H. Rept. 111-695 - 111th Congress (2009-2010)

Report text available as:

Formatting necessary for an accurate reading of this legislative text may be shown by tags (e.g., <DELETED> or <BOLD>) or may be missing from this TXT display. For complete and accurate display of this text, see the PDF.


House Report 111-695 - REPORT ON THE ACTIVITY of the COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS for the ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH CONGRESS

[House Report 111-695]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


111th Congress 
 2d Session             HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 Report
                                                                111-695
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                 Union Calendar No. 418


                         REPORT ON THE ACTIVITY

                                 of the

                      COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS

                                for the

                     ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH CONGRESS





 December 23, 2010.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed
                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                               Committee on Small Business,
                                 Washington, DC, December 23, 2010.
Hon. Lorainne C. Miller,
Clerk, House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Miller: Pursuant to clause 1(d) of rule XI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives for the 111th Congress, I 
present herewith a report on the activity of the Committee on 
Small Business for the 111th Congress, including the 
Committee's review and study of legislation within its 
jurisdiction, and the oversight activities undertaken by the 
Committee.
            Yours truly,
                                        Nydia M. Velazquez,
                                                        Chairwoman.
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Letter of Transmittal............................................   III
Jurisdiction.....................................................     1
Rules of the Committee...........................................     2
Membership and Organization......................................    11
Legislative and Oversight Activities.............................    15
Full Committee...................................................    51
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax..................................    65
Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology.......................    67
Subcommittee on Regulations and Health Care......................    69
Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship, and Trade...    71
Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight.....................    73
Oversight Plan for the 111th Congress............................    75
Implementation of the Oversight Plan for the 111th Congress......    91
Hearings Held Pursuant to Clauses 2(n), (o), and (p) of House 
  Rule XI........................................................   107
Appendix I--Committee Legislation: Committee Reports and Public 
  Laws...........................................................   109
Appendix II--Committee Publications: Committee Hearings..........   113



                                                 Union Calendar No. 418
111th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     111-695

======================================================================



 
 REPORT ON THE ACTIVITY OF THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS FOR THE ONE 
                       HUNDRED ELEVENTH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

 December 23, 2010.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Ms. Velazquez of New York, from the Committee on Small Business, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

    Clause 1(d) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 111th Congress requires that each 
standing committee, not later than January 2 of each odd-
numbered year, submit to the House a report on the activities 
of that committee, including separate sections summarizing the 
legislative and oversight activities of that committee during 
that congress.

              JURISDICTION AND SPECIAL OVERSIGHT FUNCTION

    Clause 1(p) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 111th Congress sets forth the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Small Business as follows--
    (1) Assistance to and protection of small business, 
including financial aid, regulatory flexibility, and paperwork 
reduction.
    (2) Participation of small business enterprises in Federal 
procurement and Government contracts.
    Clause 3(l) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 111th Congress sets forth the Special 
Oversight Function of the Committee on Small Business as 
follows--
    The Committee on Small Business shall study and investigate 
on a continuing basis the problems of all types of small 
business.

 RULES OF THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS FOR THE ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH 
                                CONGRESS

                         1. GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Rules of the House of Representatives, and in 
particular the committee rules enumerated in rule XI, are the 
rules of the Committee on Small Business to the extent 
applicable and by this reference are incorporated. Each 
subcommittee of the Committee on Small Business (hereinafter 
referred to as the ``committee'') is a part of the committee 
and is subject to the authority and direction of the committee, 
and to its rules to the extent applicable.

                   2. REFERRAL OF BILLS BY CHAIRWOMAN

    Unless retained for consideration by the committee, all 
legislation and other matters referred to the committee shall 
be referred by the Chairwoman as she deems appropriate to the 
subcommittee of appropriate jurisdiction within 14 days. Where 
the subject matter of the referral involves the jurisdiction of 
more than one subcommittee or does not fall within any 
previously assigned jurisdictions, the Chairwoman shall refer 
the matter, as she may deem advisable.
    In referring any measure or matter to a subcommittee, the 
Chairwoman may specify a date by which the subcommittee shall 
report thereon to the subcommittee. The Chairwoman may also 
discharge a subcommittee from consideration of any measure or 
matter referred to a subcommittee.

                           3. DATE OF MEETING

    The regular meeting date of the committee shall be the 
second Thursday of every month when the House is in session. A 
regular meeting of the committee may be dispensed with if, in 
the judgment of the Chairwoman, there is no need for the 
meeting. Additional meetings may be called by the Chairwoman as 
she may deem necessary or at the request of a majority of the 
members of the committee in accordance with clause 2(c) of rule 
XI of the House.
    At least 3 days notice of such an additional meeting shall 
be given unless the Chairwoman determines that there is good 
cause to call the meeting on less notice.
    The determination of the business to be considered at each 
meeting shall be made by the Chairwoman subject to clause 2(c) 
of rule XI of the House.
    A regularly scheduled meeting need not be held if there is 
no business to be considered or, upon at least 3 days notice, 
it may be set for a different date.

                      4. ANNOUNCEMENT OF HEARINGS

    Unless the Chairwoman, with the concurrence of the Ranking 
Minority Member, or the committee by majority vote, determines 
that there is good cause to begin a hearing at an earlier date, 
public announcement shall be made of the date, place and 
subject matter of any hearing to be conducted by the committee 
at least 7 calendar days before the commencement of that 
hearing.
    After announcement of a hearing, the committee shall make 
available as soon as practicable to all Members of the 
committee a tentative witness list and to the extent 
practicable a memorandum explaining the subject matter of the 
hearing (including relevant legislative reports and other 
necessary material). In addition, the Chairwoman shall make 
available as soon as practicable to the Members of the 
committee any official reports from departments and agencies on 
the subject matter as they are received.

              5. MEETINGS AND HEARINGS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

(A) Meetings

    Each meeting of the committee or its subcommittees for the 
transaction of business, including the markup of legislation, 
shall be open to the public, including to radio, television and 
still photography coverage, except as provided by clause 4 of 
rule XI of the House, except when the committee or 
subcommittee, in open session and with a majority present, 
determines by record vote that all or part of the remainder of 
the meeting on that day shall be closed to the public because 
disclosure of matters to be considered would endanger national 
security, would compromise sensitive law enforcement 
information, or would tend to defame, degrade or incriminate 
any person or otherwise would violate any law or rule of the 
House; Provided, however, that no person other than members of 
the committee, and such congressional staff and such executive 
branch representatives as they may authorize, shall be present 
in any business meeting or markup session which has been closed 
to the public.

(B) Hearings

    Each hearing conducted by the committee or its 
subcommittees shall be open to the public, including radio, 
television and still photography coverage, except when the 
committee or subcommittee, in open session and with a majority 
present, determines by record vote that all or part of the 
remainder of the hearing on that day shall be closed to the 
public because disclosure of testimony, evidence or other 
matters to be considered would endanger the national security, 
would compromise sensitive law enforcement information, or 
would violate any law or rule of the House; Provided, however, 
that the committee or subcommittee may by the same procedure 
vote to close one subsequent day of hearings. Notwithstanding 
the requirements of the preceding sentence, a majority of those 
present, there being in attendance the requisite number 
required under the rules of the committee to be present for the 
purpose of taking testimony, (i) may vote to close the hearing 
for the sole purpose of discussing whether testimony or 
evidence to be received would endanger the national security, 
would compromise sensitive law enforcement information, or 
violate clause 2(k)(5) of rule XI of the House; or (ii) may 
vote to close the hearing, as provided in clause 2(k)(5) of 
rule XI of the House.
    All members of the committee shall be able to participate 
in any subcommittee hearing. No member of the House may be 
excluded from non-participatory attendance at any hearing of 
the committee or any subcommittee, unless the House of 
Representatives shall by majority vote authorize the committee 
or subcommittee, for purposes of a particular series of 
hearings on a particular article of legislation or on a 
particular subject of investigation, to close its hearing to 
members by the same procedures designated for closing hearings 
to the public. Additionally, such members who would like to not 
only attend, but participate shall notify the Ranking Minority 
Member and submit a request in writing to the Chairwoman two 
days in advance of such hearing. Such requests shall be subject 
to approval of the Chairwoman and the Ranking Member.

                              6. WITNESSES

(A) Statement of witnesses

    Each witness who is to appear before the committee or 
subcommittee shall file with the committee at least two 
business days before the day of his or her appearance 75 copies 
of his or her written statement of proposed testimony. Each 
witness shall also submit to the committee a copy of his or her 
final prepared statement in an electronic format at that time.
    At least one copy of the statement of each witness shall be 
furnished directly to the Ranking Minority Member. In addition, 
all witnesses shall be required to submit with their testimony 
a curriculum vitae or other statement describing their 
education, employment, professional affiliations and other 
background information pertinent to their testimony unless 
waived by the Chairwoman. Each witness will complete a 
disclosure form detailing any contracts or business that they 
currently have with the federal government.
    The committee will provide public access to its printed 
materials, including the proposed testimony of witnesses, in 
electronic form.

(B) Interrogation of witnesses

    Whenever any hearing is conducted by the committee or any 
subcommittee upon any measure or matter, the minority party 
members on the committee shall be entitled, upon request to the 
Chairwoman by a majority of those minority members, to call a 
witness or witnesses selected by the minority to testify with 
respect to that measure or matter. The minority shall be 
entitled to a ratio of one-third of the witnesses testifying. 
For the purposes of determining this ratio, it shall not 
include testifying government officials. The witnesses 
requested by the minority shall be invited to testify by the 
Chairwoman and must furnish at least one copy of his or her 
statement and any supplementary materials directly to the 
Chairwoman within two business days before the day of his or 
her appearance unless waived by the Chairwoman.
    Except when the committee adopts a motion pursuant to 
subdivisions (B) and (C) of clause 2(j)(2) of rule XI of the 
rules of the House, committee members may question witnesses 
only when they have been recognized by the Chairwoman for that 
purpose, and only for a 5-minute period until all members 
present have had an opportunity to question a witness. The 
Chairwoman and the Ranking Member shall not be subject to the 
5-minute period limitation. For all other Committee Members, 
the 5-minute period for questioning a witness by any one member 
can be extended only with the unanimous consent of all members 
present. The Chairwoman, followed by the Ranking Minority 
Member and all other members alternating between the majority 
and minority, shall initiate the questioning of witnesses in 
both the full and subcommittee hearings. The order for 
questioning by members of each party shall be determined by the 
time in which the member arrived at the hearing after the gavel 
has been struck, with the first arriving having priority over 
members of his or her party. If members arrive at the same 
time, then seniority on the committee shall dictate the order.
    In recognizing members to question witnesses, the 
Chairwoman may take into consideration the ratio of majority 
and minority members present in such a manner as not to 
disadvantage the Members of either party. The Chairwoman, in 
consultation with the Ranking Minority Member, may decrease the 
5-minute time period in order to accommodate the needs of all 
the Members present and the schedule of the witnesses.

                              7. SUBPOENAS

    A subpoena may be authorized and issued by the committee in 
the conduct of any investigation or series of investigations or 
activities to require the attendance and testimony of such 
witness and the production of such books, records, 
correspondence, memoranda, papers and documents, as deemed 
necessary. Such a subpoena shall be authorized by a majority 
vote of the full committee. The requirement that the 
authorization of a subpoena require a majority vote may be 
waived by the Ranking Minority Member. The Chairwoman may issue 
a subpoena, in consultation with the Ranking Minority Member, 
when the House is out of session for a period of 3 days or 
longer.

                               8. QUORUM

    No measure or recommendation shall be reported unless a 
majority of the committee was actually present. For purposes of 
taking testimony or receiving evidence, there shall be one 
member from the majority and one member from the minority for 
the purposes of a quorum. Such requirement may be waived for 
field hearings by the Chairwoman. For all other purposes, one-
third of the members (or 11 Members) shall constitute a quorum.

                      9. AMENDMENTS DURING MARK-UP

    Any amendment offered to any pending legislation before the 
committee or subcommittee must be made available in written 
form when requested by any member of the committee. If such 
amendment is not available in written form when requested, the 
Chair shall allow an appropriate period for the provision 
thereof.

                    10. POSTPONEMENT OF PROCEEDINGS

    The Chairwoman in consultation with the Ranking Minority 
Member may postpone further proceedings when a record vote is 
ordered on the question of approving any measure or matter or 
adopting an amendment. The Chairwoman may resume proceedings 
postponed at any time, but no later than the next meeting day. 
In exercising postponement authority, the Chairwoman shall take 
all reasonable steps necessary to notify members on the 
resumption of proceedings on any postponed recorded vote. When 
proceedings resume on a postponed question, notwithstanding any 
intervening order for the previous question, an underlying 
proposition shall remain subject to further debate or amendment 
to the same extent as when the question was postponed.

              11. NUMBER AND JURISDICTION OF SUBCOMMITTEES

    There will be five subcommittees as follows:

Subcommittee on Finance and Tax

    The Small Business Administration (SBA) Lending and 
Investment programs: Section 7(a) loan program, 504 Certified 
Development Company program, Small Business Investment Company 
program, Disaster Loan Assistance programs, and Microloan 
program.
    Access to capital and finance issues generally.
    Oversight over tax policy and retirement/pension matters 
affecting small businesses.

Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology

    SBA Contracting programs including the following: Section 
8(a) Business Development program, Small Disadvantaged Business 
(SDB) certification operated by SBA, Women's Procurement 
Program, HUBZone program, Surety Bond program, Service-disabled 
veteran procurement, and Section 7(j) management and technical 
assistance program.
    SBA Technology programs: Small Business Innovation Research 
(SBIR) program, Small Business Technology Transfer program.
    Oversight of government-wide procurement practices and 
programs affecting small businesses.
    Oversight of technology and patent issues.

Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act, the Small Business 
Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act, and the Paperwork 
Reduction Act.
    SBA's Office of Advocacy, National Ombudsman, and SBA small 
business size standards.
    Oversight of regulations and regulatory issues that affect 
small businesses.
    Oversight of healthcare coverage issues.
    Oversight over issues affecting small healthcare providers.

Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and Trade

    SBA entrepreneurial development programs: Women's Business 
Centers, National Veterans Business Development Corporation, 
Small Business Development Centers, SCORE, Drug Free Workplace 
program, Office of Women's Business Ownership, and National 
Women's Business Council (NWBC).
    New Markets Venture Capital (NMVC) program, New Markets Tax 
Credit program, BusinessLINC and the Program for Re-Investment 
in Micro entrepreneurs.
    General oversight of programs targeted toward rural 
development and economic growth as well as general federal 
government entrepreneurial development programs.
    Oversight of agricultural issues.
    Oversight of energy issues.
    Oversight of trade issues, including SBA's Office of 
International Trade.

Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight

    Oversight of SBA Administration, Management, and Agency 
Practices.
    Oversight of activities by the Office of the Inspector 
General at SBA.
    Oversight over general issues impacting small businesses.

                          12. COMMITTEE STAFF

(A) Majority staff

    The employees of the committee, except those assigned to 
the minority as provided below, shall be appointed and 
assigned, and may be removed by the Chairwoman. The Chairwoman 
shall fix their remuneration, and they shall be under the 
general supervision and direction of the Chairwoman.

(B) Minority staff

    The employees of the committee assigned to the minority 
shall be appointed and assigned, and their remuneration 
determined, as the Ranking Minority Member of the committee 
shall determine.

