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111th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     111-472

======================================================================



 
         SUPPORTING THE GOALS AND IDEALS OF NATIONAL TRAIN DAY

                                _______
                                

 May 4, 2010.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Oberstar, from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                      [To accompany H. Res. 1301]

    The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, to whom 
was referred the resolution (H. Res. 1301) supporting the goals 
and ideals of National Train Day, having considered the same, 
report favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that 
the resolution be agreed to.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    H. Res. 1301 supports the goals and ideals of National 
Train Day as designated by Amtrak; recognizes the important 
contribution that trains make to the national transportation 
system; and urges the people of the United States to recognize 
National Train Day (May 8) as an opportunity to learn more 
about trains.

                  BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION

    H. Res. 1301 supports the goals and ideals of National 
Train Day as designated by Amtrak. Amtrak will host the third 
annual National Train Day on May 8, 2010, with events across 
the country to celebrate America's love for trains. In 2009, 
more than 140 events celebrating National Train Day took place 
across the country; Amtrak expects even more in 2010.
    National Train Day recognizes 141 years of passenger rail 
service in the United States and commemorates the day that the 
first transcontinental railroad was created. On May 10, 1869, 
in Promontory Summit, Utah, the golden spike was driven into 
the final tie that joined 1,776 miles of the Central Pacific 
and Union Pacific railways, transforming America by creating 
the nation's first transcontinental railroad.
    Transcontinental railroad passenger train service began 
five days later from Omaha to Sacramento with the trip costing 
between $40 and $111 (depending on the class of service) and 
scheduled to take 4 days, 4 hours, and 40 minutes. Today, 
Amtrak provides service between Omaha and Sacramento on the 
California Zephyr, which takes 41 hours and 8 minutes.
    Amtrak, or the National Railroad Passenger Corporation, was 
created by Congress in 1970. It began operations on May 1, 
1971. Prior to enactment, passenger rail service had declined 
in the United States, largely due to the rise of the 
automobile; the devastating economic impact of two World Wars; 
creation of the Interstate Highway System; the increasing 
availability, comfort, and convenience of air travel; 
increasing train fares and decreasing service; and a number of 
railroad bankruptcies, mergers, and acquisitions. By 1965, only 
10,000 rail passenger cars were in operation, 85 percent fewer 
than in 1929, and passenger rail service was provided on only 
75,000 miles of track. At its peak, railroads were operating on 
more than 240,000 miles of track.
    Today, Amtrak operates 21,000 route miles in 46 States, the 
District of Columbia, and three Canadian provinces. Amtrak 
operates more than 300 trains each day to more than 500 
destinations. It is also the operator for State-supported 
corridor services in 15 States and for four commuter rail 
agencies.
    On April 8, 2010, Amtrak announced that the railroad is on 
pace to break its annual ridership record carrying a best ever 
13.6 million passengers during the first six months of Fiscal 
Year (FY) 2010, representing a 4.3 percent increase over the 
same period the prior year. Amtrak has carried approximately 
100,000 more riders than the 13.5 million passengers posted in 
FY 2008, which was Amtrak's best ridership year in company 
history when Amtrak carried 28.7 million passengers.
    In 2008, Congress reauthorized Amtrak in the Passenger Rail 
Investment and Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIIA) (P.L. 110-432) 
and created two Federal-State matching grant programs to 
develop intercity passenger and high-speed rail across the 
country. In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
(Recovery Act) (P.L. 111-5), which built upon the success of 
PRIIA, provided $8 billion to States for development of 
intercity passenger and high-speed rail, and another $1.3 
billion to Amtrak for capital, safety, and security 
improvements. Later that year, Congress provided an additional 
$2.5 billion for development of intercity passenger and high-
speed rail in the Transportation, Housing and Urban 
Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2010 
(Division A of P.L. 111-117).
    On April 16, 2009, the President released a strategic plan 
for the development of high-speed intercity passenger rail in 
the United States, which proposes to help address the nation's 
transportation challenges by investing in an efficient, high-
speed passenger rail network of 100-600 mile intercity 
corridors that connect communities across America.
    In the near term, the plan proposes to lay the foundation 
for that network by investing in intercity rail infrastructure, 
equipment, and intermodal connections, beginning with the $8 
billion ``down payment'' provided under the Recovery Act, and 
continuing with a longer-term high-speed rail grant program. 
The near-term investment strategy seeks to: (1) advance new 
express high-speed corridor services (operating speeds above 
150 miles per hour (mph) on primarily dedicated track) in 
select corridors of 200-600 miles; (2) develop emerging and 
regional high-speed corridor services (operating speeds up to 
90-110 mph and 110-150 mph respectively, on shared and 
dedicated track) in corridors of 100-500 miles; and (3) upgrade 
reliability and service on conventional intercity rail services 
(operating speeds up to 79-90 mph).
    On January 28, 2010, President Obama announced the first 
recipients selected to receive part of the $8 billion in grant 
funding provided under the Recovery Act. A total of 31 States 
received awards. In the West, 23 projects received a total of 
$2.95 billion. In the Midwest, 24 projects received a total of 
$2.62 billion. In the Northeast, 23 projects received a total 
of $490 million. And in the Southeast, 12 projects received a 
total of $1.88 billion.
    The program generated enormous interest and excitement 
across the country. The Federal Railroad Administration 
received 259 grant applications from 37 States requesting 
nearly $57 billion in funding far exceeding the $8 billion 
available under the Recovery Act. According to the Obama 
administration, the first round of selections represents a down 
payment on the President's vision of a passenger rail network 
that will help address the nation's 21st Century transportation 
challenges.

