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111th Congress                                            Rept. 111-688
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 1

======================================================================



 
                           YOUTH PROMISE ACT

                                _______
                                

               December 16, 2010.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Conyers, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 1064]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the bill 
(H.R. 1064) to provide for evidence-based and promising 
practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
gang activity prevention and intervention to help build 
individual, family, and community strength and resiliency to 
ensure that youth lead productive, safe, healthy, gang-free, 
and law-abiding lives, having considered the same, report 
favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill 
as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
The Amendment....................................................     2
Purpose and Summary..............................................    23
Background and Need for the Legislation..........................    24
Hearings.........................................................    35
Committee Consideration..........................................    35
Committee Votes..................................................    35
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................    37
New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures........................    37
Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................    37
Performance Goals and Objectives.................................    39
Constitutional Authority Statement...............................    39
Advisory on Earmarks.............................................    39
Section-by-Section Analysis......................................    39
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............    45
Dissenting Views.................................................    50

                             The Amendment

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Youth Prison Reduction through 
Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education Act'' or 
the ``Youth PROMISE Act''.

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. Definitions.

  TITLE I--FEDERAL COORDINATION OF LOCAL AND TRIBAL JUVENILE JUSTICE 
                        INFORMATION AND EFFORTS

Sec. 101. PROMISE Advisory Panel.
Sec. 102. Geographic assessment of resource allocation.

                        TITLE II--PROMISE GRANTS

Sec. 200. Purposes.

           Subtitle A--PROMISE Assessment and Planning Grants

Sec. 201. PROMISE Assessment and Planning grants authorized.
Sec. 202. PROMISE Coordinating Councils.
Sec. 203. Needs and strengths assessment.
Sec. 204. PROMISE Plan components.
Sec. 205. Authorization of appropriations.

               Subtitle B--PROMISE Implementation Grants

Sec. 211. PROMISE Implementation grants authorized.
Sec. 212. PROMISE Implementation grant application requirements.
Sec. 213. Grant award guidelines.
Sec. 214. Reports.
Sec. 215. Authorization of appropriations.

              Subtitle C--General PROMISE Grant Provisions

Sec. 221. Non-supplanting clause.
Sec. 222. Grant application review panel.
Sec. 223. Evaluation of PROMISE grant programs.

                  TITLE III--PROMISE RESEARCH CENTERS

Sec. 301. Establishment of the National Research Center for Proven 
Juvenile Justice Practices.
Sec. 302. Grants for Regional Research Proven Practices Partnerships.

               TITLE IV--YOUTH-ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

Sec. 401. Purpose.
Sec. 402. Definitions.
Sec. 403. Grants to State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies 
to hire and train youth-oriented policing officers.
Sec. 404. Establishment of Center for Youth-oriented Policing.
Sec. 405. Authorization of appropriations.

       TITLE V--ENHANCED FEDERAL SUPPORT OF LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

          Subtitle A--Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief

Sec. 501. Short title.
Sec. 502. Designation as a comprehensive gang prevention and relief 
area.
Sec. 503. Interagency Gang Prevention Task Force.
Sec. 504. Authorization of appropriations.

             Subtitle B--Community and Police Collaboration

Sec. 511. Gang prevention grants.

                Subtitle C--City Youth Violence Recovery

Sec. 521. Grants to prevent or alleviate the effects of youth violence.

                        TITLE VI--PRECAUTION ACT

Sec. 601. Short title.
Sec. 602. Purposes.
Sec. 603. Definitions.
Sec. 604. National Commission on Public Safety Through Crime and 
Delinquency Prevention.
Sec. 605. Innovative crime and delinquency prevention and intervention 
strategy grants.

         TITLE VII--ADDITIONAL IMPROVEMENTS TO JUVENILE JUSTICE

Sec. 701. Youth Victim and Witness Assistance Program.
        ``Sec. 31707. Authorization of appropriations.
Sec. 702. Expansion and reauthorization of the Mentoring Initiative for 
system-involved youth.
Sec. 703. Study on adolescent development and sentences in the Federal 
system.
Sec. 704. Partnerships with professional athletic leagues.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:
            (1) Administrator.--The term ``Administrator'' means the 
        Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
        Prevention.
            (2) Community.--The term ``community'' means a unit of 
        local government or an Indian Tribe, or part of such a unit or 
        Tribe, as determined by such a unit or Tribe for the purpose of 
        applying for a grant under this Act.
            (3) Designated geographic area.--The term ``designated 
        geographic area'' means a 5-digit postal ZIP Code assigned to a 
        geographic area by the United States Postal Service.
            (4) Evidence-based.--The term ``evidence-based'', when used 
        with respect to a practice relating to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention, 
        means a practice (including a service, program, or strategy) 
        that has statistically significant juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity reduction outcomes when evaluated 
        by--
                    (A) an experimental trial, in which participants 
                are randomly assigned to participate in the practice 
                that is the subject of the trial; or
                    (B) a quasi-experimental trial, in which the 
                outcomes for participants are compared with outcomes 
                for a control group that is made up of individuals who 
                are similar to such participants.
            (5) Intervention.--The term ``intervention'' means the 
        provision of programs and services that are supported by 
        research, are evidence-based or promising practices, and are 
        provided to youth who are involved in, or who are identified by 
        evidence-based risk assessment methods as being at high risk of 
        continued involvement in, juvenile delinquency or criminal 
        street gangs, as a result of indications that demonstrate 
        involvement with problems such as truancy, substance abuse, 
        mental health treatment needs, or siblings who have had 
        involvement with juvenile or criminal justice systems.
            (6) Juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention.--The term ``juvenile delinquency and criminal 
        street gang activity prevention'' means the provision of 
        programs and resources to children and families who have not 
        yet had substantial contact with criminal justice or juvenile 
        justice systems, that--
                    (A) are designed to reduce potential juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity risks; 
                and
                    (B) are evidence-based or promising educational, 
                health, mental health, school-based, community-based, 
                faith-based, parenting, job training, social 
                opportunities and experiences, or other programs, for 
                youth and their families, that have been demonstrated 
                to be effective in reducing juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity risks.
            (7) Promising.--The term ``promising'', when used with 
        respect to a practice relating to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention, 
        means a practice that is not evidence-based, but--
                    (A) that has outcomes from an evaluation that 
                demonstrate that such practice reduces juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity; and
                    (B) about which a study is being conducted to 
                determine if such practice is evidence-based.
            (8) State.--The term ``State'' means each of the several 
        States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto 
        Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern 
        Mariana Islands, and any other territories or possessions of 
        the United States.
            (9) Youth.--The term ``youth'' means--
                    (A) an individual who is 18 years of age or 
                younger; or
                    (B) in any State in which the maximum age at which 
                the juvenile justice system of such State has 
                jurisdiction over individuals exceeds 18 years of age, 
                an individual who is such maximum age or younger.

  TITLE I--FEDERAL COORDINATION OF LOCAL AND TRIBAL JUVENILE JUSTICE 
                        INFORMATION AND EFFORTS

SEC. 101. PROMISE ADVISORY PANEL.

    (a) Organization of State Advisory Group Member Representatives.--
Section 223(f) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act 
of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5633(f)) is amended--
            (1) by striking paragraph (1) and inserting the following:
            ``(1) Organization of state advisory group member 
        representatives.--The Administrator shall provide technical and 
        financial assistance to a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization 
        that is described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue 
        Code of 1986, to assist such organization in carrying out the 
        functions specified in paragraph (2). To receive such 
        assistance, an organization shall--
                    ``(A) be governed by individuals who--
                            ``(i) have been appointed by a chief 
                        executive of a State to serve as a State 
                        advisory group member under subsection (a)(3); 
                        and
                            ``(ii) are elected to serve as a governing 
                        officer of such organization by a majority of 
                        the Chairs (or Chair-designees) of all such 
                        State advisory groups;
                    ``(B) include member representatives from a 
                majority of such State advisory groups, who shall be 
                representative of regionally and demographically 
                diverse States and jurisdictions; and
                    ``(C) annually seek appointments by the chief 
                executive of each State of one State advisory group 
                member and one alternate State advisory group member 
                from each such State to implement the advisory 
                functions specified in subparagraphs (D) and (E) of 
                paragraph (2), including serving on the PROMISE 
                Advisory Panel, and make a record of any such 
                appointments available to the public.''; and
            (2) in paragraph (2), by amending subparagraph (D) to read 
        as follows:
                    ``(D) advising the Administrator with respect to 
                particular functions or aspects of the work of the 
                Office, and appointing a representative, diverse group 
                of members of such organization under paragraph (1) to 
                serve as an advisory panel of State juvenile justice 
                advisors (referred to as the `PROMISE Advisory Panel') 
                to carry out the functions specified in subsection (g); 
                and''.
    (b) PROMISE Advisory Panel.--Section 223 of the Juvenile Justice 
and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5633) is further 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(g) PROMISE Advisory Panel.--
            ``(1) Functions.--The PROMISE Advisory Panel required under 
        subsection (f)(2)(D) shall--
                    ``(A) assess successful evidence-based and 
                promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity prevention and 
                intervention carried out by PROMISE Coordinating 
                Councils under such Act;
                    ``(B) provide the Administrator with a list of 
                individuals who have experience in administering or 
                evaluating practices that serve youth involved in, or 
                at risk of involvement in, juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity, from which the 
                Administrator shall select individuals who shall--
                            ``(i) provide to the Administrator peer 
                        reviews of applications submitted by units of 
                        local government and Indian tribes pursuant to 
                        title II of such Act, to ensure that such 
                        applications demonstrate a clear plan to--
                                    ``(I) serve youth as part of an 
                                entire family unit; and
                                    ``(II) coordinate the delivery of 
                                service to youth among agencies; and
                            ``(ii) advise the Administrator with 
                        respect to the award and allocation of PROMISE 
                        Planning grants to local and tribal governments 
                        that develop PROMISE Coordinating Councils, and 
                        of PROMISE Implementation grants to such 
                        PROMISE Coordinating Councils, pursuant to 
                        title II of such Act;
                    ``(C) develop performance standards to be used to 
                evaluate programs and activities carried out with 
                grants under title II of the Youth PROMISE Act, 
                including the evaluation of changes achieved as a 
                result of such programs and activities related to 
                decreases in juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
                gang activity, including--
                            ``(i) prevention of involvement by at-risk 
                        youth in juvenile delinquency or criminal 
                        street gang activity;
                            ``(ii) diversion of youth with a high risk 
                        of continuing involvement in juvenile 
                        delinquency or criminal street gang activity; 
                        and
                            ``(iii) financial savings from deferred or 
                        eliminated costs, or other benefits, as a 
                        result of such programs and activities, and the 
                        reinvestment by the unit or Tribe of any such 
                        savings; and
                    ``(D) provide the Center for Youth-oriented 
                Policing with a list of individuals the Panel 
                recommends for membership on the Youth-oriented 
                Policing Services Advisory Board, pursuant to section 
                403(c) of the Youth PROMISE Act.
            ``(2) Annual report.--Not later than 18 months after the 
        date of the enactment of the Youth PROMISE Act, and annually 
        thereafter, the PROMISE Advisory Panel shall prepare a report 
        containing the findings and determinations under paragraph 
        (1)(A) and shall submit such report to Congress, the President, 
        the Attorney General, and the chief executive and chief law 
        enforcement officer of each State, unit of local government, 
        and Indian Tribe.''.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--Section 299(a)(1) of the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 
5671(a)(1)) is amended to read as follows:
            ``(1) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
        this title--
                    ``(A) $6,800,000 for fiscal year 2010;
                    ``(B) $7,800,000 for fiscal year 2011;
                    ``(C) $8,800,000 for fiscal year 2012;
                    ``(D) $11,000,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
                    ``(E) $13,600,000 for fiscal year 2014.''.

SEC. 102. GEOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF RESOURCE ALLOCATION.

    (a) Grant for Collection of Data To Determine Need.--Subject to the 
availability of appropriations, the Administrator shall award a grant, 
on a competitive basis, to an organization to--
            (1) collect and analyze data related to the existing 
        juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention and intervention needs and resources in each 
        designated geographic area;
            (2) use the data collected and analyzed under paragraph (1) 
        to compile a list of designated geographic areas that are in 
        need of resources to carry out juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention;
            (3) use the data collected and analyzed under paragraph (1) 
        to rank such areas in descending order by the amount of need 
        for resources to carry out juvenile delinquency and criminal 
        street gang activity prevention and intervention, ranking the 
        area with the greatest need for such resources highest; and
            (4) periodically update the list under paragraph (2) and 
        the rankings under paragraph (3) as the Administrator 
        determines to be appropriate.
    (b) Data Sources.--In compiling such list and determining such 
rankings, the organization shall collect and analyze data relating to 
juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention--
            (1) using the geographic information system and web-based 
        mapping application known as the Socioeconomic Mapping and 
        Resource Topography (SMART) system;
            (2) from the Department of Health and Human Services, the 
        Department of Labor, the Department of Housing and Urban 
        Development, and the Department of Education; and
            (3) from the annual KIDS Count Data Book and other data 
        made available by the KIDS Count initiative of the Annie E. 
        Casey Foundation.
    (c) Use of Data by the Administrator.--The list and rankings 
required by this section shall be provided to the Administrator to be 
used to provide funds under this Act in the most strategic and 
effective manner to ensure that resources and services are provided to 
youth in the communities with the greatest need for such resources and 
services.
    (d) Limitation on Use of Collected Data.--The information collected 
and analyzed under this section may not be used for any purpose other 
than to carry out the purposes of this Act. Such information may not be 
used for any purpose related to the investigation or prosecution of any 
person, or for profiling of individuals based on race, ethnicity, 
socio-economic status, or any other characteristic.
    (e) Authorization and Limitation of Appropriations.--Of the amount 
appropriated for fiscal year 2010 to carry out this section and 
subtitle A of title II of this Act (as authorized under section 205), 
not more than one percent of such amount, or $1,000,000, whichever is 
less, shall be available to carry out this section.

                        TITLE II--PROMISE GRANTS

SEC. 200. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of the grant programs established under this title are 
to--
            (1) enable local and tribal communities to assess the unmet 
        needs of youth who are involved in, or are at risk of 
        involvement in, juvenile delinquency or criminal street gangs;
            (2) develop plans appropriate for a community to address 
        those unmet needs with juvenile delinquency and gang prevention 
        and intervention practices; and
            (3) implement and evaluate such plans in a manner 
        consistent with this Act.

           Subtitle A--PROMISE Assessment and Planning Grants

SEC. 201. PROMISE ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING GRANTS AUTHORIZED.

    (a) Grants Authorized.--The Administrator is authorized to award 
grants to units of local government and Indian Tribes to assist PROMISE 
Coordinating Councils with planning and assessing evidence-based and 
promising practices relating to juvenile delinquency and criminal 
street gang activity prevention and intervention, especially for youth 
who are involved in, or who are at risk of involvement in, juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity. Such PROMISE 
Coordinating Councils shall--
            (1) conduct an objective needs and strengths assessment in 
        accordance with section 203; and
            (2) develop a PROMISE Plan in accordance with section 204, 
        based on the assessment conducted in accordance with section 
        203.
    (b) Grant Duration, Amount, and Allocation.--
            (1) Duration.--A grant awarded under this section shall be 
        for a period not to exceed one year.
            (2) Maximum grant amount.--A grant awarded under this 
        section shall not exceed $300,000.
    (c) Allocation.--
            (1) Minimum allocation.--Subject to the availability of 
        appropriations, the Administrator shall ensure that the total 
        funds allocated under this section to units of local 
        governments and Indian tribes in a State shall not be less than 
        $1,000,000.
            (2) Ratable reduction.--If the amount made available for 
        grants under this section for any fiscal year is less than the 
        amount required to provide the minimum allocation of funds 
        under paragraph (1) to units of local government and Indian 
        tribes in each State, then the amount of such minimum 
        allocation shall be ratably reduced.

SEC. 202. PROMISE COORDINATING COUNCILS.

    To be eligible to receive a grant under this subtitle, a unit of 
local government or an Indian Tribe shall establish a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council for each community of such unit or Tribe, 
respectively, for which such unit or Tribe is applying for a grant 
under this subtitle. Each such community shall include one or more 
designated geographic areas identified on the list required under 
section 102(a)(2). The members of such a PROMISE Coordinating Council 
shall be representatives of public and private sector entities and 
individuals that--
            (1) shall include, to the extent possible, at least one 
        representative from each of the following:
                    (A) the local chief executive's office;
                    (B) a local educational agency;
                    (C) a local health agency or provider;
                    (D) a local mental health agency or provider, 
                unless the representative under subparagraph (C) also 
                meets the requirements of this subparagraph;
                    (E) a local public housing agency;
                    (F) a local law enforcement agency;
                    (G) a local child welfare agency;
                    (H) a local juvenile court;
                    (I) a local juvenile prosecutor's office;
                    (J) a private juvenile residential care entity;
                    (K) a local juvenile public defender's office;
                    (L) a State juvenile correctional entity;
                    (M) a local business community representative; and
                    (N) a local faith-based community representative;
            (2) shall include two representatives from each of the 
        following:
                    (A) parents who have minor children, and who have 
                an interest in the local juvenile or criminal justice 
                systems;
                    (B) youth between the ages of 15 and 24 who reside 
                in the jurisdiction of the unit or Tribe; and
                    (C) members from nonprofit community-based 
                organizations that provide effective delinquency 
                prevention and intervention to youth in the 
                jurisdiction of the unit or Tribe; and
            (3) may include other members, as the unit or Tribe 
        determines to be appropriate.

SEC. 203. NEEDS AND STRENGTHS ASSESSMENT.