(C) Subcommittee staff

    The Chairwoman and Ranking Minority Member of the full 
committee shall endeavor to ensure that sufficient committee 
staff is made available to each subcommittee to carry out its 
responsibilities under the rules of the committee.

                 13. POWERS AND DUTIES OF SUBCOMMITTEES

    Each subcommittee is authorized to meet, hold hearings, 
receive evidence, and report to the full committee on all 
matters referred to it. Subcommittee chairmen shall hold such 
meetings and hearings after approval of the Chairwoman of the 
full committee. Meetings and hearings of subcommittees shall 
not be scheduled to occur simultaneously with meetings or 
hearings of the full committee.

                              14. RECORDS

    The committee shall keep a complete record of all actions, 
which shall include a record of the votes on any question on 
which a record vote is demanded. The result of each 
subcommittee record vote, together with a description of the 
matter voted upon, shall promptly be made available to the full 
committee. A record of such votes shall be made available for 
inspection by the public at reasonable times in the offices of 
the committee.
    The committee shall keep a complete record of all committee 
and subcommittee activity which, in the case of any meeting or 
hearing transcript, shall include a substantially verbatim 
account of remarks actually made during the proceedings, 
subject only to technical, grammatical, and typographical 
corrections authorized by the person making the remarks 
involved.
    The records of the committee at the National Archives and 
Records Administration shall be made available in accordance 
with rule VII of the Rules of the House. The Chairwoman of the 
full committee shall notify the Ranking Minority Member of the 
full committee of any decision, pursuant to clause 3(b)(3) or 
clause 4(b) of rule VII of the House, to withhold a record 
otherwise available, and the matter shall be presented to the 
committee for a determination of the written request of any 
member of the committee.

           15. ACCESS TO CLASSIFIED OR SENSITIVE INFORMATION

    Access to classified or sensitive information supplied to 
the committee and attendance at closed sessions of the 
committee or its subcommittees shall be limited to members and 
necessary committee staff and stenographic reporters who have 
appropriate security clearance when the Chairwoman determines 
that such access or attendance is essential to the functioning 
of the committee.
    The procedures to be followed in granting access to those 
hearings, records, data, charts, and files of the committee 
which involve classified information or information deemed to 
be sensitive shall be as follows:
    (A) Only Members of the House of Representatives and 
specifically designated committee staff of the Committee on 
Small Business may have access to such information.
    (B) Members who desire to read materials that are in the 
possession of the committee should notify the clerk of the 
committee.
    (C) The clerk will maintain an accurate access log, which 
identifies the circumstances surrounding access to the 
information, without revealing the material examined.
    (D) If the material desired to be reviewed is material 
which the committee or subcommittee deems to be sensitive 
enough to require special handling, before receiving access to 
such information, individuals will be required to sign an 
access information sheet acknowledging such access and that the 
individual has read and understands the procedures under which 
access is being granted.
    (E) Material provided for review under this rule shall not 
be removed from a specified room within the committee offices.
    (F) Individuals reviewing materials under this rule shall 
make certain that the materials are returned to the proper 
custodian.
    (G) No reproductions or recordings may be made of any 
portion of such materials.
    (H) The contents of such information shall not be divulged 
to any person in any way, form, shape, or manner, and shall not 
be discussed with any person who has not received the 
information in an authorized manner.
    (I) When not being examined in the manner described herein, 
such information will be kept in secure safes or locked file 
cabinets in the committee offices.
    (J) These procedures only address access to information the 
committee or a subcommittee deems to be sensitive enough to 
require special treatment.
    (K) If a member of the House of Representatives believes 
that certain sensitive information should not be restricted as 
to dissemination or use, the member may petition the committee 
or subcommittee to so rule. With respect to information and 
materials provided to the committee by the executive branch, 
the classification of information and materials as determined 
by the executive branch shall prevail unless affirmatively 
changed by the committee or the subcommittee involved, after 
consultation with the appropriate executive agencies.
    (L) Other materials in the possession of the committee are 
to be handled in accordance with the normal practices and 
traditions of the committee.

                          16. OTHER PROCEDURES

    The Chairwoman of the full committee may establish such 
other procedures and take such actions as may be necessary to 
carry out the foregoing rules or to facilitate the effective 
operation of the committee.

                   17. AMENDMENTS TO COMMITTEE RULES

    The rules of the committee may be modified, amended or 
repealed by a majority of the members, at a meeting 
specifically called for such purpose, but only if written 
notice of the proposed change has been provided to each such 
member at least 3 days before the time of the meeting.

                         18. BUDGET AND TRAVEL

    (A) From the amount provided to the Committee in the 
primary expense resolution adopted by the U.S. House of 
Representatives for the 111th Congress, the Chairwoman, after 
consultation with the Ranking Minority Member, shall designate 
one-third of the budget under the direction of the Ranking 
Minority Member for the purposes of minority staff, travel 
expenses of minority staff and members, and minority office 
expenses.
    (B) The Chairwoman may authorize travel in connection with 
activities or subject matters under the general jurisdiction of 
the Committee.
    (C) The Ranking Minority Member may authorize travel for 
any minority member or minority committee staff member in 
connection with activities or subject matters under the general 
jurisdiction of the Committee. Before such travel, there shall 
be submitted to the Chairwoman in writing the following at 
least seven calendar days prior:
    a) The purpose of the travel.
    b) The dates during which the travel is to occur.
    c) The names of the States or countries to be visited and 
the length of time spent in each.
    d) The names of members and staff of the committee 
participating in such travel.
    At the conclusion of such travel, a summary of the activity 
and its accomplishments shall be provided to the Chairwoman 
within ten calendar days.

                         19. COMMITTEE WEBSITE

    The Chairwoman shall maintain an official Committee website 
for the purpose of furthering the Committee's legislative and 
oversight responsibilities, including communicating information 
about the Committee's activities to Committee members and other 
Members of the House. The Ranking Minority Members may maintain 
a similar website for the same purpose, including communicating 
information about the activities of the minority to Committee 
members and other Members of the House.

                             20. VICE CHAIR

    Pursuant to House Rules, the Chairwoman shall designate a 
member of the majority party to serve as Vice Chairman of the 
Committee. The Vice Chairman shall preside at any meeting or 
hearing during the temporary absence of the Chairwoman. The 
Chair also reserves the right to designate a committee member 
of the majority to serve as the Chair at a hearing or meeting.
     MEMBERSHIP AND ORGANIZATION OF THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS

                     ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH CONGRESS

                      COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS
                          FULL COMMITTEE LIST

Rep. SAM GRAVES, Missouri            Rep. NYDIA M. VELAZQUEZ, New York
  Ranking Member                       Chairwoman
Rep. ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland    Rep. DENNIS MOORE, Kansas
Rep. W. TODD AKIN, Missouri          Rep. HEATH SHULER, North Carolina
Rep. STEVE KING, Iowa                Rep. KATHY DAHLKEMPER, 
Rep. LYNN A. WESTMORELAND, Georgia   Pennsylvania
Rep. LOUIE GOHMERT, Texas            Rep. KURT SCHRADER, Oregon
Rep. MARY FALLIN, Oklahoma           Rep. ANN KIRKPATRICK, Arizona
Rep. VERN BUCHANAN, Florida          Rep. GLENN NYE, Virginia
Rep. BLAINE LUETKEMEYER, Missouri    Rep. MARK CRITZ, Pennsylvania\1\
Rep. AARON SCHOCK, Illinois          Rep. MICHAEL MICHAUD, Maine
Rep. GLENN THOMPSON, Pennsylvania    Rep. MELISSA BEAN, Illinois
Rep. MIKE COFFMAN, Colorado          Rep. DAN LIPINSKI, Illinois
                                     Rep. JASON ALTMIRE, Pennsylvania
                                     Rep. YVETTE CLARKE, New York
                                     Rep. BRAD ELLSWORTH, Indiana
                                     Rep. JOE SESTAK, Pennsylvania
                                     Rep. BOBBY BRIGHT, Alabama
                                     Rep. PARKER GRIFFITH, Alabama\2\
                                     Rep. DEBORAH HALVORSON, Illinois

----------
\1\Joined the Committee on May 25, 2010.
\2\Left the Committee on December 23, 2009.

                           SUBCOMMITTEE LIST
                    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax

Rep. VERN BUCHANAN,                  Rep. KURT SCHRADER, Chair
  Ranking Member                     Rep. DENNIS MOORE
Rep. STEVE KING                      Rep. ANN KIRKPATRICK
Rep. TODD AKIN                       Rep. MELISSA BEAN
Rep. BLAINE LUETKEMEYER              Rep. JOE SESTAK
Rep. MIKE COFFMAN                    Rep. DEBORAH HALVORSON
                                     Rep. GLENN NYE
                                     Rep. MICHAEL MICHAUD

                                 ------                                

               Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology

Rep. AARON SCHOCK,                   Rep. GLENN NYE, Chair
  Ranking Member                     Rep. YVETTE CLARKE
Rep. ROSCOE BARTLETT                 Rep. BRAD ELLSWORTH
Rep. TODD AKIN                       Rep. KURT SCHRADER
Rep. MARY FALLIN                     Rep. DEBORAH HALVORSON
Rep. GLENN THOMPSON                  Rep. MELISSA BEAN
                                     Rep. JOE SESTAK
                                     Rep. MARK CRITZ\3\

----------
\3\Rep. Mark Critz joined the Committee on May 25, 2010.

                                 ------                                

               Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare

Rep. LYNN WESTMORELAND,              Rep. KATHY DAHLKEMPER, Chair
  Ranking Member                     Rep. DAN LIPINSKI
Rep. STEVE KING                      Rep. MELISSA BEAN
Rep. VERN BUCHANAN                   Rep. JASON ALTMIRE
Rep. GLENN THOMPSON                  Rep. JOE SESTAK
Rep. MIKE COFFMAN                    Rep. BOBBY BRIGHT
                                     Rep. MARK CRITZ\4\

----------
\4\Rep. Mark Critz joined the Committee on May 25, 2010.

                                 ------                                

     Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and Trade

Rep. BLAINE LUETKEMEYER,             Rep. HEATH SHULER, Chair
  Ranking Member                     Rep. MICHAEL MICHAUD
Rep. STEVE KING                      Rep. BOBBY BRIGHT
Rep. AARON SCHOCK                    Rep. KATHY DAHLKEMPER
Rep. GLENN THOMPSON                  Rep. ANN KIRKPATRICK
                                     Rep. YVETTE CLARKE

                                 ------                                

              Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight

Rep. MARY FALLIN,                    Rep. JASON ALTMIRE, Chair
  Ranking Member                     Rep. HEATH SHULER
Rep. LOUIE GOHMERT                   Rep. BRAD ELLSWORTH
                                     VACANCY\5\

----------
\5\Vacancy due to Rep. Parker Griffith departure from the Committee on 
December 23, 2009.
                            COMMITTEE STAFF
                             Majority Staff

    Michael Day, Staff Director
   Adam Minehardt, Deputy Staff 
             Director
    Tim Slattery, Chief Counsel
  Russell Orban, General Counsel
  Moraima Garcia, Office Manager
     Darienne Gutierrez, Clerk
  Tom Dawson, Health Care Counsel
 Sarah Gallo, Agriculture Counsel
David Grossman, Technology Counsel
   Andy Jiminez, Banking Counsel
Erik Lieberman, Regulatory Counsel
  Chris Lyons, Oversight Counsel
    Naveen Parmar, Tax Counsel
 Nicole Witenstein, Trade Counsel
  Melissa Johnson, Professional 
               Staff
 Eminence Northcutt, Professional 
               Staff
  Justin Pelletier, Professional 
               Staff
   Alex Haurek, Communications 
             Director
    Zamir Ahmed, Deputy Press 
             Secretary
   Duncan Neasham, Deputy Press 
             Secretary
  Xinia Bermudez, Staff Assistant

                             Minority Staff

    Karen Haas, Staff Director
    Janet Oliver, Deputy Staff 
             Director
 Paul Sass, Deputy Chief of Staff
   Barry Pineles, Chief Counsel
Lisa Christian, Professional Staff
  Joe Hartz, Professional Staff 
              Member
 Brooke Shupe, Professional Staff
  Mark Ratto, Professional Staff 
              Member
 Caroline Rabbit, Staff Assistant
      Alexandra Sollberger, 
      Communications Director
  Kelly Hoffman, Press Assistant
                  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

    During the 111th Congress, 100 bills were referred to the 
Committee on Small Business. The full Committee reported to the 
House or was discharged from the further consideration of 22 
measures, not including conference reports. 12 measures 
regarding matters within the Committee's jurisdiction were 
enacted into law.
    The following is a summary of the legislative and oversight 
activities of the Committee on Small Business during the 111th 
Congress, including a summary of the activities taken by the 
Committee to implement its Oversight Plan submitted under 
clause 2(d) of House rule X. In addition, this report includes 
a summary of hearings held pursuant to clauses 2(n), (O), and 
(P) under House rule XI.
                             Full Committee

                         Legislative Activities

             AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009

                                (H.R. 1)

Summary
    H.R. 1 amended the Small Business Act to suspend, until 
September 30, 2010, fees under the 7(a) program and the 504 
program. The legislation also authorized the SBA to guarantee 
up to 90 percent of a 7(a) loan and directed the SBA 
Administrator to establish a Secondary Market Guarantee 
Authority and a process in which private lenders may apply for 
a federal guarantee on pools of first lien position 504 loans 
that are to be sold to third-party investors. The legislation 
authorized the Administrator to guarantee up to $3 billion of 
such pools and requires monthly reports from the Administrator 
to Congress on the guarantee authority.
    The legislation permitted the refinancing of existing 
indebtedness under the 504/CDC program, in an amount not to 
exceed 50 percent of the projected cost of the project 
financed, under certain conditions. It also provided that a 
504/CDC project meets SBA policy objectives if it creates or 
retains one job for every $65,000 guaranteed by the SBA.
    With regard to the Small Business Investment Company 
program, H.R. 1 revised and increased the maximum amount of 
outstanding leverage made available to a licensed investment 
company and revised aggregate investment limits under such 
program.
    H.R. directed the Administrator to carry out a temporary 
program to provide loans on a deferred basis to viable small 
businesses that have a non-SBA-guaranteed small business loan 
and that were experiencing immediate financial hardship. Each 
such loan was limited to $35,000 and SBA was prohibited from 
charging a fee for such loans.
    The legislation also increased the maximum surety bond 
guarantee amount and temporarily authorized the Administrator 
to guarantee a surety for a total work order or contract amount 
that does not exceed $10 million, if a federal agency 
contracting officer certifies that such a guarantee is 
necessary.
    H.R. 1 authorized the SBA to establish a temporary 
Secondary Market Lending Authority to make loans to the 
systematically important secondary market broker-dealers who 
operate the SBA secondary market.
Legislative history
    H.R. 1 was introduced by Rep. Obey on January 26, 2009. The 
bill was referred to the Committee on Appropriations and the 
Committee on the Budget.
    On January 28, 2009, the legislation passed the House by a 
vote of 244 to 188. The Senate passed H.R. 1, as amended, on 
January 20, 2009 by a vote of 61 to 37. Conference negotiations 
began shortly thereafter and the conference report passed the 
House on February 13, 2009 by a vote of 246 to 183, with 1 
voting present. On the same day, the Senate passed the 
conference report by a vote of 60 to 38.
    On February 17, 2009, the legislation was signed by the 
President and became Public Law 111-5.

