 train at-risk youth to maintain and operate
 sustainable parks...................................
San Jacinto College, Pasadena, TX for purchase of                350,000
 equipment...........................................
Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA for a             150,000
 workforce development initiative....................
Southwest Virginia Community College, Richlands, VA              400,000
 for green jobs training in rural communities........
St. Nicholas Neighborhood Preservation Corporation,              150,000
 Brooklyn, NY for a workforce development center.....
Summit Academy OIC, Minneapolis, MN for a program                400,000
 focused on weatherization technician training and
 residential energy auditing.........................
Tulane University, New Orleans, LA for a community               250,000
 health worker training program......................
UMWA Career Centers, Inc., Washington, PA for its                550,000
 mine worker training and employment programs........
University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL for the                450,000
 Hometown Heroes Reach Out and Raise Hope program....
Upper Rio Grande Workforce Solutions, El Paso, TX for            200,000
 its Rural Initiatives Program.......................
Vanguard Services Unlimited, Arlington, VA for a                 250,000
 comprehensive vocational counselor training project.
Wake Technical Community College, Raleigh, NC for job            400,000
 training in the computer simulation and green
 automotive technologies industries..................
West Los Angeles College, Culver City, CA for the                600,000
 Pathways to 21st Century Careers program............
Workforce Services Unlimited, Inc., Circleville, OH              350,000
 for a job training initiative.......................
WRTP/BIG STEP, Milwaukee, WI for workforce skills                100,000
 training to match needs in the construction,
 manufacturing and healthcare sectors................
Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation,                 305,000
 Youngstown, OH for its Youngstown Grey to Green
 Initiative to provide training in green jobs........
Youth Radio, Oakland, CA for training of at-risk                 250,000
 youth in media production, digital technology and
 broadcast engineering...............................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Reintegration of Ex-offenders.--The Committee recommends 
$108,493,000 for ex-offender retraining and reintegration 
activities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $6,507,000 below the budget request. Within the 
amount provided, the bill designates that no less than 
$34,000,000 be used for adult ex-offender activities authorized 
in the Second Chance Act--including continuation of workforce 
training grant programs. These funds are in addition to 
$100,000,000 for Second Chance Act Offender Reentry programs 
implemented by the Bureau of Prisons in the Department of 
Justice. Of the funds designated in the Committee bill for 
adult ex-offender activities, $15,000,000 is provided for a 
competitive grant program to administer Transitional Jobs 
activities and related services. The Committee notes that 
Transitional Jobs programs have been successful in reducing 
recidivism and removing employment barriers for ex-offenders. A 
recent MDRC study in New York City found that reincarceration 
rates decreased by 50 percent for parolees entering a 
Transitional Jobs program within 90 days of release from 
prison; and a separate study in Minnesota showed that homeless 
participants entering a Transitional Jobs program were 41 
percent more likely to obtain unsubsidized employment than 
homeless people not entering a Transitional Jobs program. The 
Committee directs the Department of Labor to consult with the 
Department of Justice in awarding these competitive grants.
    Of the funds provided for youth ex-offender activities, no 
less than $20,000,000 is included for continuation of fiscal 
year 2009 awards for national and regional intermediary grants 
for minority communities. The Committee also designates that 
full continuation funding of $18,715,000 be provided for 
program year 2008 planning, state/local implementation, and 
intermediary reentry grants. In addition, the Committee 
designates $17,847,000 for the balance of continuation costs 
for program year 2008 mentoring grants, as specified in the 
Joint Explanatory Statement for the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 
2009. This funding level is sufficient for continuation costs 
for mentoring grants, as new awards in program year 2009 are 
two-year grants that will not accrue continuation costs in 
fiscal year 2010.
    Evaluation.--The Committee recommends $9,600,000 to provide 
for the continuing evaluation of programs conducted under the 
Workforce Investment Act of 1998, as well as evaluation of 
Federally-funded employment-related activities under other 
provisions of law. This is $2,682,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $2,000,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee agrees with the Administration's focus on rigorous 
scientific evaluation of ongoing programs. Evaluations are 
intended to expand the approaches that work best, improve the 
ones that get mixed-results, and eliminate those that are 
failing.
    Denali Commission.--The Administration's fiscal year 2010 
budget proposes to eliminate funding for the Denali Commission 
in the Department of Labor, mirroring a similar termination of 
funding for the Denali Commission in the Department of Health 
and Human Services. The Committee adopts this recommendation. 
The Administration argues that grants provided under this 
program lack accountability and are duplicative of other 
programs in the budget. Specifically, the Administration has 
requested an appropriation of $11,965,000 for the Denali 
Commission in a separate part of its budget.
    Green Jobs.--The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for a new 
competitive grant program that prepares workers for careers in 
energy efficiency and renewable energy, which is the same as 
the budget request. The Committee supports this new 
Administration initiative to fund pre-apprenticeship programs, 
career pathways, and other gateways for workers to enter 
careers in green industries and expects the Department of Labor 
to build on investments made with funds in the Recovery Act. 
The Recovery Act provided an additional $500,000,000 for 
similar activities in program year 2009.
    Green jobs have the potential to substantially increase the 
standard of living for middle-class workers in the United 
States. Many green jobs are in construction trades that pay 10 
to 20 percent higher wages than other occupations, according to 
the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). And a significant 
percentage of green jobs will be located in the manufacturing 
sector, with a workforce that is more likely to have union 
representation and full benefits. Moreover, the focus of this 
grant program is on pre-apprenticeships and job training for 
careers that promote renewable energy and energy efficiency, 
thereby reducing the nation's dependence on carbon-based energy 
and foreign oil. This new initiative is projected to train more 
than 8,000 workers for careers in the emerging green economy.
    Career Pathways Innovation Fund.--The Committee recommends 
$130,000,000 to support a dedicated account for competitive 
grants for career pathways, which is $5,000,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level. The competitive 
grants for community colleges are intended to prepare workers 
for careers in high-demand and emerging industries, with 
flexibility for workers to enter and exit each career pathway 
at multiple levels. The Committee also includes $5,000,000 for 
a ``Career Pathways for Adults'' initiative under the Career, 
Technical and Adult Education Program in the Department of 
Education to award competitive grants for partnership models 
between community colleges and local adult education providers. 
The combined total of $135,000,000 for career pathways programs 
is the same as the budget request. The Recovery Act also 
provided $250,000,000 for competitive grants for worker 
training in high-growth and emerging industries in program year 
2009. The Career Pathways Innovation Fund replaces the 
Community-Based Job Training Grants program, which previously 
received funding under the Dislocated Worker Assistance 
National Reserve account. The Administration's fiscal year 2010 
budget request proposed to establish the program as its own 
line item. The Committee adopts this recommendation.
    Health Care Sector Initiative.--The Committee designates 
that not less than $65,000,000 of the Career Pathways 
Innovation Fund shall be for competitive grants that prepare 
workers for careers in the health care sector, with a focus on 
nursing professions.
    BLS produces the most detailed national data available 
about the supply and demand for health professions. In recent 
testimony before the Committee, the BLS Commissioner projected 
that a growing senior population would spur rapid employment 
growth throughout the health care sector--resulting in three 
million job openings over the next decade. Within the BLS 
projection, an estimated 125,000 annual job openings will 
emerge for certified nurses assistants (CNAs), licensed 
practical nurses (LPNs) and home health aides. In addition, 
Congress is considering health reform legislation this year. If 
millions of currently uninsured Americans gain access to health 
coverage, the need will increase for all levels of nurses--from 
CNAs and LPNs to Registered Nurses and Nurse Practitioners. 
According to the BLS Commissioner, all of these new positions 
will require at least some postsecondary education or 
training--precisely the type of positions supported by the 
Career Pathways Innovation Fund.
    Both DOL and HRSA provide funding for programs to address 
the nationwide shortage of nurses and other health 
professionals. In the past few years, DOL has awarded more than 
30 percent of its grants under the High-Growth Job Training 
Initiative (HGJTI) and the Community-Based Job Training Grants 
(CBJTG) to programs that train workers for careers in the 
health care sector; within the total for HGJTI and CBJTG, 
approximately 60 percent of health care grants were directed to 
nurse training. Similarly, WIA formula grants for Adult 
Training and Dislocated Worker Training in program years 2006 
and 2007 directed about 30 percent of their grants to careers 
in the health care sector; within the total for formula grants, 
approximately 60 percent of health care grants were awarded for 
nurse training.
    However, it is clear that DOL has not coordinated its grant 
programs with HRSA to comprehensively address the growing 
nationwide shortage of nurses and other health care 
professionals. For example, the primary recipient of DOL's 
CBJTG program is the nation's network of community colleges, 
which also compete for HRSA grants for their RN degree 
programs; and both DOL and HRSA support career ladder programs 
for nurses, but don't take advantage of each other's 
participating constituencies. The Committee feels it is 
important for DOL and HRSA to work together to build a 
framework of coordination with their efforts.
    The Committee directs DOL and HRSA to jointly establish a 
strategic plan for use of fiscal year 2010 resources and to 
extend that plan to future years to address emerging needs in 
the health care sector, particularly in the event of large-
scale health care reform. This plan should be drafted by a DOL-
HRSA interagency taskforce, to be established by October 1, 
2009, with the strategic plan due to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
by April 1, 2010. The taskforce should also include 
participants from the Departments of Education and Veterans 
Affairs. The Committee intends that the taskforce continue to 
meet regularly after the completion of the strategic plan to 
guide the two agencies' efforts to maximize the impact of their 
separate programs.
    Workforce Data Quality Initiative.--The Committee 
recommends $15,000,000, which is the same as the budget 
request, for a new initiative to support the development of 
longitudinal data systems that integrate education and 
workforce data. The Committee supports the Administration's 
plan to bolster data-collection infrastructure that will 
provide high quality information for participants, 
practitioners and policymakers to more accurately evaluate 
current workforce training programs. The Committee directs the 
Department of Labor to collaborate with the Department of 
Education in designing the competitive grant competition and 
awarding grants.
    Quarterly Reports.--The Committee directs the Department of 
Labor to continue to submit quarterly reports to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate on the status of grants made from H-1B fees, National 
Emergency Grants (including grants made under the authority for 
dislocated worker demonstration and pilot projects), High-
Growth Job Training Initiative awards from all sources, and 
awards made for pilot, demonstration, multi-service, research, 
and multi-State projects. These reports shall be submitted to 
the Committees of Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate no later than 15 days after the 
end of each quarter and shall summarize by funding source all 
grants awarded. Reports shall also include a list of all awards 
made during the quarter and, for each award, shall include: the 
grantee; the amount of the award; the funding source of the 
award; whether the award was made competitively or by sole 
source and, if sole sourced, the justification; the purpose of 
the award; the number of workers to be trained; and other 
expected outcomes. This will allow for continued evaluation of 
the use of sole source contracting for those remaining grants 
where the bill does not require competitive procurement.
    H-1B Training Grants.--The Committee bill continues a 
provision that requires the Secretary of Labor to award grants 
for training for employment in high-growth industries on a 
competitive basis. The bill also continues language that 
requires that funds available to the Department under the 
American Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act be 
available only for grants for training in the occupations and 
industries for which employers use the visas that generate 
these funds, and that related activities be limited to those 
necessary to support such training. The Committee does not 
apply this restriction to multi-year grants awarded prior to 
June 30, 2007. This permits the Department to fund the 
obligations made in three rounds of Workforce Innovation in 
Regional Economic Development (WIRED) grants to States.

            COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT FOR OLDER AMERICANS

    The Committee recommends $615,425,000 for Community Service 
Employment for Older Americans. This amount is $43,500,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $40,000,000 above 
the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$120,000,000 to increase this formula grant program and provide 
community service opportunities for an additional 15,000 to 
20,000 seniors in program years 2008 and 2009.
    Authorized by Title V of the Older Americans Act, this 
program provides grants to public and private nonprofit 
organizations that subsidize part-time work in community 
service activities for unemployed persons aged 55 and older 
whose family's annual income does not exceed 125 percent of the 
poverty level.
    According to a report by the Urban Institute, unemployment 
among adults age 65 and above in 2009 reached its highest 
recorded level since the Federal government began tracking the 
statistic in 1948. The Community Service Employment for Older 
Americans program responds to this crisis by placing low-income 
seniors in community service positions that are mutually 
beneficial for seniors and local communities that have been hit 
hard by the recession. The Committee's recommendation is 
intended to avoid a drastic reduction in the program slot level 
as funds from the Recovery Act expire on June 30, 2010. The 
recommended funding increase in the Committee bill will enable 
the program to serve more than 5,000 additional seniors, while 
the overall program will provide community service 
opportunities for nearly 100,000 low-income seniors in program 
year 2010.

              FEDERAL UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS AND ALLOWANCES

    The Committee recommends $1,818,400,000 for Federal 
Unemployment Benefits and Allowances, which is $859,600,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request.
    The Trade Adjustment Assistance program (TAA) provides 
assistance to certified workers adversely affected by imports 
or trade with countries covered by the North America Free Trade 
Agreement, the Andean Trade Preference Act, African Growth and 
Opportunity Act, or the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act. 
As part of the Recovery Act, President Obama signed the Trade 
and Globalization Adjustment Assistance Act of 2009 to 
reauthorize the TAA program until December 31, 2010. The 
reauthorization expands eligibility for the program, enhances 
benefits and services for eligible workers, and increases the 
cap on funding for State TAA training programs from 
$220,000,000 to $575,000,000 per year. Funding will provide for 
the payment of trade adjustment benefit payments, training, job 
search allowances, relocation allowances and associated 
administrative costs, and alternative trade adjustment 
assistance wage supplements.
    The increase in mandatory funding reflects the Department 
of Labor's estimate that the program will serve 31,609 more 
participants in fiscal year 2010 for a total of over 136,975. 
The continued growth in this program demonstrates the impact of 
foreign trade on U.S. manufacturing. The Committee is concerned 
that far greater numbers of individuals are covered by 
certifications for TAA than receive benefits or services under 
the program. In order to address the needs of these individuals 
and their families, the Committee continues to encourage the 
Department to maximize its outreach to trade-affected workers 
to ensure that eligible workers learn about the program.

     STATE UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE AND EMPLOYMENT SERVICE OPERATIONS

    The Committee recommends $4,097,056,000 for State 
Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations, which 
is $402,191,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$4,500,000 below the budget request. Included within the total, 
$4,027,153,000 is from the Employment Security Administration 
Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund and $69,903,000 is from 
the General Fund of the Treasury. The funds in this account are 
used to support the administration of Federal and State 
unemployment compensation laws and to provide assistance to 
State agencies that operate the public Employment Service. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $400,000,000 for State 
Unemployment Service Operations in fiscal year 2009.
    Unemployment Insurance Operations.--For Unemployment 
Insurance (UI) Operations, the Committee recommends 
$3,256,955,000, which is $423,500,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
total includes $3,245,645,000 for State operations and 
$11,310,000 for National Activities. The funds provided for 
State Operations are available through December 31, 2010. 
However, funds used for automation acquisitions are available 
for obligation by the States through September 30, 2012.
    In June 2009, the unemployment rate reached 9.5 percent as 
there were nearly 15 million unemployed workers in the United 
States, according to the BLS. This represents a 97 percent 
increase in unemployed workers since the beginning of the 
recession in December, 2007. In addition, a total of 14 states 
have unemployment rates in the double digits and the 
Congressional Budget Office estimates that the unemployment 
rate will average 9.0 percent in 2010. The Committee provides 
sufficient funds in this bill for States to manage the 
corresponding increase in the unemployment workload.
    The recommendation for State UI Operations includes 
$10,000,000 to conduct in-person reemployment and eligibility 
assessments in One-Stop Career Centers. An additional 
$50,000,000 is available for this purpose through a 
discretionary cap adjustment, as included in the budget request 
and the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 
2010. This recommendation is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. These 
assessments are conducted by State employment security agency 
staff. The Committee concurs with the budget request, which 
cites that a number of States have already used these 
assessments to reduce improper payments and speed reemployment. 
The Committee emphasizes that successful program integrity 
activities are vital to maintain the public's support for 
continuing benefits to recipients deserving of assistance. The 
Committee also urges that program integrity activities be 
administered in a way that will not adversely affect workers 
who receive unemployment benefits and, instead, will enhance 
their knowledge of, and referral to, necessary reemployment 
services.
    The bill provides for contingency funding for increased 
workloads that States may face in the administration of 
Unemployment Insurance by specifying that an additional 
$28,600,000 shall be available from the Unemployment Insurance 
Trust Fund for every 100,000 increase in the number of average 
weekly insured claims above 5,059,000.
    Employment Service (ES) Operations.--The Committee 
recommends $703,576,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The total includes 
$680,893,000 from the Employment Security Administration 
Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund and $22,683,000 from the 
General Fund of the Treasury. The recommendation builds on 
$400,000,000 provided in the Recovery Act to assist States as 
they provide employment services to an influx of unemployed 
workers during the economic downturn. Authorized by the Wagner-
Peyser Act and financed by employer taxes, the Employment 
Service helps jobseekers and employers by matching individuals 
seeking employment to job vacancies. The program serves 16 
million participants annually--not including additional 
services funded through the Recovery Act--and plays an 
important role in administering the work search requirement for 
UI claimants.
    The Committee recommends $20,869,000 for ES National 
Activities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. Within the amount for National 
Activities, $18,520,000 is provided for administration of the 
Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). The WOTC is a tax credit 
incentive for private sector businesses to hire members of 
certain targeted groups.
    Foreign Labor Certification.--The Committee recommends 
$68,436,000 for Foreign Labor Certification activities, which 
is $486,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Department of Labor administers 
a number of Foreign Labor Certification programs under which 
U.S. employers can obtain approval to hire foreign workers.
    Of the amount provided, $53,307,000 is for the Federal 
Administration of Foreign Labor Certification activities, which 
is $486,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.
    The Committee also provides $15,129,000 for grants to 
States for the administration of Foreign Labor Certification 
(FLC) activities. The amount provided for grants to the States 
is the same as the fiscal year 2009 level and the budget 
request. The Office of FLC provides grants to State workforce 
agencies in 54 States and U.S. territories for their work, 
including posting job orders, processing prevailing wage 
determinations, and conducting other activities related to 
Foreign Labor Certification.
    One-Stop Career Center and Labor Market Information.--The 
Committee recommends $47,220,000 for One-Stop Career Center and 
Labor Market Information, which is $4,500,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The savings 
reflect the Committee's elimination of a competitive grant 
program for State agencies to conduct market research on green 
industries. The grant competition is no longer necessary 
because the Recovery Act included $500,000,000 for a Green Jobs 
program and a portion of the provided funds will be used for 
labor market research.
    Work Incentive Grants.--The Administration's fiscal year 
2010 budget proposes to eliminate funding for Work Incentive 
Grants. The Committee adopts this recommendation. This pilot 
program has accomplished its mission of improving the 
accessibility of One-Stop Career Centers to job seekers with 
disabilities. The Committee notes that lessons from the 
Disability Program Navigators will be incorporated into new 
initiatives funded under the Office of Disability Employment 
Policy (ODEP). The Committee bill provides an increase of 
$10,352,000 to ODEP to continue providing employment and 
training services to the disabled.

        ADVANCES TO THE UNEMPLOYMENT TRUST FUND AND OTHER FUNDS

    The Committee recommends such sums as necessary for 
Advances to the Unemployment Trust Fund and Other Funds. The 
Committee estimates that $120,000,000 will be required for this 
account, which is $302,000,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the Administration's estimate. 
The appropriation is available to provide advances to several 
accounts for purposes authorized under various Federal and 
State unemployment insurance laws and the Black Lung Disability 
Trust Fund, whenever balances in such accounts prove 
insufficient.

                         Program Administration

    The Committee recommends $146,406,000 for Program 
Administration. The Committee recommendation provides 
$15,943,000 above the fiscal year 2009 level and $1,500,000 
below the budget request. The total amount includes $96,266,000 
in funds from the General Fund of the Treasury and $50,140,000 
from the Employment Security Administration Account in the 
Unemployment Trust Fund.
    Apprenticeship Services.--For Apprenticeship Services, the 
Committee recommends $27,784,000, an increase of $6,337,000 
over the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. The funding is sufficient to reallocate 27 
full-time equivalents, partially restoring staffing levels that 
existed prior to cuts imposed in the last eight years.

               Employee Benefits Security Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $154,060,000 for the Employee 
Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), which is $10,641,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $2,000,000 below 
the budget request.
    EBSA is responsible for the enforcement of title I of the 
Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) in both 
civil and criminal areas. This involves ERISA fiduciary and 
reporting/disclosure requirements. In addition, EBSA is 
responsible for enforcement of sections 8477 and 8478 of the 
Federal Employees' Retirement Security Act of 1986. The agency 
also was given responsibilities under the Health Insurance 
Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.
    The Committee fully supports the Administration's goal of 
rebuilding EBSA's enforcement staff and returning to the 
enforcement capacity that existed prior to cuts imposed during 
the last eight years. The Committee provides sufficient funding 
for EBSA to hire more than 50 new enforcement staff in fiscal 
year 2010 and intends to annualize these costs in future 
appropriations. The addition of new enforcement staff will 
enable EBSA to conduct an additional 400 civil and 20 criminal 
investigations in fiscal year 2010--an increase of 
approximately ten percent over fiscal year 2009.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation


               PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION FUND

    The Committee includes an obligation limitation of 
$464,067,000 for the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation 
(Corporation), which is $19,345,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request.
    The Corporation is a wholly-owned government corporation 
established by ERISA. The law places it within the Department 
of Labor and makes the Secretary of Labor the chairperson of 
its board of directors. The Corporation receives its income 
from insurance premiums collected from covered pension plans, 
collection of employer liabilities imposed by ERISA, and 
investment earnings, and is authorized to borrow up to 
$100,000,000 from the U.S. Treasury. The primary purpose of the 
Corporation is to guarantee the payment of pension plan 
benefits to participants if covered plans fail or go out of 
existence.
    The Committee continues bill language to permit workload 
driven increases in obligational authority based on the number 
of new plan participants in plans terminated by the 
Corporation. In addition, the bill continues language that 
permits similar workload driven increases to cover the 
investment management fees based on increases in assets 
received by the Corporation as a result of new plan 
terminations or asset growth, after approval by the Office of 
Management and Budget and notification of the Committees of 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate. 
New bill language is also included that makes workload driven 
increases available until September 30, 2011 so that funds 
remain available if the trigger is reached late in the fiscal 
year.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                         (INCLUDING RESCISSION)

    The Committee recommends $486,756,000 for the Employment 
Standards Administration (ESA), which is $46,489,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $16,700,000 below the budget 
request. The bill includes $484,632,000 in General Funds of the 
Treasury for this account and contains authority to expend 
$2,124,000 from the Special Fund established by the Longshore 
and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act.
    ESA is involved in the administration of numerous laws, 
including the Fair Labor Standards Act, the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers' 
Protection Act, the Davis-Bacon Act, the Family and Medical 
Leave Act, the Federal Employees' Compensation Act, the 
Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act, and the Federal 
Mine Safety and Health Act (black lung provisions). The agency 
also administers Executive Order 11246 related to affirmative 
action by Federal contractors and the Labor-Management 
Reporting and Disclosure Act.
    The Committee fully supports the Administration's goal of 
rebuilding ESA's enforcement staff and returning the agency to 
its enforcement capacity that existed prior to cuts imposed 
during the last eight years. The Committee provides sufficient 
funding for ESA to hire more than 350 new enforcement staff in 
fiscal year 2010 and intends to annualize these costs in future 
appropriations. The Committee requests an updated report on 
ESA's human capital strategy to be submitted to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate within 90 days of enactment of this Act. The report 
should include the number of staff hired with funds from the 
Recovery Act and the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, 
respectively; and a detailed hiring plan for the additional 
full-time equivalents the agency plans to hire in fiscal year 
2010.
    Wage and Hour Division.--The Committee recommends 
$220,156,000 for the Wage and Hour Division (WHD), which is 
$27,064,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$7,500,000 below the budget request. These additional funds are 
intended to increase staffing levels for enforcement 
activities, returning WHD to a better balance between direct 
enforcement programs and complaint-driven enforcement programs. 
Once the division is fully staffed and the new employees are 
properly trained, new investigators will conduct an additional 
6,000 investigations per year and support staff will handle an 
additional 4,500 of the conciliations currently handled by 
investigators.
    These increases are included because the Committee remains 
concerned about the continued prevalence of wage theft, 
particularly against low-wage workers who have little recourse 
to legal counsel. A recent report by the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) describes WHD's frequently 
inadequate and ineffective responses to complaints, resulting 
in low-wage workers' continued vulnerability to wage theft. 
However, the GAO also concluded that when WHD adequately 
investigates and follows through on cases they are often 
successful in protecting low-wage workers. The Committee 
believes the GAO report is strong evidence in support of the 
increased funding level for enforcement activities at WHD.
    Worker Misclassification.--The Committee continues to be 
concerned about employer misclassification of employees as 
independent contractors, which undermines enforcement of the 
nation's worker-protection laws. The Committee encourages WHD 
to continue its increased enforcement attention and resources 
on detecting and taking enforcement actions against the illegal 
misclassification of workers and unreported cash pay. The 
Committee requests that the Department submit a report on the 
feasibility of tracking the following information: the source 
of complaints on misclassification of workers and the number of 
investigations; the number of workers covered by those 
investigations; descriptive data on the employer practices that 
form the basis of the complaint; and the findings and actions 
taken, including recovery of back pay, other compensatory 
measures, and cross-referral of complaints to the Internal 
Revenue Service. The Secretary should submit the report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate by May 1, 2010.
    Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs.--The 
Committee recommends $101,521,000 for the Office of Federal 
Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), which is $19,414,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $8,000,000 below 
the budget request. These funds are also intended to support a 
restoration of enforcement capacity and to ensure that Federal 
contractors are complying with non-discrimination and equal 
opportunity statutes. Once OFCCP is fully staffed it is 
projected to conduct more than 5,000 compliance evaluations per 
year--an increase of more than 20 percent over fiscal year 
2009.
    Office of Labor Management Standards.--The Administration's 
fiscal year 2010 budget proposes to reduce funding for the 
Office of Labor Management Standards (OLMS) to $40,557,000, 
which is $4,381,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level. 
The Committee adopts this recommendation. The Committee notes 
that the OLMS budget increased by 57 percent from fiscal year 
2001 to fiscal year 2007, while the level of full-time 
equivalents at OLMS increased 32 percent over the same period.
    The Committee is also concerned about apparent fabrications 
and misreporting of data by OLMS. According to a 2007 report 
from the Center for American Progress, OLMS frequently double 
or triple-counted criminal enforcement cases in its database--
thereby exaggerating the level of criminal activity in this 
area and misrepresenting the effectiveness of OLMS. Considering 
the circumstances, the Committee believes that sufficient 
resources are provided in this bill for OLMS to accomplish its 
core mission and that available resources should be used to 
replenish enforcement agencies whose budgets have been cut 
since 2001.
    The Committee includes a rescission of $65,000,000 from 
unobligated funds collected pursuant to section 286(v) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act. This amount reflects the 
Department's estimates of the unobligated balance in this 
account through the third quarter of fiscal year 2010, assuming 
the enactment of the Administration's proposed legislation to 
expand the authorized use of these funds. The budget request 
proposed a rescission of $30,000,000.

                            SPECIAL BENEFITS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee bill includes $187,000,000 for Special 
Benefits, which is $24,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. This 
appropriation primarily provides benefits under the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act. These payments are required by 
law. In fiscal year 2010, an estimated 132,000 injured Federal 
workers or their survivors will file claims, and 49,000 will 
receive long-term wage replacement benefits for job-related 
injuries, diseases, or death.

               SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR DISABLED COAL MINERS

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $169,180,000 
for Special Benefits for Disabled Coal Miners, as requested. 
This amount is in addition to the $56,000,000 appropriated last 
year as an advance for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010. 
The total program level of $225,180,000 is $24,950,000 below 
the program level for fiscal year 2009 and the same as the 
budget request. These funds are used to provide monthly 
benefits to coal miners disabled by black lung disease and to 
their surviving spouses and certain other dependents, as well 
as to pay related administrative costs.
    The Committee recommends an advance appropriation of 
$45,000,000 for the first quarter of fiscal year 2011, which is 
the same as the budget request. These funds will ensure 
uninterrupted benefit payments to coal miners, their surviving 
spouses, and dependents.

    ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES, ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS 
                           COMPENSATION FUND

    The Committee recommends $51,197,000, to remain available 
until expended, for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness 
Compensation Program Act authorized by Title XXXVI of the 
National Defense Authorization Act of 2001. This amount is 
$1,543,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.
    Funds will be used to administer the program that provides 
compensation to employees or survivors of employees of the 
Department of Energy (DOE); its contractors and subcontractors; 
companies that provided beryllium to DOE; atomic weapons 
employees who suffer from a radiation-related cancer, 
beryllium-related disease, or chronic silicosis as a result of 
their work in producing or testing nuclear weapons; and uranium 
workers covered under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.

                    BLACK LUNG DISABILITY TRUST FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends such sums as necessary for payment 
of benefits and interest on advances for the Black Lung 
Disability program. The Committee estimates that $300,099,000 
will be required for this account, which is $2,522,584,000 
below the fiscal year 2009 level and the same as the 
Administration's estimate.
    The Black Lung Disability Trust Fund (BLDTF) pays all black 
lung compensation/medical and survivor benefit expenses when no 
responsible mine operator can be assigned liability for such 
benefits, or when coal mine employment ceased prior to 1970. 
Administrative costs that are incurred in administering the 
benefits program and operating the trust fund are also covered.
    The basic financing for the trust fund comes from a coal 
excise tax for underground and surface-mined coal. Additional 
funds come from reimbursement payments from mine operators for 
benefit payments made by the trust fund before the mine 
operator is found liable. The Emergency Economic Stabilization 
Act of 2008, enacted on October 2, 2008, authorized 
restructuring of the BLDTF debt. Pursuant to this Act, the debt 
is to be retired using the BLDTF's annual operating surpluses 
until all of its remaining obligations have been paid.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $554,620,000 for the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which is $41,578,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $9,000,000 below 
the budget request. OSHA enforces the Occupational Safety and 
Health Act of 1970 in the nation's workplaces.
    The Committee fully supports the Administration's goal of 
rebuilding OSHA's enforcement staff and returning to the 
enforcement capacity that existed prior to cuts imposed during 
the last eight years. The Committee provides sufficient funding 
for OSHA to hire more than 150 new enforcement staff across the 
agency in fiscal year 2010 and intends to annualize these costs 
in future appropriations. The Committee also requests an 
updated report on OSHA's human capital strategy to be submitted 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act. The report should include the number of staff hired 
with funds from the Recovery Act and the Omnibus Appropriations 
Act, 2009, respectively; and a detailed hiring plan for the 
additional full-time equivalents the agency plans to hire in 
fiscal year 2010.
    Statistics released by OSHA in 2009 confirm the need for 
increased enforcement personnel to improve safety and health 
conditions for America's workers. The agency reports that more 
than 5,000 workers are killed annually as a result of traumatic 
injuries sustained in the workplace--an average of 15 workers 
per day; in addition, more than 10,000 workers get sick or 
injured every day as a result of conditions in their working 
environment; and another 50,000 workers die each year from 
occupational diseases in which workplace exposures are a 
contributing factor. The cost of these injuries and illnesses 
to our economy is estimated to exceed $150,000,000,000 per 
year.
    Ergonomics.--According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the largest single source 
of workplace injuries and illnesses, accounting for almost 30 
percent of lost workday cases. To improve awareness of 
employers and employees about this serious problem, the 
Committee encourages OSHA to consider recording MSDs in a 
separate column on its injury recordkeeping form. The Committee 
believes that more accurate recording of MSD injuries in the 
workplace is necessary to track whether OSHA is making progress 
on this issue.
    Pandemic Protection for Healthcare Workers.--The recent 
experience with the 2009 outbreak of the novel H1N1 virus has 
identified significant deficiencies in efforts to protect 
healthcare workers in the event of a pandemic. Currently there 
is no comprehensive OSHA standard to protect healthcare workers 
from pandemic influenza or airborne infectious diseases. OSHA 
and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines 
recommending the use of certified respirators and other control 
measures to protect healthcare workers from pandemic influenza 
and the H1N1 virus have not been followed by many State and 
local health departments and healthcare facilities. The 
Committee notes that in May 2009, the State of California 
adopted a comprehensive standard on aerosol transmissible 
diseases to protect healthcare workers, emergency responders 
and other workers from infectious agents. The Committee urges 
OSHA to move expeditiously to develop and adopt a similar 
standard so that all healthcare and other workers will be 
protected from airborne infectious diseases, including pandemic 
flu and the novel H1N1 virus.
    Federal Enforcement.--For Federal Enforcement, the 
Committee recommends $221,149,000, an increase of $23,203,000 
over the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $6,000,000 below 
the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 bill included support 
for a minimum of 30 new personnel in Federal Enforcement. The 
Committee's recommendation for fiscal year 2010 is the next 
step in a multi-year process of rebuilding enforcement capacity 
and includes sufficient funding to hire an additional 125 
investigators and compliance personnel. The additional 
personnel will enable OSHA to expand implementation of new and 
ongoing enforcement initiatives, including the Severe Violators 
Inspection Program, the Site Specific Targeting Program, and 
the National Emphasis Programs.
    The Committee is concerned about a 2009 audit by the DOL 
Inspector General (IG) that identifies serious deficiencies in 
the implementation of OSHA's Enhanced Enforcement Program (EEP) 
from 2003 through 2008. The audit states that OSHA did not 
comply with its own program requirements in 97 percent of cases 
sampled by the IG. The worst failures included a lack of 
follow-up inspections at worksites that had been cited for 
violations to ensure that problems had been corrected, and the 
lack of any inspections at related company-wide worksites even 
when safety and health issues indicated that workers at these 
sites were at risk for serious injuries or death. In addition, 
the previous administration issued a revised directive in 2008 
that sharply reduced the number of serious cases being referred 
to the EEP. Following implementation of the new directive, the 
percentage of cases involving fatalities being referred for 
enhanced enforcement plunged from 50 percent to 7 percent. The 
Committee urges the Department to correct any deficiencies 
remaining in this program and to review the 2008 EEP directive. 
The Committee requests a report on the Department's response to 
the IG report and its subsequent activities to improve the EEP. 
The Secretary shall transmit the report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
no later than December 15, 2010.
    State Programs.--The Committee provides $103,393,000 for 
OSHA State Programs, which is $10,800,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $3,000,000 below the budget request. 
These funds support States that have assumed responsibility for 
administering their own occupational safety and health programs 
under State Plans approved and monitored by OSHA. States are 
required to establish and implement enforcement activities at 
least as effective as the Federal program.
    Federal Compliance Assistance.--Within the amount 
recommended for Compliance Assistance, the Committee provides 
$73,380,000 for Federal Compliance Assistance, which is 
$721,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same 
as the budget request.
    Training Grants.--The bill includes $10,000,000 for the 
OSHA Susan Harwood Training Grant Program to support worker 
safety and health training programs, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
year the bill removes the requirement that $3,144,000 be 
directed to the continuation of the existing Institutional 
Competency Building grants. However, the Committee believes 
that these longer-term grants that build safety and health 
competency, as well as train workers to understand the 
requirements of OSHA regulations and standards, should be the 
focus of OSHA's safety and health training program. The 
Committee expects the agency to devote the majority of the 
$10,000,000 for Susan Harwood grants to support these types of 
training programs.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $353,193,000 for the Mine Safety 
and Health Administration (MSHA), which is $6,190,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $500,000 below the budget 
request. This agency enforces the Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Act in underground and surface coal mines and in metal 
and non-metal mines. The Committee continues bill language 
designating up to $2,000,000 within the funds provided for mine 
rescue recovery activities.
    The Committee recommendation provides sufficient funds for 
the Metal and Nonmetal program to hire up to ten additional 
personnel to enhance inspection activities and reduce accidents 
and injuries in the workplace. The Committee recommendation 
also provides sufficient funds for MSHA to conduct 100 percent 
of mandatory inspections of both coal and metal/non-metal 
mines.
    The Committee continues its request for regular quarterly 
progress reports on MSHA's progress in filling all allocated 
inspector positions and completing the training of new 
inspectors hired in fiscal years 2006 through 2009. These 
quarterly reports should be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
within 30 days after the end of each quarter. The Committee 
also maintains its request that MSHA submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate within 90 days of enactment of this Act, and 
quarterly thereafter, listing mine operators who are 
challenging citations regardless of merit.
    The bill includes language to permanently authorize the 
Secretary of Labor to recognize the Joseph A. Holmes Safety 
Association as a principal safety association, permitting the 
provision of funds and the participation of Departmental staff 
in the national organization or local chapters. The Committee 
understands that this organization receives small contracts 
from the Department of Labor on a non-competitive basis, 
supplemented by the official participation of MSHA personnel.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee includes $611,623,000 for the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics (BLS), which is $14,441,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. Within 
this total, $533,359,000 is from the General Fund of the 
Treasury and $78,264,000 is from the Employment Security 
Administration Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund. The BLS 
is an independent national statistical agency that collects, 
processes, analyzes, and disseminates essential economic data 
to the U.S. Congress, other Federal agencies, State and local 
governments, business, labor, and the American public. Its 
principal surveys include the Consumer Price Index and the 
monthly unemployment series.
    The Committee recommendation provides a modest annual 
increase to cover the built-in costs for four of the budget 
activities at BLS: Prices and Cost of Living; Compensation and 
Working Conditions; Productivity and Technology; and Executive 
Direction and Staff Services. These modest increases will fund 
required cost-of-living adjustments for existing personnel and 
enable the agencies to continue producing important data like 
the Consumer Price Index and the Producer Price Index. Each of 
these programs will maintain its current number of full-time 
equivalents.
    The Committee continues bill language providing that 
$1,500,000 may be used for the mass layoff statistics program 
under section 15 of the Wagner-Peyser Act. This program 
provides information on mass layoff actions that result in 
workers being separated from their jobs. This information 
assists in identifying the causes and scope of worker 
dislocation and the characteristics of dislocated workers and 
can be used by the workforce investment and economic 
development systems in assisting employers and/or workers at 
the local level. The Committee also continues bill language 
providing that the Current Employment Survey shall maintain the 
content of the survey issued prior to June 2005 with respect to 
the collection of data for the women worker series.
    Employment and Unemployment Statistics.--The Committee 
recommends $198,028,000 for Employment and Unemployment 
Services, which is $9,822,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The increase 
will begin to correct a history of severe underfunding for this 
vital program that produces the Current Population Survey, 
National Longitudinal Surveys, and many other important 
publications used by the private sector, researchers, and 
policymakers across the country. Employment and Unemployment 
Statistics will also initiate a new data series in fiscal year 
2010 on the green energy sector that will provide much-needed 
economic information on the emergence and long-term development 
of industries related to renewable energy and energy 
efficiency.

                 Office of Disability Employment Policy


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $37,031,000 for the Office of 
Disability Employment Policy (ODEP), which is $10,352,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. ODEP provides policy guidance and leadership to 
eliminate employment barriers to people with disabilities. The 
Committee supports the expansion of these activities to include 
a new competitive grant program that will coordinate with One-
Stop Career Centers to facilitate the hiring and retention of 
individuals with disabilities--incorporating lessons learned 
from the Work Incentive Grant's Disability Program Navigators. 
The Committee also supports the Administration's plan to 
develop an entrepreneurship program for young people with 
disabilities from minority communities, focusing on 
collaboration with minority Chambers of Commerce. The Committee 
commends ODEP for its collaboration with the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics to finalize a disability-focused survey supplement 
to be included in the Current Population Survey in 2012.

                        Departmental Management


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $351,154,000 for Departmental 
Management, which is $36,956,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $4,000,000 below the budget request. This 
amount includes $350,827,000 from the General Fund of the 
Treasury, along with $327,000 from the Employment Security 
Administration Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund. The 
Recovery Act provided $80,000,000 in additional funding for 
enforcement and oversight of activities funded in the Recovery 
Act. These funds were transferred to the appropriate agencies 
that are responsible for carrying out enforcement and oversight 
activities.
    The Departmental Management appropriation finances staff 
responsible for formulating and overseeing the implementation 
of Departmental policy and management activities. In addition, 
this appropriation includes a variety of operating programs and 
activities that are not involved in Departmental Management 
functions, but for which other salaries and expenses 
appropriations are not suitable.
    Coordination on Farmworker Issues.--The Committee believes 
that migrant and seasonal farmworkers encounter unique 
employment problems that warrant close attention by the 
Department of Labor. In the 1980s and 1990s, the Department 
maintained a staff level working group to coordinate policy 
across multiple agencies and ensure enforcement of farmworker 
laws; however, the working group disappeared in recent years. 
The Committee encourages the Secretary to reconstitute this 
multi-agency coordination on farmworker policy and requests an 
update on the Department's activities on this issue. The 
Secretary should transmit this letter to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act.
    Legal Services.--The Committee recommends $113,621,000 for 
the Office of the Solicitor, which is $16,239,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $3,500,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee recommendation is sufficient to hire at 
least 60 new personnel and increase the agency's resolution of 
pending litigation and regulatory issues. The Committee expects 
to annualize these costs in future appropriations to ensure 
that the agency has adequate legal staff to support the 
Department's reinvigorated enforcement agenda.
    International Labor Affairs Bureau.--The Committee 
recommends $91,419,000 for the International Labor Affairs 
Bureau (ILAB), which is $5,345,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request.Within this 
amount, the bill provides funding at the fiscal year 2009 level 
for continuation of activities to prevent child labor and 
trafficking. The Committee also continues to designate 
$6,500,000 for model programs to address worker rights issues 
in countries with which the United States has trade preference 
programs--a program initially funded in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2008. In addition, the Committee designates 
that funding increases in this bill shall be used to add 12 
full-time equivalents to allow ILAB to fulfill its mandate 
related to the enforcement of labor provisions of free trade 
agreements, as well as to improve labor diplomacy and 
international cooperation programs and strengthen research and 
reporting on labor exploitation and worker rights. The 
Committee believes that these resources will help level the 
playing field for American workers by allowing ILAB to 
significantly improve technical assistance and monitoring of 
worker rights in countries that maintain free trade agreements 
with the United States.
    Women's Bureau.--The Committee recommends $12,604,000 for 
the Women's Bureau, which is $2,185,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $2,000,000 above the budget request. The 
Women's Bureau has a mission of promoting the welfare of wage-
earning women by advancing their opportunities for profitable 
employment and improving their working conditions. The 
Committee encourages the Women's Bureau to continue to support 
national networks for women's employment that advance women in 
the workplace through education and advocacy. The Committee 
believes that organizations which continue to exceed annual 
performance goals and are strategically aligned with the goals 
of the Women's Bureau deserve increased support. The 
recommendation therefore includes funds for the expansion of 
competitive contracts to provide technical assistance to local 
women's employment and training programs.
    Federal Contracting with Women-Owned Firms, Minority-Owned 
Firms, and Small Businesses.--The Office of Small Business 
Programs (OSBP) at the Department of Labor is responsible for 
promoting the use of small, socially and economically 
disadvantaged, and women-owned small businesses in compliance 
with Federal laws, regulations, and policies. OSBP also assists 
such firms seeking procurement opportunities with the 
Department. To further this goal, the Committee directs the 
Secretary to provide a report on the Department's ongoing 
activities to assist these firms. The report should include the 
percentage of Federal procurement contracts and subcontracts 
awarded in fiscal year 2009 to women-owned firms, minority-
owned firms, and small businesses; a review of the Department's 
technical assistance and outreach to women-owned firms, 
minority-owned firms, and small businesses; and the 
Department's plan for increasing the number of Federal 
contracts that are awarded to such firms. The Secretary should 
submit this report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate by March 1, 2010.

                          OFFICE OF JOB CORPS

    The Committee recommends $1,705,320,000 for Job Corps, 
which is $21,382,000 over the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $3,931,000 above the budget request. The Recovery Act 
included an additional $250,000,000 for construction, 
rehabilitation, and acquisition of Job Corps Centers. Within 
the Recovery Act funds, up to 15 percent was available for 
operational needs of current Job Corps Centers.
    Job Corps, authorized by WIA, is a nationwide network of 
residential facilities chartered by Federal law to provide a 
comprehensive and intensive array of training, job placement, 
and support services to at-risk young adults. Job Corps 
provides training and post-program services to more than 
100,000 young adults per year. The mission of Job Corps is to 
teach eligible young adults the skills they need to become 
employable and independent and to place them in meaningful jobs 
or further education. Participation in the program is open to 
youth and young adults ages 16 through 24 who are unemployed, 
have dropped out of school, or who are at risk of involvement 
in the criminal corrections system. The bill includes a 
provision requiring DOL to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate a 
transfer plan prior to moving the Office of Job Corps back to 
the Employment and Training Administration.
    Operations.--For Job Corps Operations the Committee 
recommends $1,576,130,000, which is $35,854,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $18,931,000 above the budget 
request. Of the amount recommended, $985,130,000 is available 
for the period July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011 and 
$591,000,000 is available for the period October 1, 2010 
through June 30, 2011. The funds provided are intended to 
support the operations of 124 Job Corps centers, including the 
new Milwaukee Job Corps Center that is scheduled to open in 
program year 2010.
    The increase above the request for Job Corps operations 
includes sufficient resources to provide a salary increase for 
professional staff at Job Corps centers. As a result of a 2006 
study on pay parity for teachers, instructors, and counselors, 
the Office of Job Corps has provided two wage increases, but 
these professional staff continue to be paid approximately 91 
percent of the market-level salary for their positions. The 
Committee supports using part of the funding increase in this 
bill to begin to eliminate the salary gap between Job Corps 
professional staff and their peers in other teaching and 
training institutions.
    Construction and Renovation.--The Committee recommends 
$100,000,000 for construction, rehabilitation and acquisition 
of Job Corps centers, which is $15,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Of the amount 
recommended, $100,000,000 is available from October 1, 2010 
through June 30, 2013. The Committee notes that construction 
costs of projects funded through the Recovery Act have been 
less expensive than previously estimated--thereby reducing the 
funding needs for construction and renovation in the fiscal 
year 2010 bill. The Committee intends that funds in this bill 
support the budget request of $29,610,000 for the construction 
of a new Job Corps Center previously approved through a 
competitive application process. Additional funds shall be used 
to diminish the growing backlog of repairs at Job Corps centers 
and to renovate existing facilities, including retrofits and 
other projects to improve energy efficiency.
    The Committee urges the Department to prepare to consider 
ways to structure a new competition for additional Job Corps 
centers that include a focus on rural workforce development, 
including the use of the Civilian Conservation Center model. 
The Committee requests that the Office of Job Corps identify 
interested communities meeting the aforementioned description 
and respond to requests for technical assistance to begin the 
process of establishing additional centers.
    Administration.--The Committee recommends $29,190,000 for 
necessary expenses of the Office of Job Corps, which is 
$528,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same 
as the budget request.
    The Committee continues bill language that provides 
contracting authority to the Office of Job Corps and a 
provision that no funds from any other appropriation shall be 
used to provide meal services at or for Job Corps centers.

                    VETERANS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING

    The Committee recommends $257,127,000 for Veterans 
Employment and Training, which is $17,688,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $2,00,000 above the budget request. 
Within this amount, $210,156,000 is from the Employment 
Security Administration Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund 
for the State and Federal administration of veterans' 
employment and training activities and $46,971,000 is from the 
General Fund of the Treasury, of which $9,641,000 is available 
from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2011.
    The Committee agrees with the request to increase funding 
by $3,500,000 for the State grants that finance the State 
personnel who assist veterans in their job search. These Local 
Veterans' Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans' 
Outreach Specialists are located within State Employment 
Service agencies and are expected to assist more than 650,000 
veterans in fiscal year 2010. The Employment Service provides 
the necessary infrastructure for the successful delivery of 
services to veterans and this infrastructure is maintained in 
the Committee recommendation.
    For the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration Program, the 
Committee provides $37,330,000, which is an increase of 
$11,000,000 over the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$2,000,000 above the budget request. This program has shown 
success in getting veterans who are homeless back into the 
economic mainstream. The Committee bill includes sufficient 
funding to increase the number of homeless veterans receiving 
assistance from 15,000 to more than 20,000 in program year 
2010. In addition, $9,641,000 is provided for the Veteran's 
Workforce Investment Program, which is an increase of 
$2,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. This program will serve nearly 
5,000 veterans with severe economic and employment hardships. 
The additional funding for these programs is essential as more 
veterans are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan to a slumping 
economy, causing heightened difficulties in finding stable 
housing and employment. The Committee also supports the efforts 
within both the homeless veterans program and the State grant 
program to address the employment needs of incarcerated 
veterans to assure their successful reintegration into the 
community. Within the increase for homeless veterans, the 
Committee supports the Administration's plan to use up to 
$4,000,000 to serve incarcerated veterans.
    The Committee fully funds the increases in the budget 
request for State grants, the Homeless Veterans' Reintegration 
Program, and the Veterans' Workforce Investment Program. In 
addition, the Committee provides $8,000,000 within the Higher 
Education account within the Department of Education to support 
new centers of excellence for veteran student success on 
college campuses.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee recommends $84,014,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $1,873,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
This amount includes $78,093,000 from the General Fund of the 
Treasury along with $5,921,000 from the Employment Security 
Administration Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund.
    The OIG was created to protect the integrity of 
Departmental programs as well as the welfare of beneficiaries 
served by those programs. Through a program of audits, 
investigations, and program evaluations, the OIG attempts to 
reduce the incidence of fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement, 
and to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness 
throughout the Department.

                           General Provisions

    Sec. 101. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of Job Corps funds for the salary of an individual at a 
rate in excess of Executive Level I.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 102. The Committee continues a provision providing the 
Secretary of Labor with the authority to transfer up to one 
percent of discretionary funds between a program, project, or 
activity, provided that no program, project, or activity is 
increased by more than three percent by any such transfer. This 
transfer authority is available only to meet emergency needs. 
The Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate are to be notified 15 days in 
advance of any transfer.
    Sec. 103. The Committee continues a prohibition on the 
purchase of goods that are in any part produced by indentured 
children.
    Sec. 104. The Committee continues a requirement that the 
Department report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate on its plan for the use 
of demonstration, pilot, multiservice, research, and multi-
State projects under the Workforce Investment Act, including 
the up to ten percent set-aside within the dislocated workers 
assistance national reserve, prior to the obligation of funds 
for these activities.
    Sec. 105. The Committee continues a requirement that grants 
made from funds available to the Department under the American 
Competitiveness and Workforce Improvement Act be used only for 
training activities in the occupations and industries for which 
employers use the visas that generate these funds, and that 
related activities be limited to those necessary to support 
such training. The bill does not apply this restriction to 
multi-year grant awards made prior to June 30, 2007.
    Sec. 106. The Committee modifies a provision that requires 
the Secretary of Labor to award Career Pathways Innovation Fund 
grants and grants made under the American Competitiveness and 
Workforce Improvement Act for training and employment in high-
growth industries on a competitive basis. Reports prepared by 
the Congressional Research Service, the Government 
Accountability Office, and the Department of Labor's Inspector 
General have documented that prior to this requirement the 
majority of these grants were awarded without competition.
    Sec. 107. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
recipients of funds provided to the Employment and Training 
Administration from using such funds for the compensation of 
any individual at a rate in excess of Executive Level II.
    Sec. 108. The Committee directs the Secretary to submit a 
plan for the transfer of the administration of the Job Corps 
program from the Office of the Secretary to the Employment and 
Training Administration. Not less than 30 days after submitting 
the plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate, the Secretary may transfer the 
administration and appropriation of the Job Corps program from 
the Office of the Secretary and the provisions of section 102 
of Public Law 109-149 shall no longer be applicable.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

    For fiscal year 2010, the Committee recommends a 
discretionary program level total of $73,720,604,000 for the 
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which is 
$7,435,858,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$1,962,852,000 above the budget request. For comparability, an 
adjustment should be made for the Low Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program (LIHEAP), which was funded in the 
Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2009. After the LIHEAP adjustment, the 
Committee's fiscal year 2010 discretionary program level for 
HHS is $2,335,858,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2009 
funding level. In addition, as requested, the Committee bill 
includes a one-time transfer of all remaining balances in the 
Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund from the Department of 
Homeland Security to HHS. The amount to be transferred is 
currently estimated to be $1,569,000,000. The Recovery Act 
provided $21,917,000,000 in discretionary resources for such 
activities as community health care services, public health 
prevention and wellness activities, health information 
technology, children and community support services, and 
scientific and health care research. This funding will increase 
access to health care, protect those in greatest need, create 
jobs, expand educational opportunities, lay the groundwork for 
successful health reform, and provide relief to States and 
local communities as they struggle to provide safety net health 
and social services to growing numbers of Americans who need 
assistance during the current economic downturn.

              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES

    For fiscal year 2010, the Committee includes a program 
level total of $7,330,817,000 for Health Resources and Services 
programs, which is $71,381,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $179,117,000 above the budget request. The 
Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) supports 
programs that provide health services to disadvantaged, 
medically underserved, and special populations; decrease infant 
mortality rates; assist in the education of health 
professionals; and provide technical assistance regarding the 
utilization of health resources and facilities.

Community Health Centers

    The Committee provides $2,190,022,000 for Community Health 
Centers (CHCs), which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $2,000,000,000 for CHCs for fiscal years 2009 and 
2010. These funds support CHCs, Migrant Health Centers, Health 
Care for the Homeless, and Public Housing Health Service 
grants. Funding will support the care of 17 million patients in 
over 7,500 service delivery sites nationwide. CHCs provide a 
medical home for underserved and disadvantaged populations. 
More than 90 percent of patients have incomes below 200 percent 
of poverty and 40 percent are uninsured. If health reform 
increases access for the uninsured, CHCs will serve in the 
important role of health providers in medical shortage areas.
    The Committee includes bill language providing $44,055,000 
for the Federal Tort Claims Act program, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The 
program provides medical malpractice liability protection to 
Federally-supported health centers.
    The Committee supports continued efforts to expand the CHC 
program into those areas of the country with high need and no 
current access to a health center. Further, the Committee urges 
HRSA to make funding available to increase capacity at existing 
centers, and for service expansion awards to increase access to 
mental health services, dental services, and pharmacy services, 
as well as outreach to special populations.
    While the Committee supports the expansion of the health 
centers program, it recognizes the narrow operating margins of 
most existing health centers. Therefore, within the amount 
provided, $56,000,000 is allocated in bill language to offset 
the rising cost of health care at existing centers and to 
resolve specific financial situations beyond the control of the 
local health center, such as unusual increases in the number of 
uninsured and underserved patients seeking care.
    The Committee recognizes that the provision of preventive 
and primary care to patients served in off-site, institutional 
and/or residential locations and sites is important to address 
the needs of medically underserved communities, whose patients 
have diverse and complicated health care needs and encounter 
many obstacles in accessing services. To facilitate appropriate 
and timely access to care, the Committee encourages HRSA to 
approve the health centers' proposed scope of project changes 
necessary to meet the comprehensive needs of medically 
underserved populations who may require services provided in 
off-site, institutional and/or residential locations and sites.
    The Committee believes that adequate funding for technical 
assistance and networking is important for the successful 
operation of the health centers program. Funds are available 
within the amount provided to centers within the bill to expand 
technical assistance to support existing centers, foster 
expansion to new communities, and ensure timely and effective 
implementation of the funds provided under the Recovery Act.

State Health Access Grants

    The Committee provides $75,000,000 for State Health Access 
Grants to begin to address the problems faced by the nearly 50 
million uninsured individuals in the U.S. This amount is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Committee believes it is important to continue 
this program while comprehensive health reform is being debated 
to give States tools to provide coverage for groups of 
uninsured populations. The Committee intends that the program 
be administered in the same manner as in 2009, with grants 
awarded competitively to States that demonstrate they have a 
program which will expand access to affordable health care 
coverage for the uninsured populations in that State. The types 
of activities that will be supported through these grants 
include:
          
 ``three share'' community coverage 
        (employer, State or local government, and the 
        individual);
          
 reinsurance plans that subsidize a certain 
        share of carrier losses within a certain risk corridor;
          
 subsidized high-risk insurance pools;
          
 health insurance premium assistance;
          
 creation of a State insurance ``connector'' 
        authority to develop new, less expensive, portable 
        benefit packages for small employers and part-time and 
        seasonal workers;
          
 development of statewide or automated 
        enrollment systems for public assistance programs; and
          
 innovative strategies to insure low-income 
        childless adults.
    The Committee directs HRSA to submit a comprehensive report 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate about the outcomes and lessons 
learned from each of the State demonstrations 18 months after 
their five-year grant period ends.

Free Clinics Medical Malpractice

    The Committee provides $40,000 for payments of claims under 
the Federal Tort Claims Act (FTCA) to be made available for 
volunteer free clinic health care professionals, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The program extends FTCA coverage to health care 
professional volunteers in free clinics in order to expand 
access to health care services to low-income individuals in 
medically underserved areas. A free clinic must apply, 
consistent with the provisions applicable to community health 
centers, to have each health care professional ``deemed'' an 
employee of the Public Health Service, and therefore eligible 
for coverage under the FTCA. In 2008, 3,006 volunteer 
healthcare providers received Federal malpractice coverage 
through the program and 93 clinics operated with FTCA-deemed 
volunteer clinicians.

National Hansen's Disease Program

    The Committee provides $16,109,000 for the National 
Hansen's Disease Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The program provides 
medical care to any patient living in the U.S. through direct 
patient care at its facilities in Louisiana, through grants to 
an inpatient program in Hawaii, and by contracting with 11 
regional outpatient clinics. These programs provide treatment 
to 2,900 active Hansen's disease patients.

National Hansen's Disease Program--Buildings and Facilities

    The Committee provides $129,000 for National Hansen's 
Disease Buildings and Facilities, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. These 
funds are used to finance the repair and upkeep of buildings at 
the Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease Center in Carville, 
Louisiana.

Payment to Hawaii for Treatment of Hansen's Disease

    The Committee provides $1,976,000 for the treatment of 
persons with Hansen's Disease in the State of Hawaii, which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. Payments are made to the State of Hawaii for the 
medical care and treatment of persons with Hansen's Disease in 
its hospital and clinic facilities at Kalaupapa, Molokai, and 
Honolulu.

National Health Service Corps (NHSC): Field Placements

    The Committee provides $39,736,000 for NHSC Field 
Placements, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $6,676,000 below the budget request. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $60,000,000 for field placement 
activities for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. These funds are used 
to support the activities of NHSC obligors and volunteers in 
the field, including travel and transportation costs of 
assignees, training and education, recruitment of students, 
residents and clinicians, and retention activities. Salary 
costs of most new assignees are paid by the employing entity. 
In fiscal year 2010, the NHSC will support more than 8,100 
clinicians across the country who will provide medical and 
dental services to almost 8.5 million people in low-income and 
underserved communities.
    The Committee recognizes that the NHSC is an essential tool 
for recruitment and retention of primary care health 
professionals at community, migrant, homeless, and public 
housing health centers, especially given recent efforts to 
expand the health centers program. The Committee encourages 
HRSA to work to increase the proportion of NHSC personnel being 
assigned to health centers.

National Health Service Corps: Recruitment

    The Committee provides $102,114,000 for NHSC recruitment 
activities, which is $6,884,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $20,474,000 below the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $240,000,000 for 
recruitment activities in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The 
program awards scholarships to health professions students and 
assists graduates in repaying their student loans. In return 
for every year of support, these individuals are obligated to 
provide a year of service in health professional shortage areas 
of greatest need. The minimum obligation is two years. This 
funding will support the recruitment of more than 1,200 
practitioners through the loan repayment and scholarship 
programs.
    The Committee continues bill language, also proposed in the 
budget request, permitting funding for NHSC recruitment as well 
as for the Nurse Loan Repayment and Scholarship Program to be 
used to make prior year adjustments to awards. This language 
was recommended as a corrective action by an outside 
investigation of a HRSA Anti-Deficiency Act violation.

Health Professions

    The Committee provides $529,708,000 for health professions, 
which is $136,982,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $1,610,000 above the budget request to continue training 
opportunities for those working in underserved areas and for 
disadvantaged populations. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $200,000,000 for health professions programs in 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010.

                         TRAINING FOR DIVERSITY

    As a step toward the restoration and expansion of the 
diversity programs, the Committee provides $100,843,000 
training for diversity, which is $14,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Committee is acutely aware of the needs identified in the 
landmark Institute of Medicine report, ``Unequal Treatment,'' 
which issued recommendations to begin closing the profound gaps 
that exist in health care delivery and treatment. The report 
recommended increases in these diversity programs because they 
are the pipeline for training minority students in the health 
professions to serve in medically-underserved communities.
    Centers of Excellence.--The Committee provides $24,602,000 
for Centers of Excellence, which is $4,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
program is designed to strengthen the national capacity to 
educate underrepresented minority (URM) students in the health 
professions by offering special support to those institutions 
that train a significant number of URM individuals. Funds are 
used for the recruitment and retention of students and faculty, 
information resources and curricula, faculty and student 
research, and the development of plans to achieve institutional 
improvements. This increase will permit HRSA to fund five 
additional Center of Excellence grants for a total of 18 
centers.
    The Committee is pleased that HRSA has re-focused the 
Centers of Excellence program on providing support to 
historically minority health professions institutions. The 
Committee recognizes the important role of this program in 
supporting faculty and other academic programs at minority 
institutions.
    Health Careers Opportunity Program.--The Committee provides 
$22,133,000 for the Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP), 
which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request. The program provides grants 
to eligible schools and health educational entities with the 
goal of increasing the number of disadvantaged students 
entering health and allied health professions programs. These 
funds will support 34 HCOP grantees to operate programs that 
will prepare 3,000 disadvantaged students at the earliest 
levels of the educational pipeline for careers in health and 
allied health professions. The Committee urges HRSA to give 
priority consideration to awarding grants to those institutions 
with an historic mission of training minorities in the health 
professions.
    Faculty Loan Repayment.--The Committee provides $1,266,000 
for the Faculty Loan Repayment program, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The 
program provides loan repayment for disadvantaged health 
professions students who serve as faculty for a minimum of two 
years. Their institutions are also required to make matching 
payments. The funding provided will support approximately 20 
faculty with loan repayments of up to $20,000 per year.
    Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students.--The Committee 
provides $52,842,000 for Scholarships for Disadvantaged 
Students, which is $7,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The program 
provides grants to eligible health professions and nursing 
schools to provide scholarships to eligible individuals from 
disadvantaged backgrounds, including students who are members 
of racial and ethnic minority groups. By statute, not less than 
16 percent of the funds must go to schools of nursing. This 
funding level will permit over 17,000 students to receive 
scholarships.

Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry

    The Committee provides $56,425,000 for Training in Primary 
Care and Dentistry, which is $8,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
training program is comprised of four elements: (1) family 
medicine; (2) general internal medicine and general pediatrics; 
(3) physician assistants; and (4) general and pediatric 
dentistry. The Committee continues bill language, also proposed 
in the budget request, directing that the general and pediatric 
dentistry programs each receive no less than $5,000,000 and 
that the family medicine program be allocated no less than 
$29,025,000. This funding level will support a total of 245 
grants, supporting over 21,500 students, a 13 percent increase 
over fiscal year 2009.

               INTERDISCIPLINARY COMMUNITY-BASED LINKAGES

Area Health Education Centers

    The Committee provides $34,150,000 for the Area Health 
Education Centers (AHEC) program, which is $1,610,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The 
program provides cooperative agreements to medical and nursing 
schools to encourage the establishment and maintenance of 
community-based training programs in off-campus rural and 
underserved areas. Emphasis is placed on enhancing the 
diversity of the health personnel workforce and improving the 
practice environment and the quality of care available in 
underserved areas. This funding increase will permit the 56 
AHECs, which operate in 47 States, to expand their networks of 
community-based training programs.

Allied Health and Other Disciplines

    The Committee provides $23,890,000 for Allied Health and 
Other Disciplines, which is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request.
    Within the total, the Committee includes the following 
amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Dental Health..........................................         20,000,000        +10,000,000                 $0
Chiropractic...........................................          1,945,000                  0                  0
Graduate Psychology Education..........................          1,945,000                  0                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Dental Health Improvement Grants.--The Committee provides 
$20,000,000 for up to 45 competitive State grants to help 
expand access to oral health services. States may use these 
grants for the purposes outlined in the Dental Health 
Improvement Act, such as encouraging more dentists to practice 
in shortage areas through such mechanisms as loan forgiveness 
and repayment for dentists; providing grants to establish or 
expand oral health services in community-based facilities; and 
expanding dental residency programs. States also may use these 
funds to integrate oral health services into the medical home 
concept for children with special health care needs and for 
grants to ensure low-income pregnant women and women of child-
bearing age have access to appropriate oral health services.
    Chiropractic Demonstration Project Grants.--These 
demonstrations will support five research projects in which 
chiropractors and physicians collaborate to identify and 
provide effective treatments for spinal and/or lower back 
conditions.
    Graduate Psychology Education.--Fiscal year 2010 funding 
will support 18 awards to train an estimated 96 trainees. The 
need for behavioral and mental health services in an integrated 
health care system is significant and well documented. Numerous 
reports have projected continuing increases in demand for 
treatment of psychological conditions in our nation's civilian, 
veterans' and military health care systems. With a rapidly 
growing generation of elderly and significant numbers of 
returning war veterans, the nation's mental health 
infrastructure is certain to experience increased strain as 
individuals and their families increasingly turn to mental 
health care professionals in local communities.

Geriatric Programs

    The Committee provides $41,997,000 for Geriatric Programs, 
which is $11,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request. The Geriatric Programs are 
comprised of three activities: (1) Geriatric Education Centers; 
(2) the Geriatric Training Program for physicians, dentists, 
and behavioral health professionals; and (3) Geriatric Academic 
Career Awards. This funding will support 54 Geriatric Education 
Centers, 14 Geriatric Training grants, and 98 Geriatric 
Academic Career Awards.

Public Health, Preventive Medicine, and Dental Public Health Programs

    The Committee provides $9,000,000 for Public Health, 
Preventive Medicine, and Dental Public Health Programs, which 
is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. The program awards grants to support the 
education and training of the public health workforce to deal 
with new and unanticipated problems and to place these 
specialists in underserved areas. This funding will support 
almost 3,600 students with traineeships and medical 
residencies.

                           NURSING WORKFORCE

    The U.S. is in the midst of a nursing shortage that is 
expected to intensify as baby boomers age and the need for 
health care grows. Compounding the problem is the fact that 
nursing colleges and universities across the country are 
struggling to expand enrollment levels to meet the rising 
demand for nursing care. In March 2009, the U.S. Bureau of 
Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that the health care sector of 
the American economy is continuing to grow, despite steep job 
losses in nearly all major industries. Over the next 20 years, 
the average age of a registered nurse (RN) will increase and 
the size of the workforce will plateau as large numbers of RNs 
retire. Because demand for RNs will increase during this time, 
a large and prolonged shortage of nurses is expected to hit the 
U.S. in the latter half of the next decade. HRSA projects that 
the nation's nursing shortage will grow to more than one 
million nurses by the year 2020. But this is not only a problem 
for the future--the nursing shortage exists now. According to 
the American Hospital Association, U.S. hospitals need 
approximately 116,000 RNs to fill vacant positions nationwide, 
translating into a national RN vacancy rate of 8.1 percent. 
This growing nursing shortage is having a detrimental impact on 
the entire health care system. Numerous studies have shown that 
nursing shortages contribute to medical errors, poor patient 
outcomes, and increased mortality rates.
    A number of factors contribute to the nursing shortage: 
Nursing school enrollment is not growing fast enough to meet 
the projected demand for RNs; a shortage of nursing school 
faculty is restricting nursing program enrollments; and 
changing demographics create a need for more nurses to care for 
the aging population, creating pressures for both supply and 
demand. A significant future factor will be the enactment of a 
health care reform plan that brings millions of uninsured 
people into the health care system.
    Both HRSA and the Department of Labor (DOL) are working to 
address the nurse shortage. As discussed in the individual 
program sections that follow, HRSA supports loan repayment and 
scholarships for students entering nursing school; loan 
programs to create incentives for nurses to continue their 
education to become faculty; advanced nursing training; 
practice and retention programs to encourage nurses to stay in 
the profession and enhance their skills; and diversity programs 
to broaden the pool of nursing school candidates. DOL supports 
nurse training through its high growth job training initiative 
and its community-based career pathways program.
    The Committee provides increases for these programs in both 
HRSA and DOL, but believes it is important for the two agencies 
to build a framework to coordinate these efforts. For example, 
DOL programs work through community colleges, which also 
compete for HRSA grants for their RN degree programs. HRSA and 
DOL both support career ladder programs for nurses, but do not 
take advantage of each other's participating constituencies. 
The BLS produces the most detailed national data available 
about the supply and demand for health professions. Yet HRSA 
and DOL do not coordinate their grant-making, strategic 
planning, or development of sectoral or geographic targeting 
based on the BLS data.
    The Committee directs HRSA and DOL to jointly establish a 
strategic plan for the use of fiscal year 2010 resources and to 
extend that plan to future years to address emerging needs in 
the health care sector, particularly in the event of large-
scale health care reform. This plan should be drafted by a DOL-
HRSA interagency taskforce, to be established by October 1, 
2009, with the strategic plan due to the Committees on 
Appropriation of the House of Representatives and the Senate by 
April 1, 2010. The taskforce also should include participants 
from the Departments of Education and Veterans Affairs. The 
Committee intends for the taskforce to continue to meet 
regularly after the completion of the strategic plan to guide 
the two agencies' efforts to maximize the impact of their 
separate programs.
    In addition, the Committee urges HRSA to expand its 
outreach program to community colleges and to bring DOL and the 
Department of Education into the effort. In its grant-making, 
the Committee encourages HRSA to increase its focus on 
associate degree programs that culminate in an RN degree as a 
way to accelerate the production of RNs. In the awarding of 
nurse education, practice and retention grants, HRSA should 
establish as a high priority those proposals that create career 
ladders leading to an RN degree, as well as those that address 
equipment needs of nursing programs.

Nurse Training Programs

    The Committee provides $263,403,000 for Nursing Training 
programs, which is $92,372,000 over the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request.
    Advanced Education Nursing.--The Committee provides 
$64,438,000 for Advanced Education Nursing, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
The program provides grant support to eligible entities to meet 
the costs of: (1) projects that support the enhancement of 
advanced nursing education and practice; and (2) traineeships 
for individuals in advanced nursing education programs. The 
program prepares registered nurses as nurse faculty, nurse 
practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, 
nurse anesthetists, nurse administrators, public health nurses, 
and other nurse specialists for advanced practice roles. In 
fiscal year 2010, almost 3,700 students and 9,500 trainees will 
be supported. Within the allocation, the Committee encourages 
HRSA to allocate funding at least at the fiscal year 2007 level 
for nurse anesthetist education.
    Nurse Education, Practice, and Retention.--The Committee 
provides $37,291,000 for Nurse Education, Practice, and 
Retention, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Nurse Education, Practice, 
and Retention program is a broad authority with targeted 
purposes under three priority areas--education, practice, and 
retention--in response to the growing nursing shortage. Funding 
will support 3,000 baccalaureate nursing students, 104,000 
primary care encounters in nurse practice arrangements, and 
13,000 internship and residency nurse participants.
    Nursing Workforce Diversity.--The Committee provides 
$16,107,000 for Nursing Workforce Diversity, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
The program provides grants and contracts to schools of nursing 
and other eligible entities to meet the costs of special 
projects to increase nursing education opportunities for 
individuals who are from disadvantaged backgrounds, including 
racial and ethnic minorities, by providing student scholarships 
or stipends, pre-entry preparation, and retention activities. 
The program also contributes to the basic preparation of 
disadvantaged and minority nurses for leadership positions 
within the nursing and health care community. In fiscal year 
2010, 15,800 minority and white disadvantaged students are 
expected to participate in the program. About 550 will receive 
scholarships.
    Loan Repayment and Scholarship Program.--The Committee 
provides $125,000,000 for the Loan Repayment and Scholarship 
Program, which is $87,872,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. This program 
offers student loan repayment to nurses, or scholarships to 
nursing students in exchange for an agreement to serve not less 
than two years at a health care facility with a critical 
shortage of nurses. This funding will provide 990 loan 
repayment agreements and 619 scholarships.
    Comprehensive Geriatric Nurse Education.--The Committee 
provides $4,567,000 for Comprehensive Geriatric Nurse 
Education, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Comprehensive Geriatric Nurse 
Education program supports grants for: (1) providing training 
to individuals who will provide geriatric care; (2) develop and 
disseminate curricula relating to the treatment of the health 
care problems of elderly individuals; (3) train faculty members 
in geriatrics; and (4) provide continuing education to 
individuals who provide geriatric care. In fiscal year 2010, 27 
training projects are expected to be funded.
    Nursing Faculty Loan Program.--The Committee provides 
$16,000,000 for the Nursing Faculty Loan Program, which is 
$4,500,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Nursing Faculty Loan Program 
supports the development of a student loan fund in schools of 
nursing to increase the number of qualified nursing faculty. 
Students may receive loans of up to $30,000 per year for a 
maximum of five years. The program has a cancellation provision 
for up to 85 percent of the loan for recipients working full-
time as nursing faculty for a period of four years. Fiscal year 
2010 funding is expected to support grants to 139 institutions 
that operate loan funds and provide loans to 550 students.
    The Committee recognizes that the continuing nurse faculty 
shortage is directly linked to the national shortage of 
registered nurses. Despite the economic downturn, the BLS 
reported the creation of over 27,000 new hospital, long-term 
care, and ambulatory care positions in the month of February 
2009 alone. Although nurses are needed for many of these new 
positions, the current faculty shortage hinders the ability of 
nursing schools to graduate enough new clinicians to fill these 
and more than 140,000 other vacant nursing positions 
nationwide. According to the American Association of Colleges 
of Nursing, almost two-thirds of the nursing schools offering 
baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs pointed to faculty 
shortages as the primary reason for turning away nearly 50,000 
qualified applicants in 2008. Compounding the problem is the 
fact that a wave of nurse faculty retirements is projected for 
the next ten years that will only worsen the crisis. The 
Committee urges HRSA to continue efforts to address the nurse 
faculty shortage and strengthen the pipeline of nurses entering 
graduate nursing programs.

Children's Hospitals Graduate Medical Education Payment Program

    The Committee provides $320,000,000 for the Children's 
Hospitals Graduate Medical Education Payment Program, which is 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. The program provides support for graduate 
medical education training in children's teaching hospitals 
that have a separate Medicare provider number (``free-
standing'' children's hospitals). The funding in this program 
is intended to make the level of Federal graduate medical 
education support more consistent with other teaching 
hospitals, including children's hospitals, which share provider 
numbers with other teaching hospitals. Payments are determined 
by formula, which is based on a national per-resident amount. 
Payments support training of resident physicians as defined by 
Medicare in both ambulatory and inpatient settings. The 
Committee believes this program is important to restoring the 
reimbursement inequity faced by pediatric hospitals, which 
provide high quality care to children with difficult and 
expensive conditions. This program supports 60 free-standing 
children's hospitals and the training of more than 5,400 
medical residents on- and off-site.

Patient Navigator Program

    The Committee provides $4,000,000 for the Patient Navigator 
Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program provides 
demonstration grants to community organizations that assist 
underserved populations in the coordination of health care 
services and provides referrals for prevention or early 
detection services for cancer and other diseases.

National Practitioner Data Bank

    The Committee assumes $19,750,000 for the National 
Practitioner Data Bank for fiscal year 2010, the same level as 
fiscal year 2009. The Committee recommendation and the budget 
request assume that the data bank will be self-supporting, with 
collections of $19,750,000 in user fees. Bill language is 
continued to ensure that user fees are collected to cover the 
full costs of the data bank operations. The National 
Practitioner Data Bank receives, stores, and disseminates 
information on paid medical malpractice judgments and 
settlements, sanctions taken by Boards of Medical Examiners, 
losses of membership in professional societies, and certain 
professional review actions taken by health care entities. 
Insurance companies, State licensure boards and authorities, 
and other health care entities and professional societies are 
required to report information to the data bank within 30 days 
of each action. The coverage of the data bank includes dentists 
and physicians, and, with respect to malpractice settlements 
and judgments, other categories of licensed health 
professionals. Hospitals are required to search the data bank 
when a health care provider applies for employment and once 
every two years thereafter. State licensing boards, other 
health care entities, licensing authorities, and professional 
societies also have access to the data bank. In fiscal year 
2010, the bank is expected to process more than 5,200,000 
queries.

Health Care Integrity and Protection Data Bank

    The Committee assumes $3,758,000 for the Health Care 
Integrity and Protection Data Bank (HIPDB) for fiscal year 
2010, the same level as fiscal year 2009. The Committee 
recommendation and the budget request assume that the data bank 
will be self-supporting, with collections of $3,758,000 in user 
fees. Bill language is continued to ensure that user fees are 
collected to cover the full costs of the data bank operations. 
HIPDB receives, stores, and disseminates information on final 
adverse actions taken against health care providers, suppliers, 
and practitioners, health care-related civil judgments and 
criminal convictions. This information is collected from and 
made available to Government agencies and health plans. HIPDB 
responded to over five million queries in 2008.

Maternal and Child Health Block Grant

    The Committee provides $665,000,000 for the Maternal and 
Child Health (MCH) Block Grant, which is $2,879,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. States 
use the MCH block grant to improve access to care for mothers, 
children, and their families; reduce infant mortality; provide 
pre- and post-natal care; support screening and health 
assessments for children; and provide systems of care for 
children with special health care needs. States served 31.7 
million children under the block grant in 2007. The Committee 
continues bill language, as proposed in the budget request, 
identifying specific amounts for Special Projects of Regional 
and National Significance (SPRANS) and Community Integrated 
Service Systems (CISS).
    The Committee intends that the following amounts be 
provided within SPRANS:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Set-aside for oral health..............................              4,859                 $0                 $0
Set-aside for epilepsy.................................              4,000               +584               +584
Set-aside for sickle cell disease......................              3,774                  0                  0
Set-aside for first time motherhood....................              4,956                  0                  0
Set-aside for doulas...................................              1,504                  0                  0
Set-aside for fetal alcohol syndrome demo..............                  0               -486               -486
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Dental Health Projects.--The Committee provides $4,859,000 
to encourage HRSA to support early childhood oral health 
interventions and prevention programs encompassing the medical/
dental interface, topical fluorides, school and community-based 
sealant programs, and systems building with the Women, Infants, 
and Children (WIC) and Head Start programs.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee has provided $4,000,000 for the 
expansion of a technical assistance support center and state 
demonstration programs which develop and implement systems of 
care to improve access to comprehensive, coordinated health 
care and related services for children and youth with epilepsy 
living in medically underserved areas.
    Sickle Cell Disease.--The Committee provides $3,774,000 to 
support the continuation of the 17 community-based sickle cell 
disease outreach and supportive service centers. These centers 
coordinate follow-up on needs identified in sickle cell 
screening, provide referrals to networks of services, and 
support community education. The Committee also provides 
$5,250,000 for sickle cell anemia demonstrations, as discussed 
later in this report, which are comprehensive, university-based 
screening and treatment centers.
    Public Awareness for First-time Parents.--These grants 
provide $4,956,000 in competitive funding to States to increase 
public awareness of resources available to new parents and 
women preparing for childbirth through advertising campaigns 
and toll-free hotlines.
    Community-Based Doula Activities.--The Committee provides 
$1,504,000 for grants to organizations to support community-
based doula activities, including technical assistance. Doula 
grants can be allocated to urban and rural settings, as 
determined by HRSA. Urban settings should be focused on 
supporting and expanding community-based activities. Rural 
settings should emphasize breastfeeding initiation and 
retention.
    Vision Screening.--The Committee recognizes that vision 
disorders are the leading cause of impaired health in childhood 
and is concerned that one in four school-aged children has a 
vision problem significant enough to affect learning. Many 
serious ocular conditions in children are treatable if 
diagnosed at an early stage. The Committee understands that 
HRSA requires States to report on a set of core performance 
measures and that these performance measures, when successfully 
addressed, can lead to better health outcomes. The Committee 
urges HRSA to develop and report on the nationwide 
implementation of a State Title V core performance measure 
related to vision screening.