    (a) Assessment.--Each PROMISE Coordinating Council receiving funds 
from a unit of local government or Indian tribe under this subtitle 
shall conduct an objective strengths and needs assessment of the 
resources of the community for which such PROMISE Coordinating Council 
was established, to identify the unmet needs of youth in the community 
with respect to evidence-based and promising practices related to 
juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention. The PROMISE Coordinating Council shall consult with a 
research partner receiving a grant under section 302 for assistance 
with such assessment. Such assessment shall include, with respect to 
the community for which such PROMISE Coordinating Council was 
established--
            (1) the number of youth who are at-risk of involvement in 
        juvenile delinquency or street gang activity;
            (2) the number of youth who are involved in juvenile 
        delinquency or criminal street gang activity, including the 
        number of such youth who are at high-risk of continued 
        involvement;
            (3) youth unemployment rates during the summer;
            (4) the number of individuals on public financial 
        assistance (including a breakdown of the numbers of men, women, 
        and children on such assistance), the estimated number of youth 
        who are chronically truant, and the number of youth who have 
        dropped out of school in the previous year; and
            (5) for the year before such assessment, the estimated 
        total amount expended (by the community and other entities) for 
        the incarceration of offenders who were convicted or 
        adjudicated delinquent for an offense that was committed in 
        such community, including amounts expended for the 
        incarceration of offenders in prisons, jails, and juvenile 
        facilities that are located in the United States but are not 
        located in such community;
            (6) a comparison of the amount under paragraph (5) with an 
        estimation of the amount that would be expended for the 
        incarceration of offenders described in such paragraph if the 
        number of offenders described in such paragraph was equal to 
        the national average incarceration rate per 100,000 population; 
        and
            (7) a description of evidence-based and promising practices 
        related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
        activity prevention available for youth in the community, 
        including school-based programs, after school programs 
        (particularly programs that have activities available for youth 
        between 3:00 and 6:00 in the afternoon), weekend activities and 
        programs, youth mentoring programs, faith and community-based 
        programs, summer activities, and summer jobs, if any; and
            (8) a description of evidence-based and promising 
        intervention practices available for youth in the community.
    (b) Limitation on Use of Assessment Information.--Information 
gathered pursuant to this section may be used for the sole purpose of 
developing a PROMISE Plan in accordance with this subtitle.

SEC. 204. PROMISE PLAN COMPONENTS.

    (a) In General.--Each PROMISE Coordinating Council receiving funds 
from a unit of local government or Indian tribe under this subtitle 
shall develop a PROMISE Plan to provide for the coordination of, and, 
as appropriate, to support the delivery of, evidence-based and 
promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
gang activity prevention and intervention to youth and families who 
reside in the community for which such PROMISE Coordinating Council was 
established. Such a PROMISE Plan shall--
            (1) include the strategy by which the PROMISE Coordinating 
        Council plans to prioritize and allocate resources and services 
        toward the unmet needs of youth in the community, consistent 
        with the needs and available resources of communities with the 
        greatest need for assistance, as determined pursuant to section 
        102;
            (2) include a combination of evidence-based and promising 
        prevention and intervention practices that are responsive to 
        the needs of the community;
            (3) take into account the cultural and linguistic needs of 
        the community; and
            (4) use approaches that have been shown to be effective at 
        reducing the rates of juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
        gang activity in communities.
    (b) Mandatory Components.--Each PROMISE Plan shall--
            (1) include a plan to connect youth identified in 
        paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 203(a) to evidence-based and 
        promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention;
            (2) identify the amount or percentage of local funds that 
        are available to the PROMISE Coordinating Council to carry out 
        the PROMISE Plan;
            (3) provide strategies to improve indigent defense delivery 
        systems, with particular attention given to groups of children 
        who are disproportionately represented in the State delinquency 
        system and Federal criminal justice system, as compared to the 
        representation of such groups in the general population of the 
        State;
            (4) provide for training (which complies with the American 
        Bar Association Juvenile Justice Standards for the 
        representation and care of youth in the juvenile justice 
        system) of prosecutors, defenders, probation officers, judges 
        and other court personnel related to issues concerning the 
        developmental needs, challenges, and potential of youth in the 
        juvenile justice system, (including training related to 
        adolescent development and mental health issues, and the 
        expected impact of evidence-based practices and cost reduction 
        strategies);
            (5) ensure that the number of youth involved in the 
        juvenile delinquency and criminal justice systems does not 
        increase as a result of the activities undertaken with the 
        funds provided under this subtitle;
            (6) describe the coordinated strategy that will be used by 
        the PROMISE Coordinating Council to provide at-risk youth with 
        evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
        delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
        intervention;
            (7) propose the performance evaluation process to be used 
        to carry out section 211(d), which shall include performance 
        measures to assess efforts to address the unmet needs of youth 
        in the community with evidence-based and promising practices 
        related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
        activity prevention and intervention; and
            (8) identify the research partner the PROMISE Coordinating 
        Council will use to obtain information on evidence-based and 
        promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention, and 
        for the evaluation under section 211(d) of the results of the 
        activities carried out with funds under this subtitle.
    (c) Voluntary Components.--In addition to the components under 
subsection (b), a PROMISE Plan may include evidence-based or promising 
practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
activity prevention and intervention in the following categories:
            (1) Early childhood development services (such as pre-natal 
        and neo-natal health services), early childhood prevention, 
        voluntary home visiting programs, nurse-family partnership 
        programs, parenting and healthy relationship skills training, 
        child abuse prevention programs, Early Head Start, and Head 
        Start.
            (2) Child protection and safety services (such as foster 
        care and adoption assistance programs), family stabilization 
        programs, child welfare services, and family violence 
        intervention programs.
            (3) Youth and adolescent development services, including 
        job training and apprenticeship programs, job placement and 
        retention training, education and after school programs (such 
        as school programs with shared governance by students, 
        teachers, and parents, and activities for youth between the 
        hours of 3:00 and 6:00 in the afternoon), mentoring programs, 
        conflict resolution skills training, sports, arts, life skills, 
        employment and recreation programs, summer jobs, and summer 
        recreation programs, and alternative school resources for youth 
        who have dropped out of school or demonstrate chronic truancy.
            (4) Heath and mental health services, including cognitive 
        behavioral therapy, play therapy, and peer mentoring and 
        counseling.
            (5) Substance abuse counseling and treatment services, 
        including harm-reduction strategies.
            (6) Emergency, transitional, and permanent housing 
        assistance (such as safe shelter and housing for runaway and 
        homeless youth).
            (7) Targeted gang prevention, intervention, and exit 
        services such as tattoo removal, successful models of anti-gang 
        crime outreach programs (such as ``street worker'' programs), 
        and other criminal street gang truce or peacemaking activities.
            (8) Training and education programs for pregnant teens and 
        teen parents.
            (9) Alternatives to detention and confinement programs 
        (such as mandated participation in community service, 
        restitution, counseling, and intensive individual and family 
        therapeutic approaches).
            (10) Pre-release, post-release, and reentry services to 
        assist detained and incarcerated youth with transitioning back 
        into and reentering the community.

SEC. 205. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    Subject to the limitation under section 102(e), there are 
authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 2010, $300,000,000 to 
carry out this subtitle and section 102.

               Subtitle B--PROMISE Implementation Grants

SEC. 211. PROMISE IMPLEMENTATION GRANTS AUTHORIZED.

    (a) PROMISE Implementation Grants Authorized.--The Administrator of 
the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is authorized 
to award grants to units of local government and Indian Tribes to 
assist PROMISE Coordinating Councils with implementing PROMISE Plans 
(developed pursuant to subtitle A).
    (b) Grant Duration and Amount.--
            (1) Duration.--A grant awarded under this section shall be 
        for a four-year period.
            (2) Maximum grant amount.--A grant awarded under this 
        section shall not be for more than $10,000,000 per year for 
        each year of the grant period.
    (c) Non-Federal Funds Required.--For each fiscal year during the 
four-year grant period for a grant under this subtitle, each unit of 
local government or Indian Tribe receiving such a grant for a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council shall provide, from non-Federal funds, in cash or 
in kind, 25 percent of the costs of the activities carried out with 
such grant.
    (d) Evaluation.--Of any funds provided to a unit of local 
government or an Indian Tribe for a grant under this subtitle, not more 
than $100,000 shall be used to provide a contract to a competitively 
selected organization to assess the progress of the unit or Tribe in 
addressing the unmet needs of youth in the community, in accordance 
with the performance measures under section 204(b)(7).

SEC. 212. PROMISE IMPLEMENTATION GRANT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Application Required.--To be eligible to receive a PROMISE 
Implementation grant under this subtitle, a unit of local government or 
Indian Tribe that received a PROMISE Assessment and Planning grant 
under subtitle A shall submit an application to the Administrator of 
the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention not later 
than one year after the date such unit of local government or Indian 
Tribe was awarded such grant under subtitle A, in such manner, and 
accompanied by such information, as the Administrator, after 
consultation with the organization under section 223(f)(1) of the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 
5633(f)(1)), may require.
    (b) Contents of Application.--Each application submitted under 
subsection (a) shall--
            (1) identify potential savings from criminal justice costs, 
        public assistance costs, and other costs avoided by utilizing 
        evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
        delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
        intervention;
            (2) document--
                    (A) investment in evidence-based and promising 
                practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal 
                street gang activity prevention and intervention to be 
                provided by the unit of local government or Indian 
                Tribe;
                    (B) the activities to be undertaken with the grants 
                funds;
                    (C) any expected efficiencies in the juvenile 
                justice or other local systems to be attained as a 
                result of implementation of the programs funded by the 
                grant; and
                    (D) outcomes from such activities, in terms of the 
                expected numbers related to reduced criminal activity;
            (3) describe how savings sustained from investment in 
        prevention and intervention practices will be reinvested in the 
        continuing implementation of the PROMISE Plan; and
            (4) provide an assurance that the local fiscal contribution 
        with respect to evidence-based and promising practices related 
        to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
        prevention and intervention in the community for which the 
        PROMISE Coordinating Council was established for each year of 
        the grant period will not be less than the local fiscal 
        contribution with respect to such practices in the community 
        for the year preceding the first year of the grant period.

SEC. 213. GRANT AWARD GUIDELINES.

    (a) Selection and Distribution.--Grants awarded under this subtitle 
shall be awarded on a competitive basis. The Administrator shall--
            (1) take such steps as may be necessary to ensure that 
        grants are awarded to units of local governments and Indian 
        Tribes in areas with the highest concentrations of youth who 
        are--
                    (A) at-risk of involvement in juvenile delinquency 
                or criminal street gang activity; and
                    (B) involved in juvenile delinquency or street gang 
                activity and who are at high-risk of continued 
                involvement; and
            (2) give consideration to the need for grants to be awarded 
        to units of local governments and Indian Tribes in each region 
        of the United States, and among urban, suburban, and rural 
        areas.
    (b) Extension of Grant Award.--The Administrator may extend the 
grant period under section 211(b)(1) for a PROMISE Implementation grant 
to a unit of local government or an Indian Tribe, in accordance with 
regulations issued by the Administrator.
    (c) Renewal of Grant Award.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the Administrator may renew a PROMISE Implementation 
grant to a unit of local government or an Indian Tribe to provide such 
unit or Tribe with additional funds to continue implementation of a 
PROMISE Plan. Such a renewal--
            (1) shall be initiated by an application for renewal from a 
        unit of local government or an Indian Tribe;
            (2) shall be carried out in accordance with regulations 
        issued by the Administrator; and
            (3) shall not be granted unless the Administrator 
        determines such a renewal to be appropriate based on the 
        results of the evaluation conducted under section 223(a) with 
        respect to the community of such unit of Tribe for which a 
        PROMISE Coordinating Council was established, and for which 
        such unit or Tribe is applying for renewal.

SEC. 214. REPORTS.

    Not later than one year after the end of the grant period for which 
a unit of local government or an Indian Tribe receives a PROMISE 
Implementation grant, and annually thereafter for as long as such unit 
or Tribe continues to receive Federal funding for a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council, such unit or Tribe shall report to the 
Administrator regarding the use of Federal funds to implement the 
PROMISE Plan developed under subtitle A.

SEC. 215. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this subtitle 
such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 
2014.

              Subtitle C--General PROMISE Grant Provisions

SEC. 221. NON-SUPPLANTING CLAUSE.

    A unit of local government or Indian Tribe receiving a grant under 
this title shall use such grant only to supplement, and not supplant, 
the amount of funds that, in the absence of such grant, would be 
available to address the needs of youth in the community with respect 
to evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention.

SEC. 222. GRANT APPLICATION REVIEW PANEL.

    The Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention, in conjunction with the PROMISE Advisory Panel, shall 
establish and utilize a transparent, reliable, and valid system for 
evaluating applications for PROMISE Assessment and Planning grants and 
for PROMISE Implementation grants, and shall determine which applicants 
meet the criteria for funding, based primarily on a determination of 
greatest need (in accordance with section 102), with due consideration 
to other enumerated factors and the indicated ability of the applicant 
to successfully implement the program described in the application.

SEC. 223. EVALUATION OF PROMISE GRANT PROGRAMS.

    (a) Evaluation Required.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations under this title, the Administrator shall, in 
consultation with the organization under section 223(f)(1) of the 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 
5633(f)(1)), provide for an evaluation of the programs and activities 
carried out with grants under this title. In carrying out this section, 
the Administrator shall--
            (1) award grants to institutions of higher education 
        (including institutions that are eligible to receive funds 
        under part J of title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
        (as amended by Public Law 110-84)) to facilitate the evaluation 
        process and measurement of achieved outcomes;
            (2) identify evidence-based and promising practices used by 
        Promise Coordinating Councils under PROMISE Implementation 
        grants that have proven to be effective in preventing 
        involvement in, or diverting further involvement in, juvenile 
        delinquency or criminal street gang activity; and
            (3) ensure--
                    (A) that such evaluation is based on the 
                performance standards that are developed by the PROMISE 
                Advisory Panel in accordance with section 223(g) of the 
                Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 
                (as added by section 101(b) of this Act);
                    (B) the development of longitudinal and clinical 
                trial evaluation and performance measurements with 
                regard to the evidence-based and promising practices 
                funded under this title; and
                    (C) the dissemination of the practices identified 
                in paragraph (2) to the National Research Center for 
                Proven Juvenile Justice Practices (established under 
                section 301), units of local government, and Indian 
                Tribes to promote the use of such practices by such 
                units and Tribes to prevent involvement in, or to 
                divert further involvement in, juvenile delinquency or 
                criminal street gang activity.
    (b) Results to the National Research Center for Proven Juvenile 
Justice Practices.--The Administrator shall provide the results of the 
evaluation under subsection (a) to the National Research Center for 
Proven Juvenile Justice Practices established under section 301.

                  TITLE III--PROMISE RESEARCH CENTERS

SEC. 301. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NATIONAL RESEARCH CENTER FOR PROVEN 
                    JUVENILE JUSTICE PRACTICES.

    (a) Center Established.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the Administrator shall award a grant to a nonprofit 
organization with a national reputation for expertise in operating or 
evaluating effective, evidence-based practices related to juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention or 
intervention to develop a National Research Center for Proven Juvenile 
Justice Practices. Such Center shall--
            (1) collaborate with institutions of higher education as 
        regional partners to create a best practices juvenile justice 
        information-sharing network to support the programs and 
        activities carried out with grants under title II of this Act;
            (2) collect, and disseminate to PROMISE Coordinating 
        Councils, research and other information about evidence-based 
        and promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention to 
        inform the efforts of PROMISE Coordinating Councils and 
        regional research partners and to support the programs and 
        activities carried out with grants under title II of this Act;
            (3) increase the public's knowledge and understanding of 
        effective juvenile justice practices to prevent crime and 
        delinquency and reduce recidivism; and
            (4) develop, manage, and regularly update an Internet 
        website to disseminate proven practices for successful juvenile 
        delinquency prevention and intervention.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out this section $5,000,000 for each of the 
fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

SEC. 302. GRANTS FOR REGIONAL RESEARCH PROVEN PRACTICES PARTNERSHIPS.

    (a) Grant Program Authorized.--The Administrator shall, subject to 
the availability of appropriations, establish a grant program to award 
grants to institutions of higher education to serve as regional 
research partners with PROMISE Coordinating Councils that are located 
in the same geographic region as an institution, in collaboration with 
the National Research Center for Proven Juvenile Justice Practices 
authorized under section 301. Regional research partners shall provide 
research support to such PROMISE Coordinating Councils, including--
            (1) assistance with preparing PROMISE grant applications 
        under title II, including collection of baseline data for such 
        applications;
            (2) assistance with the needs and strengths assessments 
        conducted under section 203; and
            (3) provision of support services to PROMISE grant 
        recipients for data collection and analysis to assess progress 
        under the PROMISE grant.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out this section $20,000,000 for each of the 
fiscal years 2010 through 2012.

               TITLE IV--YOUTH-ORIENTED POLICING SERVICES

SEC. 401. PURPOSE.

    The purpose of this title is to prevent involvement by youth in, 
and to divert youth from further involvement in, juvenile delinquency 
and criminal street gang activity by providing funding for youth-
oriented community-based law enforcement, through coordination with 
PROMISE Coordinating Councils and other community-based organizations, 
to carry out evidence-based and promising practices related to juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention that are aimed at reducing--
            (1) the number of youth who are victims of crime;
            (2) the number of youth who lack proper education and 
        community-based resources, training, and support;
            (3) self-destructive behaviors in youth;
            (4) juvenile delinquency;
            (5) criminal street gang activity; and
            (6) the ``stop snitching'' culture pervasive among youth.

SEC. 402. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:
            (1) Youth-oriented policing service.--The term ``youth-
        oriented policing service'' means a strategic effort by a 
        State, local, or tribal law enforcement agency to--
                    (A) provide evidence-based and promising practices 
                related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
                gang activity prevention and intervention; and
                    (B) use strategies based on the SARA model, in 
                collaboration with community-based public and private 
                organizations, to reduce--
                            (i) the number of youth who are victims of 
                        crime; and
                            (ii) the risks of juvenile delinquency and 
                        criminal street gang activity.
            (2) SARA model.--The term ``SARA model'' means a problem-
        solving technique used to organize approaches to recurring 
        problems, which requires action with respect to a problem that 
        includes scanning, analysis, response, and assessment.

SEC. 403. GRANTS TO STATE, LOCAL, AND TRIBAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES 
                    TO HIRE AND TRAIN YOUTH-ORIENTED POLICING OFFICERS.

    (a) Hiring Grants Authorized.--Subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the Director of the Office of Community Oriented 
Policing Services shall award grants to State, local, and tribal law 
enforcement agencies--
            (1) to hire law enforcement officers as youth-oriented 
        police to work collaboratively with PROMISE Coordinating 
        Councils, other community-based organizations, and youth at 
        high risk of becoming involved in delinquent activities to 
        reduce such risks through specialized training related to--
                    (A) youth development;
                    (B) investigation of offenses committed by youth; 
                and
                    (C) the effectiveness of evidence-based and 
                promising practices related to juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity prevention and 
                intervention, as compared to the effectiveness of 
                traditional law enforcement approaches, when dealing 
                with youth; and
            (2) for training and capacity-building of law enforcement 
        agencies related to youth-oriented policing practices and 
        efforts, including--
                    (A) carrying out youth-oriented community-based 
                policing activities including systematic needs and 
                strengths assessment, coordination, technology 
                deployment, technical assistance, and problem solving 
                techniques (such as strategies based on the SARA 
                model); and
                    (B) working with PROMISE Coordinating Councils to 
                develop effective initiatives and practices that 
                promote healthy youth development and prevent 
                involvement by youth in, or divert further youth 
                involvement in, juvenile delinquency and criminal 
                street gang activity.
    (b) Duration.--A grant awarded to a law enforcement agency under 
this section shall be for a 4-year period.
    (c) Maximum Grant Amount.--A grant awarded to a law enforcement 
agency under this section shall not exceed $2,000,000.
    (d) Priority.--In awarding grants under this section, the Director 
of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services shall give 
priority to law enforcement agencies that serve designated geographic 
areas that are ranked highest in the rankings of such areas determined 
under section 102, and shall consider whether a law enforcement agency 
serves a community for which a PROMISE Coordinating Council was 
established.