  CONGRATULATING THE MINORITY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AGENCY ON ITS 40TH 
     ANNIVERSARY AND COMMENDING ITS ACHIEVEMENTS IN FOSTERING THE 
  ESTABLISHMENT AND GROWTH OF MINORITY BUSINESSES IN THE UNITED STATES

                             (H. RES. 215)

Summary
    H. Res. 215 congratulates the Minority Business Development 
Agency on its 40th anniversary, commends its achievement in 
fostering the establishment and growth of minority businesses, 
and encourages it to continue its efforts to assist minority 
businesses as such enterprises continue to strengthen 
communities, create jobs, and contribute to the health of the 
economy in the United States.
Legislative history
    H. Res. 215 was introduced by Representative Michael Honda 
on March 5, 2009. Original Cosponsors included the Committee 
Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez, Representative Barbara Lee, and 
Representative Dale Kildee. The bill was referred to the 
Committee on Financial Services and the Committee on Small 
Business.
    On September 15, 2009, the House considered H.Res. 215 
under suspension of the rules and it passed by voice vote.

 CONGRATULATING THE ON-PREMISE SIGN INDUSTRY FOR ITS CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
                    THE SUCCESS OF SMALL BUSINESSES

                             (H. RES. 298)

Summary
    H. Res. 298 applauds the United States Small Business 
Administration for educating small business owners on the 
benefits of using well-placed, well-designed on-premise signs 
to overcome competitive disadvantages in the areas of marketing 
and advertising, and encourages the on-premise sign industry to 
continue its efforts to produce a new and greater understanding 
of how to develop safer, more effective, and more affordable 
signage products so as to alleviate small businesses' 
competitive disadvantages in marketing and advertising.
Legislative history
    H. Res. 298 was introduced by Representative Steven King on 
March 30, 2009. Original Cosponsors included Representative Dan 
Boren and Representative Stephanie Herseth Sandlin. The bill 
was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    On April 1, 2009, the House considered H. Res. 298 under 
suspension of the rules and it passed by voice vote.

                  VETERANS BUSINESS CENTER ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 1803)

Summary
    H.R. 1803 amends key sections of the Small Business Act to 
meet the emerging needs of the growing veteran population by 
ensuring the sector has affordable, timely and comprehensive 
access to resources to start or grow small businesses. The bill 
targets resources and expertise at the agency to the needs of 
veterans, including those requiring customized assistance such 
as reservists, service-disabled veterans, and women.
    The legislation enhances assistance to veteran 
entrepreneurs in three main areas: outreach, business 
counseling, and targeted resources to address specific issues. 
To provide veterans returning from deployment with access to 
entrepreneurial development resources in their local 
communities, the legislation provides for the establishment of 
additional outreach centers through a newly-created Veterans 
Business Center program at the agency. The bill also provides 
new resources for the development of specialized assistance to 
veteran-owned firms, specifically aid in accessing capital, 
procurement assistance, and for service-disabled veterans. 
Finally, the legislation updates the structure of 
entrepreneurial development assistance to the sector at the 
agency by establishing a Director of the new Veterans Business 
Center Program and formalizing the role of the National 
Veterans Task Force.
Legislative history
    H.R. 1803 was introduced by Rep. Glenn Nye on March 31, 
2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation. The Committee received testimony from 
the small business community, including a veteran's small 
business association representative who also serves as the 
Chairman of SBA's Advisory Committee on Veterans Business 
Affairs. He testified on the merits of the legislation and the 
need for an expansion of services to this sector through the 
legislation.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1803 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On July 28, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1803 and passed 
the bill by a voice vote. On July 29, 2009, the bill was 
received in the Senate, read twice, and referred to the 
Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

         EDUCATING ENTREPRENEURS THROUGH TODAY'S TECHNOLOGY ACT

                              (H.R. 1807)

Summary
    H.R. 1807 establishes distance training and education to 
potential as well as existing entrepreneurs through the use of 
high-speed communication technology. The legislation targets 
resources toward expanding access to affordable entrepreneurial 
development resources for firms across geographical borders.
    To increase access to business development services, the 
bill promotes the development and dissemination of virtual 
information through an interactive process and customized to 
the needs of specific businesses. To do this, the legislation 
provides for the establishment of contracts with service 
providers to develop entrepreneurial training content to be 
virtually conveyed to facilities across the country, including 
to SBA Small Business Development Centers, Women's Business 
Centers, Veterans Business Outreach Centers, and district 
offices as well as home based businesses. The information to be 
distributed through the legislation is required to remain 
flexible and adaptive to entrepreneurs' changing needs.
Legislative history
    H.R. 1807 was introduced by Rep. Glenn Thompson on March 
31, 2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation. The Committee received testimony from 
small business representatives, including an administrator of a 
community education center who discussed the benefits of the 
additional resources to be established in the legislation, 
particularly on rural regions.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1807 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On July 28, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1807 and passed 
the bill by a voice vote. On July 29, 2009, the bill was 
received in the Senate, read twice, and referred to the 
Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

      NATIVE AMERICAN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 1834)

Summary

    H.R. 1834 ensures entrepreneurial development services are 
customized to Native American small business owners' needs by 
amending the Small Business Act to establish the Office of 
Native American Affairs at the Small Business Administration 
(SBA). It also establishes grants for business development 
outreach facilities in regions with high concentrations of 
Native American enterprises.
    To ensure business assistance services at the agency are 
customized to this sector, the legislation formalizes the 
Office of Native American Affairs and tasks it with the 
responsibility to develop and implement tools to increase 
entrepreneurship. The legislation also expands access to 
business development services through the establishment of a 
Tribal Business Information Center program, which provides 
grants to conduct business workshops, business counseling, 
entrepreneurial development training, access to computer 
technology and other resources. The bill also establishes 
grants for eligible SBA Small Business Development Centers to 
provide customized services and work with tribal organizations 
in the development of the program.

Legislative history

    H.R. 1834 was introduced by Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick on April 
1, 2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation. The Committee received testimony from 
small business representatives, including the Chairwoman of the 
National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development who 
discussed the merits of additional policy resources and 
outreach facilities targeted to promoting Native American 
entrepreneurship.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1834 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On November 19, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1834 and 
passed the bill by a record vote of 343 ayes and 55 nays. On 
November 20, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, read 
twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                      WOMEN'S BUSINESS CENTER ACT

                              (H.R. 1838)

Summary

    The Women's Business Centers Act improves and expands 
business development resources for women entrepreneurs by 
increasing counseling and training facilities, particularly 
targeting underserved areas; enhancing the operating procedures 
of the Women's Business Center (WBC) program at the U.S. Small 
Business Administration (SBA); and mandating a more targeted 
approach to the National Women's Business Council's research 
program.
    The bill expands the network of assistance facilities and 
coordinates public-private policy efforts dedicated to this 
sector. The bill alters the WBC funding formula to establish 
more equity between permanent centers and new ones to be 
located in currently underserved areas, particularly rural and 
inner city areas. To promote services that generate economic 
growth for entrepreneurs and their communities, the bill 
establishes new program performance measurements promoting 
tangible outcomes for clients, such as job creation and 
industry productivity. To increase the efficiency and 
transparency of the WBC program's administration, the 
legislation also establishes new procedural requirements, such 
as resolving time delays and information lapses. Finally, to 
ensure that the National Women's Business Council, which is a 
bi-partisan federal advisory council, updates its plans in 
accordance with changing needs and the composition of the 
current entrepreneurial sector, the legislation mandates that 
the organization conduct specific research on priority issues.

Legislative history

    H.R. 1838 was introduced by Rep. Mary Fallin on April 1, 
2009. Rep. Yvette Clarke and Rep. McMorris Rodgers were 
original cosponsors. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Small Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation to expand entrepreneurial development 
resources, including for women business owners. The Committee 
received testimony from small business representatives, 
including the Coordinator for the Women's Business Center at 
the Rural Enterprises of Oklahoma who testified on the bill's 
merits, including the provision of increased resources and 
policy updates to the entrepreneurial development services 
available for this sector.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1838 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On November 7, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1838 and 
passed the bill by a recorded vote of 428 ayes and 4 nays. On 
November 9, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, read 
twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                               SCORE ACT

                              (H.R. 1839)

Summary

    The SCORE Act updates SBA's SCORE program to ensure 
services provided through the network of business mentoring 
chapters across the country are relevant to the needs of 
current entrepreneurs. Given the growth of entrepreneurs from 
socially-economically disadvantaged backgrounds, the 
legislation is designed to ensure expanded representation of 
emerging needs in these services.
    The legislation increases the effectiveness of the SCORE 
program by establishing new performance and benchmark 
requirements for the agency's business mentoring resources. The 
legislation establishes benchmarks regarding service delivery, 
such as the success of assisted entrepreneurs, as well as 
standards for the expertise levels of volunteers to ensure 
effective counseling. H.R. 1839 also requires SCORE counselors 
to reflect the demographics of today's business community. 
Specifically, program administrators are required to recruit 
and maintain a higher representation of volunteers from a 
diverse set of backgrounds, helping ensure that mentors provide 
appropriate advice to clients.

Legislative history

    H.R. 1839 was introduced by Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-FL-13) on 
April 1, 2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation to improve entrepreneurial development 
resources, including through the agency's business mentoring 
program. The Committee received testimony from small business 
representatives, including the SCORE Administrator from 
Manasota, Florida who testified on the benefits of the 
legislation.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1839 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On November 18, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1839 and 
passed the bill by a voice vote. On November 19, 2009, the bill 
was received in the Senate, read twice, and referred to the 
Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                 EXPANDING ENTREPRENEURSHIP ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 1842)

Summary

    H.R. 1842 facilitates businesses' access to tools that 
provide assistance addressing the challenges of the current 
economy by requiring the Small Business Administration (SBA) to 
utilize the entrepreneurial development programs more 
effectively to support job creation and economic growth. The 
legislation updates the organization and management of the 
entrepreneurial development resources at the SBA by increasing 
coordination among agency programs; requiring strategic 
planning by the agency, focusing on the use of these resources 
for job creation; and modernizing the agency's information 
technology and web portal related to these programs.
    The legislation promotes increased planning to strengthen 
entrepreneurial development services at the agency. It also 
requires outreach facilities to meet performance measures 
established to help in the creation or maintenance of jobs. To 
increase coordination of service delivery, the agency is 
required to ensure there is collaboration among the 
headquarters as well as state and local economic development 
agencies. Further, the bill requires the designation of 
Community Specialists in each SBA District Office. Finally, the 
legislation requires expanded access to agency services by 
restructuring informational entrepreneurial development 
resources.

Legislative history

    H.R. 1842 was introduced by Rep. Luetkemeyer on April 1, 
2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation to improve institutional structure and 
program implementation of the agency's ED services. The 
Committee received testimony from business assistance program 
administrators and small business representatives regarding the 
merits of the legislation to promote economic growth objectives 
through the ED resources and to better coordinate the ED 
network's efforts to deliver services more efficiently.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1842 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On November 18, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1842 and 
passed the bill by a voice vote. On November 19, 2009, the bill 
was received in the Senate, read twice, and referred to the 
Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

      SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTERS MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 1845)

Summary

    The Small Business Development Centers Modernization Act of 
2009 updates the Small Business Development Center program 
(SBDC) at the Small Business Administration to provide it with 
the resources to address current issues impacting the 
entrepreneurial sector. The legislation updates services 
provided by SBDCs through expanding the types of assistance 
available and improving the program structure.
    The legislation updates operational procedures to improve 
the delivery of services through the centers and authorizes the 
development of specialized assistance programs at SBDCs aimed 
at assisting businesses secure federal stimulus contracts and 
affordable financing. To maintain high levels of service 
through SBDCs, operational procedures are restructured to 
ensure that the program is administered efficiently. The 
legislation targets additional resources to eligible centers to 
establish new initiatives, including programs to help 
entrepreneurs access credit and capital, enter or expand in the 
procurement arena, become green enterprises or achieve 
financial stability.

Legislative history

    H.R. 1845 was introduced by Rep. Schock on April 1, 2009. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship held a hearing on April 2, 2009 to 
evaluate the legislation to enhance entrepreneurial development 
resources, particularly through the SBDC program. The Committee 
received testimony from small business representatives, 
including the Director of the Illinois Small Business 
Development Center to discuss the effect of the legislation on 
the capacity of SBDCs to meet the increasing demand for 
services particularly during the economic downturn of 2007-
2009.
    The Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship met in open session on April 30, 2009, 
and ordered H.R. 1845 reported to the Committee on Small 
Business by a voice vote.
    On November 7, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1845 and 
passed the bill by a record vote of 412 ayes and 20 nays. On 
November 9, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, read 
twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

         THE JOB CREATION THROUGH ENTREPRENEURSHIP ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 2352)

Summary

    H.R. 2352 updates SBA's core entrepreneurial development 
programs, including Small Business Development Centers, Women's 
Business Centers, Service Corps of Retired Executives, and 
Veterans and Native American Business Outreach Programs. The 
legislation updates SBA's entrepreneurial development resources 
to reflect the changing needs of small firms by providing them 
with modernized services, including business counseling, 
technical assistance, research, and mentorship, for adjusting 
to and expanding within the current recession.
    The legislation modernizes these resources to reflect the 
changing needs of entrepreneurs by improving service quality 
and relevance, enhancing service delivery methods, and 
expanding program emphasis on promoting growth. To ensure 
entrepreneurs have access to relevant business development 
tools to address economic conditions, the legislation 
establishes new, specialized services tailored to the needs of 
individual small business subsectors. New initiatives have been 
developed to provide more sophisticated levels of assistance 
and counseling. Additional services have been targeted to 
address the needs of veterans, including those requiring 
customized assistance, particularly reservists, service-
disabled, and women. Further, the bill establishes new service 
for women business owners and Native American entrepreneurs.
    The legislation also improves the ways that services are 
delivered to the small business population. It enhances the ED 
program's structure and implementation particularly affecting 
access to services for entrepreneurs in underserved 
communities, and expands the use of performance measurements. 
The legislation increases the ED programs' focus on promoting 
economic growth by increasing the agency's collaboration with 
local community organizations; facilitating the growth of 
entrepreneurs in socio-economically disadvantaged regions; and 
expanding program incentives for spurring productivity.