Sickle Cell Anemia Demonstration Program

    The Committee provides $5,250,000 for the Sickle Cell 
Anemia Demonstration Program, which is $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program was created to develop systemic mechanisms for the 
prevention and treatment of sickle cell disease. It supports 
seven university-based networks linked to local Community 
Health Centers that provide treatment, education, continuity of 
care, and provider training for sickle cell anemia patients. 
The increase in funding will permit the support of two to three 
additional projects.

Traumatic Brain Injury

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for the Traumatic Brain 
Injury (TBI) program. This is $123,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The TBI program 
funds the development and implementation of statewide systems 
to ensure access to care, including pre-hospital care, 
emergency department care, hospital care, rehabilitation, 
transitional services, education and employment, and long-term 
community support. Grants also go to State protection and 
advocacy systems. In fiscal year 2009, 16 States will receive 
TBI awards, and 57 State and territorial protection and 
advocacy systems will be funded. The Committee intends that 
HRSA allocate the TBI funding increase to State grants and 
protection and advocacy programs in the same proportions as 
they received with fiscal year 2009 funding.
    The Committee urges HRSA to better align the administrative 
requirements (including for reporting, monitoring and the 
application process) of the TBI protection and advocacy program 
with the administrative requirements of the Protection and 
Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI) program 
operated by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration. The Committee also encourages HRSA to provide 
technical assistance through a grantee with established legal 
expertise to provide assistance to protection and advocacy 
systems on legal matters. Such assistance could address the 
complex legal matters that arise in the protection and advocacy 
program.

Autism and Other Related Developmental Disorders

    The Committee provides $48,000,000 for activities 
authorized in the Combating Autism Act, which is $6,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Within the total, the Committee provides 
$28,200,000 for the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental 
and Related Disabilities (LEND) program to enhance the capacity 
of existing LEND programs and expand the number of sites and 
professionals trained to diagnose, treat, and provide 
interventions to individuals with autism spectrum disorders. 
This increase of $2,200,000 will help these programs initiate 
or expand their work in the area of interdisciplinary 
leadership training to meet the needs of children with autism 
spectrum disorders and related neurodevelopmental disabilities.

Heritable Disorders

    The Committee provides $10,013,000 for the Heritable 
Disorders program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. These funds support the 
Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and 
Children in its work recommending conditions to be added to the 
screening panel. The program also supports seven genetic and 
newborn screening service collaboratives and a national 
coordinating center. The collaboratives support telemedicine 
strategies for genetic services and counseling to families, 
education and dissemination of information to health providers, 
and State panel standardization and testing harmonization.

Congenital Disabilities

    The Committee does not provide funding for the congenital 
disabilities program, which is $1,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2009 level and the budget request. This amount is too small to 
have any impact on providing services to families receiving a 
diagnosis of Down syndrome, spina bifida or other prenatally or 
postnatally congenital diagnosed conditions. Instead, the 
Committee provides $665,000,000 for the MCH block grant. That 
program is statutorily required to implement family-centered, 
community-based systems of coordinated care for children with 
special health care needs.

Healthy Start

    The Committee provides $105,000,000 for Healthy Start, 
which is $2,628,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request. Healthy Start provides discretionary 
grants to communities with high rates of infant mortality to 
provide ongoing sources of primary and preventive health care 
to mothers and their infants. Currently, 102 communities have 
Healthy Start grants. The increase provided in the bill will 
support two to three new grants to communities.
    The National Fetal Infant Mortality Review (NFIMR) program, 
an important component of many Healthy Start programs, provides 
evidence-based interventions crucial to improving infant health 
in high risk communities. The Committee believes HRSA should 
continue to use Healthy Start funds to support the NFIMR 
program and that all Healthy Start Programs should be 
encouraged to implement NFIMR.

James T. Walsh Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program

    The Committee includes $19,000,000 for the James T. Walsh 
Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Program, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
This program provides competitive grants to States for 
universal newborn hearing screening by means of physiologic 
testing prior to hospital discharge, audiologic evaluation by 
three months of age, and entry into a program of early 
intervention by six months of age.

Emergency Medical Services for Children

    The Committee provides $20,000,000 for the Emergency 
Medical Services for Children (EMSC) Program, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
Grants are provided to States and territories to incorporate 
pediatric components into existing emergency medical services 
systems and to schools of medicine to develop and evaluate 
improved procedures and protocols for treating children. In 
fiscal year 2009, 54 grants were awarded to States and 
territories.

Ryan White HIV/AIDS Programs

    The Committee provides a program level of $2,292,414,000 
for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Programs, which is $53,993,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The bill makes available $25,000,000 in program 
evaluation funding under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act for Special Projects of National Significance. The 
bill continues language to make funds appropriated for Parts A 
and B available for three years, consistent with the 
authorization.
    Within the total, the Committee provides $142,900,000 for 
the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative, which is $3,900,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. These programs are targeted to address the growing 
HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disproportionate impact upon 
communities of color, including African Americans, Latinos, 
Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and 
Pacific Islanders.
    Emergency Assistance.--The Committee provides $679,074,000 
for the Part A Emergency Assistance Program, which is 
$15,992,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$7,999,000 above the budget request. These funds provide grants 
to metropolitan areas with very high numbers of HIV/AIDS cases 
for outpatient and ambulatory health and social support 
services. Half of the amount appropriated is allocated by 
formula and half is allocated to eligible areas demonstrating 
additional need through a competitive grant process. The 
program will provide awards to 24 eligible metropolitan areas 
and 32 transitional areas in fiscal year 2010. An estimated 
300,000 people are served by Part A.
    The Committee provides funds within the Part A program to 
prevent substantial funding losses in both eligible 
metropolitan areas and transitional grant areas. Changes in the 
reauthorization significantly altered the method for allocating 
Part A funds, and additional funds are required to create a 
stop loss against unanticipated cuts that threaten to disrupt 
access to needed medical care and support services for people 
living with HIV and AIDS. The Committee includes bill language 
to cap maximum fiscal year 2009 losses at 92.4 percent of the 
fiscal year 2006 level for eligible metropolitan areas and 
transitional grant areas. When allocating fiscal year 2010 
supplemental funds under Part A of the Ryan White CARE Act, the 
Committee urges HRSA to provide additional increases to 
jurisdictions that have experienced cuts in their total awards 
relative to the amount awarded in fiscal year 2006.
    Comprehensive Care Programs.--The Committee provides 
$1,253,791,000 for Part B Comprehensive Care programs, which is 
$30,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The funds provide formula grants to 
States for the operation of HIV service delivery consortia in 
the localities most heavily affected, the provision of home- 
and community-based care, continuation of health insurance 
coverage for infected persons, and purchase of therapeutic 
drugs. The Committee includes bill language identifying 
$835,000,000 of this total to support State AIDS Drug 
Assistance Programs (ADAP), which is $20,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The Part B program provides 59 grants to States and 
territories. In fiscal year 2010, 150,000 clients were served 
by ADAP.
    Early Intervention Program.--The Committee provides 
$206,823,000 for the Part C Early Intervention Services 
Program, which is $4,946,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $5,054,000 below the budget request. Funds are used 
for discretionary grants to Community Health Centers, Family 
Planning agencies, comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic and 
treatment centers, Federally-qualified Health Centers, county 
and municipal health departments, and other non-profit 
community-based programs that provide comprehensive primary 
care services to populations with or at risk for HIV disease. 
The grantees provide testing, risk reduction counseling, 
transmission prevention, oral health, nutritional and mental 
health services, and clinical care. Optional services include 
case management, outreach, and eligibility assistance. 
Currently, 353 grantees provide comprehensive, primary care 
services to approximately 232,000 people in 52 States and 
territories.
    Children, Youth, Women, and Families.--The Committee 
provides $78,728,000 for Part D Children, Youth, Women, and 
Families Programs, which is $1,883,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. HIV-infected 
children, youth, women, and affected family members have 
multiple, complex medical, economic, and social service needs, 
which often require more intensive care coordination, intensive 
case management, child and respite care, and direct service 
delivery to engage and maintain adolescents and mothers in 
care. Funds support innovative and unique strategies and models 
to organize, arrange for, and deliver comprehensive services 
through integration into ongoing systems of care. In fiscal 
year 2010, 90 grants will support health care and support 
services for over 80,000 women, infants, children and youth 
living in 34 States, D.C., and Puerto Rico.
    AIDS Dental Services.--The Committee provides $13,758,000 
for AIDS Dental Services, which is $329,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $1,671,000 below the budget 
request. The program includes two components: (1) the dental 
reimbursement program, which reimburses dental education 
programs for non-reimbursed costs incurred in providing care to 
AIDS patients; and (2) the community-based dental partnership, 
which increases access to oral health services and provider 
training in community settings. In fiscal year 2008, 64 dental 
schools and post-doctoral dental education programs received 
partial reimbursements for the costs of serving 33,500 
patients. In addition, 16 community-based dental partnership 
grants provided training to students and residents enrolled in 
dental education programs that provide care for people with HIV 
under direction of dentists in the community.
    Education and Training Centers.--The Committee provides 
$35,240,000 for AIDS Education and Training Centers, which is 
$843,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$3,157,000 below the budget request. The program supports a 
network of 11 regional centers with more than 130 associated 
sites that conduct targeted, multi-disciplinary HIV education 
and training for health care providers.

Organ Transplantation

    The Committee provides $24,049,000 for Organ Donation and 
Transplantation activities, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. These funds 
support a scientific registry of organ transplant recipients 
and the National Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network 
to match donors and potential recipients of organs, through a 
contract with the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). In 
fiscal year 2010, more than 29,000 deceased donor organs are 
expected to be transplanted.
    The Committee commends HRSA's Division of Transplantation 
and UNOS for working with the pulmonary hypertension (PH) 
community to address concerns regarding the allocation of lungs 
for transplantation in PH patients. The Committee encourages 
UNOS to continue its dialogue with the PH community to monitor 
concerns regarding the methodology used to determine 
transplantation eligibility for PH patients.
    The Committee notes that the Breakthrough Collaborative 
successfully increased the rates of organ donation each year 
since it was launched in fiscal year 2003, but the rates of 
increase have flattened since fiscal year 2008. The Committee 
requests that HRSA submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
on additional initiatives and programs that would help the 
Division of Transplantation reach its stated goal of a 75 
percent organ donation conversion rate.

National Cord Blood Inventory Program

    The Committee provides $11,983,000 for the National Cord 
Blood Inventory Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. This program 
provides funds to cord blood banks to build an inventory of the 
highest quality cord blood units for transplantation. Currently 
more than 38,000 cord blood units have been collected, and 233 
units have been released for transplantation.

C.W. ``Bill'' Young Cell Transplantation Program

    The Committee provides $23,517,000 for the C.W. ``Bill'' 
Young Cell Transplantation Program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The C.W. 
``Bill'' Young Cell Transplantation Program is the successor to 
the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry. Its purpose is to 
increase the number of transplants for recipients suitably 
matched to biologically unrelated donors of bone marrow and 
cord blood. In 2008, a total of 7.2 million adult volunteers 
were listed in the registry.

Office of Pharmacy Affairs

    The Committee provides $1,470,000 for the Office of 
Pharmacy Affairs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $1,500,000 below the budget request. The 
Office administers the 340B Drug Pricing program, which 
requires drug manufacturers to give covered entities such as 
Community Health Centers a discount on drugs they dispense. The 
number of covered entities is expected to reach 14,400 in 
fiscal year 2010.

Poison Control Centers

    The Committee provides $28,314,000 for Poison Control 
Centers, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. These funds support a grant 
program for 61 Poison Control Centers. In addition, funds are 
used to maintain a national toll-free number and to implement a 
media campaign to advertise that number, as well as to support 
the development of uniform patient management guidelines and 
the improvement of data collection.

Rural Programs

    The Committee provides $312,000,000 for key rural health 
programs, which fully meets the amount identified by the 
Congressional Rural Health Care Coalition and other primary 
stakeholders. This level is $23,192,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $13,291,000 below the budget request.
    Rural Outreach Grants.--The Committee provides $56,600,000 
for Rural Outreach Grants, which is $2,700,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $1,150,000 above the budget 
request. In fiscal year 2010, the program is expected to award 
245 grants to deliver and improve rural health care services to 
950,000 rural residents.
    Rural Health Research.--The Committee provides $10,200,000 
for Rural Health Research, which is $500,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This activity 
supports six rural health research centers, health services 
data analysis grants, and the Secretary's rural health advisory 
committee.
    Rural Hospital Flexibility Grants.--The Committee provides 
$41,200,000 for Rural Hospital Flexibility Grants, which is 
$2,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. Under this program, HRSA works with States to 
provide support and technical assistance to Critical Access 
Hospitals to focus on quality and performance improvement and 
to integrate emergency medical services. Of the amount 
provided, the Committee includes $15,000,000 to continue the 
Small Rural Hospital Improvement Program. In fiscal year 2010, 
1,600 grants are expected to be awarded to small rural 
hospitals for these activities.
    Delta Health Initiative.--The Administration's budget 
proposes to eliminate funding for the Delta Health Initiative. 
The Committee concurs with the budget request. The fiscal year 
2009 funding level was $26,000,000.
    Rural and Community Access to Emergency Devices.--The 
Committee provides $3,300,000 for Rural and Community Access to 
Emergency Devices, which is $1,549,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The program assists 
both urban and rural communities in increasing survivability 
from sudden cardiac arrest by providing funding for the 
purchase, placement, and training in the use of automated 
external defibrillators (AED). These funds will support the 
placement of 1,400 AEDs and training for 3,700 individuals.
    Only an estimated eight percent of victims who suffer a 
sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital survive. Immediate 
cardiopulmonary resuscitation and early intervention, using an 
AED, can more than double a patient's chance of survival. 
Communities with comprehensive AED programs, including training 
of anticipated rescuers, have achieved survival rates of 40 
percent or higher.
    State Offices of Rural Health.--The Committee provides 
$9,700,000 for State Offices of Rural Health, which is $499,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $250,000 above the 
budget request. The State Offices of Rural Health program 
creates a focal point for rural health within each State. In 
each State, the office collects and disseminates information on 
rural health, coordinates rural health resources and 
activities, provides technical assistance to rural providers 
and communities, and helps communities recruit and retain 
health professionals. In fiscal year 2010, more than 5,200 
communities will be assisted.
    Black Lung Clinics.--The Committee provides $7,200,000 for 
Black Lung Clinics, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The program supports 15 
grantees that treat approximately 11,600 patients who are 
active and retired coal miners and others with occupation-
related respiratory and pulmonary impairments.
    Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program.--The 
Committee provides $1,952,000 for the Radiation Exposure 
Screening and Education Program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program provides grants to States, local governments, and 
health care organizations for the education, prevention, and 
early detection of radiogenic cancers and diseases resulting 
from exposure to uranium during mining and milling at nuclear 
test sites. There are 1,900 patients served by the program.

Denali Commission

    The Administration's budget request proposes to eliminate 
funding for the Denali Commission in HHS, mirroring a similar 
termination in the Department of Labor. The Committee concurs 
with the budget request. The fiscal year 2009 funding level was 
$19,642,000.

Family Planning

    The Committee provides $317,491,000 for the Family Planning 
program, which is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. In fiscal 
year 2010, the program is expected to serve 5.2 million low-
income women and men at 4,500 clinics nationwide. This funding 
level will allow the program to prevent over one million 
unintended pregnancies.
    The program provides grants to public and private non-
profit agencies to support a range of family planning and 
reproductive services, as well as related preventive health 
services, such as patient education and counseling; breast and 
cervical cancer examinations; STD and HIV prevention education, 
counseling, testing and referral; and pregnancy diagnosis and 
counseling. The program is the only source of health care for 
many of its clients.

Healthcare-related Facilities and Other Programs

    The Committee includes $179,330,000 for construction and 
renovation (including equipment) of health care and other 
facilities and other health-related activities. The budget 
request does not include funding for this purpose. HRSA should 
use no more than one percent of the funds allocated for 
projects for agency administrative expenses. The bill includes 
funding for the following projects in the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Advocate Good Shepherd Hospital, Barrington, IL for              $70,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Advocate South Suburban Hospital, Hazel Crest, IL for            300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Advocates for a Healthy Community, Inc., Springfield,            250,000
 MO for facilities and equipment.....................
Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH for facilities              250,000
 and equipment.......................................
Alexandria Neighborhood Health Services, Inc.,                   500,000
 Alexandria, VA for facilities and equipment.........
Alivio Medical Center, Chicago, IL for facilities and            600,000
 equipment for a community health center in Cicero,
 IL..................................................
All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg, FL for                  350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Alton Memorial Hospital, Alton, IL for facilities and            250,000
 equipment...........................................
American Oncologic Hospital, Fox Chase Cancer Center,          1,000,000
 Philadelphia, PA for facilities and equipment for
 the American Russian Cancer Alliance................
Anchorage Neighborhood Health Center, Anchorage, AK              100,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Angelina College, Lufkin, TX for purchase of                     200,000
 equipment...........................................
Arcadia Methodist Hospital, Arcadia, CA for an                   750,000
 electronic medical records initiative...............
Arkansas Methodist Medical Center, Paragould, AR for             100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Ashtabula County Council on Aging, Inc., dba                     250,000
 Ashtabula Senior Center, Ashtabula, OH for
 facilities and equipment............................
Asian Health Services, Oakland, CA for facilities and            275,000
 equipment...........................................
Association for Utah Community Health, Salt Lake                 350,000
 City, UT for facilities and equipment...............
Athol Memorial Hospital, Athol, MA for facilities and            250,000
 equipment...........................................
Atlantic Health System, Morristown, NJ for facilities            750,000
 and equipment.......................................
AtlantiCare, Egg Harbor Township, NJ for facilities              200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Avis Goodwin Community Health Center, Dover, NH for              100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Bacharach Institute for Rehabilitation, Pomona, NJ               250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Bacon County Hospital, Alma, GA for facilities and               993,000
 equipment...........................................
Baltimore Medical System, Baltimore, MD for                      250,000
 facilities and equipment for the Highlandtown Health
 Living Center.......................................
Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas, Beaumont, TX               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Barnesville Hospital, Barnesville, OH for facilities             600,000
 and equipment.......................................
Bassett Hospital of Schoharie County dba Cobleskill              350,000
 Regional Hospital, Cobleskill, NY for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Bay Regional Medical Center, Bay City, MI for                    350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
BayCare Health System, Clearwater, FL for facilities           1,000,000
 and equipment.......................................
Bear Lake Memorial Hospital, Montpelier, ID for                  300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Ben Archer Health Center, Hatch, NM for facilities               300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Benefis Health System, Great Falls, MT for facilities            500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Billings Clinic, Billings, MT for a rural health                 250,000
 outreach program, including purchase of equipment...
BioInnovation Institute of Akron, Akron, OH for                  600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Bisbee Hospital Association, Bisbee, AZ for                      400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA for facilities and             500,000
 equipment for the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro
 Ambulatory Care Center..............................
Bothwell Region Health Center, Sedalia, MO for                   370,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Bradley Hospital, East Providence, RI for facilities             500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Branch-Hillsdale-St. Joseph Community Health Agency,             400,000
 Coldwater, MI for facilities and equipment for a
 Hillsdale public health dental clinic...............
Bronx Regional Health Information Organization,                  310,000
 Bronx, NY for facilities and equipment..............
Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Center, Bronx, NY for                     600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center,                     150,000
 Patchogue, NY for facilities and equipment..........
Brownsville Community Development Corporation,                   400,000
 Brooklyn, NY for facilities and equipment...........
Cabell Huntington Hospital Foundation, Huntington, WV            650,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Calhoun Liberty Hospital, Blountstown, FL for                    450,000
 facilities and equipment............................
California State University Channel Islands,                     195,000
 Camarillo, CA for nursing curriculum development,
 including purchase of equipment.....................
California State University San Bernardino, San                  100,000
 Bernardino, CA for facilities and equipment.........
California State University, Bakersfield, CA for                 150,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
California State University, Long Beach, Department              200,000
 of Nursing, Long Beach, CA for nursing programs.....
Camillus House, Inc., Miami, FL for facilities and               500,000
 equipment...........................................
Caritas Christi Health Care, Boston, MA for                      400,000
 facilities and equipment for Carney Hospital,
 Dorchester, MA......................................
Caroline's Room/Community Foundation of Greater New              300,000
 Haven, New Haven, CT for facilities and equipment...
Catskill Regional Medical Center, Harris, NY for                 300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Center for Asbestos Related Disease (CARD), Libby, MT            350,000
 for an asbestos surveillance initiative.............
Central Suffolk Hospital dba Peconic Bay Medical                 100,000
 Center, Riverhead, NY for facilities and equipment..
Central Washington Hospital, Wenatchee, WA for                   600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Charles T. Sitrin Health Care Center, New Hartford,              250,000
 NY for facilities and equipment.....................
Chicago Family Health Project, Chicago, IL for                   250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Chickaloon Native Village, Chickaloon, AK for                    250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Child Protection Center, Sarasota, FL for facilities             150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Childersburg Medical Clinic Board, Childersburg, AL              200,000
 for facilities and equipment at the Regional
 Diabetic Care and Advanced Wound Care Center........
Children's Hospital and Clinics of Minnesota, St.                675,000
 Paul, MN for facilities and equipment...............
Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters Health               200,000
 System, Chesapeake, VA for facilities and equipment.
Children's Hospital of the King's Daughters, Norfolk,            250,000
 VA for facilities and equipment.....................
Children's Hospital, Aurora, CO for facilities and               225,000
 equipment...........................................
Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota,                   450,000
 Minneapolis, MN for facilities and equipment........
Children's Institute of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA               600,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL for                    380,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Chinese Hospital, San Francisco, CA for facilities               350,000
 and equipment.......................................
CHOICE Regional Health Network, Olympia, WA for rural            115,000
 health outreach.....................................
CHRISTUS Health St. Francis Cabrini Hospital,                    400,000
 Alexandria, LA for an electronic medical records
 initiative..........................................
CHRISTUS Health System, Shreveport, LA for a rural               350,000
 health initiative...................................
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Cincinnati, OH for                500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Citizens for a Fair Ferndale, Hazel Park, MI for                 150,000
 facilities and equipment for Ferndale Free Clinic...
City of Bethlehem, PA for facilities and equipment...            100,000
City of Hopewell, VA for facilities and equipment....            257,000
City of New Orleans, LA for facilities and equipment             450,000
 associated with replacement of Methodist Hospital...
City of Philadelphia, PA for facilities and equipment            535,000
 for electronic health records.......................
City of Springville, AL for facilities and equipment.            250,000
City of Sumter, SC for facilities and equipment for              250,000
 Central Carolina Technical College..................
City of Vineland, NJ for facilities and equipment....            300,000
Clarian Health and Riley Hospital for Children,                  400,000
 Indianapolis, IN for facilities and equipment.......
Clarian Health, Indianapolis, IN for facilities and              200,000
 equipment...........................................
Clayton County Board of Commissioners, Jonesboro, GA             350,000
 for facilities and equipment for Alzheimer's Disease
 services............................................
Clinica Family Health Services, Lafayette, CO for                250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Clinica Sierra Vista, Bakersfield, CA for facilities             550,000
 and equipment.......................................
Clinicas de Salud del Pueblo, Inc., Brawley, CA for              400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Clinics of Hope, USA, Knoxville, TN for facilities               200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Coastal Bend College, Beeville, TX for facilities and            220,000
 equipment...........................................
Coastal Medical Access Project, Brunswick, GA for                100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Cobb County Government, Marietta, GA for facilities              500,000
 and equipment.......................................
College of Notre Dame of Maryland, Baltimore, MD for             450,000
 facilities and equipment for the school of pharmacy.
College of Southern Maryland, La Plata, MD for                   400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, MN for health                600,000
 professions training................................
College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN for a rural               350,000
 health technology project...........................
Collier County, FL for a health care access network              600,000
 for the uninsured, including purchase of equipment..
Colorado State University--Pueblo, Pueblo, CO for                300,000
 facilities and equipment for the Nursing Education
 program.............................................
Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO for                   500,000
 facilities and equipment for a biocontainment
 training facility...................................
Columbus Community Hospital, Columbus, WI for                    500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Columbus County Department of Aging and Adult                    450,000
 Services, Whiteville, NC for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, IN for                     500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Care Services, Taunton, MA for facilities              200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Community Health Alliance of Pasadena, Pasadena, CA              100,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Community Health Center of Franklin County, Inc.,                200,000
 Turners Falls, MA for facilities and equipment......
Community Health Development, Inc., Uvalde, TX for               600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Health Integrated Partnership, Inc., Glen              500,000
 Burnie, MD for facilities and equipment.............
Community Health Service Agency, Greenville, TX for              300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Hospital Association, Inc., Fairfax, MO for            500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Community Medical Center, Missoula, MT for facilities            500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Community Medical Center, Toms River, NJ for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Cooper Health System, Camden, NJ for facilities and              200,000
 equipment...........................................
Cortland Regional Medical Center, Inc., Cortland, NY             250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
County Commissioners of Charles County, MD, La Plata,            250,000
 MD for facilities and equipment.....................
County of Brunswick, Bolivia, NC for facilities and              250,000
 equipment...........................................
County of Custer, ID for facilities and equipment....            400,000
County of Hood River, OR for facilities and equipment            150,000
County of Sarasota, FL for facilities and equipment..            350,000
County of Washington, Hillsboro, OR for facilities               350,000
 and equipment for a mental health clinic............
Creighton University, Omaha, NE for facilities and             1,000,000
 equipment...........................................
Cullman Regional Medical Center, Cullman, AL for               1,000,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Daniel Memorial, Inc., Jacksonville, FL for                      500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Daniels Memorial Hospital Association, Scobey, MT for            400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
DCH Health System, Northport, AL for facilities and              350,000
 equipment...........................................
Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL for the Cancer                  700,000
 LifeLink program....................................
DCH Health System/Fayette Medical Center, Fayette, AL            600,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Denver Health and Hospital Authority, Denver, CO for             500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore,              500,000
 MD for facilities and equipment.....................
Dubois Regional Medical Center, Dubois, PA for                   100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
DuPage County Health Department, Wheaton, IL for                 150,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
E.J. Noble Hospital, Gouverneur, NY for facilities               350,000
 and equipment.......................................
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC for                     222,000
 facilities and equipment............................
East Harlem Council for Human Services, Inc., New                300,000
 York, NY for facilities and equipment...............
Easter Seals-Goodwill Northern Rocky Mountain, Inc.,             500,000
 Great Falls, MT for facilities and equipment........
Eastside Eye Care Clinic, San Antonio, TX for                    250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Edgerton Care Center, Edgerton, WI for facilities and            150,000
 equipment...........................................
Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, FL for                      500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, CA for                 350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
El Proyecto del Barrio Inc., Arleta, CA for                      300,000
 facilities and equipment for a community health
 clinic in Winnetka, CA..............................
Endless Mountains Health Systems, Montrose, PA for               700,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Enrichment Center of Hernando County, Brooksville, FL            600,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Excela Health Frick Hospital, Mt. Pleasant, PA for               150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Family Health Centers Worcester, Worcester, MA for               250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Family Service of RI, Providence, RI for facilities              400,000
 and equipment.......................................
Ferrum College, Ferrum, VA for facilities and                    200,000
 equipment...........................................
Flambeau Hospital, Park Falls, WI for facilities and             750,000
 equipment...........................................
Florida Blood Services, St. Petersburg, FL for                   200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Florida Community College at Jacksonville, FL for                250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Florida Hospital Altamonte, Altamonte Springs, FL for            100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Florida Southern College, Lakeland, FL for facilities            400,000
 and equipment.......................................
Floyd Medical Center, Rome, GA for facilities and                250,000
 equipment...........................................
Forsyth Institute, Boston, MA for facilities and                 450,000
 equipment...........................................
FoundCare, Palm Springs, FL for facilities and                   200,000
 equipment...........................................
Frank R. Howard Foundation, Willits, CA for                      350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA for purchase of                  250,000
 equipment...........................................
Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Angeles, CA for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Gordon Hospital, Calhoun, GA for an electronic                   150,000
 medical records system..............................
Graceland University, Lamoni, IA for facilities and              150,000
 equipment...........................................
Grady Health System, Atlanta, GA for facilities and              900,000
 equipment...........................................
Grand Rapids Public Schools, Grand Rapids, MI for                500,000
 facilities and equipment at the Central Health
 Science Campus......................................
Griffin Hospital, Derby, CT for facilities and                   300,000
 equipment...........................................
Grimes St. Joseph Health Center, Navasota, TX for                150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Gulf Coast Jewish Family Services, Clearwater, FL for            500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Gulf County Health Department, Port St. Joe, FL for              200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Halifax Community College, Weldon, NC for facilities             150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Hamilton Memorial Hospital, McLeansboro, IL for an               200,000
 electronic medical records initiative...............
Hancock Medical Center, Bay Saint Louis, MS for                  500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hanover Hospital, Hanover, PA for an electronic                  450,000
 medical records initiative..........................
Happiness House/Finger Lakes Cerebral Palsy                       30,000
 Association, Geneva, NY for facilities and equipment
Harnett County Central Campus Hospital, Dunn, NC for             400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for                 300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX for                 100,000
 facilities and equipment for the Nurse Call Triage
 System..............................................
Harrison Memorial Hospital, Cynthiana, KY for                    100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Health Alliance, Lake Katrine, NY for facilities and             300,000
 equipment...........................................
Healthy Learners Midlands, Columbia, SC for rural                110,000
 health outreach.....................................
Hendricks Regional Health, Danville, IN for                      550,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN for              300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital, Valencia, CA               350,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Hidalgo County Health Department, Edinburg, TX for               230,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Highland Community Hospital, Hattiesburg, MS for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Highlands Hospital, Connellsville, PA for facilities             300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Holy Name Hospital, Teaneck, NJ for facilities and               500,000
 equipment...........................................
Holyoke Medical Center, Holyoke, MA for facilities               300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Hormel Foundation, Austin, MN for facilities and                 500,000
 equipment for biomedical research...................
Hospice of Tuscarawas County, Inc., Dover, OH for                400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hospital Authority of Jefferson County, Louisville,              150,000
 GA for facilities and equipment.....................
Houlton Regional Hospital, Houlton, ME for facilities            250,000
 and equipment.......................................
Hudson Headwaters Health Network, Queensbury, NY for             350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hudson River HealthCare, Inc., Peekskill, NY for                 400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Huguley Memorial Medical Center, Burleson, TX for                380,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Hurley Medical Center, Flint, MI for facilities and              350,000
 equipment...........................................
Idaho Caring Foundation for Children, Boise, ID for              300,000
 dental services for low-income children.............
Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID for facilities             400,000
 and equipment.......................................
Illinois Capital Development Board, Springfield, IL              200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Illinois State University, Normal, IL for curriculum             500,000
 development.........................................
Indian Health Center of Santa Clara County, San Jose,            300,000
 CA for facilities and equipment.....................
Indiana Regional Medical Center, Indiana, PA for an              350,000
 electronic medical records initiative...............
Infirmary Health System, Mobile, AL for an electronic            250,000
 medical records initiative..........................
Ingham Regional Medical Center, Lansing, MI for                  100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Iowa State University, Ames, IA for facilities and               650,000
 equipment...........................................
Iowa Western Community College, Council Bluffs, IA               250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
J.C. Blair Memorial Hospital, Huntingdon, PA for                 180,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Jackson Health System, Miami, FL for health                      500,000
 information technology upgrades.....................
Jacksonville University, Jacksonville, FL for                    250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, Jamaica, NY for                 250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Jasper Memorial Hospital, Monticello, GA for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Jenkins County Hospital, Millen, GA for facilities               200,000
 and equipment.......................................
Jewish Hospital & St. Mary's Foundation, Louisville,             600,000
 KY for facilities and equipment.....................
JFK Medical Center, Edison, NJ for facilities and                300,000
 equipment...........................................
John Kanzius Cancer Research Foundation, Erie, PA for            700,000
 facilities and equipment............................
John T. Mather Memorial Hospital, Port Jefferson, NY             450,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Kaleida Health, Buffalo, NY for facilities and                   300,000
 equipment...........................................
Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA for                      100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
KVC Behavioral Health Care, Kansas City, KS for                  500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
La Porte Regional Health System, La Porte, IN for                350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
La Rabida Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL for                   325,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lake City Community College, Lake City, FL for                   250,000
 purchase of mobile clinical training laboratories...
Lake Hospital System, Painesville, OH for an                     500,000
 electronic medical records initiative...............
Lakeland Community College, Kirtland, OH for purchase            250,000
 of equipment........................................
Lamar University, Beaumont, TX for the Community and             350,000
 University Partnership Service, including facilities
 and equipment.......................................
Lamprey Health Care, Inc., Newmarket, NH for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lane Community College, Eugene, OR for facilities and            400,000
 equipment...........................................
LBJ Tropical Medical Center, Pago Pago, AS for                   700,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lehigh Valley Coalition for Kids, Allentown, PA to               150,000
 purchase and equip mobile health clinics............
Little Rivers Health Care, Bradford, VT for                      200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Long Beach, CA               350,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Los Angeles Southwest College, Los Angeles, CA for               300,000
 health professions training.........................
Lowell Community Health Center, Lowell, MA for                   600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY for facilities             150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Lutheran Social Services of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN              450,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Mackinac Straits Health System, Inc., St. Ignace, MI             150,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Madison County Health Care Center, Winterset, IA for             250,000
 an electronic medical records initiative............
Madison County Memorial Hospital, Rexburg, ID for an             350,000
 electronic medical records initiative...............
Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE for                 250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Manchester Community Health Center, Manchester, NH               250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Marian Medical Center, Santa Maria, CA for facilities            500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI for rural dental             410,000
 health outreach.....................................
Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, WI for facilities and           1,000,000
 equipment...........................................
Martin Methodist College, Pulaski, TN for facilities           1,000,000
 and equipment.......................................
Mary Queen of Vietnam Community Development                      400,000
 Corporation, New Orleans, LA for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health                     400,000
 Sciences, Worcester, MA for health professions
 training............................................
McCurtain Memorial Hospital, Idabel, OK for                      250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
McKay-Dee Hospital Center, Ogden, UT for facilities              150,000
 and equipment.......................................
Medical University of South Carolina--Hollings Cancer            200,000
 Center, Charleston, SC for facilities and equipment.
Memorial Healthcare System, Hollywood, FL for                    450,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Memorial Hermann Foundation, Houston, TX for                     250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Memorial Hermann Healthcare System, Houston, TX for            1,000,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Memorial Hospital, Miramar, FL for facilities and                250,000
 equipment...........................................
Mena Regional Health System, Mena, AR for facilities             500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Mental Health Association in High Point, NC for                  247,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Mercy Health Foundation, Durango, CO for facilities              400,000
 and equipment for a primary health clinic in La
 Plata County........................................
Mercy Medical Center--North Iowa, Mason City, IA for             350,000
 an electronic medical records initiative............
Meridian Health, Neptune, NJ for facilities and                  100,000
 equipment...........................................
Miami Beach Community Health Center, North Miami, FL             200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL for facilities              450,000
 and equipment.......................................
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, Miami,              500,000
 FL for facilities and equipment.....................
Middlesex Community College, Bedford, MA for                     300,000
 facilities and equipment for the Lowell dental
 hygiene clinic......................................
Mid-Illinois Medical District, Springfield, IL for               250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
MidState Medical Center, Meridien, CT for facilities             250,000
 and equipment.......................................
Milwaukee Health Services, Milwaukee, WI for                     100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Missouri Baptist Hospital, St. Louis, MO for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, for a                250,000
 nursing clinical simulation laboratory, including
 facilities and equipment............................
Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Monongahela Valley Hospital, Monongahela, PA for                 400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Monongalia General Hospital, Morgantown, WV for                  450,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Montana Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, Billings, MT             100,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Montgomery College, Rockville, MD for facilities and             550,000
 equipment...........................................
Morehead State University, Morehead, KY for a rural              250,000
 health initiative...................................
Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA for                    100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Morris College, Sumter, SC for facilities and                    275,000
 equipment...........................................
Morrisania Diagnostic and Treatment Center, Bronx, NY            200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Mount Nittany Medical Center, State College, PA for              150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Mount St. Mary's Hospital, Lewiston, NY for                      300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
MultiCare Health System, Tacoma, WA for facilities               250,000
 and equipment.......................................
Murphy Medical Center, Murphy, NC for facilities and             350,000
 equipment...........................................
Nanticoke Senior Center, Seaford, DE for facilities              100,000
 and equipment.......................................
Nathan Littauer Hospital Association, Gloversville,              350,000
 NY for facilities and equipment.....................
National Association of Hispanic Nurses, Washington,             500,000
 DC for health professions training..................
National Kidney Registry, Babylon, NY for purchase of            177,000
 equipment...........................................
Native Women's Health Care, Rapid City, SD for                    60,000
 facilities and equipment............................
NC Dental Health Fund, Cary, NC for facilities and               300,000
 equipment for the Missions of Mercy (MOM) free
 dental clinics......................................
Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children,                  350,000
 Wilmington, DE for facilities and equipment.........
New Horizons Health System, Owenton, KY for                      250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY for                 150,000
 facilities and equipment for ophthalmology and
 otolaryngology surgery..............................
New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY for                 200,000
 facilities and ultrasound equipment.................
New York University Langone Medical Center, New York,            270,000
 NY for facilities and equipment at Columbus Medical
 in Reno Park, Queens................................
Newton Memorial Hospital, Newton, NJ for facilities              300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Norman Regional Health System, Norman, OK for                  1,715,000
 facilities and equipment............................
North General Hospital, New York, NY for facilities              450,000
 and equipment.......................................
North Shore Community College, Danvers, MA for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment for allied health training.
North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Great              200,000
 Neck, NY for facilities and equipment...............
North Woods Community Health Center, Minong, WI for              100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine              200,000
 and Pharmacy, Rootstown, OH for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck, NY for                    350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Northern Oswego County Health Services, Inc.,                    150,000
 Pulaski, NY for facilities and equipment............
Northwest Alabama Mental Health Center, Jasper, AL               200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
NorthWest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville, AR            400,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Oakland Primary Health Services, Pontiac, MI for                 500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center--              700,000
 James Cancer Hospital and Richard Solove Institute,
 Columbus, OH for facilities and equipment...........
Oklahoma City Community College, Oklahoma City, OK               250,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City,             300,000
 OK for facilities and equipment.....................
Oklahoma State University--Center for Health Systems,            300,000
 Tulsa, OK for purchase of equipment, including a
 mobile clinic.......................................
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK for                    350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR for             175,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR for            250,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR for            100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
OSF St. Francis Hospital and Medical Group, Escanaba,            250,000
 MI for facilities and equipment.....................
Our Lady of Resurrection Medical Center, Chicago, IL             125,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Ozark Tri-County Health Care Consortium, Neosho, MO              500,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Ozarks Medical Center, West Plains, MO for facilities            500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences,                 400,000
 Yakima, WA for facilities and equipment.............
Palisades Medical Center, North Bergen, NJ for                   350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Palmetto Health Foundation, Columbia, SC for                     375,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, TX for              400,000
 facilities and equipment for the Pharmacy Inpatient
 Robotics program....................................
Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, TX for              100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Pennsylvania State University--Altoona, PA for                   320,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Petaluma Health Center, Petaluma, CA for facilities              500,000
 and equipment.......................................
Peter Christensen Health Center, Lac du Flambeau, WI             140,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ for                     200,000
 facilities and equipment for a Computerized
 Tomography (CT) scanner for the emergency department
Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services , Grand               200,000
 Rapids, MI for an electronic medical records
 initiative..........................................
Pioneer Valley Life Sciences Institute--Baystate                 500,000
 Medical Center, Springfield, MA for facilities and
 equipment...........................................
Porter-Starke Services, Inc., Valparaiso, IN for                 550,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Providence Health and Services, Anchorage, AK for a              350,000
 physician recruitment and retention initiative......
Providence Hospital, Mobile, AL for facilities and               250,000
 equipment...........................................
Providence St. Joseph Medical Center, Burbank, CA for            500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Providence St. Mary Medical Center, Walla Walla, WA              100,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Puget Sound Neighborhood Health Centers, Seattle, WA             500,000
 for facilities and equipment for the Rainier Beach
 Medical and Dental Clinic...........................
Range Regional Health Services, Hibbing, MN for                  400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Bayfield,              750,000
 WI for facilities and equipment.....................
Redlands Community Hospital, Redlands, CA for                    500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Refuah, Spring Valley, NY for facilities and                     390,000
 equipment...........................................
Renown Health Systems, Reno, NV for facilities and               800,000
 equipment...........................................
Rice University, Houston, TX for facilities and                  150,000
 equipment...........................................
Richland Parish Hospital, Delhi, LA for facilities             1,025,000
 and equipment.......................................
Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY            150,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Riverside Community College District, Riverside, CA              150,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Moreno                 400,000
 Valley, CA for facilities and equipment.............
Roane County Committee on Aging, Inc., Spencer, WV               100,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Rochester General Health System, Newark, NY for                  100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Rome Memorial Hospital Foundation, Rome, NY for                  250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Roper/St. Francis Hospital, Charleston, SC for                   200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, PA for facilities              350,000
 and equipment.......................................
Saddleback Memorial Medical Center, San Clemente, CA             150,000
 for an electronic medical records initiative........
SafeHaven of Tarrant County, Fort Worth, TX for a                200,000
 domestic violence prevention initiative.............
San Antonio Community Hospital, Upland, CA for                   750,000
 facilities and equipment............................
San Francisco Human Services Agency, San Francisco,              350,000
 CA for facilities and equipment for the Child
 Advocacy Center.....................................
San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA for            500,000
 facilities and equipment for health professions
 training............................................
San Gorgonio Memorial Hospital, Banning, CA for                  340,000
 facilities and equipment............................
San Luis Obispo County Community College District,               100,000
 San Luis Obispo, CA for facilities and equipment....
San Ysidro Health Center, San Ysidro, CA for                     250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Santa Clara Valley Health and Hospital System, San               292,000
 Jose, CA for facilities and equipment...............
Santa Fe College, Gainesville, FL for facilities and             150,000
 equipment...........................................
Schuylkill Health System, Pottsville, PA for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Seton Hill University, Greensburg, PA to develop the             500,000
 Advanced Certificate in Orthodontics, including
 purchase of equipment...............................
Shore Memorial Hospital, Somers Point, NJ for                    500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Sisters of Providence Health System, Springfield, MA             200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Sisters of St. Francis Health Services, Inc., Olympia            350,000
 Fields, IL for facilities and equipment.............
Skagit Valley Hospital, Mount Vernon, WA for                     400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Somerset Medical Center, Somerville, NJ for an                   600,000
 electronic medical records initiative...............
South Boston Community Health Center, Boston, MA for             100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
South Shore Hospital, Chicago, IL for facilities and             250,000
 equipment...........................................
Southeast Arkansas College, Pine Bluff, AR for                   200,000
 facilities and equipment for the nursing school.....
Southeast Georgia Health System, Brunswick, GA for             1,000,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau,             205,000
 MO for the SHOW Mobile initiative...................
Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT for                     350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS, Phoenix, AZ for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Sparrow Health System, Lansing, MI for an electronic             300,000
 medical records initiative..........................
Spectrum Health, Grand Rapids, MI for purchase of                200,000
 equipment...........................................
SSM St. Mary's Health Center, Jefferson City, MO for             200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Ambrose University, Davenport, IA for facilities             300,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. Bernardine Medical Center, San Bernardino, CA for            500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Bernardine Medical Center, San Bernardino, CA for            500,000
 facilities and equipment for an MRI system..........
St. Bernards Development Foundation, Jonesboro, AR               300,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
St. Clare's Health System, Denville, NJ for                      600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Elizabeth Regional Health, Lafayette, IN for                 300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Francis Hospital, Charleston, WV for facilities              650,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. Francis Medical Center, Trenton, NJ for                      350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Francis Memorial Hospital, San Francisco, CA for             500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. John West Shore Hospital, Westlake, OH for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. John's Hospital, Berryville, AR for facilities               200,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. John's Hospital, Maplewood, MN for facilities and            675,000
 equipment...........................................
St. John's Riverside Hospital, Yonkers, NY for                   250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Joseph Health System, Inc., Tawas City, MI for               400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Joseph Hospital, Eureka, CA for facilities and               350,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Joseph Hospital/Peace Health, Bellingham, WA for             300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Joseph of the Pines, Southern Pines, NC for                  453,000
 purchase and outfitting of a mobile health unit.....
St. Joseph's Mercy Care Services, Inc., Atlanta, GA              200,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
St. Joseph's/Candler Health System, Savannah, GA for             350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Luke's Health System, Boise, ID for facilities               350,000
 and equipment.......................................
St. Mary's Hospital, Passaic, NJ for facilities and              400,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Mary's Regional Medical Center, Reno, NV for                 700,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center,                 300,000
 Missoula, MT for the Western Montana Telemedicine
 Network, including purchase of equipment............
St. Vincent Charity Hospital, Cleveland, OH for                  500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Vincent Healthcare Foundation, Billings, MT for              400,000
 facilities and equipment............................
St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center, Toledo, OH for                 200,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY             400,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Stewart-Marchman-Act Foundation, Inc., Daytona Beach,            700,000
 FL for facilities and equipment.....................
Summa Foundation, Akron, OH for facilities and                   250,000
 equipment for the Center for Minority Health and
 Health Disparities Solutions........................
Sun Life Family Health Center, Casa Grande, AZ for               300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Taunton Nursing Home, Taunton, MA for facilities and             650,000
 equipment...........................................
Temple Health and Bioscience Economic Development                750,000
 District, Temple, TX for facilities and equipment...
Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Fort Worth,               300,000
 Ft. Worth, TX for facilities and equipment..........
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center,                    300,000
 Lubbock, TX for facilities and equipment............
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for facilities and            480,000
 equipment...........................................
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for the Center for            250,000
 the Study of Addiction..............................
Texas Wesleyan University, Ft. Worth, TX for                     650,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia,              700,000
 PA for facilities and equipment.....................
Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen),                300,000
 Phoenix, AZ for facilities and equipment............
Trinity Regional Medical Center, Ft. Dodge, IA for               694,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Troy University, Troy, AL for facilities and                     500,000
 equipment...........................................
U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Health, St. Thomas,            500,000
 VI for facilities and equipment for an Emergency
 Medical Services Administrative and Clinical Health
 Center..............................................
U.S. Virgin Islands Department of Health, St. Thomas,            200,000
 VI for facilities and equipment for the Eldra
 Schulterbrandt Long-Term Care Facility..............
UAW Local 1005, Parma, OH for facilities and                     300,000
 equipment for a health clinic.......................
Union College, Barbourville, KY for facilities and               500,000
 equipment...........................................
Unity Health System, Rochester, NY for facilities and            800,000
 equipment...........................................
University Hospitals, Chardon, OH for an electronic              250,000
 medical records initiative..........................
University Medical Center Foundation, El Paso, TX for            600,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little              600,000
 Rock, AR for facilities and equipment...............
University of California--Riverside, Riverside, CA             3,400,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
University of California, Davis Medical Center,                  375,000
 Sacramento, CA for facilities and equipment for the
 surgery and emergency services pavilion.............
University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA               500,000
 for health professions training.....................
University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine,                975,000
 Aurora, CO for facilities and equipment for the
 Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome.............
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO            300,000
 for health professions training through the
 Physician Pipeline for Rural Colorado...............
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL for facilities            350,000
 and equipment.......................................
University of Guam, Mangilao, GU for facilities and              400,000
 equipment...........................................
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine            250,000
 at Rockford, IL for facilities and equipment........
University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria,            400,000
 Peoria, IL for facilities and equipment.............
University of Kansas Medical Center, Wichita, KS for             500,000
 development of the Clinical Skills Simulation
 Laboratory, including curriculum development and
 purchase of equipment...............................
University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS for facilities and          1,500,000
 equipment...........................................
University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA for                840,000
 facilities and equipment, including purchase of a
 mobile dental unit..................................
University of Maine Bangor, Augusta, ME for                      300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, MD             400,000
 for facilities and equipment for an emergency
 medical facility in Queen Anne's County.............
University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL for facilities             750,000
 and equipment.......................................
University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI              500,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE for             150,000
 a rural health initiative...........................
University of North Alabama, Florence, AL for                    700,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Oklahoma--College of Medicine, Tulsa,              300,000
 OK for facilities and equipment.....................
University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus,               300,000
 San Juan, PR for facilities and equipment for the
 Unit of Comparative Medicine........................
University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL for                    2,500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee, Tampa,             250,000
 FL for nursing program facilities and equipment.....
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL for the Cancer            500,000
 Clinical Trial project..............................
University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME for                   475,000
 facilities and equipment for the nursing simulation
 laboratory..........................................
University of St. Francis, Fort Wayne, IN for                    200,000
 facilities and equipment for nurse training.........
University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN            350,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX for              650,000
 facilities and equipment............................
University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX              500,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston,              100,000
 TX for facilities and equipment.....................
University of Texas Health Science Center, San                   150,000
 Antonio, TX for facilities and equipment............
University of Texas Health Science Center, San                   270,000
 Antonio, TX for facilities and equipment............
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center,              1,000,000
 Houston, TX for facilities and equipment............
Valley Presbyterian Hospital, Van Nuys, CA for                   300,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Van Wert County Hospital, Van Wert, OH for facilities            840,000
 and equipment.......................................
Vanguard University, Costa Mesa, CA for facilities               300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Variety--The Children's Charity of Wisconsin,                     40,000
 Milwaukee, WI for facilities and equipment..........
Victor Valley Community Hospital, Victorville, CA for            250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA for               600,000
 facilities and equipment for the Massey Cancer
 Center..............................................
Visiting Nurse Services of Putnam County, Avon, IN               100,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Visiting Nurses Association Healthcare Partners of               100,000
 Ohio, Cleveland, OH for health professions training.
Wadsworth-Rittman Hospital Foundation, Wadsworth, OH             600,000
 for facilities and equipment........................
Wake Health Services, Inc., Raleigh, NC for                      550,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Warren Achievement Center, Inc., Monmouth, IL for                100,000
 rural health outreach...............................
Warren County Community College, Washington, NJ for              350,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Warren County Planning Commission, Warren, PA for                350,000
 health care facilities and equipment................
Washington County Hospital, Hagerstown, MD for                   750,000
 facilities and equipment and for an electronic
 medical records initiative..........................
Washington County, North Carolina, Plymouth, NC for              150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Washington State University, Spokane, WA for distance            150,000
 learning technologies and purchase of equipment
 related to nursing programs.........................
Weber State University, Ogden, UT for expansion of               350,000
 nursing programs, including purchase of equipment...
WellSpan Health, York, PA for purchase of equipment..            100,000
West Jefferson Medical Center, Marrero, LA for                   100,000
 facilities and equipment............................
West Liberty State College, West Liberty, WV for                  50,000
 facilities and equipment............................
WestCare Health Systems, Sylva, NC for facilities and            350,000
 equipment...........................................
Wheeling Hospital, Inc., Wheeling, WV for facilities             150,000
 and equipment.......................................
White Memorial Medical Charitable Foundation, Los                500,000
 Angeles, CA for facilities and equipment............
White Plains Hospital Center, White Plains, NY for               250,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Wills Eye Health System, Philadelphia, PA for                    150,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Wilmington College, Wilmington, OH for facilities and            200,000
 equipment...........................................
World Impact Good Samaritan Clinic, Wichita, KS for            1,000,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Xavier University of New Orleans, LA for facilities              350,000
 and equipment.......................................
Youth Dynamics, Inc., Billings, MT for facilities and            100,000
 equipment...........................................
Zufall Health Center, Dover, NJ for facilities and               225,000
 equipment...........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Telehealth

    The Committee provides $15,000,000 for Telehealth, which is 
$7,450,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$6,800,000 above the budget request. The Telehealth program 
works with and supports communities in their efforts to develop 
cost-effective uses of telehealth technologies. These 
technologies bring health services to isolated populations and 
health-related education to the practitioners who serve them.

Program Management

    The Committee provides $146,000,000 for the cost of Federal 
staff and related activities to coordinate, direct, and manage 
the programs of HRSA, which is $3,976,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $1,052,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee was pleased to learn that HRSA has named a 
Chief Dental Officer and urges the agency to establish an 
Office of Oral Health, headed by the Chief Dental Officer, to 
rebuild the dental regional workforce and provide leadership 
and oversight of HRSA dental programs.
    The Committee urges HRSA to withdraw the proposed guidance 
for the 340B drug program, ``Regarding Section 602 of the 
Veterans Health Care Act of 1992 Definition of Patient'' issued 
on January 12, 2007 and directs that any subsequent changes to 
the 340B Patient Definition be issued in proposed form with 
stakeholders having an opportunity to provide comments. The 
Committee is concerned that the January 12, 2007 guidelines may 
dramatically change the degree to which safety net health 
facilities are able to participate in the program. The 
Committee also requests that HRSA consider a patient definition 
permitting safety net health facilities eligible for grant 
funding under the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism 
Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 to use 340B pricing to 
purchase drugs needed to enhance preparedness for and response 
to bioterrorism or other public health emergencies. If HRSA 
chooses not to follow this request, the Committee expects a 
written explanation before the agency publishes final guidance.

           HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Health Education Assistance Loans (HEAL) program 
insures loans provided by non-Federal lenders to students in 
health professions schools. Under the accounting rules 
established in the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, one account 
is maintained to pay the obligations arising from loans 
guaranteed prior to fiscal year 1992. A second account pays 
obligations and collects income from premiums on loans 
guaranteed in fiscal year 1992 and beyond. Each annual cohort 
of loans is independently tracked in this account. The 
authority for this program expired in fiscal year 1999. Fiscal 
year 1998 was the last year in which loans were obligated to 
previous borrowers under the HEAL authority.
    The Committee provides $1,000,000 to liquidate obligations 
from loans guaranteed prior to 1992, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    The Committee provides $2,847,000 for HEAL program 
management, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request.

             VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM TRUST FUND

    The Committee estimates that $122,410,000 will be released 
from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund, which is 
$3,891,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.
    The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program provides a 
system of compensation for individuals with vaccine-associated 
injuries or deaths. Funds for claims from vaccines administered 
on or after October 1, 1988 are generated by a per-dose excise 
tax on the sale of selected prescribed vaccines. Revenues 
raised by this tax are maintained in a Vaccine Injury 
Compensation Trust Fund.
    Trust funds made available will support the liability costs 
of vaccines administered after September 30, 1988. They also 
will support the $6,502,000 in costs incurred by HRSA in the 
operation of the program, which is $1,098,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
These funds are required to maintain current service levels. 
Program workload is expected to increase by 260 percent from 
2008 to 2010 because of the thousands of pending autism cases.

                  COVERED COUNTERMEASURE PROCESS FUND

    The Committee does not make available funding for the 
Covered Countermeasure Process Fund created in the Public 
Readiness and Emergency Preparedness Act. The budget requested 
$5,000,000 as first-time funding for this activity. Pandemic 
influenza funding included in the fiscal year 2009 supplemental 
appropriation, P.L. 111-32, may be used for this purpose.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                DISEASE CONTROL, RESEARCH, AND TRAINING

    The Committee provides a discretionary program level total 
of $6,681,895,000 for the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC), which is $67,294,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $38,435,000 above the budget request. Of 
the funds provided, $368,863,000 shall be derived from 
evaluation set-aside funds available under section 241 of the 
Public Health Service Act, which is $37,612,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 set-aside and $38,011,000 above the requested 
set-aside.
    In addition, the Committee provides $55,358,000 for CDC to 
administer the mandatory Energy Employees Occupational Illness 
Compensation Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.
    The CDC assists State and local health authorities and 
other non-governmental health-related organizations to 
understand, control, and reduce disease and other health 
problems. The activities of CDC focus on several major 
priorities, including providing core public health functions, 
responding to urgent public health threats, monitoring the 
nation's health using scientific methods, building the nation's 
public health infrastructure, promoting health throughout each 
life-stage, and providing leadership in the implementation of 
nationwide prevention strategies to encourage responsible 
behavior and adoption of lifestyles that are conducive to good 
health.

Infectious Diseases

    The Committee provides a program level of $2,030,123,000 
for Infectious Diseases, which is $82,296,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $10,501,000 above the budget 
request. Of the funds provided, $12,864,000 shall be derived 
from evaluation set-aside funds available under section 241 of 
the Public Health Service Act, as proposed in the budget 
request.
            Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
    The Committee provides a program level of $717,460,000 for 
Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, which is $1,412,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Of the amount provided, $12,864,000 is to be 
derived from section 241 evaluation set-aside funds, as 
proposed in the budget request. In addition, the current 
Vaccines for Children (VFC) program is expected to provide 
$3,323,770,000 in vaccine purchases and distribution support in 
fiscal year 2010, for a total of $4,041,230,000 for 
Immunization and Respiratory Diseases activities in fiscal year 
2010. In addition, the Recovery Act provided an additional 
$300,000,000 in the Prevention and Wellness Fund for the 
section 317 immunization program in fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    Immunization project grants are awarded to States and local 
agencies for planning, developing, and conducting childhood and 
adult immunization programs including enhancement of the 
vaccine delivery infrastructure. CDC directly maintains a 
stockpile of vaccines, supports consolidated purchase of 
vaccines for State and local health agencies, and conducts 
surveillance, investigations, and research into the safety and 
efficacy of new and presently used vaccines.
    Within the total for Immunization and respiratory diseases, 
the Committee includes the following amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Section 317 Immunization Program.......................       $496,847,000          +$946,000                  0
Program Operations.....................................         61,621,000           +163,000                  0
Influenza..............................................        158,992,000           +303,000                  0
    Pandemic Influenza.................................        156,344,000           +298,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Section 317 Immunization Program.--Vaccines are one of the 
proven successes of public health in that they are cost-
effective and have demonstrated the ability to save lives and 
greatly reduce illness. The Committee recommendation in this 
bill and through appropriations provided in the Recovery Act is 
a step toward the goal of fully immunizing all eligible 
individuals.
    Prior to 2000 and the introduction of new vaccines and 
expanded recommendations for existing vaccines, the 317 
immunization program was adequately providing vaccines to 
children and adolescents traditionally dependent on the public 
sector for support, but who were not eligible for the VFC 
program.
    The Committee is pleased that CDC has moved forward to 
provide funding to States and local organizations that receive 
section 317 immunization program grant funds to develop 
community adolescent and adult immunization planning 
demonstrations to achieve 90 percent immunization coverage for 
vaccines routinely recommended for adolescents and adults, and 
encourages CDC to continue to support these efforts. These 
models should include existing and new efforts planned within 
existing resources as well as new activities needed and 
estimates for those needs.
    The Committee also is pleased with the report on estimated 
funding needs of the section 317 immunization program that CDC 
provided, and requests that the report be updated and submitted 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate by no later than February 1, 
2010, to reflect fiscal year 2011 cost estimates. The updated 
report also should include an estimate of optimum State and 
local operations funding as well as CDC operations funding 
needed relative to current levels to conduct and support 
childhood, adolescent, and adult programs. This estimate should 
include the cost of vaccine administration; surveillance and 
assessment of changes in immunization rates; vaccine storage, 
handling and quality assurance; implementation of centralized 
vaccine distribution and other vaccine business improvement 
practices; needs to support provider and public outreach and 
education on new vaccines; identification of barriers to 
immunization and strategies to address such barriers; 
maintenance, utilization, and enhancement of Immunization 
Information Systems, including integration with public health 
preparedness and other electronic medical record systems; 
innovative strategies to increase coverage rates in hard-to-
reach populations and geographic pockets of need; and vaccine 
safety and other non-vaccine resource needs of a comprehensive 
immunization program. Each of these activities is critical to 
ensuring the delivery of life-saving vaccines to our nation and 
have been underfunded.
    The Committee understands that according to the CDC, adult 
vaccination rates remain extremely low--resulting in deaths of 
more than 40,000 adults from vaccine preventable diseases 
annually. The Committee requests that the section 317 
immunization program report also include a discussion of 
specific strategies to reduce barriers and increase adult 
immunization rates in the U.S.
    While the Committee understands that the section 317 
immunization program does not pay administration fees, it is 
nonetheless an authorized expenditure, and the Committee 
expects this estimate to be included in the report. Recent 
studies in the medical literature reveal that vaccine 
administration and purchase payments throughout the country 
often do not cover the full costs of immunizing children, which 
has the potential to undermine the vaccine-delivery system in 
the future.
    Federal and State programs vary greatly on the 
reimbursement rates for vaccine administration for children, 
adolescents, and adults. The updated report should include 
information from the National Vaccine Advisory Financing 
Workgroup's Report on Vaccine Financing on what the most 
appropriate immunization administration reimbursement rate 
would be to optimize immunization rates whether or not they are 
administered through the section 317 immunization program. 
Additionally according to the Advisory Committee on 
Immunization Practices (ACIP) guidelines, ``To minimize the 
number of injections children receive, parenteral combination 
vaccines should be used, if licensed and indicated for the 
patient's age, instead of their equivalent component 
vaccines.'' The report should include whether an antigen-based 
vaccine administration system would remove the financial 
disincentive for and increase the use of combination vaccines.
    Influenza Vaccines.--The Committee recognizes that ACIP now 
recommends routine influenza vaccination for all children aged 
six months through 18 years. However, despite the new 
recommendation large numbers of school-aged children remain 
unvaccinated. The Committee encourages CDC to work to increase 
the rates of vaccination in school-aged children.
            HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD and TB Prevention
    The Committee provides $1,062,082,000 for HIV/AIDS, Viral 
Hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STD), and 
Tuberculosis (TB) prevention, which is $55,707,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $1,783,000 above the budget 
request.
    Within the total for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB 
Prevention, the Committee includes the following amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Domestic HIV/AIDS Prevention & Research................       $744,914,000       +$53,054,000                 $0
    State/Local Health Dept. Prevention Coop.                  348,109,000        +26,888,000        +15,000,000
     Agreements........................................
    Domestic HIV/AIDS Testing Initiative...............         65,425,000        +12,147,000        -15,000,000
        Early Diagnosis Grants.........................                  0        -15,000,000        -15,000,000
    National/Regional/Other Organizations..............        171,300,000         +5,957,000                  0
Viral Hepatitis........................................         20,150,000         +1,834,000         +1,783,000
Sexually Transmitted Diseases..........................        152,750,000           +421,000                  0
Tuberculosis...........................................        144,268,000           +398,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Domestic HIV/AIDS Prevention and Research program 
provides national leadership and support for HIV prevention 
research and the development, implementation, and evaluation of 
evidence-based HIV prevention programs serving persons affected 
by, or at risk for, HIV infection. Activities include 
surveillance, epidemiologic and laboratory studies, and 
prevention activities. CDC provides funds to State and local 
health departments to develop and implement integrated 
community prevention plans.
    HIV/AIDS in American Indian and Alaska Native 
Communities.--The Committee recognizes that American Indians 
and Alaska Natives have the known third highest rate of new HIV 
infection in the U.S. after African Americans and Hispanics. 
The Committee is concerned that of the 63 evidence-based 
prevention interventions contained in the 2008 Compendium of 
Evidence-Based HIV Prevention Interventions, none target Native 
American communities. The Committee urges CDC to increase the 
number of interventions for these populations and to work with 
the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other behavioral 
research groups to accomplish this work. The Committee further 
encourages CDC to work directly with the Tribal Epidemiology 
Centers to support their culturally-competent approach in order 
to gain needed epidemiology in the area of HIV/AIDS 
surveillance within American Indian and Alaska Native 
communities.
    HIV/AIDS in High Risk Youth.--The Committee recognizes that 
seven of the 63 evidence-based prevention interventions 
contained in CDC's 2008 Compendium of Evidence-Based HIV 
Prevention Interventions target high risk youth, and that data 
indicate that more than one-third of new infections were among 
youth aged 13-29. The Committee is concerned that none of the 
evidence-based prevention interventions target homeless 
individuals and only one intervention targets runaway youth in 
shelters to prevent HIV/AIDS. The Committee urges CDC to 
increase the number of targeted interventions for these 
populations and to work with NIH and other behavioral research 
groups to accomplish this work.
    HIV/AIDS Testing Initiative.--The Committee commends CDC 
for the prioritization of the domestic HIV/AIDS testing 
initiative among African Americans. The Committee requests that 
CDC provide an updated comprehensive report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate no later than April 1, 2010 on the progress of the 
testing initiative to date, including the number of individuals 
reached, testing positive for HIV, and accessing treatment as a 
result of their HIV positive diagnosis. The Committee continues 
to be supportive of CDC's promotion of rapid HIV tests in its 
HIV/AIDS testing activities.
    Microbicides.--The Committee requests that in the future, 
CDC include information in the HIV/AIDS section of the 
Congressional budget justification on the amount of anticipated 
and actual funding it allocates to activities related to 
research and development of microbicides for HIV prevention. 
The Committee urges CDC to work with NIH, USAID, and other 
appropriate agencies to develop processes for coordinated 
investment and prioritization for microbicide development, 
approval, and access.
    Minority AIDS Initiative.--Within the total provided, 
$95,700,000 is provided for the Minority AIDS Initiative to 
support activities that are targeted to address the growing 
HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disparate impact on communities of 
color, including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, 
Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. This 
amount is $300,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request.
    The Division of Viral Hepatitis provides the scientific and 
programmatic foundation for the prevention, control, and 
elimination of hepatitis virus infections in the U.S. CDC 
conducts surveillance, research, education, training, and 
program development focusing on activities related to Hepatitis 
A virus, Hepatitis B virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C virus (HCV).
    Hepatitis Education, Prevention, and Surveillance.--The 
Division of Viral Hepatitis is the centerpiece of the Federal 
response to controlling, reducing, and preventing the suffering 
and deaths resulting from viral hepatitis. CDC estimates that 
over 4.5 million Americans have chronic HCV and HBV infections 
and that each year up to 15,000 Americans die of HBV and HCV 
related disease. In addition, chronic Hepatitis B and C are the 
leading causes of liver cancer, now among the top ten killers 
of Americans over the age of 25, and now one of the leading 
killers of Americans living with HIV/AIDS. The Committee urges 
CDC to target funding increases for viral hepatitis toward the 
identification of chronically infected persons and their 
referral to medical care, particularly focusing on groups 
disproportionately affected by chronic HCV and HBV. In 
addition, the Committee encourages CDC to provide States with 
funds to implement a chronic Hepatitis B and C surveillance 
system, which currently does not exist. This information is 
critical to understanding the impact of Hepatitis epidemics and 
for targeting limited resources for greatest impact.
    Hepatitis Testing.--The Committee recognizes the high 
incidence of Hepatitis and its often undocumented state. In 
fiscal year 2009 the Committee urged CDC to formulate a plan 
for significant testing for Hepatitis, including the 
implementation of rapid testing technology as a means of 
ascertaining the prevalence of Hepatitis. The Committee 
requests a status report on CDC's plan to implement Hepatitis 
testing to be included in the fiscal year 2011 Congressional 
budget justification.
    Syringe Re-Use.--The Committee is deeply troubled by recent 
outbreaks of Hepatitis caused in some part by the re-use of 
syringes in outpatient health care settings. These outbreaks 
are entirely preventable with well-known infection control 
practices. The Committee urges CDC to support activities such 
as provider education and patient awareness, detection and 
tracking, and engineering and innovation activities focused on 
injection safety and infection control guidelines in the 
delivery of outpatient care. CDC is encouraged to partner with 
industry and university researchers to identify the best 
interventions to reduce the possibility of disease transmission 
in the health care setting. The Committee directs the CDC to 
provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate by April 1, 2010 on the 
direction pursued and the status of CDC's efforts.
    The Division of STD Prevention provides national leadership 
through research, policy development, and support of effective 
services to prevent sexually transmitted diseases and their 
complications such as infertility, adverse outcomes of 
pregnancy, and reproductive tract cancer. CDC assists health 
departments, health-care providers, and non-governmental 
organizations and collaborates with other governmental entities 
through the development, syntheses, translation, and 
dissemination of timely, science-based information; the 
development of national goals and science-based policy; and the 
development and support of science-based programs that meet the 
needs of communities.
    The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) program provides grants to States 
and localities for a broad range of tuberculosis control 
activities. In addition, the CDC supports State and local 
laboratories and conducts research, epidemiological 
investigations, and education and training seminars.
    TB Administrative Grant Costs.--The Committee is pleased 
that CDC is working with States, territories, and localities to 
ensure equitable TB funding to all jurisdictions through the 
distribution formula. The Committee encourages grantees to keep 
administrative costs at or below ten percent to ensure adequate 
funds to all jurisdictions in proportion to the number and 
complexity of TB cases.
    County Departments of Public Health.--The Committee lauds 
CDC's efforts to improve and update the funding formula for TB 
treatment and education, but recognizes that county departments 
of public health should be included in stakeholder meetings on 
changes to the funding formula. The Committee directs CDC to 
reach out to and include stakeholders from county departments 
of public health suffering from a disproportionate number of TB 
cases to participate in and contribute to discussion groups 
involved in the creation of new administrative funding 
formulas.
            Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases
    The Committee provides $76,790,000 for Zoonotic, Vector-
Borne, and Enteric Diseases, which is $8,812,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $3,668,000 more than the 
budget request.
    The National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric 
Diseases provides national and international scientific and 
programmatic leadership addressing zoonotic, vector-borne, 
foodborne, waterborne, mycotic, and related infections to 
identify, investigate, diagnose, treat, and prevent these 
diseases. The programs focus on the continuing challenge of 
emerging and re-emerging zoonoses and the ecologies from which 
these diseases have emerged, while recognizing the importance 
of working collaboratively, not just across CDC and the 
traditional public health community, but also with 
agricultural, wildlife, companion animal, and environmental 
agencies and organizations.
    Within the total for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric 
Diseases, the Committee includes the following amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Vector-borne Diseases, including West Nile Virus.......        $26,717,000          +$418,000                 $0
Lyme Disease...........................................          8,938,000         +3,668,000         +3,668,000
Food Safety............................................         26,942,000         +4,422,000                  0
    Prion Disease......................................          5,474,000            +86,000                  0
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome...............................          4,825,000            +75,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Food Safety.--The Committee supports CDC's increased 
investment in food safety. Improving foodborne outbreak 
detection and response remains a critical priority for CDC, as 
well as the Federal, State, and local food safety regulatory 
agencies. CDC's proposed enhancement of PulseNet and other 
surveillance tools and capacities will help ensure continuing 
improvement in this area. The Committee also believes that an 
equally important priority for CDC is to invest in generating 
the epidemiological data and conducting the analyses that 
regulatory agencies and the food industry need to target to 
implement effective prevention strategies. The Committee 
expects CDC to focus an increasing share of its management 
attention and resources on such prevention-related activities 
and to work closely with the Food and Drug Administration and 
other key parties to help prevent foodborne illness.
    Lyme Disease.--The Committee encourages CDC to expand its 
activities related to developing sensitive and more accurate 
diagnostic tools and tests for Lyme disease, including the 
evaluation of emerging diagnostic methods and improving 
utilization of diagnostic testing to account for the multiple 
clinical manifestations of acute and chronic Lyme disease; to 
expand its epidemiological research activities on tick-borne 
diseases to include an objective to determine the long-term 
course of illness for Lyme disease; to improve surveillance and 
reporting of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases in order to 
produce more accurate data on their prevalence; to evaluate the 
feasibility of developing a national reporting system on Lyme 
disease, including laboratory reporting; and to expand 
prevention of Lyme and tick-borne diseases through increased 
community-based public education and creating a physician 
education program that includes the full spectrum of scientific 
research on the diseases.
            Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases
    The Committee provides $173,791,000 for Preparedness, 
Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, which is 
$16,365,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$5,050,000 more than the budget request. In addition, the 
Recovery Act provided an additional $40,000,000 in the 
Prevention and Wellness Fund for States to develop and 
implement healthcare-associated infection reduction plans in 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    The National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and 
Control of Infectious Diseases provides focus on preparedness 
and response capacity for new and complex infectious disease 
outbreaks, and manages and coordinates emerging infectious 
diseases, integrates laboratory groups, and facilitates 
increased quality and capacity in clinical laboratories. The 
Center serves as a focal point for engaging outside agencies 
and partners in quality laboratory systems and improved 
healthcare settings.
    Antimicrobial Resistance.--The Committee is concerned that 
there are significant gaps in CDC's ability to track and 
monitor life-threatening antimicrobial resistant pathogens, 
such as Klebsiella species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 
methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as these emerge in 
hospital and community settings. In particular, the Committee 
is concerned about the lack of capacity to do sentinel 
surveillance to describe and confirm regional outbreaks, and 
urges CDC to build upon existing structures, as well as add new 
sites, to cultivate a geographically distributed sentinel 
surveillance network. This network should collect and analyze a 
variety of locally available clinical specimens and help CDC to 
describe, confirm, and intervene against emerging outbreaks of 
resistant pathogens.
    Blood Safety Surveillance.--The Committee supports the 
National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), a surveillance tool 
used by hospitals and other health care facilities to better 
understand and prevent healthcare-associated infections. The 
Committee is aware that CDC has added an additional module to 
NHSN to collect, analyze and report national data on adverse 
events and medical errors occurring during blood transfusions. 
The Committee encourages CDC to move forward in implementing 
the transfusion data network, in collaboration with private 
sector experts to maximize hospital participation, adequately 
train staff, analyze data, and develop effective interventions.
    Emerging Infectious Diseases.--The Committee provides 
increased resources for the Emerging Infectious Diseases 
program to protect the public from infectious disease threats. 
In the U.S., deaths from infectious illnesses average 
approximately 170,000 per year. Although modern medical 
advances have conquered many diseases, new infections and drug-
resistance are constantly emerging. Funding will be used to 
support the following infectious disease control and prevention 
activities: (1) diagnostic analysis of infectious agents both 
domestically and internationally through epidemiology and 
laboratory capacity; (2) development and production of reagents 
to test additional specimens; (3) providing support to State 
and local health departments to address infectious diseases; 
(4) development of new diagnostic tests; and (5) providing 
additional funding to allow CDC to respond to and control 
infectious diseases in hospitals and other settings.
    Healthcare-Associated Infections and the National 
Healthcare Safety Network.--The Committee continues to 
emphasize the reduction of healthcare-associated infections 
(HAIs) as a top priority for Federal resources. Through the 
National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), CDC monitors 
infections, antimicrobial resistance, and other adverse events 
in hospitals in all 50 States, Puerto Rico, and the District of 
Columbia. Increased funding will be used to develop improved 
surveillance in an additional 1,500 hospitals taking the total 
to 4,500 participating hospitals, which is 75 percent of all 
hospitals. Funding will also be used to expand to other 
healthcare settings to better understand the prevalence of HAIs 
outside the hospital setting, train healthcare staff to use the 
NHSN system, and demonstrate model prevention programs. As more 
States require hospitals and other healthcare settings to use 
the NHSN to track the incidence of HAIs, the system must be 
enhanced and expanded to meet this increased demand.