SEC. 404. ESTABLISHMENT OF CENTER FOR YOUTH-ORIENTED POLICING.

    (a) Grant To Establish Center for Youth-oriented Policing.--Subject 
to the availability of appropriations, the Director of the Office of 
Community Oriented Policing Services shall award a grant, on a 
competitive basis, to an eligible organization to establish a Center 
for Youth-oriented Policing to--
            (1) develop a model youth-oriented policing services 
        training program to train representatives from State, regional, 
        and local law enforcement training academies to provide youth-
        oriented policing services training to law enforcement 
        officers, which shall--
                    (A) be based on evidence-based and promising 
                practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal 
                street gang activity prevention and intervention; and
                    (B) include training related to specialized police 
                services for preventing youth at who are involved in, 
                or who are at high risk of becoming involved in, 
                juvenile delinquency or criminal street gang activity;
            (2) support the adoption of new technologies related to--
                    (A) the prioritization of risks related to juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity;
                    (B) the safety of juveniles in custody; and
                    (C) the prevention of gun violence;
            (3) develop, compile, and disseminate to youth-oriented 
        police information about evidence-based and promising practices 
        that are best practices for Youth-oriented Policing Services 
        for preventing and reducing involvement of youth in juvenile 
        delinquency and criminal street gang activity; and
            (4) develop, compile, and disseminate to youth-oriented 
        police--
                    (A) information about the ``stop snitching'' 
                culture pervasive in many communities in the United 
                States; and
                    (B) tactics to counter such culture.
    (b) Eligible Organization.--In this section, the term ``eligible 
organization'' means a nonprofit organization that has demonstrated--
            (1) experience in providing training, advice, and support 
        to law enforcement agencies;
            (2) commitment to helping youth avoid delinquency, crime, 
        and involvement with the juvenile and criminal justice systems;
            (3) experience in providing law-abiding alternative life 
        styles to youth who are participating in delinquency and 
        criminal street gang activity, or who are involved with the 
        juvenile or criminal justice systems; and
            (4) ability and commitment to work in partnership with 
        community-based organizations that provide services to reduce 
        juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity.
    (c) YOPS Advisory Board.--
            (1) Board established.--The Center for Youth-oriented 
        Policing established pursuant to subsection (a) shall establish 
        a Youth-oriented Policing Services Advisory Board to develop an 
        annual work plan for the Center (in accordance with the 
        conditions and requirements of the grant provided under this 
        section). Such Board shall meet at least once each calendar 
        quarter to consider reports of the Center's activities 
        (including progress made toward accomplishing such work plan), 
        and to approve continuation of or amendment to such work plan.
            (2) Membership.--The membership of the Youth-oriented 
        Policing Services Advisory Board shall--
                    (A) be composed of--
                            (i) an appointee of the chief executive of 
                        the Center for Youth-oriented Policing, who 
                        shall serve in an ex-officio capacity;
                            (ii) an appointee of the PROMISE Advisory 
                        Panel established pursuant to section 223(g) of 
                        the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 
                        Act of 1974 (as added by section 101(b) of this 
                        Act), who shall serve in an ex-officio 
                        capacity; and
                            (iii) individuals who are selected by the 
                        Center for Youth-oriented Policing from a list 
                        of recommended individuals provided by the 
                        PROMISE Advisory Panel in accordance with such 
                        section 223(g), as follows:
                                    (I) 8 law enforcement officers from 
                                international, national, State, and 
                                local law enforcement organizations;
                                    (II) 4 juvenile justice 
                                administrators (including judges), 
                                including 2 administrators from the 
                                State level and 2 administrators from 
                                the local level;
                                    (III) 4 representatives of 
                                community-based organizations that 
                                advocate for juveniles, one each from a 
                                national, State, local, and tribal 
                                organization; and
                                    (IV) 4 individuals who research 
                                juvenile crime prevention issues; and
                    (B) to the greatest extent possible, have a 
                demographic composition that represents the demographic 
                composition of the population of the United States.
            (3) Term of membership.--Members of the Youth-oriented 
        Policing Services Advisory Board shall serve for 3-year 
        staggered terms.

SEC. 405. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There is authorized to be appropriated to carry out this title 
$100,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2010 through 2014, to be made 
available as follows:
            (1) Such sums as may be necessary in each such fiscal year 
        to carry out the activities of the Center for Youth-oriented 
        Policing established pursuant to section 404, except that such 
        sums shall not exceed $5,000,000 or 10 percent of the total 
        amount appropriated to carry out this title, whichever is less.
            (2) Of the funds remaining for each such fiscal year after 
        sums are made available for under paragraph (1)--
                    (A) 80 percent shall be available to award grants 
                to carry out the activities in section 403(a)(1); and
                    (B) 20 percent shall be available to award grants 
                to carry out the activities in section 403(a)(2).

       TITLE V--ENHANCED FEDERAL SUPPORT OF LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

          Subtitle A--Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief

SEC. 501. SHORT TITLE.

    This subtitle may be cited as ``Mynisha's Law''.

SEC. 502. DESIGNATION AS A COMPREHENSIVE GANG PREVENTION AND RELIEF 
                    AREA.

    (a) In General.--Units of local government and Indian Tribes with a 
PROMISE Coordinating Council (established in accordance with subtitle A 
of title II of this Act) may submit an application to the Administrator 
for designation as a Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Area in 
accordance with this section.
    (b) Criteria.--
            (1) In general.--The Administrator shall establish criteria 
        for reviewing applications submitted under subsection (a) and 
        for evaluating and selecting areas for designation as 
        Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Areas.
            (2) Considerations.--In establishing criteria under 
        subsection (a) and evaluating an application for designation as 
        a Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Area, the 
        Administrator shall consider--
                    (A) the current and predicted levels of gang crime 
                activity in the area, based on the information 
                collected and analyzed under section 102;
                    (B) the extent to which violent crime in the area 
                appears to be related to criminal gang activity;
                    (C) the extent to which the area is implementing a 
                PROMISE Plan, or is otherwise already engaged in local 
                or regional collaboration regarding, and coordination 
                of, gang prevention activities; and
                    (D) such other criteria as the Administrator 
                determines to be appropriate.

SEC. 503. INTERAGENCY GANG PREVENTION TASK FORCE.

    (a) In General.--In order to coordinate Federal assistance to 
Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Areas, the Administrator shall 
establish an Interagency Gang Prevention Task Force (in this subtitle 
referred to as the ``Task Force''), consisting of a representative 
from--
            (1) the Department of Justice;
            (2) the Department of Education;
            (3) the Department of Labor;
            (4) the Department of Health and Human Services; and
            (5) the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    (b) Coordination.--For each Comprehensive Gang Prevention and 
Relief Area designated by the Administrator under section 502, the Task 
Force shall--
            (1) coordinate the activities of the Federal Government to 
        create a comprehensive gang prevention response, focusing on 
        youth through early childhood intervention, at-risk youth 
        intervention, literacy, employment, community policing, and 
        comprehensive community-based programs such as Weed and Seed, 
        Operation Cease Fire, and Homeboy Industries; and
            (2) coordinate such comprehensive gang prevention response 
        with local and regional gang prevention efforts, including 
        PROMISE Coordinating Councils and PROMISE Plans (where such 
        Plans are established).
    (c) Programs.--The Task Force shall prioritize the needs of 
Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Areas for funding under--
            (1) the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act of 1990 
        (42 U.S.C. 9858 et seq.);
            (2) the Even Start programs under subpart 3 of part B of 
        title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
        (20 U.S.C. 6381 et seq.);
            (3) the Healthy Start Initiative under section 330H of the 
        Public Health Services Act (42 U.S.C. 254c-8);
            (4) the Head Start Act (42 U.S.C. 9831 et seq.);
            (5) the 21st Century Community Learning Centers program 
        under part B of title IV of the Elementary and Secondary 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7171 et seq.);
            (6) the Job Corps program under subtitle C of title I of 
        the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (29 U.S.C. 2881 et seq.);
            (7) the community development block grant program under 
        title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 
        (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.);
            (8) the Gang Resistance Education and Training projects 
        under subtitle X of title III of the Violent Crime Control and 
        Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 13921);
            (9) any program administered by the Office of Community 
        Oriented Policing Services;
            (10) the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant program under 
        part R of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets 
        Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3796ee et seq.);
            (11) the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant 
        Program under subpart 1 of part E of title I of the Omnibus 
        Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3750 et 
        seq.); and
            (12) any other program that the Task Force determines to be 
        appropriate.
    (d) Reporting Requirements.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than February 1 of each year, 
        the Task Force shall submit to Congress and the Administrator a 
        report on the funding needs and programmatic outcomes for each 
        area designated as a Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief 
        Area.
            (2) Contents.--Each report under paragraph (1) shall 
        include--
                    (A) an evidence-based analysis of the best 
                practices and outcomes among the areas designated as 
                Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Areas; and
                    (B) an analysis of the adequacy of Federal funding 
                to meet the needs of each area designated as a 
                Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief Area and, if 
                the Task Force identifies any programmatic shortfalls 
                in addressing gang prevention, a request for new 
                funding or reprogramming of existing funds to meet such 
                shortfalls.

SEC. 504. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
necessary to carry out the purposes of this subtitle, including any 
needs identified by the Task Force as necessary to carry out this 
subtitle.

             Subtitle B--Community and Police Collaboration

SEC. 511. GANG PREVENTION GRANTS.

    (a) Authority To Make Grants.--The Office of Community Oriented 
Policing Services of the Department of Justice may make grants, in 
accordance with such rules and regulations as the Director may 
prescribe, to units of local government and Indian Tribes with a 
PROMISE Coordinating Council (established in accordance with subtitle A 
of title II of this Act) to enable such PROMISE Coordinating Council to 
develop community-based programs that provide crime prevention, 
research, and intervention services that are designed to prevent 
violence and gang involvement by youthful offenders and at-risk youth.
    (b) Use of Grant Amounts.--A grant under this section may be used 
(including through subgrants) for--
            (1) preventing initial gang recruitment and involvement 
        among younger teenagers;
            (2) preventing violence and gang involvement through 
        nonviolent and constructive activities, such as community 
        service programs, development of nonviolent conflict resolution 
        skills, restorative justice programs, employment and legal 
        assistance, family counseling, and other safe, community-based 
        alternatives for crime-involved or high-risk youth;
            (3) developing in-school and after-school gang safety, 
        control, education, and resistance procedures and programs;
            (4) identifying (and disaggregating by race, ethnicity, and 
        gender, where applicable) and addressing early childhood risk 
        factors for violence and gang involvement, including parent 
        training and childhood skills development;
            (5) identifying (and disaggregating by race, ethnicity, and 
        gender, where applicable) and fostering protective factors that 
        buffer children and adolescents from violence, crime, and gang 
        involvement;
            (6) developing and identifying investigative programs 
        designed to deter gang recruitment, involvement, and activities 
        through effective intelligence gathering;
            (7) developing programs and youth centers for first-time, 
        non-violent offenders facing alternative penalties, such as 
        mandated participation in community service, restitution, 
        mentoring, counseling, job training, and education and 
        prevention programs;
            (8) implementing multidisciplinary approaches to combat 
        youth violence and gang involvement through coordinated 
        programs operated by law enforcement and other public, private, 
        and faith-based community organizations for prevention and 
        intervention (including street outreach programs and other 
        peacemaking activities) or coordinated law enforcement 
        activities (including crime mapping strategies that enhance 
        focused crime prevention, intervention, and reintegration 
        strategies for offender reentry); or
            (9) identifying at-risk and high-risk students through home 
        visits organized through joint collaborations between law 
        enforcement, faith-based organizations, schools, health and 
        mental health providers, other community based organizations, 
        and social workers.
    (c) Maximum Grant.--The amount of a grant under this section may 
not exceed $1,000,000.
    (d) Annual Report.--Each recipient of a grant under this section 
shall submit to the Director, for each year in which funds from a grant 
received under this section are expended, a report containing--
            (1) a summary of the activities carried out with grant 
        funds during that year;
            (2) an assessment of the effectiveness of the crime 
        prevention, research, and intervention activities of the 
        recipient, based on data collected by the grant recipient;
            (3) a strategic plan for the year following the year 
        described in paragraph (1);
            (4) evidence of consultation and cooperation with local, 
        State, or Federal law enforcement or, if the grant recipient is 
        a government entity, evidence of consultation with an 
        organization engaged in any activity described in subsection 
        (b); and
            (5) such other information as the Director may require.
    (e) Definition.--In this section, the term ``units of local 
government'' includes sheriffs' departments, police departments, and 
local prosecutor offices.
    (f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated for grants under this section $35,000,000 for each of the 
fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

                Subtitle C--City Youth Violence Recovery

SEC. 521. GRANTS TO PREVENT OR ALLEVIATE THE EFFECTS OF YOUTH VIOLENCE.

    (a) Grants.--The Attorney General, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services, may award grants to eligible 
entities to prevent or alleviate the effects of youth violence in 
eligible urban communities by providing violence-prevention education, 
mentoring, counseling, and mental health services to children and 
adolescents in such communities.
    (b) Priority.--In awarding grants under this section, the Attorney 
General shall give priority to applicants that agree to use the grant 
in one or more eligible urban communities that lack the monetary or 
other resources to address youth violence.
    (c) Limitation.--The Attorney General may not make a grant to an 
eligible entity under this section unless the entity agrees to use not 
more than 15 percent of the funds provided through the grant for 
violence-prevention education.
    (d) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) The term ``eligible entity'' means a partnership 
        between a State mental health authority and one or more local 
        public or private providers, such as a local agency, State 
        agency, educational institution, or nonprofit or for-profit 
        organization.
            (2) The term ``eligible urban community'' means an urban 
        community with a high or increasing incidence of youth 
        violence.
    (e) Authorization of Appropriations.--To carry out this section, 
there is authorized to be appropriated $10,000,000 for each of fiscal 
years 2010 through 2014.

                        TITLE VI--PRECAUTION ACT

SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``Prevention Resources for 
Eliminating Criminal Activity Using Tailored Interventions in Our 
Neighborhoods Act of 2009'', or the ``PRECAUTION Act of 2009''.

SEC. 602. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of this title are to--
            (1) establish a commitment on the part of the Federal 
        Government to provide leadership on effective and culturally-
        appropriate crime prevention and intervention strategies, 
        including strategies that are responsive to gender-specific 
        needs;
            (2) further the integration of crime prevention and 
        intervention strategies into traditional law enforcement 
        practices of State and local law enforcement offices around the 
        country;
            (3) develop a plain-language, implementation-focused 
        assessment of those current crime and delinquency prevention 
        and intervention strategies that are supported by rigorous 
        evidence;
            (4) provide additional resources to the National Institute 
        of Justice to administer research and development grants for 
        promising crime prevention and intervention strategies;
            (5) develop recommendations for Federal priorities for 
        crime and delinquency prevention and intervention research, 
        development, and funding that may augment important Federal 
        grant programs, including the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice 
        Assistance Grant Program under subpart 1 of part E of title I 
        of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 
        U.S.C. 3750 et seq.), grant programs administered by the Office 
        of Community Oriented Policing Services of the Department of 
        Justice, grant programs administered by the Office of Safe and 
        Drug-Free Schools of the Department of Education, and other 
        similar programs; and
            (6) reduce the costs that rising violent crime imposes on 
        interstate commerce.

SEC. 603. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title, the following definitions shall apply:
            (1) Commission.--The term ``Commission'' means the National 
        Commission on Public Safety Through Crime Prevention 
        established under section 604(a).
            (2) Rigorous evidence.--The term ``rigorous evidence'' 
        means evidence generated by scientifically valid forms of 
        outcome evaluation, particularly randomized trials (where 
        practicable).
            (3) Subcategory.--The term ``subcategory'' means 1 of the 
        following categories:
                    (A) Family and community settings (including public 
                health-based strategies).
                    (B) Law enforcement settings (including probation-
                based strategies).
                    (C) School settings (including anti-gang and 
                general anti-violence strategies).
            (4) Top-tier.--The term ``top-tier'' means any strategy 
        supported by rigorous evidence of the sizable, sustained 
        benefits to participants in the strategy or to society.

SEC. 604. NATIONAL COMMISSION ON PUBLIC SAFETY THROUGH CRIME AND 
                    DELINQUENCY PREVENTION.