Legislative history

    H.R. 2352 was introduced by Rep. Shuler on May 12, 2009. 
Original Cosponsors included the Committee Chairwoman Nydia 
Velazquez and the following Committee members: Reps. 
Luetkemeyer; Altmire; Buchanan; Clarke; Dahlkemper; Halvorson; 
Michaud; Moore; Nye; Schock; Schrader; Sestak; and Thompson. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The Committee on Small Business held a hearing on February 
11, 2009 to examine entrepreneurial needs arising from the 
economic downturn to be addressed through the reauthorization 
and modernization of SBA's entrepreneurial development (ED) 
programs. Small business representatives and public-private 
business management consultants recommended policy changes and 
resource priorities to update the agency's ED programs.
    On April 2, 2009 the Subcommittee on Rural and Urban 
Entrepreneurship held a hearing to evaluate proposed 
legislative initiatives to update the agency's core ED programs 
and received testimony from the major program administrators on 
the likely impacts to the services available to small 
businesses from the legislation.
    On May 6, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing to consider the effect of the legislation to extend the 
scope and modify the delivery of the agency's business 
development services, as well as the role of the bill in 
strengthening small businesses during the economic downturn. 
Small business representatives testified on the merits of the 
legislation.
    The Committee on Small Business met in open session on May 
13, 2009, and ordered H.R. 2352 reported to the House, as 
amended, with a favorable recommendation by a voice vote.
    On May 20, 2009, the House considered H.R. 2352 and passed 
the bill by a record vote of 406 ayes and 15 nays. On May 21, 
2009, the bill was received in the Senate, read twice, and 
referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

             RURAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH ACT

                              (H.R. 2747)

Summary

    H.R. 2747 amends provisions of the Small Business Act 
relating to the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) 
Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) 
Program to direct the Administrator of the Small Business 
Administration (SBA) to make grants to organizations to conduct 
outreach efforts to increase participation in such programs and 
provide application, entrepreneurial, and business skills 
support to prospective program participants. The legislation 
requires organizations receiving such funds to direct 
activities toward small businesses located in areas that are 
underrepresented in SBIR and STTR programs or owned and 
controlled by women, service-disabled veterans, and minorities. 
It also directs the Administrator to establish an advisory 
board to carry out authorized activities and provides a two-
year period for each grant award. The legislation also requires 
federal agencies, in making SBIR and STTR grant awards, to 
prioritize applications so as to increase the number of 
recipients from rural areas.

Legislative history

    H.R. 2747 was introduced by Rep. Halvorson on June 8, 2009. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
the Committee on Science and Technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business 
convened a hearing on April 22, 2009 to explore the numerous 
contributions that the SBIR program makes to national security 
priorities, health technology, economic development objectives 
and America's international economic competitiveness. On June 
4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Contracting and Technology held a hearing to review the 
proposed legislation that would reauthorize and modernize the 
SBIR program. The Subcommittee met in open session on June 11, 
2009 and approved H.R. 2747 by voice vote.
    No further action has been taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                 INVESTING IN TOMORROW'S TECHNOLOGY ACT

                              (H.R. 2767)

Summary

    H.R. 2767 amends the Small Business Act to extend through 
FY 2011 the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program 
and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program. The 
legislation provides that, with respect to participation in an 
SBIR or STTR program a business that has more than 500 
employees shall not qualify as a small business and in 
determining whether a small business is independently owned and 
operated, the Administrator of the Small Business 
Administration (SBA) shall not consider the business as 
affiliated with a venture capital operating company if such 
company does not own 50 percent or more of the business and the 
company's employees do not constitute a majority of the 
business's board of directors.
    The legislation provides limited conditions under which a 
small business shall still be considered eligible for SBIR/STTR 
participation when a venture capital operating company 
controlled by a business with more than 500 employees has an 
ownership interest in a small business owned in majority part 
by venture capital operating companies.

Legislative history

    H.R. 2767 was introduced by Ranking Member Graves on June 
9, 2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business and the Committee on Science and Technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business 
convened a hearing on April 22, 2009 to explore the numerous 
contributions that the SBIR program makes to national security 
priorities, health technology, economic development objectives 
and America's international economic competitiveness. On June 
4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Contracting and Technology held a hearing to review the 
proposed legislation that would reauthorize and modernize the 
SBIR program. The Subcommittee met in open session on June 11, 
2009 and approved H.R. 2767 by voice vote.
    No further action has been taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

      COMMERCIALIZING SMALL BUSINESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT

                              (H.R. 2769)

Summary

    H.R. 2767 amends the Small Business Act to state as the 
policy of Congress that Small Business Administration (SBA) 
research and development (R&D) programs should focus on 
promoting R&D of projects governed by commercial business plans 
which have significant potential to produce products or 
services for the marketplace or for acquisition by federal 
agencies. Energy-related, nanotechnology, and rare disease-
related research topics are designated as deserving special 
consideration under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) 
Program research topics.
    The legislation requires each federal agency that is 
obligated to have an SBIR program and that awards annually $5 
billion or more in procurement contracts to establish, for 
FY2010 and thereafter, annual goals for the commercialization 
of projects funded by SBIR awards. Finally, it directs each 
federal agency required to conduct an SBIR program to establish 
a commercialization program that supports the progress of SBIR 
awardees to the third phase.

Legislative history

    H.R. 2769 was introduced by Rep. Bright on June 9, 2009. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
the Committee on Science and Technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business 
convened a hearing on April 22, 2009 to explore the numerous 
contributions that the SBIR program makes to national security 
priorities, health technology, economic development objectives 
and America's international economic competitiveness. On June 
4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Contracting and Technology held a hearing to review the 
proposed legislation that would reauthorize and modernize the 
SBIR program. The Subcommittee met in open session on June 11, 
2009 and approved H.R. 2769 by voice vote.
    No further action has been taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                     SBIR AND STTR ENHANCEMENT ACT

                              (H.R. 2772)

Summary

    H.R. 2772 amends the Small Business Act to direct each 
federal agency that is required to establish a small business 
innovation research (SBIR) program to issue research topic 
solicitations at least twice a year and make a final decision 
on topic proposals within 90 days, unless the Administrator of 
the Small Business Administration (SBA) determines that a 
decision may be extended to 180 days.
    The legislation also authorizes funding for SBIR 
administrative, oversight, and contract processing costs and 
requires a Comptroller General audit on how federal agencies 
calculate SBIR and STTR (Small Business Technology Transfer) 
extramural research budgets. It directs each federal agency 
conducting an SBIR or STTR program to establish and maintain 
program evaluation and technology utilization databases and 
authorizes them to ``fast track'' phase two awards. Finally, 
H.R. 2772 increases SBIR and STTR award levels and provides 
express authority for agencies to award sequential phase two 
awards for SBIR-funded projects.

Legislative history

    H.R. 2772 was introduced by Rep. Schock on June 9, 2009. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
the Committee on Science and Technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business 
convened a hearing on April 22, 2009 to explore the numerous 
contributions that the SBIR program makes to national security 
priorities, health technology, economic development objectives 
and America's international economic competitiveness. On June 
4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Contracting and Technology held a hearing to review the 
proposed legislation that would reauthorize and modernize the 
SBIR program. The Subcommittee met in open session on June 11, 
2009 and approved H.R. 2772 by voice vote.
    No further action has been taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                 SBIR/STTR REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 2965)

Summary

    The SBIR/STTR Reauthorization Act extends for a period of 
two years the Federal government's largest small business 
research and development programs. The legislation modernizes 
the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, changing 
the legislative guidelines and policies in order to update the 
program in response to the unique challenges facing small 
research companies and the changing research priorities of 
Federal agencies.
    The Act is aimed at three broad goals. First, the bill 
seeks to encourage greater participation in SBIR. An increase 
in the number of small businesses applying for SBIR is critical 
to the on-going success of the program. Second, the bill 
permits small companies that are majority-owned by qualifying 
venture capital firms to participate in the SBIR program. A 
2003 ruling by the Small Business Administration (SBA) has made 
small firms with large investments from venture capital 
companies ineligible to participate in the SBIR program. The 
SBA ruling forces many small businesses to choose between 
accepting investments from venture capital firms and 
participating in the Federal government's largest R&D program 
for small research firms. Third, the bill seeks to encourage 
and support commercialization initiatives at Federal agencies 
that administer SBIR programs. Under current law, certain 
Federal agencies have the authority to develop 
commercialization programs. This bill extends to all agencies 
the authority to develop programs designed to support the 
commercialization of SBIR-funded research.
    Additionally, the bill seeks to codify in statute the 
programmatic flexibility that Federal agencies need in order to 
administer SBIR awards in a manner that is most consistent with 
the agency's specific mission. The SBIR policy directive issued 
by the SBA has provided a great deal of autonomy to the Federal 
agencies, the bill codifies agency autonomy with respect to 
administering their SBIR programs. Along with granting to 
Federal agencies a great degree of autonomy, the bill also 
requires Federal agencies to establish more concrete goals and 
objectives with respect to their SBIR programs and directs the 
agencies to provide Congress with more regular reports.

Legislative history

    H.R. 2965 was introduced by Rep. Altmire on June 19, 2009. 
Original Cosponsors included the Committee Chairwoman Nydia 
Velazquez and Reps. Wu, Graves, Schock, Nye, Halvorson, and 
Bright. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business and the Committee on Science and Technology.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business 
convened a hearing on April 22, 2009 to explore the numerous 
contributions that the SBIR program makes to national security 
priorities, health technology, economic development objectives 
and America's international economic competitiveness. On June 
4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Contracting and Technology held a hearing to review the 
proposed legislation that would reauthorize and modernize the 
SBIR program. A mark-up of the legislation, which would become 
the basis for H.R. 2965 was conducted on June 11, 2009.
    On June 17, 2009, the Committee on Small Business convened 
a hearing to review H.R. 2965. Witnesses testified on the 
legislation's broad benefits to small businesses and American 
innovation. On June 25, 2009, the Committee met in open session 
and ordered H.R. 2965, as amended, to be reported by a recorded 
vote of 22 to 0.
    On July 8, 2009, the bill was considered by the House under 
a structured rule. Five amendments were made in order under the 
rule and all were agreed to by either voice vote or recorded 
vote. The bill passed the House with a vote of 386 yeas and 41 
nays. On July 9, 2009, H.R. 2965 was received in the Senate and 
read twice. On July 13, 2009, the Senate struck all after the 
Enacting Clause, substituted the language of S. 1233 as amended 
and then passed the legislation by Unanimous Consent.
    No further action has been taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

       SMALL BUSINESS HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FINANCING ACT

                              (H.R. 3014)

Summary

    H.R. 3014 amends the Small Business Act to create a new 
loan guarantee program separate from other SBA programs that is 
solely available to certain healthcare providers to purchase 
health information technology (HIT). This new HIT loan program 
will rely on private-sector lenders to provide loans that are, 
in turn, guaranteed by the SBA. The proceeds from a HIT loan 
may be used for qualifying HIT purpose including the 
acquisition, maintenance, or training for HIT systems and 
equipment. Loans are eligible for a 90 percent SBA guarantee 
and loan amounts are up to $350,000 for any single individual/
professional and $2,000,000 for any group.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3014 was introduced by Rep. Dahlkemper on April 1, 
2009. Original cosponsors included Reps. Altmire, Clarke, 
Ellsworth, Nye, Schrader, Shuler, and Velazquez. The bill was 
referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Regulations 
and Healthcare held a hearing on June 22, 2009 to discuss the 
financial challenges that solo and small group health practices 
face in adopting health information technology (HIT). In 
particular, witnesses provided testimony on the dislocations 
between capital costs and returns on investment that discourage 
greater uptake of HIT assets by small health providers.
    On Thursday, July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine 
proposed legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the 
SBA's lending and investment programs that had been identified 
by previous hearings before the Committee.
    On Thursday, October 8, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup of H.R. 3014. 
This bill was reported to the full Committee by voice vote with 
no amendments.
    On November 18, 2009, the House considered H.R. 3014 and 
passed the bill by voice vote.
    On November 19, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

 THE ENHANCED NEW MARKETS AND EXPANDED INVESTMENT IN RENEWABLE ENERGY 
                  FOR SMALL MANUFACTURERS ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3722)

Summary

    H.R. 3722, The Small Business Financing and Investment Act 
updates and expands two of the SBA's most underutilized 
programs--the New Markets Venture Capital (NMVC) program and 
the Renewable Fuel Capital Investment (RFCI) program--with 
specific emphasis on expanding the programs and providing 
targeted investment for small manufacturing firms.
    For both the NMVC and RFCI programs, a statutory mandate is 
established for the SBA Administrator to actively engage in 
affirmative actions to expand the number of investment 
companies and ensure that both programs have a broad nationwide 
distribution. Additionally, the Administrator is required to 
perform a study on the success in expanding the NMVC and RFCI 
programs and report this progress no later than one year after 
the bill's enactment.
    H.R. 3722 amends the NMVC program to place a heightened 
emphasis on increasing capital investments for small businesses 
engaged in manufacturing. The program's current limitations to 
``smaller enterprises'' will be expanded to permit investment 
in any small business concern located in a low income (LI) area 
that is engaged primarily in manufacturing. The bill also 
expands the permissible uses of operational assistance (OA) to 
include assistance for small manufacturing businesses to 
retool, update, or replace machinery or equipment. 
Additionally, the private capital requirements for NMVC 
companies that investment in small manufacturers in LI areas 
are lowered, making it easier for these companies to secure 
final approval from the SBA. Taken together, these changes will 
facilitate the licensing of more NMVC companies that will 
invest in small manufacturing firms and will provide small 
manufacturing businesses with crucial support to expand their 
business activity in a recovering economy.
    The bill makes similar amendments to the RFCI program to 
help small manufacturing firms reorient their businesses toward 
the anticipated green economy. The program's current 
limitations to ``smaller enterprises'' will be expanded to 
permit investment in any small business concern that is engaged 
in research, development, or manufacturing of renewable energy-
related goods, products or services. The program will also be 
renamed the ``Renewable Energy Capital Investment'' (RECI) and 
will be established as a permanent part of the SBA's investment 
mission. The bill will also expand the permissible uses of 
operational assistance grants (OA) to include assistance for 
RECI businesses to reduce their energy consumption or to 
retool, update, or replace machinery or equipment. The bill 
also simplifies the existing fee structure of the RECI program 
to authorize the Administrator to charge fees only for the 
purpose of offsetting the cost of RECI guarantees. Operational 
assistance grants would continue to be subsidized by 
appropriated funds. This will effectively expedite the 
implementation of the RECI program by enabling the SBA to 
implement the investment and leverage portion of the program 
independent of the operational grants.
    H.R. 3722 makes several technical and process improvements 
to both the NMVC and RECI programs. In the NMVC program, the 
final approval process for conditionally approved NMVC 
companies will be streamlined by establishing simplified 
application documents and permitting conditionally approved 
NMVC companies to receive funding for operational assistance. 
The operational assistance element will also be simplified, 
making it easier for companies to raise matching commitments 
for OA. The NMVC definition of ``low-income geographic areas'' 
would be directly associated with the definition of a ``low-
income community'' in the Internal Revenue Code, thus enabling 
NMVC companies to leverage eligible NMVC investments with New 
Markets Tax Credit allocations.
    H.R. 3722 authorizes the SBA to make up to $40 million in 
OA grants for fiscal years 2010 and 2011 in the NMVC program, 
and $40 billion in OA grants for fiscal years 2010 and 2011 in 
the RECI program. The SBA is also authorized to guaranty $100 
million in NMVC program debentures and $1 billion in RECI 
debentures for each of fiscal years 2010 and 2011.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3722 was introduced by Congresswoman Ann Kirkpatrick 
(AZ-01) on October 6, 2009 with no additional original 
cosponsors. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business and was further referred to the Subcommittee on 
Finance and Tax.
    The Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup on H.R. 
3722 on October 8, 2009 where the bill was forwarded to the 
full committee by voice vote with no amendments.
    Provisions of H.R. 3722 were incorporated in H.R. 3854, 
which was reported to the House on October 21, 2009 and 
subsequently passed by the House on October 29, 2009.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

THE SMALL BUSINESS CREDIT EXPANSION AND LOAN MARKETS STABILIZATION ACT 
                                OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3723)