Health Promotion

    The Committee provides $1,051,694,000 for Health Promotion, 
which is $31,986,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $13,439,000 above the budget request.
            Chronic Disease Prevention, Health Promotion, and Genomics
    The Committee provides $910,812,000 for Chronic Disease 
Prevention, Health Promotion, and Genomics, which is 
$29,126,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$14,573,000 more than the budget request. Chronic diseases have 
had a profound human and economic toll on our nation. More than 
1.7 million Americans die of a chronic disease each year, 
accounting for approximately 70 percent of all deaths in the 
U.S. The programs funded through this budget activity provide 
support for State and community programs, surveillance, 
prevention research, evaluation, and health promotion. In 
addition, the Recovery Act provided an additional $650,000,000 
in the Prevention and Wellness Fund to carry out evidence-based 
clinical and community-based prevention and wellness strategies 
that address chronic diseases in fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    Within the total provided, the Committee includes the 
following amounts for Chronic Disease Prevention, Health 
Promotion, and Genomics activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Heart Disease and Stroke...............................        $54,221,000          +$125,000                 $0
    Delta Health Intervention..........................          3,007,000             +7,000                  0
Diabetes...............................................         65,998,000           +151,000                  0
Cancer Prevention and Control..........................        349,454,000         +9,154,000         +8,373,000
    Breast and Cervical Cancer.........................        214,699,000         +8,846,000         +8,373,000
        WISEWOMAN......................................         20,573,000         +1,045,000         +1,000,000
    Cancer Registries..................................         46,472,000           +106,000                  0
    Colorectal Cancer..................................         39,063,000            +89,000                  0
    Comprehensive Cancer...............................         16,386,000            +38,000                  0
    Johanna's Law......................................          6,807,000            +16,000                  0
    Ovarian Cancer.....................................          5,414,000            +12,000                  0
    Prostate Cancer....................................         13,275,000            +30,000                  0
    Skin Cancer........................................          1,880,000             +4,000                  0
    Geraldine Ferraro Cancer Education Program.........          4,677,000            +11,000                  0
    Cancer Survivorship Resource Center................            781,000             +2,000                  0
Arthritis and Other Chronic Diseases...................         26,803,000         +1,558,000         +1,500,000
    Arthritis..........................................         13,318,000            +31,000                  0
    Psoriasis..........................................          1,500,000         +1,500,000         +1,500,000
    Epilepsy...........................................          7,976,000            +18,000                  0
    National Lupus Patient Registry....................          4,009,000             +9,000                  0
Tobacco................................................        106,408,000           +244,000                  0
Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity..............         44,402,000           +102,000                  0
Health Promotion.......................................         27,803,000           -738,000           +700,000
    Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.........          7,316,000            +16,000                  0
    Community Health Promotion.........................          6,468,000            +15,000                  0
        Sleep Disorders................................            861,000             +2,000                  0
    Mind-Body Institute................................                  0         -1,500,000                  0
    Glaucoma...........................................          3,519,000             +8,000                  0
    Visual Screening Education.........................          3,229,000             +7,000                  0
    Alzheimer's Disease................................          1,692,000             +4,000                  0
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease.........................            686,000             +2,000                  0
    Interstitial Cystitis..............................            660,000             +2,000                  0
    Excessive Alcohol Use..............................          2,000,000           +500,000           +497,000
    Chronic Kidney Disease.............................          2,233,000           +208,000           +203,000
School Health..........................................         62,780,000         +5,144,000                  0
    Healthy Passages Study.............................          3,493,000             +8,000                  0
    Food Allergies.....................................            497,000             +1,000                  0
Safe Motherhood/Infant Health..........................         49,891,000         +5,114,000                  0
    Preterm Birth......................................          2,005,000             +5,000                  0
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.......................            207,000                  0                  0
Oral Health............................................         15,074,000         +2,030,000         +2,000,000
Prevention Research Centers............................         33,203,000         +2,071,000         +2,000,000
Healthy Communities....................................         22,823,000            +52,000                  0
Racial & Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH).         39,644,000         +4,091,000                  0
Genomics...............................................         12,308,000            +28,000                  0
    Primary Immune Deficiency Syndrome.................          3,107,000             +7,000                  0
    Public Health Genomics.............................          9,201,000            +21,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Breast Cancer Awareness for Young Women.--Breast cancer is 
the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. There are 
approximately 180,000 new cases and 40,000 deaths from breast 
cancer annually. According to data from U.S. Cancer Statistics 
Report from 2001-2005, approximately five percent of all female 
invasive breast cancers are among women under 40 years of age. 
Raising awareness among providers and the public about the 
importance of early detection can result in improved outcomes 
and quality of life for cancer survivors. Within the total for 
breast and cervical cancer, the Committee includes $5,000,000 
for breast cancer awareness for young women. The Committee 
encourages CDC, in collaboration with HHS, the National Cancer 
Institute, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 
to develop evidence-based initiatives to advance understanding 
and awareness of breast health and breast cancer among women at 
high risk for developing breast cancer, including women under 
40.
    Chronic Kidney Disease.--The Committee previously has 
expressed concern regarding the need to expand public health 
strategies to combat chronic kidney disease (CKD) given that 
many individuals are diagnosed too late to initiate treatment 
regimens that could reduce morbidity and mortality. Up to 26 
million Americans have CKD, and millions more are at risk of 
developing the disease. Individuals with diabetes or 
hypertension have especially high vulnerability. Kidney disease 
is the ninth leading cause of death in the U.S., and death by 
cardiovascular disease is 15 to 30 times higher in patients 
with end stage renal disease than in the general population.
    The Committee has included funding to continue planning for 
capacity and infrastructure at CDC for its kidney disease 
program and to institute a CKD surveillance system. The 
Committee is pleased that CDC convened an expert panel on CKD 
and that the recommendations have been published. The Committee 
urges CDC to prioritize and begin implementation of the 
recommendations. The Committee urges CDC to support additional 
grants for State-based, culturally appropriate, community 
demonstration projects for CKD detection, to expand on the 
pilot screenings that have occurred in four States through 
previous Federal funding. The demonstration projects will 
include efforts to track the progression of CKD in patients who 
have been diagnosed, as well as identify the onset of CKD among 
individuals who are members of high risk groups but have not 
been diagnosed.
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).--COPD is the 
fourth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the only one of 
the top five causes of death that is on the rise. The Committee 
notes that CDC does not yet have a dedicated program to address 
COPD--a major source of illness and death in the U.S. The 
Committee continues to urge the National Center for Chronic 
Disease Prevention and Health Promotion to establish a COPD 
program and to develop, in consultation with appropriate 
stakeholders, a Federal plan to respond to COPD.
    Colorectal Cancer.--The Committee notes that colorectal 
cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in 
the Nation. Colorectal cancer first develops with few, if any, 
symptoms and 75 percent of colorectal cancers occur in people 
with no known risk factors. For those reasons, colorectal 
screening is a vital tool in saving lives. It is estimated that 
if every American aged 50 or older had regular screening tests, 
as many as 60 percent of deaths from colorectal cancer could be 
prevented. Since 2005, CDC has conducted community-based pilot 
programs to provide colorectal screening and diagnostic follow-
up for Americans 50 years of age and older with little or no 
health coverage. The Committee commends CDC on its efforts to 
implement screening activities and public awareness through 
partnerships with health departments, professional 
organizations, and voluntary health groups and believes that an 
investment in this kind of prevention is critical. The 
Committee requests that CDC submit a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate on CDC's activities in this important public health 
matter no later than April 1, 2010.
    Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH).--
Currently, CDC funds 22 State education agencies and one tribal 
government to establish a partnership with their State health 
agency to focus on reducing chronic disease risk factors such 
as tobacco use, poor nutrition, and physical inactivity. The 
$5,000,000 programmatic increase provided for DASH will allow 
CDC to support ten additional State education agencies. An 
economic evaluation of school-based programs to prevent 
cigarette use among middle and high school students showed that 
for every $1 invested in tobacco prevention programs almost $20 
in future medical care costs would be saved.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee supports the CDC epilepsy program, 
which has made considerable progress over the past decade in 
establishing and advancing a public health agenda to meet the 
needs of Americans with epilepsy. The Committee encourages CDC 
to develop and implement a national outcome measurement 
protocol to evaluate the impact that public health programs 
have on employment, school, social life, and general well being 
of youth, seniors, young adults, and others living with 
epilepsy. The findings of these measures will help families 
understand the relationships between medications, co-morbid 
conditions, and epilepsy, and will build a platform for a 
national call to action for additional training for schools, 
employers, first responders, and adult day care providers.
    Excessive Alcohol Use.--The Committee supports the 
recommendations of the Surgeon General's Call to Action on 
Underage Drinking, including the call for ongoing independent 
monitoring of youth exposure to alcohol advertising, and urges 
CDC to develop and continue its work to monitor and report on 
the level of risk faced by youth from exposure to alcohol 
advertising.
    Gynecologic Cancer Education and Awareness Program.--The 
Committee is encouraged by the progress that has been made by 
CDC, in coordination with the Office of Women's Health and 
qualified nonprofit private sector entities to initiate a 
national education campaign on gynecologic cancers and 
available prevention strategies. The Committee urges CDC to 
continue and enhance the current public education activities to 
increase women's knowledge regarding gynecologic cancers.
    Healthy Brain Initiative.--Studies have indicated that 
cumulative risks for vascular disease and diabetes also 
increase the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. 
In 2005, the Committee called upon CDC to launch an 
Alzheimer's-specific segment of the Healthy Aging Program, to 
aggressively educate the public and health professionals about 
ways to reduce the risks of developing Alzheimer's by 
maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The Committee recommends 
funding to continue this program and encourages CDC to support 
the evaluation of existing population-based surveillance 
systems, with a view toward developing a population-based 
surveillance system for cognitive decline, including 
Alzheimer's disease and dementia.
    Heart Disease and Stroke.--Recognizing that cardiovascular 
disease is the number one killer in the U.S., the Committee 
strongly supports the ultimate goal of providing basic 
implementation funding to each State for the competitively 
awarded Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention Program. The 
Committee is concerned that only 14 States receive basic 
implementation funding, nine States receive no funds, and many 
States have been stalled at the capacity building level for 
years--a few for a decade. Further, the Committee understands 
the importance of the CDC's continued efforts to work 
collaboratively with States to establish a comprehensive 
cardiovascular disease surveillance system to monitor and track 
these disorders at the national, State, and local levels.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease.--The Committee continues to 
prioritize CDC's inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) epidemiology 
study and has included funding to continue this important 
initiative. The Committee encourages CDC to initiate the 
establishment of a pediatric IBD patient registry.
    Interstitial Cystitis.--The Committee is pleased with CDC's 
program activities and public and professional awareness 
campaign on Interstitial Cystitis and has provided sufficient 
funds for CDC to continue its efforts on this debilitating 
disorder.
    Infertility.--The Committee has included funding within 
Safe Motherhood/Infant Health for the development of a national 
public health plan for the prevention, detection, and 
management of infertility. The development of this plan is 
critical to the efforts of more than two million women who 
battle this medical condition across the U.S. The Committee 
supports the goal of CDC's national plan to identify public 
health priorities and encourages the integration of existing 
programs and initiatives regarding infertility, as well as 
creation of new programs as deemed necessary. The Committee 
requests that CDC report on the development of this plan to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate no later than April 1, 2010.
    Maternal and Child Health.--The Committee is concerned that 
declines in infant mortality have stalled in the U.S. Each 
year, 12 percent of babies are born too early, and eight 
percent are born with low birth-weight, putting them at higher 
risk for infant death and for developmental disabilities. The 
Committee notes that many experts believe that prenatal care, 
which usually begins during the first three months of a 
pregnancy, comes too late to prevent many serious maternal and 
child health problems and are calling for improved 
preconception care. The Committee encourages CDC and its 
partners to study how best to communicate with women about the 
need for preconception care. The Committee urges CDC to 
continue to make research on preconception health and health 
care a priority.
    National Sleep Awareness Roundtable.--The Committee is 
pleased with the activities of the National Sleep Awareness 
Roundtable (NSART), a partnership between CDC, other Federal 
agencies, and the voluntary health community. The Committee 
expects CDC to support NSART and has provided funding within 
the Community Health Promotion program for this initiative and 
to incorporate sleep and sleep-related disturbances into 
established CDC surveillance systems.
    Obesity.--More than one-third of American adults, or over 
72 million people, are obese, and approximately 16 percent of 
children are obese. In 2000 alone, the cost of obesity in the 
U.S. exceeded $100,000,000,000. From 1987 through 2001, 
increases in obesity prevalence alone accounted for 12 percent 
of the growth in health spending.
    Research has shown that investing in proven community-based 
programs to increase physical activity and improve nutrition 
could substantially reduce health care costs. The Committee is 
supportive of CDC's efforts to reduce chronic diseases and 
obesity through State, school-based, and community programs; 
research; surveillance; training; intervention development; 
policy and environmental change; communication; and social 
marketing. To effectively address this epidemic, the Committee 
urges CDC to provide leadership and coordination for the 
Federal government's efforts to address overweight and obesity. 
In this leadership role, CDC should develop a national plan to 
prevent overweight and obesity among children, adolescents, and 
adults. On an annual basis, CDC should issue a report to the 
Nation on trends, research, and prevention efforts related to 
overweight and obesity in children, adolescents, and adults, 
including CDC's investments in State and community obesity 
prevention programs.
    Obesity and Built Environments.--The Committee recognizes 
the importance of the built environment for promoting healthy 
behaviors. The Committee encourages CDC to work with the 
Secretary of Transportation and encourages CDC grantees to work 
with local transit officials to coordinate the goals of 
population-level prevention programs with transportation 
projects that support healthy lifestyles and enhanced physical 
activity.
    Oral Health.--The Committee recognizes that reducing 
disparities in oral disease will require additional and 
sustained support in proven strategies at the State and local 
levels. The Committee provides funding for States to strengthen 
their capacities to assess the prevalence of oral diseases and 
the associated health burden, to target resources and 
interventions and prevention programs to the underserved, and 
to evaluate changes in policies and programs. The Committee 
encourages CDC to advance efforts to reduce the health 
disparities and burden from oral diseases, including those that 
are linked to chronic diseases.
    Pediatric Cancer.--The Committee encourages CDC to enhance 
and expand the infrastructure to track the epidemiology of 
pediatric cancer into a comprehensive nationwide registry of 
actual occurrences of pediatric cancer, as authorized by the 
Caroline Pryce Walker Conquer Childhood Cancer Act.
    Physical Fitness in Underserved Communities.--The obesity 
epidemic currently sweeping the U.S. is a particularly poignant 
problem for the nation's children. Among minority populations 
in this country, the numbers are particularly alarming. 
Statistics from CDC show that more than 22 percent of Mexican-
American males aged 12 to 19 are obese, as are over 18 percent 
of African-American males and over 17 percent of non-Hispanic 
white males in the same age group. As for females aged 12 to 
19, almost 28 percent of African-Americans and almost 20 
percent of Mexican-Americans are obese, compared to more than 
14 percent of non-Hispanic whites. The Committee encourages CDC 
to work with national and locally-based organizations to 
promote school-based and after-school programs that combine 
physical fitness and nutrition education. Particular emphasis 
should be given to low-impact team sports that have the 
greatest appeal to specific communities, such as soccer in 
Latino and immigrant communities.
    Preterm Birth.--Preterm birth affects more than 540,000 
babies each year in the U.S. and nearly 50 percent of all 
premature births have no known cause. Within the funds 
provided, the Committee encourages CDC to expand 
epidemiological research on the causes and prevention of 
preterm birth and to establish systems for the collection of 
maternal-infant clinical and biomedical information to link 
with the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System in an 
effort to identify ways to prevent preterm birth and reduce 
racial disparities.
    Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases.--The Committee remains 
supportive of the Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases program 
that has demonstrated great success in identifying and moving 
into treatment persons with undiagnosed diseases that pose a 
public health threat. The Committee believes this program 
should continue to move forward in a public-private partnership 
as it currently operates.
    Psoriasis.--As many as 7.5 million Americans are affected 
by psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis--chronic, inflammatory, 
painful, and disfiguring autoimmune diseases for which there 
are limited treatment options and no cure. Recent studies show 
people with psoriasis are at elevated risk for other chronic 
and debilitating health conditions, such as heart attack and 
diabetes and that people with severe psoriasis have a 50 
percent higher risk of mortality. The Committee is concerned 
that there is a lack of epidemiological and longitudinal data 
on individuals with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, 
including children and adolescents. The Committee provides 
funding to support such data collection in order to better 
understand the co-morbidities associated with psoriasis, 
examine the relationship of psoriasis to other public health 
concerns such as the high rate of smoking and obesity among 
those with the disease, and gain insight into the long-term 
impact and treatment of these two conditions. The Committee 
encourages CDC to work with national organizations and 
stakeholders to examine and develop options and recommendations 
for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis data collection, 
including a registry.
    Pulmonary Hypertension.--The Committee continues to be 
interested in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and encourages CDC to 
expand its partnership with the PH community aimed at 
increasing awareness of this devastating disease among the 
general public and health care providers.
    Scleroderma.--The Committee is aware that scleroderma, an 
over-production of collagen resulting in the hardening of skin 
and joints, affects an estimated 300,000 people in the U.S. The 
Committee continues to encourage CDC to undertake steps to 
increase awareness in the public and larger health care 
community to allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment.
    Teen Pregnancy Prevention.--The Committee is aware that 
one-third of girls in the U.S. get pregnant before age 20. In 
2006, over 435,000 infants were born to mothers aged 15 to 19 
years and that 80 percent of these births were unintended. The 
increase of $5,000,000 within Safe Motherhood/Infant Health 
will bring the total resources devoted to teen pregnancy 
prevention at CDC to $15,800,000. These funds will allow CDC to 
expand efforts to promote evidence-based interventions that 
provide medically accurate and age appropriate information to 
youth. Eight additional State-based teen pregnancy prevention 
coalitions will be supported, which will bring the total to 17. 
These coalitions work with State departments of education to 
implement innovative science-based prevention programs in 
youth-serving organizations and schools.
    Vision Health.--The Committee recognizes that good vision 
is an integral component to health and well being, affects 
virtually all activities of daily living, and impacts 
individuals physically, emotionally, socially and financially. 
Vision-related conditions affect people across the lifespan 
from childhood through elder years. The Committee supports 
CDC's vision health initiative, which focuses on eye disease 
surveillance and evaluation systems so that our nation has 
much-needed epidemiological data regarding overall burden and 
high-risk populations to formulate and evaluate strategies to 
prevent and reduce the economic and social costs associated 
with vision loss and eye disease.
    WISEWOMAN (Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for 
Women Across the Nation).--The Committee includes funding to 
increase support for the current WISEWOMAN grantees. WISEWOMAN 
screens uninsured and under-insured low-income women ages 40 to 
64 for heart disease and stroke risk and provides counseling, 
education, referral, and follow-up to those with abnormal 
results. Since January 2000, WISEWOMAN has screened more than 
84,000 women and has provided more than 210,000 lifestyle 
intervention sessions. An estimated 94 percent of these women 
were found to have at least one risk factor or border-line risk 
factor for heart disease, stroke, or other forms of 
cardiovascular disease.
            Birth Defects, Developmental Disabilities, Disability, and 
                    Health
    The Committee provides $140,882,000 for Birth Defects, 
Developmental Disabilities, Disability, and Health, which is 
$2,860,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$1,134,000 less than the budget request. This program collects, 
analyzes, and makes available data on the incidence and causes 
of birth defects and developmental disabilities.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for Birth Defects, Developmental Disabilities, 
Disability, and Health activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities...........        $42,776,000          +$717,000          +$600,000
    Birth Defects......................................         21,182,000            +59,000                  0
        Craniofacial Malformation......................          1,755,000             +5,000                  0
        Fetal Death....................................            846,000             +2,000                  0
        Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia...................            247,000             +1,000                  0
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.............................         10,140,000            +28,000                  0
    Folic Acid.........................................          3,426,000           +608,000           +600,000
    Infant Health......................................          8,028,000            +22,000                  0
Human Development and Disability.......................         78,194,000         +2,088,000         -1,734,000
    Disability & Health (including Child Development            13,611,000            +39,000                  0
     Studies)..........................................
    Limb Loss..........................................          2,906,000             +8,000                  0
    Tourette Syndrome..................................          1,749,000             +5,000                  0
    Early Hearing Detection and Intervention...........         10,888,000            +30,000                  0
    Muscular Dystrophy.................................          6,291,000            +17,000                  0
    Special Olympics Healthy Athletes..................          5,534,000            +15,000                  0
    Paralysis Resource Center..........................          6,015,000           +288,000         -1,733,000
    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder...........          1,751,000             +5,000                  0
    Fragile X..........................................          1,905,000             +5,000                  0
    Spina Bifida.......................................          5,483,000            +15,000                  0
    Autism.............................................         22,061,000         +1,661,000                  0
Blood Disorders........................................         19,912,000            +55,000                  0
    Hemophilia.........................................         17,203,000            +48,000                  0
    Thallasemia........................................          1,865,000             +5,000                  0
    Diamond Blackfan Anemia............................            517,000             +1,000                  0
    Hemachromatosis....................................            327,000             +1,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD).--The 
Committee continues to support the AD/HD activities of CDC, 
including the National Resources Center on AD/HD. Funding is 
provided to maintain and expand the activities at the National 
Resource Center as it responds to the demand for information 
and support services, reaches special populations in need, and 
educates health and education professionals on the impact of 
AD/HD on the ability of individuals to lead successful, 
economically self-sufficient, and independent lives integrated 
into their communities with the necessary accommodations and 
supports.
    Blood Disorders.--The Committee recognizes the many 
accomplishments of the Blood Disorders Division at CDC, 
especially those achieved through its partnership with the 
network of Hemophilia Treatment Centers. This program remains 
an essential part of CDC's blood disorders programs and needs 
to be maintained in order to respond to increasing needs of men 
and women with bleeding and clotting disorders. Within the 
total for blood disorders, the Committee encourages CDC to 
develop and implement a hemoglobinopathy surveillance and 
registry program with particular attention to Sickle Cell 
Disease.
    Cerebral Palsy.--In 2008, the Committee requested a report 
from CDC about the types of data that are most needed for a 
public health response to cerebral palsy and the strengths and 
weaknesses of the various methods of collecting epidemiologic 
data in this population. As a result of the report's findings, 
the Committee urges CDC to establish cerebral palsy 
surveillance and epidemiology systems that would work in 
concert with similar disorders.
    Folic Acid Education Campaign.--The daily consumption of 
the vitamin folic acid has been shown to significantly reduce 
serious birth defects, such as spina bifida and anencephaly. 
Since fortification of U.S. enriched grain products with folic 
acid, the rate of those birth defects has decreased by 26 
percent. CDC estimates, however, that up to 70 percent of 
neural tube defects could be prevented if all women of 
childbearing age consume 400 micrograms of folic acid daily. To 
achieve the full prevention potential of folic acid, CDC's 
national public and health professions education campaign 
should be expanded to inform more women, particularly non-
pregnant Hispanic women and women age 18-24, as well as health 
care providers about the benefits of folic acid.
    Fragile X.--The Committee urges CDC to support the 
continuation of public health activities in the areas of 
Fragile X Syndrome and Associated Disorders. The Committee 
urges CDC to focus its efforts on identifying ongoing needs and 
effective treatments by increasing epidemiological research, 
surveillance, screening efforts, and the introduction of early 
interventions and supports for individuals living with Fragile 
X Syndrome and Associated Disorders. The CDC should focus funds 
within the Fragile X program on the continued growth and 
development of initiatives that support health promotion 
activities and foster rapid, high-impact translational research 
practice for the successful treatment of Fragile X Syndrome and 
Associated Disorders.
    Limb Loss.--The Committee supports the CDC Limb Loss 
Information Center program, which has made considerable 
progress in establishing and advancing a public health agenda 
to meet the needs of Americans with limb loss. There are more 
than 1.8 million Americans living with limb loss. The vast 
majority of these limb losses are attributed to diabetic 
infection resulting in limb amputation and current military/war 
events and practices. The Committee urges CDC to continue 
efforts to expand public health activities on behalf of persons 
with limb loss and recommends establishing a registry for limb 
loss to capture its true impact. A registry will estimate the 
incidence and prevalence of limb loss, promote a better 
understanding of limb loss, and provide data that will be 
useful for research on improving limb loss management and 
developing standards of care.
    Marfan Syndrome.--The Committee continues to be interested 
in Marfan syndrome. Many individuals affected by Marfan 
syndrome are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed until they experience 
a cardiac complication. Increasing awareness of this genetic 
condition is vital to ensuring timely diagnosis and appropriate 
management and treatment. The Committee encourages CDC to work 
to increase awareness of this disease among the public and 
health care providers.
    National Birth Defects Prevention Study.--The Committee 
commends CDC's work in the area of birth defects surveillance, 
research, and prevention. With the funds provided the Committee 
urges CDC to enhance research on congenital heart defects, 
conduct genetic analysis of the samples collected via the 
National Birth Defects Prevention Study, and maintain 
assistance to the regional birth defects centers of excellence 
and aid to States to implement and expand community-based birth 
defects tracking and referral systems.
    National Spina Bifida Program.--The Committee recognizes 
that Spina Bifida is the leading permanently disabling birth 
defect in the U.S. While Spina Bifida and related neural tube 
defects are highly preventable through adequate daily folic 
acid consumption, there are more than 70,000 individuals living 
with this complex birth defect. While its secondary effects can 
be mitigated through appropriate and proactive medical care and 
management, such efforts have not been adequately supported to 
result in significant reductions of these difficult and costly 
conditions. In an effort to continue to improve the quality-of-
life of individuals affected by Spina Bifida and to reduce and 
prevent the occurrence of, and suffering from, this birth 
defect, the Committee continues to support CDC's National Spina 
Bifida Program. CDC is urged to support the implementation of 
the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry to improve the 
efficiency and quality of care in the nation's Spina Bifida 
clinics.
    Prenatally and Postnatally Diagnosed Conditions.--The 
Committee encourages CDC to increase the provision of 
scientifically sound information and support services to 
patients receiving a positive test result for Down syndrome or 
other pre- or postnatally diagnosed conditions by using 
available funds to award grants, contracts, or cooperative 
agreements to collect, synthesize, and disseminate current and 
accurate information about the tested condition; and coordinate 
the provision of, and access to, supportive services for 
patients affected, which should include a telephone hotline, an 
information clearinghouse, parent-support programs, and a 
registry of families willing to adopt children affected by such 
conditions. CDC is encouraged to provide assistance to State 
and local health departments to integrate the results of 
prenatal testing and pregnancy outcomes into State-based vital 
statistics and birth defects surveillance programs.
    Thalassemia.--The Committee believes that the thalassemia 
program, which provides blood safety surveillance to patients 
with this fatal genetic blood disease, has benefitted those 
patients by assuring that they are monitored closely by major 
research centers, while at the same time benefitting the 
general population by providing an early warning system of 
potential problems in the blood supply. CDC is encouraged to 
work closely with the patient community to maximize the impact 
of this program.
    Venous Thromboembolism.--Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and 
Pulmonary Embolism (PE), collectively known as venous 
thromboembolism (VTE) is estimated to affect one million 
Americans each year, with approximately one third of the cases 
being fatal PE. The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent 
DVT and PE, as well as a report on VTE surveillance published 
in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, recognize the 
need for strengthened disease surveillance and for the 
translation into practice of appropriate prevention measures. 
The Committee encourages CDC to develop a surveillance plan, 
which includes the resources needed to implement the 
recommendations of the Call to Action.

Health Information and Service

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$291,784,000 for Health Information and Service, which is 
$12,428,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 program level and 
the same as the budget request. Of the funds provided, 
$233,105,000 shall be derived from evaluation set-aside funds 
available under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. 
The evaluation set-aside is $36,873,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $38,011,000 more than the budget 
request.
            Health Statistics
    The Committee provides $138,683,000 for Health Statistics, 
which is $13,982,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the same as the budget request. The Health Statistics 
program is responsible for collecting, interpreting, and 
disseminating data on the health status of the U.S. population 
and the use of health services. Surveys include the National 
Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the National Health and 
Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), the National Health Care 
Survey, the National Vital Statistics System, and the National 
Survey of Family Growth.
    National Health Interview Survey.--The Committee is 
concerned over the lack of health care data about the lesbian, 
gay, bi-sexual and transgendered community. The Committee 
continues to urge CDC to enhance the National Health Interview 
Survey to collect data regarding the sexual orientation and 
gender identity of survey respondents using tested methods for 
doing so with the greatest possible accuracy.
    Nutrition Monitoring.--The Committee affirms America's 
commitment to nutrition for all, and seeks to ensure sufficient 
resources for the national nutrition monitoring activities, 
continuously conducted jointly by the National Center for 
Health Statistics (NCHS) and the Agricultural Research Service 
at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This data collection 
supports management decisionmaking and research needed to 
address and improve the crisis of obesity, nutrition-related 
diseases, physical inactivity, food insecurity, and the poor 
nutritional quality of the American diet, as well as provide 
the data needed to protect the public against environmental 
pathogens and contaminants.
    Preserving the Integrity of Seminal Health Surveys.--The 
Committee encourages the National Center for Health Statistics 
(NCHS) to fully support its ongoing seminal health surveys, in 
particular the NHIS and NHANES. These surveys provide unique 
insights into the health status of the American people and are 
an important resource to policymakers at the Federal, State, 
and local levels of government. The Committee expects NCHS to 
protect these core surveys without compromising data quality or 
accessibility, particularly with regard to minority 
populations. Further cuts to the sample sizes of these surveys 
could compromise our ability to monitor health disparities at a 
time when our society becomes increasingly diverse.
    Vital Statistics.--The Committee values NCHS and its 
critical role in monitoring our nation's health. The Committee 
has reservations about NCHS' plan to purchase only core items 
of birth and death data from States through the National Vital 
Statistics System. This plan will result in a reduction of over 
three-fourths of the number of enhanced data items that are 
routinely used to monitor maternal and infant health, such as 
use of prenatal care, smoking during pregnancy, medical risk 
factors, and educational attainment of parents, among others. 
The Committee urges NCHS to purchase the core and enhanced data 
currently collected by vital statistics jurisdictions and 
collect 12 months of these data within the calendar year.
            Public Health Informatics/Health Marketing
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$153,101,000 for Public Health Informatics and Health 
Marketing, which is $1,554,000 less than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request.
    Within the program level total, $70,597,000 is for Public 
Health Informatics, which is $522,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
Information systems and information technology extend the 
traditional reach of public health professionals. Activities 
funded through Public Health Informatics include on-going 
collaborative efforts to build a national network of public 
health information systems to enhance detection and monitoring, 
surveillance, data analysis and interpretation, preparedness, 
communications, and response.
    Also within the program level total, $82,504,000 is for 
Health Marketing, which is $2,076,000 less than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. Health 
Marketing uses commercial, non-profit and public service 
marketing, and communication science practices to better 
understand people's health-related needs and preferences, to 
motivate changes in individuals and organizations to protect 
and improve health, and to develop and enhance partnerships 
with public and private organizations.

Environmental Health and Injury Prevention

    The Committee provides $339,638,000 for Environmental 
Health and Injury Prevention, which is $8,981,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $4,622,000 more than the 
budget request.
            Environmental Health
    The Committee provides $191,023,000 for Environmental 
Health, which is $5,608,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $4,622,000 more than the budget request. The 
Environmental Health program focuses on preventing disability, 
disease, and death caused by environmental factors through 
laboratory and field research.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for Environmental Health activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Environmental Health Laboratory........................        $43,729,000          +$994,000          +$767,000
    Newborn Screening Quality Assurance Program........          6,915,000            +37,000                  0
    Newborn Screening for Severe Combined                          988,000             +5,000                  0
     Immunodeficiency Diseases.........................
Environmental Health Activities........................         81,565,000         +4,266,000         +3,855,000
    Arctic Health......................................                  0           -292,000           -294,000
    Climate Change.....................................         15,000,000         +7,500,000         +7,460,000
    Safe Water.........................................          7,237,000            +38,000                  0
    Volcanic Emissions.................................                  0            -98,000            -99,000
    Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking Network..         33,124,000         +1,981,000         +1,815,000
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Registry.......          5,027,000            +27,000                  0
    Polycythemia Vera Cluster..........................                  0         -5,000,000         -5,027,000
Asthma.................................................         30,924,000           +164,000                  0
Healthy Homes/Childhood Lead Poisoning.................         34,805,000           +184,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Asthma.--The Committee urges CDC to work with States and 
the asthma community to implement evidence-based best practices 
for policy interventions, with specific emphasis on indoor and 
outdoor air pollution, which will reduce asthma morbidity and 
mortality.
    Biomonitoring.--The Committee is aware of the potential 
connection between environmental hazards and the incidence and 
distribution of chronic disease. Environmental hazards have 
been linked to birth defects and diseases such as asthma and 
cancer. The Committee applauds CDC's biomonitoring efforts. 
Biomonitoring measures are direct measures of people's exposure 
to toxic substances in the environment. Information obtained 
from biomonitoring helps public health officials determine 
which population groups are at high risk for exposure and 
adverse health effects, assess public health interventions, and 
monitor exposure trends over time.
    The Committee encourages the CDC to direct increases for 
CDC's Environmental Health Laboratory to States with existing 
biomonitoring programs in order to expand State public health 
laboratory capabilities; to conduct subpopulation studies; to 
conduct representative analyses of routinely collected blood, 
cord blood and other biospecimens; to develop protocols for 
conducting biomonitoring of sensitive subpopulations such as 
children; and to support biomonitoring field operations such as 
participant enrollment, sample collection, data analysis, 
report generation and results communications. CDC is also 
encouraged to focus on developing new methods for identifying 
chemical sources and routes of exposure using model exposure 
questionnaires and the collection of relevant household and 
other environmental samples.
    Childhood Lead Poisoning Screening.--The Committee commends 
CDC for supporting the development of a Clinical Laboratory 
Improvement Amendment (CLIA)-waived, point-of-care lead 
poisoning screening device. This FDA approved technology holds 
great promise for increasing testing rates in underserved 
communities. The Committee continues to encourage CDC to 
promote broader use of this screening tool among its lead 
poisoning prevention grantees.
    Climate Change.--The Committee is aware that public health 
professionals are starting to consider health a central 
dimension of climate change. The Committee notes that the 
potential health effects of climate change have been 
extensively reviewed and key concerns include injuries and 
fatalities related to severe weather events and heat waves; 
infectious diseases; allergic symptoms; respiratory and 
cardiovascular disease; and nutritional and water shortages. 
The Committee recognizes the importance of developing climate 
change mitigation and adaptation strategies.
    The Committee provides increased resources for a Climate 
Change Program at CDC. In continuing to develop this program, 
the Committee urges CDC to support State climate change 
preparedness activities, public health education and 
communications about health and climate change, training for 
public health professionals on climate change and health, and 
research and surveillance. The Committee urges CDC to fund 
research on the health impacts and implications of climate 
change, the health impacts of potential mitigation strategies 
and the development of tools for modeling and forecasting 
climate change at the regional, State, and local levels. CDC 
should work with partners at the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Association, the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, and the Environmental Protection Agency to 
develop a coordinated research agenda on climate change and 
health.
    National Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking 
Network.--The World Health Organization estimates that 13 
million deaths annually are due to preventable environmental 
causes. Chronic diseases such as asthma and cancer are among 
the most frequent adverse health effects of environmental 
hazards in the U.S. The Committee recognizes the important role 
of the Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking Network in 
understanding the relationship between environmental exposures 
and the incidence and distribution of disease, including 
potential health effects related to climate change. Health 
tracking through the integration of environmental and health 
outcome data enables public health officials to better target 
preventive services so that health care providers can offer 
better care and the public will be able to develop a clear 
understanding of what is occurring in their communities and how 
overall health can be improved.
    The Committee supports the continued development of the 
National Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking Network. 
With the increased resources provided in fiscal year 2009, five 
new grantees will be funded taking the total number of grants 
to 22. In fiscal year 2010, the Committee provides increased 
funding to enable at least one additional State to integrate 
environmental and health outcome data and participate in 
National Environmental and Health Outcome Tracking Network. In 
awarding funds, the Committee encourages CDC to give preference 
to current and former grantees and States that have invested in 
health tracking infrastructure.
    National Report on Dietary and Nutritional Indicators in 
the U.S. Population.--The Committee supports the efforts of the 
Environmental Health Laboratory and its commitment to improving 
the measurement of dietary and nutritional indicators in the 
American people. The Committee recognizes that future reports 
will provide this essential information, which is not available 
in any other document in either the public or private sector. 
The Committee urges CDC to expand the report from the original 
27 indicators to other important nutritional markers such as 
trans fats and omega-3 fatty acids and encourages the 
Environmental Health Laboratory to improve and standardize 
selected laboratory tests used for the diagnosis, treatment, 
and prevention of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular 
disease, diabetes, and cancer.
    Newborn Screening for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency.--
The Committee is pleased that this newborn screening program 
has supported pilot projects in the States, which have led to 
the identification, treatment, and cure of patients with this 
fatal disease. CDC is encouraged to pilot this program in 
additional States in fiscal year 2010.
            Injury Prevention and Control
    The Committee provides $148,615,000 for Injury Prevention 
and Control, which is $3,373,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request.
    Injuries are the leading cause of death among children and 
adults under 44 years of age in the U.S. In 2004, more than 
167,000 people died from injuries and violence and over 29 
million people sustained injuries serious enough to require 
treatment in an emergency department. The injury prevention and 
control program supports intramural research, injury control 
research centers, extramural research grants, and technical 
assistance to State and local health departments to prevent 
premature death and disability and to reduce human suffering 
and medical costs caused by injury and violence.
    Within the total for Injury Prevention and Control the 
Committee includes the following amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intentional Injury.....................................       $102,648,000        +$3,267,000                 $0
    Domestic Violence and Sexual Violence..............         31,900,000         +3,086,000                  0
        Child Maltreatment.............................          7,104,000            +18,000                  0
    Youth Violence Prevention..........................         20,076,000            +54,000                  0
    Domestic Violence Community Projects...............          5,525,000            +14,000                  0
    Rape Prevention....................................         42,623,000           +107,000                  0
    All Other Intentional Injury.......................          2,524,000             +6,000                  0
Unintentional Injury...................................         31,704,000           +361,000                  0
    Traumatic Brain Injury.............................          6,152,000            +15,000                  0
    All Other Unintentional Injury.....................         25,552,000           +346,000                  0
        Elderly Falls..................................          2,000,000                  0                  0
Injury Control Research Centers........................         10,719,000           -264,000                  0
National Violent Death Reporting System................          3,544,000             +9,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Fostering Public Health Responses Program.--Nearly one 
third of American women report being physically or sexually 
abused by a husband or boyfriend at some point in their lives. 
The problem has immense financial considerations, with the 
health-related costs of intimate partner violence in the U.S. 
exceeding $5,900,000,000 each year. Early detection and 
treatment of victims and potential victims not only addresses 
the victims' needs, but can financially benefit health care 
systems in the long run. Therefore, the Committee urges the 
development of the Fostering Public Health Responses Program to 
coordinate the public health response to domestic violence.
    Gun Control Advocacy.--The Committee maintains bill 
language prohibiting funds in this bill from being used to 
lobby for or against the passage of specific Federal, State, or 
local legislation intended to advocate or promote gun control. 
The Committee understands that CDC's responsibility in this 
area is primarily data collection and the dissemination of that 
information and expects the research in this area to be 
objective and grants to be awarded through an impartial, 
scientific peer review process.
    Injury Control Research Centers.--Within the total for 
Injury Prevention and Control, the Committee includes funding 
specifically for Injury Control Research Centers. Funds are 
provided to the centers to support core operations, conduct the 
research necessary to fill gaps in the evidence base for 
developing and evaluating new injury control interventions and 
improve translation of effective interventions, conduct 
training of injury control professionals, and undertake other 
programmatic activities to reduce the burden of injury.
    Intersection between Domestic Violence and Child 
Maltreatment.--The Committee urges CDC to support training and 
collaboration on the intersection between domestic violence and 
child maltreatment. Such a program would support cross-training 
to enhance community responses to families where there is both 
child abuse and domestic violence. Law enforcement, courts, 
child welfare agencies, domestic and sexual violence service 
providers, and other community organizations could be able to 
deal with both problems simultaneously, allowing for a better 
use of our limited resources. As the two problems often occur 
together, dealing with one problem and not the other is at the 
peril of our children.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$369,341,000 for the National Institute for Occupational Safety 
and Health (NIOSH), which is $9,282,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $953,000 more than the budget 
request. Of the amount provided, $91,724,000 is to be derived 
from section 241 evaluation set-aside funds as proposed in the 
budget request, rather than $91,225,000 as provided in fiscal 
year 2009.
    NIOSH conducts applied research, develops criteria for 
occupational safety and health standards, and provides 
technical services to government, labor and industry, including 
training for the prevention of work-related diseases and 
injuries. This appropriation supports surveillance, health 
hazard evaluations, intramural and extramural research, 
instrument and methods development, dissemination, and training 
grants.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
program levels for NIOSH:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Education and Research Centers.........................        $23,740,000          +$243,000                  0
Personal Protective Technology.........................         17,218,000           +176,000                  0
    Pandemic Flu Preparedness for Healthcare Workers...          3,031,000            +31,000                  0
Healthier Workforce Centers............................          4,072,000            +42,000                  0
National Occupational Research Agenda..................        117,406,000         +5,762,000                  0
World Trade Center.....................................         70,723,000           +723,000                  0
Mining Research........................................         51,469,000         +1,469,000           +953,000
Other Occupational Safety and Health Research..........         84,713,000           +867,000                  0
    Miners Choice......................................            648,000             +7,000                  0
    National Mesothelioma Registry and Tissue Bank.....          1,024,000            +10,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Mine Technology and Safety Test Bed.--The Committee 
encourages NIOSH to develop a Mine Technology and Safety Test 
Bed, which will facilitate real-time situational awareness and 
improve miners' safety. The program should, at a minimum, 
consist of NIOSH-approved communications capable of supporting 
and integrating a multi-channel, digital voice, data and text 
messaging system that can establish connections to external 
networks. The system should also include real-time three 
dimensional immersive surveillance tracking capabilities. The 
system shall be MINER Act compliant and meet or exceed Mine 
Safety and Health Administration standards. The network 
infrastructure should be self-healing, redundant, and 
survivable during day-to-day operations and in emergency 
situations.
    Nanotechnology.--NIOSH is the leading Federal agency 
conducting research and providing guidance on the occupational 
safety and health implications of nanotechnology and 
nanomaterials. Nanotechnology has potentially revolutionary 
applications related to many key industrial sectors, including 
aerospace, biotechnology, homeland security and national 
defense, energy, information technology, and medicine. An 
estimated one million U.S. workers will be working in the 
nanotechnology field by 2015. For that reason, there is a 
significant need to understand the health effects and to 
develop the evidence base and guidance on risks and controls 
for workers in this burgeoning field. With increased resources 
in fiscal year 2010, NIOSH will focus its activities on a 
variety of occupational safety and health research activities, 
including developing recommendations for controlling 
occupational exposure to fine and ultrafine particles, 
determining the extent of workplace exposures in 25 facilities 
across the U.S., and conducting research on the explosive 
potential of various nanomaterials.
    Pandemic Influenza.--The experience with the 2009 outbreak 
of the novel H1N1 virus has identified significant deficiencies 
in efforts to protect health care workers in the event of a 
pandemic influenza. Currently there is no comprehensive 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard 
to protect health care workers from pandemic influenza and 
airborne infectious diseases. OSHA and CDC guidelines 
recommending the use of NIOSH certified respirators and other 
control measures to protect health care workers from pandemic 
influenza and the H1N1 virus have not been followed by many 
State and local health departments who instead have recommended 
lesser degrees of protection.
    OSHA and NIOSH, the agencies with legal responsibility for 
and expertise in worker protection, should take the lead in 
developing and implementing recommendations and requirements to 
protect healthcare workers from pandemic influenza and other 
infectious agents.
    To further implement the recommendations of the 2008 
Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on protecting health care 
workers from pandemic influenza, the bill includes funding in 
the NIOSH budget to study the transmissibility of pandemic 
influenza and other pathogenic bioaerosols and to evaluate the 
efficacy of respiratory protection and other control measures 
to protect health care workers from these infectious agents. As 
recommended by the IOM, such studies should include workplace 
studies during outbreaks and occurrences of influenza.
    World Trade Center.--The Committee remains concerned about 
the World Trade Center (WTC) program. Funding for the WTC 
Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program should support the 
following activities, in addition to its current activities: 
continued development of outreach services to all eligible 
participants (including eligible participants living outside 
the New York City metropolitan area) to ensure they are aware 
of the services available to them; expanded benefits counseling 
services to all eligible participants in order to ensure they 
receive all necessary services and benefits available to them; 
and evaluate the monitoring and treatment data being collected 
in the current program in order to detect emerging disease 
patterns and the effectiveness of the medical care being 
provided. Additionally, funding should also continue to support 
the WTC Health Registry.
    The Committee reiterates its direction that NIOSH submit a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate containing cost estimates and 
budget obligations for each contract or grant associated with 
the WTC Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program no later than 
15 days after the end of each quarter. Included in the report 
should be detailed information concerning the numbers of first 
response emergency personnel, residents, students, and others 
who are monitored or treated in the New York City area and 
throughout the country; and the predominant health conditions 
for which those exposed to the toxins at or around the WTC site 
or associated cleanup sites continue to experience. Quarterly 
reports should update cost estimates, budget obligations, and 
numbers of people served, as well as prevalent health 
conditions impacting participants.

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program

    The Committee provides $55,358,000 for CDC to administer 
the mandatory Energy Employees Occupational Illness 
Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA), which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    EEOICPA provides compensation to employees or survivors of 
employees of Department of Energy facilities and private 
contractors who have been diagnosed with a radiation-related 
cancer, beryllium-related disease, or chronic silicosis as a 
result of their work. NIOSH estimates occupational radiation 
exposure for cancer cases, considers and issues determinations 
for adding classes of workers to the Special Exposure Cohort, 
and provides administrative support to the Advisory Board on 
Radiation and Worker Health.

Global Health

    The Committee provides $323,134,000 for Global Health, 
which is $14,310,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $4,000,000 above the budget request.
    Through its Global Health activities, CDC coordinates, 
cooperates, participates with, and provides consultation to 
other nations, U.S. agencies, and international organizations 
to prevent and contain diseases and environmental health 
problems and to develop and apply health promotion activities. 
In cooperation with Ministries of Health and other appropriate 
organizations, CDC tracks and assesses evolving global health 
issues and identifies and develops activities to apply CDC's 
technical expertise to be of maximum public health benefit.
    Within the total, the following amounts are included for 
Global Health activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Global AIDS Program....................................       $118,979,000          +$116,000                 $0
Global Immunization Program............................        153,475,000        +10,149,000                  0
    Polio Eradication..................................        101,599,000            +99,000                  0
    Other Global/Measles...............................         51,876,000        +10,050,000                  0
Global Disease Detection...............................         37,756,000         +4,033,000         +4,000,000
Global Malaria Program.................................          9,405,000             +9,000                  0
Other Global Health....................................          3,519,000             +3,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Global Disease Detection Program.--The Committee commends 
the work of CDC in coordinating cross-cutting disease detection 
and response activities across the agency and for establishing 
the Global Disease Detection (GDD) Regional Centers to 
strengthen capacity for rapid identification and response to a 
broad range of emerging infectious disease outbreaks and health 
threats. In fiscal year 2009, one additional GDD Regional 
Center will be added to the program for a total of seven 
centers. With the increased funding provided in this bill, the 
Committee has included sufficient funding for at least one 
additional GDD Regional Center to give CDC a more extensive 
global presence. The Committee encourages increased involvement 
of CDC's global health staff worldwide as a first response to 
emerging health threats. In addition, the Committee encourages 
CDC to leverage the infrastructure of the GDD Regional Centers 
and the broader network of expertise at CDC headquarters to 
provide regional training and increase public health capacity 
in support of the International Health Regulations.
    Global Immunization/Measles.--Childhood immunization is one 
of the most cost-effective of all health interventions. In the 
past two decades, immunization has prevented an estimated 20 
million deaths globally from vaccine-preventable diseases. 
However, much more needs to be done. Measles caused an 
estimated 197,000 deaths worldwide in 2007 and is the leading 
cause of childhood deaths from a disease for which there is a 
widely available vaccine. A significant portion of the 
increased investment provided in this bill for global 
immunization will support expanded measles vaccination 
campaigns in South Asia and Africa to protect the U.S. by 
decreasing the risk of importations of vaccine-preventable 
diseases. CDC estimates that with this increased funding in 
fiscal year 2010, there will be 25,000 fewer global measles-
related deaths.
    Malaria.--The Committee supports CDC's global malaria 
program. It is essential, as the threat of drug and pesticide 
resistance looms, that CDC continues research leading to new 
tools that will be available to replace current interventions 
once they are no longer effective. The Committee urges CDC to 
expand its important malaria work, and recognizes that without 
CDC's contributions, the overall U.S. effort against malaria 
will be considerably less effective. Further, the Committee 
encourages CDC to expand its support for public-private 
partnerships involved in the discovery, development, and 
delivery of effective and affordable anti-malarial drugs.
    Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.--The Committee is aware that 
there are currently seven clinical trials testing the safety 
and effectiveness of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), and that 
PrEP is considered among the most promising of potential HIV 
prevention interventions now being studied. The Committee 
encourages the agencies sponsoring these trials--NIH, CDC, and 
the U.S. Agency for International Development--to jointly 
develop a five year coordinated PrEP research plan.

Terrorism Preparedness and Response

    The Committee provides $1,546,809,000 for Terrorism 
Preparedness and Response, which is $32,152,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. CDC distributes grants to State, local, and 
territorial public health agencies, Centers for Public Health 
Preparedness, and others to support infrastructure upgrades to 
respond to all potential hazards, including acts of terrorism 
or infectious disease outbreaks. Funds are used for needs 
assessments, terrorism response planning, training, 
strengthening epidemiology and surveillance, and upgrading 
laboratory capacity and communications systems. Activities 
support the establishment of procedures and response systems, 
and build the infrastructure necessary to respond to a variety 
of disaster scenarios.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for Terrorism Preparedness and Response activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Health Emergency Preparedness Cooperative              $714,949,000       +$14,484,000                 $0
 Agreements............................................
Centers for Public Health Preparedness.................         30,013,000            +13,000                  0
Advanced Practice Centers..............................          5,263,000             +2,000                  0
All Other State and Local Capacity.....................         10,875,000             +5,000                  0
Upgrading CDC Capacity.................................        120,795,000            +51,000                  0
Anthrax................................................                  0         -7,875,000                  0
BioSense...............................................         34,404,000            +15,000                  0
Quarantine.............................................         26,518,000            +11,000                  0
Real-time Lab Reporting................................          8,243,000             +4,000                  0
Strategic National Stockpile...........................        595,749,000        +25,442,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Cities Readiness Initiative.--The Cities Readiness 
Initiative (CRI) provides resources to cities and metropolitan 
areas around the country to better distribute countermeasures 
during public health emergencies. As CDC expanded the number of 
cities receiving CRI, it has revised the formula for allocation 
and several large high-risk cities are facing significant 
reductions (up to 25 percent) that could impact their readiness 
to coordinate a regional response and disburse countermeasures 
in a large metropolitan area. CDC should review this formula 
and the amount allocated to CRI and ensure that the funding 
level for these cities is maintained in fiscal year 2010 at 
appropriate levels. Further, the Committee requests that CDC 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate making recommendations 
for ensuring the maximum readiness level of high-risk cities no 
later than April 1, 2010.
    State-by-State Preparedness Data.--Ensuring national 
preparedness requires regular review of State preparedness 
efforts by Federal, State, and local governments, and the 
public. The Committee commends CDC for releasing ``Public 
Health Preparedness: Strengthening CDC's Emergency Response''. 
The Committee is pleased that the report provides an overview 
of public health preparedness activities and details 
accomplishments and challenges. The Committee expects the 
Department to collect and review State-by-State data on 
benchmarks and performance measures developed pursuant to the 
provisions of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Act and 
to detail how preparedness funding is spent in each State. 
These data should be made available to the Congress, State and 
local health departments, State and local governments, and to 
the public. The Committee further expects that as the 
Department collects and evaluates State pandemic response 
plans, the results of these evaluations will be made available 
to the Congress and to the public.

Public Health Research

    The Committee provides $31,170,000 for Public Health 
Research, which is $170,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The Committee 
provides these funds through the section 241 evaluation set-
aside funds as provided in fiscal year 2009 and as proposed in 
the budget request.
    Through the public health research funding, CDC supports 
high-quality public health research that studies the best 
methods for making the transition from research to practice. 
Funds support research that is proposed by experienced 
investigators working with communities, health practitioners, 
and policymakers to address local priority health concerns.

Public Health Improvement and Leadership

    The Committee provides $199,093,000 for Public Health 
Improvement and Leadership, which is $10,043,000 below the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $10,507,000 above the budget 
request.
    This activity supports several cross-cutting areas within 
CDC. Included is the CDC's leadership and management function, 
which funds the CDC Office of the Director, coordinating 
centers, and each constituent center and office. The Public 
Health Improvement and Leadership funding also supports the 
CDC's public health workforce and career development efforts.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for Public Health Improvement and Leadership 
activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leadership and Management..............................       $149,986,000          +$654,000                 $0
Director's Discretionary Fund..........................                  0         -2,948,000         -2,948,000
Public Health Workforce Development....................         35,652,000           +793,000                  0
    Applied Epidemiology Fellowship Training...........            991,000             +9,000                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The bill includes $13,455,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Access Community Health Network, Chicago, IL for a              $200,000
 program to reduce cancer disparities through
 comprehensive early detection.......................
Alameda County Department of Public Health, Office of            300,000
 AIDS, Oakland, CA for an HIV/AIDS prevention and
 testing initiative..................................
Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics, Boston,             100,000
 MA for a comprehensive program to review antibiotic
 resistance trends, interventions, and prevention
 methods, including a public information campaign....
Allina Hospitals and Clinics, Minneapolis, MN for a              200,000
 heart disease prevention program....................
American Red Cross, San Juan, PR for testing the                 400,000
 Puerto Rico blood supply for the dengue virus.......
Betty Jean Kerr Peoples Health Center, St. Louis, MO             150,000
 for the prostate cancer screening program...........
Broward County, Ft. Lauderdale, FL for a pediatric               275,000
 mortality public awareness campaign.................
Children's Health Fund, New York, NY for health                  100,000
 assessments, outreach, and education services for
 children and their families.........................
City of Laredo, TX for a community health assessment.            200,000
County of Marin, San Rafael, CA for research and                 200,000
 analysis related to breast cancer incidence and
 mortality in the county and breast cancer screening.
Dillard University, New Orleans, LA for facilities               300,000
 and equipment.......................................
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC for a                   400,000
 program to reduce health disparities through chronic
 disease management..................................
El Puente, Inc., Brooklyn, NY for a youth and family             500,000
 wellness program....................................
Family Hospice and Palliative Care, Pittsburgh, PA               100,000
 for the Center for Compassionate Care Education
 Outreach program....................................
Friends of the Congressional Glaucoma Caucus                      50,000
 Foundation, Lake Success, NY for glaucoma screenings
 in Northern Virginia................................
Ft. Valley State University, Ft. Valley, GA for a                100,000
 food and nutrition education program (EFNEP) aimed
 at curbing obesity, particularly among young
 minorities..........................................
Haitian American Association Against Cancer, Inc.,               300,000
 Miami, FL for cancer education, outreach, screening,
 and related programs................................
Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition,                       100,000
 Huntington, NY for providing services and programs
 to underserved populations on how to reduce the
 risks of cancer.....................................
Inland Northwest Health Services, Spokane, WA for a              350,000
 public health surveillance initiative...............
International Rett Syndrome Foundation, Cincinnati,              180,000
 OH for education and awareness programs regarding
 Rett Syndrome.......................................
Iowa Chronic Care Consortium/Des Moines University,              200,000
 Des Moines, IA for a preventive health initiative...
Iowa State University, Ames, IA for facilities and             1,000,000
 equipment...........................................
Latino Health Access, Santa Ana, CA for a youth                  150,000
 obesity prevention program..........................
Lupus LA, Los Angeles, CA for increasing public                  250,000
 awareness of lupus..................................
Mario Lemieux Foundation, Bridgeville, PA for the                100,000
 Hodgkin's Disease Patient and Public Education
 Outreach Initiative.................................
Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA for             350,000
 continuation and expansion of the CARE network......
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN              400,000
 for a program to improve the physical fitness of
 children and adolescents in Middle Tennessee........
Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD for a program             200,000
 to understand the social determinants and the impact
 of health disparities on the health of urban and
 underserved populations.............................
National Marfan Foundation, Port Washington, NY for              250,000
 an awareness and education campaign for Marfan
 Syndrome............................................
Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV for cancer                400,000
 education and outreach services.....................
New York Junior Tennis League, Woodside, NY for a                250,000
 childhood obesity program for high-risk youth from
 low-income families.................................
Padres Contra El Cancer, Los Angeles, CA for                     250,000
 educational resources and outreach programs to serve
 families with children with cancer..................
Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation, Kansas City, MO            100,000
 for developing education and awareness programs
 about chronic kidney disease........................
Prevent Blindness Florida, Tampa, FL for the See the             200,000
 Difference Vision Screening Program.................
Puerto Rican Cultural Center, Chicago, IL for an HIV/            100,000
 AIDS outreach and education program.................
Pulmonary Hypertension Association, Silver Spring, MD            250,000
 for a pulmonary hypertension prevention and
 awareness initiative................................
San Antonio Metropolitan Health District, San                    500,000
 Antonio, TX for a program to assess the health
 behaviors of the Kelly community and address health
 issues such as lead poisoning, asthma, and indoor
 pollutants..........................................
Schneider Children's Hospital, New Hyde Park, NY for             300,000
 comprehensive Diamond Blackfan Anemia awareness and
 surveillance........................................
Shelby County Community Services, Memphis, TN for an             200,000
 infant mortality prevention and education program...
Silent Spring Institute, Newton, MA for studies of               350,000
 the impact of environmental pollutants on breast
 cancer and women's health...........................
South Carolina HIV/AIDS Council, Columbia, SC for an             200,000
 HIV/AIDS prevention program.........................
Texas AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX            300,000
 for a youth obesity prevention initiative...........
Texas Tech University Health Science Center, Lubbock,            200,000
 TX for the West Texas Center for Influenza Research,
 Education and Treatment.............................
Thundermist Health Center, Woonsocket, RI for the                200,000
 active teen challenge project to reduce childhood
 obesity.............................................
UMOS, Inc., Milwaukee, WI for a teen pregnancy and               100,000
 sexually transmitted infections prevention program..
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM for a                  350,000
 prevention program aimed at reducing diabetes-
 related heart and blood vessel diseases in New
 Mexico..............................................
University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center,                500,000
 Houston, TX for a comprehensive cancer control
 program to address the needs of minority and
 medically underserved populations...................
University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX for               250,000
 research and education activities at the South Texas
 Border Health Disparities Center....................
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Public               300,000
 Health, Milwaukee, WI for a healthy birth outcomes
 program.............................................
Valentine Boys and Girls Club of Chicago, Chicago, IL            150,000
 for a health and physical education program to
 prevent obesity and promote healthy development.....
Visiting Nurses Association, Council Bluffs, IA for a            350,000
 telehealth initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Watts Healthcare Corporation, Los Angeles, CA for a              250,000
 project to improve breastfeeding rates..............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant

    The Committee provides $102,034,000 for the Preventive 
Health and Health Services Block Grant, which is $34,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This block grant provides flexible funds to States by 
formula for a wide range of public and preventive health 
activities. The flexibility afforded to the States allows them 
to target funds to address chronic diseases, such as diabetes, 
arthritis, heart disease, and stroke; to direct funds to meet 
challenges of outbreaks of infectious diseases such as West 
Nile virus and influenza; and/or to implement prevention and 
control programs related to injury and abuse.

Buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $30,000,000 for CDC buildings and 
facilities, which is $121,500,000 less than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. This 
funding supports continued repairs and improvement to existing 
CDC buildings and facilities to protect the interest and 
investment of the government so that deterioration of CDC 
facilities does not occur.

Business Services and Support

    The Committee provides $367,075,000 for Business Services 
and Support, which is $7,198,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $5,587,000 less than the budget request. Some 
of the activities that are supported through this funding are 
administrative services and programs, the human resources 
center, capital planning and investment control, financial 
management, security and emergency preparedness, and 
information technology services.
    It is the Committee's intention that funds provided in 
business services and support are sufficient to carry out CDC's 
business functions. The Committee will not support programmatic 
``tapping'' to achieve additional funding in this area and 
appreciates that CDC has made efforts to curtail this practice. 
If additional funding is required for activities within this or 
any other budget line, the Committee expects CDC to work with 
the Department of Health and Human Services to prepare timely 
and detailed reprogramming or transfer requests to be submitted 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate.

                     National Institutes of Health

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$31,258,788,000 for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 
which is $941,764,000 above the fiscal year 2009 appropriation 
and $500,000,000 above the budget request. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $10,400,000,000 for NIH in fiscal years 
2009 and 2010.
    Fiscal year 2009 has been a year of unprecedented 
opportunity for NIH. The combination of Recovery Act funding 
and the fiscal year 2009 Omnibus Appropriations Act increased 
the NIH appropriation by almost 40 percent. NIH is required to 
spend all Recovery Act funding in two years in order to spur 
economic recovery. NIH has risen to that challenge and has 
created new types of grants that aim to produce defined results 
in a two-year period, along with expanding current grants to 
pursue new inquiries. NIH is on track to obligate all Recovery 
Act funding by the end of fiscal year 2010.
    The Committee is convinced that investing now in NIH 
research will generate untold breakthroughs that will improve 
health and reduce health care expenditures in the future. The 
nation's return on investment in NIH includes declines in death 
rates for cardiovascular diseases and an increase in cancer 
survivorship, as just two examples. NIH is the largest single 
engine for biomedical research in the world. The pace of 
discovery in the biomedical sciences has never been as rapid or 
as promising. NIH funding supports more than 300,000 scientists 
and research personnel affiliated with more than 3,100 
organizations in all 50 States.
    The Committee is concerned by the harmful precedent 
established in the Administration's budget of setting specific 
funding levels for particular diseases. The Committee believes 
it is more appropriate to allocate funding in a way that 
permits scientific peer review to decide the most promising 
research to support. The serendipitous nature of science is 
documented each year, with breakthroughs in one disease area 
emanating from a finding in a completely unrelated field. The 
Committee recognizes these unanticipated opportunities by 
recommending a funding level which provides a comparable 
inflationary adjustment to the fiscal year 2009 levels for each 
institute and center to offset biomedical research inflation; 
includes resources to finance 10,739 new and competing grants, 
an increase of 914 over fiscal year 2009 (excluding the grants 
supported with Recovery Act funding); and provides an average 
two percent increase for both new and continuing grants to 
maintain the grants' purchasing power. The number of total 
grants will rise to 38,888, an increase of 1,105 over fiscal 
year 2009. The recommendation is attentive to the pipeline 
issue, providing funding for two programs to support young 
investigators as well as a two percent average increase in 
research training stipends. The Committee fully funds the 
Administration's request of $300,000,000 for transfer to the 
Global Fund for AIDS, Malaria and Tuberculosis and continues 
the National Children's Study with an appropriation of 
$194,400,000. The Common Fund is supported as a set-aside 
within the Office of the Director at $534,066,000.
    The following chart displays the funding provided to each 
of the 27 appropriations that comprise the total NIH 
appropriation. The full name of each institute and center is 
included in the table along with its acronym. These acronyms 
will be used throughout the report rather than repeating the 
full name of the institute or center. Funding levels are also 
shown in the detailed table at the back of the report.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                   Institutes/Centers                    FY 2010 Committee                        2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Cancer Institute (NCI)........................         $5,150,170           $181,197                 $0
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)......          3,123,403            107,714             73,047
National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research               417,032             14,380              8,995
 (NIDCR)...............................................
Nat. Inst. of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases             1,824,251             62,913             42,757
 (NIDDKD)..............................................
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke          1,650,253             56,909             37,508
 (NINDS)...............................................
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases            4,859,502            156,930             99,207
 (NIAID)...............................................
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS).          2,069,156             71,355             45,479
Nat. Inst. of Child Health and Human Development                 1,341,120             46,226             27,446
 (NICHD)...............................................
National Eye Institute (NEI)...........................            713,072             24,592             17,283
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences                695,497             32,677             11,240
 (NIEHS)...............................................
National Institute on Aging (NIA)......................          1,119,404             38,608             26,261
Nat. Inst. Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Diseases             543,621             18,749             12,796
 (NIAMS)...............................................
Nat. Inst. on Deafness & Other Communication Disorders             422,308             15,049              9,282
 (NIDCD)...............................................
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)..........            146,945              5,066              3,196
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism                 466,308             16,078             11,159
 (NIAAA)...............................................
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)................          1,069,583             36,824             24,199
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).............          1,502,266             51,775             27,590
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).......            520,311             17,944             10,717
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and                       319,217             11,009              6,530
 Bioegineering (NIBIB).................................
National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)..........          1,280,031             53,768             27,987
National Center for Complementary and Alternative                  129,953              4,482              2,712
 Medicine (NCCAM)......................................
National Center on Minority Health and Health                      213,316              7,357              4,472
 Disparities (NCMHHD)..................................
John E. Fogarty International Center (FIC).............             70,780              2,089              1,553
National Library of Medicine (NLM).....................            342,585             11,814              8,238
Office of the Director (OD)............................          1,168,704            -78,160            -14,073
Buildings and Facilities...............................            100,000            -25,581            -25,581
    Total..............................................        $31,258,788           $941,764           $500,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       National Cancer Institute

    Mission.--NCI conducts and supports basic and applied 
cancer research in early detection, diagnosis, prevention, 
treatment, and rehabilitation. NCI provides training support 
for research scientists, clinicians and educators, and 
maintains a national network of cancer centers, clinical 
cooperative groups, and community clinical oncology programs, 
along with cancer prevention and control initiatives and 
outreach programs to rapidly translate basic research findings 
into clinical practice. The Committee continues bill language 
identifying up to $8,000,000 for repairs and improvements at 
the NCI-Frederick Federally Funded Research and Development 
Center in Frederick, MD.
    Adult Acute Leukemia.--The Committee is encouraged by 
ongoing research on adult acute leukemia, particularly in 
understanding how changes in a person's DNA can cause bone 
marrow cells to develop into leukemia, the detection of minimal 
residual disease which can indicate a relapse in the disease, 
and the discovery of more effective chemotherapy drugs. The 
Committee encourages NCI to expand current studies and support 
promising new research through all available mechanisms.
    Blood Cancers.--The Committee is aware that there are 
currently over 800,000 blood cancer patients living in the 
United States, and that the incidence of certain blood cancers 
has increased in recent decades. Public Law 107-172 directed 
NIH to expand, intensify, and coordinate programs for the 
conduct and support of research with respect to blood cancer, 
and particularly with respect to leukemia, lymphoma, and 
multiple myeloma. These diseases constitute one of the leading 
causes of cancer deaths. In addition, the Committee urges NCI 
to increase its focus on more rare forms of blood cancer such 
as Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.
    CIS Partnership Program.--The Committee is concerned about 
NCI's decision to eliminate the Cancer Information Service 
(CIS) Partnership program, which has provided high quality, 
accurate information to more than 10 million Americans at a 
vulnerable time in their lives. The Congressional mandate for 
this program states--``to provide and contract for a program to 
disseminate and interpret, on a current basis, for 
practitioners and other health professionals, scientists and 
the general public, scientific and other information respecting 
the cause, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer''. The 
CIS Partnership program supports over 750 partners who work 
with a diverse population who make use of its cancer 
information and communications research laboratory. The 
Committee recommends that NCI keep the present CIS Partnership 
office in place until 2011 and requests that NCI conduct an 
evaluation of the program, develop a detailed plan on how it 
intends to fulfill the Congressional mandate for CIS, and 
report its findings to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate no later than February 
1, 2010.
    Gastrointestinal (GI) Cancer.--The Committee is concerned 
that early diagnosis of most GI cancers is difficult or 
impossible, especially aggressive GI cancers in young people, 
and curative treatment options are non-existent at later 
stages. The Committee encourages NCI to study GI cancers in 
people age 40 and under, giving emphasis particularly to late-
stage cancers for whom curative treatment options are 
unavailable. In addition, the Committee requests NCI to 
consider developing an interconnected gastrointestinal cancer 
biorepository with consistent, interoperable systems for 
collection, storage, annotation, and information sharing.
    Gynecologic Cancer SPOREs.--The Committee is encouraged by 
the success of the gynecological cancer SPORE program. At 
present there is no available screening test for ovarian cancer 
to identify the disease at an early stage and improve survival. 
Given the inadequacies of current tools, there is a pressing 
need for new effective screening technologies, as well as for 
the development of new targeted therapies to decrease the 
mortality and morbidity of this disease. In addition, there is 
a need for research that is focused on endometrial and uterine 
cancer. The Committee encourages NCI to support existing 
gynecologic cancer SPORES as well as to consider increasing 
their overall number.
    Gynecologic Oncology Clinical Trials.--The Committee is 
concerned that the gynecology clinical trials network has not 
been able to fully fund an institution's research costs when it 
enrolls patients in a trial. This may have the impact of 
limiting access for patients to these trials which are offering 
cutting edge cancer treatments. This may also negatively impact 
the pace with which these clinical trials can be completed and 
results evaluated and published. The Committee encourages NCI 
to reconsider the per patient research costs of these clinical 
trials.
    Hematology.--The Committee is aware of efforts being made 
by the Institute's Office of Latin American Cancer Program 
Development to train physicians and scientists in the 
development of clinical trials and collaborative research 
networks focused on blood cancers. The Committee encourages NCI 
to support these international programs, which will improve 
research mechanisms and access to novel treatments for cancer 
patients.
    HPV Vaccine and Cervical Cancer.--The Committee encourages 
NCI to study clinical and cost analysis benefits of 
prospectively tracking cytologic screening and HPV test results 
and outcomes in communities where HPV vaccines are being 
implemented. The Committee encourages NCI to fund research, 
including registry-based tools, that will permit identification 
of the most cost-effective management strategy for cervical 
cancer screening in the era of HPV vaccines and will identify 
the circumstances where current screening protocols fail.
    Liver Cancer.--The Committee urges NCI to focus research 
efforts on liver cancer, which continues to be one of the 
fastest growing cancers in the U.S. The Committee encourages 
NCI to pursue new interventions and treatments, as well as new 
methods for early detection and prognosis.
    Lung Cancer.--The Committee remains concerned about 
increased lung cancer rates among women and urges NCI to 
support research for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment.
    Melanoma.--The Committee is encouraged by the collaboration 
between NCI and the advocacy and research community on 
prioritizing NIH-funded melanoma research that resulted in a 
community-oriented strategic action plan for melanoma research. 
The Committee encourages NCI to support the areas of research 
identified by the strategic research plan. Furthermore, the 
Committee encourages NCI to include melanoma in the Cancer 
Genome Atlas consortium to help identify new markers for 
classification, detection and risk-assessment, particularly in 
high-risk populations.
    Mitochondrial DNA and Cancer.--The Committee is aware that 
mitochondrial DNA mutations are associated with numerous 
cancers and that NCI has increased its efforts to better 
understand this relationship. The Committee encourages the 
Institute to continue its involvement in this area of research.
    National Disparities.-- NCI has developed and supported a 
national network of designated cancer centers at academic 
medical centers across the nation as a premier vehicle for 
promoting cancer research and outreach. These centers are 
particularly valued in their regions and States for their role 
in supporting all facets of cancer research, prevention, 
control and education. The Committee notes the incidence of 
national disparities in cancer prevalence, diagnosis, 
treatment, and control, particularly within regions with large 
underserved and minority populations with poor access to these 
centers. In order to reach these populations and extend the 
benefits of designated cancer centers, the Committee recommends 
that NCI consider supporting developing centers through the 
renewal of the NCI planning grant program. This grant mechanism 
will support the development of additional designated cancer 
centers that will bring the benefits of cancer research, 
prevention, control, and outreach fostered at these centers to 
those populations most in need.
    Neuroblastoma.--The Committee continues to encourage NCI to 
accelerate support for neuroblastoma research, with a focus on 
clinical trials for high-risk patients. Given the poor survival 
rates for children with advanced disease, the Committee 
encourages NCI to prioritize support for all promising 
neuroblastoma research, both intramural and extramural.
    Pancreatic Cancer.--While there has been a continuing 
decline in mortality rates for many types of cancer, mortality 
rates for pancreatic cancer have changed little in the past 30 
years. Further, survival rates have changed little in the last 
30 years. The Committee last year urged NCI to launch a 
pancreatic cancer-specific research and training initiative. To 
further these efforts, the Committee encourages NCI to convene 
a conference of internal program and research staff to jointly 
assess the current status of the pancreatic cancer research and 
training initiative and to develop an action plan for the use 
of fiscal year 2010 funding. The Committee requests a report on 
the results of that meeting within 60 days of its occurrence.
    Pediatric Cancer.--The Committee urges NCI to intensify 
pediatric cancer research, including laboratory research, to 
identify and evaluate potential therapies, preclinical testing, 
and clinical trials through cooperative clinical trials groups. 
This research should include research on the causes, 
prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and late effects of pediatric 
cancer. The Committee also requests that NCI report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate by June 1, 2010 on the actions it has taken to 
implement the research-specific portions of the Caroline Pryce 
Walker Conquer Childhood Cancer Act.
    Reproductive Scientists Development Program.--The Committee 
urges NCI to continue its partnership with NICHD with regard to 
training the next generation of gynecologic cancer researchers. 
The success of the Reproductive Scientists Development Program 
Fellows is reflected in the fact that a majority of these 
individuals receive an investigator-initiated grant and 
continue to prosper as a career-clinician scientist.

               National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Mission.--NHLBI provides leadership for a national research 
program in diseases of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and 
blood, in blood resources, and in sleep disorders through 
support of basic, clinical, and population-based and health 
education research.
    Atrial Fibrillation.--The Committee is aware that atrial 
fibrillation (AFib), the most common chronic cardiac 
arrhythmia, substantially increases risk for stroke and 
premature death and affects an estimated 2.3 million Americans. 
The disease is more common in men, with prevalence increasing 
significantly with age. The number of patients with AFib is 
projected to increase at least 2.5-fold by 2050, underscoring a 
substantial public health risk. Not only does the disorder 
present a significant burden on health care costs, AFib has 
significant morbidity and mortality consequences, increasing 
the risk of stroke approximately five-fold and causing an 
estimated 15 percent of all strokes in the United States. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI to convene a scientific workshop to 
identify evidence-based best practices for identification and 
management of AFib, and to disseminate the findings of the 
workshop to the patient and healthcare provider community.
    Cardiovascular Diseases.--The Committee urges NHLBI to 
strengthen current studies, support new research, and continue 
to implement priorities outlined in its Division of 
Cardiovascular Diseases Strategic Plan.
    Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease.--Research has shown that 
heart disease begins as early as childhood or adolescence in 
type 1 diabetes patients, and leads to a higher fatality and 
shorter survival. As much as 10 percent of premature 
cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in the general 
population is due to type 1 diabetes. Several clinical trials 
have demonstrated the benefit of statin therapy in Type 2 
diabetes. However, there is little data regarding statin 
therapy in young (below 45 years of age) people with type 1 
diabetes. The Committee encourages NHLBI to develop clinical 
research to determine the benefits of statin therapy for those 
with type 1 diabetes.
    Gender Differences.--The Committee requests NHBLI to focus 
research on several key questions about women and heart 
disease, including research on gender differences. These 
questions include: the best tools and methods for assessing 
women's risk of heart disease; the best strategies for 
preventing heart disease in women; which treatments for heart 
disease work best for women; what are the most effective 
treatments for diastolic heart failure, which is the most 
common form of congestive heart failure in women; what is the 
role of inflammation in heart disease in women; and why women 
aged 50 and younger are more likely to die following a heart 
attack than men of the same age.
    Hematology.--With the rising incidence in the U.S. of 
Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS), an increasingly common and 
often fatal bone marrow failure disorder that primarily affects 
individuals over 60 years of age, a vigorous research program 
into the causes of this disorder and the development of 
effective treatments is needed. In 2008, a panel of outside 
experts, in collaboration with several NIH institutes, 
recommended a research agenda for MDS. The Committee encourages 
NHLBI, working with NCI, NIDDK, and NIA, to develop a plan to 
implement the MDS research agenda beginning in 2010.
    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).--The Committee remains very 
interested in efforts to find a cure for LAM, a progressive and 
often fatal lung disease in women with no effective treatment. 
The Committee supports both intramural and extramural means of 
expanding research on LAM and encourages NHLBI to use all 
available mechanisms as appropriate, including support of 
state-of-the-science symposia, request for applications, and 
facilitating access to human tissues, to stimulate a broad 
range of clinical and basic LAM research. The Committee 
understands that recent scientific findings have presented new 
treatment approaches for clinical testing, and that 
experimental drug trials have begun. The Committee encourages 
the support of extramural phase I and phase II clinical 
treatment trials to capitalize on the LAM patient populations 
that NHLBI and the Rare Lung Disease Consortium have assembled. 
The Committee is also aware of the potential benefit of 
establishing regional LAM centers, and suggests NHLBI consider 
supporting these activities.
    Marfan Syndrome.--The Committee commends NHLBI for its 
strong support of research on Marfan syndrome, particularly the 
Pediatric Heart Network clinical trial involving a medication 
for high blood pressure. The Committee encourages the Institute 
to continue to prioritize support for this promising research 
in 2010 and work to advance additional research related to 
aortic aneurysms, including studies of surgical outcomes for 
procedures to repair compromised aortas and valves.
    Obesity.--NHLBI, along with NIDDK, first published 
guidelines on the identification, evaluation, and treatment of 
overweight and obesity for the adult population in 1998. In the 
11 years since the guidelines were published, a great deal of 
scientific advancement has occurred in the areas of 
identification, prevention, management, and treatment of this 
disease. Yet the obesity guidelines have not been updated to 
reflect new evidence and practice. The Committee believes NIH's 
obesity guidelines should be updated and re-issued. Although 
NHLBI began the process of updating the clinical guidelines in 
September, 2008, it remains unclear when the guidelines will 
actually be published. The Committee encourages NIH to update 
the obesity guidelines to ensure the most up-to-date, effective 
management and treatment of overweight and obesity are 
available to help healthcare professionals, as well as families 
and communities, address the challenges associated with the 
obesity epidemic confronting the nation.
    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH).--The Committee commends NHLBI 
for its strong leadership on pulmonary hypertension (PH). The 
Committee continues to encourage the Institute to work with the 
PH community to support the establishment of a Pulmonary 
Hypertension Clinical Research Network to expand clinical 
trials and facilitate collaboration and data sharing among PH 
investigators.
    Sickle Cell Disease.--The NHLBI research program on sickle 
cell disease is a core program that has advanced physicians' 
understanding of how to diagnose, treat, and manage this 
chronic blood disease. The Committee encourages NHLBI to 
strengthen its funding for the Basic and Translational Research 
Program in sickle cell disease. The Committee takes note of 
NHLBI's Request for Information to identify sites with 
sufficient research infrastructure and patient population to 
undertake clinical studies in hemoglobinopathies with an 
emphasis on sickle cell disease and thalassemia. This research 
network, along with the surveillance system and disease 
registry under development with CDC, will improve knowledge and 
lead to better treatments for sickle cell disease and other 
hemaglobinopathies.
    Sleep Disorder Research.--The Committee applauds the 
Institute's investment in sleep-related research through the 
National Center on Sleep Disorders Research. The Committee 
notes the growing understanding of the link between sleep and 
cardiovascular health and encourages further research to better 
understand and modify the link between sleep disorders and 
cardiovascular disease.
    Thalassemia.--Thalassemia, or Cooley's anemia, is a fatal 
genetic blood disease. NHLBI has operated the Thalassemia 
Clinical Research Network for nine years to advance the science 
of treating this disease. The Committee strongly encourages 
NHLBI to renew its focus on thalassemia, which has implications 
for other blood-related disorders.

         National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

    Mission.--The mission of NIDCR is to improve the Nation's 
oral, dental and craniofacial health through research, research 
training, and the dissemination of health information. NIDCR 
accomplishes its mission by performing and supporting basic and 
clinical research; conducting and funding research training and 
career development programs to ensure that there is an adequate 
number of talented, well-prepared, and diverse investigators; 
coordinating and assisting relevant research and research-
related activities among all sectors of the research community; 
and promoting the timely transfer of knowledge gained from 
research and its implications for health to the public, health 
professionals, researchers, and policy-makers.