    (a) Establishment.--There is established a commission to be known 
as the National Commission on Public Safety Through Crime and 
Delinquency Prevention.
    (b) Members.--
            (1) In general.--The Commission shall be composed of 9 
        members, of whom--
                    (A) 3 shall be appointed by the President;
                    (B) 2 shall be appointed by the Speaker of the 
                House of Representatives, unless the Speaker is of the 
                same party as the President, in which case 1 shall be 
                appointed by the Speaker of the House of 
                Representatives and 1 shall be appointed by the 
                minority leader of the House of Representatives;
                    (C) 1 shall be appointed by the minority leader of 
                the House of Representatives (in addition to any 
                appointment made under subparagraph (B));
                    (D) 2 shall be appointed by the majority leader of 
                the Senate, unless the majority leader is of the same 
                party as the President, in which case 1 shall be 
                appointed by the majority leader of the Senate and 1 
                shall be appointed by the minority leader of the 
                Senate; and
                    (E) 1 member appointed by the minority leader of 
                the Senate (in addition to any appointment made under 
                subparagraph (D)).
            (2) Persons eligible.--
                    (A) In general.--Each member of the Commission 
                shall be an individual who has knowledge or expertise 
                in matters to be studied by the Commission.
                    (B) Required representatives.--At least--
                            (i) 2 members of the Commission shall be 
                        social scientists with experience implementing 
                        or interpreting rigorous, outcome-based trials;
                            (ii) 2 members of the Commission shall be 
                        law enforcement practitioners; and
                            (iii) 2 members of the Commission shall be 
                        youth delinquency prevention or intervention 
                        practitioners.
            (3) Consultation required.--The President, the Speaker of 
        the House of Representatives, the minority leader of the House 
        of Representatives, and the majority leader and minority leader 
        of the Senate shall consult prior to the appointment of the 
        members of the Commission to achieve, to the maximum extent 
        possible, fair and equitable representation of various points 
        of view with respect to the matters to be studied by the 
        Commission.
            (4) Term.--Each member shall be appointed for the life of 
        the Commission.
            (5) Time for initial appointments.--The appointment of the 
        members shall be made not later than 60 days after the date of 
        enactment of this Act.
            (6) Vacancies.--A vacancy in the Commission shall be filled 
        in the manner in which the original appointment was made, and 
        shall be made not later than 60 days after the date on which 
        the vacancy occurred.
    (c) Operation.--
            (1) Chairperson.--At the initial meeting of the Commission, 
        the members of the Commission shall elect a chairperson from 
        among its voting members, by a vote of \2/3\ of the members of 
        the Commission. The chairperson shall retain this position for 
        the life of the Commission. If the chairperson leaves the 
        Commission, a new chairperson shall be selected, by a vote of 
        \2/3\ of the members of the Commission.
            (2) Meetings.--The Commission shall meet at the call of the 
        chairperson. The initial meeting of the Commission shall take 
        place not later than 30 days after the date on which all the 
        members of the Commission have been appointed.
            (3) Quorum.--A majority of the members of the Commission 
        shall constitute a quorum to conduct business, and the 
        Commission may establish a lesser quorum for conducting 
        hearings scheduled by the Commission.
            (4) Rules.--The Commission may establish by majority vote 
        any other rules for the conduct of Commission business, if such 
        rules are not inconsistent with this title or other applicable 
        law.
    (d) Public Hearings.--
            (1) In general.--The Commission shall hold public hearings. 
        The Commission may hold such hearings, sit and act at such 
        times and places, take such testimony, and receive such 
        evidence as the Commission considers advisable to carry out its 
        duties under this section.
            (2) Focus of hearings.--The Commission shall hold at least 
        3 separate public hearings, each of which shall focus on 1 of 
        the subcategories.
            (3) Witness expenses.--Witnesses requested to appear before 
        the Commission shall be paid the same fees as are paid to 
        witnesses under section 1821 of title 28, United States Code. 
        The per diem and mileage allowances for witnesses shall be paid 
        from funds appropriated to the Commission.
    (e) Comprehensive Study of Evidence-based Crime and Delinquency 
Prevention and Intervention Strategies.--
            (1) In general.--The Commission shall carry out a 
        comprehensive study of the effectiveness of crime and 
        delinquency prevention and intervention strategies, organized 
        around the 3 subcategories.
            (2) Matters included.--The study under paragraph (1) shall 
        include--
                    (A) a review of research on the general 
                effectiveness of incorporating crime and delinquency 
                prevention and intervention strategies into an overall 
                law enforcement plan;
                    (B) an evaluation of how to more effectively 
                communicate the wealth of social science research to 
                practitioners;
                    (C) a review of evidence regarding the 
                effectiveness of specific crime prevention and 
                intervention strategies, focusing on those strategies 
                supported by rigorous evidence;
                    (D) an identification of--
                            (i) promising areas for further research 
                        and development; and
                            (ii) other areas representing gaps in the 
                        body of knowledge that would benefit from 
                        additional research and development;
                    (E) an assessment of the best practices for 
                implementing prevention and intervention strategies;
                    (F) an assessment of the best practices for 
                gathering rigorous evidence regarding the 
                implementation of intervention and prevention 
                strategies; and
                    (G) an assessment of those top-tier strategies best 
                suited for duplication efforts in a range of settings 
                across the country.
            (3) Initial report on top-tier crime and delinquency 
        prevention and intervention strategies.--
                    (A) Distribution.--Not later than 18 months after 
                the date on which all members of the Commission have 
                been appointed, the Commission shall submit a public 
                report on the study carried out under this subsection 
                to--
                            (i) the President;
                            (ii) Congress;
                            (iii) the Attorney General;
                            (iv) the Chief Federal Public Defender of 
                        each district;
                            (v) the chief executive of each State;
                            (vi) the Director of the Administrative 
                        Office of the Courts of each State;
                            (vii) the Director of the Administrative 
                        Office of the United States Courts; and
                            (viii) the attorney general of each State.
                    (B) Contents.--The report under subparagraph (A) 
                shall include--
                            (i) the findings and conclusions of the 
                        Commission;
                            (ii) a summary of the top-tier strategies, 
                        including--
                                    (I) a review of the rigorous 
                                evidence supporting the designation of 
                                each strategy as top-tier;
                                    (II) a brief outline of the keys to 
                                successful implementation for each 
                                strategy; and
                                    (III) a list of references and 
                                other information on where further 
                                information on each strategy can be 
                                found;
                            (iii) recommended protocols for 
                        implementing crime and delinquency prevention 
                        and intervention strategies generally;
                            (iv) recommended protocols for evaluating 
                        the effectiveness of crime and delinquency 
                        prevention and intervention strategies; and
                            (v) a summary of the materials relied upon 
                        by the Commission in preparation of the report.
                    (C) Consultation with outside authorities.--In 
                developing the recommended protocols for implementation 
                and rigorous evaluation of top-tier crime and 
                delinquency prevention and intervention strategies 
                under this paragraph, the Commission shall consult with 
                the Committee on Law and Justice at the National 
                Academy of Science and with national associations 
                representing the law enforcement, social science, and 
                juvenile justice professions, including the National 
                Sheriffs' Association, the Police Executive Research 
                Forum, the International Association of Chiefs of 
                Police, the Consortium of Social Science Associations, 
                and the American Society of Criminology.
    (f) Recommendations Regarding Dissemination of the Innovative Crime 
and Delinquency Prevention and Intervention Strategy Grants.--
            (1) Submission.--
                    (A) In general.--Not later than 30 days after the 
                date of the final hearing under subsection (d) relating 
                to a subcategory, the Commission shall provide the 
                Director of the National Institute of Justice with 
                recommendations on qualifying considerations relating 
                to that subcategory for selecting grant recipients 
                under section 605.
                    (B) Deadline.--Not later than 13 months after the 
                date on which all members of the Commission have been 
                appointed, the Commission shall provide all 
                recommendations required under this subsection.
            (2) Matters included.--The recommendations provided under 
        paragraph (1) shall include recommendations relating to--
                    (A) the types of strategies for the applicable 
                subcategory that would best benefit from additional 
                research and development;
                    (B) any geographic or demographic targets;
                    (C) the types of partnerships with other public or 
                private entities that might be pertinent and 
                prioritized; and
                    (D) any classes of crime and delinquency prevention 
                and intervention strategies that should not be given 
                priority because of a pre-existing base of knowledge 
                that would benefit less from additional research and 
                development.
    (g) Final Report on the Results of the Innovative Crime and 
Delinquency Prevention and Intervention Strategy Grants.--
            (1) In general.--Following the close of the 3-year 
        implementation period for each grant recipient under section 
        605, the Commission shall collect the results of the study of 
        the effectiveness of that grant under section 605(b)(3) and 
        shall submit a public report to the President, the Attorney 
        General, Congress, the chief executive of each State, and the 
        attorney general of each State describing each strategy funded 
        under section 605 and its results. This report shall be 
        submitted not later than 5 years after the date of the 
        selection of the chairperson of the Commission.
            (2) Collection of information and evidence regarding grant 
        recipients.--The Commission's collection of information and 
        evidence regarding each grant recipient under section 605 shall 
        be carried out by--
                    (A) ongoing communications with the National 
                Institute of Justice;
                    (B) a review of the data generated by the study 
                monitoring the effectiveness of the strategy; and
                    (C) other means as necessary.
            (3) Matters included.--The report submitted under paragraph 
        (1) shall include a review of each strategy carried out with a 
        grant under section 605, detailing--
                    (A) the type of crime or delinquency prevention or 
                intervention strategy;
                    (B) where the activities under the strategy were 
                carried out, including geographic and demographic 
                targets;
                    (C) any partnerships with public or private 
                entities through the course of the grant period;
                    (D) the type and design of the effectiveness study 
                conducted under section 605(b)(3) for that strategy;
                    (E) the results of the effectiveness study 
                conducted under section 605(b)(3) for that strategy;
                    (F) lessons learned regarding implementation of 
                that strategy or of the effectiveness study conducted 
                under section 605(b)(3), including recommendations 
                regarding which types of environments might best be 
                suited for successful replication; and
                    (G) recommendations regarding the need for further 
                research and development of the strategy.
    (h) Personnel Matters.--
            (1) Travel expenses.--The members of the Commission shall 
        be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
        subsistence, at rates authorized for employees of agencies 
        under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, United States 
        Code, while away from their homes or regular places of business 
        in the performance of service for the Commission.
            (2) Compensation of members.--Members of the Commission 
        shall serve without compensation.
            (3) Staff.--
                    (A) In general.--The chairperson of the Commission 
                may, without regard to the civil service laws, rules, 
                and regulations, appoint and terminate an executive 
                director and such other additional personnel as may be 
                necessary to enable the Commission to perform its 
                duties. The employment of an executive director shall 
                be subject to confirmation by the Commission.
                    (B) Compensation.--The chairperson of the 
                Commission may fix the compensation of the executive 
                director and other personnel without regard to the 
                provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 
                53 of title 5, United States Code, relating to 
                classification of positions and General Schedule pay 
                rates, except that the rate of pay for the executive 
                director and other personnel may not exceed the rate 
                payable for level V of the Executive Schedule under 
                section 5316 of such title.
            (4) Detail of federal employees.--With the affirmative vote 
        of \2/3\ of the members of the Commission, any Federal 
        Government employee, with the approval of the head of the 
        appropriate Federal agency, may be detailed to the Commission 
        without reimbursement, and such detail shall be without 
        interruption or loss of civil service status, benefits, or 
        privileges.
    (i) Contracts for Research.--
            (1) National institute of justice.--With a \2/3\ 
        affirmative vote of the members of the Commission, the 
        Commission may select nongovernmental researchers and experts 
        to assist the Commission in carrying out its duties under this 
        title. The National Institute of Justice may contract with the 
        researchers and experts selected by the Commission to provide 
        funding in exchange for their services.
            (2) Other organizations.--Nothing in this subsection shall 
        be construed to limit the ability of the Commission to enter 
        into contracts with other entities or organizations for 
        research necessary to carry out the duties of the Commission 
        under this section.
    (j) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated $5,000,000 to carry out this section.
    (k) Termination.--The Commission shall terminate on the date that 
is 30 days after the date on which the Commission submits the last 
report required by this section.

SEC. 605. INNOVATIVE CRIME AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION AND INTERVENTION 
                    STRATEGY GRANTS.

    (a) Grants Authorized.--The Director of the National Institute of 
Justice may make grants to public and private entities to fund the 
implementation and evaluation of innovative crime or delinquency 
prevention or intervention strategies. The purpose of grants under this 
section shall be to provide funds for all expenses related to the 
implementation of such a strategy and to conduct a rigorous study on 
the effectiveness of that strategy.
    (b) Grant Distribution.--
            (1) Period.--A grant under this section shall be made for a 
        period of not more than 3 years.
            (2) Amount.--The amount of each grant under this section--
                    (A) shall be sufficient to ensure that rigorous 
                evaluations may be performed; and
                    (B) shall not exceed $2,000,000.
            (3) Evaluation set-aside.--
                    (A) In general.--A grantee shall use not less than 
                $300,000 and not more than $700,000 of the funds from a 
                grant under this section for a rigorous study of the 
                effectiveness of the strategy during the 3-year period 
                of the grant for that strategy, including outcome 
                measures disaggregated by race, ethnicity, and gender.
                    (B) Methodology of study.--Each study conducted 
                under subparagraph (A) shall use an evaluator and a 
                study design approved by the National Institute of 
                Justice. Approval of such an evaluator and study design 
                shall be required before a grant is awarded to an 
                entity under this section.
            (4) Date of award.--Not later than 6 months after the date 
        of receiving recommendations relating to a subcategory from the 
        Commission under section 604(f), the Director of the National 
        Institute of Justice shall award all grants under this section 
        relating to that subcategory.
            (5) Type of grants.--One-third of the grants made under 
        this section shall be made in each subcategory. In distributing 
        grants, the recommendations of the Commission under section 
        604(f) shall be considered.
            (6) Authorization of appropriations.--There are authorized 
        to be appropriated $18,000,000 to carry out this subsection.
    (c) Applications.--A public or private entity desiring a grant 
under this section shall submit an application at such time, in such 
manner, and accompanied by such information as the Director of the 
National Institute of Justice may reasonably require.

         TITLE VII--ADDITIONAL IMPROVEMENTS TO JUVENILE JUSTICE

SEC. 701. YOUTH VICTIM AND WITNESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.

    (a) In General.--Section 31702(5) of the Violent Crime Control and 
Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 13862(5)) is amended by 
inserting ``, including juvenile witness and victim protection 
programs,'' after ``victim protection programs''.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--Section 31707 of the Violent 
Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (42 U.S.C. 13867) is 
amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 31707. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    ``There are authorized to be appropriated $5,000,000 for each of 
the fiscal years 2010 through 2014 to carry out this subtitle.''.

SEC. 702. EXPANSION AND REAUTHORIZATION OF THE MENTORING INITIATIVE FOR 
                    SYSTEM-INVOLVED YOUTH.

    (a) Expansion.--Section 261(a) of the Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5665(a)) is amended by 
adding at the end the following: ``Within 6 months of the date of 
enactment of the Youth PROMISE Act, the Administrator shall expand the 
number of sites receiving such grants from 4 to 12.''.
    (b) Authorization of Program.--Section 299(c) of the Juvenile 
Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5671(c)) is 
amended--
            (1) by striking ``There are authorized'' and inserting the 
        following:
            ``(1) In general.--There are authorized''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following:
            ``(2) Authorization of appropriations for mentoring 
        initiative.--There are authorized to be appropriated to carry 
        out the Mentoring Initiative for System-Involved Youth Program 
        under part E $4,800,000 for each of fiscal years 2010 through 
        2014.''.

SEC. 703. STUDY ON ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT AND SENTENCES IN THE FEDERAL 
                    SYSTEM.

    (a) In General.--The United States Sentencing Commission shall 
conduct a study to examine the appropriateness of sentences for minors 
in the Federal system.
    (b) Contents.--The study conducted under subsection (a) shall--
            (1) incorporate the most recent research and expertise in 
        the field of adolescent brain development and culpability;
            (2) evaluate the toll of juvenile crime, particularly 
        violent juvenile crime, on communities;
            (3) consider the appropriateness of life sentences without 
        possibility for parole for minor offenders in the Federal 
        system; and
            (4) evaluate issues of recidivism by juveniles who are 
        released from prison or detention after serving determinate 
        sentences.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of 
this Act, the United States Sentencing Commission shall submit to 
Congress a report regarding the study conducted under subsection (a), 
which shall--
            (1) include the findings of the Commission;
            (2) describe significant cases reviewed as part of the 
        study; and
            (3) make recommendations, if any.
    (d) Revision of Guidelines.--If determined appropriate by the 
United States Sentencing Commission after completing the study under 
subsection (a), the Commission may, pursuant to its authority under 
section 994 of title 28, United States Code, establish or revise 
guidelines and policy statements, as warranted, relating to the 
sentencing of minors.

SEC. 704. PARTNERSHIPS WITH PROFESSIONAL ATHLETIC LEAGUES.

    (a) In General.--The Attorney General may establish a program to 
provide for a youth initiative to end youth violence and other youth 
crime in collaboration with professional sports leagues and players in 
the United States, which may include the National Football League, 
National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, Major League 
Soccer, and other professional sports organizations.
    (b) Study.--
            (1) In general.--To the extent that the program under 
        subsection (a) is established, not later than 1 year after the 
        date of the enactment of this Act, the Attorney General shall 
        conduct a study of the potential for reducing youth violence 
        and other youth crime through collaborations with professional 
        sports organizations and players in the United States, such as 
        the National Football League, National Basketball Association, 
        Major League Baseball, and Major League Soccer.
            (2) Contents.--The study conducted under paragraph (1) 
        shall--
                    (A) identify and describe all efforts undertaken by 
                professional sports organizations and players in the 
                United States to reduce youth crime; and
                    (B) include a description of the progress of these 
                efforts in achieving the goal of reducing youth 
                violence and other youth crime.
    (c) Report.--In the case a study is conducted under subsection (b), 
not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
Attorney General shall submit to Congress a report on such study, which 
shall--
            (1) include the findings of the Attorney General;
            (2) describe significant programs reviewed as part of the 
        study; and
            (3) make recommendations, if any.