Summary

    H.R. 3723 updates and streamlines the SBA's largest small 
business finance program, the 7(a) program. Most importantly, 
the bill makes a number of changes to help small businesses 
access credit in an environment where many have experienced 
unprecedented capital constraints. The legislation increases 
the maximum gross size of 7(a) loans by 33 percent--from the 
current level of $2 million to $3 million. This level of loans 
will help provide small firms with larger amounts of capital 
under the program without increasing the SBA's level of risk 
exposure with larger guarantee amounts on larger loans. This 
change will also ensure that the program remains focused on 
startup and early stage small firms, businesses that have 
historically encountered the greatest difficulties in accessing 
credit. It also avoids making small borrowers carry a 
disproportionate share of the risk associated with larger 
loans.
    A new Capital Backstop program is also established under 
which the SBA will provide assistance to lenders in the 
application, processing, and underwriting functions for 7(a) 
loans, thus acting as a conduit to match lenders who are 
willing to make loans with borrowers in need of capital. Under 
this program, the SBA would also act as a lender of last resort 
for creditworthy borrowers in times of credit shortage or when 
private lenders withdraw from lending in an effort to hoard 
capital--as was widely seen in the recent credit crunch. This 
program would only take effect in the event that the Bureau of 
Economic Analysis has determined that the gross domestic 
product of the U.S. has declined for three consecutive 
quarters, and if the annual program level volume of the SBA's 
7(a) loan program has declined by 30 percent or more compared 
to the same time in the previous fiscal year. It should also be 
noted, however, that the SBA would be required to apply the 
existing eligibility and credit underwriting criteria that are 
used for 7(a) loans, thus avoiding any adverse selection for 
SBA loan-making. In fact, the SBA backstop portfolio should 
carry no more risk than that of a 7(a) private sector lender. 
Additionally, total program level in the Capital Backstop 
program would be identical to the annual program level of the 
7(a) program, meaning that the program would not entail any 
increased exposure beyond levels already contemplated in the 
annual 7(a) program level authorization. Finally, to avoid any 
undue personnel burden on the SBA's other programs, the Capital 
Backstop program would be carried out using a reserve cadre of 
lending professionals that is skilled and trained to make 
loans.
    The bill will also extend the recovery and relief loan 
benefits that were originally established under the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) through the end of 
fiscal year 2011, thus providing businesses with no-fee loans 
that are backed up to 90 percent by the SBA. The America's 
Recovery Capital (ARC) loan program will also see several 
enhancements, with its extension through the end of fiscal year 
2011, a new single-page application requirement, and an 
increase in the maximum size of ARC loans to $50,000. Previous 
restrictions on the use of ARC loans to service other SBA debt 
will also be eliminated, thus expanding the reach of ARC 
proceeds as a significant source of business stabilization 
capital.
    The bill incorporates several initiatives aimed at 
encouraging more lenders to participate in the 7(a) program and 
make more loans available to small firms. First, the 7(a) 
lending process is simplified and streamlined, particularly 
among community banks and lenders who do not currently 
participate in the program. A Small Bank Outreach program will 
be established with the specific mission of identifying and 
supporting small banks, credit unions, and community lenders to 
participate in the program. The legislation also establishes a 
Rural Lender Outreach program to reduce the paperwork burden 
associated with 7(a) loans.
    To ensure that the SBA's private sector lenders receive 
fair and expeditious resolution of their complaints, an 
independent and objective Ombudsman's office will be created to 
resolve lenders' appeals separately from the SBA's program 
administration offices. This measure will enhance participation 
in the lending programs by ensuring that program participants 
can make informal inquiries or file formal appeals to an 
independent, disinterested party in the strictest confidence 
and without fear of retaliation. The Ombudsman and independent 
review process, however, would not be a binding determination 
and would not affect other existing administrative procedures 
or judicial remedies.
    The bill also adapts the 7(a) program to achieve specific 
public policy objectives through the establishment of a Rural 
Lender Outreach program to focus on making loans with 
increased-guarantees and reduced paperwork burdens for 
entrepreneurs in rural communities. It also targets capital 
toward socially and economically disadvantaged businesses by 
providing permanent authority for the Community Express Loan 
program and the Increased Veteran Participation Loan program. 
The legislation will also expand access to 7(a) loans for 
businesses that are organized as cooperative enterprises and 
will prohibit the SBA from applying disparate treatment to 
loans that are used to finance goodwill when a business is 
bought or sold.
    This legislation also addresses several deficiencies that 
discourage existing lenders from fully utilizing the program. 
The legislation will put an end to improper denials and long 
waiting periods when lenders apply for the SBA to honor its 
guarantees by requiring the SBA to make prompt and proper 
payment on guaranty repurchase applications. A National Lender 
Training Program will be established to train new and 
participating lenders on SBA's lending systems, policies, and 
procedures, and to help reduce incidents of improper loan 
underwriting and documentation in the program. The Secondary 
Market Lending Authority established under ARRA will be made a 
permanent part of the SBA's access to capital mission and will 
be expanded to provide warehouse credit to any 7(a) lender.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \6\Currently, participation in the Secondary Market Lending 
Authority is limited solely to systemically significant brokers and 
dealers in 7(a) loans.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The bill authorizes a program level of $20 billion for 
fiscal years 2010 and 2011. This is approximately 14 percent 
higher than the current level of $17.5 billion and should be 
more than adequate to support any increased lending that may 
occur in the program.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3723 was introduced by Congresswoman Deborah Halvorson 
(IL-11) on October 6, 2009 with no additional original 
cosponsors. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business and was further referred to the Subcommittee on 
Finance and Tax.
    The Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup on H.R. 
3723 on October 8, 2009 where bill was forwarded to the full 
committee by voice vote with no amendments.
    Provisions of H.R. 3723 were incorporated in H.R. 3854, 
which was reported to the House on October 21, 2009 and 
subsequently passed by the House on October 29, 2009.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

           SMALL BUSINESS MICROLENDING EXPANSION ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3737)

Summary

    H.R. 3737 authorizes the SBA to utilize surplus funds for 
the purpose of reducing the interest rates that borrowers pay 
in the program. Borrowers will benefit from legislative 
language that permits intermediaries to make loans with more 
flexible credit that can better meet the needs of small 
businesses, particularly those with seasonal business. The SBA 
will be required to establish a process for the transmission of 
credit reporting data to the major credit bureaus, thus 
enabling program participants to establish credit histories 
through the program.
    The legislation also increases the maximum size of loans 
made under the program, both for intermediaries and borrowers. 
Currently, the maximum obligation that any intermediary may 
have under the program is $3.5 million, with first-year 
intermediaries limited to just $750,000. This bill will 
increase those caps to $7 and $1 million respectively. The 
legislation also seeks to bring more intermediaries into the 
program by broadening the eligibility requirements for micro-
intermediaries to qualify for the program.
    Finally, the bill makes a number of technical revisions to 
the 7(m) program that will increase its overall efficacy. An 
annual reporting requirement will be implemented to closely 
track the performance of the program and provide policymakers 
with information on the program's performance.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3737 was introduced by Rep. Ellsworth on October 7, 
2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The full Committee subsequently held a hearing on June 10, 
2009, to examine the challenges facing the full array of the 
SBA's capital access programs. The Committee received testimony 
on issues facing the 7(a), Certified Development Company (CDC), 
Small Business Investment Company (SBIC), New Markets Venture 
Capital (NMVC), 7(m)/Microloan, and Renewable Fuels Capital 
Investment (RFCI) Company programs. Witnesses at this hearing 
discussed various deficiencies affecting the efficacy of these 
programs and proposed steps that could be taken to better meet 
the SBA's capital access mission.
    On Thursday, July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine 
proposed legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the 
SBA's lending and investment programs that had been identified 
by previous hearings before the Committee. Witnesses at this 
hearing discussed several legislative proposals that would make 
a number of important reforms to the SBA's existing programs.
    On Thursday, October 8, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup of H.R. 3737. 
This bill was reported to the full Committee by voice vote with 
no amendments.
    On November 6 and 7, 2009, the House considered H.R. 3737 
and passed the bill by a vote of 405 to 23.
    On November 9, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

           SMALL BUSINESS EARLY-STAGE INVESTMENT ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3738)

Summary

    Under the Small Business Early Stage Investment (SBESI) 
program established by this legislation, the SBA will provide 
grant funding to act as co-investment in qualified companies 
that will focus on investing in small businesses, with 
particular emphasis on financing early-stage small businesses 
in targeted industries. Early stage small businesses are those 
that have not generated revenues in excess of $15 million in 
any of the previous three years.
    In order to receive SBA funding, however, an investment 
company must have capital commitments from non-federal sources 
that are at least equal to the amount of its grant request. SBA 
funding would then be repaid pari passau when the fund exits 
its investments. As SBA funding is repaid, funds will go to a 
revolving capital fund administered by the SBA and be 
recommitted to new program participants.
    Funds from the SBESI program will only be given to highly 
qualified investment funds with experienced managers that have 
a proven track record of returning a profit to their investors. 
As a condition of receiving grants, the investment funds must 
commit to repayment of all investors, including the SBA, in 
cash. The SBA shall establish a process for selecting funds to 
participate in the program, with an abbreviated application 
process for investment companies that have already secured a 
license under the SBA's Small Business Investment Company 
(SBIC) program. SBICs will also benefit from presumptive 
qualifications under several selection criteria for which they 
previously qualified under the SBIC licensing process.
    In order to receive SBESI funds, applicants must have 
raised private capital in an amount equal to or greater than 
the amount of SBA funds being requested. The maximum amount of 
a grant may not exceed $100 million for any single investment 
fund or its affiliates. Investment companies receiving grant 
monies must make all of their investments in small businesses, 
and no less than 50 percent of their investments in early stage 
small businesses in targeted industries.
    In exchange for receiving SBESI funds, participating 
investment funds must convey a ``grant interest'' to the SBA. 
The grant interest shall have all the rights and attributes of 
an investor interest, but shall not denote control or voting 
rights to the SBA. The grant interest shall entitle the SBA to 
a pro rata portion of any distributions made by the investment 
company, in cash, and equal to the pro rata share of the total 
funds in the investment company that the SBA grant commitment 
comprised.
    As distributions are made by participating funds, all 
distributions shall go to a revolving fund and be recommitted 
to new participating funds. SBA will audit participating 
investment companies when half of the grant commitment funds 
have been drawn-down to ensure that the grant is being invested 
in a fashion consistent with the law.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3738 was introduced by Rep. Nye on October 7, 2009. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    On March 26, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations held a hearing to 
examine issues related to investment in small businesses, with 
particular emphasis on how prevailing economic conditions have 
affected investment in small firms. Witnesses in this hearing 
explained how the current recession has aggravated the need for 
investment funds, particularly for equity investing in small 
firms, and how new federal initiatives could allay those needs. 
Additionally, this hearing explored numerous setbacks to the 
SBA's investment programs that have dramatically reduced the 
amount of investment in early stage and startup businesses and 
have inhibited the flow of venture capital to small businesses 
in general.
    The full Committee subsequently held a hearing on June 10, 
2009, to examine the challenges facing the full array of the 
SBA's capital access programs. Witnesses at this hearing 
discussed various deficiencies affecting the efficacy of these 
programs and proposed steps that could be taken to better meet 
the SBA's capital access mission.
    On Thursday, July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine 
proposed legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the 
SBA's lending and investment programs that had been identified 
by previous hearings before the Committee. Witnesses at this 
hearing discussed several legislative proposals that would make 
a number of important reforms to the SBA's existing programs 
and establish new programs that will help close the gap for 
equity investment that was left when the SBA's investing 
programs were curtailed.
    On Thursday, October 8, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup of H.R. 3738. 
This bill was reported to the full Committee by voice vote with 
no amendments.
    On November 18, 2009, the House considered H.R. 3738 and 
passed the bill by voice vote.
    On November 19, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

THE JOB CREATION AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT THROUGH CDC MODERNIZATION ACT 
                                OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3739)

Summary

    H.R. 3739 will modernize and improve the Certified 
Development Company (CDC) program by making an array of 
technical changes that increase the flow of capital to small 
businesses and addressing two of the program's most important 
challenges. The bill contains several provisions that will 
directly benefit small businesses in need of long-term, fixed-
rate financing. Businesses will be able to make larger equity 
injections to reduce the amount of a CDC project that is 
financed with a first lien loan. This will result in lower-cost 
CDC financings, particularly for startup or capital-intensive 
businesses. Borrowers will also have the option of including 
loan and debenture closing costs in a CDC financing loan, thus 
reducing the upfront cost of these loans. Additionally, the 
maximum size of CDC financings will be significantly 
increased--from the current limit of $10 million to $12.5 
million--and existing statutory limits that prohibit borrowers 
from securing CDC loans and 7(a) loans for the maximum combined 
amounts will be eliminated.
    Borrowers will also benefit from legislative initiatives to 
expand the program's reach to businesses that are owned by 
women, minorities, and veterans by permitting CDCs to consider 
the qualifications of two or more business owners in 
determining whether a financing qualifies for larger 
financings. Additionally, the bill will expand the program to 
permit financing for businesses in low-income communities and 
rural areas, while also increasing the maximum loan size for 
these businesses as well as for businesses that are a major 
source of employment in their community.
    The bill contains provisions that will be vital to the 
long-term success of the CDC program, by authorizing CDC staff 
to act as local agents of the SBA in performing workouts, 
liquidations, and recoveries. This will help minimize losses by 
ensuring timely liquidation and recovery of defaulted loans. 
The bill contains a provision for the SBA to reimburse CDC 
costs for both staff and contractors, as necessary, for these 
liquidation activities, with the funds ultimately coming from 
increased recoveries on defaulted loans. These provisions will 
be particularly relevant in the current environment where loan 
defaults in the program are increasing in response to the 
economic downturn and real estate values declining.
    Finally, an important, but easily overlooked focus for the 
bill will be to codify the existing certification requirements 
and processes that define CDCs. Although historically defined 
in agency guidance and regulation, the statutory codification 
of the program's membership requirements, operational 
parameters, and ethical standards are critical to the long-term 
stability and successful implementation of the program. These 
changes will provide permanent and fixed authority for every 
existing CDC while simultaneously laying the groundwork for new 
CDCs to enter the program.
    The bill authorizes a program level of $9 billion for FY 
2010 and $10 billion for FY 2011. Because the program operates 
at zero subsidy, however, no appropriation will be necessary to 
support these levels of lending in the program.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3739 was introduced by Congressman Vern Buchanan (FL-
13) on October 6, 2009 with no additional original cosponsors. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
was further referred to the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax.
    The Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup on H.R. 
3739 on October 8, 2009 where the bill was forwarded to the 
full committee by voice vote without amendments.
    Provisions of H.R. 3739 were incorporated in H.R. 3854, 
which was reported to the House on October 21, 2009 and 
subsequently passed by the House on October 29, 2009.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

    THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY MODERNIZATION ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3740)