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Mission.--NIDDK supports research in three major disease 
categories: diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic diseases; 
digestive diseases and nutrition; and kidney, urologic, and 
hematologic diseases. NIDDK supports a coordinated program of 
fundamental and clinical research and demonstration projects 
relating to the causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of 
diseases within these categories. The Institute also supports 
efforts to transfer the knowledge gained from its research 
program to health professionals, patients, and the general 
public.
    Digestive Diseases.--Diseases of the digestive system 
continue to affect more than one-half of all Americans at some 
time in their lives. The Committee urges NIDDK to prioritize 
and begin to implement the recommendations of the recently 
completed Long-Range Research Plan for Digestive Diseases 
produced by the National Commission on Digestive Diseases. The 
Committee is pleased that irritable bowel syndrome has been 
included in the action plan. The Committee also encourages 
NIDDK to establish an advisory body to guide the implementation 
of the recommendations of the Commission on a long-term basis.
    Genetics of Diabetic Kidney Disease.--The Committee 
recognizes NIDDK for supporting studies to identify the genetic 
factors that make some diabetic patients more susceptible to 
kidney disease. The Committee encourages NIDDK to develop 
programs to translate this new knowledge into therapies to 
treat and prevent kidney disease.
    Genetics of Type 1 Diabetes.--The Committee commends NIDDK 
for its management of the International Type 1 Diabetes 
Genetics Consortium, which has taken a lead role in providing 
data and samples to investigators for studies to understand the 
genetic causes of type 1 diabetes.
    Glomerular Disease Research.--Focal segmental 
glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome are serious 
glomerular diseases that have a disproportionate impact on 
children and young adults. The Committee urges NIDDK to 
continue to strengthen the glomerular disease research 
portfolio through collaboration with other NIH institutes and 
centers. The Committee continues to be interested in the 
establishment of a national patient registry on glomerular 
disease.
    Hemophilia and Hepatitis C.--The Committee understands that 
hepatitis C (HCV) continues to have a devastating impact on the 
hemophilia population, with nearly half of all persons with 
hemophilia having contracted HCV, and many of these individuals 
co-infected with HIV. The Committee encourages NIDDK to pursue 
research initiatives on co-infection and the progression of 
liver disease in this population.
    Hepatitis B.--The Committee notes that NIDDK has responded 
to the challenges surrounding the management of chronic 
hepatitis B by establishing a Hepatitis B Clinical Research 
Network and by conducting a Consensus Development Conference on 
the management and treatment of hepatitis B. The Committee 
encourages the Hepatitis B Clinical Research Network to 
increase its focus on pregnant women and pediatric cases of 
hepatitis B and further urges that a research plan be developed 
to address the research priorities identified by the Consensus 
Development Conference. In particular, better understanding of 
the nature of the different clinical categories of hepatitis B 
and of fibrosis and cirrhosis are needed. New medical 
interventions for management of hepatitis B and the diseases 
with which it is associated, including fibrosis and cirrhosis, 
are also needed.
    Hepatitis C.--The Committee urges a continuing focus on the 
development of new treatments for hepatitis C and notes that 
without new medical interventions the projected direct and 
indirect costs of hepatitis C will be more than $85,000,000,000 
over the next 10 years.
    Incontinence.--The Committee is pleased that NIDDK 
collaborated with NICHD and the Office of Medical Applications 
of Research on a state-of-the-science conference on 
incontinence. The Committee urges the Institute to prioritize 
and begin to implement the recommendations of this conference.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).--The Committee commends 
NIDDK for its leadership on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) 
and encourages the institute to strengthen its support for 
genetic and clinical IBD research and other opportunities 
outlined in the research agenda, Challenges in Inflammatory 
Bowel Disease. The Committee particularly encourages NIDDK to 
support pediatric IBD research.
    Kidney Disease.--The Committee is aware of the increasingly 
high prevalence of kidney disease in the American population. 
The Committee also recognizes that while research has led to 
various treatments to slow the progression of the disease, 
there is currently no cure. The Committee urges NIDDK to 
prioritize research on the disease's relationship with its 
leading causes, particularly diabetes, hypertension, and 
obesity; methods for prevention; and effective therapies that 
improve mortality statistics. In particular, the Committee also 
urges NIDDK to prioritize investigator-initiated research that 
studies: acute kidney injury, diabetic nephropathy, glomerular 
disease, hypertension, transplantation, and kidney-related 
cardiovascular toxicity. Additional work is required to (1) 
develop new disease biomarkers and imaging technologies which 
are critical for the management of kidney diseases, (2) 
implement necessary infrastructure for disease-specific 
registries and clinical trials networks to better allow 
investigators to bridge the gap from the bench to the bedside, 
and (3) track data on patient race and ethnicity to understand 
the disparities related to morbidity and mortality of kidney 
disease among underrepresented minority patients.
    Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD).--The Committee encourages 
NIDDK to work via the NIH Program on Public-Private 
Partnerships to support the establishment of PKD diagnostic and 
clinical treatment centers for treating PKD patients and 
overseeing clinical trials. These centers should work in 
collaboration with clinical and translational science awards 
and PKD Centers of Excellence to ensure that PKD patients can 
participate in promising clinical trials and pilot studies. The 
Committee encourages NIDDK to also facilitate the establishment 
of a centralized facility for the volumetric analysis of kidney 
images, PKD genotyping and surrogate marker analysis.
    The Committee urges NIDDK to maintain its support of 
clinical trials and the PKD Diagnostic and Clinical Treatment 
Centers. The Committee encourages NIDDK to convene a blue 
ribbon panel to plan the future strategic direction of PKD 
research, to expand the number of PKD researchers, and 
implement best practices in order to strengthen current 
efforts. The Committee also encourages NIDDK to consider the 
feasibility of establishing a core repository of laboratory 
animals for renal cystic diseases like PKD, which will help 
lower research costs and enhance scientific discoveries in this 
area of translational research.
    Thalassemia.--The Committee urges NIDDK to play a 
significant role in the Thalassemia Clinical Research Network 
because the iron chelation and non-invasive iron measurement 
issues addressed by the institute are important to the quality 
of life of thalassemia patients.
    Type 1 Diabetes Clinical Trials.--The Committee urges NIDDK 
to continue to expand the pipeline of new therapies being 
tested by the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet. Implementing the 
sharing of study samples and data fosters mechanistic and 
clinical research aimed at understanding how these drugs work, 
so they can be optimized to reduce side effects and to benefit 
all patient populations.
    Type 1 Diabetes Research Biosamples.--The Committee 
commends NIDDK for establishing biorepositories to house data 
and biological specimens collected by studies such as the 
international Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium [T1DGC], the 
Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young [TEDDY] 
Study, and the natural history study of TrialNet. The Committee 
urges NIDDK to widely advertise the availability of samples to 
the diabetes research community, ensure that the 
biorepositories implement efficient procedures to rapidly 
disseminate those samples to qualified researchers, and develop 
policies to expedite the availability of samples from other 
clinical trials in type 1 diabetes.

        National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

    Mission.--NINDS supports and conducts basic, translational, 
and clinical neurological research and research training to 
increase understanding of the brain and improve the prevention 
and treatment of neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The 
NINDS mission encompasses over 600 disorders, including stroke, 
head and spinal cord injury, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and 
neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT).--The Committee commends NINDS 
for its recent efforts to advance understanding and development 
of therapies for CMT and related neurodegenerative diseases. 
NIH has undertaken an innovative partnership with a voluntary 
health association involving high throughput screens to 
identify candidate treatments that will quickly be brought to 
clinical trials. The Committee supports this effort and 
believes that such translational research has the greatest 
potential to rapidly develop therapies for patients with CMT 
and other degenerative disorders. The Committee encourages 
NINDS to develop innovative communications mechanisms to ensure 
that information on treatments can be shared in an accurate and 
timely manner with practitioners and patients.
    Chiari.--The Committee recognizes that a research 
conference titled ``Chiari Malformation: State of the Research 
and New Directions'' was convened in November 2008 to identify 
the current state of knowledge and to identify key areas of 
research. The Committee encourages aggressive measures toward 
implementing these recommendations, including but not limited 
to: using advanced engineering and imaging analysis to develop 
an objective diagnostic test for symptomatic Chiari, 
understanding the genetic basis of Chiari, and increasing focus 
on pediatric patients including symptoms, optimal treatments, 
and quality of life issues. The Committee requests NINDS to 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate by April 30, 2010 
detailing its progress.
    Dystonia.--The Committee continues to support research on 
treatment regarding the neurological movement disorder, 
dystonia, and recommends that NINDS consider updating the 
recent program announcement on dystonia research.
    Epilepsy.--Epilepsy affects the lives of more than 3 
million Americans and their families. The Committee applauds 
NINDS for hosting the ``Curing Epilepsy 2007'' conference that 
has resulted in community-determined benchmarks designed to 
fast-forward the progress of finding a cure for epilepsy. While 
recognizing that NINDS is working toward advancement of a cure 
through all of the benchmarks, the Committee is particularly 
interested in three areas of epilepsy research and encourages 
NINDS to focus attention on grants and mechanisms that address 
epileptogenesis, co-morbidities, and sudden unexplained death 
in epilepsy.
    Epilepsy often occurs as the result of changes in the brain 
following a head trauma. Such trauma is prevalent in soldiers 
who suffer traumatic brain injury, which leads to post-
traumatic epilepsy in subsequent months. Epileptogenesis 
research on the origin of this disorder can lead to new 
approaches to preventing epilepsy and its progression through 
new insights for treating post-traumatic epilepsy both on and 
off the battlefield.
    Epilepsy is often accompanied by other neurological 
conditions such as stroke, Alzheimer's and autism. By 
understanding that epilepsy is not just an isolated condition 
causing seizures but may be the connection among various 
cognitive disorders, researchers can study co-morbidities and 
address the problem of senior citizens experiencing seizures 
for the first time.
    The Committee encourages researchers to study family 
history, interactions with medications, and create animal 
models to help solve the mysteries of sudden unexplained death 
in epilepsy and prevent death from seizures. The Committee 
recognizes that clinical researchers are needed to carry out 
trials and studies to test findings and further develop the 
research initiatives from the Curing Epilepsy 2007 conference. 
The Committee encourages NINDS to provide sufficient support to 
carry out such clinical research.
    Familial dysautonomia (FD).--The Committee commends NIH for 
supporting research that has led to progress in FD-related 
genetic therapy and animal models, and encourages NINDS to 
place a high priority on basic, clinical and translational 
research that could lead to advances in medical outcomes for 
people suffering from FD. The Committee is concerned that 
people suffering from rare autonomic disorders, and 
specifically people suffering from FD, continue to face 
premature mortality and severe morbidity. Despite recent 
advances in FD life expectancy, the Committee believes that 
more research is needed to better understand the underlying 
mechanisms of this disease, to develop more effective 
treatments, and to prevent or slow down the degenerative 
effects of FD.
    Headache Disorders.--The Committee urges NINDS to: (1) 
solicit grant applications for fundamental and translational 
research on headache disorders with Requests for Applications, 
and (2) recruit new investigators with career training and 
transition awards. The Committee encourages NINDS to establish 
a screening program for therapies for headache disorders 
comparable in scope to the Anticonvulsant Screening Program. 
The Committee commends NINDS for recently initiating a process 
towards defining Headache Disorders Research Benchmarks and 
requests a report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate on the progress of this 
program by December 1, 2009.
    Hypoglycemia.--The Committee recognizes NINDS's efforts to 
organize a workshop of leading experts to identify the 
challenges and opportunities for preventing episodes of 
dangerously low blood-sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Hypoglycemic 
episodes affect the majority of people with diabetes, and the 
threat and incidence of hypoglycemia is a major limiting factor 
in intensive glucose control. The Committee requests that NINDS 
consider a pilot study to improve the understanding of 
hypoglycemia.
    Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome (OMS).--OMS is a rare, 
autoimmune disorder that targets the brain. In childhood it is 
associated with neuroblastoma of the chest, abdomen or pelvis. 
Besides the symptoms of involuntary eye movements, 
tremulousness, muscle jerks, and gait disorder, the patients 
have rages, inability to sleep, and may become mute and unable 
to sit or stand. Permanent problems in motor control, language 
development, behavior and cognition--even mental retardation--
are common. The available treatment options for OMS are 
extremely limited. The Committee urges NINDS to accelerate 
research efforts to identify OMS susceptibility genes and 
biomarkers, and to develop innovative immunotherapeutic 
strategies. The Committee also encourages NINDS to develop 
grant opportunities to support further research and to work 
with private associations in NIH sponsored workshops on OMS.
    Peripheral and Autonomic Neuropathy.--NINDS is urged to 
consider renewing its focus on methods to prevent and treat 
nerve damage due to disease, especially diabetes.
    Stroke.--The Committee encourages NINDS to expand current 
stroke studies and related activities, support new stroke 
initiatives, and to implement priorities in its Stroke Progress 
Review Group Report.

         National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Mission.--NIAID supports and conducts basic, applied, and 
clinical research and research training programs in infectious, 
immunologic, and allergic diseases. NIAID-supported research 
includes research on HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, sexually 
transmitted infections, neglected tropical diseases, emerging 
and re-emerging infectious diseases, asthma, allergic and 
autoimmune diseases, and transplantation. The goals of NIAID 
research are to increase understanding of disease pathogenesis 
and the immune system, to improve disease diagnosis, to develop 
new and improved drugs to treat such diseases, and to develop 
new and improved vaccines and other approaches to prevent such 
diseases, many of which significantly affect public health.
    The Committee includes bill language transferring 
$500,000,000 from the Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund 
advance appropriation provided in the Department of Homeland 
Security Appropriations Act, 2004, to the appropriation for 
NIAID. The Committee notes that the Project BioShield program 
has encountered great difficulty in procuring medical 
countermeasures. Without significant increased investment in 
early stage development through NIAID programs and later stage 
advanced research and development through the Biomedical 
Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), products 
cannot move along the development pipeline to be procured 
through Project BioShield. This investment of the Reserve Fund 
in NIAID is essential to jumpstart Project BioShield's 
activities. 
    Antimicrobial Resistance Research.--The Committee is 
encouraged by NIAID's commitment to a wide range of research 
addressing antimicrobial resistance--the development of 
antimicrobials and diagnostics for drug-resistant bacteria and 
parasites, partnerships for development of vaccines for 
selected pathogens, in vitro assessments for antimicrobial 
activity, and targeted clinical trials. The Committee 
encourages NIAID to consider additional opportunities to 
advance research related to antimicrobial resistance and 
related product development.
    Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (TB).--Drug-resistant TB is on 
the rise globally, with 500,000 cases reported in 2006. Without 
the development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines, the 
number of people with drug-resistant TB will continue to 
increase. The Committee encourages NIAID to intensify research 
into developing new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines to halt the 
spread of drug-resistant TB.
    Hepatitis B.--The Committee supports NIAID's plans to fund 
experimental models of hepatitis B (HBV) and to continue 
support for a specialized animal model of hepatitis virus. The 
Committee notes that NIAID has effectively responded to the 
challenges surrounding the management of other infectious 
diseases with specific programs and networks, and suggests the 
same be done for HBV. The Committee understands that although 
there are now a number of medications approved for the 
treatment of HBV, they are of limited therapeutic value since 
most of them target the same virus functions. The Committee 
encourages NIAID to support research on different courses of 
treatment as well as ways to identify new cellular and 
antiviral targets. In addition, the Committee believes that 
special attention to the problems associated with co-infections 
of hepatitis B with hepatitis C and HIV is needed.
    Immune Tolerance Network (ITN).--The Committee commends 
NIAID for its oversight of ITN, which designs and conducts 
clinical trials of new immune-modulating therapies for Type 1 
diabetes and other diseases. The Committee encourages NIAID to 
implement the sharing of samples and data from these trials, in 
order to expedite the development of new therapies for Type 1 
diabetes.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).--The Committee encourages 
NIAID to accelerate its inflammatory bowel disease research 
portfolio and explore partnerships with the IBD community aimed 
at fostering additional research on the role of the immune 
system in the development and progression of IBD in both adult 
and pediatric populations.
    Malaria.--The Committee encourages NIAID to strengthen its 
support for public-private partnerships involved in the 
research and development of antimalarial drugs, and 
particularly notes the activities of the Medicines for Malaria 
Venture (MMV). The Committee is aware that NIAID-funded 
scientists recently decoded the genome of Plasmodium vivax, the 
malaria-causing parasite most common in Asia and Latin America. 
This achievement is expected to significantly advance 
scientific understanding in several areas key to malaria 
control and prevention, including drug resistance. The 
Committee urges NIAID to continue this work and help to ensure 
that new tools are available when current interventions begin 
to lose their effectiveness.
    Microbicides.--Encouraging results from a recent NIH 
Microbicide Trials Network safety and effectiveness study of 
particular microbicide candidate showed that the product was 
safe and approximately 30 percent effective in preventing HIV 
infection. While data from this study are not definitive and 
results from additional trials are needed to confirm the 
findings, this study supports the concept that a microbicide 
could prevent HIV infection. The Committee urges NIH to work 
with USAID, CDC, and other appropriate agencies to develop 
processes for coordinated investment and prioritization for 
microbicide development, approval, and access.
    Scleroderma.--The Committee is aware of emerging 
opportunities in scleroderma research and continues to 
encourage the Institute to partner with the scleroderma patient 
community in convening a state-of-the-science conference in 
this important area.

             National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Mission.--NIGMS supports research and research training in 
the basic biomedical sciences. Institute grantees, working in 
such fields as cell biology, biophysics, genetics, 
developmental biology, pharmacology, physiology, biological 
chemistry, bioinformatics, and computational biology study 
normal biological processes to better understand what goes 
wrong when disease occurs. In this way, NIGMS supports the 
development of new knowledge, theories, and technologies that 
can then be applied to the disease-targeted studies supported 
by other NIH components. NIGMS-supported basic research 
advances also find applications in the biotechnology and 
pharmaceutical industries. The Institute's training programs 
help provide the scientists needed by industry and academia. 
NIGMS also has programs to increase the diversity of the 
biomedical workforce.

  Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human 
                              Development

    Mission.--The NICHD conducts and supports basic, 
translational, and clinical research and training on the 
reproductive, developmental, and behavioral processes that 
determine and maintain--and rehabilitation that restores and 
improves--the health and well-being of children, adults, 
families and populations.
    Demographic Research.--The Committee encourages NICHD to 
continue its support of trans-NIH behavioral and social science 
research initiatives on disasters and health outcomes to 
develop more data on the consequences of disasters on the 
health of children and vulnerable groups. Further, the 
Committee encourages NICHD to continue its investment in large-
scale data sets, such as the New Immigrant Study and National 
Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, because of their value 
and accessibility to researchers worldwide. Finally, the 
Committee encourages NICHD to continue research on how the 
structure and characteristics of the work environment affect 
child and family health and well-being and how health and well-
being in the early years affect health and well-being later in 
life.
    Developmental Disabilities Research Centers.--The Committee 
recognizes the important contributions of the Eunice Kennedy 
Shriver Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research 
Centers (IDDRC) toward understanding why child development goes 
awry, discovering ways to prevent developmental disabilities, 
and discovering treatments and interventions to improve the 
lives of people with developmental disabilities and their 
families. The Committee is particularly pleased with IDDRC 
contributions in the areas of autism, fragile X syndrome, Down 
syndrome and other genetic and environmentally induced 
disorders. The Committee urges NICHD to strengthen its support 
of the IDDRCs so that they can conduct basic and translational 
research to develop effective prevention, treatment and 
intervention strategies for children and adults with 
developmental disabilities.
    Fetal Origins of Adult Disease.--Research suggests that an 
inadequate prenatal environment may permanently alter and 
program the fetus for the onset of many diseases later in life, 
including hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and 
obesity, as well as psychiatric and behavioral disorders. The 
Committee encourages NICHD to focus on efforts to improve 
pregnancy, pregnancy outcomes and ultimately improve the long-
term health of the nation by predicting and preventing the 
onset of these chronic diseases.
    First Pregnancy Complications.--The Committee commends 
NICHD for identifying complications in first pregnancies as an 
important area requiring further research. This understudied 
group of women is at highest risk of developing preeclampsia, 
which puts them at risk for multiple devastating maternal 
complications, fetal death and preterm delivery. In the last 
decade, the rate of preterm births among first pregnancies 
increased 50 percent. The Committee encourages NICHD to move 
forward with initiatives to identify predictors and 
interventions to improve the outcome for first pregnancies and 
to lower the risks in subsequent pregnancies.
    Healthy babies.--The Committee encourages NICHD to continue 
its research to pinpoint the connections and causations between 
maternal obesity, diabetes, and heart disease and low 
birthweight babies, as well as other likely causes of poor 
infant health.
    Late Preterm Births.--The Committee is aware that preterm 
birth rates continue to rise, reaching over 12 percent, and 
that the largest component of those births is in the late 
preterm birth category (deliveries between 34 and 37 weeks of 
gestation). The Committee understands that morbidity is 
significant for the babies, including respiratory 
complications, difficulty transitioning after delivery, and 
feeding issues. The Committee encourages NICHD to strengthen 
its research efforts to understand the causes of late preterm 
births and to facilitate research into better management and 
identification of interventions for their prevention. The 
Committee applauds NICHD for planning and conducting the 
Surgeon Generals' Conference on Preterm Birth. The Committee 
encourages NICHD to support research on preterm birth as 
outlined in the research agenda produced at the Conference.
    Maternal Fetal Medicine Units Network (MFMU).--The MFMU has 
changed obstetrical practice by identifying new therapies and 
identifying practices that are not useful. The Committee 
encourages NICHD to vigorously support the MFMU so that 
therapies and preventive strategies that have significant 
impact on the health of mothers and their babies will not be 
delayed.
    Pregnancy Effects on Pancreatic Beta Cells.--During 
pregnancy, functional pancreatic beta cell mass increases in 
the mother to meet the increased metabolic demands associated 
with pregnancy. An inadequate expansion of functional beta cell 
mass may contribute to gestational diabetes. Insights into the 
mechanisms underlying the increased beta cell response may lead 
to new therapeutic directions for treatment of gestational 
diabetes, and also provide important insights into the 
biochemical signals and pathways promoting beta cell function. 
By understanding these mechanisms and pathways, insights will 
be gained that may help design therapies to expand, maintain or 
restore beta cell mass in gestational diabetes and potentially 
all major forms of diabetes. NIDDK and NICHD are encouraged to 
work together to promote research to explore the effects of 
pregnancy on beta-cell growth and function.

                         National Eye Institute

    Mission.--NEI conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research, research training, and other programs with respect to 
blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual 
function, preservation of sight, and the special health 
problems and needs of individuals who are visually-impaired or 
blind. In addition, NEI is responsible for the dissemination of 
information, specifically public and professional education 
programs aimed at the prevention of blindness.
    Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD).--The Committee 
commends NEI for its trans-institute research into the cause, 
prevention, and treatment of AMD, the nation's leading cause of 
blindness. The Committee is pleased that NEI plans initial 
safety trials of a protective version of the gene variant as a 
means to treat and even preempt the disease. The Committee also 
recognizes NEI research into a protein pathway as another means 
to prevent and reverse AMD. The Committee applauds NEI for the 
ongoing work in the second phase of its Age-related Eye Disease 
Study, in which additional dietary supplements are being 
studied to determine whether they demonstrate or enhance 
protective effects against the progression to advanced AMD.

          National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

    Mission.--The mission of NIEHS is to prevent and reduce the 
burden of human illness and disability by understanding how the 
environment influences the development and progression of human 
disease. In addition, NIEHS is responsible for the research of 
the National Toxicology Program whose mission is to coordinate 
toxicity testing across the Federal government and to evaluate 
substances of public health concern.
    Endocrine Disruptors.--Increasing evidence suggests that 
numerous chemicals, both natural and man-made, may interfere 
with the endocrine system at all stages of life and produce 
adverse effects in humans. The Committee is concerned about the 
lack of research relating to the dangers of endocrine-
disrupting chemicals in the home, workplace, schools, and 
indoor and outdoor recreational environments. The Committee 
encourages NIEHS, in conjunction with the National Toxicology 
Program, to support, directly or by grant or cooperative 
agreement, state-of-the-art studies to increase efforts to 
understand the true nature and scope of the impact of endocrine 
disruptors. This research should address areas related to 
neurobiology, behavior and reproduction.
    Translational Research.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of translational research programs and applauds 
NIEHS's investment in clinical research through the Disease 
Investigation Through Specialized Clinically-Oriented Ventures 
in Environmental Research program.

                      National Institute on Aging

    Mission.--NIA supports and conducts biomedical, social and 
behavioral research, training, and health information 
dissemination with respect to the aging process and the 
diseases and other special problems and needs of older 
Americans.
    Alzheimer's Disease.--An estimated 2.4 to 5.1 million 
Americans suffer from Alzheimer's disease. As the baby boom 
generation ages, the number of persons affected is projected to 
grow to 7.7 million by 2030 and as many as 13.2 million by 
2050. The Committee encourages NIA to accelerate the 
translation of basic research findings into clinical studies 
and human trials, and to fully implement a study of individuals 
who are genetically predisposed to develop early-onset 
Alzheimer's disease. NIA is urged to work closely with NINDS 
and NIMH in these efforts.
    Demographic and Economic Research.--The Committee is aware 
that in 2010 NIA will be making five-year awards as part of its 
Demography of Aging Centers and Roybal Centers for Research on 
Applied Gerontology programs. If enough high quality 
applications are received, the Committee encourages the 
Institute, with support from its funding partners, to consider 
expanding the program. In addition, the Committee encourages 
NIA to increase the minority sample size of the Health and 
Retirement Study to understand the impact of the economic 
downturn on pre-retirees and retirees in those groups.
    Hematology.--The Committee commends NIA for establishing a 
consortium of research centers focused on anemia of the 
elderly, with the goal of developing effective prevention and 
treatment strategies to reduce the burden of this disease.

 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

    Mission.--NIAMS conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research and research training, and the dissemination of health 
information on the more than 100 forms of arthritis; 
osteoporosis and other bone diseases; muscle biology and muscle 
diseases; orthopedic disorders, such as back pain and sports 
injuries; and numerous skin diseases.
    Arthritis.--The Committee encourages NIAMS to consider 
developing a national network of cooperating clinical centers 
for the care and study of children with arthritis. Federal 
funding of similar initiatives in childhood cancer have 
resulted in markedly improved outcomes, supporting the idea 
that participation in research protocols improves the standard 
for all children with cancer.
    Bone Loss.--The Committee urges NIAMS to support research 
into the pathophysiology of bone loss in diverse populations in 
order to develop targeted therapies to improve bone density, 
bone quality and bone strength. The Committee also encourages 
NIAMS to support research in the assessment of 
microarchitecture and bone remodeling rates to more accurately 
determine fracture risk, as well as anabolic approaches to 
increase bone mass, novel molecular and cell-based therapies 
for bone and cartilage regeneration.
    Lupus.--The Committee urges NIAMS to strengthen support for 
research on the causes of and cures for lupus, a life-altering 
disease that affects women, men and children, but 
disproportionately women in the 15- to 44-year old age range 
and people of color. Further research is needed to expand 
knowledge on a possible genetic link and conditions that may 
trigger the disease, as well as on the disease's effect on 
specific organs.
    Marfan Syndrome.--The Committee encourages NIAMS to 
strengthen its support for collaborative, multi-investigator 
research related to Marfan syndrome and to collaborate with 
NHLBI in support of the Pediatric Heart Network's clinical 
trial on Marfan syndrome.
    Musculoskeletal Conditions.--The Committee notes that 
musculoskeletal conditions are among the most disabling and 
costly conditions suffered by Americans. These diseases affect 
over 107 million Americans, with females suffering a higher 
rate of occurrence than males. The Committee encourages NIAMS 
to focus research on women and musculoskeletal conditions, 
including research on gender differences. The Committee 
requests that NIAMS provide a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
by September 30, 2010 on its plans to sharpen its research 
focus into women and musculoskeletal conditions. This report 
should include the number of grants made that specify research 
into gender differences in these conditions.

    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

    Mission.--NIDCD funds and conducts research in human 
communication. Included in its program areas are research and 
research training in the normal and disordered mechanisms of 
hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. The 
Institute addresses special biomedical and behavioral problems 
associated with people who have communication impairments or 
disorders. In addition, NIDCD is actively involved in health 
promotion and disease prevention, dissemination of research 
results, and supports efforts to create devices that substitute 
for lost and impaired sensory and communication functions.
    Tinnitus.--The Committee is aware that the incidence of 
tinnitus continues to increase and that tinnitus remains the 
number one service-connected disability for returning military 
personnel. Because tinnitus research will benefit all 
populations, the Committee remains interested in a multi-
disciplinary approach to promote accurate diagnosis and 
treatment for tinnitus. The Committee encourages NIDCD to move 
ahead with a collaborative research initiative with the 
Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs 
and requests an update on the progress of such efforts in the 
FY 2011 budget justification report.

                 National Institute of Nursing Research

    Mission.--NINR supports and conducts scientific research 
and research training to reduce the burden of illness and 
disability; improve health-related quality of life; enhance 
end-of-life and palliative care; and establish better 
approaches to promote health and prevent disease.

           National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    Mission.--NIAAA supports research to generate new knowledge 
to answer crucial questions about why people drink; why some 
individuals are vulnerable to alcohol dependence or alcohol-
related diseases and others are not; the relationship between 
genetic and environmental factors involved in alcoholism; the 
mechanisms whereby alcohol produces its disabling effects, 
including organ damage; how to prevent alcohol abuse and 
associated damage, especially in the underage population; and 
how alcoholism treatment can be improved. NIAAA addresses these 
questions through a program of biomedical, behavioral, and 
epidemiologic research on alcoholism, alcohol abuse, and 
related problems.
    Underage Drinking Research.--The Committee continues to 
encourage NIAAA to study alcohol advertising issues as an 
underage drinking prevention research priority. The Committee 
requests a description for the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House of Representatives and the Senate of NIAAA's plans to 
conduct such research, as well as a detailed breakdown of 
NIAAA's research activity in the area of underage drinking 
prevention by subject area by February 1, 2010.

                    National Institute on Drug Abuse

    Mission.--NIDA-supported science addresses questions about 
drug abuse and addiction, which range from its causes and 
consequences to its prevention and treatment. NIDA research 
explores how drugs of abuse affect the brain and behavior and 
develops effective prevention and treatment strategies. The 
institute works to ensure the transfer of scientific data to 
policymakers, practitioners, and the public.
    Pulmonary Hypertension.--The Committee continues to note 
with concern a significant increase in the number of pulmonary 
hypertension diagnoses related to the abuse of methamphetamine. 
The Committee encourages NIDA, in partnership with the 
pulmonary hypertension community, to initiate appropriate 
research and awareness activities focused on this growing 
public health problem.
    Reducing Health Disparities.--The Committee notes that the 
consequences of drug abuse disproportionately impact 
minorities, especially African American populations, and is 
pleased to learn that NIDA continues to encourage researchers 
to conduct more studies in this population, particularly in 
geographic areas where HIV/AIDS is high and/or growing among 
African Americans, including in criminal justice settings.

                  National Institute of Mental Health

    Mission.--NIMH is responsible for basic and clinical 
research to improve diagnosis, treatments, and overall quality 
of care for persons with mental illnesses. Disorders of high 
priority to NIMH include schizophrenia; depression and manic 
depressive illness; obsessive-compulsive disorder; anxiety 
disorders and other mental and behavioral disorders that occur 
across the lifespan, which include childhood mental disorders 
such as autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; 
eating disorders; and other illnesses. NIMH supports and 
conducts fundamental research in neuroscience, genetics, and 
behavioral science. In addition to laboratory and controlled 
clinical studies, the NIMH supports research on the mental 
health needs of special populations and health services 
research.
    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).--The Committee 
encourages NIMH to convene a panel of experts to make 
recommendations for enhancing development and dissemination of 
early detection tools, effective treatments and family 
education for BPD, and requests that NIMH submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate by April 1, 2010 detailing 
NIMH's plans to strengthen its programs for BPD.

                National Human Genome Research Institute

    Mission.--NHGRI provides leadership for the development of 
resources and technology to accelerate genome research and its 
application to human health. NHGRI-supported activities include 
basic and translational research to understand the sequence and 
function of both human and non-human genomes, human genetic 
variation, and the genetic and environmental basis of disease. 
Also central to NHGRI research goals are training programs and 
a strong focus on the ethical, legal, and social implications 
of genomic science and medicine.

      National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

    Mission.--The NIBIB mission is to improve human health by 
leading the development and accelerating the application of 
biomedical technologies. The Institute is committed to 
integrating the engineering and physical sciences with the life 
sciences to advance basic research and medical care.

                 National Center for Research Resources

    Mission.--NCRR provides laboratory scientists and clinical 
researchers with environments and tools that they can use to 
prevent, detect, and treat a wide range of diseases. This 
support enables discoveries that begin at the molecular and 
cellular level, move to animal-based studies, and then are 
translated to patient-oriented clinical research, resulting in 
cures and treatments for both common and rare diseases. NCRR 
connects researchers with each other and with patients and 
communities across the nation to bring the power of shared 
resources and research to improve human health.
    Within the $10,400,000,000 provided for NIH in the Recovery 
Act, $1,300,000,000 was allocated for NCRR for fiscal years 
2009 and 2010--$1,000,000,000 for extramural facility 
construction and renovation and $300,000,000 for shared 
instrumentation grants.
    Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSAs).--For the 
CTSA program, the Committee assumes the same funding level and 
budget allocation between NCRR and the Common Fund as in the 
budget request. The Committee is pleased with the progress of 
the CTSA program and urges NCRR to continue to support the 
implementation of this initiative consistent with the plan 
outlined in the budget justification. The Committee is pleased 
that the K-30 Clinical Research Curriculum Awards mechanism has 
been continued for those institutions that have not yet 
received a CTSA Award.

       National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Mission.--NCCAM was established to stimulate, develop, and 
support rigorous and relevant research of high quality and 
open, objective inquiry into the safety and effectiveness of 
complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices and to 
train individuals to apply the tools of exacting science to CAM 
systems and modalities in order to provide health care 
professionals and the American public with reliable information 
about these practices.

       National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

    Mission.--NCMHD conducts and supports research, training, 
information dissemination, and other programs aimed at reducing 
the disproportionately high incidence and prevalence of 
disease, burden of illness and mortality experienced by certain 
American populations, including racial and ethnic minorities 
and other groups, such as the urban and rural poor, with 
disparate health status.
    Project EXPORT.--The Committee commends NCMHD for its 
successful Project EXPORT initiative and urges continued 
support for this important program.
    Research Endowment.--The Committee commends NCMHD for its 
leadership in addressing the longstanding problem of health 
status disparities in minority and medically underserved 
populations, and encourages NCMHD to continue its successful 
research endowment program as an ongoing initiative.

                  John E. Fogarty International Center

    Mission.--FIC was established to improve the health of the 
people of the United States and other nations through 
international collaborations in the biomedical sciences. In 
support of this mission, the FIC pursues the following four 
goals: (1) mobilize international research efforts against 
global health threats; (2) advance science through 
international cooperation; (3) develop human resources to meet 
global research challenges; and (4) provide leadership in 
international science policy and research strategies.
    Global Health Research Training and Workforce Capacity.--
The Committee commends FIC for its continuing work to 
strengthen biomedical research capacity in the developing 
world, and by doing so advancing the global efforts against 
malaria, neglected tropical diseases, and other health issues 
that disproportionately impact the developing world. The 
Committee is aware that having a trained and expert local 
workforce as well as a research infrastructure for them to use 
has significant benefits for efforts to research and combat 
diseases of global priority. The Committee recognizes that 
expanding in-country research capacity will complement 
associated United States efforts to improve global health, and 
strongly supports FIC's efforts to achieve these objectives.

                      National Library of Medicine

    Mission.--NLM collects, organizes, and disseminates 
information important to biomedicine; serves as a national 
information resource for medical education, research, and 
health service activities; enhances access to biomedical 
literature through electronic services; serves the public by 
providing electronic access to reliable health information for 
consumers; supports and directs the national network of 
libraries of medicine; provides grants for research in 
biomedical communications, medical library development, and 
training health information specialists; conducts and supports 
research in biomedical informatics and computational biology; 
and creates information resources for genomics, molecular 
biology, toxicology, medical images, environmental health, 
emergency preparedness and response, and health services 
research.

                         Office of the Director

    Mission.--OD provides leadership to the NIH research 
enterprise and coordinates and directs initiatives that cross-
cut NIH. OD is responsible for the development and management 
of intramural and extramural research and research training 
policy, the review of program quality and effectiveness, the 
coordination of selected NIH-wide program activities, and the 
administration of centralized support activities essential to 
the operations of NIH.
    The Committee includes bill language identifying 
$534,066,000 for the total support of the Common Fund.
    The Committee includes bill language within the Office of 
the Director account allocating $194,400,000 to continue the 
National Children's Study (NCS). The Committee is aware that 
the NCS is now projected to exceed its original budget by a 
substantial margin. The Committee believes NIH is prudent in 
taking the step to `pause' the research before initiating the 
full study in order to test in advance the feasibility, 
acceptability, and cost of each element. However, the Committee 
remains firmly committed to the NCS, believing it will provide 
important answers about the influence of the environment on 
children's health and development.
    The Committee continues bill language identifying 
$25,000,000 for flexible research authority modeled on the 
Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
    Six general provisions are included pertaining to NIH:
          
 The Committee rejects the Administration 
        proposal to limit salaries of researchers through an 
        NIH grant to not more than the rate of Executive Level 
        II and continues language (sec. 203) setting the limit 
        at Executive Level I.
          
 The Committee continues language (sec. 207) 
        to provide the Director of NIH, jointly with the 
        Director of the Office of AIDS Research, the authority 
        to transfer up to three percent of human 
        immunodeficiency virus research funding. The Committee 
        also continues a provision (sec. 208) to make NIH funds 
        available for human immunodeficiency virus research 
        available to the Office of AIDS Research.
          
 The Committee continues a provision (sec. 
        214) granting authority to the OD to support research 
        under the flexible research authority.
          
 The Committee continues language (sec. 216) 
        requested by the Administration permitting institutes 
        and centers to use their appropriation for renovation 
        and improvement of facilities, up to $2,500,000 per 
        project and up to a total of $35,000,000 across NIH.
          
 The Committee continues a provision (sec. 
        217) transferring one percent of funds made available 
        for National Research Service Awards to the Health 
        Resources and Services Administration and one percent 
        to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
    The Committee shares NIH's concern about the pipeline for 
new investigators and the prospect of researchers becoming so 
discouraged by repeated rejection of their applications that 
they leave the field. The Committee provides funding for the 
following programs to begin to address this problem:
          
 $102,000,000 funded through all the 
        institutes and centers for the Pathways to Independence 
        program to provide new investigators with mentored 
        grants that convert into independent research project 
        grants; and
          
 $80,000,000 through the Common Fund for the 
        New Innovator awards that provide first-time 
        independent award funding for a five-year period based 
        more on ideas than experimental data.
    The Committee does not provide funding for one-year Bridge 
awards for investigators who either are being considered for 
their first award renewal or have just missed the funding 
payline with no other sources of support. Funding provided in 
the Recovery Act has already addressed this need for fiscal 
years 2009 and 2010. The Administration did not request funding 
for this activity in the fiscal year 2010 budget.
    In line with its commitment to support new investigators, 
the Committee provides a two percent increase in research 
training stipends, which is only the third stipend increase in 
the last six years.
    The Committee believes the Director's Pioneer Awards are an 
effective tool to encourage high risk, transformative research 
and has provided $40,600,000 within the Common Fund for this 
purpose. The Committee also continues the Transformative R0-1 
Grants program, a high risk, high reward initiative first 
funded through the Common Fund in fiscal year 2009.
    Included within funding for the Office of the Director is 
$96,711,000 for radiological, nuclear and chemical 
countermeasures.
    The Committee assumes for the Clinical and Translational 
Research Award (CTSA) program the same funding level and the 
budget allocation between NCRR and the Common Fund as in the 
budget request.
    The Committee provides up to $10,000,000 for the Director's 
Discretionary Fund to respond to unanticipated, one-time 
scientific opportunities. The Committee requests notification 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate on a quarterly basis of any 
obligation of these funds.
    The Committee provides $24,000,000 to continue the 
Therapeutic Rare and Neglected Disease initiative. This trans-
NIH program will advance drug development for rare and 
neglected diseases and combat antibiotic resistance by 
leveraging the chemical genomic centers created through the 
Common Fund.
    The Committee provides $5,000,000 for the new bioethics 
research and training initiative proposed in the budget 
request, but funds it throughout the institutes and centers 
rather than in the Office of the Director. The Committee 
believes it is important to have each NIH entity engaged in the 
bioethics effort. However, the Committee expects the Office of 
the Director to maintain central oversight of this initiative.
    The Committee expects NIH to notify the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
each time the Director uses the one percent transfer authority 
provided in the NIH reauthorization.

Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives 
        (DPCPSI)

    The DPCPSI was established by the NIH reauthorization to 
coordinate and facilitate trans-NIH research initiatives and 
emerging areas of scientific opportunities and public health 
challenges. The Division houses the existing NIH offices of the 
Office of Research on Women's Health, the Office of AIDS 
Research, the Office of Dietary Supplements, the Office of 
Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, the Office of Rare 
Diseases, the Office of Disease Prevention, and the Office of 
Medical Applications Research. The DPCPSI is developing the new 
technology tool, the Research, Condition, and Disease 
Categorization system, to automate and standardize the 
categorization, coding and reporting process for public health 
areas of interest.

Office of Research on Women's Health

    The Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH) works in 
collaboration with the institutes and centers of NIH to promote 
and foster efforts to address gaps in knowledge related to 
women's health through the enhancement and expansion of funded 
research and/or the initiation of new investigative studies. 
ORWH is responsible for ensuring the inclusion of women in 
clinical research funded by NIH, including the development of a 
computerized tracking system and the implementation of 
guidelines on such inclusion. ORWH is also involved in 
promoting programs to increase the number of women in 
biomedical science careers, and in the development of women's 
health and gender factors as a focus in biology.
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).--The Committee is pleased 
with the increased focus on IBS at ORWH and encourages the 
Office to continue strengthening research on this prevalent 
functional gastrointestinal disorder.
    Vulvodynia.--The Committee encourages NIH to support the 
educational outreach campaign on vulvodynia, launched in 2007, 
to ensure that developed materials are more widely disseminated 
to the public, patient and medical communities. In addition, 
because five years have passed since the last NIH vulvodynia 
conference, the Committee requests that ORWH convene, with the 
support of relevant ICs, a research conference on vulvodynia 
during fiscal year 2010.

Office of AIDS Research

    The challenges posed by HIV/AIDS exceed the mission of any 
individual institute, and virtually every NIH institute and 
center is involved in conducting or supporting AIDS research. 
The Office of AIDS Research (OAR) was established in the 1993 
NIH Revitalization Act and given authorities to manage trans-
NIH research so that it would function essentially as an 
``institute without walls.'' OAR has the authority to plan, 
coordinate, and evaluate AIDS research, to set scientific 
priorities through a trans-NIH AIDS strategic plan, and to 
determine the AIDS research budgets of each NIH Institute and 
Center to address that plan. For all appropriated funds, the 
Director of OAR and the Director of NIH together determine the 
total for AIDS research within the total NIH appropriation, and 
the Director of OAR determines and allocates the IC 
distribution of those funds.
    The Committee believes that NIH continues to be the world's 
leader in research to respond to the critical needs of the AIDS 
pandemic, both in the U.S. and around the world. The Committee 
commends NIH for supporting the NIH AIDS and non-AIDS funding 
allocation at the current relative rate and endorses the 
continuation of this policy. The Committee continues to endorse 
the importance of OAR, including its critical trans-NIH budget 
authority and its status as a unique ``institute without 
walls.'' The Committee commends the Office for its leadership 
in setting trans-NIH AIDS research priorities, including 
important new basic science initiatives in the area of 
genomics, and its ongoing support for innovative research and 
community outreach to address the complex issues of AIDS in 
racial and ethnic minority populations in the U.S.
    The bill continues language permitting OAR to use up to 
$8,000,000 for construction or renovation of facilities, as 
authorized in title XXIII of the Public Health Service Act.

Office of Dietary Supplements

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) was established in 
recognition that dietary supplements can have an important 
impact on prevention and health maintenance. In collaboration 
with other NIH institutes and centers and other federal 
agencies, ODS works to strengthen knowledge about dietary 
supplements by supporting and coordinating scientific research 
in the field.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research

    The Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research 
(OBSSR) provides leadership and direction for the development 
of a trans-NIH plan to increase the scope of and support for 
behavioral and social sciences research and in defining an 
overall strategy for the integration of these disciplines 
across NIH institutes and centers; develops initiatives to 
stimulate research in the behavioral and social sciences arena 
and to integrate a biobehavioral perspective across the 
research areas of NIH; and promotes studies to evaluate the 
contributions of behavioral, social and lifestyle determinants 
in the development, course, treatment, and prevention of 
illness and related public health problems.

Office of Rare Disease Research

    The Office of Rare Disease Research (ORD) was established 
in recognition of the need to provide a focal point of 
attention and coordination at NIH for research on rare 
diseases. ORD works with Federal and non-Federal national and 
international organizations concerned with rare disease 
research and orphan products development; develops a 
centralized database on rare diseases research; and stimulates 
rare diseases research by supporting scientific workshops and 
symposia to identify research opportunities.
    Glomerular Disease.--The Committee is aware of 
opportunities to increase collaborative research efforts 
regarding the glomerular disease Focal Segmental 
Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and encourages ORD to consider FSGS 
for inclusion in its Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortia 
Program.
    Porphyria.--The Committee encourages ORD to develop an 
agenda for basic and clinical research for the treatment of 
porphyria and to consult with patient stakeholder organizations 
when considering the development of the research agenda.

Multi-institute Research Issues

    Amyloidosis.--The Committee encourages NIH to continue to 
intensify its research efforts into amyloidosis, a group of 
rare diseases characterized by abnormally folded protein 
deposits in tissues. These diseases are often fatal and there 
is no known cure. Treatment involving large-dose intravenous 
chemotherapy followed by stem cell replacement or rescue is 
effective for many patients, but this procedure is risky, 
unsuitable for some patients, and not a cure. The Committee 
urges NIH to keep the Committee informed on the steps that need 
to be taken to increase the understanding, prevention and 
treatment of this devastating group of diseases.
    Basic Behavioral Research.--The Committee is pleased to 
learn that the NIH leadership has launched a initiative to 
develop a basic behavioral research blueprint modeled after the 
Neuroscience Blueprint to help ensure the funding of the basic 
behavioral research necessary to advance and improve health 
outcomes. The Committee requests that it be kept informed of 
progress and expects the development, review and implementation 
of the basic behavioral research blueprint to be completed by 
March 2010. The Committee notes that an April, 2008 report from 
NIH indicated that basic behavioral research is funded in 13 of 
the 27 NIH institutes and centers. The Committee supports the 
continued funding of this category of research by the various 
institutes and centers as appropriate to their respective 
missions. However, the Committee continues to believe that 
DPCPSI, through OBSSR, should take scientific leadership for 
this research portfolio.
    Bone Diseases.--The Committee encourages NIH to support 
genetic and other research on diseases such as osteogenesis 
imperfecta and Paget's disease and other rare bone diseases 
such as fibrous dysplasia, osteopetrosis, fibrous ossificans 
progressiva, melhoreostosis, and X-linked hypophosphatemic 
rickets. The Committee also encourages NIH to strengthen 
support across all institutes for new basic science and 
clinical investigators through the various K award mechanisms.
    Celiac Disease.--The Committee recognizes that celiac 
patients are at dramatically increased risk of developing many 
other serious and fatal conditions including neurological 
problems, cancer, and autoimmune disorders including type I 
diabetes, thyroid and liver disease. The Committee encourages 
the Director to develop an agenda for basic and clinical 
research for the treatment of celiac disease and to consult 
with patient stakeholder organizations when considering the 
development of the research agenda.
    Chromosome Abnormalities.--Rare diseases by definition 
affect only a small number of people, yet the health impact of 
those conditions on individuals can be severe and even life-
threatening. The Committee requests that NIH provide an update 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate by January 1, 2010 on its 
research on conditions involving chromosomal duplications or 
deletions, including Chromosome 18, and the progress made to 
date by the rare disease consortium. The Committee further 
requests that the update include an estimation of the public 
health impact of research in this area.
    Class B Animal Dealers.--The Committee has reviewed the 
report on the use of random source dogs and cats in NIH 
research that it requested from the National Academy of 
Sciences (NAS) in fiscal year 2008. The NAS report concluded 
that, in some circumstances, the use of dogs and cats with the 
qualities of random source animals may be necessary for NIH-
funded research. The report found, however, that it was not 
necessary to obtain random source dogs and cats for NIH 
research from Class B dealers, if alternative sources can be 
assured. The Committee would like to eliminate the use of Class 
B dealer animals in NIH research, but also wants to be certain 
that sufficient supplies of non-Class B dealer random source 
animals exist. The NAS report recommends that NIH: (1) use the 
Request for Proposal mechanism to provide or develop specific 
animal models; and/or (2) support private research animal 
colonies. The Committee urges NIH to explore these options to 
ensure an adequate supply of random source animals for NIH 
research. The Committee expects NIH to submit a report by April 
1, 2010 to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate describing its specific plans to 
pursue these recommendations, identifying which types and the 
number of random source animals are being sought. The report 
should also include a timeline identifying when a sufficient 
pool of random source animals will exist so that NIH can 
prohibit the use of Class B dealer animals in its funded 
research.
    Dystonia.--The intramural program at NIH continues to 
advance research activity in dystonia, and the Committee 
encourages continued support in this area of study.
    Extramural Conflicts of Interest.--The Committee is 
encouraged that NIH has issued an advance notice of proposed 
rulemaking as a first step in responding to the Committee's 
directive in fiscal year 2009 to develop a conflict of interest 
policy for extramural grantees, both institution administrators 
and scientists. The Committee understands that the comment 
period on the advance notice has just ended. It urges NIH to 
rapidly review the comments received and take the next steps to 
develop a robust extramural conflict of interest policy. It is 
clear from reports of continued abuses that NIH policy must be 
strengthened to deal with the increasing complexity of public-
private interactions in biomedical research.
    Fragile X.--The Committee commends the National Institutes 
of Health for developing the NIH Research Plan on Fragile X 
Syndrome and Associated Disorders. The Committee congratulates 
NIH and its private foundation partners for providing a 
research grant to a pharmaceutical company to fund fragile X 
drug development. This public-private partnership should serve 
as a model for future programs for investing in fragile X and 
other rare diseases. The Director is encouraged to dedicate 
sufficient resources to implement the NIH Research Plan on 
Fragile X Syndrome and Associated Disorders, with the guidance 
of the recently established Fragile X Research Coordinating 
Group. The Committee recommends that NIH convene a consensus 
conference on translational research opportunities during 2010.
    Gender Differences.--For many disorders, the gender of the 
patient influences disease etiology, natural history, diagnosis 
and treatment alternatives and outcomes. The Committee 
encourages each of the institutes involved in the NIH 
Neuroscience Blueprint to carefully analyze their Neuroscience 
Blueprint research portfolio to ensure that gender is included 
as a variable, when appropriate, and to require that all 
reported results include gender-specific analysis.
    Grants.gov.--The Committee understands that the government-
wide grant-making system, Grants.gov, is struggling under the 
weight of the applications generated by Recovery Act funding. 
In fact, the Committee understands that the system was on the 
verge of collapse in April 2009 until HHS was able to cobble 
together a patch to keep it operating through the summer. The 
Committee understands that the system is handicapped by the 
lack of central management as well as inadequate funding from 
the partner agencies which are mandated to use it. The 
Committee directs the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to 
review the Grants.gov system and report to the Office of 
Management and Budget, HHS, and the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
its recommendations for improved system management. 
Specifically, GAO should recommend a business model that 
provides an adequate, reliable funding stream and the 
appointment of a unified administrative body that is delegated 
both control and resources. GAO should submit its report no 
later than January 1, 2010. Within sixty days of the GAO 
report, OMB and HHS should submit a joint report to the 
Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
the Senate on actions taken or planned in response to the GAO 
findings.
    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT).--The Committee 
encourages NIH to establish a trans-institute research group to 
coordinate implementation of research recommendations 
identified at the 2006 NIH HHT conference, with a particular 
focus on understanding the cause, diagnosis, prevention, and 
treatment of HHT.
    Lyme Diseases.--The Committee encourages NIH to intensify 
research on tick-borne diseases, including research that will 
increase understanding of the full range of Lyme disease 
processes and the physiology of Borrelia burgdorferi, including 
the mechanisms of persistent infection. Recognizing NIH's 
collaborative role with CDC and other agencies in the 
development of diagnostics, the Committee encourages NIH to 
support research that may lead to the development of more 
sensitive and accurate diagnostic tests for Lyme disease 
capable of distinguishing between active and past infections.
    The Committee encourages the Director, in collaboration 
with the Director of NIAID, to sponsor a scientific conference 
on Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. The Committee believes 
that the conference should represent the broad spectrum of 
scientific views on Lyme disease and should provide a forum for 
public participation and input from individuals with Lyme 
disease.
    Lymphatic Research and Lymphatic Disease.--The Committee 
urges NIH to begin to implement the recommendations of the 
trans-NIH working group on lymphatic research. The Committee 
encourages NIH to work toward the creation of centralized core 
facilities for: (a) experimental molecular and diagnostic 
lymphatic imaging; (b) the development and standardization of 
research reagents; and (c) the generation of virtual networks 
to facilitate basic, translational, and clinical research.
    Minority Institutions.--The Committee continues to be 
pleased with the NIH Director's implementation of various 
programs focused on developing the research infrastructure at 
minority health professions institutions, including Research 
Centers at Minority Institutions and NCMHD. The Committee 
encourages the NIH Director to work closely with the Director 
of NCMHD to establish a program of coordination among these 
various mechanisms and partner with minority health professions 
schools to address their infrastructure needs.
    Mitochondrial Disease.--The Committee is aware that the 
study of mitochondrial disease and dysfunction presents a 
number of unique research challenges and opportunities. The 
Committee expects that the Director will continue to treat 
mitochondrial disease research as a high priority area within 
the resources provided in the Common Fund, including through 
expanded efforts to advance fundamental understanding of 
mitochondrial function and variation, improved detection and 
analysis of mitochondrial proteins, and the accelerated 
application of systems biology and computational modeling 
approaches. The Committee also requests the Director to work to 
coordinate and promote mitochondrial disease research across 
the numerous appropriate institutes and centers and, in 
particular, that the Director review and consider implementing 
recommendations developed by the NHLBI's Working Group on 
Modeling Mitochondrial Dysfunction.
    The Committee applauds NHLBI for its work to support 
improved understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction 
in cardiovascular illness, including through a recent request 
for applications. The Committee is aware that NHLBI has held 
working group and other meetings related to mitochondrial 
dysfunction and cardiovascular disease that have identified 
opportunities to strengthen mitochondrial research through 
steps such as adopting a systems biology approach, promoting 
cross-disciplinary research collaboration, and developing 
improved tools and models. The Committee requests that NHLBI 
move forward to implement these identified opportunities.
    The Committee is aware that more than one in 4,000 children 
born in the U.S. each year will develop a mitochondrial disease 
by ten years of age. The Committee therefore encourages NICHD 
to increase its research commitment in the area of 
mitochondrial disease and to utilize the National Children's 
Study as a vehicle for research into the epigenomics, incidence 
and pathology of mitochondrial disease.
    Neurofibromatosis (NF).--NF is an important research area 
for multiple NIH Institutes. Recognizing NF's connection to 
many of the most common forms of cancer, the Committee 
encourages NCI to strengthen its NF research portfolio in pre-
clinical and clinical trials by applying newly developed and 
existing drugs. The Committee also encourages NCI to support NF 
centers, virtual centers, SPORE programs, pre-clinical mouse 
consortia, patient databases, and tissue banks, and to 
coordinate with other NIH institutes and government agencies in 
doing so. The Committee also urges additional focus from NHLBI, 
given NF's involvement with hypertension and congenital heart 
disease. The Committee encourages NINDS to continue to 
aggressively explore NF's implications for conditions such as 
spinal cord injury, learning disabilities and memory loss. In 
addition, the Committee continues to encourage NICHD to expand 
funding of clinical trials for NF patients in the area of 
learning disabilities, including the creation of NF centers 
involved with treating and curing these disabilities. NF can 
result in deafness; the Committee therefore encourages NIDCD to 
expand its NF research portfolio.
    Pregnant Women in Clinical Studies.--While over the last 
two decades, women have increasingly been included in clinical 
studies, pregnant women continue to be largely excluded from 
medical research, leading to a troubling lack of knowledge 
about how to treat pregnant women's illnesses and limited 
understanding of how illness in pregnancy affects women's 
health over time. Many pregnant women suffer from serious 
medical conditions including diabetes, hypertension, 
depression, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Pregnancy 
significantly changes women's physiology, including blood flow, 
digestion, kidney function and hormonal and enzymatic activity, 
in ways that can dramatically change the nature and progression 
of disease and the way that medications work. Despite these 
important differences, pregnant women are rarely involved in 
health research and, as a result, in many cases little is known 
about how to safely and effectively manage illness in 
pregnancy. The Committee encourages NIH to expand research on 
pregnant women with the goals of better understanding the long-
term health effects on women of disease states in pregnancy, 
the proper therapeutics for pharmacologic treatments for 
pregnant women who face illness, and the safety and efficacy of 
medications administered to pregnant women and fetuses.
    Primary Care Practice Research.--The Committee recognizes 
the role of NIH in researching primary care and prevention 
interventions in order to improve health outcomes, reduce 
health care-associated infections, and reduce the overall costs 
of healthcare. The Committee requests that the Director work 
with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, CDC, and 
the Office of the Secretary to develop a coordinated approach 
to research in primary care practice, with a specific focus on 
improving health among populations with disparate health 
outcomes.
    Psoriasis.--The Committee recognizes that scientists are 
identifying genes of immune cells involved in psoriasis, which 
gives promise to identifying and developing a permanent method 
of control for psoriasis and, eventually, a cure. The Committee 
recognizes that additional genetics, immunology and clinical 
research focused on understanding the mechanisms of psoriasis 
are needed and encourages NIAMS and NIAID to study the genetic 
susceptibility of psoriasis, develop animal models of 
psoriasis, identify and examine immune cells and inflammatory 
processes involved in psoriasis and elucidate psoriatic 
arthritis-specific genes and other biomarkers.
    The Committee also recognizes the mounting evidence of co-
morbidities associated with psoriasis and the potential higher 
risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease for people with 
severe psoriasis. The Committee urges NHLBI to consider these 
factors in its research, specifically that individuals with 
severe psoriasis have an increased risk of heart attack, 
independent of other major risk factors, and that for people in 
their forties and fifties with severe psoriasis, the risk of 
heart attack is more pronounced. The Committee also encourages 
NIDDK to consider in its research that diabetes is more 
prevalent for patients with severe psoriasis than for those 
with mild disease. The Committee encourages NIMH to conduct 
research to better understand why it is estimated that as many 
as 52 percent of psoriasis patients report clinically 
significant psychiatric symptoms and that individuals with 
psoriasis are twice as likely to have thoughts of suicide.
    Rehabilitation.--The Committee recognizes the importance of 
supporting research efforts to improve an individual's function 
and quality of life. The Committee encourages NIH to evaluate 
the efficacy of movement-based rehabilitation interventions, 
such as therapeutic exercise, to improve physical function in 
individuals with musculoskeletal conditions including 
arthritis, back pain, hip fracture, and major joint 
replacements.
    The Committee recognizes the advances that NIH-funded 
research has achieved in the area of stroke rehabilitation. The 
Committee encourages continued focus on rehabilitation 
interventions, especially physical therapy, to maximize an 
individual's function and quality of life after a stroke.
    The Committee encourages the Director to work with the 
National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) and 
relevant NIH institutes and centers to enhance and increase 
collaboration and support for medical rehabilitation and 
disability research across NIH. The Committee believes that 
rehabilitation and disability research is well-suited for the 
type of cross-disciplinary, translational research that the 
Director's office has made a priority in recent years.
    Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI).--The 
Committee continues to recognize the critical role of minority 
institutions in addressing the ongoing racial and ethnic health 
disparities in the United States. The Committee encourages NIH 
to expand its direct participation with minority institutions 
and increase the resources available to these institutions. The 
Committee also recognizes the importance of the RCMI program in 
building research capacity at minority institutions. The RCMI 
program assists minority institutions in competing for NIH 
grants and other funding by helping to recruit promising 
researchers, equip and modify existing laboratories, and fund 
core research facilities and other research support at minority 
institutions. The Committee further expresses support for the 
RCMI translational research network (RTRN) and its focus on 
strengthening ties between minority institutions, and 
encourages NIH to continue designating specific resources for 
the RTRN apart from the existing RCMI program. The Committee 
encourages NIH to strengthen participation from minority 
institutions, especially those with a track record of producing 
minority scholars in science and technology.
    Spina Bifida.--The Committee encourages NIDDK, NICHD, and 
NINDS to study the causes and care of the neurogenic bladder in 
order to improve the quality of life of children and adults 
with spina bifida; to support research to address issues 
related to the treatment and management of spina bifida and 
associated secondary conditions, such as hydrocephalus; and to 
invest in understanding the myriad co-morbid conditions 
experienced by children with spina bifida, including those 
associated with both paralysis and developmental delay.
    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Carrier Screening.--The 
Committee encourages NHGRI, NICHD, and NINDS to work 
collaboratively to develop specific recommendations and 
guidelines for providers and patients on pan-ethnic carrier 
screening for SMA. The Committee urges the institutes to 
partner with the relevant professional societies and the 
advocacy community in this effort. The Committee expects an 
update on these activities in the fiscal year 2011 
congressional budget justifications. The Committee also 
encourages the Director to establish a trans-NIH working group 
on SMA composed of the relevant institutes to ensure ongoing 
support of SMA research and drug development.
    Stem Cell Research Supported With Recovery Act Funds.--The 
Committee is pleased to note that stem cell research was 
included as a special emphasis area in the NIH Challenge Grant 
program--a special initiative supported by funds from the 
Recovery Act to focus on health and science problems amenable 
to significant progress within a two-year time frame. The 
Committee is also pleased to note that NIH has recently 
published guidelines for the use of human embryonic stem cells 
(hESC) with NIH funds. In recognition that the implementation 
of these new guidelines will delay the funding of Recovery Act 
awards to support hESC and thus frustrate Congressional intent 
to expedite this important area of research, the Committee 
encourages NIH to utilize full two-year funding of stem cell 
research awards with Recovery Act funds in fiscal year 2010.
    Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS).--The Committee encourages the 
Director to support collaborative research on SWS conducted by 
appropriate NIH institutes and centers, other government 
agencies and voluntary organizations. The Committee commends 
NINDS for its leadership role and collaboration with ORD in SWS 
research. The Committee encourages NIH to support 
multidisciplinary research studies into seizures, stroke, the 
blood-brain barrier, blood flow, angiogenesis, immune 
suppression, hormone abnormalities and co-morbidities such as 
attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The Committee also 
encourages NIH to support research on SWS and inflammatory 
response, growth factors, and the identification of markers in 
vasculature.
    Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorders (TMJDs).--A 
range of comorbid conditions are associated with TMJDs. Many 
are captured in ongoing longitudinal studies funded by 
institutes and centers other than NIDCR. In order to advance 
the knowledge of the degree of overlap between TMJDs and the 
associated comorbidities, the Committee requests that NIH-
funded population-based research projects, where appropriate 
and in consultation with the NIH Pain Consortium co-chairs, add 
measures to characterize the TMJD phenotype to permit the 
development of a sound basis for research into the underlying 
mechanisms driving the TMJD phenomenology and its comorbid 
conditions.
    Translating NIH Research To Address Racial and Ethnic 
Health Disparities.--The Committee is encouraged by the efforts 
of the Director to translate the benefits of NIH research into 
clinical practice. The Committee notes, however, that while the 
benefits of NIH research have led to an overall decline in 
mortality across a range of diseases, racial and ethnic health 
disparities have continued to increase. Therefore the Committee 
requests that the Director, working closely with the Director 
of NCMHD, report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate on the steps NIH has 
taken to ensure that racial and ethnic minorities are able to 
access the clinical benefits of NIH research. The report should 
include a brief summary of the NIH's outreach efforts to 
include racial and ethnic minorities.
    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC).--The Committee is 
encouraged by the potential of NIH-funded TSC research to 
reveal a better understanding not only of TSC, but more 
prevalent disorders such as autism, epilepsy and cancer. 
Because of the ``gateway'' potential of TSC research into these 
disorders, the Committee encourages a significant strengthening 
of TSC research at all relevant institutes, and stronger 
coordination of this effort through the Trans-NIH TSC 
Coordinating Committee. In particular, the Committee encourages 
expanded research at NICHD, NINDS, NIMH, and ORD targeted on 
the role of TSC-associated genes in the mechanisms of epilepsy, 
autism and mental health. Furthermore, the Committee encourages 
NIH to coordinate research at NINDS, NIAMS, NICHD, NHLBI, 
NIDDK, NCI, ORD, and NHGRI on the mechanisms of tumor growth 
and drug target testing in preclinical models. Finally, the 
Committee encourages all relevant NIH institutes to support 
clinical trials for the manifestations of TSC: epilepsy, 
autism, developmental delay, neurocognitive and mental health 
issues, and tumor growth in kidneys, brain, skin, heart, liver, 
and eyes.
    Underage Drinking and Adolescent Brain Development.--The 
Committee requests the Director of NIH to oversee a broad 
review of the research literature regarding the influence of 
drinking alcohol on the development of the adolescent brain and 
the public policy implications of this research. This report 
should be provided to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate by October 1, 2011.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    Mission.--The Buildings and Facilities appropriation 
provides for the design, construction, improvement, and major 
repair of clinical, laboratory, and office buildings and 
supporting facilities essential to the mission of the National 
Institutes of Health. The funds in this appropriation support 
the 77 buildings on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland; 
the Animal Center in Poolesville, Maryland; the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences facility in Research 
Triangle Park, North Carolina; and other smaller facilities 
throughout the United States.
    Within the $10,400,000,000 provided for NIH in the Recovery 
Act, $500,000,000 was allocated for Buildings and Facilities 
for fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    The Committee provides sufficient funding in the bill to 
support the construction of the Northwest Child Care Center on 
the Bethesda campus, as requested in the budget.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$3,551,023,000 for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration (SAMHSA), which is $84,532,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $25,556,000 above the 
budget request. Within the total, $131,585,000 is provided 
through the section 241 Public Health Service Act evaluation 
set-aside, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request.
    SAMHSA supports mental health and alcohol and drug abuse 
prevention and treatment services nationwide through 
discretionary capacity expansion and science to service 
activities, formula block grants to the States and associated 
technical assistance efforts. The agency consists of three 
principal centers: the Center for Mental Health Services 
(CMHS), the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), and 
the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). The Office of 
the Administrator is responsible for overall agency management.
    Homeless Grants.--The Committee includes within the total 
provided for Programs of Regional and National Significance 
across SAMHSA, $75,000,000 for homeless programs, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Committee believes that programs that provide 
supportive services to individuals in permanent housing 
settings will help to end long-term homelessness in this 
country and directs SAMHSA to continue to fund supportive 
services programs within the authority of the Programs of 
Regional and National Significance. The distribution of these 
funds between CMHS and CSAT is detailed later in this report.
    In addition, the Committee provides $68,047,000 for the 
State and territorial formula-based Projects for Assistance in 
Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program, which is 
$8,360,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The funding provided for PATH, 
combined with the homeless grants funded in the Programs of 
Regional and National Significance, results in a total resource 
level of $143,047,000 for homelessness initiatives at SAMHSA.
    Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative.--The Committee provides 
$116,656,000 for activities throughout SAMHSA Programs of 
Regional and National Significance that address the growing 
HIV/AIDS epidemic and its disparate impact on communities of 
color, including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, 
Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. This 
amount is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
the budget request. These funds provide grants to organizations 
with a history of providing culturally competent, community-
specific, and linguistically appropriate services in hard-to-
reach and high-risk communities of color to expand service 
infrastructure and capacity. The distribution of these funds 
between CMHS, CSAT, and CSAP is detailed later in this report.
    The Committee recognizes that professional counselors are 
highly trained and well qualified mental health professionals 
who deliver culturally appropriate behavioral health services 
to diverse populations through the public and private sectors. 
The Committee urges SAMHSA to increase the pool of culturally 
competent mental health professionals in the U.S. by granting 
professional counselors eligibility to participate in the 
Minority Fellowship Program beginning in fiscal year 20102.
    Minority Fellowship Program.--The Committee includes within 
the total provided for Programs of Regional and National 
Significance across SAMHSA, $5,093,000 for the Minority 
Fellowship Program, which is $392,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The distribution of 
these funds between CMHS, CSAT, and CSAP is detailed later in 
this report.
    The Committee recognizes that professional counselors are 
highly trained and well qualified mental health professionals 
who deliver culturally appropriate behavioral health services 
to diverse populations through the public and private sectors. 
The Committee urges SAMHSA to increase the pool of culturally 
competent mental health professionals in the U.S. by granting 
professional counselors eligibility to participate in the 
Minority Fellowship Program beginning in fiscal year 2010.
    Persons with Co-occurring Conditions or Multiple 
Disabilities.--The Committee encourages SAMHSA to expand and 
improve its commitment to support services for persons with co-
occurring mental illness and substance abuse disorders or 
multiple disabilities. In addition, SAMHSA is encouraged to 
enhance its monitoring of compliance with the Americans with 
Disabilities Act within agencies and departments served by both 
the mental health and substance abuse prevention and treatment 
block grants in order to ensure meaningful access to services 
and treatments by all individuals, including persons with co-
occurring or multiple disabilities.

Center for Mental Health Services

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$1,008,182,000 for the Center for Mental Health Services 
(CMHS), which is $39,030,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $22,363,000 above the budget request. Within the 
total, $21,039,000 is provided through the section 241 Public 
Health Service Act evaluation set-aside, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    Borderline Personality Disorder.--The Committee encourages 
SAMHSA to convene a panel of experts to make recommendations 
for expanding early detection, evidence-based treatment, and 
family education to promote resiliency and recovery for 
borderline personality disorder (BPD). The Committee again 
requests that SAMHSA submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
detailing SAMHSA's plans to expand its programs for BPD by 
April 1, 2010.
            Programs of Regional and National Significance
    The Committee provides $357,165,000 for mental health 
Programs of Regional and National Significance, which is 
$12,727,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$21,363,000 above the budget request. The program includes 
studies that identify the most effective service delivery 
practices, knowledge synthesis activities that translate 
program findings into useful products for the field, and 
knowledge application projects that support adoption of 
exemplary service approaches throughout the country.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for mental health Programs of Regional and National 
Significance:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capacity:
    Co-Occurring State Incentive Grant.................         $3,611,000                  0                  0
    Seclusion and Restraint............................          2,449,000                  0                  0
    Youth Violence Prevention..........................         95,042,000           +540,000           +540,000
        Safe Schools/Healthy Students..................         84,860,000           +540,000           +540,000
            College Emergency Preparedness.............          3,000,000           +763,000           +763,000
        School Violence................................         10,182,000                  0                  0
National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative.............         40,000,000         +2,000,000         +2,000,000
Children and Family Programs...........................          9,194,000                  0                  0
Mental Health Transformation Activities................          5,912,000                  0                  0
Consumer and Family Network Grants.....................          6,236,000                  0                  0
Mental Health Transformation State Incentive Grants....         26,012,000                  0                  0
Project LAUNCH.........................................         20,000,000                  0                  0
Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration.........         14,000,000         +7,000,000         +7,000,000
Community Resilience and Recovery Initiative...........          5,000,000         +5,000,000         +5,000,000
Suicide Lifeline.......................................          6,000,000         +1,516,000         +1,516,000
Garrett Lee Smith--Youth Suicide Prevention:
    State Grants.......................................         29,738,000                  0                  0
    Campus Grants......................................          4,975,000                  0                  0
American Indian/American Native Suicide Prevention.....          2,944,000                  0                  0
Homelessness Prevention Programs.......................         32,250,000                  0                  0
Older Adults Programs..................................          4,814,000                  0                  0
Minority AIDS..........................................          9,283,000                  0                  0
Criminal and Juvenile Justice Programs.................          6,684,000                  0                  0Science to Service:
Garrett Lee Smith--Suicide Resource Center.............          4,957,000                  0                  0
Mental Health Systems Transformation Activities........          9,949,000                  0                  0
National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and                   544,000                  0                  0
 Practices.............................................
SAMHSA Health Information Network......................          1,920,000                  0                  0
Consumer & Consumer Support Technical Assistance                 1,927,000                  0                  0
 Centers...............................................
Minority Fellowship Program............................          4,475,000           +392,000           +392,000
Disaster Response......................................          1,054,000                  0                  0
Homelessness...........................................          2,306,000                  0                  0
HIV/AIDS Education.....................................            974,000                  0                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Community Resilience and Recovery Initiative.--The 
Committee recognizes that as a result of the current economic 
downturn, many Americans report experiencing heightened levels 
of stress, anxiety, and grief. According to SAMHSA, the 
reactions to economic pressures closely resemble the 
psychological effects experienced after natural disasters. 
Stress reduction and behavioral health promotion are important 
for people directly or indirectly impacted by financial and job 
security crises. Therefore, the Committee includes $5,000,000 
for a new Community Resilience and Recovery Initiative, which 
builds upon SAMHSA's crisis counseling program. The program 
will use a public health, outreach-oriented approach to provide 
supportive interventions to individuals and families, public 
education and networking, and referral for those needing more 
extensive mental health, substance abuse, and case management 
services.
    Primary and Behavioral Health Care Integration.--The 
Committee continues to be deeply concerned that, according to 
reports, people with serious mental health disorders die on 
average 25 years sooner than other Americans. In fiscal year 
2009, the Committee provided funding for a new program to 
integrate primary care and specialty medical services in 
community mental health centers and other community-based 
behavioral health agencies. As a result of this initial 
funding, SAMHSA has developed a program that targets the 
estimated three million persons in the U.S. with severe mental 
illnesses currently being served in the public mental health 
system. SAMHSA indicates that 11 publicly-funded community 
mental health and other community-based behavioral health 
agencies will be awarded grants in 2009. In order to expand the 
number of grants and increase the number of people with severe 
mental illnesses served, the Committee includes $14,000,000, 
which is $7,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request.
    Suicide Lifeline.--The economic downturn has resulted in 
job loss, economic insecurity, and crisis for many families and 
communities. People search for needed services from State or 
local service systems, but these public systems of care have 
been reduced due to the financial difficulties at the State and 
local levels. The SAMHSA Suicide Lifeline program is a national 
call-in line for persons who are thinking of suicide because 
they have found no other solutions to their problems. In 
January of 2008, the number of calls to the Lifeline was just 
over 39,000. Last month there were over 54,000 phone calls. 
Approximately 25 percent of the 54,000 calls were related to 
the economic downturn. In order to continue to adequately staff 
the Lifeline and appropriately train the individuals answering 
the calls, the Committee provides $6,000,000, an increase of 
$1,516,000 over the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request.
    Youth Violence Prevention.--The Committee provides 
$95,042,000 to continue and expand violence prevention programs 
in schools, including elementary, secondary, and postsecondary 
educational institutions. This is $540,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Funds are used 
by schools to establish an emergency/crisis management response 
plan; to provide mental health and substance abuse treatment 
services to those in need; to educate students on mental health 
promotion, suicide, and violence prevention; to prepare 
educational materials on mental health for students and 
families of students to increase awareness of mental health and 
substance abuse issues in young adults; to train students and 
school personnel to respond effectively to students with mental 
and behavioral health problems that could lead to school 
failure, substance abuse, and/or violent behaviors; and, as 
needed, to develop a network/infrastructure to link the school 
with health care providers who can treat mental and behavioral 
problems. Within this amount, the Committee intends that not 
less than $84,860,000 be used to collaborate with the 
Department of Education for the Safe Schools/Healthy Students 
initiative and not less than $3,000,000 shall be used to 
continue a jointly funded initiative administered by the 
Department of Education and SAMHSA to support competitive 
grants to institutions of higher education to develop and 
implement emergency management plans for preventing campus 
violence, including assessing and addressing the mental health 
needs of students, and for responding to threats and incidents 
of violence or natural disaster in a manner that ensures the 
safety of the campus community.
    Within the $10,108,000 included in the bill, $4,915,000 
shall be used for the following projects in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
American Combat Veterans of War, San Diego, CA for              $175,000
 mental health services for returning veterans.......
American Red Cross, Lower Bucks County Chapter,                  100,000
 Levittown, PA for mental health services and case
 management..........................................
BayCare Health System, Clearwater, FL for a mental               200,000
 health initiative...................................
Bellfaire JCB, Shaker Heights, OH for the Social                 200,000
 Advocates for Youth program.........................
Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Eagle Butte, SD for                   90,000
 alcohol and drug awareness and youth suicide
 prevention programs.................................
City of Detroit, MI for behavioral health services at            700,000
 the Grace Ross Health Center........................
Foothill Family Service, Pasadena, CA for mental                 200,000
 health services to children ages 0-5 and parenting
 education that supports the services provided to the
 children............................................
Gateway Healthcare, Pawtucket, RI for behavioral                 200,000
 health services for returning veterans..............
Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Family Services,                    100,000
 Pasadena, CA for mental health and emotional support
 services for children of the terminally ill during
 the illness and after the death.....................
Heartland Health Outreach, Chicago, IL for a mental              200,000
 health supportive services program..................
Hispanic Counseling Center, Hempstead, NY for mental             200,000
 health services and treatment for the uninsured and
 underinsured Hispanic population on Long Island.....
Jacksonville Community Rehabilitation Center,                    200,000
 Jacksonville, FL for long-term substance abuse and
 mental health programs for those with severe mental
 health ailments.....................................
Ohel Children's Home and Family Services, Brooklyn,              550,000
 NY for inpatient and outpatient mental health
 treatment services..................................
Pacific Clinics, Arcadia, CA for mental health and               500,000
 suicide prevention programs for adolescents.........
Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Rosebud, SD for suicide                     500,000
 prevention and early intervention services..........
Spectrum Programs Inc., Miami, FL for a mental health            200,000
 and substance abuse program.........................
St. Bernard Project, Chalmette, LA for mental health             100,000
 services............................................
St. Luke's Hospital, Adult Behavioral Services, Cedar            400,000
 Rapids, IA for behavioral health services...........
Young & Healthy, Pasadena, CA for mental health care             100,000
 for children who are uninsured or underinsured......
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Mental Health Block Grant
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$420,774,000 for the Mental Health Block Grant, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The block grant provides funds to States to support 
mental illness prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation 
services. Funds are allocated according to statutory formula 
among the States that have submitted approved annual plans. The 
Committee notes that the Mental Health Block Grant funding 
represents less than one percent of total State mental health 
funding and less than two percent of State community-based 
mental health services. Within the total, $21,039,000 is 
provided through the section 241 Public Health Service Act 
evaluation set-aside, which is the same level as provided in 
fiscal year 2009 and the budget request.
            Children's Mental Health
    The Committee provides $125,316,000 for the comprehensive 
community mental health services grant program for children 
with serious emotional disorders, which is $16,943,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Funding for this program supports grants and 
technical assistance for community-based services for children 
and adolescents up to age 22 with serious emotional, 
behavioral, or mental disorders. The program assists States and 
local jurisdictions in developing integrated systems of 
community care. Each individual served receives an individual 
service plan developed with the participation of the family and 
the child. Grantees are required to provide increasing levels 
of matching funds over the six-year grant period. With the 
increase provided, SAMHSA estimates that an additional 11,000 
children will benefit from this program.
            Projects for Assistance in Transition from Homelessness 
                    (PATH)
    The Committee provides $68,047,000 for the Projects for 
Assistance in Transition from Homelessness (PATH) program, 
which is $8,360,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the same as budget request. The PATH program supports 
grants to States and territories to provide assistance to 
individuals suffering from severe mental illness and/or 
substance abuse disorders and who are homeless or at imminent 
risk of becoming homeless. Grants may be used for outreach, 
screening and diagnostic treatment services, rehabilitation 
services, community mental health services, alcohol or drug 
treatment services, training, case management services, 
supportive and supervisory services in residential settings, 
and a limited set of housing services. Increased resources will 
provide an estimated 11,000 additional individuals with serious 
mental illnesses who are homeless or at risk of becoming 
homeless with community-based support services.
            Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness
    The Committee provides $36,880,000 for the Protection and 
Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI) program, 
which is $1,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This funding is distributed to 
States according to a population and income based formula to 
assist State-designated independent advocates to provide legal 
assistance to mentally ill individuals during their residence 
in State-operated facilities and for 90 days following their 
discharge.