                          Purpose and Summary

    H.R. 1064, the Youth Prison Reduction through Opportunity, 
Mentoring, Intervention, Support and Education Act (``Youth 
PROMISE Act'') is designed to prevent youth violence, 
delinquency, and street gang crime, and to redirect youth 
already involved in the juvenile or criminal justice systems 
toward law-abiding and productive lives.
    H.R. 1064 will provide Federal support for evidence-based 
and promising programs\1\ that work to prevent the involvement 
of at-risk youth in juvenile delinquency or criminal street 
gang activity, and that provide positive alternatives for youth 
who have become involved in juvenile delinquency or criminal 
street gang activity. Rejecting ``one size fits all'' 
approaches that funnel more youth into the juvenile and 
criminal justice systems, the Youth PROMISE Act supports 
evidence-based and promising local community efforts to prevent 
youth from entering the justice system in the first place.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\The terms ``evidence-based'' and ``promising'' are widely used 
in the research relating to crime prevention and intervention 
strategies. Both terms are defined in the bill. In general, an 
evidence-based strategy or practice has shown statistically significant 
juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity reduction 
outcomes based on experimental trial, in which participants are 
randomly chosen, or quasi-experimental trial, in which participants are 
compared to a control group. A promising strategy is one that is not 
yet evidence-based, but that has been demonstrated to reduce juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity, and for which a study is 
being conducted to determine if it is evidence-based.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Under the Youth PROMISE Act, communities facing the 
greatest youth gang and crime challenges come together and form 
a local PROMISE Coordinating Council. This council consists of 
stakeholders within the juvenile and criminal justice systems, 
including law enforcement leaders and practitioners, educators 
and representatives from the school system, community-based and 
social service organizations, faith-based organizations, health 
and mental health providers, court services, prosecutors and 
public defenders, and housing officials. Once formed, the 
council is charged with developing a comprehensive plan for 
implementing evidence-based and promising prevention and 
intervention strategies. These strategies are geared toward 
young people who are at risk of becoming involved in, or who 
are already involved in, gangs or the criminal justice system, 
and operate to redirect youth toward productive and law-abiding 
alternatives.
    The Youth PROMISE Act also promotes effective law 
enforcement techniques through Youth Oriented Policing Services 
(``YOPS''). YOPS provides training, hiring and support for 
officers to implement strategic and age-appropriate community-
based activities that are designed to minimize youth crime and 
victimization and reduce the long-term involvement of youth in 
the juvenile and criminal justice systems. The Act also 
provides for thorough evaluation and analysis of the reductions 
in incarceration and criminal justice costs and other financial 
savings resulting from the investment in prevention and 
intervention.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\Extensive background information relating to the bill is 
available at 
http://www.bobbyscott.house.gov/ypa.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                Background and Need for the Legislation

    The problems of youth violence and gang crime have taken a 
toll on communities throughout the country. The impact is 
particularly felt by residents of our most distressed and 
impoverished communities. Such crime forces families to live in 
fear, and destroys the lives of many young people.
    National experts in a variety of fields have called on 
Congress to adopt legislation to prevent and address the issues 
of gangs and youth violence. Extensive research on youth 
violence, child development, and education reveals that 
evidence-based and promising education and community-based 
prevention and intervention strategies can prevent and curtail 
youth crime, and redirect young people away from gang 
involvement toward productive participation in society.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\See generally, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, A Road Map for 
Juvenile Justice Reform (cataloguing research and best practices of 
``what works'' in juvenile justice reform): 
http://www.aecf.org/ /media/PublicationFiles/
AEC180essay_booklet_MECH.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Experts around the country have argued that to prevent and 
reduce violent crime, policymakers must support community-based 
strategies that can reach all young people, especially those 
who are disconnected from school, work, and family, and those 
who are from distressed and impoverished neighborhoods.\4\ 
These researchers and experts have developed a substantial body 
of knowledge that further establishes that such strategies can 
prevent violence and crime in a cost-effective manner.\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\See, e.g., New Evidence on the Monetary Value of Saving a High 
Risk Youth, Mark A. Cohen, Vanderbilt University and University of York 
(U.K.) and Alex R. Piquero, John Jay College of Criminal Justice & City 
University of New York Graduate Center, December 2007.
    \5\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                               BACKGROUND

    Despite the wealth of research on the effectiveness of 
evidence-based and promising prevention and intervention 
strategies in preventing and reducing crime, for decades we 
have moved away from prevention techniques as too many elected 
officials simply supported ``tough on crime'' punitive policies 
that translated into expanded police and prosecutorial power. 
This punitive approach generally yields more arrests, more 
trials, and more incarceration, but without reducing crime 
commensurately.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\See Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, No 
More Children Left Behind Bars, available at: http://
chhi.podconsulting.com/assets/documents/publications/NO MORE CHILDREN 
LEFT BEHIND.pdf (concluding ``Incarceration is a spectacularly 
unsuccessful treatment.'').
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Furthermore, notwithstanding the political appeal of such 
``tough on crime'' policies, research demonstrates that 
choosing enforcement over prevention produces flawed and costly 
policies that often inflict incalculable harm on the very 
communities the policies are intended to protect.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Today in the United States, far too many of our poorer, 
urban communities have staggeringly low high school graduation 
rates, especially for male students of color. At the same time, 
our nation records the highest incarceration rate in the world. 
There are now 2.3 million people behind bars in the United 
States.\8\ Incarceration rates are even higher from poor 
communities and communities of color.\9\ The Children's Defense 
Fund estimates that one in every three Black males born in 2001 
will end up incarcerated at some point in his lifetime, without 
appropriate intervention. The problem is so severe, the 
Children's Defense Fund has launched an entire campaign to 
fight what it refers to as the problem of the ``Cradle to 
Prison Pipeline.''\10\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \8\US Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2009. 
See also One in 100: Behind Bars in America, Pew Center on the States, 
2008, available at http://www.pewcenteronthestates.org/uploadedFiles/
8015PCTS_Prison08_FINA L_2-1-1_FORWEB.
pdf.
    \9\Id.
    \10\See generally http://www.childrensdefense.org/helping-americas-
children/cradle-to-prison-pipeline-campaign/.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The social and economic costs to the nation of such high 
incarceration rates are overwhelming.\11\ According to some 
estimates, we spend 55 billion dollars annually on 
incarceration in the United States.\12\ In contrast, preventing 
young people from joining gangs in the first place is projected 
to save millions of dollars that are currently spent to arrest, 
convict, and imprison them as lawbreakers later.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \11\See Pew Center on the States, http://
www.pewcenteronthestates.org/uploadedFiles/
PSPP_1in31_report_FINAL_WEB_3-26-09.pdf.
    \12\Pew Center on the States, One in 100: Behind Bars in America 
2008, http://www.pewcenteronthestates.org/uploadedFiles/
8015PCTS_Prison08_FINAL_2-1-1_FORWEB.
pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The overly-punitive criminal justice approach in this 
country has contributed to widening racial and ethnic 
disparities in our juvenile and criminal justice systems. It is 
stunningly expensive, and it doesn't work. Significant evidence 
demonstrates that more incarceration will not solve the 
problem.\13\ Indeed, law enforcement officials around the 
country emphasize that we ``cannot arrest our way out of the 
problem'' of youth gang crime.\14\ Law enforcement experts have 
also indicated that there are sufficient Federal sanctions to 
prosecute gang crime and exact severe penalties; the Racketeer 
Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) is a prime 
example.\15\ Rather than calling for additional or duplicative 
sanctions, law enforcement officers have urged Congress to 
provide support for programs in local communities to prevent 
problems from occurring in the first place.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \13\See note 18, infra.
    \14\Willam J. Bratton, Chief of the Los Angeles Police Department, 
emphasized this point on June 11, 2009 in his testimony before the 
Senate Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on Crime and Drugs, hearing 
``Exploring the National Criminal Justice Commission Act of 2009.''
    \15\In Boyle v. United States, 556 U.S. 18 (2009), the United 
States Supreme Court adopted a more expansive interpretation of the 
scope of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, making 
it easier to apply RICO to informal ``Association-in-Fact 
Enterprises.'' The Court held that prosecutors and civil plaintiffs can 
use the statute to pursue an ``association-in-fact enterprise'' without 
needing proof that it has a structure separate from that inherent in 
the pattern of racketeering activity in which it engaged.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    On February 15, 2007, in a hearing before the House 
Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and 
Homeland Security, ``Making Communities Safer: Youth Violence 
and Gang Interventions that Work,'' Paul Logli, then Chairman 
of the National District Attorneys Association, testified 
regarding how he and other prosecutors endeavor to make 
charging decisions and sentencing recommendations taking into 
account the accused's potential to turn his or her life around:

        What helps us make those decisions is if we have 
        available to us programs . . . that give us 
        alternatives, that show us that this person can be put 
        in that anti-truancy program, if we can work with that 
        family to get that person to go to school and to learn 
        how to read and write, and how to develop job skills so 
        that they can get a job. The most important thing for 
        many of these people is to have a job so they can 
        support a family and make their mortgage payments.
          But if we don't have programs that can bring them 
        there, then my job is much tougher. . . . I don't need 
        any more laws. I've got all the criminal laws I need in 
        the State of Illinois. I don't need any more sanctions. 
        The sentences are plenty tough. I have got all the 
        discretion I need.
          What I need is . . . programs on the street that have 
        staying power and that have credibility and that will 
        work with people, that I can refer people to. Because 
        what I do have is the hammer. I have the coercion that 
        might just make that person stick to a program, whether 
        you call it pulling levers or anything else. We make 
        that decision, whether they're worth working with or it 
        is just time to warehouse them. And that is a real loss 
        to society.\16\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \16\Making Communities Safer: Youth Violence and Gang Interventions 
That Work: Hearing Before the Subcomm. on Crime, Terrorism, and 
Homeland Security of the H. Comm. on the Judiciary, 110th Cong. 81 
(2007).

    The U.S. Department of Justice's National Criminal Justice 
Reference Service has also found incarceration does little to 
disrupt the violent activities of gang-affiliated inmates. 
Research reveals that prisons and detention centers can in fact 
strengthen gang affiliations and become a breeding ground for 
potential gang activity.\17\ Insofar as youth in the community 
form gangs for protection and family-like relationships, 
incarcerated youth have an even greater need for protection.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \17\See Judith Greene and Kevin Pranis, Gang Wars: The Failure of 
Enforcement Tactics and the Need for Effective Public Safety 
Strategies, Justice Policy Institute 2007 
http://www.justicepolicy.org/content-hmID=1811&smID;=1581&ssmID;=22.htm.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Despite the overwhelming evidence that incarceration is 
counterproductive, the continued implementation of punitive 
criminal justice policies in this country has increased 
incarceration rates, disproportionately impacting poor youth 
and youth of color. Moreover, these policies exacerbate the 
problem of gang-related crime, funnel into the justice system a 
disproportionate number of youth who have a cognizable mental 
health and/or substance abuse disorder, and make communities 
less safe.\18\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \18\See generally, Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and 
Justice, No More Children Left Behind Bars, http://
chhi.podconsulting.com/assets/documents/publications/NO MORE CHILDREN 
LEFT BEHIND.pdf. A number of other organizations have commissioned or 
conducted related research reaching similar conclusions, including the 
American Psychological Association, the Washington State Institute for 
Public Policy, the Social Development Research Group of Seattle, 
Washington, the Justice Policy Institute, the National Council on Crime 
and Delinquency, and the Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile 
Justice and Delinquency Prevention.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Evidence shows that it is entirely feasible to move 
children away from a ``cradle to prison pipeline'' and onto a 
positive and productive life trajectory.\19\ Extensive research 
indicates that a continuum of evidenced-based and promising 
prevention programs for youth identified as being at risk of 
involvement in delinquent behavior, as well as intervention for 
those already involved, will greatly reduce crime and decrease 
criminal justice and social welfare expenditures.\20\ Experts 
also note these programs are most effective for at-risk youth 
when provided in the context of a coordinated, collaborative 
local strategy involving law enforcement and other local public 
and private entities.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \19\See Smart on Crime: Recommendations for the Next Administration 
and Congress, Juvenile Justice Reforms Chapter, available at http://
2009transition.org/criminaljustice/index.php?
option=com_content&view;=article&id;=24&Itemid;=21.
    \20\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

     EFFECTUATING THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND LAW 
                          ENFORCEMENT EXPERTS

    H.R. 1064 is consistent with the recommendations of 
juvenile and criminal justice and law enforcement experts from 
around the country.
    On June 21 and 22, 2007, Representative Robert C. ``Bobby'' 
Scott (D-VA), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism 
and Homeland Security, hosted a National Crime Policy Summit to 
examine the causes of and solutions to violent crime in the 
United States. More than 50 crime policy makers, researchers, 
practitioners, analysts, and law enforcement officials from 
across the political spectrum gathered to discuss evidence-
based and other promising strategies to prevent and reduce gang 
violence and crime.
    These experts agreed that a sustained investment in 
prevention and intervention is essential to addressing the 
problems of youth violence and criminal street gangs, and 
constitutes smart crime policy.\21\ Research reveals that given 
a strong support structure, and effective prevention and 
intervention services, most young people ``age out'' or desist 
from delinquency and crime when they reach adulthood. For 
example, a report of the U.S. Department of Justice indicates 
that ``gang-membership tends to be short-lived, even among 
high-risk youth . . . with very few youth remaining gang 
members throughout their adolescent years.''\22\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \21\See Smart on Crime: Recommendations for the Next Administration 
and Congress, Juvenile Justice Reforms Chapter, available at http://
2009transition.org/criminaljustice/index.php?
option=com_content&view;=article&id;=24&Itemid;=21.
    \22\Juvenile Offenders and Victims: 2006 National Report, Office of 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Statistical Briefing Book, 
Department of Justice.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    According to top scholars in a variety of fields, including 
economics, educational psychology, and public health, public 
dollars spent on effective prevention and education programs 
are far more effective in stemming violence, curtailing crime 
and delinquency, and discouraging gang affiliation than 
broadening prosecutorial powers or stiffening criminal 
penalties for young people accused of crimes.\23\ Public 
opinion polling studies also reveal that taxpayers 
overwhelmingly favor investing in prevention, education, and 
rehabilitation programs rather than paying for ever-more 
prosecution and incarceration of youthful offenders.\24\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \23\In recent years, a wide range of organizations have 
commissioned or conducted research in this area and reached similar 
conclusions. These organizations include the American Psychological 
Association, the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, the 
Social Development Research Group of Seattle, Washington, the National 
Council on Crime and Delinquency, the Justice Policy Institute, and the 
Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention. For more information, see http://chhi.podconsulting.com/
assets/documents/publications/NO MORE CHILDREN LEFT BEHIND.pdf.
    \24\See Models for Change, Systems Reform In Juvenile Justice, 
Rehabilitation Versus Incarceration of Juvenile Offenders: Public 
Preferences in Four Models for Change States, available at: http://
modelsforchange.net/pdfs/WillingnesstoPayFINAL.pdf; see also National 
Juvenile Justice Network, Polling on Public Attitudes About the 
Treatment of Young Offenders, available at http://
www.pendulumfoundation.com/Polling%20on%20Public%20Attitudes.pdf.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Following the summit, and guided by the recommendations of 
the wide array of experts who testified, Representative Scott 
introduced the Youth PROMISE Act in the 110th Congress. He 
reintroduced the bipartisan bill in the 111th Congress with 
Representative Michael N. Castle (R-DE).

               NATIONAL SUPPORT FOR THE YOUTH PROMISE ACT

    A national coalition of more than 250 local, State, and 
national entities, including juvenile and criminal justice 
organizations, law enforcement organizations, education groups 
and school districts, community-based organizations, faith-
based organizations, cities and city councils around the 
country, local, State and national elected officials, the U.S. 
Conference of Mayors, the National Association of Counties, and 
the National Association of Juvenile and Family Court Judges 
have all endorsed the Youth PROMISE Act and have urged Congress 
to pass it.

The following cities and States have passed formal resolutions 
in support of the Youth PROMISE Act:

  City of Los Angeles, CA
  City of Pasadena, CA
  City of San Francisco, CA
  New Hampshire House of Representatives
  City of East Cleveland, OH
  City of Philadelphia, PA
  City of Pittsburgh, PA
  Santa Fe County, NM
  City of New York, NY
  City of Hampton, VA
  City of Newport News, VA
  City of Norfolk, VA
  City of Portsmouth, VA
  City of Richmond, VA

The following international, national, State and local 
organizations have formally endorsed the Youth PROMISE Act:

International Organizations

  Citizens United for the Rehabilitation of Errants (CURE), 
        International
  Continental Societies, Incorporated
  Covenant House International
  Human Rights Watch
  International Community Corrections Association
  Penal Reform International
  World Vision

National Organizations

  Afterschool Alliance
  Alliance for Children and Families
  American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP)
  American Bar Association
  American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)
  American Correctional Association
  American Council of Chief Defenders
  American Federation of School Administrators, AFL-CIO
  American Federation of Teachers (AFT)
  American Friends Service Committee (AFSC)
  American Jewish Congress
  American Probation and Parole Association
  American Psychological Association
  Asian American Justice Center
  ASPIRA, Inc.
  Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law
  Boy Scouts of America
  Boys and Girls Clubs of America
  Campaign for Youth Justice
  Catholic Charities USA
  Center for Children's Law and Policy
  Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice
  Child Welfare League of America
  Children's Defense Fund
  Coalition for Juvenile Justice
  Coalition on Human Needs
  Correctional Education Association
  Council for Educators of At-Risk and Delinquent Youth
  Council for Opportunity in Education
  Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA)
  Family Justice
  Federal CURE
  First Five Years Fund
  Girls Inc.
  Immigrant Justice Network
  Institute for Community Peace
  Justice Policy Institute
  Juvenile Justice Trainers Association
  Leadership Conference on Civil Rights
  League of Young Voters
  Legal Action Center
  Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service
  Mennonite Central Committee Washington Office
  Mental Health America
  Mexican American Legal Defense & Educational Fund (MALDEF)
  National Advocacy Center of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd
  National African-American Drug Policy Coalition, Inc.
  National Alliance of Black School Educators
  National Alliance to End Homelessness
  National Alliance for Faith and Justice
  National Association for the Advancement of Colored People 
        (NAACP)
  National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice
  National Association of Counties (NACo)
  National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
  National Association of Juvenile Correctional Agencies
  National Association of Secondary School Principals
  National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials (NBC-LEO)
  National Black Police Association
  National Center for Youth Law

National Consortium of TASC (Treatment Accountability for Safer 
Communities) Programs

  National Council for Community Behavioral Health
  National Council of La Raza
  National Council on Crime and Delinquency
  National Council on Educating Black Children
  National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ)
  National Council for Urban (Gang) Peace, Justice and 
        Empowerment
  National Education Association
  National Federation of Families for Children's Mental Health
  National Head Start Association
  National Hire Network
  National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild
  National Juvenile Defender Center
  National Juvenile Detention Association
  National Juvenile Justice Network
  National Network for Youth
  National Organization of Black Law Enforcement (NOBLE)
  National Organization of Concerned Black Men, Inc.
  National Partnership for Juvenile Services
  National Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
  National Trust for the Development of African-American Men
  National Urban League
  National Women's Law Center
  Open Society Policy Center
  The Peace Alliance
  Presbyterian Church (USA), Washington Office
  Prison Legal News
  Prisons Foundation
  Southeast Asia Resource Action Center
  Southern Poverty Law Center
  Students for Sensible Drug Policy
  The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, Law and Policy 
        Section
  The Rebecca Project for Human Rights
  The School Social Work Association of America
  The Sentencing Project
  The Student Peace Alliance
  Therapeutic Communities of America (TCA)
  Time Dollar Youth Court
  TimeBanks USA
  Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations
  United Church of Christ, Justice and Witness Ministries
  United Methodist Church, General Board of Church and Society
  United Neighborhood Centers of America
  U.S. Conference of Mayors
  U.S. Dream Academy
  U.S. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association (USPRA)
  VOICES for America's Children
  W. Haywood Burns Institute
  Washington Office on Latin America
  Youth Law Center
  Youth Matter America