Summary

    The Small Business Financing and Investment Act will update 
and streamline the SBA's largest investment program, the Small 
Business Investment Company program. The legislation will seek 
to increase the number and size of investments made in small 
firms under the program. Perhaps equally important, the bill 
will seek to halt the continued flight of SBICs that 
participate in the program by establishing an expedited 
licensing process to keep successful SBICs that are in good-
standing involved in the program. The bill will also revise the 
SBIC leverage limitations to create an incentive for 
successful, well run SBICs to remain in the program by 
permitting SBICs that are managed by the same team to access 
the increased leverage limits available for a family of SBIC 
funds.
    The bill will spur innovation within the program and test 
new structures for SBIC leverage by providing the SBA with 
specific authority to create new pilot programs within the SBIC 
program. This would be subject to limitations on the number, 
size, term, and dollar amount of any leverage pilot program, 
and could not constitute mandatory program changes for SBICs to 
follow. The SBA would also be required to continue applying 
existing requirements to maintain zero-subsidy in the SBIC 
program, and would have to comply with the notice and comment 
rulemaking provisions of current law.
    Businesses will have access to greater investment under the 
provisions of the bill that expand the Energy Saving Debenture 
program and increase the amounts of leverage available to 
invest in veteran-owned businesses. Burdensome SBA regulations 
that limit businesses' ability to prepay SBIC leverage will 
also be eliminated, enabling businesses to prepay a de minimis 
amount of their SBIC investment without prior approval from the 
SBA. This change will provide businesses with greater 
flexibility in managing the investment funds they receive under 
the program.
    Finally, the bill makes a number of technical revisions to 
the SBIC program that will increase the overall efficacy of the 
program. The bill clarifies that venture leases, equipment 
leases, real estate sale leasebacks, and similar arrangements 
qualify as loans that are authorized forms of financing for 
SBIC funds. The bill also corrects inconsistencies between the 
SBA's regulations and the Small Business Investment Act to 
clarify the terms of a default on an SBIC loan.
    The bill authorizes the SBA to make up to $5 billion in 
SBIC debenture guarantees and in each of fiscal years 2010 and 
2011.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3740 was introduced by Congressman Blaine Luetkemeyer 
(MO-09) on October 6, 2009 with no additional original 
cosponsors. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business and was further referred to the Subcommittee on 
Finance and Tax.
    The Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup on H.R. 
3740 on October 8, 2009 where the bill was forwarded to the 
full committee by voice vote with no amendments.
    Provisions of H.R. 3740 were incorporated in H.R. 3854, 
which was reported to the House on October 21, 2009 and 
subsequently passed by the House on October 29, 2009.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

        SMALL BUSINESS DISASTER READINESS AND REFORM ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3743)

Summary

    H.R. 3743 directs the SBA to improve the way in which it 
disburses approved assistance to victims of disasters. The bill 
directs the SBA to only require that repayment begins once all 
the disaster loan proceeds have been disbursed and further 
requires that repayment amounts be based solely on funds that 
have actually been disbursed, not on amounts that were approved 
and not disbursed.
    The bill also establishes a grant program to assist small 
businesses in the most severe of disasters for which the 
Administrator has declared eligibility for additional disaster 
assistance. To ensure that grant assistance only goes to the 
neediest small businesses and is only used to spur 
redevelopment in communities where market forces have failed, 
the program will only be applicable under very limited 
circumstances. In order to receive a grant, a small business 
must have been located in those communities most severely 
damaged by the disaster, must have been in existence for at 
least two years prior to the disaster, must have been rejected 
for a conventional SBA loan, must have remained economically 
viable following the disaster, and must have certified that 
they will reopen their business in one of the affected 
communities.
    The legislation creates an outreach program under which the 
SBA will allocate funds to Women's Business Centers, Veterans' 
Business Outreach Centers, Small Business Development Centers 
and local chambers of commerce for these organizations to 
provide applicants with assistance in preparing applications 
for loan assistance and navigating the SBA's convoluted loan 
process.
    Finally, the SBA's disaster planning and preparedness will 
be enhanced through the creation of Regional Disaster Working 
Groups. Under this provision the Regional Administrator in each 
of the SBA's regional offices must develop region-specific 
disaster preparedness and response plans that are based upon 
the comprehensive disaster response plan required by Section 40 
of the Small Business Act and that is developed in cooperation 
with city, state, and federal emergency response authorities as 
well as with representatives from businesses located within the 
region. At a minimum, the disaster preparedness and recovery 
subplan must identify and plan for three disaster scenarios, 
either natural or manmade, that are likely to occur in the 
region.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3743 was introduced by Rep. Griffith on October 7, 
2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    The Committee held a hearing on June 10, 2009, to examine 
the challenges facing the full array of the SBA's capital 
access programs. Witnesses at this hearing discussed various 
deficiencies affecting the efficacy of these programs and 
proposed steps that could be taken to better meet the SBA's 
capital access mission.
    On Thursday, July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine 
proposed legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the 
SBA's lending programs that had been identified by previous 
hearings before the Committee.
    On July 29, 2009, the Committee held an agency oversight 
hearing that focused on a GAO examination of the SBA's Disaster 
program. This hearing reviewed the agency's progress in making 
improvements post-Katrina and made recommendations for 
improvements.
    On Thursday, October 8, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup of H.R. 3743. 
This bill was reported to the full Committee by voice vote with 
no amendments.
    On November 6, 2009, the House considered H.R. 3743 and 
passed the bill by voice vote.
    On November 9, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

          SMALL BUSINESS FINANCING AND INVESTMENT ACT OF 2009

                              (H.R. 3854)

Summary

    The Small Business Financing and Investment Act of 2009 
extends through fiscal year 2011 the federal government's 
primary small business lending and investment programs. In 
doing so, the legislation makes key reforms to these programs 
that are intended to improve the flow of capital to small firms 
amidst one of the worst economic downturns in decades. The 
legislation also establishes two new programs that are intended 
to fill the gaps in the SBA's existing array of capital access 
programs, particularly in the provision of capital to early-
stage small businesses in capital-intensive industries and for 
small firms whose access to capital is limited by the cost of 
financing.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3854 was introduced by Rep. Schrader on October 20, 
2009. Original cosponsors included Committee Chairwoman 
Velazquez and Reps. Halverson and Kirkpatrick. The bill was 
referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business held 
six hearings to examine the issue of small business access to 
capital, the SBA's capital access programs, and related 
legislation.
    On March 26, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations held a hearing to 
examine issues related to investment in small businesses, with 
particular emphasis on how prevailing economic conditions have 
affected investment in small firms. Witnesses in this hearing 
explained how the current recession has aggravated the need for 
investment funds, particularly for equity investing in small 
firms, and how new federal initiatives could allay those needs. 
Additionally, this hearing explored numerous setbacks to the 
SBA's investment programs that had dramatically reduced the 
amount of investment in early stage and startup businesses and 
had inhibited the flow of venture capital to small businesses 
in general.
    The full Committee subsequently held a hearing on June 10, 
2009, to examine the challenges facing the full array of the 
SBA's capital access programs. The Committee received testimony 
on issues facing the 7(a), Certified Development Company (CDC), 
Small Business Investment Company (SBIC), New Markets Venture 
Capital (NMVC), 7(m)/Microloan, and Renewable Fuels Capital 
Investment (RFCI) Company programs. Witnesses at this hearing 
discussed various deficiencies in these programs and proposed 
steps that could be taken to better meet the SBA's capital 
access mission.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Regulations 
and Healthcare held a hearing on June 22, 2009 to discuss the 
financial challenges that solo and small group health practices 
face in adopting health information technology (HIT). In 
particular, witnesses provided testimony on the dislocations 
between capital costs and returns on investment that discourage 
greater uptake of HIT assets by small health providers.
    On July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, Subcommittee 
on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine proposed 
legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the SBA's 
lending and investment programs that had been identified during 
previous hearings. Witnesses at this hearing discussed several 
legislative proposals that would make a number of important 
reforms to the SBA's existing programs and establish new 
programs that will help close the gap for equity investment 
that was left when the SBA's investing programs were curtailed.
    On Thursday, October 8, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a markup of legislation 
affecting the SBA's capital access programs, including the 
7(a), CDC, Microloan, SBIC, NMVC, and Disaster loan programs. 
These bills would also establish a new lending program to 
provide reduced cost capital to small medical practices that 
purchase health information technology and new equity investing 
program under the SBA. These bills were reported to the full 
Committee by voice vote with no amendments.
    The full Committee subsequently held a hearing on October 
14, 2009, to review proposed legislation to address 
deficiencies in the SBA's lending and investment programs that 
had been identified by previous hearings before the Committee. 
Witnesses at this hearing expressed their support for several 
legislative proposals to reform the SBA's existing programs and 
establish new programs to help close the gap for equity 
investment.
    The Committee on Small Business met in open session on 
October 21, 2009 and ordered H.R. 3854 reported to the House by 
voice vote. No amendments were offered during the markup.
    On October 29, 2009, the House considered H.R. 3854 and 
passed the bill by a vote of 389 to 32. The underlying bill 
text was modified pursuant to a self-executing rule. Sixteen 
amendments were made in order and fifteen were approved, while 
one was withdrawn.
    On November 2, 2009, the bill was received in the Senate, 
read twice, and referred to the Committee on Small Business and 
Entrepreneurship.
    No further action was taken on this legislation in the 
111th Congress.

                    TEMPORARY EXTENSION ACT OF 2010

                              (H.R. 4691)

Summary

    H.R. 4691 extended several expiring federal programs, 
including the small business loan guarantee program established 
under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which was 
reauthorized through March 28, 2010 by this legislation.

Legislative history

    H.R. 4691 was introduced by Chairman Rangel on February 25, 
2010 and cosponsored by Reps. Conyers, Waxman, Miller, and 
Oberstar. The bill was referred to the Committee on Ways and 
Means, and in addition to the Committees on Energy and 
Commerce, Education and Labor, Transportation and 
Infrastructure, Financial Services, Small Business, the 
Judiciary, and the Budget, for a period to be subsequently 
determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of 
such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the 
committee concerned.
    On February 25, 2010, the House considered the legislation 
under suspension of the rules and it was passed by voice vote.
    On February 25, 2010, H.R. 4691 was received in the Senate. 
The Senate passed the legislation by a vote of 78 to 19 on 
March 2, 2010. On March 2, 2010, the legislation was signed by 
the President and became Public Law 111-144.

TO PERMIT THE USE OF PREVIOUSLY APPROPRIATED FUNDS TO EXTEND THE SMALL 
        BUSINESS LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

                              (H.R. 4938)

Summary

    H.R. 4938 makes up to $40 million of funds appropriated for 
the business loan program of the Small Business Administration 
(SBA) under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2010 available 
for small business loan fee reductions and eliminations and the 
cost of guaranteed loans authorized under the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA).
    The legislation also amends ARRA to extend from March 28, 
2010, through April 30, 2010, the authority of the SBA to 
guarantee up to 90 percent of qualifying small business loans 
made by eligible lenders under the Small Business Act or the 
Small Business Investment Act of 1958.

Legislative history

    H.R. 4938 was introduced by Rep. Serrano on March 25, 2010. 
The bill was referred to the Committee on Small Business.
    On March 25, 2010, the House considered the legislation 
under suspension of the rules and it was passed by voice vote.
    On March 25, 2010, H.R. 4938 was received in the Senate and 
it was passed by Unanimous Consent. On March 26, 2010, the 
legislation was signed by the President and became Public Law 
111-150.

               SMALL BUSINESS JOBS AND CREDIT ACT OF 2010

                              (H.R. 5297)

Summary

    H.R. 5297 makes several changes to SBA's access to capital 
and contracting programs. This includes provisions increasing 
the size of 7(a), 504/CDC, and Microloans. In addition, 
provisions were included regarding the Secondary Market 
program, the Surety Bond program, the New Markets Venture 
Capital program and the Office of International Trade, where a 
new state export assistance program and a rural export 
promotion initiative were established. In addition, the floor 
plan financing program was extended.
    Significant changes were made to small business procurement 
initiatives. This includes the establishment of a framework to 
reduce contract bundling, the creation of a multiple award set-
aside program for small businesses, the repeal of the Small 
Business Competitive Demonstration program, and the 
establishment of parity of SBA's contracting programs. In 
addition, changes are made to subcontracting requirements and 
the OMB is required to report on opportunities for 
micropurchase opportunities for small businesses.
    The legislation also provides the Office of Advocacy with a 
separate budget line item, sets up a small business size 
standard certification process, makes changes to Small Business 
Development Center grants, and permits the SBA loans to be made 
for businesses impacted by aquaculture disasters.
    In addition to provisions related to SBA, the legislation 
also established in the Treasury the Small Business Lending 
Fund, administered by the Secretary of the Treasury to cover 
purchases of preferred stock and other financial instruments 
from eligible institutions. It also creates a State Small 
Business Credit Initiative, administered by the Secretary to 
allocate federal funds to participating states with capital 
access programs. Finally, the legislation included several tax 
provisions targeted at small firms.

Legislative history

    H.R. 5297 was introduced by Rep. Frank on May 13, 2010. The 
bill was referred to the Committee on Financial Services.
    On May 27, 2010, the Committee on Financial Services 
reported the legislation by a vote of 42 to 23. The legislation 
passed the House on June 17, 2010 by a vote of 241 to 182. The 
Senate received the legislation on June 18, 2010 and the Senate 
began consideration of the legislation and a substitute 
amendment to it on July 19, 2010. On September 16, 2010, H.R. 
5297, as amended, passed the Senate by a vote of 61 to 38. On 
September 23, 2010, the House passed the Senate version of H.R. 
5297 by a vote of 237 to 187.
    On September 27, 2010, the legislation was signed by the 
President and became Public Law 111-240.

 LEGISLATION TO TEMPORARILY EXTEND THE PROGRAMS OF THE SMALL BUSINESS 
                            ADMINISTRATION 


TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                              (H.R. 1541)

Summary

    H.R. 1541 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through July 31, 2009.

Legislative history

    H.R. 1541 was introduced by Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez on 
March 17, 2009. Original Cosponsors included the following 
Committee members: Rep. Sestak; Rep. Dahlkemper; and Rep. 
Griffith. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business.
    On March 17, 2009, the House considered H.R. 1541 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed by voice vote.
    On March 17, 2009, H.R. 1541 was received in the Senate and 
was passed by unanimous consent. On March 20, 2009, the 
legislation was signed by the President and became Public Law 
111-10.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                               (S. 1513)

Summary

    S. 1513 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through September 30, 2009.

Legislative history

    S. 1513 was introduced by Senator Landrieu and passed the 
Senate on July 24, 2009.
    On July 29, 2009, the House considered S. 1513 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed by voice vote.
    On July 31, 2009, the legislation was signed by the 
President and became Public Law 111-43.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                              (H.R. 3614)

Summary

    H.R. 3614 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through October 31, 2009.

Legislative history

    H.R. 3614 was introduced by Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez on 
September 22, 2009. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Small Business.
    On September 23, 2009, the House considered H.R. 3614 and 
it was passed by a recorded vote of 417 to 2.
    On September 25, 2009, the Senate amended H.R. 3614 and it 
was passed by unanimous consent. On September 29, 2009, the 
House concurred to the Senate amendment. On September 30, 2009, 
the legislation was signed by the President and became Public 
Law 111-66.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                               (S. 1929)

Summary

    S. 1929 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through January 31, 2010.

Legislative history

    S. 1929 was introduced by Senator Landrieu and passed the 
Senate on October 26, 2009.
    On October 28, 2009, the House considered S. 1929 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed, as amended, by voice 
vote.
    On October 29, 2009, the Senate agreed to the House 
amendments by Unanimous Consent.
    On October 30, 2009, the legislation was signed by the 
President and became Public Law 111-89.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                              (H.R. 4508)

Summary

    H.R. 4508 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through April 30, 2010.