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$2,240,090,000 for the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment 
(CSAT), which is $47,157,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $1,443,000 above the budget request. Within the 
total, $87,796,000 is provided through the section 241 Public 
Health Service Act evaluation set-aside, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
            Programs of Regional and National Significance
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$461,499,000 for substance abuse treatment Programs of Regional 
and National Significance (PRNS), which is $47,157,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $1,443,000 above the 
budget request. Within the total, $8,596,000 is provided 
through the section 241 Public Health Service Act evaluation 
set-aside, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request.
    The programs funded through PRNS support activities to 
improve the accountability, capacity, and effectiveness of 
substance abuse treatment services and services delivery. These 
activities include capacity expansion initiatives to help 
communities respond to serious, emerging, and unmet treatment 
needs. They also include science into services initiatives 
through monitoring and accreditation of treatment programs, 
training, dissemination and knowledge application activities. 
These programs promote the adoption of science- and evidence-
based treatment practices by developing and field-testing new 
treatment models in order to facilitate the provision of 
quality treatment services and service delivery. These 
activities are undertaken in actual service settings rather 
than laboratories and results are disseminated to State 
agencies and community treatment providers. The goal is to 
promote continuous, positive treatment service delivery change 
for those people who use and abuse alcohol and drugs.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for substance abuse treatment Programs of Regional and 
National Significance:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capacity:
Co-Occurring State Incentive Grants....................         $4,263,000                 $0                 $0
Opioid Treatment Programs/Regulatory Activities........          8,903,000                  0                  0
Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral, and Treatment          29,106,000                  0                  0
 (SBIRT)...............................................
Targeted Capacity Expansion--General...................         28,989,000                  0                  0
Pregnant and Postpartum Women..........................         16,000,000                  0                  0
Strengthening Treatment Access and Retention...........          1,775,000                  0                  0
Recovery Community Services Program....................          5,236,000                  0                  0
Access to Recovery.....................................         98,954,000                  0                  0
Children and Families..................................         20,678,000                  0                  0
Treatment Systems for Homeless.........................         42,750,000                  0                  0
Minority AIDS..........................................         65,988,000                  0                  0
Criminal Justice Activities............................         87,635,000        +50,000,000                  0
    Treatment Drug Courts..............................         58,882,000        +35,000,000                  0
        Families Affected by Methamphetamine Abuse.....          5,000,000         +5,000,000                  0
    Ex-Offender Re-Entry...............................         23,200,000        +15,000,000                  0
Services Accountability................................         20,816,000                  0                  0
National All Schedules Prescription Electronic                           0         -2,000,000         -2,000,000
 Reporting (NASPER)....................................Science to Service:
Addiction Technology Transfer Centers..................          9,081,000                  0                  0
Seclusion and Restraint................................             20,000                  0                  0
Minority Fellowship Program............................            547,000                  0                  0
Special Initiatives/Outreach...........................          2,400,000                  0                  0
Information Dissemination..............................          4,553,000                  0                  0
National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and                   893,000                  0                  0
 Practices.............................................
SAMHSA Health Information Network......................          4,255,000                  0                  0
Program Coordination and Evaluation....................          5,214,000                  0                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Treatment Drug Courts.--The Committee provides $58,882,000 
for Treatment Drug Courts, which is $35,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. Treatment Drug Courts combine the sanctioning power of 
courts with treatment services to break the cycle of child 
abuse and neglect, criminal behavior, alcohol and/or drug use, 
and incarceration or other penalties. SAMHSA funds are used to 
provide substance abuse treatment services, including 
assessment, case management, and program coordination. Since 
2005 Treatment Drug Courts have increased from 1,200 to over 
2,100 in 2008, but there is a limited amount of treatment, 
mental health, and recovery support services available. With 
this increase, more than 100 new drug courts will be supported, 
which will result in an additional 5,200 individuals getting 
needed substance abuse treatment and other related services 
over the fiscal year 2009 levels.
    As requested, the Committee provides $5,000,000 to fund 25 
grants for Family Dependency Treatment Drug Courts focused on 
methamphetamine within the total for Treatment Drug Courts. 
Children exposed to methamphetamine laboratories not only face 
physical danger from chemical contamination and explosions, but 
they are at a heightened risk for abuse and neglect. These 
grants will support a collaborative approach, including 
treatment providers, child welfare specialists, and judges, to 
provide community-based social services for the children of 
methamphetamine-addicted parents. SAMHSA estimates that 870 
children with methamphetamine-addicted parents will be provided 
critical social services support.
    Within the $10,108,000 included in the bill, $3,443,000 
shall be used for the following projects in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
A Safe Haven Foundation, Chicago, IL for behavioral             $300,000
 health services for individuals affected by
 substance abuse.....................................
Chesterfield County, VA for the Dual Treatment Track             143,000
 program.............................................
Gavin Foundation, Inc., South Boston, MA for                     200,000
 substance abuse treatment services at its Cushing
 House facility for adolescents......................
Operation UNITE, Somerset, KY for a substance abuse            1,000,000
 treatment and voucher program.......................
Pinellas County Board of County Commissioners,                   300,000
 Clearwater, FL for a substance abuse treatment
 initiative..........................................
San Francisco Department of Public Health, San                   750,000
 Francisco, CA for mental health and substance abuse
 services for homeless veterans......................
Tuesday's Children, Manhasset, NY for a mental health            750,000
 initiative..........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant
    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$1,778,591,000 for the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment 
(SAPT) Block Grant, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. Within the total, 
$79,200,000 is provided through the section 241 Public Health 
Service Act evaluation set-aside, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 level and the budget request. The SAPT Block 
Grant provides funds to States to support alcohol and drug 
abuse prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation services. Funds 
are allocated among the States according to a statutory 
formula. State applications, including comprehensive State 
plans, must be approved annually by SAMHSA as a condition of 
receiving funds.
    The SAPT Block Grant is an effective and efficient program 
that provides vital prevention and treatment services for the 
nation's most vulnerable populations. According to SAMHSA, the 
SAPT Block Grant has been successful in expanding capacity and 
achieving positive results. In particular, outcome data from 
the SAPT Block Grant found that, at discharge, 73 percent of 
clients were abstinent from illegal drugs and 77 percent of 
clients were abstinent from alcohol. The Committee is also 
aware that SAPT Block Grant funded programs help people find or 
regain employment, stay away from criminal activity, reunite 
with families, and find stable housing.
    SAPT Block Grant Set-Aside for Prevention.--The Committee 
recognizes the important role played by the 20 percent 
prevention services set-aside within the SAPT Block Grant. 
According to SAMHSA, SAPT Block Grant funding represents 64 
percent of primary prevention funding in States. This effective 
substance abuse prevention program helped contribute to a 25 
percent decrease in illicit drug use by 8th, 10th and 12th 
graders combined between 2001 and 2008. The Committee urges 
SAMHSA to promote maximum flexibility in the use of prevention 
set-aside funds in order to allow each State to employ 
prevention strategies that match State and local circumstances.
    National Outcome Measures (NOMs).--The Committee remains 
aware of the collaborative work by SAMHSA and State substance 
abuse directors to implement outcomes data collection and 
reporting through the NOMs initiative. The Committee is pleased 
to know that States continue to make progress in reporting NOMs 
data through the SAPT Block Grant. According to SAMHSA, 
approximately 47 States voluntarily reported substance abuse 
outcome data in 2008. State substance abuse agencies reported 
significant improvements in a number of areas, including 
abstinence from alcohol and illegal drug use, criminal justice 
involvement, employment, and stable housing. The Committee 
encourages SAMHSA to continue working with State substance 
abuse agencies in order to continue to help States address 
technical issues and promote State-to-State problem solving 
solutions.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention

            Programs of Regional and National Significance
    The Committee provides $200,009,000 for the substance abuse 
prevention Programs of Regional and National Significance, 
which is $994,000 less than the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $1,750,000 more than the budget request. The program 
identifies and disseminates evidence-based substance abuse 
prevention approaches.
    Within the total, the Committee provides the following 
amounts for substance abuse prevention Programs of Regional and 
National Significance:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Capacity:
    Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive            $111,777,000        +$1,774,000        +$1,774,000
     Grants............................................
    Mandatory Drug Testing.............................          5,206,000                  0                  0
    Minority AIDS......................................         41,385,000                  0                  0
    Methamphetamine....................................                  0         -1,774,000         -1,774,000
    Program Coordination/Data Coordination and                   6,300,000                  0                  0
     Consolidation Center..............................
    Sober Truth on Preventing (STOP) Underage Drinking.          7,000,000                  0                  0
        National Adult-Oriented Media Public Service             1,000,000                  0                  0
         Campaign......................................
        Community-Based Coalition Enhancement Grants...          5,000,000                  0                  0
        Intergovernmental Coordinating Committee on the          1,000,000                  0                  0
         Prevention of Underage Drinking...............Science to Service:
    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder....................          9,821,000                  0                  0
    Center for the Application of Prevention                     8,511,000                  0                  0
     Technologies......................................
    Best Practices Program Coordination................          4,789,000                  0                  0
    National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and               650,000                  0                  0
     Practices.........................................
    SAMHSA Health Information Network..................          2,749,000                  0                  0
    Minority Fellowship Program........................             71,000                  0                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of 
Underage Drinking (ICCPUD) Progress Report.--The Committee 
notes that ICCPUD has not submitted an annual progress report 
on national progress in reducing underage drinking since 
January 2006. The Committee directs ICCPUD to submit a progress 
report on the goals articulated in the initial report, funds 
being expended by various agencies, and progress on key 
indicators, including age of initiation, beverage preference, 
source of alcohol, morbidity, mortality, and costs of underage 
drinking. This report should be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
no later than April 1, 2010.
    State Activities on Underage Drinking Prevention.--The 
Committee encourages SAMHSA to prioritize the collection of 
data regarding the enforcement of underage drinking laws, 
including the development, testing, and provision of incentives 
for States to adopt a uniform data system for reporting State 
enforcement data. This should include data regarding State laws 
and regulations that raise the cost of underage alcohol use, as 
described in the Surgeon General's 2007 Call to Action to 
Prevent and Reduce Underage Drinking, including alcohol tax 
rates, restrictions on low-price, high-volume drink specials, 
and wholesaler pricing provisions.
    Underage Drinking Public Service Announcement Campaign.--
The Committee supports the continuation of the Public Service 
Announcement (PSA) Campaign on underage drinking prevention. 
The Committee notes that the STOP Act requires SAMHSA to report 
to Congress on the production, broadcasting and evaluation of 
the campaign, the effectiveness of the campaign in reducing 
underage drinking, the need for and likely effectiveness of an 
expanded adult-oriented media campaign, and the feasibility and 
likely effectiveness of a youth-focused media campaign to 
combat underage drinking. The Committee requests that SAMHSA 
prepare and submit the required report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
no later than April 1, 2010.
    Underage Drinking Survey Results.--The Committee commends 
SAMHSA for its support of town hall meetings on underage 
drinking. The Committee reiterates its request that underage 
drinking findings from Federal surveys be separately and 
prominently highlighted, and continues to request that examples 
of how the Committee's directives are being accomplished be 
submitted in the fiscal year 2011 Congressional budget 
justification.
    Preventing Steroid Use.--Within the funds available, the 
Committee urges CSAP to develop and implement appropriate 
prevention programs focused on preventing the use of steroids 
and other performance enhancing drugs by young people. In 
addition, the Committee urges SAMHSA to work with NIDA and CDC 
to examine the relationship between youth steroid and other 
performance enhancing drug use and suicides within this 
population and to develop evidence-based treatment protocols 
for helping young people abusing steroids and other performance 
enhancing drugs to safely stop using these drugs.
    Within the $10,108,000 included in the bill, $1,750,000 
shall be used for the following projects in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Betty Ford Institute, Palm Springs, CA for a                    $250,000
 substance abuse prevention and training initiative..
Coalition for a Drug-Free Hawaii, Honolulu, HI for a             200,000
 youth alcohol abuse and suicide prevention program..
Operation UNITE, Somerset, KY for a multi-school               1,000,000
 substance abuse counseling and curriculum
 development program.................................
Postpartum Resource Center of New York, West Islip,              100,000
 NY for perinatal mood disorder prevention and early
 detection programs, support groups, and a
 multilingual helpline...............................
Rhode Island State Nurses Association, Pawtucket, RI             100,000
 for substance abuse programs for nurses.............
St. Ann's Corner of Harm Reduction, Bronx, NY for                100,000
 mental health consultations and substance abuse
 prevention and treatment support services...........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Program Management

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$101,947,000 for Program Management, which is $1,816,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Within the total, $22,750,000 is provided 
through the section 241 Public Health Service Act evaluation 
set-aside, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The appropriation provides 
funding to coordinate, direct, and manage the agency's 
programs. Funds are used for salaries, benefits, space, 
supplies, equipment, travel and overhead.

St. Elizabeths Hospital Building and Facilities

    The Committee provides $795,000 for St. Elizabeths Hospital 
Buildings and Facilities, which is $23,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
This funding is available until expended to pay for hazardous 
substance remediation on the West Campus of St. Elizabeths 
Hospital.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality


                    HEALTHCARE RESEARCH AND QUALITY

    The Committee provides a program level total of 
$372,053,000 for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality 
(AHRQ), which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request.
    The mission of AHRQ is to improve the quality, safety, 
efficiency, and effectiveness of health care for all Americans. 
The agency fulfills its mission by conducting and supporting 
health services research that focuses on answering questions on 
such topics as clinical practice, outcomes of care and 
effectiveness, evidenced-based medicine, health care quality, 
patient safety and medical errors, health care costs and 
financing, and health information technology. AHRQ research 
findings are used by providers, health care administrators, and 
others to improve health care quality, accessibility, and 
outcomes of care.

Research on Health Costs, Quality, and Outcomes

    The Committee provides $309,053,000 for Research on Health 
Costs, Quality, and Outcomes, which is $5,000,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program identifies the most effective and efficient approaches 
to organize, deliver, finance, and reimburse health care 
services; determines how the structure of the delivery system, 
financial incentives, market forces, and better information 
affects the use, quality, and cost of health services; and 
facilitates the translation of research findings for providers, 
patients, plans, purchasers, and policymakers. It also funds 
research that determines what works best in increasing the 
cost-effectiveness and appropriateness of clinical practice; 
supports the development of tools to measure and evaluate 
health outcomes, quality of care, and consumer satisfaction 
with health care system performance; and facilitates the 
translation of information into practical uses through the 
development and dissemination of research databases.
            Patient-Centered Health Research
    Within the total for Research on Health Costs, Quality, and 
Outcomes, the Committee provides $12,500,000 for Patient-
Centered Health Research. This is $37,500,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Funding 
is provided to cover the continuation costs of current research 
grants. The Recovery Act provided an additional $1,100,000,000 
for Patient-Centered Health Research in fiscal years 2009 and 
2010 to be administered by AHRQ, NIH, and the HHS Office of the 
Secretary. This program provides current, unbiased evidence 
about the effectiveness of different health care interventions. 
The objective of the program is to help consumers, health care 
providers, and others make informed choices among treatment 
alternatives.
    The Committee does not intend for the patient-centered 
health research funding included in fiscal year 2010 to be used 
to mandate coverage, reimbursement, or other policies for any 
public or private payer. The funding shall be used to conduct 
or support research to evaluate and compare the clinical 
outcomes, effectiveness, risk, and benefits of two or more 
medical treatments and services that address a particular 
medical condition. Further, the Committee recognizes that a 
``one-size-fits-all'' approach to patient treatment is not the 
most medically appropriate solution to treating various 
conditions. Research conducted should be consistent with 
Departmental policies relating to the inclusion of women and 
minorities.
    Maternity Care Models.--The Committee is concerned that the 
U.S. continues to lag behind almost all developed countries in 
perinatal outcomes, despite spending more than double per 
capita on childbirth than other industrialized countries. 
Further, the Committee is aware that maternity care is a major 
component of the escalating health care costs in the U.S., with 
combined mother/baby charges for hospitalization estimated at 
$79,000,000,000 in 2005--far exceeding charges for any other 
health condition. Although there is an extensive body of 
knowledge regarding best evidence-based practices in maternity 
care, current practice is not following the research. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages AHRQ to study the 
comparative effectiveness of different maternity care models 
and practices, including both physician and non-physician 
providers; all three birth settings of hospital, birth centers, 
and planned home birth; and the practices of elective 
induction, primary elective cesarean section, and repeat 
cesarean section.
            Prevention and Care Management
    Within the total for Research on Health Costs, Quality, and 
Outcomes, the Committee provides $24,404,000 for Prevention and 
Care Management, which is $17,304,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. This program 
supports research focusing on improving care and reducing 
disparities for common chronic conditions, such as diabetes, 
asthma, and heart disease and supports the U.S. Preventive 
Services Task Force, which translates evidence-based knowledge 
into recommendations for clinical preventive services to be 
implemented as part of routine clinical practice.
    Establishing a robust primary care system capable of 
delivering high quality, safe, and efficient care management is 
a foundational element for effective health reform. Additional 
resources for AHRQ's Prevention and Care Management activities 
will focus on four key areas: health care redesign, which will 
support research to evaluate the patient-centered medical home 
model and develop tools to better understand the needs of 
patients with multiple chronic conditions; clinical-community 
linkages, which will support the evaluation of models that 
integrate community-based services and public health with 
clinical care; self-management support to help evaluate ways 
for people to manage their own health; and care coordination, 
which will develop better ways to transition patients from 
hospitals to primary care to reduce readmissions.
            Health Information Technology
    Within the total for Research on Health Costs, Quality, and 
Outcomes, the Committee provides $32,320,000 for Health 
Information Technology (HIT), which is $12,500,000 less than 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
Funding is provided to cover the continuation costs of current 
research grants. AHRQ's HIT program develops and disseminates 
evidence and evidence-based tools to inform policy and practice 
on how HIT can improve the quality of American health care.
            Patient Safety
    Within the total for Research on Health Costs, Quality, and 
Outcomes, the Committee provides $66,585,000 for Patient 
Safety, which is $17,696,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. Funding provided in this 
program supports research grants, training programs, and other 
tools and resources to prevent, mitigate, and decrease the 
number of medical errors, patient safety risks, and quality 
gaps associated with healthcare and their harmful impact on 
patients. There are two main components of AHRQ's Patient 
Safety portfolio: Patient Safety Organizations, for which the 
Committee provides $7,000,000; and Patient Safety Threats and 
Medical Errors, for which the Committee provides $59,585,000.
    Healthcare-Associated Infections.--The Committee continues 
to be concerned about healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). 
According to CDC, HAIs are one of the top ten leading causes of 
death in the U.S., accounting for nearly 100,000 associated 
deaths and $28,000,000,000 to $33,000,000,000 in excess health 
care costs annually. Within the total for Patient Safety 
Threats and Medical Errors, the Committee provides $25,000,000 
for AHRQ's HAI activities, which is $15,696,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    With increased resources, the Committee directs AHRQ to 
place major emphasis on expanding the checklist model for 
reducing central-line associated blood stream infections in 
intensive care units, which was originally developed through 
AHRQ-funded research at Johns Hopkins University. In fiscal 
year 2009 this program was expanded from ten to 32 States, the 
District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Additional funding in 
fiscal year 2010 will bring this successful model to all 50 
States and to enhance the initiative to focus on other HAIs, 
including clostridium difficile, surgical site infections, and 
catheter-associated urinary tract infections and to broaden the 
reach of the checklist to all units of hospitals.
    HAIs are not just a problem in hospitals, but are a major 
concern in other settings, including dialysis centers, 
ambulatory care, surgery centers, and the nursing home setting. 
Increased resources will allow AHRQ to support the research 
necessary to develop, validate, and implement infection 
prevention and control models designed specifically for these 
settings.
    Additionally, AHRQ will offer technical assistance and 
practical training opportunities based on the highly successful 
Patient Safety Improvement Corps training program. This 
program, which is a partnership with the Department of Veterans 
Affairs, improves patient safety by providing health care staff 
with the knowledge and skills needed to investigate medical 
errors and to develop and evaluate sustainable system 
interventions to prevent them.
    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) 
Collaborative Research Initiative.--MRSA is the most common 
HAI. The number of MRSA-associated hospital stays has more than 
tripled since 2000, reaching nearly 369,000 in 2005, according 
to AHRQ's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. 
Patients hospitalized for MRSA have longer hospital stays and 
are more likely to die than patients who don't have MRSA. These 
infections are especially common in intensive care units. In 
order to address MRSA specifically, the Committee provides AHRQ 
with $10,000,000, which is $2,000,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request.
    The Committee urges AHRQ to support investigator-initiated 
research aimed at identifying new interventions to reduce 
infections. Just as the basic science of the agents that cause 
HAIs is evolving, so is the knowledge about how to prevent and 
treat them. Although in some cases adequate knowledge about how 
to reduce HAIs is available and the primary barrier is how to 
implement and apply that knowledge, in other cases, optimal 
solutions are not apparent. Support for novel approaches is one 
way to expand the arsenal of interventions aimed at reducing 
HAIs, including MRSA.
    Ambulatory Patient Safety.--The Committee recognizes AHRQ's 
efforts to examine the risks associated with the migration of 
health care into ambulatory settings. In light of the growing 
number of incidents involving syringe reuse and hepatitis C 
transmission across the country, the Committee urges AHRQ to 
expand the ambulatory safety and quality program to identify 
the inherent risks in ambulatory settings and to develop 
potential solutions for protecting patients. AHRQ is encouraged 
to partner with CDC for assessment, content expertise, and 
evaluation activities to enable these efforts.
            Crosscutting Activities Related to Quality, Effectiveness, 
                    and Efficiency Research
    Within the total for Research on Health Costs, Quality, and 
Outcomes, the Committee provides $169,514,000 for Crosscutting 
Activities Related to Quality, Effectiveness, and Efficiency 
Research, including training grants and contracts and research 
management. This is $10,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. Research activities 
supported by funding in this area look to answer questions 
about cost, organization, and socioeconomics related to 
healthcare; long-term healthcare; training; quality of care; 
system capacity; and hazards preparedness.
    The Committee values AHRQ for its critical role in 
supporting health services research to improve health care 
quality, reduce costs, advance patient safety, decrease medical 
errors, eliminate health care disparities, and broaden access 
to essential services. However, the Committee is troubled that 
AHRQ's investigator-initiated research portfolio has languished 
even though many of the sentinel studies that have changed the 
face of health and health care in the U.S. are the result of 
researchers' ingenuity and creativity. The Committee provides 
AHRQ additional funding for investigator-initiated research to 
advance discovery and the free marketplace of ideas.
    Building the Next Generation of Researchers.--The Committee 
is concerned about declines in the number of, and funding for, 
training grants for the next generation of researchers. The 
Committee urges AHRQ to provide greater support to pre- and 
post-doctoral training grants and fellowships to ensure America 
stays competitive in the global research market.
    Broadening the Evidence Base in Response to Health Care 
Challenges.--The Committee recognizes that AHRQ's research 
portfolio focuses predominantly on patient safety, health care 
quality, and patient-centered health research. Unfortunately, 
these efforts have included less research on ways to improve 
the quality and efficiency of the health care system as a 
whole, and have resulted in relatively little funding to study 
what drives health care costs or to determine how to achieve 
needed improvements in efficiency. The Committee urges AHRQ to 
develop a more balanced research agenda, supporting all aspects 
of health care research outlined in its statutory mission, 
including, the costs, utilization of, and access to, health 
care and the ways in which health care services are organized, 
delivered, and financed.
    Diabetes.--Measurement and appropriate management of 
hemoglobin A1c can reduce the risk of complications of 
diabetes. Several quality measurement programs such as CMS' 
Physician Quality Reporting Initiative reward measurement, but 
do not reward appropriate management of hemoglobin A1c. This is 
due to the lack of outcomes focused measures that encourage 
appropriate hemoglobin A1c management. Studies have identified 
a number of patient characteristics that can impact hemoglobin 
A1c levels including age, gender, race, ethnicity, body mass 
index, severity of diabetes, duration of diabetes, type of 
treatment for diabetes, co-morbidities, life expectancy, 
medication adherence, and self-monitoring adherence. The 
Committee is aware that measure developers have attempted to 
create a measure for the appropriate management of hemoglobin 
A1c, but have failed to reach consensus on a methodology that 
encourages appropriate management and measurement while 
avoiding unintended consequences that may discourage or fail to 
recognize appropriate management. The Committee encourages AHRQ 
to seek to advance the development of an appropriate A1c 
management quality measure by providing support to develop a 
new measure or measures and/or ways to adapt current measures 
to support this goal. This could be in the form of support to 
groups that have large A1c databases, such as the Veterans 
Administration system or one of AHRQ's Accelerating Change and 
Transformation in Organizations and Networks partners.
    Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction.--Mindfulness-based 
stress reduction (MBSR) is the most commonly used meditation-
based intervention in medical settings in the U.S. There is a 
growing body of scientific literature that has examined the 
impact of MBSR on pain, brain function, immune function, and on 
the symptoms and underlying biological mediators of some 
diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, psoriasis, and 
cancer. However, the extent to which MBSR might affect health 
care utilization has never been systemically studied. Even 
modest reductions in health care utilization could translate 
into significant dollar savings cumulatively throughout the 
nation and may have implications for health care policy. The 
Committee urges AHRQ to support research to determine whether 
MBSR impacts health care utilization.
    Moving Research into Practice.--Health services research 
has great potential to improve health and health care when 
widely disseminated and used. The Committee supports AHRQ's 
research translation activities, including practice-based 
research centers and learning networks that are designed to 
better understand health care delivery and move the best 
available research and decision-making tools into health care 
practice. The Committee provides funding for AHRQ to expand 
these programs. This will ensure health care delivery is rooted 
in the best available evidence and help improve health care 
quality and ultimately health outcomes.
    Restoring Innovation and Competitiveness.--The Committee is 
pleased that AHRQ is working to address the decline in 
investigator-initiated research opportunities through its 
Innovations Research Portfolio. The Committee provides funding 
for AHRQ to expand this grant making program to advance 
discovery and the free marketplace of ideas, and urges AHRQ to 
provide more opportunities for investigator-initiated research 
through its other core programs, including the Effective Health 
Care Program.

Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys

    The Committee provides $60,300,000 for the Medical 
Expenditures Panel Surveys (MEPS), which is $5,000,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
The MEPS provide data for timely national estimates of health 
care use and expenditures, private and public health insurance 
coverage, and the availability, costs, and scope of private 
health insurance benefits. This activity also provides data for 
analysis of changes in behavior as a result of market forces or 
policy changes on health care use, expenditures, and insurance 
coverage; develops cost/savings estimates of proposed changes 
in policy; and identifies the impact of changes in policy for 
subgroups of the population. Increased funding will allow AHRQ 
to support a sample size robust enough to continue to collect 
statistically significant data for racial and ethnic minority 
population subgroups.

Program Support

    For Program Support, the Committee provides $2,700,000, 
which is the same as fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This activity supports the overall direction 
and management of the agency.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services


                     GRANTS TO STATES FOR MEDICAID

    The Committee provides $220,962,473,000 for the Federal 
share of current law State Medicaid costs, which is 
$31,107,439,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. This amount does not include 
$71,700,038,000 which was advance funded in the fiscal year 
2009 appropriation for the first quarter of fiscal year 2010. 
In addition, the Committee provides an advance appropriation of 
$86,789,382,000 for program costs in the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2011. The Committee has also included indefinite 
budget authority for unanticipated costs in fiscal year 2010.
    Medicaid is projected to provide health care to 53.3 
million people in fiscal year 2010, an increase of 4.3 percent. 
This represents 17.2 percent of the U.S. population. Medicaid 
will provide coverage to 26.2 million children. Non-disabled 
adults under age 65 and children will represent 74 percent of 
the Medicaid population, but account for 35 percent of Medicaid 
benefit outlays. In contrast, the elderly and disabled 
populations are estimated to make up 26 percent of the Medicaid 
population, yet account for approximately 65 percent of 
Medicaid benefit outlays. Medicaid is the largest payer for 
long-term care in America.

                PAYMENTS TO THE HEALTH CARE TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee provides $207,296,070,000 for the Payments to 
the Health Care Trust Funds account, which supports Medicare 
Part B and prescription drug benefits for 46.6 million Medicare 
beneficiaries. This amount is $9,552,070,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $65,000,000 above the budget 
request. This entitlement account includes the general fund 
subsidy to the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust 
Fund for Medicare Part B benefits, Medicare drug benefits and 
administration, and State high risk pools as well as other 
reimbursements to the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund for 
benefits and related administrative costs, which have not been 
financed by payroll taxes or premium contributions. The 
increase over the budget request is due to the reimbursement to 
the trust fund for the high risk pools initiative funded in the 
Program Management account. The Committee continues bill 
language requested by the Administration providing indefinite 
authority to pay the general revenue portion of the Medicare 
Part B premium match and provides resources for the Medicare 
Part D drug benefit program in the event that the annual 
appropriation is insufficient.

                           PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

    The Committee makes available $3,463,362,000 in trust funds 
for Federal administration of the Medicare and Medicaid 
programs, which is $147,976,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $2,138,000 below the budget request. This 
activity supports the two largest Federal health care programs, 
Medicare and Medicaid, along with the Children's Health 
Insurance Program (CHIP) and the Medicare prescription drug 
program. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) 
is the largest purchaser of health care in the U.S., serving 
approximately 98 million Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP 
beneficiaries.

Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation

    The Committee provides $31,600,000 for Research, 
Demonstration and Evaluation, which is $1,408,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $25,378,000 below the budget 
request. These funds support a variety of studies and 
demonstrations in such areas as monitoring and evaluating 
health system performance; improving health care financing and 
delivery mechanisms; modernization of the Medicare program; the 
needs of vulnerable populations in the areas of health care 
access, delivery systems, and financing; and information to 
improve consumer choice and health status. The Committee 
includes the full request of $14,800,000 for the Medicare 
Current Beneficiary Survey. Funding for Real Choice Systems 
Change grants is not included.
    The Committee encourages CMS to conduct a demonstration 
program comparing Type II diabetes therapies to determine which 
of them optimally assist people with Medicare in weight control 
while reaching and maintaining target blood glucose levels. The 
Committee encourages CMS to submit to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate a 
report on the demonstration no later than January 1, 2011.
    The Committee recognizes that the Medicare Modernization 
Act of 2003 included a Welcome to Medicare physical exam 
benefit for new Medicare enrollees. However, despite clinical 
data showing hepatitis B and C are a major health problem in 
the United States, a hepatitis B and C screening benefit 
currently is not covered under the Medicare program. To assist 
in determining whether Congress should add a hepatitis B and C 
screening benefit to the Welcome to Medicare physical exam, the 
Committee encourages the Secretary to conduct a three-year 
hepatitis B and C screening and treatment demonstration project 
and to submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
of Representatives and the Senate a report on the demonstration 
no later than December 31, 2013.
    The bill includes $1,600,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bi-State Primary Care Association, Montpelier, VT to            $100,000
 treat uninsured patients............................
County of Ventura Health Care Agency, Ventura, CA for            200,000
 Medicaid enrollment programs........................
Fond du Lac County, WI for the Save a Smile Program..            400,000
Jewish Healthcare Foundation, Pittsburgh, PA for                 100,000
 program to increase involvement of pharmacists in
 chronic disease management..........................
PACE Greater New Orleans, New Orleans, LA for                    500,000
 facilities and equipment............................
Patient Advocate Foundation, Newport News, VA for a              300,000
 patient assistance program for the uninsured........
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medicare Operations

    The Committee provides $2,323,862,000 to support Medicare 
claims processing contracts, which is $58,147,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $40,000,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Committee includes bill language as proposed in the 
budget request that extends the availability of $65,600,000 
through September 30, 2011 for Medicare contracting reform 
activities. The Committee also includes bill language as 
proposed in the budget request providing $35,681,000 for the 
Healthcare Integrated General Ledger Accounting System, to 
remain available through September 30, 2011. The bill does not 
include language proposed in the budget request to provide 
extended availability for funds related to the Medicare 
Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008.
    Within the total, the Committee provides $45,000,000 for 
the State Health Insurance Program (SHIP), which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $5,000,000 above the 
budget request. The Committee believes SHIP is an important 
vehicle to help the 46.6 million Medicare beneficiaries grapple 
with changes in coverage and prescription drug plans. SHIP 
provides one-on-one counseling to those who have trouble 
accessing the internet or the toll-free hotlines.
    The Committee notes that the CMS Medicaid policy on 
coverage for routine HIV Testing is unclear, and should be 
updated to reflect the Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing 
of Adults, Adolescents, and Pregnant Women in Healthcare 
Settings issued in September 2006 by the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC).

State Survey and Certification

    The Committee provides $346,900,000 for State inspections 
of facilities serving Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, 
which is $53,772,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request.
    This program supports the certification and periodic 
inspection of facilities receiving Medicare funding, such as 
nursing homes, hospitals, hospices, and rehabilitation centers. 
These inspections target quality of care, appropriateness of 
staffing, and patient safety. In 2010, more than 83,000 
initial, recertification and complaint surveys are expected to 
be conducted.
    The Committee has provided sufficient funding for survey 
and certification activities to provide surveys of all types of 
facilities at least once every six years. Some types of 
facilities are currently reviewed as infrequently as once every 
11.5 years, including ambulatory surgery centers (prior to 
Recovery Act funding). These types of facilities have been 
implicated in past outbreaks of healthcare-associated 
infections (HAI). Greater frequency of surveys is expected to 
increase awareness of and reduction in the occurrence of HAIs. 
The Committee also directs CMS to train all State inspectors on 
CDC's revised HAI interpretative guidelines. With the increased 
frequency of inspections, surveyors must be equipped to detect 
evidence of HAIs or faulty procedures that could result in 
HAIs.
    Because of the growth in the number of facilities seeking 
survey and certification so that they are permitted to 
participate in CMS programs, the Committee encourages CMS to 
explore the use of alternative licensure activities to provide 
additional resources for initial survey and certification 
activities. The Committee understands this is particularly 
acute for dialysis facilities and urges CMS to direct the 
States to triage first-time applications by length of wait time 
and remoteness of facility.

State High-Risk Insurance Pools

    The Committee provides $65,000,000 through specific 
appropriations language to support the State High-Risk 
Insurance Pools Program, which is $10,000,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level. The budget request does not include 
discretionary funding for high risk pools for fiscal year 2010, 
instead requesting $75,000,000 in mandatory demonstration 
funding as part of a legislative proposal.
    Thirty-five States currently operate high-risk pools that 
are the health insurers of last resort for almost 200,000 
individuals who have lost or are ineligible for group insurance 
coverage, and who are medically high-risk and unable to 
purchase individual health insurance in the commercial market. 
High-risk pools represent a successful public/private 
partnership. All risk pool participants pay a monthly premium, 
capped at 125 to 200 percent of the average market premium. 
Insurers and health care providers support the program through 
assessments, and some States contribute to their pools. The 
Committee anticipates a declining need for State high-risk 
insurance pools as universal health care coverage becomes a 
reality.

Federal Administration

    The Committee provides $696,000,000 to support Federal 
administrative activities related to the Medicare and Medicaid 
programs, which is $54,649,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $1,760,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee does not continue bill language authorizing CMS to 
use funds for the Healthy Start, Grow Smart program for parents 
of children enrolled in the Medicaid program because of lagging 
State participation.
    As part of its effort to combat HAIs, the Committee directs 
CMS to include in its ``pay for reporting'' system, which 
penalizes hospitals that fail to report quality data to 
Hospital Compare, two infection control measures developed by 
the Hospital Quality Alliance (HQA)-- central line-associated 
bloodstream infections and a surgical site infection rate. 
These two measures have been agreed upon by the HQA membership, 
tested, and validated. If the measures are included in Hospital 
Compare, the public reporting of the data is likely to reduce 
HAI occurrence, an outcome demonstrated in previous research.
    The Committee also directs CMS to add additional HAI 
measures in its next expansion of the ``pay for performance'' 
system in which hospitals receive lower reimbursement for 
treatment of conditions that are not present upon admission. Of 
the 12 general conditions currently tracked under ``pay for 
performance'', three are related to HAIs (catheter-associated 
urinary tract infection, vascular catheter-associated 
infection, and surgical site infections). The Committee directs 
CMS to report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
of Representatives and the Senate by May 1, 2010 outlining 
progress in this regard.
    The Committee is concerned that language and cultural 
barriers inhibit many minority seniors from accessing Medicare 
and encourages CMS to expand multilingual help lines to improve 
access to eligible programs by underserved minority seniors.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to adopt quality 
measures for hepatitis B and C screening and treatment for use 
by dialysis providers and physicians who treat patients on 
dialysis. The Committee encourages the Secretary to include 
these quality measures and an analysis in the CMS Physician 
Quality Reporting Initiative.

              HEALTH CARE FRAUD AND ABUSE CONTROL ACCOUNT

    The Committee provides $311,000,000 to be transferred from 
the Medicare trust funds for Health Care Fraud and Abuse 
Control activities conducted by CMS, the HHS Inspector General, 
and the Department of Justice, which is $113,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This funding is in addition to $1,156,000,000 that is 
provided as mandatory funding through authorizing bills. 
Funding will provide resources for expanded efforts for 
Medicaid program integrity activities, for safeguarding the 
Medicare prescription drug benefit and the Medicare Advantage 
program, and for program integrity efforts carried out by the 
Department of Justice.

                Administration for Children and Families


  PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT AND FAMILY SUPPORT 
                                PROGRAMS

    The Committee provides $3,571,509,000 for the Child Support 
Enforcement and Family Support programs, which is $254,810,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. The Committee also provides $1,100,000,000 in 
advance funding, as requested, for the first quarter of fiscal 
year 2011 to ensure timely payments for Child Support 
Enforcement programs. These programs support State-administered 
programs of financial assistance and services for low-income 
families to promote their economic security and self-
sufficiency. The Committee recommendation includes an estimated 
$33,000,000 for payments to territories, which is the same as 
the comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request.

                   LOW INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE

    The Committee provides $5,100,000,000 for the Low Income 
Home Energy Assistance program (LIHEAP), the same as the 
comparable fiscal year 2009 funding level and $1,900,000,000 
above the discretionary budget request. The Administration's 
fiscal year 2010 discretionary budget proposes $3,200,000,000 
for LIHEAP and, in addition, includes a legislative proposal to 
create a trigger mechanism that would make additional mandatory 
funding available if energy prices reach certain levels. Under 
the budget request, States would be forced to eliminate 
assistance payments to approximately 1.7 million households and 
reduce the average benefit by approximately $100. Absent 
enactment of such legislation, the Committee recommendation 
ensures that approximately 7.5 million low-income households 
continue to receive the home energy assistance they need in a 
volatile energy market.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$4,509,672,000 for the State formula grants, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $2,099,672,000 above 
the budget request. The Committee bill maintains the 
distribution of formula grant funds as allocated in fiscal year 
2009. The Committee recommends $590,328,000 for the contingent 
emergency reserve, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $199,672,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee does not include language making the contingency 
reserve funding available until expended, as included in the 
budget request. The Committee intends that not more than 
$27,000,000 be used for the Leveraging Incentive Program, which 
rewards States that leverage private or non-Federal resources 
for home energy assistance.
    LIHEAP provides assistance to low-income households to help 
pay the costs of home energy. While energy prices have declined 
recently in conjunction with the global economic downturn, home 
energy prices remain high, unpredictable, and unaffordable for 
many households. LIHEAP serves the most vulnerable households 
in the country, including some of those hardest hit by the 
economic downturn for which rapidly rising home-energy costs or 
severe weather conditions can have dire consequences. Currently 
93 percent of households receiving LIHEAP assistance have at 
least one family member who is elderly, disabled, a child under 
18, or have a single adult living with one or more children. 
Approximately 80 percent of households receiving LIHEAP 
assistance have annual incomes below $20,000 and almost 40 
percent have incomes below $10,000.
    The Committee maintains bill language included in the 
Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing 
Appropriations Act, 2009, allowing States to provide assistance 
to households making up to 75 percent of the State median 
income. In fiscal year 2009, approximately 17 percent of 
eligible households under these new eligibility criteria 
received assistance.

                     REFUGEE AND ENTRANT ASSISTANCE

    The Committee provides $714,968,000 for Refugee and Entrant 
Assistance programs. This amount is $81,526,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $25,689,000 less than the 
budget request. The Committee includes bill language making 
most of these funds available through September 30, 2012, as 
requested. This funding would provide assistance to over 
160,000 arriving refugees, asylees, entrants, trafficking 
victims, and unaccompanied alien children, including 29,000 
special immigrants from Iraq and Afghanistan.
    The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) programs are 
designed to help refugees, asylees, Cuban and Haitian entrants, 
and trafficking victims become employed and self-sufficient. 
These programs also assist unaccompanied immigrant children in 
Federal custody and victims of torture.
    The Committee notes the inherent uncertainties in 
estimating the necessary funding level for ORR programs. A 
significant amount of ORR's expenses are determined by the 
number of refugees arriving in the United States and the number 
of unaccompanied alien children transferred to ORR's care. In 
particular, in recent years the number of refugees arriving in 
the United States, while increasing, has been lower than 
expected, resulting in significant carryover of unobligated 
balances. While ORR does not plan on carrying over any 
unobligated balances into fiscal year 2010, the Committee urges 
the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to allocate 
any unexpected carryover in fiscal year 2010 for social 
services activities.
    The Committee recommends that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) conduct an evaluation of ORR's administration of 
the refugee assistance programs, including an assessment of the 
effectiveness of ORR programs at helping refugees achieve self-
sufficiency. Preliminary data indicates that the economic 
downturn has made it increasingly difficult for arriving 
refugees to achieve self-sufficiency. As the number of refugees 
entering the United States continues to rise, with some of the 
largest increases in those from Iraq and Afghanistan, this 
growing caseload will continue to put stress on ORR programs. 
It is critical that the United States follow through in this 
humanitarian mission and provide adequate services to this very 
vulnerable population. The Committee is particularly interested 
in GAO identifying any inequities in the system, evaluating the 
Voluntary Agency Matching Grant program compared to State-
administered and Wilson-Fish programs, and recommending 
possible improvements to ensure all refugees receive the 
assistance they need to achieve self-sufficiency within a 
reasonable period of time.

Transitional and Medical Services

    The Committee provides $337,102,000 for Transitional and 
Medical Services, which is $54,754,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Transitional and Medical Services program provides, through 
State governments and non-profit organizations, cash, medical, 
and other assistance to eligible refugees, asylees, entrants, 
and victims of trafficking who are not categorically eligible 
for Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Medicaid, or SSI. 
State refugee programs are reimbursed for their costs of 
providing assistance, while non-profit organizations are 
awarded grants to provide assistance in States not 
participating in the program, or participating in only parts of 
the program. Transitional and Medical Services also provides 
funding for the Voluntary Agency Matching Grant program.
    While still falling below the ceiling established by the 
State Department, the number of refugees arriving in the United 
States has been increasing in recent years. From fiscal year 
2003 to fiscal year 2008 the number of arriving refugees more 
than doubled, from less than 30,000 to over 60,000. In fiscal 
years 2009 and 2010 ACF expects these numbers to approach the 
80,000 ceiling established by the State Department. ACF expects 
an additional 29,000 special immigrants arriving from Iraq and 
Afghanistan, up from only 100 in fiscal year 2007. At the same 
time, the economic downturn has resulted in refugees receiving 
assistance for a longer period of time, often for the full 
eight months for which they are eligible. The Committee 
recommendation will ensure that eligible refugees continue to 
receive transitional and medical assistance in their first 
vulnerable months in the United States.
    Voluntary Agency Matching Grant Program.--Under the 
Voluntary Agency Matching Grant program, national voluntary 
refugee resettlement agencies match Federal funds and provide 
job placement, job development, and interim cash assistance 
with the goal of refugees attaining self-sufficiency in their 
first four to six months in the United States. Refugees 
participating in this program are not eligible for other cash 
assistance. While the economic downturn has created new 
challenges, the Committee continues to recognize the positive 
outcomes of this program, which has experienced success in 
facilitating economic self-sufficiency for newly arriving 
refugees within a short period of time. The Committee requests 
that ORR include in their fiscal year 2011 Congressional budget 
justification, additional information on the Voluntary Agency 
Matching Grant program, including actual and projected 
information on funding levels; the number of refugees 
participating in the program; demographics of refugees 
participating in the program including country of origin and 
level of education attainment; and the number of refugees 
achieving self-sufficiency within four and six months in the 
United States.
    Family Preservation for Unaccompanied Refugee Minors 
(URM).--The Committee commends the initial steps taken by ORR 
to address the problem of separated children and refugee family 
breakdown by piloting a family preservation specialist 
initiative in the URM Program. The Committee urges ORR to 
consider expanding this initiative. In addition, the Committee 
requests that ORR provide adequate funding to URM programs for 
capacity development so that they have the necessary 
infrastructure to accommodate increasing numbers of 
unaccompanied and separated refugee children. The Committee 
requests ORR to provide estimates in its fiscal year 2011 
Congressional budget justification on the number of family 
preservation specialists funded, along with actual and 
projected data on the number of refugee children in the URM 
program.

Victims of Trafficking

    The Committee provides $9,814,000 for Victims of 
Trafficking, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Committee strongly supports 
the continued administration of a national network for 
identification, tracking, and certification of trafficking 
victims. The Committee is encouraged that the William 
Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act 
of 2008 (TVPRA) grants the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services new authority to provide interim assistance to child 
victims of trafficking. The Committee also supports efforts to 
ensure that child trafficking victims do not remain trapped in 
life-threatening situations out of fear of being interrogated 
by law enforcement authorities.

Social Services

    The Committee provides $154,005,000 for Social Services, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. Funding is distributed by a combination of 
formula and discretionary grants to states and non-profit 
organizations and supports a variety of services for refugees 
including employment preparation, job placement, social 
adjustment services, interpretation and translation services, 
English language training, and childcare.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee includes 
$19,000,000 for continued support to communities with large 
concentrations of Cuban and Haitian entrants of varying ages 
whose cultural differences make assimilation especially 
difficult, justifying a more intense level and longer duration 
of Federal assistance.
    In addition, the Committee urges ACF to use any unobligated 
balances under this account carried over into fiscal year 2010 
to expand social services to refugees, particularly for 
emerging housing assistance to refugees. The Committee is 
concerned that the current economic downturn has left many 
refugees unable to find or maintain employment and, as a 
result, facing eviction and homelessness. The economic climate 
has intensified an already difficult transition and the 
Committee urges ACF to use any unanticipated carryover to help 
refugees as they contend with new and unforeseen challenges.
    The Committee continues to request that ACF adequately fund 
the Refugee School Impact program. This program provides grants 
to support impacted school districts to fund activities that 
will lead to the effective integration and education of refugee 
children.

Preventive Health

    The Committee provides $4,748,000 for Preventive Health, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. These funds are awarded through discretionary 
grants to States to support the coordination and promotion of 
health screening, treatment, and medical follow-up services to 
refugees.

Targeted Assistance

    The Committee provides $48,590,000 for the Targeted 
Assistance program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. These grants provide 
assistance to areas with high concentrations of refugees.

Unaccompanied Alien Children

    The Committee provides $149,351,000 for the Unaccompanied 
Alien Children (UAC) program, which is $26,231,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $26,230,000 less than 
the budget request. Subsequent to the fiscal year 2010 request, 
the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 included an 
additional $82,000,000 for the UAC program for costs associated 
with the TVPRA. These additional funds will remain available 
through September 30, 2011.
    The UAC program provides for the care and placement of 
unaccompanied children who are apprehended in the U.S. by law 
enforcement and taken into care pending resolution of their 
immigration cases. ACF provides grants and contracts to State-
licensed facilities to provide temporary shelter, medical care, 
pro bono legal services, family reunification services, and 
other support services for children in ACF's care.
    The TVPRA includes new requirements regarding the treatment 
and care of unaccompanied alien children. The TVPRA requires 
that unaccompanied alien children interdicted from Mexico and 
Canada whom the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
determines to be victims of trafficking, at risk of trafficking 
upon return, or who have a credible fear of persecution upon 
return, must be transferred to ACF's care. Previously all 
children from contiguous countries apprehended at the border 
were immediately returned and not transferred to ACF. The TVPRA 
also provides for increased monitoring, screening, and 
assessments for children, increased home studies before 
children are placed with a sponsor, mandatory follow-up for 
children for whom a study is conducted, and specialized 
training for Federal, State and local personnel. The Committee 
supports these new provisions aimed at ensuring the proper care 
and treatment of unaccompanied alien children. However, these 
new requirements have only become effective as of March 2009 
and limited data are available on the actual costs of carrying 
out the provisions of the TVPRA. The Committee requests ACF to 
provide a report within 60 days of enactment of this Act to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate on how ACF has implemented the provisions of the 
TVPRA and the costs associated with carrying out these new 
provisions, including information on the number of children 
transferred to ACF's care, the length of stay while under ACF's 
care, and other costs associated with implementing the TVPRA.
    Transportation of Unaccompanied Alien Children.--The 
Committee does not include funding for the transportation of 
unaccompanied alien children from the point of apprehension to 
placement in an ORR facility. The Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB), in consultation with HHS and DHS, released a memo 
in June 2009 specifying that DHS will continue to be 
responsible for this transportation in fiscal year 2010. In 
addition, a more extensive report will be completed by 
September 30, 2009 detailing specific recommendations 
concerning improvements to the program. In preparing this 
report, the Committee urges OMB, HHS, and DHS to consider the 
best interest of the unaccompanied alien children. The 
Committee urges HHS and DHS to work to ensure the placement of 
children in areas with access to important medical, mental 
health, and legal services. Many facilities are currently 
located in rural areas close to the border to facilitate an 
easier transfer of children between DHS and HHS. However, many 
of these areas lack access to key services.
    Pro Bono Pilot Program.--Unaccompanied alien children are 
not guaranteed legal representation and many children appear 
before a judge to determine their immigration status without an 
attorney. Pro bono legal representation is absolutely critical 
to ensure that children understand their rights as they 
navigate the legal process to determine their status in the 
United States. The Committee commends ORR for implementing a 
pro bono pilot program for unaccompanied alien children and 
includes no less than $6,000,000 within the UAC program to 
continue and expand this initiative. The Committee urges ORR to 
continue to work towards ensuring that all unaccompanied alien 
children understand their legal rights and have access to pro 
bono representation. The Committee requests a report be 
included in the fiscal year 2011 budget justification on the 
effectiveness of this initiative, including the number and 
proportion of unaccompanied alien children provided pro bono 
legal representation.
    Independent Evaluation.--The Homeland Security Act of 2002 
transferred responsibility for the care and treatment of 
unaccompanied alien children to HHS to ensure that the child 
welfare needs of children are protected. Since that time there 
has not been a comprehensive evaluation of the UAC program. The 
Committee recommends up to $250,000 for an independent 
evaluation of the UAC program to determine if the UAC program 
is operating consistent with child welfare best practices.
    Field Coordinator Program.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of the field coordinator program to properly 
evaluate children, make recommendations based on their 
independent evaluation of the child, and advocate in the best 
interests of the child. Given the expected increase in the 
number of unaccompanied alien children resulting from the 
TVPRA, the Committee urges ORR to expand the field coordinator 
program to ensure that children are properly evaluated and 
their best welfare protected.

Victims of Torture

    The Committee provides $11,358,000 to provide a 
comprehensive program of support for domestic centers and 
programs for victims of torture. This amount is $541,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
Funding supports services and rehabilitation for victims of 
torture, including social and legal services and training for 
healthcare providers on treating the physical and psychological 
effects of torture.

   PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee provides $2,127,081,000 for the discretionary 
portion of the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional $2,000,000,000 
for the CCDBG in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The CCDBG provides 
child care services for low-income families.
    One out of every three families with young children earn 
less than $25,000 and child care costs can make up a sizable 
piece of any family's budget. For many families, single-parent 
households in particular, child care can be prohibitively 
expensive. A recent study found that in the vast majority of 
States, the average annual cost of child care for two young 
children is more than half the median income for single parent 
households.
    The Committee continues to believe that providing 
affordable high quality child care is a critical investment 
that can have lasting benefits for families. Single mothers who 
receive child care assistance are 40 percent more likely to 
remain employed after two years than those who do not receive 
assistance. Children receiving high quality child care 
demonstrate greater mathematical ability, greater thinking and 
attention skills, and fewer behavioral problems than children 
who receive lower quality care. Including mandatory funds, the 
Committee recommendation will help provide child care services 
to an estimated 1.7 million children in fiscal year 2010. 
Together with the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and 
the Social Services Block Grant, 34 percent of children in 
families with income under 150 percent of the Federal Poverty 
Level receive child care subsidies.
    Within the total for CCDBG, the Committee includes 
$271,401,000 for activities to improve the quality of child 
care, including $99,534,000 for infant and toddler care; 
$18,960,000 for child care resource and referral activities; 
$1,000,000 for the Child Care Aware toll-free hotline; and 
$9,910,000 for child care research, demonstration, and 
evaluation activities.

                      SOCIAL SERVICES BLOCK GRANT

    The Committee provides $1,700,000,000 for the Social 
Services Block Grant (SSBG), the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Committee provides 
the entire authorized amount for this flexible source of 
funding to help local communities provide a variety of social 
services to needy individuals and their families. Funds are 
distributed to States by formula grants and States have the 
flexibility to determine what services and activities are 
supported, provided they are targeted at a broad set of goals, 
including reducing or eliminating poverty, achieving or 
maintaining self-sufficiency, and preventing neglect and abuse.
    SSBG supports services in critical areas such as nutrition, 
employment, housing, public health, and other social services 
that experience increased demand in an economic downturn. The 
funds in this bill will allow States to reach approximately 19 
million vulnerable individuals.

                 CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee provides a total program level of 
$9,447,168,000 for Children and Families Services Programs, 
which is $135,840,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $22,608,000 below the budget request. Within the total 
provided, $10,217,000 is provided through the section 241 
Public Health Service Act evaluation set-aside. This account 
finances a number of programs aimed at enhancing the well-being 
of the nation's children and families, particularly those who 
are disadvantaged or troubled.

Head Start

    The Committee provides $7,234,783,000 for Head Start, which 
is $121,997,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
$2,100,000,000 for Head Start, with a directive that HHS work 
with grantees to manage resources to sustain fiscal year 2009 
awards through fiscal year 2010. The Committee recommendation 
will allow Head Start to serve approximately 978,000 children 
in fiscal year 2010, maintaining the 69,000 increase in 
children served due to the Recovery Act.
    Head Start provides grants to local public and private non-
profit agencies to provide comprehensive early childhood 
development services, including educational, health, 
nutritional, and social services, to economically disadvantaged 
children before they enter school. Head Start was reauthorized 
in December 2007, with several significant changes to the 
program, including expanding eligibility, establishing a 
funding priority for American Indian and Alaska Native and 
Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs, enhancing 
qualification requirements for Head Start teachers and other 
staff, and imposing new competition requirements for poorly 
performing grantees.
    The Committee requests that the Office of Head Start 
include the waiting lists for the Head Start, Early Head Start, 
and the Indian and Migrant and Seasonal Head Start programs as 
part of the annual Program Information Reporting System.
    Homeless Children.--The Improving Head Start for School 
Readiness Act of 2007 includes provisions intended to enhance 
services for homeless children and increase their participation 
in Head Start. The Committee encourages ACF, in developing and 
implementing Head Start training and technical assistance, to 
work with organizations specializing in improving services to 
homeless children in early education programs.
    Vision Screening.--The Committee recognizes that vision 
disorders are the leading cause of impaired health in childhood 
and is concerned that while Head Start currently requires 
children to be screened for vision problems, there are no 
procedures for training, tracking, or conducting the screening. 
This lack of national uniform standards continues to cause many 
Head Start enrollees to fall through the cracks without 
diagnosis or treatment. The Committee encourages the 
continuation and expansion of collaborative efforts between the 
Office of Head Start and stakeholders to ensure that all Head 
Start enrollees receive vision screening services and other 
resources available to them in their community.

Consolidated Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs

    The Committee provides $98,234,000 for Consolidated Runaway 
and Homeless Youth Programs, which is $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Funding 
supports the establishment and operation of runaway and 
homeless youth shelters and transitional living programs. 
Funding also supports the national toll free runaway and 
homeless youth crisis hotline, which receives over 100,000 
calls annually.
    Grants are used to develop or strengthen community-based 
shelters, which are outside the law enforcement, juvenile 
justice, child welfare, and mental health systems. Basic 
Centers provide outreach, crisis intervention, temporary 
shelter, counseling and family unification services. 
Transitional Living Programs provide longer-term services for 
older children who cannot safely live with their families, 
providing skills designed to help youth transition to self-
sufficiency. The Transitional Living Program also funds 
programs for pregnant and parenting teens.

Prevention Grants to Reduce Abuse of Runaway Youth

    The Committee provides $18,721,000 for Prevention Grants to 
Reduce Abuse of Runaway Youth, which is $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program provides grants to support street-based outreach and 
education to runaway, homeless, and street youth who have been 
sexually abused or who are at-risk of sexual abuse. The street 
outreach program ensures rapid engagement with young people in 
an effort to prevent the most terrible situations that take 
place when they are subjected to life on the streets, including 
physical and sexual abuse, assault, commercial sexual 
exploitation, disease, long-term homelessness, and even death.

Child Abuse State Grants

    The Committee provides $26,535,000 for Child Abuse State 
Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request. These funds support grants to States to 
improve child protective service systems. State grants are 
based on an initial $50,000 allocation per State, with 
additional funds distributed based on the State's relative 
share of the number of children under age 18.

Child Abuse Discretionary Activities

    The Committee provides $40,595,000 for Child Abuse 
Discretionary Activities, which is $1,162,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $1,250,000 above the budget 
request. Funding supports a variety of research and 
demonstration projects.
    Home Visitation Initiative.--Within the total provided for 
Child Abuse Discretionary Activities, the Committee provides 
$15,000,000 for the Home Visitation initiative. These funds 
support competitive grants to States to encourage investment of 
existing funding streams into proven-effective home visitation 
models. As in fiscal year 2009, the Committee directs ACF to 
ensure that these funds support models that have been shown in 
well-designed, randomized controlled trials to produce 
sizeable, sustained effects on important child and family 
outcomes, such as abuse and neglect. The budget includes a 
legislative proposal to establish a capped entitlement program 
to provide a dedicated funding stream to States to establish 
and expand evidenced-based home visitation programs. The 
Committee strongly supports home visitation programs and, 
pending enactment of this legislation, continues to fund the 
establishment and expansion of programs within this account.
    Within the $14,819,000 included in the bill, $1,250,000 
shall be used for the following projects in the following 
amounts:
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
County of Contra Costa, Martinez, CA for an                     $350,000
 initiative for children and adolescents exposed to
 domestic violence...................................
Douglas County C.A.R.E.S., Roseburg, OR for the Kids             300,000
 in Common program to provide services to abused and
 neglected children..................................
Marcus Autism Center, Atlanta, GA for an autism                  300,000
 initiative..........................................
University of California, Merced/The Great Valley                300,000
 Center, Merced, CA for child abuse prevention
 education services..................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Community-based Child Abuse Prevention

    The Committee provides $41,689,000 for Community-based 
Child Abuse Prevention, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. Funds are provided 
to State agencies and are used to develop, operate, expand, and 
enhance community-based efforts to strengthen and support 
families in an effort to prevent child abuse and neglect.

Abandoned Infants Assistance

    The Committee provides $11,628,000 for the Abandoned 
Infants Assistance program, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The purpose of 
this program is to provide financial support to public and 
private community and faith-based entities to develop, 
implement, and operate demonstration projects that will prevent 
the abandonment of infants and young children exposed to HIV/
AIDS and drugs; identify and address their needs; assist such 
children to reside with their natural families or in foster 
care; recruit, train, and retain foster parents, as well as 
health and social services personnel; provide respite care for 
families and foster families; and prevent the abandonment of 
infants and young children.

Child Welfare Services and Training

    The Committee provides $281,744,000 for Child Welfare 
Services, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program provides grants to 
States to assist public welfare agencies to improve child 
welfare services. State services include preventive 
intervention so that children may stay in their homes, 
alternative placement such as foster care or adoption if it is 
not possible for children to remain at home, and reunification 
programs so that, if appropriate, children can return home.
    In addition to the amount for Child Welfare Services, the 
Committee provides $27,207,000 for Child Welfare Training, 
Research and Demonstration, which is $20,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The 
increased funding is for a new Innovative Approaches to Foster 
Care program, as proposed by the Administration. This program 
would provide funding to States, localities, and tribes to 
improve the outcome of children and families in foster care, 
particularly those with long-term involvement. Almost one-
quarter of children in foster care have been in foster care for 
three years or longer and these remain some of the most 
challenging cases. Grantees demonstrating improvement in 
outcomes for children in long-term foster care would be 
eligible for bonus funding.

Adoption Opportunities

    The Committee provides $26,379,000 for Adoption 
Opportunities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
funding specifically targeted at improving the adoption of 
children, particularly those with special needs, removing 
barriers to adoption, and providing innovative services that 
support families involved in adoption.

Adoption Incentives

    The Committee provides $39,500,000 for Adoption Incentives, 
which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request. This program targets 
incentives at placement of older children and children with 
special needs. Funds are awarded to States using three 
baselines: one for the total number of children adopted, one 
for children with special needs under the age of nine, and one 
for children aged nine and older. The goal of this program is 
to increase the number of adoptions nationwide. The Fostering 
Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 
doubled the authorized incentive payments for the hardest-to-
place children.

Adoption Awareness

    The Committee provides $12,953,000 for the Adoption 
Awareness Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
funding to train staff to provide health services to pregnant 
women to inform them about adoption, develop best practice 
guidelines on adoption counseling, and publicize information 
about the adoption of children with special needs.

Strengthening Communities Fund

    The Committee does not recommend funding for the 
Strengthening Communities Fund because the Recovery Act 
included $50,000,000 for this activity, including funding for a 
national evaluation of the program. The budget proposed 
$50,000,000 for this activity, to provide capacity-building 
grants for organizations and State, local, and Tribal 
governments responsible for providing training and technical 
assistance to small non-profit organizations, with the ultimate 
goal of improving the effectiveness of non-profit 
organizations. The Committee notes that this is a new 
initiative and has not yet been evaluated. The Committee will 
consider future funding recommendations pending an evaluation 
of the program.

Social Services and Income Maintenance Research

    The Committee provides a total program level of $19,331,000 
for Social Services and Income Maintenance Research, which is 
$929,000 less than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$13,569,000 more than the budget request. Within this amount 
$5,762,000 is provided through the section 241 Public Health 
Service Act evaluation set-aside. These funds support research, 
demonstration, evaluation, and dissemination activities. Recent 
topics funded through this program include welfare-to-work 
strategies and programs to strengthen family relationships and 
promote healthy marriages.
    Within the $14,819,000 included in the bill, $13,569,000 
shall be used for the following projects in the following 
amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Asian Pacific Women, Los Angeles, CA for a domestic              $50,000
 violence prevention and education initiative........
Barry University, Miami Shores, FL for the Center for            300,000
 Community Services Initiatives......................
Beth El House, Alexandria, VA for housing and social             200,000
 services to formerly homeless single mothers and
 their families......................................
Bethany House, Laredo, TX for equipment and job                  230,000
 training resources to help the unemployed find
 gainful employment..................................
Bethel's Place, Houston, TX for the Heavenly Hands               100,000
 community project...................................
Beyond Shelter, Los Angeles, CA for a crisis                     400,000
 intervention demonstration project..................
Chabad of South Bay, Lomita, CA for a project to                 370,000
 improve services for youth and families in crisis...
Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters Health               500,000
 System, Norfolk, VA for a comprehensive program to
 treat abused children...............................
City of Bellevue, WA for the Wrap-Around Services                375,000
 program.............................................
City of Emeryville, CA for early childhood                       250,000
 development, counseling, and related services.......
City of Ft. Worth, TX for the Early Childhood Matters            425,000
 Initiative..........................................
City of Norwich, CT for services to pregnant and                  85,000
 parenting adolescents and their families............
City of San Jose, CA for a pilot program to evaluate             284,000
 and assess the Smart Start childcare model..........
Council of Peoples Organization, Brooklyn, NY for the            150,000
 Community Youth Program.............................
Easter Seals of Southern Georgia, Albany, GA for                 100,000
 respite services for children who are
 developmentally disabled, have autism, or are
 medically fragile...................................
Eva's Place, Sandusky, MI for domestic violence                  200,000
 service programs....................................
First 5 Alameda County, San Leandro, CA for its                  500,000
 children's screening, assessment, referral, and
 treatment initiative................................
Glenwood School for Boys and Girls, Glenwood, IL for             350,000
 housing support and educational and social skills
 development programs................................
Greater New Britain Teen Pregnancy Prevention, Inc.,             100,000
 New Britain, CT for teen pregnancy prevention
 services............................................
Gregory House Programs, Honolulu, HI for a                       100,000
 comprehensive homelessness prevention program for
 people living with HIV/AIDS.........................
Homeless Prenatal Program, San Francisco CA for case             400,000
 management and supportive services..................
Hope Institute for Children and Families,                        100,000
 Springfield, IL for facilities and equipment........
Horizons for Homeless Children, Roxbury, MA for                  630,000
 programs for homeless children......................
Human Services Coalition of Tompkins County, Inc.,                50,000
 Ithaca NY for 2-1-1 Tompkins to provide access to
 social services.....................................
Huron County Safe Place, Bad Axe, MI for domestic                150,000
 violence service programs...........................
Jewish Community Council of Canarsie, Brooklyn, NY               300,000
 for services for at-risk Holocaust survivors........
Lapeer Area Citizens Against Domestic Assault,                   200,000
 Lapeer, MI for domestic violence service programs...
Larkin Street Youth Services, San Francisco, CA for              300,000
 homeless and runaway youth services.................
LifeStyles of Maryland, Inc., La Plata, MD for its                60,000
 Safe Nights Program for homeless and disadvantaged
 populations.........................................
Little Friends, Inc., Naperville, IL for an autism               200,000
 initiative..........................................
Make the Road New York, Jackson Heights, NY for                  300,000
 support services for low-income and working families
Minot State University, Minot, ND for its Great                  300,000
 Plains Autism Treatment Program.....................
Monterey County Probation Department, Salinas, CA for            750,000
 the Silver Star Gang Prevention and Intervention
 Program.............................................
Montgomery County Department of Health and Human                 200,000
 Services, Rockville, MD for community based service
 delivery and outreach...............................
National Energy Assistance Directors' Association,               200,000
 Washington, DC for research and information
 dissemination related to the Low Income Home Energy
 Assistance Program..................................
North Ward Center, Newark, NJ for comprehensive                  400,000
 services for people with autism spectrum disorders..
Pathways PA, Holmes, PA for services for pregnant and            150,000
 parenting teens.....................................
Pierce County Alliance, Tacoma, WA for a program to              150,000
 expedite the permanent placement of child victims of
 parental abuse or neglect...........................
Polaris Project, Washington, DC for the New Jersey               250,000
 Trafficking Intervention Program....................
Prince George's County, Upper Marlboro, MD for a                 165,000
 program for transition aged youth...................
Safe Horizons, Port Huron, MI for domestic violence              200,000
 service programs....................................
 Salvation Army San Bernardino Center for Worship and            160,000
 Service, San Bernardino, CA for the Support Family
 Services Program....................................
Santa Clara Family Health Plan, Campbell, CA for a               300,000
 program to transfer medically fragile and severely
 developmentally disabled individuals from an
 institutional setting...............................
SingleStop USA, San Francisco, CA for a program to               100,000
 increase low-income households' access to social
 services............................................
Somerset Home for Temporarily Displaced Children,                400,000
 Bridgewater, NJ for a transitional/permanent housing
 program for youth who have aged out of foster care..
Susanna Wesley Family Learning Center, East Prairie,             250,000
 MO to assist at-risk youth and their families.......
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL for the West               355,000
 Alabama Autism Outreach Center......................
University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, MO for              280,000
 services for people with Autism Spectrum Disorders..
University of Toledo, Toledo, OH for services for                500,000
 persons with autism and research on autism spectrum
 disorders...........................................
Wayne County Department of Children and Family                   150,000
 Services, Detroit, MI for the Kids-TALK forensic
 interviewing project................................
Wynona's House, Newark, NJ for multicultural                     300,000
 psychotherapeutic interventions for child victims of
 sexual abuse........................................
YWCA of Monterey County, Monterey, CA for expansion              250,000
 of direct services and prevention programs to combat
 domestic and gang violence..........................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Developmental Disabilities Assistance

    The Committee provides $186,355,000 for programs authorized 
by the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights 
Act and the Help America Vote Act, which is $2,500,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
            State Councils on Developmental Disabilities
    Within the total for developmental disabilities assistance, 
$74,316,000 is for allotments to States to fund State Councils 
on Developmental Disabilities, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. These State 
Councils develop, improve, and expand the system of services 
and supports for people with developmental disabilities. 
Through their activities, Councils on Developmental 
Disabilities provide for the inclusion and integration of 
individuals with developmental disabilities in the economic, 
political, social, cultural, religious and educational 
mainstream of the nation.
            Protection and Advocacy
    Within the total for developmental disabilities assistance, 
$41,024,000 is available to States for the Developmental 
Disabilities Protection and Advocacy Program, which is aimed at 
protecting the legal and human rights of the developmentally 
disabled. This amount is $1,000,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request.
            Voting Access for Individuals With Disabilities
    Within the total for developmental disabilities assistance, 
the Committee recommends $17,410,000 for Voting Access for 
Individuals with Disabilities, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Within the 
funds provided, $12,154,000 is for payments to States to 
promote access for voters with disabilities and $5,256,000 is 
for State protection and advocacy systems. These programs are 
intended to make polling places accessible and provide equal 
access and participation for individuals with disabilities. The 
protection and advocacy program will ensure that individuals 
can fully participate in the electoral process, including 
registering to vote, accessing polling places, and casting a 
vote.
    The Committee encourages ACF to continue to work with 
States to ensure that these funds are properly used within a 
reasonable amount of time.
            Developmental Disabilities Projects of National 
                    Significance
    Within the total for developmental disabilities assistance, 
the Committee recommends $14,662,000 for Developmental 
Disabilities Projects of National Significance, which is 
$500,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. Within this amount, the Committee recommends 
$3,000,000 for the establishment of a national autism resource 
and information center, to help families and other caregivers 
of individuals with autism spectrum disorders access 
information about evidence-based interventions, services, and 
protocols. This award shall be made on a competitive basis.
            University Centers for Excellence in Developmental 
                    Disabilities
    Within the total for developmental disabilities assistance, 
the Committee recommends $38,943,000 for the University Centers 
for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, which is 
$1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This funding provides discretionary grants to 
public or not-for-profit entities associated with universities. 
The grants provide basic operational and administrative core 
support for these entities. In addition, these funds support 
interdisciplinary training, community services, research and 
technical assistance, and information dissemination.

Native American Programs

    The Committee provides $48,523,000 for Native American 
programs, which is $1,500,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Native American 
programs assist tribal and village governments, Native American 
institutions, and organizations to support and develop stable, 
diversified local economies. In promoting social and economic 
self-sufficiency, this program provides financial assistance 
through direct grants for individual projects, training and 
technical assistance, and research and demonstration programs.
    Within this amount, the Committee intends that not less 
than $11,000,000 be used to fund Native American language 
programs, as authorized by the Esther Martinez Native American 
Languages Preservation Act of 2006.

Community Services

    The Committee provides $770,025,000 for community services 
activities, which is $5,288,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $4,712,000 above the budget request.
            Grants to States for Community Services
    Within the total for community services activities, the 
Committee provides $700,000,000 for the Community Services 
Block Grant (CSBG), which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $1,000,000,000 for CSBG in fiscal years 2009 and 
2010. The Recovery Act also included language allowing States 
to increase the income eligibility ceiling from 125 percent to 
200 percent of the poverty level for appropriated funds in 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    The CSBG provides flexible funding to over 1,000 counties, 
territories, and Indian tribes for services, such as 
employment, housing, nutrition, energy, emergency services, 
child care, job training and placement, parenting education, 
adult literacy classes, domestic violence prevention, emergency 
food assistance, and health needs of low-income people. As a 
result of the funds provided in this bill, localities will 
assist more than 16 million low-income individuals.
    The Committee directs that $500,000 of training and 
technical assistance funds under CSBG be allocated for a 
national community economic development training and capacity 
development initiative. Successful implementation of community 
development programs requires significant investment in high-
quality board and staff training and proven technical 
assistance. This funding will enable community action agency 
leaders to attain the professional skills needed to undertake 
projects to enhance their communities' future security through 
financing and implementing innovative housing, economic and 
community development partnerships.
            Community Economic Development
    Within the total for community services activities, the 
Committee provides $36,000,000 for Community Economic 
Development, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Community Economic 
Development program provides grants to locally-initiated 
community economic development corporations (CEDCs) to make 
loans to or investments in private business enterprises that 
provide employment, training, and business opportunities for 
low-income individuals in poor communities. The Committee 
continues bill language clarifying Congressional intent 
regarding disposition of intangible assets, including loans and 
investments, acquired under the community economic development 
authority of the CSBG Act.
            Rural Community Facilities
    Within the total for community services activities, the 
Committee provides $10,000,000 for Rural Community Facilities, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$10,000,000 more than the budget request. This program provides 
training and technical assistance to communities for planning, 
developing, and managing, safe drinking water and wastewater 
facilities. As in the past, these funds should be allocated to 
regional rural community assistance programs.
            Job Opportunities for Low-Income Individuals
    The Committee does not provide funding for Job 
Opportunities for Low-Income Individuals because the Committee 
recommendation includes $50,000,000 for a new Transitional Jobs 
initiative in the Department of Labor to provide employment 
opportunities to the same target population of TANF recipients 
and low-income individuals as this program. The budget request 
included $5,288,000 for this program, the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level. In fiscal year 2009, this program 
provided grants to non-profit organizations to create new 
employment and business opportunities for TANF recipients and 
other low-income individuals. The effectiveness of this 
narrowly focused program has never been evaluated, and the 
Committee believes these activities are duplicated by other 
programs.
            Individual Development Accounts
    Within the total for community services activities, the 
Committee provides $24,025,000 for Individual Development 
Accounts, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. Individual Development Accounts 
are dedicated savings accounts that can be used by families 
with limited means for purchasing a first home, paying for 
postsecondary education or capitalizing a business. The intent 
of the program is to encourage participants to develop and 
reinforce strong habits for saving money. Section 501(c)(3) 
organizations are eligible to apply for the funds and 
applicants must match Federal funds with non-Federal funds.

Violent Crime Reduction Programs

    The Committee provides $133,776,000 for Family Violence 
Prevention and Services and Battered Women's Shelters, which is 
$6,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program is designed to assist States and 
tribes in efforts to prevent family violence and to provide 
immediate shelter and related assistance for victims of family 
violence and their dependents.
    In addition, the Committee provides $3,209,000 to finance a 
domestic violence hotline, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request.

Mentoring Children of Prisoners

    The Committee provides $49,314,000 for Mentoring Children 
of Prisoners, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program supports 
competitively awarded grants to States and local governments, 
Indian tribes and consortia, and faith- and community-based 
organizations to mentor children of prisoners and those 
recently released from prison.

Independent Living Training Vouchers

    The Committee provides $45,351,000 for Independent Living 
Training Vouchers, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
vouchers of up to $5,000 per year for post-secondary assistance 
such as tuition, books, fees, supplies, and vocational training 
for foster care youth and former foster care youth. These 
discretionary funds will provide vouchers to approximately 
16,000 such youth to help them transition from foster care.

Teenage Pregnancy Prevention

    The Committee provides a total program level of 
$114,455,000 for a new teenage pregnancy prevention initiative, 
as requested by the Administration. This program will provide 
funds to public and private entities on a competitive basis for 
proven-effective or otherwise promising teenage pregnancy 
prevention programs that provide medically accurate, age-
appropriate, and complete information to youths. The Committee 
is deeply concerned that teenage birth rates have begun to rise 
after 14 years of decline. In 2006, teenage birth increased for 
the first time since 1991, following a 34-percent decline over 
that period. Preliminary data indicates this increase may have 
continued in 2007. Studies have found that the overwhelming 
majority of teenage pregnancies are unplanned. Reducing the 
incidence of teenage pregnancy can have untold individual and 
societal benefits, including reducing poverty, improving 
education outcomes, improving child well-being, and reducing 
the need for abortions.
    Within the total, the Committee provides not less than 
$75,000,000 for evidence-based programs that have shown through 
rigorous evaluation, defined as randomized controlled trials, 
to reduce teenage pregnancy, delay sexual activity, or increase 
contraceptive use. Most evidence-based programs that have been 
proven effective at reducing risk factors associated with 
teenage pregnancy are those that encourage abstinence as the 
safest choice and also discuss contraceptive use as a way to 
avoid pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Within the 
total, the Committee further provides not less than $25,000,000 
to develop, test, replicate, and refine programs that may not 
yet have rigorous evaluation demonstrating effectiveness, but 
use promising or innovative approaches to prevent teenage 
pregnancy. Any remaining amounts not specified herein should be 
used for program support, training and technical assistance, 
demonstration development, and additional research and 
evaluation activities.
    Within the total, $4,455,000 is provided through the 
Section 241 Public Health Service Act evaluation set-aside for 
evaluating promising teenage pregnancy prevention approaches.

Community-based Abstinence Education

    The Administration's budget request did not include funding 
for Community-based Abstinence Education, which received a 
program level total of $99,114,000 in fiscal year 2009. The 
Committee adopts this recommendation. Abstinence education 
approaches meeting the qualifications laid out in the Teenage 
Pregnancy Prevention program will be eligible for funding under 
that program.

Faith-based Center

    The Committee provides $1,376,000 for the Faith-based 
Center, which is $14,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and same as the budget request. The center will support 
implementation of faith-based and community initiatives.

Disaster Human Services Case Management

    The Committee provides $2,000,000 for the Disaster Human 
Services Case Management initiative, as proposed by the 
Administration. This new initiative will be a collaboration 
between ACF and the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and 
Response within HHS and the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency. Its purpose is to assist States in building the 
capacity to provide effective case management services to 
victims of major disasters.

Program Direction

    The Committee provides $213,485,000 for Program Direction, 
which is $16,555,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $4,139,000 less than the budget request. Program 
Direction provides funding for salaries and expenses for ACF 
program management in Washington, D.C. headquarters, ten 
regional offices, and 13 child support enforcement offices. 
There have been numerous reauthorizations in the past two years 
that have included major new responsibilities for ACF relating 
to the administration of Head Start, Refugee and Entrant 
Assistance programs, and foster care and adoption assistance 
programs.
    Within the total, the Committee provides $1,000,000 to be 
transferred to National Commission on Children and Disasters, 
as provided for in title VI of division G of the Omnibus 
Appropriations Act, 2008, to continue a comprehensive study of 
the needs of children relating to the preparation for, response 
to, and recovery from major disasters and emergencies. In 
total, the National Commission on Children and Disasters will 
have received $3,000,000 of this activity, the authorized 
funding level.
    Within the total, the Committee provides up to $2,000,000 
for improving the Public Assistance Reporting Information 
System.

                   PROMOTING SAFE AND STABLE FAMILIES

    The Committee provides $345,000,000 in mandatory funds for 
the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Committee recommends $63,311,000 in discretionary 
funds for this program, which is also the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. A total of 
$443,311,000 will be available in fiscal year 2010 for this 
program, which enables each State to operate a coordinated 
program of family preservation services, community-based family 
support services, time-limited reunification services, and 
adoption promotion and support services. States receive funds 
based on their share of children in all States receiving food 
stamp benefits.