State and Local Organizations

  ACLU of Illinois
  ACLU of North Carolina
  ACLU of Ohio
  Action for Children North Carolina
  Advocates for Children and Youth (MD)
  Alabama Youth Justice Coalition
  Alston Wilkes Society (SC)
  Alturas Mas Altas (CA)
  Archdiocese of Los Angeles, Office of Restorative Justice 
        (CA)
  Asian Law Caucus (CA)
  ATTIC Correctional Services, Inc. (WI)
  Barrios Unidos--Santa Cruz Chapter (CA)
  Barrios Unidos--Virginia Chapter
  CASA of Maryland, Inc.
  Center for Community Alternatives (NY)
  Central American Legal Assistance (NY)
  Chicago Area Project (IL)
  Children's Action Alliance (AZ)
  Children's Campaign, Inc. (FL)
  Citizens for Juvenile Justice (MA)
  City of New York Department of Juvenile Justice
  Columbia Heights Shaw Family Collaborative (DC)
  Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance
  Contra Costa County Public Defender's Office (CA)
  Correctional Association of New York
  Council for Children's Rights (NC)
  DC Alliance of Youth Advocates
  DC NAACP Youth Council
  Delaware Center for Justice
  Equal Justice Initiative (AL)
  Everychild Foundation (CA)
  Facilitating Leadership in Youth (FLY) (DC)
  Faith Communities for Families and Children (CA)
  Families & Allies of Virginia's Youth
  Families & Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children
  Families Moving Forward (CT)
  Florida Public Defender Association, Inc.
  Florida Public Defender, Fourth Judicial Circuit
  Florida Families for Fair Sentences
  Franklin County Public Defender (OH)
  Fusion Partnerships, Inc. (MD)
  Hispanic Urban Minority Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Outreach 
        Program (OH)
  Homies Unidos (CA)
  H.O.P.E., Inc (KS)
  Identity, Inc. (MD)
  The Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence (RI)
  John Howard Association of Illinois
  JustChildren (VA)
  Justice for DC Youth
  Juvenile Court Judges of California
  Juvenile Justice Center of Suffolk University Law School (NY)
  Juvenile Justice Coalition (OH)
  Juvenile Justice Initiative of Illinois
  Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana
  Kansas CURE
  Keeping Our Kids Safe: The Newport News Violence Prevention 
        Network (VA)
  L.A. Unified School District (CA)
  L.A. Youth Justice Coalition (CA)
  Latin American Youth Center (DC)
  Leaders in Community Alternatives, Inc. (CA)
  Life Pieces to Masterpieces, Inc. (DC)
  Law Office of Anthony J. Keber (MA)
  Maryland CURE
  Maryland Department of Juvenile Services
  Maryland Juvenile Justice Coalition
  Maryland Office of the Public Defender
  Mental Health Association in Pennsylvania
  Michigan Council on Crime and Delinquency
  Mid-Atlantic Juvenile Defender Center, Juvenile Law and 
        Policy Clinic, University of Richmond School of Law 
        (VA)
  Midwest Juvenile Defender Center (IL)
  Minnesota Juvenile Justice Coalition
  Mississippi CURE
  Mississippi Youth Justice Project
  New Hampshire Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
  New Jersey Association on Correction
  New Mexico Council on Crime and Delinquency
  New Mexico Criminal Defense Lawyers Association
  Pacific Juvenile Defender Center (CA)
  Parents Who Care Coalition (SD)
  Parents, Youth, Children and Family Training Institute (AL)
  Partnership for Safety and Justice (OR)
  Peace in the Hood (OH)
  Puerto Rico Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
  Public Justice Center (MD)
  PTA of Illinois
  Quad A For KIDS/A Rochester Area Community Foundation 
        Initiative (NY)
  Southern Juvenile Defender Center (AL)
  Texas Criminal Justice Coalition
  The Center for Community Development, Inc. (VA)
  The Fortune Society (NY)
  The Law Offices of Public Defender Bennett H. Brummer
  (Miami-Dade Public Defender's Office) (FL)
  The Pendulum Foundation (CO)
  The Poor People's Alliance, Connecticut Chapter
  San Francisco Youth Commission (CA)
  The S.T.O.P. Family Investment Center at Oakmont North (VA)
  Southern Juvenile Defender Center (AL)
  Southern Poverty Law Center (AL)
  Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth
  UNC Juvenile Justice Clinic, University of North Carolina at 
        Chapel Hill School of Law
  United Church of Christ, Justice and Witness Ministries (OH)
  United in Peace, Inc. (IL)
  Utah Commission on Criminal Justice and Juvenile Justice
  Virginia Coalition for Juvenile Justice
  Virginia Commonwealth University School of Education
  Virginia Commonwealth University Center for School-Community 
        Collaboration
  Virginia CURE
  VOICES for Alabama's Children
  VOICES for Children in Nebraska
  VOICES for Ohio's Children
  Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
  Washington Defender Association
  Washington Defender Association's Immigration Project
  Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (PA)
  Youth Advocacy Project of the Committee for Public Counsel 
        Services (MA)
  Young America Works Public Charter School (DC)

Prominent Elected Officials, Celebrities, and Academics Who 
Have Endorsed the Youth PROMISE Act:

  Casey Affleck, Actor and film director (CA)
  Leroy D. Baca, Sheriff, County of Los Angeles (CA)
  Jason Bateman, television and film actor (CA)
  Carol Oughton Biondi, California Department of Corrections 
        and Rehabilitation, Corrections Standards Authority, 
        Board Member, Child Advocate, Juvenile Justice Expert, 
        Commissioner, Los Angeles County Commission for 
        Children and Families Los Angeles (CA)
  Father Greg Boyle, S.J., Executive Director of Homeboy 
        Industries (CA)
  Jim Brown, NFL Hall of Famer (CA)
  Scott Budnick, Film Producer, Warner Bros, Youth Advocate, 
        Board Member, Los Angeles Conservation Corps (CA)
  Tony Cardenas, Councilmember, Los Angeles City Council (CA)
  Jacqueline Caster, Founder and President, Everychild 
        Foundation (CA)
  Erika Christensen, Actress (CA)
  Baron Davis, NBA player (CA)
  Rob Dyrdek, professional skateboarder, actor, entrepreneur 
        (CA)
  Kathy Eldon, television presenter, magazine editor, 
        journalist, television and film producer
  Flea, musician (CA)
  Tom Hayden, social and political activist and politician (CA)
  Benjamin Jealous, President and Chief Executive Officer, 
        NAACP (CA)
  Anthony Kiedis, vocalist, lyricist (CA)
  Joaquin Phoenix, actor, director, producer, social activist 
        (CA)
  Rain Phoenix, actress, musician, and singer (CA)
  Liv Tyler, actress and model (CA)
  Cash Warren, film producer (CA)
  Robin Wright, Actress (CA)
  The Honorable Toni Harp, Connecticut State Senator
  The Honorable Kelvin Roldan, Connecticut State Representative
  Marian Wright Edelman, Children's Defense Fund (DC)
  Wade Henderson, President, Leadership Conference on Civil and 
        Human Rights (DC)
  Jolanta Juszkiewicz, Ph.D., American University (DC)
  Hilary O. Shelton, NAACP, Washington Bureau Director (DC)
  Troy Vincent, NFL Vice President of Player Development (DC)
  Aaron Kupchik, Ph.D., University of Delaware
  Judge Glenda Hatchett (GA)
  Donna M. Bishop, Northeastern University (MA)
  Charles J. Ogletree, Harvard Law School, Jesse Climenko 
        Professor of Law and Vice Dean for the Clinical 
        Programs, and Founding and Executive Director of the 
        Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice 
        (MA)
  Susan J. Carstens, Psy.D., L.P. Juvenile Specialist, Crystal 
        Police Dept. (MN)
  The Honorable Alice L. Bordsen, North Carolina State 
        Representative
  Cory A. Booker, Mayor, Newark, NJ
  Michael R. Bloomberg, Mayor, New York City
  Maggie Gyllenhaal, Actress (NY)
  Star Jones, lawyer and television personality (NY)
  Russell Wendell Simmons, Chairman, Rush Communications (NY)
  Tony Roshan Samara, George Mason University (VA)
  Earle Williams, Psy.D., Hampton University (VA)

Additional Activities and Support for the Youth PROMISE Act

  A national coalition developed in support of the Youth 
        PROMISE Act, and held regular meetings over the course 
        of 3 years to promote the legislation.
  Film producer Cash Warren, Baron Davis and actress Jessica 
        Alba joined Representatives Scott and Castle on May 6, 
        2009 at the Capitol Visitors Center for a film 
        screening, discussion of the need for youth violence 
        prevention legislation and support for the Youth 
        PROMISE Act. The next day, on May 7, 2009, advocates 
        from across the country came together to promote the 
        Youth PROMISE Act at a national summit and Youth 
        PROMISE Act day on Capitol Hill.
  The Peace Alliance, an alliance of organizers and advocates 
        throughout the United States, adopted the Youth PROMISE 
        Act as a top priority for its legislative agenda, 
        organizing Hill briefings, field hearings, mobilizing 
        celebrity support, and working with Ben and Jerry's to 
        develop a national campaign in support of the Youth 
        PROMISE Act. More about the Peace Alliance's efforts is 
        available on the Campaign website at: http://
        www.youthpromiseaction.org/
  Prominent entertainment, sports and political figures came 
        together to urge support for passage of the Youth 
        PROMISE Act in a ``viral video,'' available at: http://
        www.youtube.com/watch?v=wh3c6ZpGrio
  Supporters of the Youth PROMISE Act and stars from the viral 
        video debuted the video and spoke in support of the 
        Youth PROMISE Act at the Capitol Visitors Center in 
        Washington, D.C. on May 26, 2010.

                                Hearings

    The Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security 
held a hearing on July 15, 2009, on H.R. 1064. Testimony was 
received from Marian Wright Edelman, President and Founder, 
Children's Defense Fund; Deborah Prothrow-Stith, MD, 
Consultant, Spencer Stuart; Leroy D. Baca, Sherriff, Los 
Angeles County; David B. Muhlhausen, Ph.D., Senior Policy 
Analyst, Center for Date Analysis, The Heritage Foundation; and 
Tracy Velazquez, Executive Director, Justice Policy Institute.

                        Committee Consideration

    On October 29, 2009, the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, 
and Homeland Security met in open session and ordered the bill 
H.R. 1064 favorably reported, by voice vote, a quorum being 
present. On December 16, 2009, the full Committee met in open 
session and ordered the bill H.R. 1064 favorably reported with 
an amendment, by a rollcall vote of 17 to 14, a quorum being 
present.

                            Committee Votes

    In compliance with clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, the Committee advises that the 
following rollcall votes occurred during the Committee's 
consideration of H.R. 1064:
    1. Motion to table an appeal of the Chair's ruling that an 
amendment offered by Mr. Forbes to add enhanced criminal 
penalties to the bill was non-germane. Agreed to 16 to 14.

                                                 ROLLCALL NO. 1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Ayes            Nays           Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Conyers, Jr., Chairman......................................              X
Mr. Berman......................................................              X
Mr. Boucher.....................................................
Mr. Nadler......................................................              X
Mr. Scott.......................................................              X
Mr. Watt........................................................              X
Ms. Lofgren.....................................................
Ms. Jackson Lee.................................................              X
Ms. Waters......................................................
Mr. Delahunt....................................................
Mr. Wexler......................................................
Mr. Cohen.......................................................              X
Mr. Johnson.....................................................              X
Mr. Pierluisi...................................................              X
Mr. Quigley.....................................................              X
Ms. Chu.........................................................
Mr. Gutierrez...................................................
Ms. Baldwin.....................................................              X
Mr. Gonzalez....................................................
Mr. Weiner......................................................              X
Mr. Schiff......................................................              X
Ms. Sanchez.....................................................              X
Ms. Wasserman Schultz...........................................              X
Mr. Maffei......................................................              X
Mr. Smith, Ranking Member.......................................                              X
Mr. Sensenbrenner, Jr...........................................
Mr. Coble.......................................................                              X
Mr. Gallegly....................................................                              X
Mr. Goodlatte...................................................                              X
Mr. Lungren.....................................................                              X
Mr. Issa........................................................                              X
Mr. Forbes......................................................                              X
Mr. King........................................................                              X
Mr. Franks......................................................                              X
Mr. Gohmert.....................................................                              X
Mr. Jordan......................................................
Mr. Poe.........................................................                              X
Mr. Chaffetz....................................................                              X
Mr. Rooney......................................................                              X
Mr. Harper......................................................                              X
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
    Total.......................................................             16              14
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    2. Motion to report H.R. 1064 favorably, as amended. Passed 
17 to 14.

                                                 ROLLCALL NO. 2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       Ayes            Nays           Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. Conyers, Jr., Chairman......................................              X
Mr. Berman......................................................              X
Mr. Boucher.....................................................
Mr. Nadler......................................................              X
Mr. Scott.......................................................              X
Mr. Watt........................................................              X
Ms. Lofgren.....................................................
Ms. Jackson Lee.................................................              X
Ms. Waters......................................................
Mr. Delahunt....................................................              X
Mr. Wexler......................................................
Mr. Cohen.......................................................              X
Mr. Johnson.....................................................              X
Mr. Pierluisi...................................................              X
Mr. Quigley.....................................................              X
Ms. Chu.........................................................              X
Mr. Gutierrez...................................................
Ms. Baldwin.....................................................              X
Mr. Gonzalez....................................................
Mr. Weiner......................................................              X
Mr. Schiff......................................................              X
Ms. Sanchez.....................................................              X
Ms. Wasserman Schultz...........................................              X
Mr. Maffei......................................................
Mr. Smith, Ranking Member.......................................                              X
Mr. Sensenbrenner, Jr...........................................
Mr. Coble.......................................................                              X
Mr. Gallegly....................................................                              X
Mr. Goodlatte...................................................
Mr. Lungren.....................................................                              X
Mr. Issa........................................................                              X
Mr. Forbes......................................................                              X
Mr. King........................................................                              X
Mr. Franks......................................................                              X
Mr. Gohmert.....................................................                              X
Mr. Jordan......................................................                              X
Mr. Poe.........................................................                              X
Mr. Chaffetz....................................................                              X
Mr. Rooney......................................................                              X
Mr. Harper......................................................                              X
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
    Total.......................................................             17              14
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee advises that the 
findings and recommendations of the Committee, based on 
oversight activities under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, are incorporated in the 
descriptive portions of this report.

               New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee adopts as its 
own the estimate of new budget authority or tax expenditures or 
revenues contained in the cost estimate prepared by the 
Director of the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to section 
402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

               Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee sets forth, with 
respect to the bill, H.R. 1064, the following estimate and 
comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                  Washington, DC, January 26, 2010.
Hon. John Conyers, Jr., Chairman,
Committee on the Judiciary,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 1064, the ``Youth 
Prison Reduction through Opportunities, Mentoring, 
Intervention, Support, and Education Act.''
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Mark 
Grabowicz.
            Sincerely,
                            Douglas W. Elmendorf, Director.

Enclosure.
H.R. 1064--Youth Prison Reduction through Opportunities, Mentoring, 
        Intervention, Support, and Education Act.

                                SUMMARY

    H.R. 1064 would authorize the appropriation of $886 million 
over the 2010-2014 period, mostly for the Department of Justice 
(DOJ) to make grants to State, local, and tribal governments 
for programs to reduce juvenile delinquency and improve the 
juvenile justice system. In addition, CBO estimates that the 
bill would authorize the appropriation of $300 million annually 
over the 2010-2014 period for DOJ to make Youth Prison 
Reduction through Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, 
Support, and Education (PROMISE) grants to local and tribal 
governments to implement initiatives to reduce juvenile crime.
    Assuming appropriation of the necessary amounts, CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 1064 would cost about $1.9 
billion over the 2010-2015 period and another $500 million in 
subsequent years. Enacting the bill would not affect direct 
spending or revenues.
    This bill contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on State, local, or tribal 
governments.

                ESTIMATED COST TO THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

    The estimated budgetary impact of H.R. 1064 is shown in the 
following table. The costs of this legislation fall within 
budget function 750 (administration of justice).

                                     By Fiscal Year, in Millions of Dollars
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                             2010   2011   2012   2013   2014   2015   2010-2010
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION
PROMISE Grants
  Estimated Authorization Level                               300    300    300    300    300      0     1,500
  Estimated Outlays                                            45    171    240    195    255    264     1,170

Other Programs
  Authorization Level                                         205    168    169    171    173      0       886
  Estimated Outlays                                            20     75    115    146    175    155       686

  Total Changes
    Estimated Authorization Level                             505    468    469    471    473      0     2,386
    Estimated Outlays                                          65    246    355    341    430    419     1,856
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                           BASIS OF ESTIMATE

    H.R. 1064 would authorize the appropriation of $300 million 
in 2010 for grants to local and tribal governments for 
planning, assessing, and developing initiatives to reduce 
juvenile crime (PROMISE assessment and planning grants). In 
addition, the bill would authorize the appropriation of such 
sums as necessary for each year over the 2011-2014 period for 
DOJ grants to local and tribal governments to implement the 
initiatives (PROMISE implementation grants). CBO estimates that 
the implementation grants would require annual funding equal to 
the amount provided by the bill to plan the initiatives--$300 
million per year over the 2011-2014 period.
    In addition, H.R. 1064 would authorize the appropriation of 
specific amounts totaling $886 million over the 2010-2014 
period, mostly for DOJ to make grants to State, local, and 
tribal governments for programs to reduce juvenile delinquency 
and improve the juvenile justice system.
    For this estimate, CBO assumes that H.R. 1064 will be 
enacted during fiscal year 2010. We assume that the authorized 
and estimated amounts will be appropriated near the start of 
each fiscal year (except 2010) and that spending will follow 
the historical spending patterns for those activities. We 
assume that supplemental appropriations for 2010 would be 
enacted.

              INTERGOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE-SECTOR IMPACT

    This bill contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on State, 
local, or tribal governments. Those governments would benefit 
from the authorization of appropriations in this bill for 
grants and technical assistance. Any costs to those governments 
would be incurred voluntarily as conditions of Federal 
assistance.

                         ESTIMATE PREPARED BY:

Federal Costs: Mark Grabowicz; Impact on State, Local, and 
    Tribal Governments: Melissa Merrell; Impact on the Private 
    Sector: Samuel Wice.

                         ESTIMATE APPROVED BY:

Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

                    Performance Goals and Objectives

    The Committee states that pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, H.R. 
1064 will prevent and intervene in juvenile delinquency and 
youth gang violence by providing resources for evidence-based 
and promising programs to help youth lead productive, safe, 
healthy, gang-free, and law-abiding lives.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds the authority for 
this legislation in article I, section 8, clause 1 of the 
Constitution.