Legislative history

    H.R. 4508 was introduced by Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez on 
January 26, 2010. The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Small Business.
    On January 27, 2010, the House considered H.R. 4508 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed by voice vote.
    On January 28, 2010, H.R. 4508 was received in the Senate 
and was passed by unanimous consent. On January 29, 2010, the 
legislation was signed by the President and became Public Law 
111-136.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                               (S. 3253)

Summary

    S. 3253 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through July 31, 2010.

Legislative history

    S. 3253 was introduced by Senator Landrieu and passed the 
Senate on April 22, 2010.
    On April 27, 2010, the House considered S. 3253 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed by voice vote.
    On April 30, 2010, the legislation was signed by the 
President and became Public Law 111-162.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                              (H.R. 5849)

Summary

    H.R. 5849 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through September 30, 2010.

Legislative history

    H.R. 5849 was introduced by Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez on 
July 27, 2010. The bill was referred to the Committee on Small 
Business.
    On July 27, 2010, the House considered H.R. 5849 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed by voice vote.
    On July 28, 2010, H.R. 5849 was received in the Senate and 
was passed by unanimous consent. On July 30, 2010, the 
legislation was signed by the President and became Public Law 
111-214.

TO PROVIDE FOR AN ADDITIONAL TEMPORARY EXTENSION OF PROGRAMS UNDER THE 
    SMALL BUSINESS ACT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT ACT OF 1958

                               (S. 3839)

Summary

    S. 3839 extended the programs authorized under the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 
through January 31, 2010.

Legislative history

    S. 3839 was introduced by Senator Landrieu and passed the 
Senate on September 24, 2010.
    On September 28, 2010, the House considered S. 3839 under 
suspension of the rules and was passed by voice vote.
    On September 30, 2010, the legislation was signed by the 
President and became Public Law 111-251.
                             Full Committee

                          Oversight Activities

 HEALTH CARE REFORM IN A STRUGGLING ECONOMY: WHAT'S ON THE HORIZON FOR 
                            SMALL BUSINESS?

    On February 4, 2009, the House Committee on Small Business 
held a hearing entitled ``Health Care Reform in a Struggling 
Economy: What's on the Horizon for Small Business?'' The 
Committee discussed the challenge of offering health insurance 
coverage for small businesses. Particular attention was given 
to the leading health reform proposals under consideration by 
Congress, and the opportunities health reform may offer small 
firms and their workers. Testimony was offered by Alissa Fox, 
Senior Vice President, Office of Policy and Representation for 
the BlueCross BlueShield Association; Tom Haynes, Executive 
Director of the CocaCola Bottlers' Association; Dan Ratner on 
behalf of the National Retail Federation; Janette Davis, CPA, 
on behalf of the U.S. Women's Chamber of Commerce; Michael 
Beene on behalf of the National Association for the Self-
Employed; and Mr. Dirck Clark of Heartland Regional Medical 
Center.

THE STATE OF SBA'S ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AND THEIR ROLE 
                     IN PROMOTING ECONOMIC RECOVERY

    The Committee on Small Business held a hearing on February 
11, 2009 to examine entrepreneurial needs arising from the 
economic downturn. This included a review of the SBA's 
entrepreneurial development (ED) programs and proposals to 
modernize these initiatives. Small business representatives and 
industry experts recommended policy changes to the agency's ED 
programs.

   DROP IN RETIREMENT SAVINGS: THE CHALLENGES SMALL BUSINESSES FACE 
    FUNDING AND MAINTAINING RETIREMENT PLANS IN A STRUGGLING ECONOMY

    On February 25, 2009, the Committee examined the impact the 
recession and drop in stock market had on small businesses' 
ability to fund pension and other retirement benefits. 
Retirement benefits provide both future financial security for 
business owners and employees, but also allow small business 
owners the ability to attract and retain talented individuals 
as their businesses grow. However, with the steep decline in 
the stock market an estimated $2 trillion in retirement savings 
were lost over the past 2 years. Small businesses that have 
defined benefit plans have fiduciary obligations with respect 
to funding their plans that are increasingly harder to meet. 
Employees and small businesses that are in defined contribution 
plans were being forced to take distributions from depleted 
accounts.
    Witnesses included Stephen Dobrow of Primark Benefits, 
Jason Speer, owner of Quality Float Works, Andrew Keeler, a 
certified financial planner with Everhart Financial Group, and 
Catherine Collinson of Transamerica Center for Retirement 
Studies. The witnesses highlighted how the recession has 
impacted their industry, and potential policy changes to aid 
small businesses and their employees that are experiencing 
hardship as a result of the recession.

    THE STATE OF THE RENEWABLE FUELS INDUSTRY IN THE CURRENT ECONOMY

    On March 4, 2009 the Committee held a hearing entitled: 
``The State of the Renewable Fuels Industry in the Current 
Economy.'' The Committee heard testimony from witnesses who 
discussed the state of the renewable fuels industry in light of 
current economic conditions.
    The hearing focused on access to capital issues, the effect 
of volatile energy prices, and how the overall downturn is 
affecting the renewable fuels industry. This forum also 
examined current policies promoting renewable and next 
generation fuels, including those in the 2008 Farm Bill. It 
enabled the Committee to consider future policies that will 
further develop the industry's future during these times of 
uncertainty. The Committee also heard testimony from small 
renewable fuels producers and related industries about how they 
are adjusting during a period of economic instability.
    Witnesses included: Mr. Nathan Kimpel, President and Chief 
Operating Officer, New Energy Corp.; Mr. John Howe, Vice 
President of Public Affairs, Verenium Corporation; Mr. Manning 
Feraci, Vice President of Federal Affairs, National Biodiesel 
Board; Mr. Ron Litterer, Chairman, National Corn Growers 
Association; Mr. Brooks Hurst, Member of the Board of 
Directors, The Paseo-Cargill Biofuels Plant, on Behalf of the 
Missouri Soybean Association.

 THE PRESIDENT'S FY 2010 BUDGET AND MEDICARE: HOW WILL SMALL PROVIDERS 
                              BE IMPACTED?

    On March 18, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``The President's Budget and Medicare: How 
Will Small Providers Be Impacted?'' The Committee examined 
Medicare policy within the President's budget outline for FY 
2010. The purpose of the hearing was to consider the 
Administration's proposed changes to Medicare, and the 
implications it presents for small medical practices and 
medical facilities. Witness testimony was offered by Dr. 
Jeffrey P. Harris on behalf of the American College of 
Physicians; Dr. Joseph M. Heyman on behalf of the American 
Medical Association; Dr. John T. Preskitt on behalf of the 
American College of Surgeons; Mr. Edward J. Hannon on behalf of 
the American Hospital Association; and Robert E. Moffit Ph.D. 
on behalf of the Heritage Foundation.

      HEARING ON WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE PURSUANT TO HOUSE RULE XI

    The Committee held a hearing on March 25, 2009 to assess 
the extent of the fraud and management problems in the SBA's 
Historically Underutilized Business Zone Empowerment 
Contracting (HUBZone) program and whether or not the agency 
implemented GAO recommendations from 2008 regarding these 
problems. In addition, GAO reviewed its findings regarding the 
``credit elsewhere'' requirement of the Small Business 
Administration's (SBA) 7(a) loan program. GAO's Managing 
Director of Forensic Audits and Special Investigations, Greg 
Kutz, testified on GAO's findings of the expanded fraud 
investigation the Committee requested in 2008. Bill Shear, 
Director of Financial Markets and Community Investment at GAO, 
provided a progress report on the recommendations GAO made in 
2008 to strengthen the operation of the HUBZone program and 
also reviewed GAO's findings on the ``credit elsewhere'' as it 
is applied to 7(a) loans. The SBA testified about their 
progress in resolving problems uncovered in these programs.

          IRS OVERSIGHT: SMALL BUSINESS CONCERNS WITH THE IRS

    On April 1, 2009, the Commissioner of the IRS, Douglas 
Shulman, testified before the Committee on a wide range of 
small business tax issues. For many small businesses, one of 
the largest impediments to growth is the complexity of the tax 
code and the administrative burdens associated with meeting 
their tax obligations. The hearing explored the IRS's efforts 
were taking to make it as easy as possible for small businesses 
to comply with the tax code and also how the IRS plans to 
outreach to small businesses so that the IRS can understand the 
needs and concerns of small businesses. Additionally, as the 
nation's collector and distributor of tax revenue, the IRS will 
play a critical role in the stimulus. The hearing allowed 
members of the Committee to ascertain whether the IRS was 
properly staffed to process the millions of dollars in refunds 
and tax credits owed to small businesses. After the hearing, 
the Committee sent a letter to the IRS detailing small business 
concerns and the Commissioner responded via letter and assured 
the Committee it will work closely with the Chair regarding all 
small business tax issues.

          THE IMPORTANCE OF TECHNOLOGY IN AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY

    On April 22, 2009 the Committee on Small Business convened 
a hearing to provide an overview of the SBIR program and to 
highlight its role in advancing innovation and creating jobs. 
Program managers from Federal government agencies and 
representatives of small firms testified about the public-
private partnerships that SBIR awards facilitate.

    CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS FOR SMALL BUSINESSES AND FAMILY FARMERS

    On April 29, 2009 the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled: ``Climate Change Solutions for Small 
Businesses and Family Farmers.'' The Committee heard testimony 
from Mr. Fred Yoder, Past President, National Corn Growers 
Association, from Plain City, Ohio; Mr. Robert McNamara, 
President, F.J.A. Christiansen Roofing Co., Inc., in Milwaukee, 
WI representing the National Roofing Contractors Association; 
Mr. Roger Johnson, President, National Farmers Union; Mr. 
Gordon P. Sharp, Chairman, Aircuity, Inc. in Newton, MA; and 
Mr. Lawrence W. Kavanagh, Vice President, Environment & 
Technology representing the American Iron and Steel Institute.
    This hearing provided a critical forum when the House 
considered climate change legislation, as small businesses and 
family farmers will have a critical role in future energy 
policy solutions. The hearing examined the potential 
opportunities reforms present and ensured the needs of small 
businesses are addressed in crafting measures. The hearing was 
also an opportunity for panelists to discuss existing industry 
practices as well as policy solutions that can reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions while maintaining a strong economy. 
The Committee also heard testimony about voluntary and 
cooperative efforts.
    Following the hearing, the Chairwoman sent a letter 
outlining small business and agriculture issues that should be 
addressed during House consideration of energy legislation.

    LEGISLATION TO REAUTHORIZE AND MODERNIZE SBA'S ENTREPRENEURIAL 
                          DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

    On May 6, 2009 the Committee held a hearing to examine 
legislation to reauthorize and modernize SBA's Entrepreneurial 
Development (ED) Programs. The legislation extended the scope 
and modified the delivery of business development services for 
SBA's ED programs. In particular, the Committee considered the 
legislation's role in stabilizing and strengthening small 
businesses during the current period of economic weaknesses. 
Small business representatives provided testimony at the 
hearing.

THE ROLE OF SMALL BUSINESS SUPPLIERS AND MANUFACTURERS IN THE DOMESTIC 
                             AUTO INDUSTRY

    On May 13, 2009, the Committee held a hearing to examine 
the role that small business suppliers and manufacturers play 
in supporting the domestic auto industry. The hearing focused 
on the prevailing conditions in the domestic automobile 
industry in the wake of the 2008 recession and resulting 
bankruptcies of General Motors and Chrysler. The hearing 
examined the implications of these events for small businesses 
throughout the U.S., with particular emphasis on how small 
manufacturers and third-tier auto part suppliers have been 
affected. Witnesses also discussed the importance of the 
domestic automotive industry to the small business economy and 
the role that the federal government should play in helping 
stabilize this sector of the economy in order to facilitate the 
wider recovery of the economy. The Committee received testimony 
from the Association for Manufacturing Technology, the Motor 
and Equipment Manufacturers Association, the National Tooling 
and Machining Association, the Precision Metalforming 
Association, National Association of Surface Finishers and the 
American Foundry Society.

                        HEROES OF SMALL BUSINESS

    On May 20, 2009, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Heroes of Small Business.'' Entrepreneurs from across the 
country testified on their small business success stories. The 
Committee examined the important contributions these firms make 
creating jobs, growing the economy and strengthening local 
communities.

 COMMON GROUND: FINDING CONSENSUS ON HEALTH REFORM, THE SMALL BUSINESS 
                              PERSPECTIVE

    On June 3, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``Common Ground: Finding Consensus on Health 
Reform, the Small Business Perspective.'' The Committee 
examined the health reform debate giving particular attention 
to those issues impacting the small business community. 
Witnesses were asked to provide their views on health reform, 
and where they see opportunities for legislative consensus. 
Testimony was offered by Jim Wordsworth on behalf of the United 
States Chamber of Commerce; John Nicholson on behalf of the 
National Federation of Independent Business; Ms. Joan M. 
Burkholder on behalf of the United States Women's Chamber of 
Commerce; Freddy Castiblanco on behalf of the Main Street 
Alliance; and Mr. Bradley Thompson II on behalf of the Printing 
Industries of America.

 LAYING THE GROUNDWORK FOR ECONOMIC RECOVERY: EXPANDING SMALL BUSINESS 
                           ACCESS TO CAPITAL

    On June 10, 2009, the Committee held a hearing to conduct 
oversight of the Small Business Administration's (SBA) 
financing programs. Specifically, this hearing explored the 
challenges facing the SBA's Capital Access programs, including 
the 7(a) loan program, the Certified Development Company 
program (``CDC'' or ``504''), the 7(m) loan program 
(``Microloan''), the Small Business Investment Company program 
(``SBIC''), the New Markets Venture Capital program (``NMVC''), 
and the Renewable Fuels Capital Investment program (``RFCI''). 
More specifically, this hearing set the groundwork for 
legislative actions necessary to modernize these programs and 
better achieve the mission of providing small businesses with 
access to capital for economic recovery. The Committee received 
testimony from the Independent Community Bankers of America; 
the National Association of Development Companies; the Credit 
Union National Association; the National Association of Small 
Business Investment Companies; the American Bankers 
Association; the Biotechnology Industry Organization, the 
International Franchise Association; the Associated Equipment 
Distributors; and the National Marine Manufacturers 
Association.

 LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES TO STRENGTHEN AND MODERNIZE THE SBIR AND STTR 
                                PROGRAMS

    On June 17, 2009 the Committee on Small Business convened a 
hearing to examine legislative proposals to improve the SBIR 
and STTR programs. At this hearing, the Committee heard 
testimony from small businesses and industry experts on how 
these proposals will affect small businesses' ability to 
advance research and development.

   THE LOOMING CHALLENGE FOR SMALL MEDICAL PRACTICES: THE PROJECTED 
 PHYSICIAN SHORTAGE AND HOW HEALTHCARE REFORMS CAN ADDRESS THE PROBLEM

    On July 8, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``The Looming Challenge for Small Medical 
Practices: The Projected Physician Shortage and How Health Care 
Reforms Can Address the Problem.'' The Committee discussed the 
issue of physician supply and the future of small medical 
practices. Specifically, witnesses offered their views 
regarding the projected physician workforce shortage, 
strategies to address the problem, and how current trends have 
influenced care in rural and underserved areas. Testimony was 
provided by Dr. Robert E. Harbaugh, on behalf of the American 
Association of Neurological Surgeons/ Congress of Neurological 
Surgeons; Dr. George F. Sheldon on Behalf of the American 
College of Surgeons; Dr. Carlo J. Demarco American Osteopathic 
Association; Dr. Lori Heim on behalf of the American Academy of 
Family Physicians; and Dr. Bruce A. Kauk of Northland Internal 
Medicine located in Gladstone, Missouri.