                PAYMENTS FOR FOSTER CARE AND PERMANENCY

    The Committee provides $5,532,000,000 for Payments for 
Foster Care and Permanency, which is $123,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. Including advance appropriations in fiscal year 2009, 
a total of $7,332,000,000 will be available for this activity 
in fiscal year 2010. The Committee also includes an advance 
appropriation of $1,850,000,000 for the first quarter of fiscal 
year 2011 to ensure timely completion of first quarter grant 
awards.
    Within the total, including the advance appropriation from 
the prior year, the Committee recommends $4,681,000,000 for the 
Foster Care program, which is $21,000,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
This program provides funds to States for foster care 
maintenance payments for children living in foster care. These 
funds also reimburse States for administrative costs to manage 
the program and training for staff and parents. The Fostering 
Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 
expanded eligible training expenditures and educational 
stability and health oversight requirements.
    Within the total, the Committee recommends $2,462,000,000 
for Adoption Assistance, which is $91,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This program provides funds to States to subsidize 
families who adopt children with special needs, e.g., older 
children, a member of a minority or sibling group, or children 
with physical, mental, and emotional disabilities. In addition, 
the program provides training for adoptive parents and State 
administrative staff. This annually appropriated entitlement 
provides alternatives to long, inappropriate stays in foster 
care by developing permanent placements with families.
    Within the total, the Committee recommends $49,000,000 for 
the Kinship Guardianship Assistance program, which is 
$35,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Fostering Connections to 
Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 created the 
Kinship Guardianship Assistance program to provide subsidies to 
a relative taking legal guardianship of a child for whom being 
returned home or adoption are not appropriate permanency 
options. This increase reflects the first full year of 
implementation of the program.
    Finally, within the total, the Committee recommends 
$140,000,000 for the Independent Living program, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. This program assists foster children age 16 or older 
make successful transitions to independence. Funds support a 
variety of services, including educational assistance, career 
exploration, vocational training, job placement, life skills 
training, home management, health services, substance abuse 
prevention, preventive health activities, and room and board. 
Each State receives funds based on the number of children on 
whose behalf the State receives Federal Foster Care Payments.

                        Administration on Aging


                        AGING SERVICES PROGRAMS

    The Committee provides $1,530,881,000 for programs 
administered by the Administration on Aging (AOA), which is 
$37,038,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$100,000,000 for senior nutrition services within AOA. AOA 
administers the programs authorized by the Older Americans Act, 
except for the Community Services Employment for Older 
Americans Program, which is administered by the Department of 
Labor. The majority of the funding appropriated to AOA is 
distributed via statutory formula to States or tribal 
organizations based on their share of the population over age 
60.

Home and Community-Based Supportive Services

    The Committee provides $371,348,000 for Home and Community-
Based Supportive Services, which is $10,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Funds 
are distributed to States and territories by formula grant 
based on a State's share of the population over age 60. This 
program serves as the foundation for the national aging 
services network by coordinating a variety of activities for 
seniors that help seniors remain at home for as long as 
possible. States allocate funds based on local needs, funding 
services such as transportation, case management, information 
and referral, in-home care, adult day care, and physical 
fitness programs. Funding also supports multi-purpose senior 
centers, which coordinate and integrate services for the 
elderly. In fiscal year 2010, this funding will support 
approximately 26 million rides to doctor's offices grocery 
stores, pharmacies, senior centers, meal sites, and other 
critical daily activities; 32 million hours of personal care, 
homemaker, and chore services; nine million hours of adult day 
care; and four million hours of case management services.

Preventive Health Services

    The Committee provides $21,026,000 for Preventive Health 
Services, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. These funds are awarded to States 
and territories to support activities that educate older adults 
about the importance of healthy lifestyles and promote healthy 
behaviors that can prevent or delay chronic disease and 
disability.

Protection of Vulnerable Older Americans

    The Committee provides $21,383,000 for the Protection of 
Vulnerable Older Americans, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This amount 
includes funding for the Long-term Care Ombudsman Program, 
which protects the rights and interests of residents in nursing 
homes, board and care homes, assisted living facilities, and 
similar adult care facilities. The amount also includes funding 
for the Prevention of Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation 
Program, which trains law enforcement and medical professionals 
to recognize and respond to elder abuse.

Family Caregiver Support Services

    The Committee provides $154,220,000 for Family Caregiver 
Support Services, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Family Caregiver 
Support Services program provides formula grants to States to 
provide a support system in each State for family caregivers. 
All States are expected to put in place five basic system 
components: individualized information on available resources; 
assistance to families in locating services from private and 
voluntary agencies; caregiver counseling, training and peer 
support; respite care; and other supplemental services.

Native American Caregiver Support Services

    The Committee provides $6,389,000 for Native American 
Caregiver Support Services, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The program 
assists American Indian tribes in providing multifaceted 
systems of support services for family caregivers, as well as 
for grandparents caring for grandchildren.

Nutrition Services

    The Committee provides $829,205,000 for Nutrition Services, 
which is $19,462,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $97,000,000 for this activity in fiscal year 2009. 
The Committee recommendation will support almost 239 million 
meals to an estimated 2.5 million seniors, including 387,000 
seniors with severe disabilities in fiscal year 2010, an 
increase of approximately three million meals.
    The Nutrition Services program includes Congregate 
Nutrition Services, Home-Delivered Nutrition Services and the 
Nutrition Services Incentive Program. The Congregate Nutrition 
Services program provides funding by formula grant to States 
for the provision of meals and related services in a variety of 
congregate settings. The Home-Delivered Nutrition Services 
program provides funding by formula grant to States for the 
delivery of meals and related services to seniors who are 
homebound. The Nutrition Services Incentive Program awards 
additional funding to existing congregate and home-delivered 
meal providers based on the number of meals they provided in 
the previous year. The funding distribution for these programs 
is included in the detailed table accompanying this report.
    The Older American Act provides States with significant 
flexibility to transfer funds between Home-Delivered and 
Congregate Nutrition Services to meet the varying demands for 
nutrition services in different States. The Older Americans Act 
also provides States flexibility to transfer funds between 
Nutrition Services programs and Home and Community Based 
Supportive Services. This allows States with a higher demand 
for congregate meals to also provide transportation services to 
meal sites. The Committee recognizes this need for flexibility. 
In order to get a more accurate sense of the demand for 
different services, the Committee requests AOA to include in 
future Congressional budget justifications the actual amount 
obligated by States for Home Delivered Nutrition Services, 
Congregate Nutrition Services, and Home and Community-Based 
Supportive Services, including transfers between programs.

Grants for Native Americans

    The Committee provides $28,208,000 for Grants for Native 
Americans, which is $1,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $3,000,000 for Nutrition Services for Native 
Americans within this activity. Grants are distributed to 
tribal organizations to help Native American elders remain 
healthy and independent by providing transportation, nutrition, 
health screenings, and other services.

Program Innovations

    The Committee provides $21,128,000 for Program Innovations, 
which is $2,956,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $8,079,000 more than the budget request. Program 
Innovation funds are used for grants and contracts to support 
projects that develop new and promising practices to serve 
older adults and their families.
    Within the total for Program Innovations, the Committee 
recommendation includes the following amounts for programs of 
national significance:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                                                              FY 2010 budget
                                                         FY 2010 committee       FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Model Approaches to Statewide Legal Assistance Systems.         $2,000,000                 $0                 $0
National Legal Assistance & Support Projects...........            746,000                  0                  0
National Education & Resource Center on Women &                    249,000                  0                  0
 Retirement............................................
Multigenerational Civic Engagement.....................            982,000                  0                  0
National Resource Center on Native Americans...........            693,000                  0                  0
National Minority Aging Organizations: Asian-Pacific               357,000                  0                  0
 Americans.............................................
National Minority Aging Organizations: Native Americans            129,000                  0                  0
National Minority Aging Organizations: Hispanic &                  448,000                  0                  0
 African Americans.....................................
National Alzheimer's Call Center.......................          1,000,000                  0                  0
Community Innovations for Aging in Place...............          8,000,000         +3,000,000         +3,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Community Innovations for Aging in Place.--Within the funds 
provided, the Committee includes $8,000,000 for the Community 
Innovations for Aging in Place program, which is $3,000,000 
more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. This funding will provide grants to community-based 
organizations for model aging in place initiatives, such as the 
coordination and delivery of services to elderly residents 
living in naturally occurring retirement communities. The 
Committee encourages AOA to ensure that these initiatives are 
coordinated with existing programming under the Older Americans 
Act, including Aging and Disability Resource Centers, Nursing 
Home Diversion, and Evidence-Based Prevention activities.
    National Alzheimer's Call Center.--Within the funds 
provided, the Committee includes $1,000,000 to continue a 24-
hour call center to provide Alzheimer family caregivers with 
professional care consultation and crisis intervention. The 
nationwide Alzheimer Call Center provides telephone support, 
crisis counseling, and information and referral services in 
over 140 languages, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and 365 
days a year. In 2008 the Call Center received over 270,000 
calls from persons with Alzheimer's disease, their families, 
and caregivers.
    National Minority Aging Organizations.--The Committee 
continues to support National Minority Aging Organizations and 
their role in reducing and eliminating health disparities among 
racial and ethnic minorities. Funding supports practical, 
nontraditional, community-based intervention for reaching older 
individuals who experience barriers to accessing home and 
community-based services, focusing on barriers due to language 
and low-literacy, as well as those directly related to cultural 
diversity.
    The bill includes $5,079,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Catholic Charities Hawaii, Honolulu, HI for an                  $400,000
 independent living demonstration project............
Center on Halsted, Chicago, IL for wellness services             475,000
 for seniors.........................................
City of Fremont, CA for training, coordination, and              150,000
 outreach to address the needs of seniors............
City of Long Beach, CA for a program to coordinate               100,000
 senior services and activities within the region....
County of Ventura, CA for an elder abuse prevention              654,000
 and treatment program...............................
Family Caregiver Alliance, San Francisco, CA for a               500,000
 National Resource Center on Family Caregiving.......
Jewish Family and Children's Service of Minneapolis,             250,000
 Minnetonka, MN for the Family Caregiver Access
 Network Demonstration Project.......................
Jewish Family Service of Central New Jersey,                     300,000
 Elizabeth, NJ for an aging-in-place demonstration...
Jewish Family Service of Metropolitan Detroit, West              200,000
 Bloomfield, MI for a family caregiver services
 development project.................................
Jewish Family Service of Somerset, Hunterdon and                 225,000
 Warren Counties, Somerville, NJ for an aging-in-
 place demonstration.................................
Mosaic-Garden City Agency, Garden City, KS for the               350,000
 Legacy Senior Services Initiative to provide
 services to seniors with intellectual or
 developmental disabilities or Alzheimer's disease...
NORC Supportive Services Center, Inc., New York, NY              500,000
 for a program to provide medical products and
 services to seniors.................................
Rebuilding Together, Inc., Washington, DC for the                350,000
 Safe at Home falls prevention initiative............
Stetson University College of Law, Gulfport, FL for a            100,000
 demonstration program to educate seniors on economic
 issues..............................................
UJA Federation of Northern New Jersey, Paramus, NJ               200,000
 for an aging in place program.......................
United Jewish Communities of MetroWestNJU, Whippany,             100,000
 NJ for the Lifelong Involvement for Vital Elders
 independent aging demonstration program.............
Westminster Village, Allentown, PA for the Demential             225,000
 Leadership Initiative Program.......................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aging Network Support Activities

    The Committee provides $44,283,000 for Aging Network 
Support Activities, which is $2,589,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. 
Aging Network Support Activities provide competitive grants and 
contracts to support ongoing activities, which help seniors and 
their families obtain information about their care options, 
benefits, and which assist States, tribes and community 
providers of aging services to carry out their mission and help 
seniors remain independent and living in their homes and 
communities.
    Within the total for Aging Network Support Activities, the 
Committee recommendation includes the following amounts for 
programs of national significance:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                              FY 2010      -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                          Committee                          FY 2010  Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Health & Long-Term Care Programs.......................        $30,589,000        +$2,589,000                 $0
Pension Information & Counseling Program...............          1,719,000                  0                  0
National Eldercare Locator.............................          1,178,000                  0                  0
National Long-Term Care Ombudsman Resource Center......            547,000                  0                  0
National Center on Elder Abuse.........................            811,000                  0                  0
Senior Medicare Patrol Program.........................          9,439,000                  0                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Health and Long Term Care Programs.--Within the funds 
provided, the Committee provides $30,589,000 for Health and 
Long-Term Care programs, formerly the Choices for Independence 
program. This includes funding for Aging and Disability 
Resource Centers (ADRC), Evidence-Based Disease and Disability 
Prevention programs (EBDP), and Community Living programs 
(formerly Nursing Home Diversion programs). These programs help 
older individuals improve and maintain their health, better 
direct their care, extend their personal resources, and remain 
in the community through low-cost community based service 
alternatives. ADRCs serve as the entry point for health and 
long-term care at the community level. There are currently over 
200 sites operating in 47 States and territories. The EBDP 
program provides grants focusing on low-cost interventions at 
the community level, including chronic disease self-management, 
diabetes self-management education programs, prevention of 
falls, and physical activity. There are over 1,200 programs 
being piloted in 27 States. The Community Living program helps 
States begin to reform their long-term care systems by 
strategically using ADRCs to identify individuals at risk of 
nursing home placement and spend-down to Medicaid, and 
providing them information and access to community-based long-
term care services that enable them to continue to live at home 
and in the community. The Committee continues to support these 
programs and recommends that AOA build on and expand these 
programs, while continuing to evaluate them, measuring their 
outcomes and impacts and identifying opportunities for 
continued improvement.
    The Committee commends the work AOA has done, in 
conjunction with the Veterans Administration (VA), to help 
aging veterans remain independent and living in their homes and 
communities. Through AOA's Community Living program, local 
aging agencies identify aging veterans and work with VA Medical 
Centers to provide a flexible package of services that allows 
aging veterans to choose their own services, from home-
delivered meals to brain health activities, to help them remain 
independent. The Committee supports this joint initiative that 
builds on the similar missions of AOA and VA while avoiding 
duplicating efforts by effectively using the resources of both 
agencies to provide consumer-directed services to aging 
veterans.

Alzheimer's Disease Demonstration Grants

    The Committee provides $11,464,000 for Alzheimer's Disease 
Demonstration Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The demonstration grant 
program provides competitive matching grants to a limited 
number of States to encourage program innovation and 
coordination of public and private services for people with 
Alzheimer's disease and their families. The Committee supports 
work on emerging issues, such as early intervention and chronic 
care management, and believes these grants can have broad 
implications for Medicaid and Medicare, on underserved 
populations, and on the dissemination and replication of 
program successes nationwide.

Lifespan Respite Care

    The Committee provides $2,500,000 for Lifespan Respite 
Care, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the budget request. These funds will support coordinated 
systems of community-based respite care services for family 
caregivers of children and adults with special needs. The 
budget request included funding for this activity within the 
General Departmental Management account (GDM). In fiscal year 
2009, this program was funded under GDM but administered by 
AOA.

Program Administration

    The Committee provides $19,727,000 for Program 
Administration, which is $1,031,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $1,503,000 less than the budget request. 
This activity provides administrative and management support 
for all programs administered by AOA.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee provides $403,452,000 for General 
Departmental Management, which is $10,176,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $3,597,000 below the budget 
request. Included in this amount is authority to spend 
$5,851,000 from the Medicare trust funds, as requested by the 
Administration. In addition, the Office of the Secretary has 
access to $69,756,000 for policy evaluation funding activities 
under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act.
    This appropriation supports activities that are associated 
with the Secretary's roles as policy officer and general 
manager of the Department. The Office of the Secretary also 
implements Administration and Congressional directives, and 
provides assistance, direction and coordination to the 
headquarters, regions, and field organizations of the 
Department. In addition, this funding supports the Office of 
the Surgeon General and several other health promotion and 
disease prevention activities that are centrally administered.
    Caroline Pryce Walker Conquer Childhood Cancer Act.--The 
Committee includes $10,000,000 within the Office of the 
Secretary to implement the Caroline Pryce Walker Conquer 
Childhood Cancer Act. The Secretary shall make these funds 
available to the appropriate operating divisions within the 
Department.
    Commissioned Corps Transformation.--The Committee provides 
$14,813,000 for transformation, readiness, and training of the 
Commissioned Corps, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. Funds will be used to 
support personnel management and training, information 
technology, and other transformation activities that will 
enable the Commissioned Corps to better respond to public 
health emergencies and to address health care needs in 
isolated, hardship, hazardous, and other hard-to-fill 
positions.
    Federal Contracting with Women-Owned Firms, Minority-Owned 
Firms, and Small Businesses.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of HHS to provide a report on the Department's 
activities to assist women-owned and minority-owned firms 
seeking to compete for Federal contracts. The report should 
include the percentage of Federal procurement contracts and 
subcontracts awarded in fiscal year 2009 to women-owned firms, 
minority-owned firms, and small businesses; a review of the 
Department's technical assistance and outreach to women-owned 
firms, minority-owned firms, and small businesses; and the 
Department's plan for increasing the number of Federal 
contracts that are awarded to such firms. The Secretary should 
submit this report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate by March 1, 2010.
    Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs).--The Committee 
continues its strong interest in, and support of, the 
implementation of the HHS Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-
Associated Infections, with the goal of dramatically reducing 
these life-threatening infections that patients acquire while 
receiving treatment for medical or surgical conditions, 
resulting in nearly 100,000 deaths annually. Yet, the annual 
2008 National Healthcare Quality Report issued by AHRQ 
indicates that patient safety measures have actually worsened 
by nearly one percent each year for the past six years, in 
part, due to a rise in HAIs.
    In fiscal year 2009, the Committee provided a $21,800,000 
increase to HHS to facilitate a comprehensive, coordinated 
effort throughout the Department to combat HAIs. An additional 
$50,000,000 for grants to States was provided in the Recovery 
Act to help fight this significant health care problem.
    For fiscal year 2010, the Committee continues this 
initiative by including an increase of $33,848,000 for HAI-
related activities within the Department. This amount includes 
an increase of $16,152,000 within CDC and $17,696,000 within 
AHRQ. Within the Office of the Secretary, the Committee 
includes $5,000,000 that will be used to continue a national 
public awareness campaign to raise awareness of the importance 
of addressing HAIs among healthcare providers, institutions, 
and consumers; assess progress in meeting performance measures; 
and establish a framework for evaluation efforts. In addition, 
an increase of $53,772,000 is included within CMS to increase 
the frequency of inspections of nursing homes and other medical 
facilities, giving inspectors more opportunities to identify 
infection control problems.
    During fiscal year 2010, States will be submitting State 
action plans to HHS that outline actions they will take to 
reduce HAIs, including measurable five-year goals and interim 
milestones for reducing such infections. The Committee looks 
forward to receiving a progress report from HHS on national 
implementation activities and, by June 1, 2010, the report 
mandated in Public Law 111-8 regarding the adequacy of the 
State plans for achieving national and State goals for reducing 
HAIs.
    The Committee supports the Department's efforts to reduce 
HAIs not only in hospitals, but also in ambulatory surgical 
care settings through increased inspections of these facilities 
in recognition of the growing number of incidents involving 
syringe reuse and misuse of multi-dose vials. These facilities 
have been the fastest growing provider type participating in 
Medicare.
    The Committee notes that the shortage of primary care 
health professionals may lead to medical errors that can 
contribute to healthcare associated infections, as health 
workers may be more prone to making medical errors due to 
extended and often unregulated work hours and increased 
fatigue. The Committee also notes the importance of developing 
standardized protocols and training programs directed at 
primary care health professionals and health care 
administrators. The Committee, therefore, encourages the 
Secretary to consider and incorporate strategies to increase 
the size of the primary care workforce and to address 
recommendations from the Government Accountability Office 
regarding physician and medical work hours within the HAI 
Action Plan in order to increase capacity to detect, prevent, 
and reduce healthcare-associated infections.
    Institute of Medicine Mental Health Workforce.--The 
Committee provides up to $900,000 to support an Institute of 
Medicine study that shall provide: (1) a systematic and trend 
analysis of the current and projected mental and behavioral 
healthcare needs of the American people, particularly for aging 
and growing ethnic populations; and (2) policy recommendations 
for achieving a competent and well-trained mental health 
workforce to address those needs. The Committee believes that 
such a study would be particularly timely in light of the 
projected doubling of the aged population by 2030, new evidence 
on the importance of addressing mental health issues as part of 
effective chronic disease management, increased numbers of 
veterans with post traumatic stress disorder, improved 
diagnostic techniques, and implementation of a new Federal 
mental health parity law.
    Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee.--The Committee 
recommends $1,000,000 to support the Interagency Autism 
Coordinating Committee (IACC). The bill provides that these 
funds shall be transferred, within 30 days after enactment of 
this Act, to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 
which administers the IACC. The IACC is responsible for 
coordinating activities among the operating divisions and 
agencies of the Department of Health and Human Services 
concerning autism spectrum disorders, as authorized under the 
Combating Autism Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-416). These funds, 
combined with funds included within the budget request for the 
National Institute of Mental Health, will result in 
approximately $2,000,000 for the work of the IACC in fiscal 
year 2010. The first IACC Strategic Plan for Autism Spectrum 
Disorders Research was completed on January 26, 2009. 
Anticipated activities of the IACC during fiscal year 2010 
include updating the strategic plan and holding scientific 
workshops.
    Poverty Research Center Program.--The Committee includes no 
less than the fiscal year 2009 level for the Poverty Research 
Center program, which will be re-competed in fiscal year 2010.
    Racial and Ethnic Disparities.--The Committee is deeply 
concerned about the continuing racial and ethnic disparities in 
health and health care. The Committee encourages the Office of 
the Secretary to develop a National Strategy to Eliminate 
Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and Health Care, to be 
implemented and monitored in partnership with State and local 
governments, communities, and the private sector. This national 
strategy should include measurable goals, benchmarks and 
timelines and progress reporting by the Office of the Secretary 
to the President and to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate at scheduled intervals. 
The Committee also urges the Administration include the 
elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities within the 
core of its health reform efforts.
    Scientific Information.--The Committee continues bill 
language directing that information requests from the Chairmen 
and Ranking Members of the House and Senate Subcommittees on 
Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related 
Agencies, on scientific research or any other matter shall be 
transmitted in a prompt and professional manner, uncensored, 
and without delay to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate.
    Tick-borne Diseases.--The Committee directs the Secretary 
to review the coordination of efforts across HHS operating 
divisions with respect to tick-borne diseases to ensure that: a 
broad spectrum of scientific viewpoints is represented in 
public health policy decisions, accurate information is 
disseminated to the public and physicians, and actions are 
taken by the Department that will foster significant progress 
in the development and adoption of improved diagnostics for 
Lyme disease. The Department shall submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate with the findings from this review not later 
than September 30, 2010.
    White House Conference on Children and Youth.--The 
Committee urges the Administration to consider establishing a 
White House Conference on Children and Youth that would follow 
the model of previous conferences held decennially since 1909.
    The bill includes $700,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
BayCare Health System, Tampa, FL for a community-               $200,000
 based health outreach program to address health
 disparities in South Pinnellas and Hillsborough
 counties............................................
South Central Family Health Center, Los Angeles, CA              100,000
 for a community diabetes management initiative......
University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL for a                  400,000
 health information technology evaluation project....
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Adolescent Family Life

    The Committee provides $29,778,000 for the Adolescent 
Family Life program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
comprehensive and integrated approaches to the delivery of care 
for pregnant and parenting adolescents, and prevention 
demonstration programs that develop, test and evaluate 
pregnancy prevention interventions. The bill designates 
$13,120,000 for a teenage pregnancy prevention initiative, 
proposed by the Administration, of which $9,840,000 is for 
evidence-based programs and $3,280,000 is for research and 
demonstration of promising or innovative approaches to 
preventing teenage pregnancies.

Office of Minority Health

    The Committee provides $56,000,000 for the Office of 
Minority Health (OMH), which is $3,044,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $44,000 above the budget request. 
The Committee does not include funding for a one-time project 
costing $5,283,000 in fiscal year 2009. Excluding this project, 
the Committee provides an $8,283,000 increase over fiscal year 
2009 for ongoing and new activities.
    The OMH works with U.S. Public Health Service agencies and 
other agencies of the Department to address the health status 
and quality of life for racial and ethnic minority populations 
in the United States. OMH develops and implements new policies; 
partners with States, tribes, and communities through 
cooperative agreements; supports research, demonstration, and 
evaluation projects; and disseminates information.
    The Committee is encouraged by the progress OMH is making 
to improve the health status of minority individuals and looks 
forward to OMH further demonstrating the effectiveness of 
providing health education services in a community setting.
    Minority Health Schools.--The Committee commends OMH for 
its efforts to partner with our nation's historically black 
medical schools, including expanding opportunities for 
biomedical research and supporting residency training faculty. 
The Committee also encourages OMH to continue its leadership in 
defining the opportunities at minority health schools to 
resolve health disparities. The Committee requests a report on 
the status of these activities by May 1, 2010.
    Lupus Health Provider Education.--Within the amount 
provided for the OMH, $1,000,000 is included to continue the 
national health provider education program to improve lupus 
diagnosis and treatment and reduce health disparities. The 
Committee remains very concerned about barriers to early 
medical diagnosis of lupus, a debilitating autoimmune disease 
that is up to three times more common among African Americans, 
Hispanics and Native Americans and affects over 1.5 million 
person--90 percent of whom are women. The Committee is pleased 
that OMH is working with the Surgeon General and the Office on 
Women's Health to implement a continuing health education 
program with the ultimate goal of improving diagnosis for those 
with lupus and reducing disparities to care. OMH is encouraged 
to involve a wide array of public health, community, academic, 
medical and industry organizations, including those working to 
improve medical school curricula.

Office on Women's Health

    The Committee provides $33,746,000 for the Office on 
Women's Health (OWH), which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The OWH advises the 
Secretary and provides Department-wide coordination of programs 
focusing specifically on women's health.
    Violence Against Women Initiative.--The Committee includes 
$2,325,000 to continue the OWH violence against women 
initiative. The Committee intends that these funds be used to 
enhance health care providers understanding of domestic and 
dating violence, and to develop a coordinated public health 
response regarding the domestic violence issues.

HIV/AIDS in Minority Communities

    The Committee bill includes $53,891,000 to be available to 
the Secretary for transfer to the Department's operating 
divisions for specific program activities to address the high-
priority HIV prevention and treatment needs of minority 
communities. This amount is $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. These funds are 
provided to promote an effective, culturally competent and 
linguistically appropriate public health response to the HIV/
AIDS epidemic.
    Minority Community-based Organizations.--The Committee 
emphasizes that national minority AIDS initiative funds are 
intended to support minority community-based organizations and 
engage them in capacity building and service provision. The 
Committee encourages the full participation of minority 
community-based organizations during the competitive grant 
process.
    HIV Testing Initiative.--The Committee continues to commend 
the Office of the Secretary for its leadership on the African 
American HIV testing initiative of the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention and requests a comprehensive progress 
report.
    Within the total, the Committee expects that activities 
that are targeted to address the growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and 
its disproportionate impact upon communities of color, 
including African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian 
Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders, will be 
supported at no less than last year's funding level.

Afghanistan

    The Committee provides $5,789,000 for the Afghanistan 
health initiative, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. These funds will be used 
for the joint Departments of Defense and Health and Human 
Services initiative to improve maternal and newborn health 
outcomes at the largest women's hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan. 
A portion of the funds will also be used to assist the 
activities of the Afghanistan Ministry of Public Health to 
bolster public health and the delivery of health care to 
underserved high-risk populations. The Committee includes bill 
language specifying the amount of assistance and citing the 
Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 as the relevant 
authority.

Embryo Adoption Awareness Campaign

    The Committee includes $4,200,000 for the embryo adoption 
awareness campaign, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. These funds will be used 
to educate Americans about the existence of frozen embryos 
(resulting from in-vitro fertilization), which may be available 
for donation/adoption. The Committee includes bill language 
permitting these funds also to be used to provide medical and 
administrative services to individuals adopting embryos, deemed 
necessary for such adoptions, consistent with the Code of 
Federal Regulations.

                OFFICE OF MEDICARE HEARINGS AND APPEALS

    The Committee provides $71,147,000 for the Office of 
Medicare Hearings and Appeals, which is $6,543,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This Office supports hearings at the administrative 
law judge level, the third level of Medicare claims appeals. In 
fiscal year 2008, the total number of claims exceeded 180,000, 
a 34 percent increase over the previous year. Because the 
Recovery Audit Contractor (RAC) program pilot has been made 
permanent in all 50 States, the number of RAC claims is 
expected to quadruple in 2010 to more than 40,000. This funding 
will support the Office's 378 full-time equivalent staff to 
continue the timely adjudication of all Medicare appeals.

  OFFICE OF THE NATIONAL COORDINATOR FOR HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee makes available $61,342,000 for the Office of 
the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology 
(ONC), which is $111,000 above the amount made available in 
fiscal year 2009 and the same as the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $2,000,000,000 until 
expended for ONC activities.
    This program was established to bring together decision-
makers to develop standards for modern health information 
technology (IT), devise certification procedures for health IT 
solutions, develop a secure nationwide health information 
network architecture, and develop policy and technology 
solutions that provide adequate privacy protections for 
personal health information. The ultimate goal is the secure, 
accurate, and rapid exchange of interoperable electronic health 
information throughout a nationwide health information network. 
ONC is responsible for promoting the use of electronic health 
records in clinical practice and coordinating Federal health 
information systems.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee provides $50,279,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $5,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $17,000,000 for OIG 
activities in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Permanent 
appropriations for this office are contained in the Health Care 
Fraud and Abuse Control Program, the Health Insurance 
Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as well as the 
Deficit Reduction Act of 2005. Total funds provided in this 
bill and the permanent appropriations are expected to be 
$252,484,000 in fiscal year 2010.
    The OIG was created by law to protect the integrity of 
Departmental programs as well as the health and welfare of 
beneficiaries served by those programs. Through a comprehensive 
program of audits, investigations, inspections and program 
evaluations, the OIG attempts to reduce the incidence of fraud, 
waste, abuse and mismanagement, and to promote economy, 
efficiency and effectiveness throughout the Department.
    The Committee continues bill language requiring that at 
least 40 percent of the funding provided in this Act for the 
OIG be used for investigations, audits, evaluations and 
inspections of discretionary programs funded in this Act. The 
Committee continues to be dissatisfied by the relative lack of 
attention in the OIG to discretionary programs funded in this 
bill, which provides the OIG's discretionary operating funding. 
The Committee also encourages the OIG to strengthen its program 
evaluation activities as opposed to the relatively narrow 
financial audit findings which seem to constitute the bulk of 
the reports transmitted to the Committee.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

    The Committee provides $41,099,000 for the Office for Civil 
Rights (OCR), which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. Within this 
amount, the Committee includes authority to transfer $3,314,000 
from the Medicare trust funds.
    The OCR is responsible for enforcing civil rights statutes 
that prohibit discrimination in health and human services 
programs. OCR implements the civil rights laws through a 
compliance program designed to generate voluntary compliance 
among all HHS recipients.

               MEDICAL BENEFITS FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

    The Committee provides an estimated $474,557,000 for 
Medical Benefits for Commissioned Officers of the U.S. Public 
Health Service. This is $39,863,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request.
    This account provides for retirement payments to U.S. 
Public Health Service officers who are retired because of age, 
disability or length of service; payments to survivors of 
deceased officers; medical care for active duty and retired 
members, and dependents and beneficiaries; and payments to the 
Social Security Administration for military service credits.

            PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES EMERGENCY FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee provides $2,100,649,000 for the Public Health 
and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF) to support a 
comprehensive program to prepare for and respond to the health 
and medical consequences of all public health emergencies, 
including bioterrorism, to prepare for an influenza pandemic, 
and support the cybersecurity efforts of HHS. This amount is 
$702,854,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$577,920,000 less than the budget request. As requested, the 
Committee bill includes a one-time transfer of all remaining 
balances in the Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund from the 
Department of Homeland Security to this account. The amount to 
be transferred is currently estimated to be $1,569,000,000.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR)

    The Committee provides $1,644,928,000 for activities 
administered by ASPR. This amount is $856,737,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $510,000,000 less than the 
budget request. ASPR is responsible for coordinating national 
policies and plans for medical and public health preparedness 
and for administering a variety of public health preparedness 
programs, including the National Disaster Medical System, the 
Hospital Preparedness Cooperative Agreement Grants Program, 
Project BioShield, and the Office of Biomedical Advanced 
Research and Development Authority.
            Operations
    The Committee provides $12,847,000 for ASPR Operations, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. Funding is used for staff salaries and expenses 
to direct and coordinate HHS-wide capabilities to prepare for 
and respond to bioterrorism and other public health and medical 
emergencies.
            Preparedness and Emergency Operations
    The Committee provides $35,565,000 for ASPR Preparedness 
and Emergency Operations. This amount is $13,340,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. Funding is used to manage the continued planning for 
capabilities to meet public health and medical response 
missions on a day-to-day basis and in response to threatening 
or emergent public health situations, and maintains a regional 
preparedness and response capability.
    Within the total increase, $10,000,000 is provided to 
prepare for and respond to non-Stafford Act National Special 
Security Events and other planned and unplanned events, 
including other mass gathering events and public health 
emergencies. Due to the unpredictable nature of the public 
health response requirements for events, $5,000,000 of the 
total is available for obligation through September 30, 2011. 
Additional funding will also be used for such activities as 
national-level preparedness gap analyses, regional readiness 
exercises, and other preparedness planning activities.
            National Disaster Medical System
    The Committee provides $56,037,000 for the National 
Disaster Medical System (NDMS), which is $6,537,000 more than 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The NDMS is a cooperative partnership between Federal 
and non-Federal partners to care for large numbers of 
individuals impacted by a disaster. This consists of emergency 
medical response, patient evacuation, and medical services and 
treatment. Funding is used for supplies and equipment and also 
for activities such as training, exercises, and operational 
support.
            Hospital Preparedness Cooperative Agreement Grants Program
    The Committee provides $420,000,000 for the Hospital 
Preparedness Cooperative Agreement Grants Program, which is 
$32,415,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. The program provides funding to 
State and local health departments to improve overall surge 
capacity and capability to enhance hospital preparedness to 
respond to all-hazard events, including the potential for an 
influenza pandemic or for terrorist incidents. In fiscal year 
2009, HHS shifted the grant cycle for the hospital preparedness 
program, which required an appropriation to cover nine months 
and three weeks of grants to States versus a full year's worth 
of grants. The increase provided in this bill and in the budget 
request funds a full year of State grants.
    Medical Waste.--ASPR should review the potential for on-
site capacity at medical facilities to treat infectious medical 
waste during a pandemic or bioterrorism emergency including the 
economic impact on hospitals of implementation. ASPR should 
also review whether Hospital Preparedness Program (HPP) grant 
funding could be used to aid facilities in developing this 
capacity if awardees determine having this capacity on-site is 
a priority and would be beneficial during an emergency. 
Information from these reviews should be included as part of 
the fiscal year 2010 Congressional budget justification.
            Emergency Systems for the Advance Registration of Volunteer 
                    Health Professionals
    The Committee provides $6,000,000 for the Emergency Systems 
for the Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals 
(ESAR-VHP), which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. ESAR-VHP is a program to 
establish a national network of State-based programs to 
facilitate the use of volunteers in an emergency. The program 
provides States with standardized guidance for volunteer 
recruitment, registration, credential verification, legal and 
regulatory issues, and policies for the use of volunteers.
            Advanced Research and Development
    The Administration proposed bill language to transfer 
$305,000,000 from the Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund 
(SRF) advance appropriation provided in the Department of 
Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2004, to fund Advanced 
Research and Development. The Committee adopts this 
recommendation. The Advanced Research and Development program, 
which is administered by the Office of Biomedical Advanced 
Research and Development Authority (BARDA), provides resources 
to expand the development of promising medical countermeasures 
to prevent, prepare for, and respond to the adverse public 
health consequences of chemical, biological, radiological, and 
nuclear (CBRN) threats and public health emergencies. This 
amount is $30,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the same as the budget request.
            Project BioShield Special Reserve Fund
    The Administration proposed bill language to transfer all 
remaining balances in the Project BioShield SRF still available 
at the end of fiscal year 2009 from the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) to HHS. The Committee adopts this 
recommendation. This transfer aligns the financial 
responsibility of the Project BioShield SRF with HHS 
programmatic responsibility. At the end of fiscal year 2009 and 
after transfers to BARDA for the CBRN advanced research and 
development program and the National Institute of Allergy and 
Infectious Diseases (NIAID), an estimated total of $764,000,000 
will remain available in the Project BioShield SRF to procure 
and stockpile emergency medical countermeasures. This funding 
is available for obligation through September 30, 2013.
    Congress established Project BioShield in 2004, as a 
national effort to prepare for terrorist threats that impact 
the public health by facilitating the production of new 
vaccines, medicines, diagnostics, and other medical 
interventions to protect the U.S. population. Five years later, 
the program has failed to deliver those protections. The 
Federal government has procured only a handful of products to 
be used against the 14 material threat determinations and 
population threat assessments issued to date by DHS. For 
instance, Project BioShield has been unable to procure the next 
generation vaccine for anthrax, which is the leading 
bioterrorist threat, although this has been a top priority 
since the program's inception. It has become abundantly clear 
to the Committee, and reaffirmed by HHS officials, that without 
significant increased investment in discovery and pre-clinical 
development through NIAID and later stage advanced research and 
development through BARDA, Project BioShield will continue to 
be a failure.
    The Committee also notes that due to the lack of medical 
countermeasure procurements, there are still significant 
carryover balances in the Project BioShield SRF. As of June 
2009, approximately $2,881,000,000, or more than 50 percent, of 
the $5,593,000,000 provided in 2004 for the Project BioShield 
SRF remains unobligated. The Committee is closely monitoring 
the progress of the advanced research and development portfolio 
and the expenditure rates of the Project BioShield SRF through 
monthly reports from HHS. Once additional products have a 
higher probability of success to licensure, additional funding 
will be considered for the Project BioShield SRF.
            BioShield Management
    The Committee provides $22,364,000 for BioShield 
Management. This amount is $312,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. This 
program provides the oversight and implementation 
infrastructure for medical countermeasure procurement under 
BioShield. Funding supports program management, regulatory 
affairs, and quality assurance staff to oversee both product 
development and implementation of internal controls, including 
on-site oversight of contract manufacturers, and pre-award 
audits.
            Medical Countermeasure Dispensing
    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for a new program, 
Medical Countermeasure Dispensing, which is funded at the same 
level as the budget request. The Cities Readiness Initiative 
(CRI), funded through CDC, provides grants to prepare major 
U.S. cities and metropolitan areas to effectively respond to a 
large scale bioterrorist event by dispensing antibiotics to 
their entire population within 48 hours of the decision to 
distribute countermeasures. Through CRI exercises, HHS 
recognized that a Federal ``first strike'' capability also 
needed to be developed to meet the 48 hour timeframe. Funds 
will be used to expand the conceptual program utilizing the 
U.S. Postal Service (USPS) for direct residential delivery of 
medical countermeasures. This funding is provided through 
September 30, 2011 and up to $8,000,000 may be transferred to 
the USPS.
            Global Medicine, Science, and Public Health
    The Committee provides $8,748,000 for Global Medicine, 
Science, and Public Health, which is $58,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This program fosters the development of public health 
infrastructure around the world with the cooperation of other 
international partners to promote accurate and prompt reporting 
of disease outbreaks.
            Policy, Strategic Planning, and Communications
    The Committee provides $4,367,000 for ASPR Policy, 
Strategic Planning, and Communications, which is $75,000 more 
than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Funding supports policy formulation, analysis, 
coordination, and evaluation for preparedness, response, and 
strategic planning.

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Resources and Technology

    The Committee provides $14,080,000 for the Office of the 
Chief Information Officer, under the Assistant Secretary for 
Resources and Technology, for information technology 
cybersecurity. This is $5,174,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $35,920,000 less than the budget 
request. This funding goes to projects aimed at protecting the 
Department's information technology systems. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $50,000,000 for HHS cybersecurity in 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010.

Office of Security and Strategic Information

    The Committee provides $4,893,000 for the Office of 
Security and Strategic Information (OSSI), which is $1,630,000 
more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as 
the budget request. OSSI consolidates functions across HHS 
related to physical security, personnel/classified information 
security, and strategic information.

Office of Public Health and Science

    The Committee provides $12,581,000 for the Medical Reserve 
Corps (MRC) program, which is $237,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
mission of the MRC is to improve the health and safety of 
communities across the country by organizing and utilizing 
public health, medical, and other volunteers. MRC members are 
identified, credentialed, trained, and prepared in advance of 
an emergency, and are utilized throughout the year to improve 
the public health system.

Office of the Secretary

    The Committee provides $424,167,000 for public health 
preparedness and other activities administered by the Office of 
the Secretary, which is $160,924,000 less than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $32,000,000 less than the budget 
request.
            Pandemic Influenza
    The Committee led the effort to provide the $7,650,000,000 
included in the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2009 (Public 
Law 111-32) for pandemic influenza preparedness and response 
activities. The increased resources included in the 
supplemental were provided to address the current H1N1 outbreak 
and to prepare for the potential of future outbreaks, increased 
severity of the virus, or for a new flu strain to emerge. On 
June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) raised the 
worldwide pandemic alert level to Phase 6 in response to the 
ongoing global spread of the H1N1 virus. A Phase 6 designation 
indicates that a global pandemic is underway. As of July 6, 
2009, more than 100 countries have reported cases of human 
infection with over 94,000 confirmed human cases and 429 
deaths. Over one-third of the total worldwide infections have 
occurred in the U.S.
    In this bill, the Committee continues to provide the base 
pandemic influenza preparedness and response funding upon which 
the supplemental funds are built. Taken together, funds will 
enable HHS to support a comprehensive Pandemic Influenza 
preparedness and response plan. A broad of array of activities 
will be supported with the funding in this bill and the 
supplemental, including: advanced development and purchase of 
vaccines and antiviral drugs; stockpiling of medical supplies 
and diagnostic, vaccine delivery, and personal protective 
equipment; for upgrading State and local public health 
capacity; domestic and international surveillance; preparation 
for a possible vaccination campaign; and public health 
research.
    Within the HHS Office of the Secretary, the Committee 
provides $354,167,000 for Pandemic Influenza preparedness and 
response activities, which is $230,924,000 less than the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. In 
addition, the Committee provides $191,344,000 for on-going 
Pandemic Influenza activities within the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of 
Health (NIH) for an HHS Pandemic Influenza total in this bill 
of $545,511,000.
    Within the HHS Office of the Secretary total, the Committee 
provides $276,000,000 to be available until expended. The 
Committee includes bill language, as requested, that permits 
the Secretary to deposit products purchased with these funds 
into the Strategic National Stockpile and to use funds for the 
construction or renovation of privately owned facilities for 
the production of pandemic vaccine and other biologics, as 
deemed necessary by the Secretary. In addition, bill language 
is included, as requested, that permits the Secretary to 
transfer funds to other HHS accounts for the purpose of 
Pandemic Influenza preparedness and response.
            Parklawn Lease Expiration
    The Committee provides $70,000,000 for the fit-out and 
other costs related to a competitive lease procurement to 
renovate or replace the Parklawn Federal building. This is 
$32,000,000 less than the budget request. Funding was not 
appropriated for this activity in fiscal year 2009. The current 
lease of the Parklawn building expires on July 31, 2010. The 
level of funding provided covers all anticipated fiscal year 
2010 costs, including costs to reposition staff in the current 
facility. Remaining costs will be considered in fiscal year 
2011.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 201. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
amount available for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    Sec. 202. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
number of Public Health Service employees assigned to assist in 
child survival activities and to work in AIDS programs through 
and with funds provided by the Agency for International 
Development, the United Nations International Children's 
Emergency Fund, or the World Health Organization.
    Sec. 203. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
salary of an individual through an NIH, AHRQ, or SAMHSA grant 
or other extramural mechanism to not more than the rate of 
Executive Level I.
    Sec. 204. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the Secretary from using evaluation set-aside funds until the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate receive a report detailing the planned use of 
such funds.
    Sec. 205. The Committee continues a provision permitting 
the Secretary to use up to 2.4 percent of funds authorized 
under the PHS Act for the evaluation of programs.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 206. The Committee continues a provision permitting 
the Secretary of HHS to transfer up to one percent of any 
discretionary appropriation from an account, provided that no 
appropriation is increased by more than three percent by any 
such transfer.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 207. The Committee continues a provision to provide 
the Director of NIH, jointly with the Director of the Office of 
AIDS Research, the authority to transfer up to three percent of 
human immunodeficiency virus funds.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 208. The Committee continues a provision to make NIH 
funds available for human immunodeficiency virus research 
available to the Office of AIDS Research.
    Sec. 209. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of Title X funds unless the applicant for the award 
certifies to the Secretary that it encourages family 
participation in the decision of minors to seek family planning 
services and that it provides counseling to minors on how to 
resist attempts to coerce minors into engaging in sexual 
activities.
    Sec. 210. The Committee continues a provision stating that 
no provider of services under Title X shall be exempt from any 
state law requiring notification or the reporting of child 
abuse, child molestation, sexual abuse, rape, or incest.
    Sec. 211. The Committee continues a provision related to 
the Medicare Advantage program.
    Sec. 212. The Committee continues and makes permanent a 
provision to exempt States from Synar provisions if certain 
funding criteria are met.
    Sec. 213. The Committee includes a provision to allow 
funding for HHS international HIV/AIDS and other infectious 
disease, chronic and environmental disease, and other health 
activities abroad to be spent under the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956.
    Sec. 214. The Committee continues a provision granting 
authority to the Office of the Director of the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) to enter directly into transactions 
in order to implement the NIH Roadmap for medical research and 
permitting the Director to utilize peer review procedures, as 
appropriate, to obtain assessments of scientific and technical 
merit.
    Sec. 215. The Committee continues a provision extending the 
Council on Graduate Medical Education.
    Sec. 216. The Committee continues a provision clarifying 
that funds appropriated to NIH institutes and centers may be 
used for minor repairs or improvements to their buildings, up 
to $2,500,000 per project with a total limit for NIH of 
$35,000,000.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 217. The Committee continues a provision transferring 
one percent of the funding made available for National 
Institutes of Health National Research Service Awards to the 
Health Resources and Services Administration and one percent to 
the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

    For fiscal year 2010, the Committee recommends a 
discretionary program level total of $64,674,486,000, which is 
$1,141,287,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level, and 
$17,838,000 below the budget request. For comparability, these 
figures adjust the budget request to include discretionary Pell 
Grant funding of $17,495,000,000, which is the current law 
baseline estimate. In addition, the Recovery Act provided 
$98,200,000,000 in discretionary and mandatory resources to 
States, school districts, and institutions of higher education 
in fiscal years 2009 and 2010 to support education and training 
activities. This unprecedented funding increase will help to 
save and create jobs for essential teachers, faculty, and other 
education personnel during the current economic downturn. These 
strategic investments will provide educational opportunities to 
students and adults, facilitate progress in strengthening all 
levels of education, from pre-school through postsecondary 
education, and contribute to the nation's long-term economic 
prosperity and growth.

                    Education for the Disadvantaged

    The Committee recommends $15,938,215,000 for the Education 
for the Disadvantaged programs. This amount is $178,129,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 appropriation and $492,917,000 below 
the budget request, which proposed funding for several 
unauthorized activities. Of the total amount available, 
$4,850,510,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2010 for 
obligation on or after July 1, 2010 and $10,841,176,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2011 for obligation on or after 
October 1, 2010. In addition, the Recovery Act provided 
$13,000,000,000 for these activities in fiscal years 2009 and 
2010. This appropriation account includes compensatory 
education programs authorized under title I of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act and section 418A of the Higher 
Education Act.
Grants to Local Educational Agencies
    For fiscal year 2010 the Committee recommends 
$14,492,401,000 for Title I grants to local educational 
agencies (school districts), which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $1,500,000,000 above the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$10,000,000,000 for Title I eligible schools in fiscal years 
2009 and 2010. Title I grants provide the Federal foundation of 
support for the Elementary and Secondary Education Act's 
accountability system, which emphasizes State standards and 
aligned assessments, measuring adequate yearly progress in 
reading and math, improvement for struggling schools, and 
teacher quality. Approximately 20 million children are served 
by Title I programs in nearly 55,000 public schools.
    Of the amounts provided for Title I programs, 
$6,597,946,000 is available for Basic Grants to Local 
Educational Agencies. This amount is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $1,500,000,000 above the budget 
request. The Committee does not agree with the Administration's 
request to cut Title I basic grants by $1,500,000,000 in order 
to fund new, untested initiatives. The Committee believes that 
these grants support the core efforts of school districts to 
ensure that low-income children can overcome the effects of 
poverty to succeed in school and in life.
    Within the amount for Title I Basic Grants, up to 
$4,000,000 shall be available to the Secretary of Education on 
October 1, 2009, to obtain annually updated local educational-
agency-level census poverty data from the Bureau of the Census.
    The Committee recommends $1,365,031,000 for Title I 
Concentration Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. Concentration Grants 
target funds to school districts in which the number of low-
income children exceeds 6,500 or 15 percent of the total 
school-age population.
    The Committee recommends $3,264,712,000 for Title I 
Targeted Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. Targeted Grants provide 
higher payments to school districts with high numbers or 
percentages of low-income students.
    The Committee recommends $3,264,712,000 for Title I 
Education Finance Incentive Grants (EFIGs), which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
EFIGs provide payments to States and school districts that 
incorporate ``equity'' and ``effort'' factors that are intended 
to encourage States to spend more on education and to improve 
the equity of State funding systems.

William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Program

    The Committee strongly recommends $66,454,000 for Even 
Start, which is the same amount as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level. Even Start provides grants to States for family literacy 
programs, integrating early childhood education, adult 
education and parenting education, for low-income families and 
their children, from birth to 7 years old. Generally, these 
parents are not in school, are above the State's age of 
compulsory school attendance, and have not earned a high school 
diploma (or its equivalent). The Committee does not agree with 
the Administration's proposal to eliminate Even Start, which is 
based on the results of flawed evaluation studies. For example, 
the Third National Even Start Evaluation: Program Impacts and 
Implications for Improvement, 2003, was based on a very small 
sample (1.5 percent) of Even Start projects, was not 
representative of Even Start participants and programs, and 
predated new accountability measures for the program. The 
Committee encourages the Department to continue to work with 
States to improve indicators of program quality, including 
assessments for dual language learners, and the effectiveness 
of Even Start instructional services.

School Improvement Grants

    The Committee provides $545,633,000 for School Improvement 
Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $1,000,000,000 below the budget request. This formula grant 
program provides assistance to States and school districts for 
Title I schools that do not make adequate yearly progress for 
at least two consecutive years. Approximately 13,000 schools 
qualify for these supplemental improvement grants because they 
have been identified for school improvement, corrective action, 
or restructuring. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$3,000,000,000 for this program in fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    The Committee strongly supports the Administration's focus 
on ensuring that the nation's chronically low-performing 
schools have the necessary assistance to improve student 
performance, but does not provide the additional $1,000,000,000 
proposed by the Administration. The Committee does not support 
shifting these resources from Title I Basic Grants. For fiscal 
year 2010, under this bill and the Recovery Act, $4,123,419,000 
will be available for these targeted school reform efforts, 
quadrupling the level of support available in fiscal year 2008, 
under both the School Improvement Grants program and the four 
percent set-aside under the Title I program for school 
improvement activities. Further, the Committee notes that the 
Secretary may utilize the ``Race to the Top'' $4,350,000,000 
fund to provide even greater amounts of assistance to States 
for low-achieving schools.
    The Committee wants to be certain that States and school 
districts have sufficient capacity to utilize this 
unprecedented amount of funding so that interventions and 
turnaround strategies for low-achieving schools are high-
quality, effective and sustainable. The Committee will consider 
whether to provide an even higher level of support during 
consideration of the fiscal year 2011 budget.
    The bill includes language requiring that State educational 
agencies ensure that not less than 50 percent of the 
$545,633,000 provided for School Improvement Grants be used for 
evidence-based reading instruction. The Committee directs the 
Department to work with the States to ensure that evidence-
based reading instruction is embedded in school turnaround 
strategies for low-performing schools. The Committee believes 
this approach will prove to be an effective strategy because it 
is targeted at the schools that most need intervention.
    In addition, the bill includes language permitting State 
and local educational agencies to use fiscal year 2009 and 2010 
appropriations for School Improvement Grants for any school 
eligible to receive assistance under part A of Title I that has 
not made adequate yearly progress for at least two years or is 
in a State's lowest quintile of performance based on 
proficiency rates and, in the case of secondary schools, 
priority shall be given to those schools with graduation rates 
below 60 percent. The Committee does not include the bill 
language proposed by the Administration requiring each State 
educational agency to use 40 percent of School Improvement 
Grants for middle and high schools, as the Committee believes 
that States and districts should have flexibility in targeting 
these funds to schools with the greatest need for assistance.
    The Committee does not include bill language requested by 
the Administration to set aside $30,000,000 of School 
Improvement Grants for competitive awards to school districts 
in Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas that were impacted by 
hurricanes Katrina, Ike or Gustav. These districts are eligible 
for Title I formula and School Improvement Grants. Moreover, 
school districts in these States, which received $746,250,000 
in assistance to restart school operations in December 2005 and 
$30,000,000 for personnel assistance in May 2007, have not yet 
spent all of these funds.

Early Childhood Grants

    The Committee does not provide funding for new Title I 
Early Childhood Grants, which is $500,000,000 below the 
Administration's request. The Administration proposed to cut 
Title I Basic Grants by $500,000,000 and shift these resources 
into an unauthorized program of Title I early childhood 
education grants. The Committee notes that school districts 
already have authority under the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act to use any portion of their Title I grants for 
pre-K education programs. The Committee will reconsider the 
request for a new Title I early childhood education program 
should it become authorized. In support of early childhood 
education, the Committee provides a $121,997,000 increase for 
Head Start under the Department of Health and Human Services to 
support high-quality services for an estimated 978,000 at-risk 
children from birth to age five.

Early Learning Fund

    The Committee does not recommend funding for the Early 
Learning Fund, for which the Administration requested 
$300,000,000. The Early Learning Fund is an Administration 
proposal to provide competitive grants to State educational 
agencies, or the agency in a State that administers early 
childhood programs, to develop new or improve upon a statewide 
infrastructure of integrated early learning supports and 
services for children, from birth through age five. This new 
initiative is not authorized. Further, the Committee notes that 
the Recovery Act provided $100,000,000 to State Advisory 
Councils on Early Childhood Education and Care established 
under the Head Start Act to improve the quality, availability, 
and coordination of services for children from birth to school 
entry.

Early Reading First

    The Committee recommends $127,549,000 for Early Reading 
First, which is $15,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $35,000,000 below the budget request. This 
competitive grant program, targeted toward children from birth 
through five years old, supports the development of verbal 
skills, phonetic awareness, pre-reading development, and 
assistance for professional development for teachers in 
evidence-based strategies of instruction. The Committee expects 
the Department to strengthen professional development 
partnerships for early childhood educators through grants 
awarded under Early Reading First.

Striving Readers

    The Committee recommends $146,000,000 for Striving Readers, 
which is $110,629,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $224,371,000 below the budget request. These funds will 
support reading interventions for approximately 445,000 
students reading significantly below grade level. Striving 
Readers finances competitive grants to develop, implement, and 
evaluate reading interventions for middle school or high school 
students who are reading significantly below their grade level. 
Studies show that far too many adolescents cannot read well 
enough to succeed in school and careers; more than six million 
high school students nationally are struggling readers. By 
ninth grade, many of these adolescents are destined to drop out 
of school without completing a high school diploma or GED.
    Within the total, not less than $70,000,000 is provided to 
double the Department's investment to help struggling 
adolescents build their literacy skills and developing evidence 
on high-quality literacy instruction at the secondary school 
level.
    Within the total, not less than $66,000,000 is provided to 
enable the Department to initiate a Striving Readers early 
literacy grants program to assist school districts in testing a 
variety of strategies designed to improve children's reading 
comprehension, with particular emphasis on vocabulary 
development, oral language fluency, and writing skills.
    Finally, within the total, up to $10,000,000 is provided 
for national activities and evaluation related to early 
childhood and adolescent literacy, including the development of 
new tools, technical assistance, and evaluations to support 
early childhood and adolescent literacy improvement. The 
Committee directs that the Department prepare and submit to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate a comprehensive and integrated fiscal year 2010 
implementation plan for K-12 literacy-related activities (i.e. 
grants, technical assistance, research, development, and 
evaluation activities) across the Department, including but not 
limited to activities under Title I School Improvement Grants, 
Early Reading First, Striving Readers, Reading Is Fundamental, 
Reach Out and Read, and the Institution of Education Sciences. 
This plan shall be submitted not less than 60 days after 
enactment of this Act and 30 days prior to the release of a 
request for proposals under the Striving Reading program.

Literacy Through School Libraries

    The Committee recommends $19,145,000 for Literacy through 
School Libraries, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program helps school 
districts provide students with increased access to up-to-date 
school library materials; a well-equipped, technologically 
advanced school library media center; and well-trained and 
professionally certified school library media specialists.

State Agency Programs: Migrant

    The Committee recommends $394,771,000 for the State Agency 
Program for Migrant Education. This amount is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program supports special educational and related services for 
children of migratory agricultural workers and fishermen, 
including: (1) supplementary academic education; (2) remedial 
or compensatory instruction; (3) English for limited English 
proficient students; (4) testing; (5) guidance counseling; and 
(6) other activities to promote coordination of services across 
States for migrant children whose education is interrupted by 
frequent moves.

State Agency Programs: Neglected and Delinquent

    For the State Agency Program for Neglected and Delinquent 
Children, the Committee recommends $50,427,000, which is the 
same as fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
This formula grant program provides educational services for 
children and youth under age 21 in institutions for juvenile 
delinquents, adult correctional institutions, or institutions 
for the neglected. A portion of these funds may be used for 
projects that support the successful re-entry of youth 
offenders into postsecondary and vocational programs.

Evaluation

    The Committee provides $9,167,000 for Evaluation, which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. Title I evaluation supports large scale national 
evaluations that examine how Title I is contributing to 
improved student performance at the State, local education 
agency, and school levels. It also supports short-term studies 
that document promising models.

High School Graduation Initiative

    The Committee provides $50,000,000 for a High School 
Graduation Initiative authorized under part H of title I of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act (School Dropout 
Prevention Program), as proposed by the Administration. This 
amount is $50,000,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level. The High School Graduation Initiative will support 
competitive grants to school districts that propose 
comprehensive approaches to improving high school graduation 
rates through prevention and reentry systems for students at 
risk of not graduating. Of the amount provided, up to 
$5,000,000 may be used for peer review, technical assistance, 
dissemination, evaluation and other national activities. The 
Committee directs that the Department provide a briefing to the 
Committee on the planned use of these funds not less than 30 
days prior to the release of a request for proposals.

Special Programs for Migrant Students

    The Committee recommends $36,668,000 for the Special 
Programs for Migrant Students. This amount is $2,500,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. These programs support grants to colleges, 
universities, and nonprofit organizations to support 
educational programs designed for students who are engaged in 
migrant and other seasonal farmwork. The High School 
Equivalency Program (HEP) recruits migrant students age 16 and 
over and provides academic and support services to help those 
students obtain a high school equivalency certificate and 
subsequently to gain employment or admission to a postsecondary 
institution or training program. The College Assistance Migrant 
Program (CAMP) provides tutoring and counseling services to 
first-year, undergraduate migrant students and assists those 
students in obtaining student financial aid for their remaining 
undergraduate years. The Committee recommendation assumes the 
allocation of funds between HEP and CAMP as proposed by the 
Administration.

                               Impact Aid

    The Committee recommends $1,290,718,000 for Federal Impact 
Aid programs, which is $25,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $100,000,000 for this purpose for fiscal years 
2009 and 2010. This account supports payments to school 
districts affected by Federal activities, such as those that 
educate children whose families are connected with the military 
or who live on Indian land.
    The Committee recommendation repeats language, as requested 
by the Administration, to ensure that schools serving the 
children of military personnel continue to receive Impact Aid 
funds when the military parents who live on-base are deployed 
and the child continues to attend the same school and in cases 
in which an on-base military parent is killed while on active 
duty and the child continues to attend the same school.

Basic Support Payments

    The Committee recommends $1,151,535,000 for Basic Support 
Payments to local educational agencies, which is $23,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. Basic Support Payments compensate school districts for 
lost tax revenue and are made on behalf of Federally-connected 
children, such as children of members of the uniformed services 
who live on Federal property.

Payments for Children With Disabilities

    The Committee recommends $48,602,000 for Payments for 
Children with Disabilities, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. These payments 
compensate school districts for the increased cost of serving 
Federally-connected children with disabilities.

Facilities Maintenance

    The Committee recommends $4,864,000 for Facilities 
Maintenance, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. These capital payments are 
authorized for maintenance of certain facilities owned by the 
Department of Education.

Construction

    The Committee recommends $17,509,000 for the Construction 
program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $100,000,000 for this purpose for fiscal years 2009 
and 2010. This program provides formula and competitive grants 
for building and renovating school facilities to local 
educational agencies that educate Federally-connected students 
or have Federally-owned land. The Committee provides funding 
for the formula grants, while the Administration proposed 
competitive grants.

Payments for Federal Property

    The Committee recommends $68,208,000 for Payments for 
Federal Property, which is $2,000,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. Funds are awarded to 
school districts to compensate for lost tax revenue as the 
result of Federal acquisition of real property since 1938.

                      School Improvement Programs

    The Committee recommends $5,239,644,000 for School 
Improvement Programs. This amount is $122,372,000 less than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $57,463,000 above the budget 
request. Of the total amount available, $3,375,993,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2010 for obligation on or after 
July 1, 2010 and $1,681,441,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 
2011 for obligation on or after October 1, 2010. The Recovery 
Act provided an additional $720,000,000 for these programs in 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This account includes programs 
authorized under titles II, IV, V, VI, and VII of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act; the McKinney-Vento 
Homeless Assistance Act; title IV-A of the Civil Rights Act; 
section 203 of the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 
2002; and section 105 of the Compact of Free Association 
Amendments Act of 2003.

State Grants for Improving Teacher Quality

    The Committee provides $2,947,749,000 for State Grants for 
Improving Teacher Quality, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. This program 
provides States and districts with a flexible source of funding 
with which to strengthen the skills and knowledge of teachers, 
principals, and administrators to enable them to improve 
student achievement. States are authorized to retain 2.5 
percent of funds for State activities, including reforming 
teacher certification, re-certification or licensure 
requirement; and expanding, establishing, or improving 
alternative routes to State certification. This program also 
helps States carry out activities that include support during 
the initial teaching and leadership experience, such as 
mentoring programs; assisting school districts in effectively 
recruiting and retaining highly qualified and effective 
teachers and principals; reforming tenure and compensation 
systems; and developing professional development programs for 
principals.

Mathematics and Science Partnerships

    The Committee recommends $178,978,000 for Mathematics and 
Science Partnerships, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program promotes 
strong math and science teaching skills for elementary and 
secondary school teachers. Grantees may use program funds to 
develop rigorous math and science curricula; establish distance 
learning programs; and recruit math, science, and engineering 
majors into the teaching profession. They may also provide 
professional development opportunities. Grants are made to 
States by formula based on the number of children aged 5 to 17 
who are from families with incomes below the poverty line. 
States then award the funds competitively to partnerships that 
must include the State education agency; an engineering, math, 
or science department of an institution of higher education; 
and a high-need school district. Other partners may also be 
involved.

Educational Technology State Grants

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for the Educational 
Technology State Grants program, which is $169,872,000 below 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This program also received $650,000,000 under the 
Recovery Act for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The Committee 
continues to support all aspects of the Educational Technology 
State Grants program, which cover a much wider array of 
applications and services than mere software, such as 
professional development, well-equipped classrooms, and 
administrative structures that recognize the role technology 
plays in all disciplines.

Supplemental Education Grants

    The Committee recommends $17,687,000 for Supplemental 
Education Grants to the Federated States of Micronesia and the 
Republic of the Marshall Islands, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The 
Compact of Free Association Amendments Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-
188) authorizes these entities to receive funding for general 
education assistance. The Committee recommendation includes a 
consolidated amount for Supplemental Education Grants because 
the underlying statute determines the allocation between 
Micronesia and the Marshall Islands.

21st Century Community Learning Centers

    The Committee recommends $1,181,166,000 for 21st Century 
Community Learning Centers, which is $50,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program is a formula grant to States, which in turn distribute 
95 percent of the funds on a competitive basis to local school 
districts, community-based organizations, and other public 
entities and private organizations. Grantees must target 
students who attend low-performing schools. Funds may be used 
for before- and after-school activities that advance student 
academic achievement including remedial education and academic 
enrichment activities; math, science, arts, music, 
entrepreneurial and technology education; tutoring and 
mentoring; recreational activities; and expanded library 
service hours.
    The Committee believes that quality after-school programs 
can help reduce crime, transform behavior, and change the 
activities that students participate in after school. Millions 
of young people are alone and unsupervised in the hours after 
school, before parents return home from work. This situation 
places children and teens at grave risk for juvenile crime, 
substance abuse, teen pregnancy, and other problems. Providing 
students with academic enrichment, and other student support 
services, can serve to protect them from these behaviors, while 
also helping to develop skills and values to become 
contributing citizens.
    The $50,000,000 increase over fiscal year 2009 will help 
communities provide after-school programs to nearly 1.7 million 
students, which is approximately 70,000 more students than in 
fiscal year 2009.

State Assessments

    The Committee recommends $410,732,000 for State 
Assessments, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program provides States with 
funding to develop annual assessments and to carry out 
activities related to ensuring accountability for results in 
the State's schools and school districts. Funds appropriated in 
excess of $400,000,000, or the statutory amount at which States 
are required to administer annual assessments in third through 
eighth grades, may be used to improve assessments for students 
with limited English proficiency and students with 
disabilities. These funds will assist States in developing 
tougher standards and assessments that measure not only basic 
skills, but also whether students possess 21st-century skills 
like problem-solving and critical thinking.

Javits Gifted and Talented Education

    The Committee provides $7,463,000 for the Javits Gifted and 
Talented Education program, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level. The Committee disagrees with the 
President's proposal to eliminate this program. This program 
supports competitive grants to State educational agencies, 
school districts, colleges and universities, and other entities 
for research, demonstration projects, and other activities 
designed to enhance the ability of elementary and secondary 
schools to meet the educational needs of gifted and talented 
students.

Foreign Language Assistance Grants

    The Committee recommends $26,328,000 for Foreign Language 
Assistance Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The program supports 
competitive grants to school districts and States to increase 
the quality and quantity of elementary and secondary-level 
foreign language instruction in the United States.
    The bill provides that $9,360,000 shall be available for 
five-year grants to local educational agencies that would work 
in partnership with one or more institutions of higher 
education to establish or expand articulated programs of study 
in languages critical to U.S. national security. The programs 
would be designed to enable successful students, as they 
advance through college, to achieve a superior level of 
proficiency or professional working proficiency in critical 
need languages such as Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and 
Russian, as well as the Indic, Iranian, and Turkic language 
families. The Committee encourages school districts applying 
for this funding to reach out to institutions and centers 
funded under the Department's International Education programs 
under Title VI of the Higher Education Act. The bill also 
continues the longstanding policy of not funding the incentive 
program.

Education for Homeless Children and Youth

    The Committee recommends $65,427,000 for the Education for 
Homeless Children and Youth program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $70,000,000 for these 
activities in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Grants are allocated 
to States in proportion to the total each State receives under 
the Title I program. For local grants, at least 50 percent must 
be used for direct services to homeless children and youth, 
including tutoring, remedial or other educational services.

Training and Advisory Services

    The Committee recommends $6,980,000 for Training and 
Advisory Services authorized by Title IV-A of the Civil Rights 
Act, which is $2,509,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the same as the budget request. Title IV-A authorizes 
technical assistance and training services for local 
educational agencies to address problems associated with 
desegregation on the basis of race, sex, or national origin. 
The Department awards three-year grants to regional Equity 
Assistance Centers (EACs) located in each of the ten Department 
of Education regions. The EACs provide services to school 
districts upon request. Typical activities include 
disseminating information on successful education practices and 
legal requirements related to nondiscrimination on the basis of 
race, sex, and national origin in educational programs. The 
Committee recommendation maintains support for Training and 
Advisory Services at the fiscal year 2009 level after 
accounting for the deletion of one-time fiscal year 2009 grants 
for technical assistance to school districts facing challenges 
in complying with a 2007 Supreme Court decision.

Education for Native Hawaiians

    The Committee recommends $33,315,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. A number of authorized programs limited to 
Native Hawaiians are supported with these funds, including a 
model curriculum project, family-based education centers, 
postsecondary education fellowships, gifted and talented 
education projects, and special education projects for disabled 
pupils. The bill modifies existing bill language regarding the 
use of funds under this program for school construction, 
renovation, and modernization, as proposed by the 
Administration.

Alaska Native Education Equity

    The Committee recommends $33,315,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. These funds are used to develop supplemental 
educational programs to benefit Alaska Natives. The bill 
modifies existing bill language regarding the use of funds 
under this program, as proposed by the Administration.

Rural Education

    The Committee recommends $173,382,000 for Rural Education 
programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. There are two programs to assist 
rural school districts with improving teaching and learning in 
their schools: the Small, Rural Schools Achievement program, 
which provides funds to rural districts that serve a small 
number of students; and the Rural and Low-Income Schools 
program that provides funds to rural districts that serve 
concentrations of poor students, regardless of the number of 
students served by the district. Funds appropriated for Rural 
Education shall be divided equally between these two programs.

Comprehensive Centers

    The Committee recommends $57,113,000 for Comprehensive 
Centers, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. First funded in fiscal year 2005, 
this grant program finances 21 comprehensive centers, including 
16 regional centers, that provide training and technical 
assistance to State educational agencies within their 
geographic regions, to help implement provisions of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and five content 
centers specializing in assessment and accountability, high 
schools, innovation and improvement, and teacher quality. A new 
competition for these centers will be held during fiscal year 
2010.

                            Indian Education

    The Committee recommends $132,282,000 for Indian Education. 
This amount is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This account supports programs 
authorized by part A of title VII of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act.
    Although the educational outcomes of Indian students have 
improved in recent years, the Department of Education finds 
that the Indian student population remains subject to 
significant risk factors that threaten their ability to improve 
their academic achievement, such as high drop-out rates among 
high school students. The Committee provides the funding 
increase to demonstrate its commitment to help Indian students 
achieve academic success. This increase will enable eligible 
schools to address the unique educational and culturally 
related academic needs of 472,000 Indian students.

Grants to Local Educational Agencies

    The Committee recommends $104,331,000 for Grants to Local 
Education Agencies, which is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. This program 
provides assistance through formula grants to school districts 
and schools supported or operated by the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs. The purpose of this program is to reform elementary 
and secondary school programs that serve Indian students, 
including preschool children. Grantees must develop a 
comprehensive plan and ensure that the programs they carry out 
will help Indian students reach the same challenging standards 
that apply to all students. This program supplements the 
regular school program to help Indian children sharpen their 
academic skills, bolster their self-confidence, and participate 
in enrichment activities that would otherwise be unavailable.

Special Programs for Indian Children

    The Committee recommends $19,060,000 for Special Programs 
for Indian Children, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. These programs make 
competitive awards to improve the quality of education for 
Indian students. The program also funds the American Indian 
Teacher Corps and the American Indian Administrator Corps to 
recruit and support American Indians as teachers and school 
administrators.

National Activities

    The Committee recommends $3,891,000 for National 
Activities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. Funds under this authority 
support research, evaluation and data collection to provide 
information about the educational status of Indian students and 
the effectiveness of Indian education programs.

                       INNOVATION AND IMPROVEMENT

    The Committee recommends $1,353,363,000 for Innovation and 
Improvement programs. This amount is $356,938,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $86,586,000 below the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional $200,000,000 
for these activities in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This 
appropriation account includes programs authorized under part G 
of title I and portions of titles II and V of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act.

Troops-to-Teachers and Transition to Teaching

    The Committee recommends $14,389,000 for Troops to 
Teachers, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program is designed to 
assist eligible members of the armed forces obtain 
certification or licensure as elementary and secondary school 
teachers, or vocational or technical teachers.
    The Committee recommends $43,707,000 for Transition to 
Teaching, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Transition to Teaching 
program is designed to help mitigate the shortage of qualified 
licensed or certified teachers by providing competitive grants 
to State and local educational agencies, to assist with 
recruiting, training, and placing talented individuals in 
teaching positions, and supporting them during their first year 
in the classroom. In particular, the program focuses on mid-
career professionals who have substantial career experience, 
including former military personnel, and recent college 
graduates.
    These funds will assist more than 13,000 individuals to 
enter teaching careers through alternative routes to teacher 
certification.

National Writing Project

    The Committee recommends $24,291,000 for the National 
Writing Project. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The National Writing 
Project is a non-profit organization that supports and promotes 
K-16 teacher training programs in effective teaching of 
writing. Federal funds support 50 percent of the costs of these 
programs, and recipients must contribute an equal amount.

Teaching of Traditional American History

    The Committee recommends $100,000,000 for the Teaching of 
Traditional American History program, which is $18,952,000 
below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. This program supports competitive grants to school 
districts to promote the teaching of American history in 
elementary and secondary schools as a separate academic 
subject. Evaluation findings in 2005 indicated that this 
program is not reaching the teachers most in need of 
professional development in history instruction. In 2007, the 
Department of Education began a new four-year evaluation of 
this program to examine the relationship between teacher 
participation, teacher content knowledge, and student 
achievement. The Committee believes the recommended level is 
sufficient pending program improvement efforts and the 
completion of this national evaluation.

School Leadership

    The Committee recommends $29,220,000 for School Leadership 
activities, which is $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The program 
provides competitive grants to assist high-need school 
districts with recruiting, training, and retaining principals 
and assistant principals. Within this amount, the bill includes 
$5,000,000 to continue a national initiative to recruit, train, 
and support results-oriented, highly motivated individuals to 
lead high-need schools with a focus on raising the achievement 
of all students and closing the achievement gap in these 
schools. New Leaders for New Schools (NLNS) shall utilize these 
funds to continue to build the organization's capacity to 
develop and deliver training for aspiring principals and 
support for principals, and conduct research to create a 
national knowledge base to inform the recruitment, selection, 
and training of principals for high-need schools. NLNS and its 
partners shall provide not less than a 150 percent match in 
cash or in-kind for the Federal funds provided for this 
initiative. The match may consist of cash or in-kind offerings 
by private philanthropy or public sources, including funding 
allocated by partner State and school systems.

Advanced Credentialing

    The Committee recommends $10,649,000 for Advanced 
Credentialing, which shall be provided to the National Board of 
Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS). This amount is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Advanced Credentialing program supports activities 
to encourage and support teachers seeking advanced 
certification or credentialing. A 2008 study conducted by the 
National Academy of Sciences of the NBPTS at the request of the 
Committee concluded that teachers who earn NBPTS certification 
are more effective at improving their student's achievement 
than teachers who do not have NBPTS certification. The 
Committee recommendation includes $1,000,000 to continue the 
NBPTS effort to develop an advanced school leadership 
credential.

Charter School Grants and Credit Enhancement for Charter School 
        Facilities

    The Committee recommends $256,031,000 for support of 
Charter School Grants, which includes Facilities Incentive 
Grants and the Credit Enhancement for Charter School Facilities 
Grants. This amount is $40,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level for these programs and $12,000,000 below the 
budget request. The Department may use any funds in excess of 
$195,000,000 for grants to assist in financing new and 
renovating existing charter school facilities. The Committee 
recommendation will support the planning and start-up of over 
1,300 new charter schools in fiscal year 2010.
    The Charter Schools Grants program encourages education 
reform by supporting the planning, development, and initial 
implementation of charter schools. In exchange for a commitment 
to increase student achievement, charter schools are exempt 
from many statutory and regulatory requirements. The Charter 
Schools Grants program finances grants to State educational 
agencies (SEAs) or, if a State's SEA chooses not to 
participate, charter school developers to support the 
development and initial implementation of public charter 
schools. Facilities Incentive Grants and credit enhancement 
awards help charter schools obtain adequate school facilities. 
These programs work in tandem to support the development and 
operation of charter schools.
    The Committee notes that there is growing evidence of mixed 
student achievement in charter schools compared to other public 
schools. Most recently, a June 2009 comprehensive assessment of 
charter schools across 16 States found wide variation in 
performance. In the aggregate, nearly half of the charter 
schools were found to have student achievement results no 
different than other local public schools and more than a third 
delivered learning results worse than traditional public 
schools. Overall, these studies indicate that more attention 
should be given to the quality and performance of charter 
schools as the number of these schools increase over the next 
several years.
    Accordingly, the Committee recommends increased funding for 
charter school grants, but not the entire amount of the 
Administration's request. The Committee also recommends new 
measures designed to increase monitoring and oversight of 
charter school performance. The bill language permits the 
Secretary to reserve up to: (1) $20,000,000 to make awards to 
charter management organizations and other entities to 
replicate and expand successful charter school models and 
networks; and (2) $10,000,000 to support technical assistance 
to public chartering agencies in order to increase the number 
of high-performing charter schools. It also requires grant 
applicants to develop plans to build the capacity of public 
chartering agencies to hold charter schools accountable for 
student performance and to require certain accountability 
measures.

Voluntary Public School Choice

    The Committee recommends $25,819,000 for Voluntary Public 
School Choice, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program supports 
efforts to establish intra-district and inter-district public 
school choice programs to provide students in participating 
schools with the widest variety of options for their education. 
Funds are used to make competitive awards to States, school 
districts or partnerships.

Magnet Schools Assistance

    The Committee recommends $104,829,000 for the Magnet 
Schools Assistance program, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. The Magnet 
Schools Assistance program awards competitive grants to local 
educational agencies to establish or operate magnet schools 
that are part of a desegregation plan approved by a court or by 
the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. A magnet 
school is defined by statute as ``a school or education center 
that offers a special curriculum capable of attracting 
substantial numbers of students of different racial 
backgrounds.''