                       SUMMARY OF THE LEGISLATION

    H. Res. 1301 supports the goals and ideals of National 
Train Day as designated by Amtrak. National Train Day will be 
held on Saturday, May 8, 2010. Further, the resolution 
recognizes the important contribution that trains make to the 
national transportation system, and urges the people of the 
United States to recognize that day as an opportunity to learn 
more about trains.

            LEGISLATIVE HISTORY AND COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    On April 27, 2009, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, 
and Hazardous Materials Chairwoman Corrine Brown introduced H. 
Res. 367. On May 5, 2009, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure discharged the resolution. On May 6, 2009, the 
House agreed to H. Res. 367 by a vote of 426-0.
    On April 27, 2010, Subcommittee Chairwoman Brown introduced 
H. Res. 1301. On April 29, 2010, the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure met in open session to 
consider H. Res. 1301. The Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure ordered H. Res. 1301 reported favorably to the 
House by a voice vote with a quorum present.

                              RECORD VOTES

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires each committee report to include the 
total number of votes cast for and against on each record vote 
on a motion to report and on any amendment offered to the 
measure or matter, and the names of those members voting for 
and against. There were no recorded votes taken in connection 
with consideration of H. Res. 1301 or ordering the resolution, 
reported. A motion to order H. Res. 1301 reported favorably to 
the House was agreed to by voice vote with a quorum present.

                      COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS

    With respect to the requirements of clause 3(c)(1) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in this report.

                          COST OF LEGISLATION

    With respect to clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, H. Res. 1301 is a resolution of 
the House of Representatives, and therefore does not have the 
force of law. As such, there is no cost associated with this 
resolution for fiscal year 2010, or any fiscal year thereafter.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(2) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, and 
section 308(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding, so no comparison of the total estimated 
funding level for the relevant programs to the appropriate 
level under current law is required.
    2. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(4) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding, so no statement of general performance and 
objectives for any measure that authorizes funding is required.
    3. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(3) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding, so no cost estimate nor comparison for any 
measure that authorizes funding is required.

                     COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XXI

    Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, the Committee is required to include a list 
of congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited 
tariff benefits, as defined in clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of 
rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives. H. Res. 
1301 does not contain any earmarks, limited tax benefits, or 
limited tariff benefits under clause 9(e), 9(f), or 9(g) of 
rule XXI.

                   CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, H. Res. 1301 is a resolution of the 
House of Representatives, and therefore does not have the force 
of law. As such, clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII does not apply.

                       FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    H. Res. 1301 contains no Federal mandates.

                        PREEMPTION CLARIFICATION

    Section 423 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
requires the report of any Committee on a bill or joint 
resolution to include a statement on the extent to which the 
bill or joint resolution is intended to preempt state, local, 
or tribal law. The Committee states that H. Res. 1301 does not 
preempt any state, local, or tribal law.

                      ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act are created by this 
legislation.

                APPLICABILITY TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that the resolution does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act (P.L. 104-1).

         CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW MADE BY THE BILL, AS REPORTED

    H. Res. 1301 makes no changes in existing law.