                          Advisory on Earmarks

    In accordance with clause 9 of rule XXI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, H.R. 1064 does not contain any 
congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff 
benefits as defined in clause 9 of rule XXI.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis

    The following discussion describes the bill as reported by 
the Committee.
    Sec. 1. Short title. Section 1 sets forth the short title 
of the bill as the ``Youth Prison Reduction through 
Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education 
Act'' or ``Youth PROMISE Act.''
    Sec. 2. Table of Contents. Section 2 sets forth the table 
of contents for the bill. Sec. 3. Definitions. Section 3 of the 
bill defines nine key terms in the bill. Section 3(1) defines 
``Administrator'' as the Administrator of the Office of 
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). Section 
3(2) defines the term ``community'' for the purpose of applying 
for a grant under the Act. Section 3(3) defines ``designated 
geographic area'' in a manner consistent with the United States 
Postal Service. Section 3(4) defines ``evidence-based'' in a 
manner consistent with use of the term by the Department of 
Justice and research experts in the field of juvenile and 
criminal justice. Section 3(5) defines ``intervention'' in a 
manner consistent with use of the term by the Department of 
Justice and experts in the fields of juvenile and criminal 
justice. Section 3(6) defines ``juvenile delinquency and 
criminal street gang activity prevention'' to clarify these 
goals under the Act. Section 3(7) defines ``promising'' in a 
manner consistent with use of the term by the Department of 
Justice and experts in the fields of juvenile and criminal 
justice. Section 3(8) defines ``State'' to include all States, 
the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and 
all islands, territories or possessions of the United States. 
Section 3(9) defines ``youth'' to include all individuals 18 
years of age or younger, and all individuals subject to the 
jurisdiction of the juvenile justice system in any State.
Title I. Federal Coordination of Local and Tribal Juvenile Justice 
        Information and Efforts.
    Sec. 101. Promise Advisory Panel. Section 101 of the bill 
amends section 223 of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention Act of 1974 to create a Federal PROMISE Advisory 
Panel. The Panel is charged with assessing successful evidence-
based and promising practices related to juvenile delinquency 
and criminal street gang activity. The Panel is to assist the 
OJJDP in selecting PROMISE community grantees. The Panel will 
also develop standards for the evaluation of juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention approaches carried out under the PROMISE Act. 
Eighteen months after the Youth PROMISE Act is enacted, and 
annually thereafter, the Panel is to submit a report of its 
findings regarding successful evidence-based and promising 
practices and approaches related to juvenile delinquency and 
criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention to 
Congress.
    Sec. 102. Geographic Assessment of Resource Allocation. 
Section 102 of the bill provides for specific data collection 
in each designated geographic area to assess the needs and 
existing resources for juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
gang activity prevention and intervention. This data will 
inform the strategic geographic allocation of resources 
provided under the Act to the areas with the greatest need for 
assistance.
Title II. PROMISE Grants.
    Sec. 200. Section 200 outlines the purposes of the PROMISE 
grant programs established under Title II of the Act.
            Subtitle A. PROMISE Assessment and Planning Grants.
    Sec. 201. PROMISE Assessment and Planning Grants 
Authorized. Section 201 establishes grants to local and tribal 
communities to assist the PROMISE Coordinating Council in 
assessing the needs and strengths of juvenile delinquency and 
criminal street gang activity prevention and intervention 
resources in the community. Based on that assessment, the 
PROMISE Coordinating Councils then develop plans, which include 
a comprehensive array of evidence-based and promising 
prevention and intervention programs. Each planning grant 
awarded under this section has a maximum 1-year duration, and a 
$300,000 maximum amount.
    Sec. 202. PROMISE Coordinating Councils. Section 202 
establishes the eligibility requirements for the PROMISE 
Coordinating Councils. This section also outlines the 
membership composition of the Councils.
    Sec. 203. Needs and Strengths Assessment. Section 203 
describes the strengths and needs assessment of the community 
resources, which the PROMISE Coordinating Councils will 
conduct. This section also sets parameters for use of the 
information collected under this assessment: the information 
may be used for the sole purpose of developing a PROMISE plan 
in accordance with this subtitle of the Act.
    Sec. 204. PROMISE Plan Components. Section 204 describes 
the PROMISE Plans that the PROMISE Coordinating Councils 
develop under the Act. The Plans are responsive to the needs 
and strengths of the community; they reflect the community's 
linguistic and cultural needs; and they employ approaches that 
have been proven effective in preventing and reducing 
involvement in juvenile delinquency, youth violence and 
criminal street gang activity. The Plans also identify the 
availability of local funds for program implementation; provide 
strategies to improve the delivery of indigent defense, 
especially for groups of youth who are disproportionately 
represented in the juvenile and criminal justice systems; and 
provide training for attorneys and members of the legal system 
who interact with youth in the juvenile justice system. The 
Plan must ensure that the number of youth in the juvenile and 
criminal justice systems does not increase as a result of the 
activities undertaken with the funds provided under this 
subtitle. This section also outlines several voluntary 
components of the PROMISE Plans.
    Sec. 205. Authorization of Appropriations. Section 205 
establishes the authorization for this subtitle and for section 
102 of the bill.
            Subtitle B. PROMISE Implementation Grants.
    Sec. 211. PROMISE Implementation Grants Authorized. Section 
211 establishes grants, which the Administrator of the Office 
of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention will award to 
units of local government and Indian Tribes to assist the 
PROMISE Coordination Councils with the implementation of the 
PROMISE Plans. Each grant awarded under this section has a 
maximum 4-year duration, and a $10,000,000 maximum amount. This 
section also requires the contribution of non-Federal funds to 
implement the activities and programs supported by the grant.
    Sec. 212. PROMISE Implementation Grant Application 
Requirements. This section outlines the required contents for 
the implementation grant applications. The implementation plans 
must describe the activities the grants funds will support, and 
the anticipated outcomes of the investment in such activities. 
The plans also must identify potential criminal justice and 
related cost savings that will be obtained from the prevention 
of juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang activity. 
After identifying the savings to be obtained, the plans must 
describe the reinvestment of those savings in the PROMISE 
Plan's ongoing implementation.
    Sec. 213. Grant Award Guidelines. This section describes 
the selection and distribution of grant awards under this 
subtitle. This section charges the Administrator with ensuring 
that grants are awarded to the areas of greatest need. This 
section also outlines the possibility of a PROMISE 
implementation grant award extension, and a grant award 
renewal.
    Sec. 214. Reports. Section 214 requires implementation 
grant recipients to report to the Administration on an annual 
basis about the funds used to implement the PROMISE plan.
    Sec. 215. Authorization of Appropriations. Section 215 
authorizes the appropriation of such sums as may be necessary 
to carry out this subtitle.
            Subtitle C. General PROMISE Grant Provisions.
    Sec. 221. Non-Supplanting Clause. Section 221 requires that 
a grant recipient under this title may only use the grant to 
supplement, and not supplant, the amount of funds available to 
support youth in the community with respect to juvenile 
delinquency and criminal street gang activity prevention and 
intervention.
    Sec. 222. Grant Application Review Panel. Section 222 
provides for a national evaluation of PROMISE plan programs and 
activities.
Title III. PROMISE Research Centers.
    Sec. 301. Establishment of the National Research Center for 
Proven Juvenile Justice Practices. Section 301 establishes a 
National Research Center for Proven Juvenile Justice Practices. 
This Center will collect and disseminate information to PROMISE 
Coordinating Councils and the public on current research and 
other information about evidence-based and promising practices 
related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street gang 
activity.
    Sec. 302. Grants for Regional Research Proven Practices 
Partnership. Section 302 provides for regional academic 
research partners to assist the PROMISE Coordinating Councils 
in developing their assessments and plans.
Title IV. Youth-Oriented Policing Services.
    Sec. 401. Purpose. This section establishes the purpose of 
Youth-Oriented Policing Services. The purpose is to provide 
funding for youth-oriented community-based law enforcement to 
coordinate with PROMISE Coordinating Councils and other 
community-based organizations to prevent and intervene in the 
involvement of youth in juvenile delinquency and criminal 
street gang activity.
    Sec. 402. Definitions. Section 402 defines ``youth-oriented 
policing service.'' This section also defines ``SARA model,'' 
which is a problem-solving technique used in youth- oriented 
policing services.
    Sec. 403. Grants to State, Local, and Tribal Law 
Enforcement Agencies to Hire and Train Youth-Oriented Policing 
Officers. Section 403 provides that the Director of the Office 
of Community Oriented Policing Services shall award grants for 
the hiring and training of Youth Oriented Policing officers to 
help prevent and address juvenile delinquency and criminal 
street gang activity. A grant awarded under this section has a 
4-year duration, and shall not exceed $2,000,000.
    Sec. 404. Establishment of a Center for Youth-Oriented 
Policing. Section 404 establishes a Center for Youth Oriented 
Policing, which will be responsible for identification, 
development and dissemination of information related to 
strategic policing practices and technologies to law 
enforcement agencies related to youth.
    Sec. 405. Authorization of Appropriations. Section 405 
authorizes appropriations to carry out this title.
Title V. Enhanced Federal Support of Local Law Enforcement.
            Subtitle A. Comprehensive Gang Prevention and Relief.\25\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \25\This subtitle incorporates legislation introduced by Senator 
Barbara Boxer, S. 208.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sec. 501. Short Title. Section 501 sets out this subtitle 
as ``Mynisha's Law.''
    Sec. 502. Designation as a Comprehensive Gang Prevention 
and Relief Area. This section provides for the application by 
units of local government and Indian Tribes with a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council for designation as a Comprehensive Gang 
Prevention and Relief Area.
    Sec. 503. Interagency Gang Prevention Task Force. Section 
503 provides for Federal coordination and collaboration through 
an interagency task force, including representatives from the 
Departments of Justice, Education, Labor, Health and Human 
Services, Housing and Urban Development. This task force is 
charged with identifying and coordinating access to Federal 
gang prevention resources, and low-income affordable housing.
    Sec. 504. Authorization of Appropriations. This section 
authorizes appropriation of such sums as may be necessary to 
carry out the purposes of this subtitle.
            Subtitle B. Community and Police Collaboration.
    Sec. 511. Gang Prevention Grants. Section 511 authorizes 
the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services to award 
grants to local and tribal governments with a PROMISE 
Coordinating Council to develop community-based programs that 
provide crime prevention, research, and intervention services 
designed for gang members and at-risk youth. A grant under this 
section may not exceed $1,000,000. Grant recipients under this 
section shall report to the Director of the Office of Community 
Oriented Policing Services on an annual basis. This section 
also authorizes the appropriations for grants under this 
section.
            Subtitle C. City Youth Violence Recovery.\26\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \26\This subtitle incorporates legislation introduced by Rep. John 
Larson in the 110th Congress, H.R. 854.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sec. 521. Grants to Prevent or Alleviate the Effects of 
Youth Violence. This section authorizes the Attorney General, 
in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services, to award grants to facilitate partnerships between 
State mental health authorities and local public or private 
entities to prevent or alleviate the effects of youth violence 
in urban communities. Grants under this section provide 
violence-prevention education, mentoring, counseling, and 
mental health services to children and adolescents. This 
section also authorizes appropriations to carry out the 
section.
Title VI. PRECAUTION ACT.\27\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \27\This title incorporates legislation introduced by Senator Russ 
Feingold, S. 3160.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sec. 601. Short Title. Section 601 establishes this title 
of the bill as the ``Prevention Resources for Eliminating 
Criminal Activity Using Tailored Interventions in Our 
Neighborhoods Act of 2009,'' or the ``PRECAUTION Act of 2009.''
    Sec. 602. Purposes. Section 602 describes the purposes of 
the PRECAUTION Act, including the promotion of effective and 
culturally appropriate Federal, State and local crime 
prevention and intervention strategies, the assessment of such 
strategies, the provision of resources to promote such 
strategies, and the reduction of the costs that rising violent 
crime imposes on interstate commerce.
    Sec. 603. Definitions. Section 603 defines the terms 
``Commission,'' ``rigorous evidence,'' and ``subcategory'' for 
the purpose of title VI.
    Sec. 604. National Commission on Public Safety through 
Crime and Delinquency Prevention. Section 604 creates a 
national commission on crime prevention and intervention 
strategies to coordinate the data and research on crime 
prevention and intervention; identify programs that are ready 
for replication around the country; and, provide guidance to 
state and local law enforcement about the implementation of 
crime prevention and intervention strategies. The commission is 
charged with identifying promising areas of crime prevention 
and intervention programming that could benefit from further 
research and development.
    Sec. 605. Innovative Crime and Delinquency Prevention and 
Intervention Strategy Grants. Section 605 provides that the 
Director of the National Institute of Justice may award grants 
to public and private entities to fund the implementation and 
evaluation of innovative crime or delinquency prevention or 
intervention strategies. A grant under this section has a 
maximum 3-year duration, and shall not exceed $2,000,000. 
Section 605 also authorizes appropriations to carry out this 
subsection.
Title VII. Additional Improvements to Juvenile Justice.
    Sec. 701. Youth Victim Witness Assistance Program. Section 
701 increases Federal support for witness and victim protection 
programs by providing an additional authorization of $5,000,000 
to be appropriated for juvenile victim and witness protection 
programs.
    Sec. 702. Expansion and Reauthorization of the Mentoring 
Initiative for System- Involved Youth. Section 702 provides for 
an expansion of the Federal mentoring initiative for system-
involved youth under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention Act.
    Sec. 703. Study on Adolescent Development and Sentences in 
the Federal System. Section 703 requires the United States 
Sentencing Commission to conduct a study on adolescent brain 
development and culpability; recidivism of juveniles who are 
released from prison or detention; and, the appropriateness of 
sentences of life without parole for minor offenders in the 
Federal system.\28\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \28\H.R. 1064 was introduced and ordered to be reported before the 
United States Supreme Court decided Graham v. Florida, 560 U.S. 15 
(2010), in which the Court held that it is unconstitutional to sentence 
juvenile offenders to life imprisonment without parole for non-homicide 
offenses. The Court has yet to rule on the constitutionality of life 
without parole sentences for juveniles for homicide offenses.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sec. 704. Partnerships with Professional Athletic Leagues. 
Section 704 provides that the Attorney General may establish a 
program in collaboration with national professional sports 
leagues and players to address youth violence and crime. This 
section also provides that if such a program is established, 
the Attorney General shall conduct a study within 1 year of 
enactment of the Act of the potential for reducing youth 
violence and crime through such collaborations with 
professional sports organizations and players.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

        JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION ACT OF 1974



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE II--JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Part B--Federal Assistance for State and Local Programs

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                              STATE PLANS

    Sec. 223. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (f) Technical Assistance.--
            [(1) In general.--The Administrator shall provide 
        technical and financial assistance to an eligible 
        organization composed of member representatives of the 
        State advisory groups appointed under subsection (a)(3) 
        to assist such organization to carry out the functions 
        specified in paragraph (2).]
            (1) Organization of state advisory group member 
        representatives.--The Administrator shall provide 
        technical and financial assistance to a nonpartisan, 
        nonprofit organization that is described in section 
        501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, to 
        assist such organization in carrying out the functions 
        specified in paragraph (2). To receive such assistance, 
        an organization shall--
                    (A) be governed by individuals who--
                            (i) have been appointed by a chief 
                        executive of a State to serve as a 
                        State advisory group member under 
                        subsection (a)(3); and
                            (ii) are elected to serve as a 
                        governing officer of such organization 
                        by a majority of the Chairs (or Chair-
                        designees) of all such State advisory 
                        groups;
                    (B) include member representatives from a 
                majority of such State advisory groups, who 
                shall be representative of regionally and 
                demographically diverse States and 
                jurisdictions; and
                    (C) annually seek appointments by the chief 
                executive of each State of one State advisory 
                group member and one alternate State advisory 
                group member from each such State to implement 
                the advisory functions specified in 
                subparagraphs (D) and (E) of paragraph (2), 
                including serving on the PROMISE Advisory 
                Panel, and make a record of any such 
                appointments available to the public.
            (2) Assistance.--To be eligible to receive such 
        assistance, such organization shall agree to carry out 
        activities that include--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    [(D) advising the Administrator with 
                respect to particular functions or aspects of 
                the work of the Office; and]
                    (D) advising the Administrator with respect 
                to particular functions or aspects of the work 
                of the Office, and appointing a representative, 
                diverse group of members of such organization 
                under paragraph (1) to serve as an advisory 
                panel of State juvenile justice advisors 
                (referred to as the ``PROMISE Advisory Panel'') 
                to carry out the functions specified in 
                subsection (g); and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (g) PROMISE Advisory Panel.--
            (1) Functions.--The PROMISE Advisory Panel required 
        under subsection (f)(2)(D) shall--
                    (A) assess successful evidence-based and 
                promising practices related to juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity 
                prevention and intervention carried out by 
                PROMISE Coordinating Councils under such Act;
                    (B) provide the Administrator with a list 
                of individuals who have experience in 
                administering or evaluating practices that 
                serve youth involved in, or at risk of 
                involvement in, juvenile delinquency and 
                criminal street gang activity, from which the 
                Administrator shall select individuals who 
                shall--
                            (i) provide to the Administrator 
                        peer reviews of applications submitted 
                        by units of local government and Indian 
                        tribes pursuant to title II of such 
                        Act, to ensure that such applications 
                        demonstrate a clear plan to--
                                    (I) serve youth as part of 
                                an entire family unit; and
                                    (II) coordinate the 
                                delivery of service to youth 
                                among agencies; and
                            (ii) advise the Administrator with 
                        respect to the award and allocation of 
                        PROMISE Planning grants to local and 
                        tribal governments that develop PROMISE 
                        Coordinating Councils, and of PROMISE 
                        Implementation grants to such PROMISE 
                        Coordinating Councils, pursuant to 
                        title II of such Act;
                    (C) develop performance standards to be 
                used to evaluate programs and activities 
                carried out with grants under title II of the 
                Youth PROMISE Act, including the evaluation of 
                changes achieved as a result of such programs 
                and activities related to decreases in juvenile 
                delinquency and criminal street gang activity, 
                including--
                            (i) prevention of involvement by 
                        at-risk youth in juvenile delinquency 
                        or criminal street gang activity;
                            (ii) diversion of youth with a high 
                        risk of continuing involvement in 
                        juvenile delinquency or criminal street 
                        gang activity; and
                            (iii) financial savings from 
                        deferred or eliminated costs, or other 
                        benefits, as a result of such programs 
                        and activities, and the reinvestment by 
                        the unit or Tribe of any such savings; 
                        and
                    (D) provide the Center for Youth-oriented 
                Policing with a list of individuals the Panel 
                recommends for membership on the Youth-oriented 
                Policing Services Advisory Board, pursuant to 
                section 403(c) of the Youth PROMISE Act.
            (2) Annual report.--Not later than 18 months after 
        the date of the enactment of the Youth PROMISE Act, and 
        annually thereafter, the PROMISE Advisory Panel shall 
        prepare a report containing the findings and 
        determinations under paragraph (1)(A) and shall submit 
        such report to Congress, the President, the Attorney 
        General, and the chief executive and chief law 
        enforcement officer of each State, unit of local 
        government, and Indian Tribe.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


     PART E--DEVELOPING, TESTING, AND DEMONSTRATING PROMISING NEW 
                        INITIATIVES AND PROGRAMS

SEC. 261. GRANTS AND PROJECTS.