Fund for the Improvement of Education

    The Committee recommends $217,666,000 for the Fund for the 
Improvement of Education, which is $32,704,000 below the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $3,830,000 above the budget 
request.
    Within the amount for the Fund for the Improvement of 
Education, the bill includes funding for the following 
activities in the following amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Academies for American History and Civics..............                 $0        -$1,945,000                 $0
Arts in Education......................................         40,166,000          2,000,000          2,000,000
Continuation Awards....................................         10,000,000         10,000,000           -700,000
Data Quality and Evaluation............................          3,000,000          1,110,000                  0
Digital Professional Development.......................                  0                  0         -5,000,000
Excellence in Economics Education......................          1,447,000                  0                  0
Exchanges with Historic Whaling and Trading Partners...                  0         -8,754,000         -8,754,000
Foundations for Learning...............................          1,000,000                  0          1,000,000
Full-Service Community Schools.........................         10,000,000          5,000,000          5,000,000
History, Civics, Government Initiative.................                  0                  0        -37,000,000
Mental Health Integration..............................                  0         -5,913,000         -6,913,000
National History Day...................................            500,000                  0            500,000
Other activities.......................................          1,376,000            676,000                  0
Reading is Fundamental.................................         24,803,000                  0                  0
Reach Out and Read.....................................          4,965,000                  0            -35,000
Ready to Teach.........................................                  0        -10,700,000                  0
Parental Assistance Information Centers................         39,254,000                  0                  0
Promise Neighborhoods..................................         10,000,000         10,000,000                  0
Teach for America......................................         15,000,000            105,000                  0
Women's Educational Equity.............................          2,423,000                  0                  0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommendation does not include funding for 
several lower priority or duplicative activities, as requested 
by the Administration. Funding for improving instruction in 
American history and civics is included within Teaching 
American History ($100,000,000), Civic Education ($35,000,000) 
and the Close Up Foundation ($1,942,000) and, therefore, the 
Committee does not fund the Academies for American History and 
Civics and a proposed History, Civics, and Government 
initiative. The Exchanges with Historic Whaling and Trading 
Partners program supports narrowly focused activities limited 
to Alaska, Hawaii, Massachusetts and Mississippi and, 
therefore, the Committee does not fund this activity. Funding 
in the bill to improve mental health services in the schools is 
provided under the Safe Schools/Healthy Students initiative 
($159,676,000) and the Children's Mental Health program 
($125,316,000) and, therefore, the Committee does not fund this 
activity. The Ready-to-Teach program has completed five-year 
competitive awards to the Public Broadcasting Service 
($29,116,466) and the Alabama Education Television Foundation 
($29,116,466) and, therefore, the Committee does not include 
continued funding for this program; instead, these funds are 
redirected to higher priority fiscal stabilization grants to 
public broadcasting stations under the Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting.
    Arts in Education.--The Committee provides $40,166,000 for 
Arts in Education, which is $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 level and the budget request. Within this total, the 
Committee provides $8,639,000 for VSA Arts, $6,838,000 for the 
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, $14,675,000 for 
the Model Arts program, $9,520,000 for Professional Development 
for Arts Educators, and $494,000 for evaluation activities.
    National studies show that the arts not only motivate 
students to learn more and inspire them to achieve better 
grades, they also keep at risk youth in schools and graduating 
on time. Given the demonstrated value of arts in education, the 
Committee notes the troubling findings of the most recent 
National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), which show 
that students who are Black or Hispanic, from low-income 
households, and/or who attend city schools score significantly 
worse on arts testing than their counterparts, revealing 
potentially considerable gaps in the quality of and access to 
arts instruction. In order for visual arts, music, theater, and 
dance education to remain an essential subject of learning in 
our nation's schools--regardless of race/ethnicity or 
socioeconomic status--public investment in arts education must 
become a priority, and data collection and research in arts 
education must improve. To this latter end, the Committee 
requests that the Department of Education produce comprehensive 
reports on the status of all arts education disciplines in U.S. 
public schools when implementing future Fast Response 
Statistical Surveys and National Assessment of Education 
Progress evaluations.
    Full-Service Community Schools.--The Committee strongly 
supports the Full-Service Community Schools initiative, which 
encourages coordination of education, developmental, family, 
health, and other services for students, families, and 
communities through partnerships between: (1) public elementary 
and secondary schools and (2) community-based organizations and 
public-private ventures. In its first year of operation, the 
Department received 519 applications of which only ten, or two 
percent, could be supported due to limited funding. These 
awards were continued in fiscal year 2009. For fiscal year 
2010, the Committee doubles funding for full-service community 
schools to $10,000,000 so that additional meritorious 
applications can be supported.
    Promise Neighborhoods.--The Committee provides $10,000,000 
for Promise Neighborhoods, which is $10,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 level and the same as the budget request. 
Promise Neighborhoods is a new initiative to support one-year 
planning grants to nonprofit, community-based organizations for 
the development of comprehensive neighborhood programs designed 
to combat the effects of poverty and improve educational 
outcomes for children and youth, from birth through college. 
The Committee directs that these grants be made on a 
competitive basis, after a rigorous peer review. In addition, 
the Committee directs that the Department provide a briefing to 
the Committee on the planned use of these funds not less than 
15 days prior to the release of a request for proposals.
    The bill includes $51,732,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Inc.,              $700,000
 Bridgeport, CT for its Total Learning early
 childhood initiative................................
Alabama School of Math and Science, Mobile, AL for               100,000
 curriculum development and teacher training,
 including purchase of equipment.....................
Alaska Native Heritage Center, Anchorage, AK for                 150,000
 educational programming and outreach................
America Scores, St. Louis, MO for an after-school                200,000
 program.............................................
An Achievable Dream, Newport News, VA for education              300,000
 and support services for at-risk children...........
Aquatic Adventures Science Education Foundation, San             200,000
 Diego, CA for an after-school science education
 program, which may include equipment and technology.
Arab City School District, Arab, AL for an education             150,000
 technology initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Auburn Joint Vocational School District, Concord                 250,000
 Township, OH for curriculum development.............
AVANCE, Inc., Austin, TX for parenting education                 350,000
 programs............................................
AVANCE, Inc., El Paso, TX for a parenting education              250,000
 program.............................................
AVANCE, Inc., Waco, TX for a family literacy program.            100,000
Babyland Family Services, Inc., Newark, NJ for an                400,000
 early childhood education program...................
Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore MD to                   500,000
 establish alternative education programs for
 academically challenged students, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Bay Point Schools, Inc., Miami, FL for a boarding                400,000
 school for at-risk students.........................
Best Buddies Florida, Orlando, FL for mentoring                  250,000
 programs in the 4th Congressional District for
 elementary and secondary school students with
 disabilities........................................
Bloomfield Board of Education, Bloomfield, NJ to                 300,000
 provide alternative education for academically
 challenged students.................................
Boise State University, Boise, ID for the Idaho                  400,000
 SySTEMic Solution program...........................
California State University, Northridge, CA for                  400,000
 teacher training and professional development.......
Capeverdean American Community Development,                      100,000
 Pawtucket, RI for after-school, tutoring, and
 literacy programs...................................
Carnegie Hall, New York, NY for music education                  300,000
 programs............................................
Center for Rural Development, Somerset, KY for the               500,000
 Forward in the Fifth literacy program...............
Charter School Development Foundation, Las Vegas, NV             400,000
 for an early childhood education program............
Chicago Youth Centers, Chicago, IL for the ABC Youth             200,000
 Center after school program, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Childhelp, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ to develop a                     250,000
 comprehensive update to the Good Touch Bad Touch
 curriculum..........................................
Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA for             250,000
 an outreach program to encourage minorities to
 consider health care careers........................
Children's Literacy Initiative, Philadelphia, PA for             200,000
 its literacy program................................
Choice Thru Education, Inc., Chelsea, MA for                     100,000
 educational and career development programs for at-
 risk youth..........................................
City of Bell, CA for an after-school program, which              200,000
 may include equipment and technology................
City of Fairfield, CA for an after-school and job-               350,000
 skills training program.............................
City of La Habra, CA for the Young at Art program....            148,000
City of Newark, CA for an after-school program.......             50,000
City of Prestonsburg, KY for an arts education                   200,000
 initiative..........................................
City School District of New Rochelle, New Rochelle,              297,000
 NY for after-school programs........................
Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional                900,000
 Learning, Chicago, IL for social and emotional
 learning curriculum development and implementation
 in the Youngstown, Niles, and/or Warren City, OH
 school districts....................................
College Success Foundation, Issaquah, WA for its                 400,000
 academic support and mentoring programs, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Public              250,000
 School Systems, Saipan, MP for its Refaluwasch and
 Chamorro language programs..........................
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Public              100,000
 School Systems, Saipan, MP for the purchase of books
 and educational materials...........................
Communities in Schools--Northeast Texas c/o Northeast            200,000
 Texas Community College, Mt. Pleasant, TX for
 dropout prevention programs.........................
Communities-in-Schools, Bell-Coryell Counties Inc.,              250,000
 Killeen, TX for the Youngest Victims of War project.
Connecticut Technical High School System, Middletown,            350,000
 CT for equipment for Eli Whitney Technical High
 School's Manufacturing Technology Program...........
Connecticut Technical High School System, Middletown,            250,000
 CT for equipment for Vinal Technical High School's
 Manufacturing Technology Program....................
Contra Costa Child Care Council, Concord, CA for an              100,000
 early childhood education program...................
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 10,                   300,000
 Chippewa Falls, WI for after-school programs........
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 11, Turtle            400,000
 Lake, WI for after-school programs..................
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 12,                   400,000
 Ashland, WI for after-school programs...............
Cooperative Educational Service Agency No. 9,                    300,000
 Tomahawk, WI for after-school programs..............
Corpus Christi Independent School District, Corpus               200,000
 Christi, TX for its South Texas School Literacy
 Project.............................................
County of Alachua, FL for after school programming...            250,000
Cullman County Schools, Cullman, AL for a mobile                 150,000
 laboratory initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Cuyahoga County Board of County Commissioners,                   100,000
 Cleveland, OH for an early childhood education
 program.............................................
Delaware Department of Education, Dover, DE for a                250,000
 school leadership initiative........................
Devereux Center for Effective Schools, King of                   100,000
 Prussia, PA for the School-wide Positive Behavioral
 Support program.....................................
East Los Angeles Classic Theater, Los Angeles, CA for            150,000
 an arts education program...........................
East Whittier City School District, Whittier, CA for             225,000
 support services for at-risk students, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Eastern Kentucky PRIDE, Somerset, KY for                         250,000
 environmental education programs....................
Eden Housing, Hayward, CA for a technology training              100,000
 program, which may include equipment and technology.
Education Service Center, Region 12, Hillsboro, TX                70,000
 for a GEAR UP college preparation program...........
Enrichment Services Program, Inc., Columbus, GA for              100,000
 after-school tutoring and GED programs for at-risk
 youth...............................................
Farrell Area School District, Farrell, PA for                    200,000
 education enrichment programs, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Fayette County Schools, Lexington, KY for a foreign            2,500,000
 language program....................................
Five County Regional Vocational System, Tamms, IL for             50,000
 education support services for at-risk students.....
Franklin County Schools, Russellville, AL for an                 935,000
 education technology initiative, including purchase
 of equipment........................................
Franklin McKinley School District, San Jose, CA for              180,000
 an academic enrichment and college preparation
 program, which may include equipment and technology.
Girls Incorporated of Alameda County, San Leandro, CA            250,000
 for a literacy program for young girls, which may
 include equipment and software......................
Glenwood School for Boys and Girls, West Campus, St.             100,000
 Charles, IL for an assessment and evaluation system,
 which may include software and technology...........
Governors State University, University Park, IL for              200,000
 early childhood education and after-school programs.
Harambee Institute, St. Louis, MO for an after-school            325,000
 arts education program, which may include equipment
 and technology......................................
Harcum College, Bryn Mawr, PA for a science,                     243,000
 technology, engineering and math education
 initiative, including purchase of equipment.........
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu, HI for its             700,000
 Assistance to Low Performing Schools Project, which
 may include equipment and technology................
Hazleton Area School District, Hazleton, PA for                  300,000
 curriculum development, equipment and technology....
Helen Keller International, New York, NY for the               1,200,000
 Child Sight Vision Screening Program and to provide
 eyeglasses to children whose educational performance
 may be hindered because of poor vision..............
Highland Falls-Fort Montgomery Central School                    800,000
 District, Highland Falls, NY for science education,
 which may include equipment and technology..........
Highline School District, Burien, WA for Aviation                335,000
 High School, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Hope Through Housing Foundation, Rancho Cucamonga,               350,000
 CA, for an academic tutoring and enrichment
 initiative..........................................
Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne, Ft.             260,000
 Wayne, IN for the Strategic Languages Institute.....
Indianapolis Public Schools, Indianapolis, IN for an             500,000
 instructional technology program, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Institute for Advanced Learning and Research,                    200,000
 Danville, VA for an environmental education program,
 which may include equipment and technology..........
Institute for Student Achievement, Lake Success, NY              150,000
 for a school retention and completion initiative at
 Point Coupee, Louisiana Central Prep High School....
Irwin County Schools, Ocilla, GA to purchase                     100,000
 textbooks...........................................
Jawonio, Inc., New York, NY for educational support              118,000
 services for students with disabilities.............
Jazz at Lincoln Center, New York, NY for music                   400,000
 education programs..................................
Jobs for Arizona's Graduates, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ               150,000
 for drop out prevention and after-school programs...
Joplin R-VIII School District, Joplin, MO for an                 100,000
 education technology initiative, including purchase
 of equipment........................................
KNME-TV, Albuquerque, NM for the Ready to Learn                   50,000
 program.............................................
Labor of Love Performing Arts Academy, Chicago, IL               400,000
 for an after-school arts program....................
Laurinburg Institute, Laurinburg, NC for its math,               400,000
 science, technology and engineering program.........
Leadership Excellence, Inc., Oakland, CA for a                   250,000
 mentoring program for at-risk youth.................
Leadership, Education and Athletics in Partnership,              300,000
 Inc., New Haven, CT for its after-school and
 mentoring programs..................................
Lee Pesky Learning Center, Boise, ID for the Idaho               350,000
 Early Literacy Project, which may include the
 purchase of equipment...............................
Leon County Schools, Tallahassee, FL for its gifted              350,000
 and talented enrichment program.....................
Literacy Council of West Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL for             250,000
 a literacy program..................................
Little Black Pearl Art and Design Center, Chicago, IL            300,000
 for an after-school arts program....................
LOOKBOTHWAYS, Port Townsend, WA for development of an            500,000
 internet safety curriculum..........................
Maspeth Town Hall, Inc., Maspeth, NY for after-                  150,000
 schools programs for at-risk youth in Queens, NY....
McLean County Fiscal Court, Calhoun, KY for purchase             150,000
 of equipment at the Livermore Community Library.....
Meeting Street, Providence, RI for an early childhood            700,000
 education program...................................
Memphis City Schools, Memphis, TN for an after-school            500,000
 program.............................................
Merced County Association of Governments, Merced, CA             425,000
 to develop a college preparatory program at Buhach
 Colony High School..................................
Michigan City Area Schools, Michigan City, IN for                350,000
 career and technical education programs, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Millcreek Children Center, Youngstown, OH for an arts            145,000
 education program, which may include equipment......
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, WI for community            110,000
 learning centers....................................
Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS for a               630,000
 teacher training initiative at the College of
 Education's Early Childhood Institute...............
Missouri State University, Springfield, MO for the               150,000
 Missouri Innovation Academy.........................
National Center for Electronically Mediated Learning,            150,000
 Inc., Milford, CT for the P.E.B.B.L.E.S. Project,
 which may include equipment.........................
National Network of Digital Schools Management                   500,000
 Foundation, Beaver, PA for the development of an
 online education program, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
New Haven Reads Community Book Bank, Inc., New Haven,            200,000
 CT for its after-school tutoring program............
New York Hall of Science, Queens, NY for its teacher             450,000
 training program for science........................
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC for a               100,000
 childrens' engineering and technological literacy
 program.............................................
North River Commission, Chicago, IL for after school             100,000
 enrichment programs in Chicago public schools
 located in the North River Commission area..........
North Rockland Central School District, Garnerville,             297,000
 NY for an English literacy program, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Northern Rockies Educational Services (NRES),                    300,000
 Missoula, MT for the Taking Technology to the
 Classroom initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Ogden City School District, Ogden, UT for a teacher              250,000
 training initiative, including purchase of equipment
Ohio University, Athens, OH for its Southeast Ohio               100,000
 Center for Excellence in Mathematics and Science....
Old Bridge Township Public Schools, Matawan, NJ for              200,000
 equipment and technology............................
Orange County Department of Education, Costa Mesa, CA            400,000
 for an Internet safety training program.............
Ossining Union Free School District, Ossining, NY for            297,000
 after-school and mentoring initiatives..............
Ouachita Parish School Board, Monroe, LA for                     400,000
 programming at the Northeast Louisiana Family
 Literacy Interagency Consortium.....................
Palisades Park School District, Palisades Park, NJ               150,000
 for its after-school homework program, which may
 include technology and equipment....................
Palm Beach County School District, West Palm Beach,              300,000
 FL for a mentoring program..........................
Parents as Teachers of Lake County, Inc., Hammond, IN            100,000
 for family literacy services........................
Pasadena Educational Foundation, Pasadena, CA for its            100,000
 Early College High School initiative................
Peaceable Kingdom Retreat for Children, Inc.,                    255,000
 Killeen, TX for educational programming.............
Pegasus Players, Chicago, IL for an arts education               100,000
 program.............................................
Polk County Public Schools, Bartow, FL for purchase              150,000
 of equipment........................................
Port Chester-Rye Union Free School District, Port                297,000
 Chester, NY for after-school, tutoring, or other
 activities to implement full service community
 schools.............................................
Project Cornerstone, San Jose, CA for education and              226,000
 enrichment activities...............................
Prospera Initiatives, Inc., Annandale, VA for a                  200,000
 mentoring program...................................
Resource Area For Teachers, San Jose, CA for teacher             200,000
 training and professional development...............
Rio Rancho Public Schools, Rio Rancho, NM for teacher            250,000
 training and professional development, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
River Region Multicultural Chamber of Commerce, La               300,000
 Place, LA for after-school and summer academic
 enrichment programs.................................
River Rouge School District, River Rouge, MI for                 200,000
 transitional services and workforce training for
 youth, which may include equipment and technology...
Riverside Unified School District, Riverside, CA for             325,000
 a science, technology, engineering and mathematics
 initiative, including curriculum development and
 purchase of equipment...............................
Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA for its              300,000
 AVID/Advanced Placement program.....................
Rockdale County Public Schools, Conyers, GA to                   400,000
 establish year-round Pre-K programs, which may
 include expenses for tuition, transportation, and
 meals...............................................
Rodel Foundation of Delaware, Wilmington, DE for the             150,000
 Delaware Parent Leadership Institute................
San Antonio Youth Centers, San Antonio, TX for after-            200,000
 school programs, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
San Jose Unified School District, San Jose, CA for a             250,000
 longitudinal data system............................
Save the Children, Westport, CT for a literacy                   100,000
 program.............................................
Save the Children, Westport, CT for a rural literacy             300,000
 program in Washington, St. Martin, and/or Tangipahoa
 parishes, which may include equipment and technology
School District of Cheltenham Township, Elkins Park,              50,000
 PA for a dual enrollment program, which may include
 expenses for tuition and textbooks..................
Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, WA for a language               200,000
 immersion program...................................
Self Enhancement, Inc., Portland, OR for a mentoring             525,000
 and academic enrichment program.....................
Shodor Education Foundation, Inc., Durham, NC for its            200,000
 Computing Mentoring Academic Transitions through
 Experience, Research, and Service initiative........
Signature Theatre, Arlington, VA for an arts                     500,000
 education program...................................
Sisters In Struggle, Hempstead, NY for a life-skills             200,000
 program for at-risk youth, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Somerset Hills School District, Bernardsville, NJ for            312,000
 the Cultural Tolerance Education initiative.........
South Berkshire Educational Collaborative, Great                 250,000
 Barrington, MA for educational enrichment and
 professional development activities.................
South Carolina Governor's School for Science and                 275,000
 Mathematics Foundation, Columbia, SC for academic
 enrichment programs in science, mathematics,
 engineering and technology..........................
Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT             200,000
 for its Autism Center for Excellence................
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford,             350,000
 OK for purchase of equipment........................
Southwestern University, Georgetown, TX for a summer             443,000
 college preparatory program.........................
Special Olympics 2010 USA National Games, Lincoln, NE            350,000
 to support the 2010 Special Olympics National Games.
Springboard for Improving Schools, San Francisco, CA             150,000
 for teacher training and professional development in
 one or more school districts in the 20th
 Congressional district..............................
Springboard for Improving Schools, San Francisco, CA             150,000
 for the Improving Student Achievement in the
 Palmdale, CA Elementary School District program.....
Springboard Schools, San Francisco, CA for teacher               150,000
 training and professional development in the Santa
 Ana Unified School District.........................
Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY for its Say Yes to             300,000
 Education after-school and extended learning
 initiative..........................................
Tarrytown Union Free School District, Tarrytown, NY              297,000
 for programs for at-risk youth......................
Texas A&M University--Commerce, TX for a science,                100,000
 technology, engineering and math initiative.........
Texas State University--San Marcos, TX for the Texas             350,000
 Mathworks initiative................................
Toledo GROWs, Toledo, OH for a hands-on science based            300,000
 curriculum in urban areas...........................
Trimble Local School District, Glouster, OH for an               175,000
 after-school program................................
Tulsa Public Schools, Tulsa, OK for the Tulsa                    350,000
 Academic Center.....................................
United Way of Miami-Dade, Miami, FL for the Center of            300,000
 Excellence in Early Education, including teacher
 training programs...................................
United Way of Youngstown/Mahoning Valley, Youngstown,            100,000
 OH for an early childhood education program.........
University of Houston, Houston, TX for teacher                   400,000
 training and professional development...............
University of Nebraska--Kearney, Kearney, NE for                 350,000
 curriculum development..............................
University of North Carolina at Greensboro,                      165,000
 Greensboro, NC for the ON TRACK mathematics
 enrichment program..................................
University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL for the            250,000
 Virtual School Readiness Incubator..................
Upper Palmetto YMCA, Rock Hill, SC for an                        225,000
 environmental education program, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
USD 353, Wellington, KS, Public Schools for                      250,000
 technology upgrades and teacher training............
USD 373, Newton, Kansas Public Schools for technology            250,000
 upgrades............................................
USD 402, Augusta, KS Public Schools for technology               250,000
 upgrades............................................
USD 446, Independence, KS Public Schools for                     250,000
 technology upgrades and teacher training............
USD 470, Arkansas City, KS Public Schools for                    250,000
 technology upgrades, professional development and
 training/technical assistance.......................
USD 490, Butler County, KS for technology upgrades               250,000
 and teacher training at the El Dorado, KS public
 school system.......................................
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI for its science,             300,000
 engineering, mathematics, aerospace academy.........
We Care San Jacinto, San Jacinto, CA for an                      100,000
 afterschool tutoring program........................
Western Oklahoma State College, Altus, OK for                    100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Wings of Eagles, Horseheads, NY for a Regional                   275,000
 Science, Technological, Engineering, and Math
 Academy.............................................
YMCA of Warren, Warren, OH for an after-school                   100,000
 program.............................................
Yonkers Public Schools, Yonkers, NY for Saturday                 297,000
 academies, music education, and teacher professional
 development activities..............................
YWCA of the Harbor Area and South Bay, San Pedro, CA             300,000
 for an early childhood education program............
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Teacher Incentive Fund

    The Committee recommends $445,864,000 for the Teacher 
Incentive Fund (TIF), which is $348,594,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $41,406,000 below the budget 
request. In addition, the Recovery Act provided $200,000,000 
for TIF for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The goals of TIF are to 
improve student achievement by increasing teacher and principal 
effectiveness; reform teacher and principal compensation 
systems so that teachers and principals are rewarded for gains 
in student achievement; increase the number of effective 
teachers teaching low-income, minority, and disadvantaged 
students in hard-to-staff subjects; and create sustainable 
performance-based compensation systems. The program provides 
grants to encourage school districts and States to develop and 
implement innovative ways to provide financial incentives for 
teachers and principals who raise student achievement and close 
the achievement gap in some of our nation's highest-need 
schools. The bill includes language recommended by the 
Administration to permit TIF funds to support initiatives that 
provide performance-based compensation to all staff in a school 
(rather than only to teachers and the principal).
    Within the total amount provided, $220,000,000 will 
continue awards made with fiscal year 2009 Omnibus and Recovery 
Act funds, $200,000,000 will be available for new awards, and 
the remaining funds will support training, technical 
assistance, evaluation, and peer review activities.
    Finally, the bill includes a general provision that 
prohibits the obligation of funds for new TIF awards prior to 
the submission of an impact evaluation plan to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate. The Committee intends that the Institute of Education 
Sciences oversee the conduct of this TIF evaluation, which 
shall employ rigorous scientific methods including, to the 
extent practicable, random assignment.

National Teacher Recruitment Campaign

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for a new National 
Teacher Recruitment Campaign, which is $10,000,000 more than 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $20,000,000 below the budget 
request. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act authorizes 
a National Teacher Recruitment Campaign, which may be carried 
out through a national teacher recruitment clearinghouse to 
assist high-need schools and to conduct a national public 
service campaign concerning the available resources for and 
possible routes to entering teaching. The Committee 
recommendation does not include funding for grants to school 
districts, which already receive teacher recruitment and 
retention funding through the Improving Teacher Quality State 
Grants, TIF, and the Teacher Quality Partnership programs. The 
Committee provides these resources for a comprehensive national 
effort to link those who wish to enter teaching with teaching 
positions, which may include a national clearinghouse. The 
Committee directs that the Department provide a briefing to the 
Committee on the planned use of these funds no later than 30 
days prior to the release of a request for proposals.

Ready-to-Learn Television

    The Committee recommends $25,416,000 for the Ready-to-Learn 
Television program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Ready-to-Learn 
Television program is designed to facilitate student academic 
achievement by supporting the development and distribution of 
educational video programming for preschool and elementary 
school children and their parents.

Close Up Fellowships

    The Committee recommends $1,942,000 for the Close Up 
Fellowships program, which is the same amount as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level. The Committee does not agree with the 
Administration's request to terminate this program. Close Up 
Fellowships are administered by the Close Up Foundation and 
support fellowships to low-income middle- and high school 
students for low-income families and their teachers to spend 
one week in D.C. attending seminars on government and current 
events and meeting with leaders from the three branches of the 
Federal government.

Advanced Placement Program

    The Committee recommends $43,540,000 for the Advanced 
Placement program. This recommendation is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program finances grants to States to pay Advanced Placement 
test fees on behalf of low-income individuals, as well as 
grants to States, local education agencies, or nonprofit 
educational entities with relevant expertise, to support 
activities intended to expand access to advanced placement 
programs for low-income individuals. The Committee 
recommendation includes $15,374,000 for test fee subsidies for 
low-income students who are enrolled in advanced placement 
classes and plan to take Advanced Placement or International 
Baccalaureate tests. The remaining funds are allocated for 
Advanced Placement Incentive Program Grants, which are used to 
expand access to Advanced Placement programs for low-income 
students, by supporting activities such as teacher training, 
development of pre-advanced placement courses, and books and 
supplies.

             State Fiscal Stabilization Fund, Recovery Act

    The Committee includes $3,000,000 for the What Works and 
Innovation Fund authorized under the State Fiscal Stabilization 
Fund established in the Recovery Act. This amount is $3,000,000 
more than the fiscal year 2009 level and $97,000,000 less than 
the request. This fund supports competitive grants to school 
districts, and to partnerships between nonprofit organizations 
and school districts, that have made significant progress in 
improving student achievement to scale up their work and serve 
as models of best practices. The Recovery Act provided 
$650,000,000 for this purpose in fiscal year 2010. The 
Committee recommends additional funding to provide additional 
flexibility to the Secretary of Education to address the 
expected strong demand for this assistance.
    The Committee encourages the Department to establish 
invitational priorities under the What Works and Innovation 
Fund for program approaches that prepare students to 
successfully pursue, enter, and matriculate in college as 
described in sections 801 and 808 of the Higher Education Act.

                 Safe Schools and Citizenship Education

    The Committee recommends $395,753,000 for Safe Schools and 
Citizenship Education programs. This amount is $294,617,000 
below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $17,855,000 below 
the budget request. This appropriation account includes 
programs authorized under parts of titles II, IV, and V of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities: State Grants

    The President's fiscal year 2010 budget proposes to 
eliminate funding for Safe and Drug Free Schools and 
Communities State Grants program, which was funded at 
$294,759,000 in fiscal year 2009. While the Committee supports 
efforts to improve school safety and reduce drug use, the 
Committee agrees with the Administration's request and the need 
to redirect these funds into higher impact activities, such as 
teacher and principal training and development. Safe and Drug-
Free Schools and Communities State Grants are State-
administered, formula grant programs intended to provide 
assistance to schools to establish safe and orderly school-
environments. However, school districts generally do not 
receive sufficient funding to support quality interventions. 
The Committee recommends below a series of targeted 
interventions to help districts foster a safe and secure 
learning environment, develop emergency response plans, and 
reduce alcohol and drug use.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities: National Programs

    The Committee recommends $195,041,000 for the Safe and 
Drug-Free Schools and Communities National Programs, which is 
$54,777,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$55,855,000 below the budget request. Under this program, the 
Secretary of Education administers a variety of activities to 
prevent the illegal use of drugs, underage drinking, and 
violence among students at all levels of education.
    Within the funds included in the bill for Safe and Drug 
Free Schools and Communities, National Programs, the following 
amounts are provided for the following activities:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               FY 2010 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                       FY 2010 Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
School Culture and Climate.............................        $50,000,000        $50,000,000       -$50,000,000
School and College Emergency Preparedness..............         40,000,000          4,009,000                  0
Safe Schools/Healthy Students..........................         77,816,000                  0                  0
Drug Testing Initiative................................          7,839,000          1,232,000                  0
Postsecondary Education Drug and Violence Prevention...          5,409,000           -608,000         -2,608,000
Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking (STOP Act).          2,500,000                  0          2,500,000
Project SERV...........................................          2,000,000          2,000,000         -3,000,000
National activities....................................          9,477,000           -576,000         -2,747,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    School Culture and Climate.--The Committee includes 
$50,000,000 for an initiative to support new approaches to 
assisting schools foster a safe, secure and drug-free learning 
environment, particularly by using approaches to change school 
culture and climate--and thereby improve character and 
discipline--and reduce drug use, crime and violence. The funds 
will support approximately 200 competitive awards focused on: 
(1) reducing suspensions and expulsions related to student 
disruptive behavior and nonviolent offenses; and (2) reducing 
violent crime in schools, on school grounds, and on the way to 
and from school.
    School and College Emergency Preparedness.--The Committee 
also continues its initiative to enhance school and college 
emergency preparedness planning. These activities assist school 
districts and colleges in preventing, preparing for, 
mitigating, and responding to catastrophic events and other 
crises. The Committee recommends a total of $43,000,000 for 
this initiative--$40,000,000 under the Department of Education 
and $3,000,000 under the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration (SAMHSA). This amount includes 
$33,000,000 for elementary and secondary education and 
$10,000,000 for higher education, of which $7,000,000 is 
provided under the Department of Education and $3,000,000, is 
provided under SAMHSA.
    Safe Schools/Healthy Students.--The Committee's 
recommendation includes $77,816,000 for the Safe Schools/
Healthy Students initiative. The bill also provides $81,860,000 
for this initiative under SAMHSA. In total, $159,676,000 will 
be available in fiscal year 2010 for these comprehensive 
grants, which require the commitment of local partners--school 
districts, local law enforcement, juvenile justice agencies, 
and public mental health authorities--to develop joint 
strategies and services to prevent youth violence and provide 
student mental health services. A key feature of this program 
is its collaborative planning among the Department of 
Education, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the 
Department of Justice and joint funding between the Department 
of Education and SAMHSA.
    Student Drug Testing.--For the final year of the Student 
Drug Testing Initiative, the Committee provides $7,839,000, as 
requested by the Administration. These projects must be 
conducted in strict compliance with Supreme Court rulings on 
student drug testing.
    Postsecondary Education Drug and Violence Prevention.--The 
Committee provides $5,409,000 for Postsecondary Education Drug 
and Violence Prevention. This program provides financial and 
technical assistance to institutions of higher education for 
drug prevention and campus safety programs for students 
attending such institutions. The amount provided also includes 
funds for a National Recognition Awards program that would 
recognize models of exemplary, effective, and promising drug 
and alcohol prevention programs on college campuses.
    Sober Truth on Preventing Underage Drinking (STOP Act).--
The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for the Sober Truth on 
Preventing Underage Drinking (STOP Act). Among other things, 
this program finances grants to institutions of higher 
education, States and non-profit organizations to combat 
underage drinking in communities.
    Project SERV.--The bill includes $2,000,000 for the School 
Emergency Response to Violence initiative (Project SERV). The 
Committee expects that these funds will be sufficient for 
fiscal year 2010, given approximately $6,200,000 in unexpended 
balances from prior years and historical expenditure patterns. 
Project SERV provides education-related services to school 
districts in which the learning environment has been disrupted 
due to a violent or traumatic crisis.
    Social and Emotional Learning.--The Committee believes that 
addressing the social and emotional development of students 
through evidence-based social and emotional learning programs 
is a highly effective way to create safe and drug-free schools 
and to promote higher student achievement and attainment. The 
Committee urges Federal support for the implementation of 
evidenced-based social and emotional learning standards and 
programming.

Alcohol Abuse Reduction

    The Committee recommends $32,712,000 for this program, 
which is the same amount as the fiscal year 2009 funding level. 
This program awards competitive grants to school districts to 
develop and implement programs to reduce alcohol abuse in 
secondary schools. The Committee recommendation will support 
$3,657,000 in new awards in fiscal year 2010.

Mentoring Programs

    The Administration's budget proposes to eliminate funding 
for Mentoring Programs, which were funded at $47,264,000 in 
fiscal year 2009. The Committee adopts this recommendation. 
This program provides competitive grants to school districts 
and community-based organizations to promote mentoring programs 
for children. In March 2009, the Department's Institute of 
Education Sciences completed a rigorous multi-year evaluation, 
which found this program to be ineffective. Students were 
compared on 17 measures across four domains: school engagement, 
academic achievement, delinquent behavior, and ``prosocial'' 
behavior. The evaluation found no statistically significant 
impacts of this program on any of the measures. The Committee 
does support mentoring programs for at-risk children and youth, 
however, and recommends $17,847,000 for new mentoring programs 
for youth offenders under the Re-integration of Ex-offenders 
Program in the Department of Labor and $49,314,000 for the 
Mentoring Children of Prisoners program in the Department of 
Health and Human Services.

Character Education

    The Administration's budget proposes to eliminate funding 
for Character Education, which was funded at $11,912,000 in 
fiscal year 2009. The Committee adopts this recommendation. 
This program provides support for the design and implementation 
of character education programs in elementary and secondary 
schools, but is now too small to have significant impact. In 
lieu of these funds, the Committee provides $50,000,000 for a 
larger grant competition focused on school culture and climate, 
which may include character education.

Elementary and Secondary School Counseling

    The Committee provides $55,000,000 for Elementary and 
Secondary School Counseling, which is $3,000,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program provides grants to school districts to enable them to 
establish or expand elementary school and secondary school 
counseling programs. School counselors are primarily supported 
with non-Federal funds.
    According to the Department, a recent review of school 
counseling research found that school counseling programs have 
a significant impact in reducing student disciplinary problems, 
enhancing problem solving skills, and increasing career 
knowledge; they also were found to have a small but positive 
impact on academic achievement. The funds provided by the 
Committee will support the hiring and training of qualified 
school counselors, school psychologists, child and adolescent 
psychiatrists, and school social workers to provide beneficial 
counseling services.

Carol M. White Physical Education Program

    The Committee recommends $78,000,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program provides grants to local 
educational agencies and community-based organizations to 
initiate, expand, and improve physical education programs for 
students in kindergarten through 12th grade.
    The Committee again directs the Department to work with CDC 
to incorporate the school health index into this program. In 
fiscal year 2010, approximately $39,000,000 will be available 
for new awards; the Department shall grant priority to those 
applications that have completed physical education and 
nutritional assessments as part of the school health index or 
propose to implement the school health index. Awards should 
support the implementation of science-based curriculum tools to 
encourage physical education and healthy eating. In addition, 
the Committee provides $62,780,000 under CDC to expand from 22 
to 32 the number of State educational agencies receiving 
assistance for school health, nutrition, and obesity programs.

Civic Education

    The Administration's budget proposes to eliminate funding 
for Civic Education. The Committee strongly disagrees with this 
proposal and instead recommends $35,000,000 for Civic 
Education, which is the $1,541,000 more than the fiscal year 
2009 funding level. Program funds support the ``We the People'' 
and the Cooperative Education Exchange programs. ``We the 
People'' seeks to promote civic competence and responsibility 
among students. The Cooperative Education Exchange program 
provides support for education exchange activities in civics 
and economics between the United States and eligible countries 
in Central and Eastern Europe, the Commonwealth of Independent 
States, any country of the former Soviet Union, the Republic of 
Ireland, the Province of Northern Ireland, or a developing 
country with a democratic form of government. Within the total 
amount for Civic Education, $2,957,000 is designated in the 
bill for a comprehensive program, developed by the Center for 
Civic Education, in partnership with Indiana University and the 
National Conference on State Legislatures, to improve student 
knowledge, understanding, and support of American democratic 
institutions. The bill also designates up to $13,383,000 to 
carry out the Cooperative Education Exchange program.

                      English Language Acquisition

    The Committee recommends $760,000,000 for the English 
Language Acquisition program. This amount is $30,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Of 
this amount provided for the 2010-2011 academic year, 
$49,400,000 is appropriated for obligation on or after October 
1, 2009 and $710,600,000 is appropriated for obligation on or 
after, July 1, 2010. All funds are available through September 
30, 2011. The bill modifies existing language to calculate all 
State awards based on a three-year average of data from the 
American Community Survey.
    This program provides formula grants to States to serve 
limited English proficient students. Grants are based on each 
State's share of the national limited English proficient (LEP) 
and recent immigrant student population. Funds under this 
account also support professional development to increase the 
pool of teachers prepared to serve LEP students as well as 
evaluation activities.
    High rates of immigration over the last two decades have 
resulted in dramatic increases in the number of LEP students 
identified by States. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the 
number of LEP students has risen from below 1 million in 1980 
to above 4.6 million in 2005. According to the Department, the 
overall increase in LEP students, and the rapid growth in the 
LEP population in States lacking an infrastructure for serving 
LEP students, underscores the need for this program.

                           Special Education

    The Committee recommends $12,579,677,000 for programs for 
children with disabilities authorized under the Individuals 
with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This funding level is 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. Of the total amount available, $3,726,354,000 is 
available for obligation on or after July 1, 2010, and 
$8,592,383,000 is available for obligation on or after October 
1, 2010. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$12,200,000,000 for special education in fiscal years 2009 and 
2010. These grants help States and localities pay for a free 
appropriate education for 6.7 million students with 
disabilities aged 3 through 21 years.

Grants to States

    The Committee recommends $11,505,211,000 for Part B Grants 
to States, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $11,300,000,000 for Part B Grants to States in 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This program provides formula 
grants to assist States in meeting the excess costs of 
providing special education and related services to children 
with disabilities. States generally transfer most of the funds 
to local educational agencies; however, they can reserve some 
funds for program monitoring, technical assistance, and other 
related activities. In order to be eligible for funds States 
must make free appropriate public education available to all 
children with disabilities.
    The Committee believes that students with disabilities 
should have an equal opportunity to participate in high quality 
education and it helped to make this goal a reality by 
providing a historic $11,300,000,000 for Part B Grants to 
States in the Recovery Act. These funds, together with the 
funds provided in this bill, will support a record 25 percent 
Federal contribution toward special education in each of fiscal 
years 2009 and 2010.
    The Committee includes bill language proposed in the budget 
request to limit the increase in the amount of funds required 
to be transferred to the Department of the Interior to the 
lesser of the 2009 plus inflation or the percentage change in 
the funding for the Grants to States program.

Preschool Grants

    The Committee recommends $374,099,000 for Preschool Grants, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$400,000,000 for Preschool Grants to States in fiscal years 
2009 and 2010. These funds provide additional assistance to 
States to help them make free, appropriate public education 
available to children with disabilities ages three through 
five.

Grants for Infants and Families

    The Committee recommends $439,427,000 for Grants for 
Infants and Families, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $500,000,000 for Grants for Infants and Families 
in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. These funds provide additional 
assistance to States to help them make free, appropriate public 
education available to children with disabilities from birth 
through age two.

IDEA National Activities

    The Committee recommends $252,845,000 for the IDEA National 
Activities program. This amount is the same as fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The IDEA National 
Activities programs support State efforts to improve early 
intervention and education results for children with 
disabilities.
    State Personnel Development.--The Committee recommends 
$48,000,000 for State Personnel Development, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
This program focuses on professional development by supporting 
grants to States to assist with improving personnel preparation 
and professional development related to early intervention and 
educational and transition services that improve outcomes for 
students with disabilities.
    Technical Assistance and Dissemination.--The Committee 
recommends $48,549,000 for Technical Assistance and 
Dissemination, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program provides 
funding for technical assistance, demonstration projects, and 
information dissemination. These funds support efforts by State 
and local education agencies, institutions of higher education, 
and other entities to build State and local capacity to make 
systemic changes and improve results for children with 
disabilities.
    Personnel Preparation.--The Committee recommends 
$90,653,000 for Personnel Preparation, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program supports competitive awards to help address State-
identified needs for qualified personnel to work with children 
with disabilities, and to ensure that those personnel have the 
necessary skills and knowledge to serve children with special 
needs. Awards focus on addressing the need for leadership and 
personnel to serve low-incidence populations.
    Parent Information Centers.--The Committee recommends 
$27,028,000 for Parent Information Centers, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
This program makes awards to parent organizations to support 
Parent Training and Information Centers, including community 
parent resource centers. These centers provide training and 
information to meet the needs of parents of children with 
disabilities living in the areas served by the centers, 
particularly underserved parents and parents of children who 
may be inappropriately identified. Technical assistance is also 
provided under this program for developing, assisting, and 
coordinating centers receiving assistance under this program.
    Technology and Media Services.--The Committee recommends 
$38,615,000 for Technology and Media Services, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. This program makes competitive awards to support the 
development, demonstration, and use of technology and 
educational media activities of educational value to children 
with disabilities.
    Within the total, the bill includes $13,250,000 for 
Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic, Inc. These funds support 
continued development, production, and circulation of 
accessible educational materials for print-disabled students 
and their teachers, and accelerated use of digital technology.

Special Olympics Education Programs

    The Committee recommends $8,095,000 for Special Olympics 
Education Programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This program finances 
grants to the Special Olympics to support activities which 
increase awareness of and participation in the Special 
Olympics.

            Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research

    The Committee recommends $3,504,305,000 for Rehabilitation 
Services and Disability Research. This amount is $116,543,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $3,570,000 above 
the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$680,000,000 for Rehabilitation Services in fiscal years 2009 
and 2010. The programs in this account are authorized by the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Helen Keller National Center 
Act, and the Assistive Technology Act of 1998.

Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants

    The Committee recommends $3,084,696,000 for Vocational 
Rehabilitation State Grants, which is $110,061,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level, and the same as the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional $540,000,000 
for Vocational Rehabilitation State grants in fiscal years 2009 
and 2010. This program supports basic vocational rehabilitation 
services through formula grants to the States. These grants 
support a wide range of services designed to help persons with 
physical and mental disabilities prepare for and engage in 
gainful employment to the extent of their capabilities. 
Emphasis is placed on providing vocational rehabilitation 
services to persons with the most significant disabilities. The 
Committee's recommendation provides the cost-of-living 
adjustment for Vocational Rehabilitation Grants to States, as 
authorized.

Client Assistance State Grants

    The Committee recommends $11,576,000 for Client Assistance 
State Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. Client Assistance State Grants 
support services for eligible individuals and applicants of the 
Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants program, and other 
programs, projects, and services funded under the 
Rehabilitation Act. These formula grants are used to help 
persons with disabilities overcome problems with the service 
delivery system and improve their understanding of services 
available to them under the Rehabilitation Act.

Training

    The Committee recommends $37,766,000 for the Training 
program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The program supports long-term 
and short-term training, in-service personnel training, and 
training of interpreters for deaf persons. Projects in a broad 
array of disciplines are funded to ensure that skilled 
personnel are available to serve the vocational needs of 
persons with disabilities.

Demonstration and Training Programs

    The Committee recommends $9,076,000 for Demonstration and 
Training Programs, which is $518,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and $2,570,000 above the same as the budget 
request. These programs authorize discretionary awards on a 
competitive basis to public and private organizations to 
support demonstrations, direct services, and related activities 
for persons with disabilities.
    The bill includes $2,570,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AbilityFirst, Pasadena, CA for programs to provide              $100,000
 employment assistance for individuals with
 disabilities........................................
Best Buddies Maryland, Baltimore, MD for mentoring               300,000
 programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Best Buddies Massachusetts, Boston, MA for mentoring              70,000
 programs in the 8th Congressional district for
 persons with intellectual disabilities..............
Best Buddies Virginia, Falls Church, VA for mentoring            250,000
 programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Best Buddies, San Francisco, CA for mentoring                    250,000
 programs for persons with intellectual disabilities.
Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL for a                   600,000
 training program to prepare instructors to work with
 visually impaired veterans, which may include
 scholarships........................................
Opportunity Enterprises, Inc., Valparaiso, IN for its            150,000
 adult day program, which may include equipment......
Southern California Rehabilitation Services, Downey,             100,000
 CA for computer and Internet training for
 individuals with disabilities, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Southside Training, Employment and Placement                     300,000
 Services, Inc., Farmville, VA for training,
 employment services, and placement assistance for
 persons with disabilities, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Special Olympics of Rhode Island, Warwick, RI for                200,000
 delivering programs and promoting physical fitness
 among individuals with disabilities.................
Vocational Guidance Services-- Painesville Center,               100,000
 Painesville, OH for the Training Enhancements
 Promoting Jobs for Ohioans with Disabilities project
Wisconsin Coalition of Independent Living Centers,               150,000
 Inc., Madison, WI for its Increase Vets'
 Independence Initiative to provide independent
 living services to disabled veterans................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers

    The Committee recommends $2,239,000 for programs serving 
Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
program provides discretionary grants to finance comprehensive 
vocational rehabilitation services available to migrant and 
seasonal farmworkers with vocational disabilities. Projects 
emphasize outreach activities, specialized bilingual 
rehabilitation counseling, and coordination of vocational 
rehabilitation services with services from other sources.

Recreational Program

    The Committee recommends $2,474,000 for Recreational 
Programs, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program provides individuals 
with recreation and related activities to aid in their 
employment, mobility, independence, socialization, and 
community integration. Discretionary grants are made on a 
competitive basis to States, public agencies, and nonprofit 
private organizations, including institutions of higher 
education.

Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights

    The Committee recommends $18,101,000 for Protection and 
Advocacy of Individual Rights, which is $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This 
funding increase will help to meet the growing demand for 
services by children and adults with disabilities within their 
community and avoid institutionalization. Grants are awarded to 
entities that have the authority to pursue legal, 
administrative, and other appropriate remedies to protect and 
advocate for the rights of persons with disabilities.

Projects With Industry

    The Committee recommends $19,197,000 for Projects with 
Industry, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program promotes greater 
participation of business and industry in the rehabilitation 
process. The program provides placement and job development 
services to assist persons with disabilities to prepare them 
for employment in the competitive labor market. Awards are made 
to a variety of agencies and organizations, including business 
and industrial corporations, rehabilitation facilities, labor 
organizations, trade associations, and foundations.

Supported Employment State Grants

    The Committee recommends $29,181,000 for Supported 
Employment State Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. These formula grants 
assist States in developing collaborative programs with public 
agencies and nonprofit agencies for training and post-
employment services leading to supported employment. In 
supported employment programs, persons with the most 
significant disabilities are given special supervision and 
assistance to enable them to work in an integrated setting.

Independent Living

    The Committee recommends $137,867,000 for Independent 
Living Programs, which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The Recovery 
Act provided an additional $140,000,000 for Independent Living 
for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. These programs provide services 
to individuals with disabilities to maximize their independence 
and productivity, and to help them integrate into the 
mainstream of American society.
    Independent Living State Grants.--The Committee recommends 
$23,450,000 for Independent Living State Grants, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional $18,200,000 
for Independent Living State Grants for fiscal years 2009 and 
2010. This program supports formula grants to States to provide 
services for independent living for persons with significant 
disabilities.
    Centers for Independent Living.--The Committee recommends 
$80,266,000 for Centers for Independent Living, which is 
$3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $87,500,000 for Independent Living Centers for 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010. A population-based formula 
determines the total amount available for discretionary grants 
for centers in each State. These grants support a network of 
consumer-controlled, nonresidential, community-based, private, 
nonprofit centers that provide a wide range of services to help 
persons with significant disabilities live more independently 
in family and community settings. Centers provide information 
and referral services, independent living skills training, peer 
counseling, and individual and systems advocacy.
    Independent Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are 
Blind.--The Committee recommends $34,151,000 for Independent 
Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind, which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional $34,300,000 
for Independent Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are 
Blind Grants for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Funds are 
distributed to States according to a formula based on the 
population of individuals who are 55 or older, and support 
services for persons 55 years old or over whose severe visual 
impairment makes gainful employment extremely difficult to 
obtain, but for whom independent living goals are feasible.

Program Improvement

    The Committee recommends $852,000 for Program Improvement, 
which is $230,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. The program provides technical 
assistance and consultative services to public and non-profit 
private agencies and organizations; short-term training and 
technical instruction; conducts special demonstrations; 
collects, prepares, publishes and disseminates educational or 
informational materials; and monitors and conducts evaluations.

Evaluation

    The Committee recommends $1,217,000 for program evaluation, 
which is $230,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
the same as the budget request. These funds are used to 
evaluate the impact and effectiveness of individual programs 
authorized under the Rehabilitation Act. Contracts are awarded 
on an annual basis for studies to be conducted by persons not 
immediately involved in the administration of the programs 
authorized by the Act.

Helen Keller National Center

    The Committee recommends $8,362,000 for the Helen Keller 
National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth and Adults, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. These funds are used for the operation of a national 
center that provides intensive services for deaf-blind 
individuals and their families at Sands Point, New York, and a 
network of ten regional offices that provide referral, 
counseling, transition services, and technical assistance to 
service providers.

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    The Committee recommends $110,741,000 for the National 
Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, which is 
$3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Institute supports research, 
demonstration, and training activities that are designed to 
maximize the employment and integration into society of 
individuals with disabilities of all ages. The Committee 
encourages the Administration to establish an Interagency 
Committee on Disability Research to develop a comprehensive 
government-wide strategic plan for disability and 
rehabilitation research, including capacity building and 
knowledge translation.

Assistive Technology

    For Assistive Technology, the Committee recommends 
$30,960,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. Technology assistance activities 
are authorized under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998. This 
Act authorizes population-based formula grants to the States to 
assist them in supporting alternative financing programs and 
assistive technology device demonstrations, loan, and 
reutilization programs. In addition, the funds support 
protection and advocacy services related to assistive 
technology and national technical assistance activities.
    Of the funds provided, $25,660,000 is for the State grant 
program, $4,300,000 is for the protection and advocacy program, 
and $1,000,000 is for national activities. Consistent with the 
authorizing statute, the Committee does not provide separate 
funding for the alternative financing program. Instead, funds 
for alternative financing are included in the State grant 
program.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities

    The Committee recommends $211,036,000 for Special 
Institutions for Persons with Disabilities. This amount is 
$225,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same 
as the budget request.

                 AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND

    The Committee recommends $22,599,000 for the American 
Printing House for the Blind, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This funding 
subsidizes the production of educational materials for legally 
blind persons enrolled in pre-college programs. The Printing 
House, which is chartered by the State of Kentucky, 
manufactures and maintains an inventory of educational 
materials in accessible formats that are distributed free of 
charge to schools and States based on the number of blind 
students in each State. The Printing House also conducts 
research and field activities to inform educators about the 
availability of materials and how to use them.

               NATIONAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF

    The Committee recommends $68,437,000 for the National 
Technical Institute for the Deaf which is $4,225,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The Committee's recommendation includes $5,400,000 for 
construction. The National Technical Institute for the Deaf was 
established by Congress in 1965 to provide a residential 
facility for postsecondary technical training and education for 
deaf persons with the purpose of promoting the employment of 
these individuals. The Institute also conducts applied research 
and provides training in various aspects of deafness. The 
Secretary of Education administers these activities through a 
contract with the Rochester Institute of Technology in 
Rochester, New York.

                          GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY

    The Committee recommends $120,000,000 for Gallaudet 
University, which is $4,000,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
funding level, and the same as the budget request. The 
Committee's recommendation includes $2,000,000 for 
construction. Gallaudet is a private, non-profit educational 
institution Federally-chartered in 1864 providing elementary, 
secondary, undergraduate, and continuing education for deaf 
persons. In addition, the University offers graduate programs 
in fields related to deafness for deaf and hearing students, 
conducts research on deafness, and provides public service 
programs for deaf persons.

                 Career, Technical, and Adult Education

    The Committee recommends $2,016,447,000 for Career, 
Technical, and Adult Education programs, which is $72,099,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $2,000,000 below 
the budget request. This account includes vocational education 
programs authorized by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Act of 2006. The account also includes adult 
education programs authorized under the Workforce Investment 
Act of 1998. These significant new investments reflect the 
increasing need to assist students to stay in school or return 
to school in order to complete a high school degree or 
equivalent that will prepare them for the workforce or 
postsecondary education or training.

Career and Technical Education

    The Committee recommends $1,271,694,000 for Career 
Education. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.

Career and Technical Education: State Grants

    The Committee recommends $1,160,911,000 for Career and 
Technical Education State Grants, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Of the 
funds provided, $791,000,000 is appropriated for obligation on 
or after October 1, 2010.
    State Grants support a variety of career and technical 
education programs developed in accordance with the State plan. 
The Act concentrates Federal resources on institutions with 
high concentrations of low-income students. The populations 
assisted by State Grants range from secondary students in pre-
vocational courses to adults who need retraining to adapt to 
changing technological and labor markets. Funding for State 
Grants will continue support for state-of-the art career and 
technical training to approximately six million students in 
secondary schools and more than four million students in 
community and technical colleges.

Tech-Prep Education State Grants

    The Committee recommends $102,923,000 for Tech-Prep 
Education State Grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. This appropriation 
includes activities under title II of the Carl D. Perkins 
Career and Technical Education Act of 2006.
    The Tech-Prep Education State Grants program provides 
planning and demonstration grants to a consortia of local 
educational agencies and postsecondary institutions to develop 
and operate model technical education programs that integrate 
academic and vocational education. These programs begin in high 
school and provide students with the mathematical, science, 
communications, and technological skills needed to enter a two-
year associate degree or two-year certificate program in a 
given occupational field. They also help students make a 
successful transition into further postsecondary education or 
begin their careers.

National Programs

    The Committee recommends $7,860,000 for National programs, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This authority supports the conduct and 
dissemination of research in career and technical education. It 
also includes support for the National Centers for Research and 
Dissemination in Career and Technical Education and other 
discretionary research.

Adult Education

    The Committee recommends $639,567,000 for Adult Education. 
This amount is $72,099,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and $2,000,000 below the budget request.

Adult Basic Literacy Education State Grants

    The Committee recommends $628,221,000 for Adult Basic 
Literacy Education State Grants, which is $74,099,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. These State formula grants, authorized under the Adult 
Education Act, support programs to enable all adults to acquire 
basic literacy skills, to enable those who so desire to 
complete secondary education, and to make available to adults 
the means to become more employable, productive, and 
responsible citizens.
    Within the total amount for Adult Basic Literacy Education 
State Grants, $45,907,000 is provided for a one-time increase 
to those States that, between fiscal years 2003 and 2008, did 
not receive their full allocations because of an administrative 
error by the Department of Education. This funding allows these 
States to recover the additional amounts to which they are 
entitled. The bill includes language holding harmless those 
States that received overpayments during this period. The 
remaining increase of $28,192,000 is distributed to States 
under statutory formulas.
    According to the Department of Education, there is a 
significant and ongoing need for adult education services given 
to the number of high school dropouts and the growing 
population of adult immigrants without the English language 
skills that are needed to succeed in school and the workplace. 
Moreover, the adult education program is one of a relatively 
few number of programs that was rated as effective under the 
Program Assessment Rating Tool. Accordingly, the Committee 
provides the requested funding to begin to address these needs. 
Under the Committee recommendation, over three million adults 
will be served, an increase of 316,000 adults over the fiscal 
year 2009 level.
    The bill also specifies that the set aside for English 
literacy and civics education State grants within the adult 
education program shall be $75,000,000 in fiscal year 2010, 
providing a $7,104,000 increase over the fiscal year 2009 
level, as requested.

National Leadership Activities

    The Committee provides $11,346,000 for National Leadership 
Activities, which is $4,468,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level, and $2,000,000 below the budget request. Through 
applied research, development, dissemination, evaluation, and 
program improvement activities, this program assists State 
efforts to improve the quality of adult education. The funds 
support such projects as evaluations on the status and 
effectiveness of adult education programs, national and 
international adult literacy surveys, and technical assistance 
on using technology to improve instruction and administration 
that shows promise of contributing to the improvement and 
expansion of adult education. Additional activities include 
addressing the need to increase the literacy and workforce 
skills of the nation's native-born adult population, as well as 
the growing need to meet the English language acquisition, 
literacy, and workforce skills needs of the immigrant 
population.
    Within the total, the bill includes $5,000,000 for an Adult 
Workforce Transition initiative, which will provide competitive 
grants to partnerships of local adult education providers and 
community colleges, business and industry, to enable adults to 
transition into new careers in a changing economy. This 
initiative will complement the $130,000,000 provided within the 
Department of Labor for the Career Pathways Innovation Fund, 
resulting in a total of $135,000,000 to prepare workers for 
careers in high-demand and emerging industries.

National Institute for Literacy

    The Administration's request does not include funds for the 
National Institute for Literacy (NIFL), which received 
$6,468,000 in fiscal year 2009. The Committee adopts this 
recommendation. The Committee is concerned about duplicative 
Federal efforts in support of basic literacy and skills 
services and the efficient use of resources. A recent review 
showed at least nine other Federal agencies with 
responsibilities in these areas. The broad mission of the 
Institute and the lack of clear management oversight have led 
to project overlap and high administrative overhead costs. The 
Institute has had few successful examples of joint projects 
which leveraged the resources of multiple organizations; thus, 
failing, to end the fragmentation of programs across agencies 
as envisioned when it was created.
    The Committee directs the Department to consult with 
stakeholders in the field of adult literacy to determine which 
activities currently supported by NIFL are worthwhile, if any, 
and to incorporate these activities under the National 
Leadership activities line, where appropriate.

Smaller Learning Communities

    The Committee recommends $88,000,000 for Smaller Learning 
Communities, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. Within the total, $83,600,000 
becomes available for obligation on or after July 1, 2010 and 
all funds remain available through September 30, 2011. As in 
past years, the bill specifies that these funds shall be used 
only for activities related to the redesign of large high 
schools enrolling 1,000 or more students. The funds provided in 
the bill will help school districts to implement smaller, more 
personalized learning environments in large high schools 
benefiting approximately 500,000 students in fiscal year 2010.
    The Committee directs that the Department consult with the 
House Committee on Appropriations prior to the release of 
program guidance for the fiscal year 2010 Smaller Learning 
Communities grant competition. Further, the Committee directs 
the Department to submit to the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House of Representatives and the Senate an operating plan 
outlining the planned use of the five percent set-aside prior 
to the obligation of these funds.

State Grants for Incarcerated Youth Offenders

    The Committee recommends $17,186,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program makes grants to State correctional 
agencies to assist and encourage incarcerated youths to acquire 
functional literacy skills as well as life and job skills.

                      Student Financial Assistance


                     (INCLUDING DEFERRAL OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $19,634,905,000 for Student 
Financial Assistance programs, which is $477,932,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $338,096,000 above the 
budget request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$17,314,000,000 for student financial assistance in fiscal 
years 2009 and 2010.

Pell Grants

    The Committee recommends $17,783,395,000 for the Pell Grant 
program, which is $495,395,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$17,114,000,000 for Pell Grants for academic years 2009 and 
2010, and an additional $3,030,000,000 is available for 
mandatory supplemental Pell Grants under the College Cost 
Reduction and Access Act (CCRA). These funds will support Pell 
awards to students for the 2010-11 academic years.
    Pell Grants help to ensure access to higher educational 
opportunities for low- and middle-income students by providing 
need-based financial assistance that helps them pay for college 
costs. These grant awards are determined according to a 
statutory formula, which considers income, assets, household 
size, and the number of family members in college, among other 
factors. Pell Grants are the foundation of Federal 
postsecondary student aid programs.
    The Committee does not include the bill language proposed 
by the Administration that assumes enactment of proposed 
language that would change the Pell Grant program to an 
appropriated entitlement, setting the maximum award at $5,550 
and thereafter increasing the maximum award amount by the 
Consumer Price Index plus one percent. This legislative 
proposal will be considered by the authorizing committees. In 
the interim, the Committee continues bill language providing 
discretionary funding for Pell awards.
    The bill also includes language deferring $511,000,000 in 
unobligated balances under the Academic Competitiveness and 
National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent 
(SMART) Grants until October 1, 2010 because these funds are 
not needed for awards in fiscal year 2010. The Administration 
requested a rescission of these funds.
    In fiscal year 2009, the Committee led the effort to 
provide a historic $619 increase in the maximum Pell award, to 
$5,350, with fiscal year 2009 Omnibus Act, Recovery Act, and 
CCRA funding. This bill maintains the discretionary portion of 
the maximum Pell Grant award at $4,860, which will be combined 
with a mandatory supplement of $690 to provide a $5,550 maximum 
Pell Grant in fiscal year 2010, an increase of $200 over the 
2009 level.
    Under the Committee's recommendation, the maximum Pell 
award will have increased by $1,500, or 37 percent, since 2006, 
greatly enhancing postsecondary educational opportunities for 
many Americans. In fiscal year 2010, nearly 7.6 million low- 
and middle-income students will benefit from this investment in 
Pell Grants.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

    The Committee recommends $757,465,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 
provide funds to postsecondary institutions for need-based 
grants of up to $4,000 to undergraduate students, with priority 
given to students who are Pell-eligible. Approximately 65 
percent of dependent recipients have annual family incomes 
under $30,000 and nearly 80 percent of independent SEOG 
recipients have annual family incomes under $20,000.
    Institutions must contribute a 25 percent match toward 
their Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants' allocations. 
Thus, the amount provided in the bill will result in nearly 
$960,000,000 in need-based student financial aid benefiting 
nearly 1.3 million students.

Federal Work-Study

    The Committee recommends $980,492,000 for the Federal Work-
Study program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $200,000,000 for this program for fiscal years 
2009 and 2010. Federal Work-Study funds are provided through 
institutions to students who work part-time. The funds assist 
with paying for the cost of education. Approximately 3,400 
colleges and universities receive funding, according to a 
statutory formula, and may allocate it for job location and job 
development centers. Work-study jobs must pay at least the 
Federal minimum wage and institutions must provide 25 percent 
of student earnings. Thus, the amount provided in the bill will 
result in nearly $1,200,000,000 in need-based student aid for 
approximately 780,000 undergraduate and graduate students.
    Work Colleges.--The Department shall provide the same 
funding from the Federal Work-Study Program appropriation 
(excluding funding provided under the Recovery Act) in fiscal 
year 2010 as in the prior year for the Work Colleges program 
authorized under section 448 of the Higher Education Act.

Perkins Loans: Loan Cancellations

    The Committee recommends $49,701,000 for this program, 
which is $17,463,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $49,701,000 above the request. The Administration's request 
does not include discretionary funds for this purpose; instead, 
it proposes legislation to establish a new mandatory Perkins 
Loan program that would include the costs of loan forgiveness 
for existing Perkins Loans. This program reimburses college 
revolving loan funds for Perkins loans that are forgiven under 
Federal law. Perkins Loans may be forgiven when a student 
borrower pursues a public service career in statutorily-
designated areas, including teaching in low-income communities 
and in under-staffed subject areas, Head Start programs, 
military service in areas of imminent danger, Peace Corps and 
ACTION service, nurses and medical technicians providing health 
care services, and law enforcement. Over one half of Perkins 
loan cancellations are for teachers.
    The bill continues discretionary funding of Perkins Loan 
cancellations pending Congressional review of the 
Administration's legislative proposal.

Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership

    The Committee recommends $63,852,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program provides dollar-for-dollar 
matching funds to States for grant and work-study assistance to 
eligible postsecondary students who demonstrate financial need. 
Over half of Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership 
grants go to students with annual family incomes under $20,000. 
The amount provided in the bill will leverage nearly 
$162,000,000 in need-based aid to approximately 162,000 
students.

                       Student Aid Administration

    The Committee recommends $870,402,000 for Student Aid 
Administration, which is $117,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $60,000,000 for this 
account in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Under this account, the 
Department delivers, or supports the delivery of, a complex 
array of grants, work-study, and loan assistance to over 11.5 
million college students and their families. Programs 
administered under this account include Pell Grants, Academic 
Competitiveness and National Science and Mathematics Access to 
Retain Talent (SMART) Grants, campus-based programs, Teacher 
Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) 
grants, Federal and Federally guaranteed student loans, and new 
loan purchase programs under the Ensuring Continued Access to 
Student Loans Act of 2008.
    The substantial increase in funding recommended by the 
Committee for fiscal year 2010 is necessary to ensure that 
students are guaranteed access to loans and provided high-
quality servicing through competitive, private sector providers 
that process loans and repayments. The Department will utilize 
appropriated funds to manage new loan purchase authorities, 
ensure the capacity to handle increased Direct Loan volume, and 
modernize student aid systems to improve efficiency and 
customer service.

                            Higher Education

    The Committee recommends $2,293,882,000 for Higher 
Education programs, which is an increase of $193,732,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $243,691,000 above the 
budget request. The Recovery Act provided an additional 
$100,000,000 for the Higher Education account for fiscal years 
2009 and 2010.

Strengthening Institutions

    The Committee recommends $84,000,000 for the Part A, 
Strengthening Institutions program, which is $4,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. This program provides general operating subsidies to 
institutions with low average educational and general 
expenditures per student and significant percentages of low-
income students. Funds may be used for faculty and academic 
program development, management, joint use of libraries and 
laboratories, acquisition of equipment, and student services. 
This is a competitive grant program.

Strengthening Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    The Committee recommends $136,938,000 for the Hispanic-
Serving Institutions program, which is $43,682,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $39,019,000 above the budget 
request. The Hispanic-Serving Institutions program provides 
operating subsidies to schools that serve at least 25 percent 
Hispanic students. Funds may be used for faculty and academic 
program development, management, joint use of libraries and 
laboratories, acquisition of equipment, and student services. 
This is a competitive grant program.

Promoting Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans

    The Committee recommends $10,500,000 for the Promoting 
Postbaccalaureate Opportunities for Hispanic Americans program. 
The Administration did not request discretionary funding for 
this activity, which was supported under the Fund for the 
Improvement of Postsecondary Education in fiscal year 2009. 
This program provides expanded postbaccalaureate educational 
opportunities for the academic attainment of Hispanic and low 
income students. In addition, it expands academic offerings and 
enhances program quality at institutions of higher education 
educating the majority of Hispanic college students. This is a 
competitive grant program.
    In addition, the Higher Education Opportunity Act provides 
an additional $11,500,000 in mandatory funding for this program 
in fiscal year 2010.

Strengthening Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    The Committee recommends $283,172,000 for Strengthening 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), which is 
$45,077,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$33,172,000 above the budget request. This program provides 
operating subsidies to accredited, historically black colleges 
and universities that were established prior to 1964, with the 
principal mission of educating black Americans. Funds are 
distributed through a formula grant based on the enrollment of 
Pell Grant recipients, number of graduates, and the number of 
graduates entering graduate or professional schools in which 
blacks are underrepresented. The minimum grant is $500,000. 
Funds may be used to establish or enhance a teacher education 
program, community outreach programs, and curriculum 
development. Funds are awarded on a competitive basis.
    In addition, the Administration's budget includes 
$32,000,000 under the National Science Foundation to support 
undergraduate education in science, technology, engineering and 
mathematics in these same institutions. These funds are 
recommended by the Committee in the Commerce, Justice, Science, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, 2010.

Strengthening Historically Black Graduate Institutions

    The Committee recommends $61,425,000 for the Strengthening 
Historically Black Graduate Institutions program, which is 
$2,925,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The program provides five-year 
grants to 18 postsecondary institutions that are specified in 
section 326(e)(1) of the Higher Education Act. Funds may be 
used to build endowments, provide scholarships and fellowships, 
and to assist students with the enrollment and completion of 
post baccalaureate and professional degrees.
    In addition, the Higher Education Opportunity Act provides 
$11,500,000 in mandatory funding for master's degree programs 
at HBCUs and predominantly Black institutions in fiscal year 
2010.

Strengthening Predominantly Black Institutions

    The Committee recommends $13,727,000 for the Strengthening 
Predominantly Black Institutions (PBIs) program, which is 
$13,727,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$5,852,000 above the budget request. This new program provides 
five-year grants to help PBIs to plan, develop, undertake, and 
implement activities to enhance their capacity to serve more 
low- and middle-income Black Americans; expand higher education 
opportunities for students by encouraging college preparation 
and student persistence in secondary and postsecondary 
education; and to strengthen the financial ability of the PBIs 
to serve the academic needs of these students. Funds are 
awarded on a competitive basis.

Strengthening Asian American and Native American Pacific-Islander-
        Serving Institutions

    The Committee recommends $4,575,000 for the Asian American 
Pacific Islander program, which is $2,075,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $1,950,000 above the budget 
request. This program provides grants to undergraduate 
institutions that have an undergraduate student enrollment of 
at least ten percent Asian American or Native American Pacific 
Islander. Funds may be used for faculty and academic program 
development, management, joint use of libraries and 
laboratories, acquisition of equipment, and student services. 
Funds are awarded on a competitive basis.

Strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions

    The Committee recommends $18,010,000 for the Strengthening 
Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions program, 
which is $6,431,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $5,852,000 above the budget request. This program enables 
these institutions to improve and expand higher education 
opportunities for Native Alaskans and Hawaiians. Funds may be 
used for equipment acquisition, facilities' improvement, 
faculty development, and student support services. Funds are 
awarded on a competitive basis.

Native American Serving Non-Tribal Institutions

    The Committee recommends $4,575,000 for the Native American 
Serving Non-Tribal Institutions program, which is $4,575,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $1,950,000 above 
the budget request. This program helps Native-American serving, 
nontribal institutions to improve and expand their capacity to 
serve Native Americans and low-income individuals. Funds are 
awarded on a competitive basis.

Strengthening Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities

    The Committee recommends $36,021,000 for the Strengthening 
Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities program, which is 
$12,863,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$11,705,000 above the budget request. This program enables 
these institutions to improve and expand higher education 
opportunities for American Indian students. In past years, the 
Committee has supported a competitive grant program to assist 
institutions in addressing long overdue and high-priority 
infrastructure and facilities requirements. The Committee 
intends for the funds provided to be used to support the 
continuation of existing grants and new planning or 
developmental grants. Any remaining funds shall be available 
for grants for renovation and construction of facilities to 
continue to address needed facilities repair and expansion. 
Funds are awarded on a competitive basis.

International Education and Foreign Language Studies

    The Committee recommends $128,881,000 for International 
Education and Foreign Language Studies. This amount is 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. These programs are designed to help meet the 
nation's security and economic needs through the development of 
expertise in foreign languages and area and international 
studies.
    Domestic Programs.--The Committee recommends $111,635,000 
for the Domestic Programs of the International Education and 
Foreign Languages Studies program, which is $9,300,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
Authorized by title VI of the Higher Education Act, these 
programs include national resource centers, foreign language 
and area studies fellowships, undergraduate international 
studies and foreign language programs, international research 
and studies projects, business and international education 
projects, international business education centers, language 
resource centers, American overseas research centers, and 
technological innovation and cooperation for foreign 
information access.
    The Committee is aware that all national resource centers, 
centers for international business education, and research and 
language centers will compete for new awards in fiscal year 
2010. The bill includes sufficient funds to increase the 
average award for the existing number of centers. The Committee 
believes that restoring the awards that have eroded over the 
years, thereby enabling each center to implement an effective, 
multifaceted program of advanced language training, research, 
technical assistance, and outreach, should be a priority over 
expanding the number of centers over current levels. The 
Committee requests a briefing with Department of Education 
officials not less than 30 days prior to the issuance of these 
requests for proposal.
    The Committee provides sufficient funds to increase the 
FLAS academic year institutional allowance and the numbers of 
FLAS academic year and summer fellowships. Due to the global 
financial crisis, falling endowments and State funds have made 
filling the tuition gap more difficult for institutions of 
higher education. These fellowships should be allocated across 
all world areas, with an emphasis on languages of strategic 
national importance.
    The bill repeats language permitting up to one percent of 
the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays funds provided to the Department to 
be used for program evaluation, national outreach, and 
information dissemination activities. The Committee urges the 
Department to use a portion of these funds to assist Title VI 
grantees with developing web portals to improve the 
dissemination of information produced under these programs to 
the public.
    Overseas Programs.--The Committee recommends $15,209,000 
for the Overseas Programs of the International Education and 
Foreign Language Studies programs, popularly known as the 
Fulbright-Hays Act. This amount is $500,000 more than fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. Funding for 
these programs support group projects abroad, faculty research 
abroad, special bilateral projects, and doctoral dissertation 
research abroad. Fulbright-Hays provides an essential overseas 
component for research and training of Americans in foreign 
languages and international studies. Overseas immersion is 
critical to achieving high levels of foreign language 
proficiency. Additional funds provided over the request should 
be used to expand doctoral and faculty research fellowships, 
and group projects abroad in intermediate and advanced language 
skills in the strategic world areas.
    The Committee expects the increased funding to be used to 
help graphic the rising costs of educational and programming 
activities occurring abroad due to the declining value of the 
U.S. dollar.
    The bill also repeats language allowing Title VI and 
section 102(b)(6) funds for individuals planning to apply their 
advanced language skills in the fields of government, 
professional, or international development.
    International Public Policy.--The Committee recommends 
$2,037,000 for the Institute for International Public Policy. 
This amount is $200,000 higher than fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This program is intended to 
increase the participation of underrepresented populations in 
international service, including private international 
voluntary organizations and the U.S. Foreign Service. This 
program provides a grant to an eligible recipient to operate 
the Institute through sub-grantees chosen among minority-
serving institutions. The Committee encourages the funding of 
Ralph Bunche Scholarships and the continued emphasis on helping 
students obtain foreign language competence and international 
expertise in areas important to national security.

Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education

    The Committee recommends $133,916,000 for the Fund for the 
Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), which is 
$249,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$86,492,000 above the budget request. This program awards 
grants and contracts to a variety of postsecondary institutions 
and other organizations to improve the quality and delivery of 
postsecondary education.
    FIPSE Comprehensive Program.--Within the total, the 
Committee includes $34,805,000 for the Comprehensive Program. 
The Committee directs the Department to establish invitational 
priorities under the Comprehensive Program for centers of 
excellence for teacher preparation as described in Section 242; 
university sustainability initiatives as described in section 
881; rural development initiatives for rural-serving colleges 
and universities as described in section 861; as well as for 
initiatives to assist highly qualified minorities and women to 
acquire doctoral degrees in fields where they are 
underrepresented as described in section 807 of the Higher 
Education Act.
    College Textbook Rental Initiative.--Within the total, the 
Committee includes $10,000,000 for the second year of funding 
for a college textbook rental initiative. This pilot initiative 
provides competitive grants to institutions of higher education 
to support pilot programs that expand the services of 
bookstores to provide the option for students to rent course 
materials in order to achieve savings for students. The 
Committee directs that these funds be awarded under a FIPSE 
special focus competition, in accordance with section 803(b)-
(d) of the Higher Education Act.
    Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student Success.--Within 
the total, the Committee includes not less than $8,000,000 for 
competitive grants to institutions of higher education to 
encourage model programs to support veterans, particularly 
those returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, pursuing 
postsecondary education by coordinating services to address 
their academic, financial, physical and social needs. The 
Committee directs that these funds be awarded under a FIPSE 
special focus competition, in accordance with section 873 of 
the Higher Education Act.
    The bill includes $68,247,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AB Christian Learning Center, Ft. Worth, TX for a               $175,000
 higher education resource center....................
Alamo Community College, San Antonio, TX for an                  200,000
 associates degree program for air traffic
 controllers, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Albany State University, Albany, GA for a model                  150,000
 program to increase the recruitment and retention of
 underrepresented students in postsecondary education
Alexander City Chamber of Commerce Foundation,                   100,000
 Alexander City, AL for the Gateway to Education
 Scholarship program, including scholarships.........
Alverno College, Milwaukee, WI for its Research                  100,000
 Center for Women and Girls, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Anne Arundel Community College, Hanover, MD for its              350,000
 science, technology, engineering, and math
 initiative, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Anoka Ramsey Community College, Coon Rapids, MN for              800,000
 curriculum development in programs relating to the
 medical device manufacturing industry, including
 purchase of equipment...............................
Armstrong Atlantic State University Cyber Security               457,000
 Research Institute Foundation, Savannah, GA for
 curriculum development, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Asnuntuck Community College, Enfield, CT for a                   250,000
 Medical Device Machine Technology Certificate
 Program, which may include equipment and technology.
Beloit College, Beloit, WI for college scholarships              150,000
 and college outreach and early awareness programs...
Brandeis University, Waltham, MA for science and                 350,000
 technology academic programs, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Brazosport College, Galveston, TX for purchase of                200,000
 equipment to be used in the petrochemical and
 nuclear technician training programs................
Brazosport College, Lake Jackson, TX for curriculum              380,000
 development.........................................
Breathitt Veterinary Center, Hopkinsville, KY for                350,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Briar Cliff University, Sioux City, IA for purchase              100,000
 of equipment........................................
Burcham Hills Retirement Community, East Lansing, MI             200,000
 to develop an Alzheimer's and dementia training
 program, including purchase of equipment............
Butler Community College, El Dorado, KS for purchase             500,000
 of equipment........................................
Caldwell College, Caldwell, NJ for curriculum                    550,000
 development, including purchase of equipment........
California Baptist University, Riverside, CA for                 300,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
California State University, Fullerton, CA for                   350,000
 curriculum development associated with the
 Vietnamese language and culture program.............
California State University, Fullerton, CA for the               300,000
 Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning
 in Mathematics and Science..........................
California State University, Sacramento, CA for                  350,000
 equipment and technology for science laboratories...
Campbell University, Buies Creek, NC for an                      300,000
 initiative at its School of Pharmacy to train
 underrepresented pharmacists........................
Canisius College, Buffalo, NY for its science                    400,000
 education program, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Castleton State College, Castleton, VT for                       400,000
 development of a bachelor of science in nursing
 degree program......................................
Central Maine Community College, Auburn, ME for its              150,000
 Veterans to College Initiative to provide academic
 counseling and support to veterans..................
Centralia College, Centralia, WA for biotechnology               375,000
 and science equipment...............................
Cheyney University of Pennsylvania, Cheyney, PA for              100,000
 its Keystone Honors Academy.........................
City College of San Jose, CA for its California                  368,000
 Construction College to train students for careers
 in construction management, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Clackamas Community College, Oregon City, OR for                 400,000
 education and training programs in renewable energy
 fields, which may include equipment and technology..
Clarke College, Dubuque, IA for its Doctor of Nurse              400,000
 Practitioner program, which may include equipment,
 technology and scholarships.........................
Coahoma Community College, Clarksdale, MS for                     50,000
 curricula, equipment and technology.................
Coffeyville Community College, Coffeyville, KS for               500,000
 the Native American Center, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
College of Southern Idaho, Twin Falls, ID for                    200,000
 curriculum development, including the purchase of
 equipment...........................................
College of the Canyons, Santa Clarita, CA for the                100,000
 University Center Consortium, including curriculum
 development.........................................
College Opportunity Resources for Education,                     750,000
 Philadelphia, PA for college preparation and
 scholarship assistance..............................
College Summit-West Virginia, Dunbar, WV for a                   100,000
 college access initiative...........................
Columbia College, Columbia, SC for its Masters Degree            200,000
 Program in Divergent Learning.......................
Columbus State University, Columbus, GA for a                    150,000
 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM)
 program.............................................
Creighton University, Omaha, NE for purchase of                  500,000
 equipment...........................................
Dallas County Community College District, Dallas, TX             300,000
 for its Science, Technology, Engineering and
 Mathematics (STEM) Professions Initiative, which may
 include scholarships................................
Dean College, Franklin, MA for its Embedded Study                150,000
 Model Project to integrate academic support services
 into curricula, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Donnelly College, Kansas City, KS for equipment and              200,000
 technology..........................................
Eastern Arizona College, Thatcher, AZ for the Gila               400,000
 Community College nursing education program, which
 may include equipment and technology................
Edmonds Community College, Lynwood, WA for equipment             500,000
 for training programs at its National Advanced
 Materials and Manufacturing Innovation Center.......
Elgin Community College, Elgin, IL for the Health                100,000
 Careers Center of Excellence, including curriculum
 development and purchase of equipment...............
Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA for its                     325,000
 Curriculum for the Bioregion initiative.............
Fairleigh Dickenson University, Madison, NJ for                  500,000
 curriculum development, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Florida Gulf Coast University, Ft. Myers, FL for the             350,000
 Coastal Watershed Institute.........................
Ft. Hays State University, Hays, KS for purchase of              250,000
 equipment...........................................
Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, AL for                 100,000
 technology upgrades.................................
George C. Wallace Community College, Dothan, AL for              200,000
 equipment and technology to train energy technicians
 for nuclear facilities..............................
Grace College and Theological Seminary, Winona Lake,             150,000
 IN for curriculum development, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology,                 300,000
 Harrisburg, PA for science, technology, engineering
 and mathematics (STEM) academic programs, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Hill College, Hillsboro, TX for vocational training              200,000
 at the Bosque County campus, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Huston-Tillotson University, Austin, TX for a math               350,000
 and science education initiative....................
Hutchinson Community College, Hutchinson, KS for                 250,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Illinois Community College Trustee Association,                  600,000
 Springfield, IL for the Illinois Community College
 Sustainability Network to promote and provide energy
 education and sustainable practices.................
Iowa Valley Community College, Marshalltown, IA for              165,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Itawamba Community College, Fulton, MS for                       700,000
 consolidation of the Tupelo and Fulton Nursing
 School Programs in order to provide additional
 nursing specialists to a five-county region.........
Ivy Tech Community College, Terre Haute, IN for                  600,000
 equipment and technology for training programs at
 its Advanced Manufacturing Center...................
Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL for              250,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Jewish Employment and Vocational Service (JEVS) d/b/a            165,000
 JEVS Human Services, Philadelphia, PA for an
 associate degree program in court reporting, which
 may include equipment and technology................
Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, NC for an                400,000
 Undergraduate Research Center for Electronic and
 Cyber Security, which may include equipment,
 technology and student financial assistance.........
Kalamazoo Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse            100,000
 Services, Kalamazoo, MI for a nursing distance
 education curriculum, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Kalamazoo Valley Community College, Kalamazoo, MI for            350,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Kankakee Community College, Kankakee, IL for                     400,000
 renewable energy technology training programs, which
 may include equipment and technology................
Keene State College, Keene, NH for its Regional                  300,000
 Center for Advanced Manufacturing Education, which
 may include equipment and student financial
 assistance..........................................
Kern Community College District, Bakersfield, CA for             250,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Lake Michigan College, Benton Harbor, MI for                     150,000
 curriculum development, including the purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Lake Superior College, Duluth, MN for certificate and            200,000
 degree programs in aviation, which may include
 equipment and technology............................
Lakeshore Technical College, Cleveland, WI for                   250,000
 curriculum development..............................
LeTourneau University, Longview, TX for purchase of              350,000
 equipment...........................................
Lincoln Land Community College, Springfield, IL for              350,000
 the HIRE Education Program, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Livingstone College, Salisbury, NC for its Center for            300,000
 Holistic Learning to provide academic and student
 support services, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
Long Island University, Brookville, NY for a Grow                700,000
 Your Own Teacher Program providing mentoring,
 education and support to high school students in
 underserved areas, which may include college
 scholarships........................................
Los Angeles City College Foundation, Los Angeles, CA             450,000
 for the Los Angeles City College nursing program....
Madisonville Community College, Madisonville, KY for             100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Marian University, Fond du Lac, WI for nursing                   200,000
 curriculum development..............................
Maricopa County Community College District, Mesa, AZ             100,000
 for health professions training.....................
Maricopa County Community College District, Tempe, AZ            300,000
 for its East Valley Veterans Education Center to
 enable veterans to enroll in and complete
 postsecondary education, which may include equipment
 and technology......................................
Maricopa County Community College District, Tempe, AZ            300,000
 for the Bilingual Nursing Program at South Mountain
 Community College, which may include stipends.......
Marshall University Research Corporation, Huntington,            300,000
 WV for equipment and technology for advanced
 maritime training...................................
Marymount Manhattan College, New York, NY for                    400,000
 academic programs at the Geraldine Farraro Center
 for Educational Excellence in Science, Technology,
 and Math, which may include equipment and technology
Marymount University, Arlington, VA for science                  200,000
 equipment and technology............................
Maryville College, Maryville, TN for an experiential             300,000
 science education program...........................
Metropolitan State College, Denver, CO for equipment             200,000
 and technology for its accredited aviation training
 program.............................................
Mid-America Christian University, Oklahoma City, OK              485,000
 for teacher training programs, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, TN              450,000
 for a STEM education teacher training initiative,
 which may include stipends..........................
Midland Independent School District, Midland, TX for             350,000
 teacher training....................................
Mississippi Valley State University, Itta Bena, MS               400,000
 for an initiative to prepare undergraduate students
 for professional medical education, which may
 include equipment, technology and scholarships......
Monroe Community College, Rochester, NY for an                   275,000
 Academy for Veterans' Success to provide academic,
 career counseling, and support services to veterans.
Monroe Community College, Rochester, NY to establish             325,000
 a medical laboratory technician program, including
 curriculum development and purchase of equipment....
Monroe County Community College, Monroe, MI for a                200,000
 Nuclear Engineering Technology Program..............
Mount Union College, Alliance, OH for engineering and            100,000
 technology programs, which may include curricula,
 faculty, equipment, technology and student support..
Neumann College, Aston, PA for pharmacy education                200,000
 programs, which may include equipment and technology
Nevada State College, Henderson, NV for nursing                  400,000
 education programs, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
New College, Sarasota, FL for digital collections at             100,000
 the Jane Bancroft Cook Library......................
New Mexico Military Institute, Roswell, NM for its               300,000
 Native American Criminal Justice Program, which may
 include student scholarships........................
Niagara Community College, Sanborn, NY for equipment             100,000
 and technology for training programs in hospitality
 and tourism.........................................
Niagara County Community College, Sanborn, NY for                275,000
 information technology upgrades.....................
North Arkansas College, Harrison, AR for an education            250,000
 technology initiative, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
North Shore Community College, Danvers, MA for a                 400,000
 veterans education and job training program, which
 may include scholarships and stipends...............
Northampton Community College, Bethlehem, PA for                 400,000
 programmatic support of its Monroe County campus,
 which may include equipment and technology..........
Northern Kentucky University Foundation, Highland                350,000
 Heights, KY for purchase of equipment...............
Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale, VA               500,000
 for a health information management program.........
Northwestern Connecticut Community College, Winsted,             350,000
 CT for an associate degree nursing program, which
 may include equipment and technology................
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK for a                  450,000
 wildlife management technician program, which may
 include equipment...................................
Palm Beach Community College, Lake Worth, FL for                 150,000
 education and training programs in emerging
 industries at its Institute for Energy, which may
 include equipment and technology....................
Palm Beach Community College, Lake Worth, FL for                 350,000
 equipment and technology for student technology and
 communication programs at its Belle Glade campus....
Polk Community College, Winter Haven, FL for purchase            300,000
 of equipment........................................
Portland Community College, Portland, OR for                     350,000
 education and training programs in renewable energy
 and emerging industries, which may include equipment
 and technology......................................
Pulaski Technical College, North Little Rock, AR for             500,000
 library improvements, which may include equipment
 and technology......................................
Richland Community College, Decatur, IL for                      200,000
 curriculum development in its bioenergy and
 bioprocessing degree programs.......................
Riverside Community College District, Riverside, CA              600,000
 for curriculum development..........................
Rockford College, Rockford, IL for technology                    250,000
 upgrades............................................
Rutgers University School of Law, Camden, NJ, for its            500,000
 public interest legal program, which may include
 scholarships and fellowships, a public interest
 summer externship program, its Marshall Brennan
 Program, and pro bono legal services................
Salve Regina University, Newport, RI for equipment               500,000
 and technology at its Blackstone Valley learning
 center and Newport campus...........................
San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA for            350,000
 a competency-based early childhood education and
 training initiative, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
San Jacinto College, Pasadena, TX for training                   400,000
 programs in the maritime and energy industries,
 which may include equipment and technology..........
San Jose State University Research Foundation, San               220,000
 Jose, CA for an interdisciplinary Center for Global
 Innovation and Immigration, including curricula
 development and student research....................
San Luis Obispo County Community College District,               350,000
 San Luis Obispo, CA for purchase of equipment.......
San Mateo County Community College District, San                 350,000
 Mateo, CA for the University Center Consortium
 initiative to expand academic programs and the
 number of students pursuing postsecondary education.
Santa Fe College, Gainesville, FL for a clinical                 450,000
 laboratory sciences program, including curriculum
 development and purchase of equipment...............
Seattle University, Seattle, WA for the Fostering                500,000
 Scholars Program, including scholarships............
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau,             500,000
 MO for technology upgrades..........................
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville,                       200,000
 Edwardsville, IL for purchase of equipment..........
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL for                 400,000
 equipment and technology upgrades...................
Southern Queens Park Association, Jamaica, NY for its            350,000
 Young Adults College Access & Preparedness Program,
 in partnership with Bard College and local high
 schools, to expand college access, retention and
 graduation for youth and young adults...............
Southern Union Community College, Wadley, AL for                 100,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Special Education District of McHenry County,                    100,000
 Woodstock, IL for the Pathways Program..............
St. Clair County Community College, Port Huron, MI               100,000
 for curriculum development..........................
St. Francis College, Brooklyn, NY for its Project                650,000
 Access initiative, which may include equipment and
 technology..........................................
St. Joseph's College, Brooklyn, NY for equipment and             400,000
 technology for science laboratories, smart
 classrooms and distance learning....................
St. Mary's College of Maryland, St. Mary's City, MD              600,000
 for science laboratory and information technology
 equipment...........................................
St. Norbert College, De Pere, WI for an initiative to            400,000
 prepare students in science, technology, engineering
 and math (STEM) fields, which may include equipment
 and technology......................................
St. Peter's College, Jersey City, NJ for equipment               300,000
 and technology for ``smart'' classrooms.............
St. Petersburg College, Clearwater, FL for a                     300,000
 healthcare informatics program, including curriculum
 development and purchase of equipment...............
St. Thomas University, Miami Gardens, FL for a                   300,000
 science and technology teacher training program in
 conjunction with the Miami-Dade County Public School
 System..............................................
St. Vincent College, Latrobe, PA for purchase of                 150,000
 equipment...........................................
St. Xavier University, Chicago, IL for equipment and             550,000
 technology for a media center, library and distance
 learning programs...................................
St. Xavier University, Orland Park, IL for the                   500,000
 Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
 Education Center, including purchase of equipment...
State University of New York at Geneseo, Geneseo, NY             500,000
 for purchase of equipment...........................
Tallahassee Community College, Tallahassee, FL for               200,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Texas Life-Sciences Collaboration Center, Georgetown,            245,000
 TX for life science programs, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Texas State Technical College, Waco, TX for its                  100,000
 Career Paths for Veterans project...................
Texas State University, San Marcos, TX for nursing             1,000,000
 curriculum development, including purchase of
 equipment...........................................
Three Rivers Community College, Poplar Bluff, MO for             215,000
 an education technology initiative..................
Trident Technical College, Charleston, SC for the                500,000
 nursing education program, which may include
 equipment...........................................
Trine University, Angola, IN for curriculum                      340,000
 development.........................................
Union County College, Cranford, NJ for curriculum                400,000
 development.........................................
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ for the Disability             500,000
 Resource Center to provide instruction and support
 to disabled veterans to ensure academic success,
 which may include equipment.........................
University of Connecticut School of Law, Hartford, CT            365,000
 for a Center for Energy and Environmental Law.......
University of Guam, Mangilao, GU for development, in             300,000
 conjunction with the Guam Public School System and
 Guam Community College, of a K-16 educational
 program to provide a seamless pathway for college
 and careers.........................................
University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA for the               12,602,000
 Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the Senate, which
 may include support for an endowment................
University of Minnesota, Crookston, MN for its Center            500,000
 for Rural Entrepreneurial Studies, which may include
 equipment, technology and student support...........
University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH for its                  450,000
 National Center on Inclusive Education for Children
 with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Related
 Disabilities........................................
University of New Haven, Waterbury, CT for equipment             350,000
 and technology for the Henry C. Lee Institute of
 Forensic Science Learning Center....................
University of New Mexico-Taos, NM for equipment and              450,000
 technology for distance education programs..........
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga,             770,000
 TN for the Center for Leadership in Science,
 Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education,
 including purchase of equipment.....................
University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler, TX for a                    300,000
 science, technology, engineering and math
 initiative, including purchase of equipment.........
University of Virginia, Wise, VA for installation of             150,000
 a Voice Over Internet Protocol telephone system and
 demonstration activities through its Emerging
 Technologies Learning Center........................
University of Washington, Bothell, WA for a nursing              200,000
 faculty consortium training program, which may
 include scholarships................................
Valley City State University, Valley City, ND for                400,000
 science, technology, engineering and mathematics
 (STEM) workshops, courses, certificates and programs
 to increase undergraduate and graduate participation
 in STEM programs....................................
Vanguard University, Costa Mesa, CA for a teacher                350,000
 training initiative, including purchase of equipment
Wayne State College, Norfolk, NE for equipment at the            100,000
 South Sioux City College Center.....................
Western Governors University, Salt Lake City, UT for             100,000
 curriculum development..............................
Western Kentucky Community and Technical College,                250,000
 Paducah, KY for purchase of equipment...............
Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY for               500,000
 purchase of equipment...............................
Wharton County Jr. College, Wharton, TX for                      220,000
 curriculum development to train students for work in
 the nuclear power industry..........................
Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC for its Focusing              350,000
 on Collegiate Undergraduate Success initiative to
 enhance residential learning and academic support
 services for students...............................
York College of Pennsylvania, York, PA for facilities            300,000
 and equipment.......................................
Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH for its              200,000
 Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) Project to integrate
 SEL theory and techniques into the College of
 Education curricula and for evaluation activities...
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Minority Science and Engineering Improvement

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Minority 
Science and Engineering Improvement Program, which is 
$1,423,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$994,000 above the budget request. The Minority Science and 
Engineering Improvement Program awards grants to improve 
mathematics, science, and engineering programs at institutions 
serving primarily minority students and to increase the number 
of minority students who pursue advanced degrees and careers in 
those fields.

Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions

    The Committee recommends $8,162,000 for this program, which 
is $389,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program provides grants to two tribally 
controlled postsecondary career and technical institutions to 
provide career and technical education to Native American 
students.

Federal TRIO Programs

    The Committee recommends $868,089,000 for the TRIO 
programs, which is $20,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The TRIO programs provide 
a variety of outreach and support services to encourage low-
income, potential first-generation college students to enter 
and complete college. Discretionary grants of up to four or 
five years are awarded competitively to institutions of higher 
education and other agencies. At least two-thirds of the 
eligible participants in TRIO must be low-income, first-
generation college students. Under the Committee 
recommendation, approximately 845,000 students will receive 
TRIO services, nearly 7,000 more than in fiscal year 2009.
    The Committee intends that the funding increase be used for 
the Student Support Services program, which will be re-competed 
in fiscal year 2010. Of this amount, $10,000,000 shall be for 
college completion awards to provide grant aid to participating 
students who are at high risk of dropping out of college due to 
financial need. The Committee intends that Student Support 
Services projects receiving these college completion awards 
shall provide matching funds equal to 33 percent of the total 
award; thus leveraging an additional $3,300,000 in need-based 
student aid. The Student Support Service program offers a broad 
range of support services to postsecondary students to increase 
their retention and graduation rates and to increase their 
transfer rates from two-year to four-year colleges. A national 
evaluation of Student Support Services indicates that 
participation in supplemental services is related to improved 
student outcomes.

GEAR UP

    The Committee recommends $333,212,000 for the GEAR UP 
program, which is $20,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. This additional funding 
will enable the Department to make new awards available in 
fiscal year 2010. GEAR UP provides grants to States and 
partnerships of low-income middle and high schools, 
institutions of higher education and community organizations to 
target entire grades of students and give them the skills, 
encouragement, and scholarships to successfully pursue 
postsecondary education.
    GEAR UP is proving to be an effective strategy for 
addressing the dropout crisis and boosting college enrollment 
rates of low-income students. Early evaluation findings and 
performance data show that GEAR UP has positive impacts on 
student achievement, high school graduation, and college 
entrance rates for GEAR UP participants. In total, the 
Committee recommendation will help approximately 812,000 at-
risk middle and high school students prepare for and attend 
college, an increase of nearly 44,000 students over the fiscal 
year 2009 level.
    The Committee intends that not less than $6,600,000 of the 
increase over fiscal year 2009 be used for State grants, of 
which half must be used to provide student scholarships, and 
not less than $6,600,000 be used for Partnership grants. The 
statutory 50 percent matching requirement for State grant 
recipients will produce a minimum of $3,300,000 in scholarship 
assistance for participating students. The Committee encourages 
the Department to give favorable consideration in any 
competitions for GEAR UP funding to partnerships that, in 
addition to providing early intervention services, guarantee 
college scholarships to GEAR UP students.

Byrd Scholarships

    The Committee recommends $40,642,000 for this program, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. This program provides formula grants to States 
to award $1,500 scholarships for up to four years of higher 
education to students who demonstrate academic excellence in 
high school. Under the Committee bill, approximately 27,000 
students will receive merit scholarships in fiscal year 2010.

Javits Fellowships

    The Committee recommends $9,687,000 for Javits Fellowships, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. Under the Javits Fellowships program, 
institutions receive Federal support to make fellowship awards 
to students pursuing doctoral study in the arts, humanities, 
and social sciences. The Committee recommendation will support 
approximately 225 fellowship awards in the 2011-2012 academic 
year.

Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need

    The Committee recommends $31,030,000 for the Graduate 
Assistance in Areas of National Need program, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
The program awards grants to institutions of higher education 
to provide fellowships to economically disadvantaged students 
who have demonstrated academic excellence and who are pursuing 
graduate education in designated areas of national need, such 
as the sciences, mathematics, engineering, and nursing. The 
Committee recommendation will support fellowships for 
approximately 700 students in fiscal year 2010.

Teacher Quality Partnerships Grants

    The Committee recommends $43,000,000 for Teacher Quality 
Partnerships which is $7,000,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act provides 
an additional $100,000,000 for Teacher Quality Partnerships for 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010. A total of 50 new awards will be 
made based on funding in fiscal years 2009 and 2010.
    The Teacher Quality Partnership program aims to improve the 
quality of teachers working in high-need schools and early 
childhood education programs by creating model teacher 
preparation programs and teaching residency programs. The 
Committee recommendation will support continuing grants issued 
with fiscal year 2009 or Recovery Act funds.

Baccalaureate STEM and Foreign Language Teacher Training Program

    The Committee does not recommend funding for the 
Baccalaureate STEM and Foreign Language Teacher Training 
Program, which is the $1,092,000 below the fiscal year 2009 
funding and the budget request. The Committee eliminates this 
program because it duplicates funding included in the 
Administration's budget request for the National Science 
Foundation of $113,220,000 for the Robert Noyce Teacher 
Scholarship Program and Math and Science Partnership Program. 
These programs are designed to encourage college students and 
professionals to become K-12 mathematics and science teachers 
and improve K-12 student achievement. This bill also includes 
$178,978,000 for Mathematics and Science Partnerships, which 
supports the recruitment of individuals with mathematics, 
science, and engineering majors into the teaching profession.

Master's STEM and Foreign Language Teacher Training Program

    The Committee does not recommend funding for the Master's 
STEM and Foreign Language Teacher Training Program, which is 
$1,092,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
budget request. The Committee eliminates this program because 
it duplicates funding included in the Administration's budget 
request for the National Science Foundation for the Robert 
Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program providing graduate degree 
programs for students to become mathematics and science 
teachers in high-need K-12 school districts.

Child Care Access Means Parents in School

    The Committee recommends $17,034,000 for Child Care Access 
Means Parents in School, which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This program 
helps to ensure that low-income student parents have access to 
postsecondary education and affordable and convenient child 
care. Colleges and universities may receive discretionary 
grants of up to four years to support or establish a campus-
based childcare program primarily serving the needs of low-
income students enrolled at the institution. Priority is given 
to childcare programs that leverage significant local or 
institutional resources and utilize a sliding fee scale.

Demonstration Projects to Ensure Quality Higher Education for Students 
        with Disabilities

    The Committee recommends $10,755,000 for Demonstration 
Projects to Ensure Quality Higher Education for Students with 
Disabilities, which is $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request. These programs provide 
students with disabilities a higher quality education through 
support for model demonstrations to provide technical 
assistance or professional development for post-secondary 
faculty, staff and administrators in institutions of higher 
education, as well as support for model demonstration programs 
that promote the successful transition of students with 
intellectual disabilities into higher education.
    Within the total, the Committee intends that $6,755,000 be 
used to support continuation awards for Demonstration Projects 
to Support Postsecondary Faculty, Staff and Administrators in 
Educating Students with Disabilities under subpart 1 of part D 
of title VII of the Higher Education Act. The remaining 
$4,000,000 shall be used to support new awards for Transition 
Programs for Students With Intellectual Disabilities Into 
Higher Education under subpart 2 of part D of title VII of the 
Higher Education Act.

Underground Railroad Program

    The Committee recommends $1,945,000 for the Underground 
Railroad Program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level. This program provides grants to non-profit 
institutions to research, display, interpret and collect 
artifacts relating to the history of the Underground Railroad.

GPRA Data/Higher Education Act Program Evaluation

    The Committee recommends $609,000 for program evaluation 
and development of data required under the Government 
Performance and Results Act for Higher Education programs 
administered by the Department. This amount is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.

B.J. Stupak Olympic Scholarships

    The Committee recommends $977,000 for B.J. Stupak Olympic 
Scholarships, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level. This program provides financial assistance to Olympic 
athletes who are pursuing a postsecondary education. The 
Committee recommendation will provide scholarships to over 90 
student athletes.

Thurgood Marshall Legal Education Opportunity Scholarships

    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for the Thurgood 
Marshall Legal Education Opportunity program, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level. This program provides 
low income, minority, or disadvantaged secondary school and 
college students with the information, preparation, and 
financial assistance needed to gain access to and complete law 
school study and admission to law practice. This funding will 
support, including financial assistance, over 160 Thurgood 
Marshall Fellows.

                           HOWARD UNIVERSITY

    The Committee recommends $234,977,000 for Howard 
University, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. The bill includes a minimum of 
$3,600,000 for the endowment, which is $136,000 above the 
current level.
    Howard University is a ``Research I'' university located in 
the District of Columbia. Howard University provides 
undergraduate liberal arts, graduate and professional 
instruction to approximately 11,000 students from all 50 
States. Masters degrees are offered in over 55 fields and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 26 fields. The Committee notes 
recent University efforts to achieve staffing reductions 
through buy out and early out offers, reflecting the financial 
pressures the University is experiencing. In addition, as part 
of its ongoing monitoring process, the Department of Education 
has expressed concern about the University's overall lack of 
progress with regard to addressing findings in its financial 
auditing reports and cites concern with the efficacy of the 
University's internal controls. The Committee requests that the 
University conduct a review of its financial management 
practices and staffing and provide a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate no later than May 1, 2010 describing how the University 
plans to address its financial challenges and improve its 
fiscal oversight.
    Within the amount provided, the Committee recommends 
$28,946,000 for the Howard University Hospital, which is the 
same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. The hospital serves as a major acute and ambulatory 
care center for the District of Columbia, and functions as a 
major teaching facility.

         COLLEGE HOUSING AND ACADEMIC FACILITIES LOANS PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $461,000 for the Federal 
administration of the College Housing and Academic Facilities 
Loan program, the Higher Educational Facilities Loans program, 
and the College Housing Loans program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request. 
Previously these programs helped to ensure that postsecondary 
institutions were able to make necessary capital improvements 
to maintain and increase their ability to provide a high-
quality education. Since 1994, no new loans have been made, and 
the Department's role has been to manage the outstanding loans.

  HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CAPITAL FINANCING PROGRAM 
                                ACCOUNT

    The Committee recommends $20,582,000 for the Historically 
Black College and University Capital Financing program, 
authorized under part D of Title III of the Higher Education 
Act. This amount is $10,228,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Historically Black Colleges and University Capital Financing 
program makes capital available for repair and renovation of 
facilities at historically black colleges and universities. In 
exceptional circumstances, capital provided under the program 
can be used for construction or acquisition of facilities.
    The Committee recommendation includes $354,000 for the 
administrative expenses to carry out this program and 
$20,228,000 for loan subsidy costs that will be sufficient to 
guarantee up to $178,221,000 in new loans in fiscal year 2010. 
Funds will also be used to continue technical assistance 
services to help Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
improve their financial stability and access to capital 
markets.

                    INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES

    The Committee recommends $664,256,000 for the Institute of 
Education Sciences, which is $47,081,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $25,000,000 below the budget request. 
The Recovery Act provided an additional $250,000,000 for this 
account in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This account supports 
education research, statistics, dissemination, evaluation, and 
assessment activities. The bill provides that $593,606,000 of 
the amount provided for this account shall remain available 
through September 30, 2011 to accommodate cyclical surveys and 
assessments, as well as facilitate planning of long-term 
research projects.
    The Committee includes up to $2,000,000 for IES conduct a 
national study on minority male achievement as described in 
section 1109 of The Higher Education Act.

Research, Development, and Dissemination

    The Committee recommends $199,196,000 for Research, 
Development, and Dissemination, which is $32,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $25,000,000 below the budget 
request. The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) supports 
research, development, and national dissemination activities 
that are aimed at expanding fundamental knowledge of education 
and promoting the use of research and development findings in 
the design of efforts to improve education.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for several 
research priorities, including research on and development of 
promising educational innovations; a new research effort to 
develop, test, and disseminate interventions to improve reading 
comprehension; and a research program to support English 
language learners.
    In addition, the Committee includes $2,000,000 for a new 
research and development center for adult learning and literacy 
within the Institute of Education Sciences, which shall be 
awarded on a competitive basis and structured similar to other 
IES centers with a five-year grant period. This new research 
center will address the unique challenges of adult learning and 
literacy, and identify and support the best practices in this 
field of research. The center will establish a broad-based 
national level research agenda, conduct research, and translate 
and disseminate its research findings to practitioners and 
policymakers.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects its support for the 
Department's efforts to carry out congressionally authorized 
evaluations of Federal education programs using rigorous 
methodologies that are capable of producing scientifically 
valid knowledge regarding which program activities are 
effective. To ensure that authorized evaluations are conducted 
in a rigorous manner, are independent of the program offices, 
and include scientific peer review, the Committee believes that 
the IES should be the lead agency for the design and 
implementation of these evaluations. The Committee believes 
further that it is appropriate for program offices to work 
collaboratively with IES to include an option in program 
solicitations for grantee participation in such evaluations, to 
the extent appropriate and where not specifically prohibited by 
law.
    The Committee repeats its request that the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) conduct an evaluation of the What 
Works Clearinghouse (WWC) to examine the extent to which WWC 
reviews meet rigorous standards, the timeliness of reviews, the 
consistency of standards and review procedures, the clarity, 
usefulness, and utility to educators of the products issued by 
the WWC, and the cost effectiveness of the WWC. The Committee 
requests that this evaluation be completed no later than May 1, 
2010.

Statistics

    The Committee recommends $108,521,000 for the activities of 
the National Center for Education Statistics, which is 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. Statistics activities are 
authorized under title I of the Education Sciences Reform Act 
of 2002. The Center collects, analyzes, and reports statistics 
on all levels of education in the United States. Activities are 
carried out directly and through grants and contracts and 
include projections of enrollments, teacher supply and demand, 
and educational expenditures. IES also provides technical 
assistance to State and local education agencies and 
postsecondary institutions.

Regional Educational Laboratories

    The Committee recommendation includes $70,650,000 for the 
Regional Educational Laboratories, an increase of $3,081,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. The Regional Educational Laboratories help 
States and education practitioners implement the requirements 
contained in the No Child Left Behind Act. This assistance 
includes product development, applied research, technical 
assistance, and professional development.

Research in Special Education

    The Committee recommendation includes $70,585,000 for 
Research in Special Education, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the budget request. This program 
supports competitive awards to produce and advance the use of 
knowledge to improve services and results for children with 
disabilities. The program focuses on producing new knowledge, 
integrating research and practice, and improving the use of 
knowledge.

Special Education Studies and Evaluations

    The Committee recommendation includes $11,460,000 for 
Special Education Studies and Evaluations, which is $2,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level. This program awards 
competitive grants, contracts and cooperative agreements to 
assess the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act and the effectiveness of State and local efforts 
to provide special education and early intervention programs 
and services to infants, toddlers, and children with 
disabilities.

Statewide Data Systems

    The Committee recommendation includes $65,000,000 for 
Statewide Data Systems, which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the budget request. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $250,000,000 for Statewide Data Systems 
for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This program awards grants to 
State educational agencies to enable such agencies to design, 
develop, and implement statewide, longitudinal data systems. 
Such data systems help States to efficiently and accurately 
manage, analyze, disaggregate, and use individual student data 
consistent with the No Child Left Behind Act. The bill provides 
that these funds may be used for data systems that include 
postsecondary and workforce information and information on 
children of all ages, and specifies that up to $10,000,000 of 
these funds may be used for State data coordinators and for 
awards to public or private entities to improve data 
coordination, quality and use.

Assessment

    The Committee recommendation includes $138,844,000 for 
Assessment, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the budget request. This amount includes $8,723,000 
for the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB), which is 
the same as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget 
request. In addition, this amount includes $130,121,000 for the 
National Assessment of Educational Progress, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the budget request.
    The National Assessment of Educational Progress is the only 
nationally representative and continuing survey of educational 
ability and achievement of American students. The primary goal 
of the Assessment is to determine and report the status and 
trends of the knowledge and skills of students, subject by 
subject. Subject areas assessed in the past have included 
reading, writing, mathematics, science, and history, as well as 
citizenship, literature, art, and music. The National 
Assessment of Educational Progress is operated by contractors 
through competitive awards made by the National Center for 
Education Statistics. The NAGB formulates the policy guidelines 
for the program.
    In fiscal year 2010, NAGB will conduct the 2010 U.S. 
history, civics and geography assessments at grades 4, 8 and 
12. It will also prepare for 2011 national and State 
assessments in reading, math, and writing at grades 4 and 8, a 
national grade 12 writing assessment, and the Trial Urban 
District Assessment.

                        Departmental Management


                         PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee recommendation includes $615,277,000 for 
Program Management at the Department of Education. This amount 
is $30,430,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$4,300,000 below the budget request. These activities are 
authorized by the Department of Education Organization Act, 
P.L. 96-88, and include costs associated with the management 
and operation of the Department as well as separate costs 
associated with the Office for Civil Rights and the Office of 
the Inspector General.
    Congressional Budget Justifications.--Committee commends 
the Department for the Fiscal Year 2010 Justifications of 
Appropriations Estimates to the Congress, which were well 
written, contained useful budget, programmatic, and performance 
information, and submitted on time. The Committee appreciates 
the continual improvement in the Department's budget 
justifications, which sets a high standard for other Federal 
agencies to follow.
    Educational Opportunity and Equity Commission.--The 
Committee is concerned about disparities in the educational 
opportunities provided by different schools within States, 
counties, and even within a single school district. The 
Committee directs the Department to establish an Educational 
Opportunity and Equity Commission, which would be comprised of 
a diverse group of education experts (e.g. teachers, 
professors, administrators) and stakeholders (e.g. parents, 
students, businesses) and would conduct hearings and community 
engagement meetings regarding how the Federal government could 
improve education and eliminate disparities by ensuring that 
each student receives an equitable and sound education.
    Federal Contracting with Women-Owned Firms, Minority-Owned 
Firms, and Small Businesses.--The Committee directs the 
Secretary of Education to provide a report on the Department's 
activities to assist women-owned and minority-owned firms 
seeking to compete for Federal contracts. The report should 
include the percentage of Federal procurement contracts and 
subcontracts awarded in fiscal year 2009 to women-owned firms, 
minority-owned firms, and small businesses; a review of the 
Department's technical assistance and outreach to women-owned 
firms, minority-owned firms, and small businesses; and the 
Department's plan for increasing the number of Federal 
contracts that are awarded to such firms. The Secretary should 
submit this report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate by March 1, 2010.
    Military Recruiting and Parental Consent.--The Committee is 
concerned about student and parent privacy with respect to 
military recruiting. Section 9528 of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965 established an opt-out system, 
through which parents may request that private information not 
be released. In practice, this opt-out option has not been 
adequately communicated to parents. The Committee requests that 
the Department provide technical assistance to school districts 
through the comprehensive centers to ensure that the opt-out 
option is clearly understood by parents.
    Rural Education.--Children in rural America face unique 
challenges to academic and life success. Over 20 percent of 
children in the U.S. attend schools in rural areas, and nearly 
one in five live in poverty. Low population density and 
infrastructure deficits create obstacles to children's success. 
Therefore, the Committee encourages the Department to dedicate 
resources towards research and consideration of best-practices 
that will help address this concern. The Department should 
consider structured afterschool and literacy interventions 
tailored to serve rural, poor populations; prevention and 
enrichment activities, including improved access to physical 
activity and nutritious food; and addressing transportation 
barriers that limit programming options and deter 
participation. In addition, the Committee encourages the 
Department to consider establishing a Federal advisory 
committee to study the challenges faced by rural public school 
systems in delivering elementary and secondary education.

Program Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes $452,200,000 for 
Program Administration, which is $18,718,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and $4,300,000 below the budget 
request. These funds support the staff and other costs of 
administering programs and activities at the Department. Items 
include personnel compensation and health, retirement and other 
benefits as well as travel, rent, telephones, utilities, 
postage fees, data processing, printing, equipment, supplies, 
technology training, consultants and other contractual 
services. The Committee bill includes language proposed by the 
Administration extending the availability of funds appropriated 
for the renovation of buildings and related relocation of 
Department staff. Within the funds provided, $8,200,000, to 
remain available until expended, is for the relocation of, and 
renovation of buildings occupied by, Department staff.

                        Office for Civil Rights

    The bill includes $103,024,000 for the Office for Civil 
Rights. This amount is $6,198,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. The Office 
for Civil Rights is responsible for enforcing laws that 
prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national 
origin, sex, disability, and age in all programs and 
institutions that receive funds from the Department. These laws 
extend to 50 State educational agencies, 14,000 local 
educational agencies, and nearly 6,500 institutions of higher 
education, including proprietary schools. They also extend to 
82 State rehabilitation agencies, libraries, museums, and other 
institutions receiving Federal funds.
    The Committee encourages the Department to conduct a campus 
survey on sexual harassment on college campuses in order to 
assess the need for an online reporting system for sexual 
harassment incidents on college campuses. The Committee 
encourages the Department to collaborate with relevant 
organizations that have well established prior experience in 
this area.

                    Office of the Inspector General

    The bill includes $60,053,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General, which is $5,514,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. The 
Recovery Act provided an additional $14,000,000 for this office 
for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. This Office has authority to 
inquire into all program and administrative activities of the 
Department as well as into related activities of grant and 
contract recipients. It conducts audits and investigations to 
determine compliance with applicable laws and regulations, to 
check alleged fraud and abuse, efficiency of operations, and 
effectiveness of results.

                           General Provisions

    Sec. 301. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds in this Act from being used for the 
transportation of students or teachers in order to overcome 
racial imbalances or to carry out a plan of racial 
desegregation.
    Sec. 302. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds in this Act from being used to require the 
transportation of any student to a school other than the school 
which is nearest the student's home in order to comply with 
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    Sec. 303. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits funds in this Act from being used to prevent the 
implementation of programs of voluntary prayer and meditation 
in public schools.

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 304. The Committee continues a transfer of funds 
provision that allows up to one percent of any discretionary 
funds appropriated for the Department of Education to be 
transferred between appropriations accounts, provided that no 
appropriation is increased by above three percent by any such 
transfer.
    Sec. 305. The Committee continues a provision that allows 
the Outlying Areas to consolidate funds under title V of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
    Sec. 306. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the obligation of funds in this Act for new awards under the 
Teacher Incentive Fund prior to the submission of an impact 
evaluation plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate.
    Sec. 307. The Committee includes provisions making 
technical corrections to the Innovation Fund within the State 
Fiscal Stabilization Fund established under section 14007 of 
division A of the Recovery Act.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES


 Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $5,396,000 for the Committee for 
Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled, which 
is $302,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.
    The Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or 
Severely Disabled, established by the Wagner-O'Day Act of 1938, 
is the independent Federal agency that administers the 
AbilityOne (formerly Javits-Wagner-O'Day or JWOD) Program. The 
program's primary objective is to increase employment 
opportunities for people who are blind or have other severe 
disabilities and, whenever possible, to prepare them to engage 
in competitive employment.

             Corporation for National and Community Service

    The bill provides $1,059,016,000 for the Corporation for 
National and Community Service (the Corporation), which is 
$169,150,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$90,000,000 below the budget request.
    The Corporation makes grants to States, institutions of 
higher education, public and private non-profit organizations, 
and others to create service opportunities for a wide variety 
of individuals through full-time national and community service 
programs. The Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act reauthorized 
the Corporation in 2009. New programs authorized under the 
Serve America Act include: new national service corps under the 
AmeriCorps program focused on education, healthy futures, clean 
energy, veterans, and economic opportunities; a Summer of 
Service program within Learn and Serve; and a Social Innovation 
Fund to identify and scale-up high impact, results-oriented 
non-profit initiatives. In addition, the Serve America Act 
establishes a Call to Service Campaign in conjunction with a 
September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance.

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $782,179,000 for the Operating 
Expenses of the programs administered by the Corporation. This 
amount is $101,615,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $75,500,000 below the budget request.

Domestic Volunteer Services Programs

    Within the Operating Expenses total, the Committee provides 
$318,832,000 for the Domestic Volunteer Service Programs 
administered by the Corporation, which is $8,997,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request.
    VISTA.--The Committee provides $97,932,000 for the 
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) program, which is 
$1,882,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $65,000,000 for Volunteers in Service for America 
(VISTA) in fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The VISTA program 
supports individuals who recruit low-income volunteers and 
organize community volunteer activities, but who do not provide 
direct volunteer services.
    National Senior Volunteer Corps.--The Committee provides a 
total of $220,900,000 for the National Senior Volunteer Corps, 
which is $7,115,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation supports an increase of more 
than 9,000 members in the Retired Senior Volunteer Program 
(RSVP) for a total of over 438,000 direct volunteers, and 
maintains the volunteer level of Foster Grandparents at nearly 
29,000 and Senior Companions at over 15,000. In addition, the 
fiscal year 2010 funding levels provided for all three National 
Senior Volunteer Corps programs--Foster Grandparents, Senior 
Companions, and RSVP--maintain or provide modest increases for 
administrative costs, recruitment and retention, and electronic 
grants management systems.

National and Community Service Programs

    Within the Operating Expenses total, the Committee provides 
$463,347,000 for National and Community Service programs 
administered by the Corporation. This amount is $92,618,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $75,500,000 less 
than the budget request. Funding for the National Service Trust 
is appropriated in a separate funding account.
    AmeriCorps State and National Grants.--The Committee 
provides $331,547,000 for AmeriCorps State and National Grants, 
which is $60,351,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and $41,000,000 less than the budget request. The Recovery Act 
provided an additional $89,000,000 for AmeriCorps State and 
National grants for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Funds for the 
AmeriCorps State and National program support grants to public 
and non-profit organizations that recruit, train, and place 
AmeriCorps members in service programs to meet critical 
community needs in education, public safety, health, and the 
environment. This funding investment, together with Recovery 
Act funds, will increase the number of all AmeriCorps members 
from approximately 74,000 to nearly 89,000, putting AmeriCorps 
on a growth path towards achieving the long-term goal of 
reaching 250,000 members by 2017.
    Disability Grants.--The Committee provides $5,000,000 for a 
newly authorized Disability Grants program, which is the same 
as the budget request. In fiscal year 2009, $4,140,000 was 
provided for a similar program under the Innovation, 
Assistance, and Other Activities line item. These grants will 
be made available to the entire community of national service 
grantees to support increased service and volunteer 
opportunities for Americans with disabilities.
    Innovation, Assistance, and Other Activities.--The 
Committee provides $40,500,000 for Innovation, Assistance, and 
Other Activities, which is $21,607,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $25,000,000 below the budget request. 
This funding level will enable the Corporation to increase its 
focus on social innovation and demonstration programs that both 
strengthen and encourage service and civic participation while 
increasing private and public investment in nonprofit community 
organizations. The Committee does not provide funding for the 
new Volunteer Generation Fund as requested in fiscal year 2010 
in order to fund higher priority initiatives in CNCS.
    Within the total for Innovation, Assistance, and Other 
Activities, the Committee provides $35,000,000 to create a new 
Social Innovation Fund to provide seed capital to and scale up 
proven and promising solutions to our nation's most pressing 
problems. The Serve America Act requires that Social Innovation 
Fund grantees and sub-grantees provide no less than a one-to-
one dollar match, therefore the Committee believes this initial 
investment will be sufficient to begin this new program.
    As requested, the Committee also provides $1,500,000 for a 
national Call to Service Campaign and for the September 11th 
National Day of Service and Remembrance.
    Evaluation.--The Committee provides $6,000,000 for 
Evaluation, which is $2,109,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. This funding 
will enable the Corporation to provide research and analysis to 
strengthen program performance and expand national service 
through innovation and reform; conduct evaluation research 
designed to measure the impact of the Corporation's programs; 
and provide national data on volunteering.
    National Civilian Community Corps.--The Committee provides 
$26,300,000 for the National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC), 
which is $1,200,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level 
and the same as the budget request. NCCC participants focus on 
disaster relief, infrastructure development, environmental 
improvement, energy conservation, and urban and rural 
development. This funding supports a five-campus structure, 
which ensures coverage across all 50 States in the event of a 
disaster.
    Learn and Serve America.--The Committee provides 
$39,500,000 for Learn and Serve America, which is $2,041,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. Learn and Serve America provides grants to 
schools, higher education institutions, and community-based 
organizations that engage students, their teachers, and others 
in service-learning. This teaching and learning strategy 
integrates curricula with community service, enabling young 
people to solve the needs of their communities while improving 
grades, increasing attendance, and developing personal and 
social responsibility.
    Within the total for Learn and Serve America, the Committee 
provides up to $2,000,000 for the newly authorized Summer of 
Service program for 2,000 students in fiscal year 2010. The 
budget request did not recommend funding for this program. The 
goal of the Summer of Service program is to develop the ethic 
of active citizenship and enable 6th through 12th graders 
(particularly economically disadvantaged youth) to contribute 
to their communities while building essential skills for future 
success. Each participant who successfully completes a Summer 
of Service is entitled to an educational award.
    State Commissions.--The Committee provides $17,000,000 for 
State Commission administrative grants, which is $5,210,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $1,000,000 above 
the budget request. These funds support grants to the State 
Commissions to implement and administer the expanded AmeriCorps 
service program at the State level.
    Training and Technical Assistance.--The Committee provides 
$7,500,000 for a new Training and Technical Assistance program, 
which is $500,000 below the budget request. In prior years, 
Training and Technical Assistance activities were funded by an 
allocation from each of the Corporation's programs. These funds 
support training and technical assistance for grantees, the 
National Clearinghouse, and other national training providers, 
and for a civic health assessment.

                         NATIONAL SERVICE TRUST

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee provides $178,214,000 for the National 
Service Trust, to be available until expended. This amount is 
$47,139,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$17,423,000 below the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $40,000,000 for the National Service Trust for 
fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The National Service Trust pays for 
education awards earned by AmeriCorps and VISTA members who 
complete their service. In fiscal year 2010, the Segal 
Education Award will increase from $4,725 to $5,350 to align it 
with the maximum Pell Grant level. This is the first increase 
in the award amount since the inception of the Corporation for 
National and Community Service in 1993. The Committee fully 
funds the increase for the higher education award level and 
covers additional education awards for the increase in 
AmeriCorps State and National members. In addition, the 
Committee includes $1,000,000 for education awards for 2,000 
students under the Summer of Service program in fiscal year 
2010. The Committee continues bill language that allows the 
Corporation to transfer funds from AmeriCorps grants funded 
under the Operating Expenses account to the National Service 
Trust after notice of such a transfer is transmitted to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Senate. The Committee also continues bill language that 
allows funds appropriated for the National Service Trust to be 
invested without regard to apportionment requirements.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $80,923,000 for Salaries and 
Expenses associated with the administrative activities of the 
Corporation for National and Community Service. This amount is 
$9,208,000 more than the fiscal year 2009 funding level and 
$7,077,000 below the budget request. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $6,000,000 for Salaries and Expenses in fiscal 
years 2009 and 2010. These funds allow the Corporation to 
manage and operate its programs. The Committee provides a 13 
percent increase in funding over fiscal year 2009, which will 
enable the Corporation to continue a measured expansion of its 
administrative workforce and training, as well as its 
information technology infrastructure.
    In October 2008, the Committee requested that the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG) evaluate the internal budgeting 
procedures of the Corporation due to financial management 
issues and the failure of key information technology systems. 
In June 2009, the OIG provided preliminary findings and 
recommendations to the Committee. As a result of these 
findings, the Committee believes that significant steps need to 
be taken by the Corporation's management to strengthen its 
policies regarding budget formulation and execution, human 
capital management, contracting, and information technology 
processes. The Committee believes that the Corporation's 
ability to effectively manage a significant expansion of 
service programs and initiatives requires a robust 
administrative governance process and technological 
infrastructure. The Committee directs the Corporation to 
provide a comprehensive plan to address these management gaps, 
particularly deficiencies in financial management, within two 
months of receiving the OIG's final audit report. The Committee 
directs the OIG to continue its management oversight of the 
Corporation and requests a revised work plan for fiscal year 
2010 that reflects this priority.

                      Office of Inspector General

    The Committee provides $7,700,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General (OIG), which is $1,188,000 more than the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. The Recovery Act provided an additional $1,000,000 for 
the OIG for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The OIG is authorized 
by the Inspector General Act of 1978. This office provides an 
independent assessment of all of the operations and programs of 
the Corporation for National and Community Service, through 
audits, investigations, and other proactive projects.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    Sec. 401. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language that requires the Corporation for National and 
Community Service to ensure that significant changes to program 
requirements or policy are made only through public notice and 
comment rulemaking.
    Sec. 402. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language that combines separate matching requirements for 
AmeriCorps grants.
    Sec. 403. The Committee recommendation continues bill 
language requiring that donations to the Corporation for 
National and Community Service be used to supplement and not 
supplant operations.

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

    The Committee recommends a $440,000,000 fiscal year 2012 
advance appropriation for the Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting (CPB), which is $10,000,000 more than the fiscal 
year 2011 advance appropriation. CPB's appropriation is 
allocated according to a statutory formula reserving no less 
than 89 percent of the appropriation for grants to public 
broadcasting stations or program producers, six percent for 
system support, and no more than five percent for CPB 
operations. These funds will partially support the operations 
of over 1,150 public radio and television stations.
    For fiscal year 2010, the bill includes a total of 
$101,000,000 for public broadcasting. Of this amount, 
$40,000,000 is provided for fiscal stabilization grants to 
public television and radio stations, which have been 
negatively impacted by the economic downturn. On average, these 
stations have seen a non-Federal revenue loss of approximately 
19 percent, which has led to numerous job losses and reductions 
in local programming and services. In March 2009, in 
consultation with public television and radio stations, the 
Corporation developed a set of guidelines that would govern the 
distribution of any fiscal stabilization funds provided to 
public broadcasting stations. The Committee expects that the 
Corporation will utilize those guidelines in issuing such 
grants, which shall be awarded no later than 45 days after the 
enactment of this Act. Further, the Committee directs that no 
later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act, the 
Corporation shall submit a report to the Committee detailing 
how the funds were distributed. The President's request did not 
include these funds.
    Also within the total amount for fiscal year 2010, the 
Committee recommends $36,000,000 for digital transition 
activities, which is $1,409,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the request. Finally, within the 
total amount for fiscal year 2010, the Committee provides 
$25,000,000 for the third and final funding installment for a 
three-year project to enhance public radio satellite capacity 
and improve related ground and operating systems. This amount 
is $1,642,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the request.
    The Committee continues and updates bill language 
restrictions on the use of funds included in fiscal year 2009.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $47,000,000 for the Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service (FMCS), which is $1,524,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and $697,000 above the 
budget request.
    The FMCS, created in 1947 through the Labor Management 
Relations Act, assists parties in labor disputes in industries 
affecting commerce to settle such disputes through conciliation 
and mediation. Subsequent Acts and Executive Orders have 
expanded the role of the FMCS to provide mediation services to 
the private sector and alternative dispute resolution programs 
to Federal government agencies, as well as promote and 
establish labor-management partnerships in the private sector. 
In addition, the FMCS convenes boards of inquiry appointed by 
the President in emergency disputes. By statute, the 
jurisdiction of the FMCS excludes the rail and airline 
industries, which are covered by the National Mediation Board 
under the Railway Labor Act.
    The Committee bill includes provisions first enacted in 
fiscal year 1996 granting the FMCS the authority to accept 
gifts and to charge fees for certain services.
    Within the total, not less than $650,000 shall be used for 
FMCS's Labor-Management Grants Program, to remain available 
through September 30, 2011. This program provides grants to 
encourage and support joint labor-management activities 
conducted by plant, area, and industry-wide committees designed 
to improve labor-management relationships, employment security, 
and organizational effectiveness. These funds assist in the 
establishment and operation of these labor-management 
committees. The Committee believes this program has 
demonstrated success in improving workplace relationships and 
in instilling effective and efficient conflict resolution.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $9,858,000 for the Federal Mine 
Safety and Health Review Commission (Commission), which is 
$1,205,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Commission is responsible for 
reviewing the enforcement activities of the Secretary of Labor 
under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act, including new 
responsibilities provided for in the Mine Improvement and New 
Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act). The Commission's 
administrative law judges (ALJ) hear and decide cases initiated 
by the Secretary of Labor, mine operators, or miners. The five-
member Commission hears appeals from administrative law judge 
decisions, rules on petitions for discretionary review, and may 
direct, on its own initiative, a review of cases that present 
unusual questions of law.
    In recent years there has been a significant increase in 
the number of new cases brought before ALJs for review, more 
than doubling in one year from 4,100 in fiscal year 2007 to 
almost 9,000 in fiscal year 2008. The Committee is concerned 
that this increasing workload has resulted in a significant 
increase in cases pending, with cases pending at the beginning 
of the year expected to increase from just over 4,000 in fiscal 
2008 to over 15,000 in fiscal year 2010. The Committee provides 
the full amount of the request to allow the Commission to hire 
additional ALJs and support staff. In addition, the Committee 
requests that the Commission include in its fiscal year 2011 
Congressional budget justification information on how it plans 
to handle this increase in new cases while keeping the pending 
workload at a reasonable level.

               Institute for Museum and Library Services


    OFFICE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES: GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

    The Committee provides $275,688,000 for the Institute of 
Museum and Library Services (IMLS), which is $848,000 above the 
fiscal year 2009 funding level and $10,132,000 above the budget 
request.
    IMLS, created in 1996 by the Museum and Library Services 
Act, provides support for museums and libraries to provide 
broad and equitable access to high-quality knowledge resources 
by administering the Library Services and Technology Act and 
the Museum Services Act. Within the total for IMLS, the 
Committee recommends the following amounts:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                2009 Committee compared to--
                                                                           -------------------------------------
                    Budget activity                      FY 2010 Committee                      FY 2010  Budget
                                                                                 FY 2009            request
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Library Services Technology Act (LSTA):................
    Grants to States...................................       $172,561,000        +$1,061,000          +$204,000
    Native American Library Services...................          3,717,000                  0            -19,000
    National Leadership: Libraries.....................         12,437,000                  0            -62,000
    Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian..................         24,525,000                  0           -123,000
Museum Services Act:...................................
    Museums for America................................         19,176,000                  0            -96,000
    Museum Assessment Program..........................            460,000                  0             -2,000
    21st Century Museum Professionals..................          1,280,000                  0             -6,000
    Conservation Project Support.......................          3,052,000                  0            -15,000
    Conservation Assessment Program....................            803,000                  0             -4,000
    Native American/Hawaiian Museum Services...........            945,000                  0             -5,000
    National Leadership: Museums.......................          7,981,000                  0            -40,000
African American History and Culture Act:..............
    Museum Grants for African American History &                 1,485,000           +175,000           +168,000
     Culture...........................................
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Library Services and Technology

    The Grants to State Library Agencies program provides funds 
to State Library Administrative Agencies using a population-
based formula. The Committee recommendation ensures that all 
States receive a minimum funding level of $680,000 provided for 
in the Library Services and Technology Act reauthorization, 
while ensuring that additional funds are distributed based on 
an equitable population based formula.
    Native American/Native Hawaiian Library Services Grants 
support improved access to library services for Native 
Americans, Alaska Native Villages, and Native Hawaiians.
    The National Leadership Grants for Libraries support 
cutting-edge projects to enhance library services nationwide by 
providing grants that enable libraries to address current 
problems in creative ways, develop and test innovative 
solutions, and expand the boundaries within which libraries 
operate.
    The Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program builds the 
professional capacity of libraries by improving staff knowledge 
and skills, supporting recruitment and education efforts, and 
providing grants for research related to library education and 
library staffing needs.

Museum Services

    Museums for America grants strengthen museums as active 
resources for lifelong learning and as community assets.
    The Museum Assessment Program provides technical assistance 
to help institutions assess their strengths and weaknesses and 
create a plan for the future.
    The 21st Century Museum Professionals program supports the 
preparation of museum professionals for the future by updating 
and expanding their knowledge and skills.
    The Conservation Project Support program awards grants to 
help museums identify conservation needs and priorities and 
perform activities to ensure the safekeeping of their 
collections.
    The Conservation Assessment Program assists small museums 
in laying the groundwork for effective collections management 
by providing professional assistance in analyzing all aspects 
of care, assessing current practices, and recommending actions 
to be taken.
    Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services grants 
enable Native American tribes, Alaska Native villages or 
corporations, and organizations that primarily serve Native 
Hawaiians to benefit their communities and audiences through 
strengthened museum services.
    National Leadership Grants for Museums support cutting-edge 
projects to enhance museum services nationwide by providing 
grants that enable museums to address current problems in 
creative ways, develop and test innovative solutions, and 
expand the boundaries within which museums operate.

African American History and Culture

    Museum Grants for African American History and Culture 
build professional capacity in the African American museum 
community.

Program Administration

    The Committee provides $17,134,000 for Program 
Administration, which is $217,000 above the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the same as the budget request. Program 
Administration funds provide administrative and management 
support for all programs administered by IMLS. Within the funds 
provided, the Committee includes funds for Policy, Research, 
and Statistics, including functions formerly conducted by the 
National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. This 
accommodates the directive in the fiscal year 2003 
reauthorization for IMLS to conduct and publish analyses of the 
impact of museum and library services.
    The bill includes $10,132,000 for the following projects in 
the following amounts:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Committee
                       Project                           recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Aerospace Museum of California Foundation, Inc.,                $930,000
 McClellan, CA for maintenance of collections........
Alameda County Library Foundation, Fremont, CA for               300,000
 technology and equipment for the Castro Calley
 Library.............................................
Botanical Research Institute of Texas, Ft. Worth, TX             500,000
 to enhance collections..............................
Cedar Rapids Public Library, Cedar Rapids, IA for its            300,000
 flood recovery project..............................
Center for American History, Austin, TX for                      250,000
 educational programming at the Sam Rayburn Library
 and Museum..........................................
Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose, San Jose, CA            120,000
 for education programs..............................
City of Chino Hills, CA for library facility                     250,000
 improvements........................................
City of Daphne, AL for library equipment.............            100,000
City of Desert Hot Springs, CA for preservation of               100,000
 collections at the Cabot's Pueblo Museum............
City of San Diego, CA for books, technology,                      25,000
 education and outreach programs for the Skyline
 Hills Branch Library................................
City of Twin Falls, ID to digitize collections.......            100,000
City of Yucaipa, CA for expanded library collections             100,000
 and technology upgrades.............................
Downingtown Library Senior Center, Downingtown, PA to            350,000
 expand collections and for technology upgrades......
Florida Holocaust Museum, St. Petersburg, FL for                 200,000
 exhibits, collections and educational outreach
 programs............................................
Gig Harbor History Museum, Gig Harbor, WA for                    200,000
 exhibits and interactive displays...................
Glenville State College, Glenville, WV for                       350,000
 programming and equipment for the college library's
 veteran's history project...........................
Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile, AL for              100,000
 exhibits and educational outreach...................
Isamue Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, Long                 30,000
 Island City, NY for conservation projects...........
Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Foundation,                220,000
 Jackson, MS for educational outreach programs.......
Morris Museum, Morristown, NJ for exhibits and                   300,000
 educational programming.............................
Museum of Aviation, Warner Robins, GA for science and            350,000
 educational programs................................
Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL for                  175,000
 teacher professional development....................
Mystic Seaport Museum, Inc., Mystic, CT for                      350,000
 technology based educational programs...............
National Voting Rights Museum & Institute, Selma, AL             450,000
 for the preservation and restoration of exhibits....
Native American Cultural Center and Museum, Oklahoma             750,000
 City, OK for exhibits and educational programming...
New Jersey State Library for the Blind and                       100,000
 Handicapped, Trenton, NJ for an awareness campaign
 and digital materials...............................
Oakland Museum of California, Oakland, CA for a                  250,000
 technology initiative for educational outreach......
Orange County Library System, Orlando, FL for Spanish            500,000
 language media and books............................
Phoenixville Public Library, Phoenixville, PA to                 157,000
 enhance collections.................................
St. Louis Art Museum Foundation, St. Louis, MO for               225,000
 restoration and reinstallation of exhibits..........
Tallahatchie County Board of Supervisors, Glendora,              400,000
 MS for preservation of exhibits and collections for
 the Emmett Till memorial complex....................
Texas Southern University, Robert Terry Library and              300,000
 Mickey Leland Center, Houston, TX for archive
 preservation........................................
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for the Virtual               850,000
 Vietnam Archive.....................................
Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site Foundation,                    150,000
 Buffalo, NY for exhibits and interactive displays...
Town of Jamestown, Jamestown, CA for books and                   100,000
 materials for the Jamestown County Library..........
Witte Museum, San Antonio, TX for exhibits and                   100,000
 educational outreach................................
Young at Art Children's Museum, Davie, FL for the                100,000
 Global Village educational program..................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends $11,800,000 for the Medicare 
Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), which is $397,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. MedPAC advises Congress on payment and other policy 
issues affecting the Medicare program and on implications of 
changes in health care delivery and the market for health care 
services on the Medicare program.
    The Committee recognizes that regional inequities in 
Medicare reimbursement have created barriers to care and have 
penalized states that have cost-effective health care delivery 
systems. The Committee urges the Medicare Payment Advisory 
Commission develop recommendations on policies and practices 
that would equalize Medicare payments across regions while 
encouraging health outcomes and quality care under Medicare.

                     National Council on Disability


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $3,271,000 for the National Council 
on Disability (NCD), which is $65,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request.
    The NCD monitors implementation of the Americans with 
Disabilities Act and makes recommendations to the President, 
Congress, the Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the 
National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research on 
public policy issues of concern to individuals with 
disabilities.

                     National Labor Relations Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $283,400,000 for the National Labor 
Relations Board (NLRB), which is $20,805,000 above the fiscal 
year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget request.
    The NLRB receives, investigates, and prosecutes unfair 
labor practice charges filed by businesses, labor unions, and 
individuals. The NLRB also schedules and conducts 
representation elections. The five members of the NLRB consider 
appeals of administrative law judge decisions. The Committee 
will continue to monitor potential legislation that could 
affect NLRB's workload.

                        National Mediation Board


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $12,992,000 for the National 
Mediation Board (NMB), which is the same as the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and $442,000 below the budget request. The 
NMB mediates labor disputes between employees and railroad and 
airline carriers subject to the Railway Labor Act. The NMB also 
resolves representation disputes involving labor organizations 
seeking to represent railroad or airline employees.
    The Committee is displeased that the National Mediation 
Board did not submit its fiscal year 2009 Congressional budget 
justification to the Committee in a timely manner. The 
Committee requires the detailed information included in the 
Congressional budget justification to properly analyze the 
budget request and determine recommended funding levels.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The Committee provides $11,712,000 for the Occupational 
Safety and Health Review Commission, which is $526,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request.
    The Commission adjudicates contested citations issued by 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration against 
employers for violations of safety and health standards. The 
Commission's administrative law judges settle and decide cases 
at the initial level of review. OSHRC's three appointed 
Commissioners also review cases, issue rulings on complicated 
matters, and may direct review of any decision by an 
administrative law judge.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                     DUAL BENEFITS PAYMENTS ACCOUNT

    The Committee provides $64,000,000 for dual benefits, which 
is $8,000,000 below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.
    These funds pay dual benefits to retirees receiving both 
Railroad Retirement and Social Security benefits. The Committee 
includes a provision permitting a portion of these funds to be 
derived from income tax receipts on dual benefits as authorized 
by law. The Railroad Retirement Board estimates that 
approximately $3,000,000 may be derived in this manner.

          Federal Payment to the Railroad Retirement Accounts

    The Committee provides $150,000 for the interest earned on 
unnegotiated checks, which is the same as the fiscal year 2009 
funding level and the budget request.

                      Limitation on Administration

    The Committee provides a consolidated limitation of 
$109,073,000 on the expenditure of Railroad Retirement and 
Railroad Unemployment Trust Funds for administrative expenses 
of the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB), which is $3,610,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request.
    The RRB administers comprehensive retirement-survivor and 
unemployment-sickness insurance benefit programs for railroad 
workers and their families. This appropriation limits the 
amount of funds in the Railroad Retirement and Railroad 
Unemployment Insurance Trust Funds that may be used by the RRB 
for administrative expenses. The committee prohibits funds from 
the Railroad Retirement Trust Fund from being spent on any 
charges over and above the actual cost of administering the 
trust fund, including commercial rental rates.
    The Committee maintains its position that the financial 
statements and audit of the National Railroad Retirement 
Investment Trust (Trust) should remain separate from the 
financial statements and audit of the RRB. The Committee notes 
that the Railroad Retirement and Survivors' Improvement Act of 
2001 (Act) mandates that the Trust functions independently from 
the RRB. Further, the Act specifically requires a separate 
audit of the Trust by a nongovernmental auditor and requires 
that the results of this audit be included in the Trust's 
Annual Management Report to Congress. The Committee expects 
that the Trust shall be administered and audited solely in 
conformance with the Act of 2001.

             LIMITATION ON THE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The Committee provides authority to expend $8,186,000 from 
the Railroad Retirement and Railroad Unemployment Insurance 
Trust Funds for the Office of Inspector General, which is 
$380,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same 
as the budget request.
    The Inspector General conducts and supervises audits and 
investigations of programs and operations of the RRB. The 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2008, included a provision 
that allows the Office of Inspector General to conduct audits, 
investigations and reviews of Medicare programs. The Committee 
continues bill language that clarifies the Inspector General's 
authority to receive funds for these activities.

                     Social Security Administration


                PAYMENTS TO SOCIAL SECURITY TRUST FUNDS

    The Committee recommends $20,404,000 for mandatory payments 
necessary to compensate the Old Age and Survivors Insurance 
(OASI) Trust Fund and the Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Fund 
for special payments to certain uninsured persons (for which no 
payroll tax is received), costs incurred for administration of 
pension reform activities and interest lost on the value of 
benefit checks issued but not negotiated. This amount is $2,000 
below the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request. This appropriation restores the trust funds to 
the position they would have been in had they not borne these 
costs properly charged to the general funds.

                  SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME PROGRAM

    The Committee recommends $34,742,000,000 for the 
Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. This is 
$4,270,463,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Committee also provides 
$16,000,000,000 in advance funding for the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2011, as requested.
    The Committee is concerned that the Social Security 
Administration's current Supplemental Security Income (SSI) 
rules--which count research compensation for participation in a 
clinical drug study as income for determining SSI--are a 
barrier to participation in clinical trials. The Committee 
encourages the Social Security Administration to disregard any 
compensation to an individual who is a participant in a 
clinical trial testing treatments for diseases that have been 
reviewed and approved by an institutional review board and meet 
the ethical standards for clinical research for the purposes of 
determining that individual's eligibility for the SSI program.

Beneficiary Services

    In addition to Federal benefits, the Social Security 
Administration (SSA) administers a program of supplementary 
State benefits for those States that choose to participate. The 
funds also are used to reimburse the trust funds for the 
administrative costs of the program. The Committee provides 
$49,000,000 for beneficiary services, which is $46,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the 
budget request.

Research and Demonstration

    Within the appropriation for SSI, the Committee recommends 
$49,000,000 for research and demonstration activities conducted 
under section 1110 of the Social Security Act. This amount is 
$14,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request.

Administration

    Within the appropriation for SSI, the Committee recommends 
$3,442,000,000 for payment to the Social Security trust funds 
for SSI's share of the base administrative expenses of SSA. 
This amount is $235,463,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding 
level and the same as the budget request.

                 LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    The Committee recommends a Limitation on Administrative 
Expenses for SSA of $10,800,500,000 to be funded from the 
Social Security and Medicare trust funds. This amount is 
$733,000,000 above the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the 
same as the budget request. The Recovery Act provided an 
additional $1,090,000,000 to process an influx of disability 
and retirement claims related to the economic downturn; to 
administer the issuance of a one-time Economic Recovery Payment 
to Social Security beneficiaries; and for necessary expenses to 
replace the National Computer Center.
    The Committee notes that the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 
2009, provided an additional $126,500,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 budget request for SSA to accelerate its Hearings Backlog 
Reduction Plan. SSA has used these funds to make initial 
progress in reducing the disability hearings backlog, as the 
number of pending hearings has fallen for the first time since 
2001. The Committee also supports SSA's plan to add more than 
200 administrative law judges (ALJs) with funds in this bill, 
with an overall target of 1,450 ALJs by 2011. The Committee 
continues to urge SSA to ensure that ALJs have sufficient 
support staff to maximize ALJ productivity, as this remains a 
cost-effective means of reducing the backlog more efficiently. 
The Committee provides the full budget request to ensure that 
SSA builds on its recent success and can continue to reduce the 
hearings backlog despite the recent steep increase in initial 
disability claims due to the economic downturn.

Social Security Advisory Board

    The Committee recommends that not less than $2,300,000 
within the Limitation on Administrative Expenses be available 
for the Social Security Advisory Board, which is $300,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request.

Continuing Disability Reviews and Redeterminations

    The Committee recommendation for the Limitation on 
Administrative Expenses includes $273,000,000 for conducting 
continuing disability reviews (CDRs) and redeterminations of 
SSI eligibility. An additional $485,000,000 is available for 
this purpose through a discretionary cap adjustment, as 
included in the budget request and the Concurrent Resolution on 
the Budget for Fiscal Year 2010. The recommendation for CDRs 
and redeterminations of SSI eligibility is $254,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2009 funding level and the same as the budget 
request. Moreover, the Committee includes bill language 
allowing up to $34,000,000 of the additional funds to be 
available for asset verification initiatives, if the Office of 
the Chief Actuary determines that such initiatives would be at 
least as cost effective as redeterminations of eligibility. The 
bill language is consistent with the provisions of the 
Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2010. The 
Committee emphasizes that successful program integrity 
activities are vital to maintain the public's support for 
continuing benefit payments to recipients deserving of 
assistance.
    The Committee is concerned about delays in processing work-
related CDRs that determine if disability insurance 
beneficiaries have lost eligibility for benefits due to 
returning to the workplace. These delays cause SSA to transmit 
overpayments after beneficiaries have returned to work and then 
impose hardships on beneficiaries forced to repay unexpected 
sums; in addition, SSA is frequently unable to recover all the 
overpaid funds. The Committee requests that SSA provide a 
report by December 15, 2010 on its progress in eliminating 
delays in processing work-related CDRs and other workloads 
essential to the work-related CDR process, including work 
reports and work reviews.

User fees

    In addition to the other amounts provided, the Committee 
provides $161,000,000 for administrative activities funded from 
user fees. Of this amount, $160,000,000 is derived from fees 
collected from States that request SSA to administer State SSI 
supplementary payments. And $1,000,000 is made available from a 
fee payment process for non-attorneys who represent claimants 
under a five-year demonstration project that will end in fiscal 
year 2010.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    The Committee recommends $102,682,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General, which is $4,555,000 above the fiscal year 
2009 funding level and the same as the budget request. Within 
this total, the bill also provides authority to expend 
$73,682,000 from the Social Security trust funds for activities 
conducted by the Inspector General. The Recovery Act provided 
an additional $2,000,000 for oversight and audit of programs 
under the Social Security account.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS


                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    Sec. 501. The Committee continues a provision to allow the 
Secretaries of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education 
to transfer unexpended balances of prior appropriations to 
accounts corresponding to current appropriations to be used for 
the same purpose and for the same periods of time for which 
they were originally appropriated.
    Sec. 502. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the obligation of funds beyond the current fiscal year unless 
expressly so provided.
    Sec. 503. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
appropriated funds to be used to support or defeat legislation 
pending before the Congress or any State legislature, except in 
presentation to the Congress or any State legislature itself.
    Sec. 504. The Committee continues a provision to limit the 
amount available for official reception and representation 
expenses for the Secretaries of Labor and Education, the 
Director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and 
the Chairman of the National Mediation Board.
    Sec. 505. The Committee continues a provision to require 
grantees receiving Federal funds to clearly state the 
percentage of the total cost of the program or project that 
will be financed with Federal money.
    Sec. 506. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
appropriated funds to be used for any abortion.
    Sec. 507. The Committee continues a provision to provide 
exceptions for Sec. 506 and a provision to prohibit funds from 
being made available to a Federal agency or program, or to a 
State or local government, if such agency, program or 
government discriminates against institutional or individual 
health care entities because they do not provide, pay for, 
provide coverage of, or refer for abortions.
    Sec. 508. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds in the Act concerning research involving human 
embryos. However, this language should not be construed to 
limit Federal support for research involving human embryonic 
stem cells carried out in accordance with policy outlined by 
the President.
    Sec. 509. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds for any activity that promotes the 
legalization of any drug or substance included in schedule I of 
the schedules of controlled substances.
    Sec. 510. The Committee continues a provision to prohibit 
the use of funds to promulgate or adopt any final standard 
providing for a unique health identifier until legislation is 
enacted specifically approving the standard.
    Sec. 511. The Committee continues a provision related to 
annual reports to the Secretary of Labor.
    Sec. 512. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits the transfer of funds from this Act except by 
authority provided in this Act or another appropriation Act.
    Sec. 513. The Committee continues a provision to limit 
funds in the bill for public libraries to those libraries that 
comply with the requirements of the Children's Internet 
Protection Act.
    Sec. 514. The Committee continues a provision to limit 
technology funds in the bill for elementary and secondary 
schools to those schools that comply with the requirements of 
the Children's Internet Protection Act.
    Sec. 515. The Committee continues a provision regarding 
procedures for reprogramming of funds.
    Sec. 516. The Committee continues a provision pertaining to 
appointments to a scientific advisory committee.
    Sec. 517. The Committee continues a provision requesting 
each department and related agency funded through this Act to 
submit an operating plan within 45 days of enactment, detailing 
any reprogramming of funds which result in a different funding 
allocation than that in the fiscal year 2010 Act, the 
accompanying detailed table, or budget request.
    Sec. 518. The Committee modifies a provision that requires 
the Secretaries of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education to submit a quarterly report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
containing certain information on noncompetitive contracts, 
grants, and cooperative agreements exceeding $100,000 in value.
    Sec. 519. The Committee continues a provision that 
prohibits the use of funds in this Act for a contract or grant 
exceeding $5,000,000 unless the prospective contractor or 
grantee makes certain certifications regarding Federal tax 
liability.
    Sec. 520. The Committee continues a provision prohibiting 
funds in this Act to process claims for credit for quarters of 
coverage based on work performed under a Social Security number 
that was not the claimant's number and the performance of such 
work under such number has formed the basis for a conviction of 
the claimant of a violation of section 208(a)(6) or (7) of the 
Social Security Act.
    Sec. 521. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the use of funds in this Act to implement a Social Security 
totalization agreement with Mexico.
    Sec. 522. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the use of funds in this Act that contravene the 1996 Personal 
Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act.
    Sec. 523. The Committee includes a provision that prohibits 
the use of funds in the Act for needle exchange programs that 
are within 1,000 feet of a public or private day care center, 
elementary school, vocational school, secondary school, 
college, junior college, or university, or any public swimming 
pool, park, playground, video arcade, or youth center, or an 
event sponsored by any such entity.

                        CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee on Appropriations bases 
its authority to report this legislation from clause 7 of 
section 9 of article I of the Constitution of the United States 
of America which states:

          No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
        consequence of Appropriations made by law * * *

    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

                 COMPARISON WITH THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives and section 308(a)(1)(A) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(``Budget Act''), the following table compares the levels of 
new budget authority provided in the bill with the appropriate 
allocation under section 302(b) of the Budget Act.
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  302(b) allocation             This bill
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Budget                    Budget
                                                               authority     Outlays     authority     Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary...............................................      160,654      219,692      163,400   \1\218,789
Mandatory...................................................      551,512      552,780      551,512     552,780
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior year budget authority.

    Note.--The amounts in this bill are technically in excess 
of the Subcommittee section 302(b) suballocation. However, 
pursuant to section 422 of the Congressional budget resolution 
for fiscal year 2010, increases to the Committee's section 
302(a) allocation are authorized for funding in the reported 
bill for (1) program integrity spending relating to State 
Unemployment Insurance in-person reemployment and eligibility 
assessments, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health 
Care Fraud and Abuse Control, and Social Security 
Administration Continuing Disability Reviews and SSI 
Eligibility Redeterminations, and (2) the Low Income Home 
Energy Assistance Program. After the bill is reported to the 
House, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget will provide 
an increased section 302(a) allocation consistent with the 
funding provided in the bill. That new allocation will 
eliminate the technical difference prior to floor 
consideration.

                      FIVE-YEAR OUTLAY PROJECTIONS

    Pursuant to section 308(a)(1)(B) of the Congressional 
Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, the following table 
contains five-year projections prepared by the Congressional 
Budget Office of outlays associated with the budget authority 
provided in the accompanying bill:


                        [In millions of dollars] Outlays:..............................................
    2010..............................................        \1\624,299
    2011..............................................            64,624
    2012..............................................            15,185
    2013..............................................             3,538
    2014 and beyond...................................              522\1\Excludes outlays from prior year budget authority.

               ASSISTANCE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

    Pursuant to section 308(a(1)(C) of the Congressional Budget 
and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, the financial assistance 
to State and local governments is as follows:


                        [In millions of dollars] New budget authority..................................           362,229
Fiscal year 2010 outlays resulting therefrom..........           317,602
                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
transfers of funds included in the accompanying bill.

                                TITLE I

    Language is included under ``Training and Employment 
Services'' authorizing the transfer of funds from the 
``Evaluation'' account to any other account within the 
Department to carry out evaluation activities.
    Language is included under ``Special Benefits'' which 
provides for the transfer of such sums as necessary from the 
``Postal Service'' account.
    Language is included under ``Black Lung Disability Trust 
Fund'' which provides for the transfer of $32,720,000 to the 
``Department of Labor, Employment Standards Administration, 
Salaries and Expenses.''
    Language is included under ``Black Lung Disability Trust 
Fund'' which provides for the transfer of $25,091,000 to the 
``Department of Labor, Departmental Management, Salaries and 
Expenses.''
    Language is included under ``Black Lung Disability Trust 
Fund'' which provides for the transfer of $327,000 to the 
``Department of Labor, Inspector General.''
    Language is included under ``Black Lung Disability Trust 
Fund'' which provides for the transfer of $356,000 to the 
``Department of the Treasury.''
    Language is included under ``Departmental Management, 
Salary and Expenses'' authorizing the transfer of up to 
$5,000,000 to any other account within the Department to carry 
out evaluation activities.
    A general provision is included that allows not to exceed 
one percent of any discretionary appropriations to be 
transferred between a program, project or activity of the 
Department of Labor, provided that no such program, project or 
activity is increased by more than three percent by such 
transfer.
    A general provision is included that requires the 
Department to submit a plan to transfer the administration of 
the Job Corps program from the Office of the Secretary to the 
Employment and Training Administration. The Department is 
prohibited from transferring the administration authority or 
appropriation for Job Corps until 30 days after submitting the 
plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives and the Senate.

                                TITLE II

    Language is included under ``National Institute of Allergy 
and Infectious Diseases'' providing for the transfer of 
$300,000,000 to the ``Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, 
and Tuberculosis'', U.S. Agency for International Development.
    Language is included under ``National Institute of Allergy 
and Infectious Diseases'' transferring to the account 
$500,000,000 from ``Biodefense Countermeasures'' in the 
Department of Homeland Security Appropriations Act, 2004.
    Language is included under ``Children and Family Services 
Programs'' providing for the transfer of $1,000,000 to the 
National Commission on Children and Disasters.
    Language is included under ``Office of the Secretary, 
General Departmental Management'' providing for the transfer of 
$1,000,000 to the National Institute of Mental Health to 
administer the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee.
    Language is included under ``Public Health and Social 
Services Emergency Fund'' authorizing the transfer of up to 
$8,000,000 to the U.S. Postal Service from the amount made 
available for the delivery of medical countermeasures.
    Language is included under ``Public Health and Social 
Services Emergency Fund'' that $305,000,000 to support advanced 
research and development shall be derived by transfer from 
funds appropriated under the heading ``Biodefense 
Countermeasures'' in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2004.
    Language is included under ``Public Health and Social 
Services Emergency Fund'' authorizing the transfer of pandemic 
influenza preparedness and response funds to other 
appropriation accounts of the Department of Health and Human 
Services.
    Language is included under ``Public Health and Social 
Services Emergency Fund'' transferring all remaining balances 
from funds appropriated under the heading ``Biodefense 
Countermeasures'' in the Department of Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act, 2004.
    A general provision is included that allows not to exceed 
one percent of any discretionary funds to be transferred 
between appropriation accounts of the Department of Health and 
Human Services, provided that no appropriation account is 
increased by more than three percent by such transfer.
    A general provision is included that allows the transfer of 
up to three percent among the institutes and centers of the 
National Institutes of Health from amounts identified as 
pertaining to the human immunodeficiency virus.
    A general provision is included that allows the transfer of 
funding determined to be related to the human immunodeficiency 
virus to the Office of AIDS Research.
    A general provision is included that transfers one percent 
of the amount made available for National Research Service 
Awards at the National Institutes of Health to the Agency for 
Healthcare Research and Quality and one percent to the Health 
Resources and Services Administration.

                               TITLE III

    A general provision is included that allows not to exceed 
one percent of any discretionary funds to be transferred 
between appropriation accounts of the Department of Education, 
provided that no appropriation account is increased by more 
than three percent by such transfer.

                                TITLE IV

    Language is included under ``National Service Trust'' to 
allow the transfer of additional funds if necessary from within 
``Operating Expenses'' to support the activities of national 
service participants of the Corporation of National and 
Community Service.
    Language is included under ``Social Security 
Administration'' authorizing the transfer of up to three 
percent of the Social Security Administration's ``Limitation on 
Administration Expenses'' account to be available for purposes 
of the Office of Inspector General.

                              RESCISSIONS

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table lists the 
rescissions in the accompanying bill.

                   RESCISSIONS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                       Account                               Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor, Employment Standards                    $65,000,000
 Administration......................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3(e) (Ramseyer Rule)