    (a) Authority To Make Grants.--The Administrator may make 
grants to and contracts with States, units of general local 
government, Indian tribal governments, public and private 
agencies, organizations, and individuals, or combinations 
thereof, to carry out projects for the development, testing, 
and demonstration of promising initiatives and programs for the 
prevention, control, or reduction of juvenile delinquency. The 
Administrator shall ensure that, to the extent reasonable and 
practicable, such grants are made to achieve an equitable 
geographical distribution of such projects throughout the 
United States. Within 6 months of the date of enactment of the 
Youth PROMISE Act, the Administrator shall expand the number of 
sites receiving such grants from 4 to 12.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


             Part F--General and Administrative Provisions

                    AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

    Sec. 299. (a) Authorization of Appropriations for Title II 
(Excluding Parts C and E).--[(1)   There are authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out this title such sums as may be 
appropriate for fiscal years 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007.]
            (1) There are authorized to be appropriated to 
        carry out this title--
                    (A) $6,800,000 for fiscal year 2010;
                    (B) $7,800,000 for fiscal year 2011;
                    (C) $8,800,000 for fiscal year 2012;
                    (D) $11,000,000 for fiscal year 2013; and
                    (E) $13,600,000 for fiscal year 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Authorization of Appropriations for Part E.--[There are 
authorized]   
            (1)   In general.--There are authorized to be 
        appropriated to carry out part E, and authorized to 
        remain available until expended, such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal years 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, and 
        2007.
            (2) Authorization of appropriations for mentoring 
        initiative.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
        carry out the Mentoring Initiative for System-Involved 
        Youth Program under part E $4,800,000 for each of 
        fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


         VIOLENT CRIME CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
TITLE III--CRIME PREVENTION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Subtitle Q--Community-Based Justice Grants for Prosecutors

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 31702. USE OF FUNDS.

    Grants made by the Attorney General under this section 
shall be used--
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (5) by a State, unit of local government, or Indian 
        tribe to create and expand witness and victim 
        protection programs, including juvenile witness and 
        victim protection programs, to prevent threats, 
        intimidation, and retaliation against victims of, and 
        witnesses to, violent crimes.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


[SEC. 31707. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    [There are authorized to be appropriated $20,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 2008 through 2012 to carry out this 
subtitle.]

SEC. 31707. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated $5,000,000 for each 
of the fiscal years 2010 through 2014 to carry out this 
subtitle.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                            Dissenting Views

    We oppose H.R. 1064, which creates a series of redundant 
and burdensome grant programs, offices, boards, and studies to 
address youth crime and gang prevention and authorizes over 
$1.23 billion in new spending.
    While we agree with the majority that evidence-based, 
effective crime prevention programs play a critical role in 
deterring our youth from participating in gangs, prevention 
alone is not the answer to quelling the escalating gang 
violence in America. We must also equip the nation's law 
enforcement officers and prosecutors with the ability to 
suppress gang violence and gang recruitment.
    The Youth PROMISE Act (``Youth Prison Reduction through 
Opportunities, Mentoring, Intervention, Support, and Education 
Act'') seeks to ``provide for evidence-based and promising 
practices related to juvenile delinquency and criminal street 
gang activity prevention and intervention.'' H.R. 1064 purports 
to do so primarily through the creation of (1) PROMISE 
Assessment Grants, and later, (2) PROMISE Implementation 
grants, to state/local/tribal government. Both grants would be 
funded through the grant authority of the Department of 
Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention 
(OJJDP) after coordination with newly-created State Advisory 
Groups, a PROMISE Advisory Panel to OJJDP comprised of members 
of the State Advisory Road, and local PROMISE Coordinating 
Councils (PCCs).
    The OJJDP PROMISE Advisory Panel is then charged with, 
among other things, assessing successful prevention and 
intervention practices carried out by PCCs and developing 
standards to be used in evaluating the programs. Pursuant to 
H.R. 1064, OJJDP's Administrator may award a grant on a 
competitive basis, up to $1,000,000, to collect and analyze 
data related to existing juvenile delinquency and criminal 
street gang activity intervention and prevention programs, use 
the data to compile a list of designated geographic areas that 
are in need of resources on juvenile delinquency and criminal 
street gang activity, and rank those designated in descending 
order by the amount of need for resources for such 
intervention.
    H.R. 1064 proposes to authorize one-year PROMISE Assessment 
grants of up to $300,000, predicated on the creation of a PCC 
that would conduct localized needs and strengths assessment 
that would be mandated to look at, among the number of at-risk 
youth, the number of youth involved in juvenile delinquency 
and/or street gangs, summer youth unemployment, an estimate of 
those on public welfare in the area, an estimate of the total 
costs for incarceration of inmates in the local area including 
a comparison to other areas nationwide, and a description of 
promising intervention and prevention practices in use or 
proposed for the area. The bill proposes to authorize 
$300,000,000 for PROMISE Assessment grants for FY 2010.
    The bill further authorizes four-year PROMISE 
Implementation grants of up to $10 million for any local 
government unit, predicated on prior receipt of a Youth PROMISE 
Assessment grant and an application that documents the intended 
use of the grant and any estimated efficiencies in criminal 
justice spending and estimated reduction in crime based on the 
intervention and prevention program(s) supported by the grant. 
H.R. 1064 does not provide an authorized amount for the 
implementation grants, but rather includes ``such sums as may 
be necessary'' language for the grants. The 2007 version of the 
Youth PROMISE Act introduced by Chairman Scott authorized $2 
billion to be appropriated for implementation grants from 2010-
13.
    The bill also creates a National Research Center for Proven 
Juvenile Justice Programs to collect, analyze, and disseminate 
intervention and prevention best practices to and from PROMISE 
Coordinating Council. The bill further authorizes for 
appropriation $100 million in grants to state/local/tribal law 
enforcement governments to hire ``Youth Oriented Police'' 
(YOPS), trained through the creation of a national Center for 
Youth Oriented Policing. Grant authority for YOPS would be 
modeled after and administered by DOJ's COPS administrator. In 
addition, the bill seeks to create a National Commission on 
Public Safety through Crime and Delinquency Prevention to 
conduct a study and issue a report on the effectiveness of 
crime and delinquency prevention and intervention strategies.

               H.R. 1064 PROPOSES A REDUNDANT AND COSTLY 
                         APPROACH TO PREVENTION

    Unfortunately, H.R. 1064 goes far beyond simply authorizing 
Federal assistance for community prevention programs. The bill 
proposes to implement broad-sweeping, nationalized programs to 
address youth crime and gang prevention. H.R. 1064 creates 11 
new grant programs, a multitude of new layers of bureaucracy, 
and over a dozen new reports, studies, evaluations, and 
assessments. All of this comes with a price tag of over 1 and a 
quarter BILLION dollars,\1\ with much of the funding targeted 
towards studying, analyzing, and assessing prevention 
techniques and less for funding actual youth crime prevention 
programs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\The bill specifically authorizes $1,230,750,000 in new spending 
while authorizing two provisions for ``such sums'' as may be necessary, 
thus pushing the total authorization above one and a quarter billion 
dollars.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    H.R. 1064 also legislates its one-size-fits all approach in 
a vacuum. The bill approaches youth crime and gang prevention 
as if no such program on this subject exists. On the contrary, 
dozens of local government and non-profit programs across the 
country are reaching children every day. Yet, under the Youth 
PROMISE Act, the local government programs will have to be set 
aside or scrapped and replaced with the Youth PROMISE programs 
in order to receive any of the bulk of the authorized funding.
    And non-profit, community-based programs are all but left 
out of this legislation. Of the 11 new grants created by this 
bill, only one--the Innovative Crime and Delinquency Prevention 
and Intervention Strategy Grant--can be awarded to private 
organizations. Likewise, a number of these grants fund studies 
by NGOs and educational institutions rather than putting money 
in the hands of community programs that are currently helping 
young people avoid a life of crime and gang involvement.

        Section 102--new grant program to assess ``designated 
        geographic areas'' in need of funding.

        Section 201--new grant program for PROMISE assessment 
        and planning.

        Section 211--new grant program for PROMISE 
        implementation.

        Section 223--new grant program for evaluation of 
        PROMISE grants by institutions of higher education.

        Section 301--new grant program for a nonprofit NGO to 
        establish the National Research Center for Proven 
        Juvenile Justice Practices.

        Section 302--new grant program for institutions of 
        higher education to serve as regional research partners 
        with PROMISE Coordinating Councils.

        Section 403--new grant program for the hiring and 
        training of Youth Oriented Policing Officers.

        Section 404--new grant program for a NGO to establish a 
        Center for Youth-Oriented Policing.

        Section 511--new grant program to award PCC communities 
        with gang prevention grants.

        Section 522--new grant program to ``eligible entities'' 
        to prevent and alleviate the effects of youth violence.

        Section 605--new grant program for public and private 
        entities to implement and evaluate innovative crime or 
        delinquency prevention and intervention strategies.

        Section 701--expands the use of existing community-
        based justice grants for prosecutors.

        Section 702--expands the breadth of the Mentoring 
        Initiative for System-Involved Youth grants.

    Federal grant programs targeted specifically at youth crime 
and gang prevention also currently exist. The Justice 
Department's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency 
Prevention (OJJDP) operates the Gang Reduction Program, the 
Gang Free Schools and Communities Program, and the Tribal Youth 
Program, all of which are demonstrating success.
    For instance, the OJJDP Youth Gang Prevention Initiative, 
which includes a Gang Reduction Program (GRP), is ``designed to 
reduce gang activity in target neighborhoods by incorporating 
research-based interventions that contribute to juvenile 
delinquency and gang activity.'' Much like Youth PROMISE 
purports to, the GRP is funding pilot sites in communities with 
significant program investment, strong indicators of citizen 
involvement, and high rates of crime and gang activity and 
integrating Federal, state, and local resources into state-of-
the-art practices in prevention, intervention and 
suppression.\2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\Gang Reduction Program, Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice, available at http:/
/www.ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/programs/antigang/index.html.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    H.R. 1064 creates multiple new layers of bureaucracy within 
local, tribal and Federal Government and establishes a host of 
centers, facilities, and partnerships both in and outside 
government, leading to a myriad of overlapping and duplicative 
functions.

        Section 101--replaces the existing Federal Advisory 
        Committee on Juvenile Justice with a PROMISE Advisory 
        Panel within the Office of Juvenile Justice and 
        Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) of the Justice 
        Department.

        Section 202--requires all units of local governments or 
        Indian tribes to establish PROMISE Coordinating 
        Councils (PCC) comprised of 20 members from a broad 
        cross-section of health care, government, juvenile, and 
        community groups in order to be eligible for a PROMISE 
        assessment and planning grant.

        Section 211--requires each unit of local government or 
        Indian tribe with a PCC to award a competitive contract 
        to an organization (presumably a NGO) that will 
        ``assess the progress'' of the government or tribe in 
        addressing the unmet needs of youth in the community.

        Section 222--requires the OJJDP Administrator to 
        establish and utilize a transparent, reliable, and 
        valid system for evaluating applications for PROMISE 
        grants.

        Section 301--establishes a National Research Center for 
        Proven Juvenile Justice Practices via a grant to a NGO.

        Section 302--designates institutions of higher 
        education to serve as regional research partners with 
        PCCs.

        Section 404--establishes a Center for Youth-Oriented 
        Policing via a grant to a NGO. The Center will also 
        include a YOPS Advisory Board comprised of 22 members.

        Section 504--establishes an Interagency Gang Prevention 
        Task Force to include representatives from DOJ, DOED, 
        DOL, HHS, and HUD.

        Section 522--requires the creation of an eligible 
        entity, defined as a ``partnership between a State 
        mental health authority and one or more local public or 
        private providers'' to receive the new grant created 
        under this section.

        Section 604--establishes a National Commission on 
        Public Safety through Crime and Delinquency Prevention.

        Section 605--requires the NIJ to designate a full-time 
        employee to oversee the grants under this section. Also 
        requires the grant recipient to utilize an 
        ``evaluator'' approved by the NIJ employee for the 
        ``rigorous'' study required by this section.

    The requirements on units of local government or Indian 
tribes to even become eligible for the PROMISE assessment 
grants are likely cost-prohibitive for most communities, which 
seek out Federal assistance because they don't have the funds 
to operate these programs.
    H.R. 1064 directs multiple studies, assessments, plans, 
reports, and evaluations of evidence-based programs to deter 
juveniles from crime and gangs. This begs the question: Do 
evidence-based programs to prevent youth from engaging in crime 
or joining a gang currently exist? If so, why should we expend 
millions in taxpayer dollars to study what we already know? And 
can we realistically expect a program proven to work in one 
community to enjoy the same success nationwide?

        Section 101--requires the newly created PROMISE 
        Advisory Panel within OJJDP to annually report to 
        Congress, the President, and Attorney General, as well 
        as to the chief executive officer and chief law 
        enforcement officer of each State, unit of local 
        government, and Indian tribe.

        Section 102--requires a NGO to compile a list of 
        ``designated geographic areas'' that are in need of 
        resources and provide such list to the OJJDP 
        Administrator.

        Section 203--requires each PCC to perform an 
        ``objective strengths and needs assessment'' of the 
        resources of the community. Presumably such assessment 
        must be provided to the OJJDP Administrator to 
        demonstrate compliance with the grant requirements.

        Section 204--requires each PCC to develop a PROMISE 
        Plan to coordinate and deliver evidence-based and 
        promising practices for prevention. This section also 
        requires each PCC to partner with an institution of 
        higher education that will provide to the PCC 
        information on evidence-based and promising practices.

        Section 211--requires each PCC to award a contract to a 
        NGO to assess the progress of the PCC in implementing 
        its PROMISE Plan.

        Section 214--requires each PCC to submit an annual 
        report to the OJJDP Administrator on implementation of 
        PROMISE grants.

        Section 223--requires the OJJDP Administrator to 
        evaluate the PROMISE programs and report the results of 
        its evaluation to the National Research Center for 
        Proven Juvenile Justice Practices.

        Section 301--requires the National Research Center to 
        create a best practices juvenile justice information-
        sharing network to disseminate research to PCCs.

        Section 404--requires the Center for Youth-Oriented 
        Policing to develop and disseminate a model youth-
        oriented policing services training program.

        Section 505--requires the Interagency Gang Prevention 
        Task Force to submit an annual report to Congress.

        Section 604--requires the National Commission on Public 
        Safety through Crime and Delinquency Prevention to 
        study the effectiveness of crime and delinquency 
        prevention and intervention strategies and submit and 
        initial and final report to Congress.

        Section 605--requires each grant recipient under this 
        section to conduct a ``rigorous study of the 
        effectiveness of the strategy during the 3-year period 
        of the grant for that strategy.''

        Section 703--directs the U.S. Sentencing Commission to 
        study the appropriateness of sentences for minors in 
        the Federal system.

            H.R. 1064 IS DEVOID OF ANY ENFORCEMENT MEASURES

    Preventing America's youth from engaging in crime and 
participating in gangs is a critical component to stemming 
crime and violence in our communities and breaking the cycle of 
violence and lawlessness by our children and teens. But 
prevention is not the only component. If we are serious about 
dismantling dangerous gangs in our country, we must also have 
tough enforcement of our laws to suppress the violence brought 
upon our communities at the hands of criminal street gangs.
    The Justice Department's 2009 National Gang Threat 
Assessment\3\ demonstrates the need for tough enforcement. 
According to the Assessment, ``approximately 1 million gang 
members belonging to more than 20,000 gangs were criminally 
active within all 50 states and the District of Columbia as of 
September 2008.''\4\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\National Gang Threat Assessment 2009, National Drug Intelligence 
Center, U.S. Department of Justice, Jan. 2009, available at http://
www.justice.gov/ndic/pubs32/32146/index.htm.
    \4\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Criminal gangs are responsible for roughly 80 percent of 
the crime in many cities and towns across the country, 
including alien smuggling, armed robbery, assault, auto theft, 
drug trafficking, extortion, fraud, home invasions, identity 
theft, murder, and weapons trafficking.
    ``Gang members are the primary retail-level distributors of 
most illicit drugs. They also are increasingly distributing 
wholesale-level quantities of marijuana and cocaine in most 
urban and suburban communities. Some gangs traffic illicit 
drugs at the regional and national levels; several are capable 
of competing with U.S.-based Mexican DTOs.''\5\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \5\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The landscape of suppression and enforcement has changed. 
Gangs are no longer limited to urban areas. Many rural 
communities are experiencing a spike in gang activity and gang-
related crime and many rural law enforcement agencies lack the 
resources and training to effectively respond to the influx of 
gangs into their communities.
    Gangs actively recruit new members in our middle and high 
schools. ``Gang activity at schools is rising, in part, because 
gangs are using middle schools and high schools as venues for 
recruitment and drug distribution. Law enforcement agencies in 
several jurisdictions in eastern states report that gangs are 
directing teenage members who had dropped out of school to 
reenroll, primarily to recruit new members and sell drugs.''\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\Id.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    And gang investigators from across the country agree. The 
National Alliance of Gang Investigators Association opposes the 
Youth PROMISE Act because it fails to address gang suppression, 
creates redundant centers and agencies, and fails to implement 
juvenile justice and education programs that will effectively 
reduce gang proliferation.
    Unfortunately, the majority rejected an amendment offered 
by Mr. Forbes to include strong gang enforcement provisions in 
the bill. The amendment revised the existing Federal criminal 
statute (18 U.S.C. Sec. 521) to prohibit gang crimes that are 
committed to further the activities of a criminal street gang. 
It more clearly describes the elements and penalties for the 
Federal gang offense and provides important definitions for 
``criminal street gang'' and ``gang crime.'' This language is 
similar to provisions included in legislation sponsored by the 
gentleman from California, Mr. Schiff and Senator Feinstein.

                               CONCLUSION

    The suppression and dismantling of violent gangs cannot be 
solved simply through prevention. It requires a coordinated 
approach that includes strong enforcement. This legislation 
fails to acknowledge this, instead relying upon youth crime 
prevention to quell violent gang activity.
    Moreover, this bill seeks to fund these prevention efforts 
through a veritable hodgepodge of research, government 
bureaucracies, and new spending. Considering the dire state of 
our economy and an estimated $12 trillion national debt, we 
believe it is irresponsible for Congress to approve over a 
billion dollars in new Federal programs for an issue that is 
first and foremost the purview of the states. At the very 
least, Congress should especially avoid creating new programs 
that authorize over a billion dollars in new Federal spending. 
We urge our colleagues to oppose this legislation.

                                   Lamar Smith.
                                   F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr.
                                   Howard Coble.
                                   Elton Gallegly.
                                   Bob Goodlatte.
                                   Daniel E. Lungren.
                                   Darrell E. Issa.
                                   J. Randy Forbes.
                                   Steve King.
                                   Trent Franks.
                                   Louie Gohmert.
                                   Jim Jordan.
                                   Ted Poe.
                                   Jason Chaffetz.
                                   Tom Rooney.
                                   Gregg Harper.