 ECONOMIC RECOVERY: TAX STIMULUS ITEMS THAT BENEFITTED SMALL BUSINESS 
                           WITH A LOOK AHEAD

    On July 15, 2009, the Committee held a hearing analyzing 
the tax provisions contained in the stimulus package that 
benefitted small businesses during the recession and what more 
needs to take place to revive our economy. Realizing the 
economic situation our country was facing early in the year, 
Congress passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009 (ARRA) to jumpstart the economy. ARRA contained a variety 
of tax rebates, credits, deductions, and other incentives 
directly targeted at small businesses. The hearing focused on 
whether small businesses had utilized these provisions. The 
National Association of Realtors commented that housing sales 
increased as a result of the first-time home buyer's tax 
credit. The Air Conditioning Contractors Association of America 
noted that 75% of their members had witnessed increased sales 
as a result of the non-business energy tax credits for air 
conditioners, and other home heating equipment. The Independent 
Community Bankers Association and Association of Manufacturing 
Technologies emphasized that the extension of the Net Operating 
Loss provision provided their members an infusion of cash 
especially at a time when access to credit is severely limited. 
All witnesses on the panel emphasized to the Committee that 
their businesses were still hurting. They suggested extensions 
of some of the current tax provisions, such as the section 179 
expensing provisions and an increased home buyer's tax credit, 
while doing as much as possible to increase lending.

MEETING THE NEEDS OF SMALL BUSINESSES AND FAMILY FARMERS IN REGULATING 
                          OUR NATION'S WATERS

    On July 22, 2009 the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``Meeting the Needs of Small Businesses and 
Family Farmers in Regulating our Nation's Waters.'' The 
nation's waterways play a critical role in all acts of 
commerce, especially when it comes to small businesses and 
agriculture. Not only are waters used to transport goods, but 
there are many waters that are used or affected in the daily 
operations of small businesses in a wide variety of industries.
    The Committee took the opportunity to evaluate the 
regulatory framework for our nation's waters and the concerns 
of small business and family farmers. The Committee listened to 
farmers and small businesses on ways to ensure that the federal 
regulation of waterways meets the needs of our environment and 
economy. These small firms are directly affected by the 
coordination between federal, state and local governments in 
how these waters and relevant business activities are 
regulated.
    Testifying were members of the agriculture sector, and 
construction trade groups. Those presenting statements 
included: Mr. Charlie Kruse, President, Missouri Farm Bureau, 
on behalf of American Farm Bureau Federation; Mr. Trey Pebley, 
McAllen Construction Inc., on behalf of Associated General 
Contractors; Mr. Jim Chilton, on behalf of Arizona Cattle 
Growers Association, Arizona Public Lands Council, and National 
Cattlemen's Beef Association; Mr. Lyle Schellenberg, President, 
Armadillo Underground, on behalf of National Utility 
Contractors Association; and Mr. Bob Gray, Executive Director, 
Northeast Dairy Farmers Cooperatives.

      HEARING ON WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE PURSUANT TO HOUSE RULE XI

    On July 29, 2009, the Committee held a hearing to fulfill 
its mandate of performing Quarterly Congressional Oversight of 
the SBA. The purpose of the hearing was to review the SBA's 
progress in addressing identified deficiencies in its various 
programs. Specifically, however, this hearing focused on the 
SBA's progress in implementing legislative reforms to its 
Disaster Assistance program and the HUBZone program. The 
Committee received testimony from the SBA Administrator as well 
as from the Government Accountability Office.

 THE CHALLENGES OF THE 2009-H1N1 INFLUENZA AND ITS POTENTIAL IMPACT ON 
               SMALL BUSINESSES AND HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS

    On September 9, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held 
a hearing entitled ``The Challenges of the 2009-H1N1 Influenza 
and its Potential Impact on Small Businesses and Healthcare 
Provider.'' The hearing examined (1) the preparation of small 
business for H1N1 Influenza, (2) the financial impact a 
pandemic would have on small business, (3) the stress the 2009-
H1N1 outbreak could place on small medical practices, and (4) 
the response of the federal government.
    Testimony was provided by Rear Admiral Anne Schuchat, MD, 
Assistant Surgeon General for the United States Public Health 
Service and Director of the National Center for Immunization 
and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) for the Department of Health 
and Human Services; Dr. Rebecca Blank, Under Secretary of 
Commerce for Economic Affairs for the U.S. Department of 
Commerce; Mr. Bridger McGaw, Acting Assistant Secretary for the 
Private Sector for the Department of Homeland Security; Mr. 
Anthony Demangone on behalf of the National Association of 
Federal Credit Unions; Dr. Jim King on behalf of the American 
Academy of Family Physicians; Mr. Harold Jackson on behalf of 
the U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Dr. David T. Tayloe on behalf of 
the American Academy of Pediatrics; and Ms. Chris Chinn on 
behalf of the American Farm Bureau Federation.

 THE IMPACT OF FINANCIAL REGULATORY RESTRUCTURING ON SMALL BUSINESSES 
                         AND COMMUNITY LENDERS

    On September 23, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held 
a hearing on the effect of financial regulatory restructuring 
on small businesses and community lenders. This hearing 
examined how proposed changes to the structure and powers of 
federal financial services regulators will impact smaller 
firms. The Committee heard testimony from two panels of 
witnesses. The first panel included business owners and 
representatives from trade associations. The second panel was 
comprised of banks, credit unions, and a broker/dealer.

     EXPIRING TAX INCENTIVES: EXAMINING THEIR IMPORTANCE FOR SMALL 
             BUSINESSES ON THE ROAD TO AN ECONOMIC RECOVERY

    On September 30, 2009, the Committee held a hearing 
examining tax provisions that are due to expire at the end of 
the year and their importance to small businesses. Commonly 
known as ``tax extenders'', Congress on an annual or bi-annual 
basis extends certain tax provisions that encourage business 
investment, and promotes consumer spending. The hearing took on 
increased importance since the economy had recently shown signs 
of improvement. The witnesses stressed that to sustain that 
momentum, Congress should extend these important tax 
provisions.
    Witnesses included representatives of the National Retail 
Federation, National Restaurant Association, and the 
International Franchise Association. These witnesses stressed 
to the Committee that provisions such as the 15-year 
depreciation schedule for retail and restaurant improvements 
encourages businesses in their industry to upgrade and improve 
their restaurants and stores. In addition, the Bio-diesel Board 
testified that the Bio-diesel tax credit was essential for 
their members to maintain production and create jobs. Finally, 
the minority witness, Keith Hall, implored Congress to protect 
small businesses from the harmful reach of the Alternative 
Minimum Tax. All of these provisions are considered in the tax 
extenders package. After the hearing, the Committee wrote a 
letter to the respective tax writing Committees on House and 
Senate detailing the need to extend these tax incentives.

 THE STATE OF THE NATION'S HOUSING SECTOR: AN EXAMINATION OF THE FIRST 
     TIME BUYER'S CREDIT AND FUTURE POLICIES TO SUSTAIN A RECOVERY

    On October 7, 2009, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``The State of the Nation's Housing Sector: An Examination of 
the First Time Buyer's Credit and Future Policies to Sustain a 
Recovery.'' The Committee examined the current state of the 
nation's housing sector and the millions of small businesses 
who operate in it. The hearing assessed the impact of the 
first-time homebuyer tax credit and federal policies affecting 
the real estate industry.

            INCREASING ACCESS TO CAPITAL FOR SMALL BUSINESS

    On October 14, 2009, the Committee held a hearing to review 
proposed legislation to address deficiencies in the SBA's 
lending and investment programs that had been identified by 
previous hearings before the Committee. Witnesses at this 
hearing expressed their support for several legislative 
proposals to reform the SBA's existing programs and establish 
new programs that will help close the gap for equity 
investment. These proposals ultimately became the basis for 
H.R. 3854, the Small Business Financing and Investment Act of 
2009.

THE RECOVERY ACT AND BROADBAND: EVALUATION OF BROADBAND INVESTMENTS ON 
                   SMALL BUSINESSES AND JOB CREATION

    On October 28, 2009, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``The Recovery Act and Broadband: Evaluation of Broadband 
Investments on Small Businesses and Job Creation.'' The 
Committee heard testimony from government and industry 
representatives on steps to advance broadband deployment and 
adoption through American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 
(ARRA) programs. Through this hearing, the Committee examined 
the impact on small firms and the importance of these programs 
in job creation.

 SMALL BUSINESSES AND THE ESTATE TAX: IDENTIFYING REFORMS TO MEET THE 
                NEEDS OF SMALL FIRMS AND FAMILY FARMERS

    On November 4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing regarding the estate tax and its impact on small 
businesses. The hearing highlighted the concerns small 
businesses have with the uncertainty surrounding the estate tax 
regime. While the current exemption levels protect most small 
businesses, the law faced expiration at the end of 2009, with 
the estate tax being repealed in 2010, and then coming back in 
2010 at exemption levels falling back to $1 million and a tax 
rate of 55 percent.
    Witnesses included a small grocer representing the Food 
Marketing Institute, a representative from the National 
Cattlemen's Beef Association, and a small printer representing 
the Printing Industries Association. The witnesses detailed how 
the complexity and uncertainty surrounding the estate has 
increased operational costs for their respective businesses and 
made planning nearly impossible. Further, the witnesses 
detailed that the estate tax is especially burdensome for 
capital intensive businesses such as family farms and those in 
the printing industries. The witnesses stated that they fear 
they may have to liquidate the business in order to pay the 
estate tax assessment. The Committee assured the witnesses that 
it will ensure that small businesses concerns are heard when 
the estate tax debate begins.

      HEARING ON WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE PURSUANT TO HOUSE RULE XI

    The Committee on Small Business held a hearing on November 
19, 2009 that focused on the SBA's operation of the Service-
Disable Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) procurement 
program. Witnesses included SBA Administrator Karen Mills and 
Greg Kutz, GAO's Managing Director of Special Investigations. 
GAO testified regarding SBA's fraud prevention controls for the 
SDVOSB program. It found that ten contracts were let to 
ineligible firms. GAO also determined that over $100 million in 
sole-source or restricted competition SDVOSB contracts and $300 
million in other contracts went to those 10 ineligible firms. 
GAO uncovered that one firm did not employ any service disabled 
veteran and, in four cases, found that SBA had previously found 
the firms ineligible after bid protests, but that the 
contracting agencies had allowed the contracts to proceed. The 
majority of the cases involved ineligible firms, including some 
large and one foreign-owned firm, which used an SDVOSB ``front 
company'' to ``pass-through'' the benefits of the contract.

CONDITION OF SMALL BUSINESS AND COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE LENDING IN LOCAL 
                                MARKETS

    On February 26, 2010, the Committee on Small Business and 
the Committee on Financial Services held a joint hearing 
entitled, ``Condition of Small Business and Commercial Real 
Estate Lending in Local Markets.'' The purpose of this hearing 
was to examine the state of small business lending and the role 
that this activity would play in the economic recovery. 
Additionally, this hearing reviewed the current state and 
potential risks in the commercial real estate (CRE) sector and 
explored how it relates to the small business lending and real 
estate sectors. The hearing was comprised of three panels of 
witnesses, including small business representatives and CRE 
professionals; federal regulators and agency officials; and 
lenders and investment companies.

           BUSINESS INCUBATORS AND THEIR ROLE IN JOB CREATION

    On March 17, 2010, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``Business Incubators and Their Role in Job 
Creation.'' The purpose of the hearing was to evaluate the 
overall effectiveness of incubators in promoting small business 
development and employment growth within the current economic 
conditions. The hearing considered how these business 
development facilities and programs can contribute to an 
employment-focused economic recovery as well as current 
obstacles to their effectiveness.
    The Committee received testimony from policy experts in the 
business incubation and small business fields. The President of 
the National Business Incubation Association testified on the 
critical tools these facilities provide to small firms, 
particularly start-ups, as well as recommendations for 
legislative initiatives to increase the effectiveness of 
incubators across the country. A witness representing academia 
provided the Committee with data demonstrating the impact of 
business incubators on job creation. The Director of Research 
and Policy at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation highlighted 
the role of incubators in providing the critical technical 
assistance tools to promote entrepreneurship. The director of 
an angel investment foundation testified on the importance of 
venture funds linked with technical assistance to promote 
sustainable start up enterprises. Finally, administrators of 
two business incubators highlighted the role that these 
facilities serve in promoting start-ups in their regions and 
detailed critical needs facing these operations.

  SMALL BUSINESS PARTICIPATION IN THE FEDERAL PROCUREMENT MARKETPLACE

    On March 24, 2010, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing on issues related to small business procurement, which 
included oversight of the contracting programs of the Small 
Business Administration (SBA). The focus of the hearing was on 
small businesses' participation in the federal procurement 
marketplace and what steps should be taken to modernize the 
government's efforts in this area. The Committee examined 
several issues, including the potential for small business 
reforms to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the GSA 
schedule, the need to expand small firms' access to multiple 
award and multiple agency contracts, the adequacy of the 
acquisition workforce, recent court challenges to SBA's 
contracting programs, and contract bundling. Witnesses 
represented small businesses from a wide range of industries 
and demographics including veterans, women, aerospace, 
engineering, and consulting.

 ENTREPRENEURS AND TAX DAY: HOW THE IRS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES IMPACT 
                            SMALL BUSINESSES

    On April 14, 2010, the House Committee on Small Business 
held a hearing entitled ``Entrepreneurs and Tax Day: How the 
IRS Policies and Procedures Impact Small Businesses.'' The 
Committee discussed the Internal Revenue Service's relationship 
with small businesses and the agency's efforts to simplify the 
tax code for small businesses. The hearing explored the 
administrative burdens for small businesses regarding tax 
compliance and examinations while examining strategies the IRS 
could implement to aide small businesses. The hearing also 
assessed small business outreach programs within the IRS with 
special attention paid to the IRS's response to recent tax law 
changes created by the Recovery Act. Specifically the hearing 
focused on staffing and procedures the IRS implemented that 
ensured effective administration of the Recovery Act. Committee 
Members also evaluated how the National Research Program on 
Employment Taxes will impact small businesses and steps the IRS 
will take to reduce the administrative burdens associated with 
the study. Testimony was offered by Douglas Shulman, 
Commissioner of the Internal Revenue Service.

      HEARING ON WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE PURSUANT TO HOUSE RULE XI

    On Wednesday April 21, 2010, the Committee held a hearing 
to fulfill its mandate of performing Quarterly Congressional 
Oversight of the SBA. The purpose of the hearing was to receive 
the report of an audit conducted by the SBA's Office of the 
Inspector General to determine whether Certified Development 
Companies (CDCs) that participate in the Premier Certified 
Lender (PCL) loan program exercised prudent underwriting 
practices when making SBA loans and whether the compensation 
practices of CDC executives were excessive, relative to the 
gross receipts of CDCs. The results of this report found 
widespread deficiencies within the PCL program and determined 
that, in 4 out of 5 instances, PCLs were paying out excessive 
executive compensation. Witnesses at this hearing included the 
Administrator of the SBA and the SBA Inspector General.

 EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF SMALL BUSINESS TRADE POLICY ON JOB CREATION 
                          AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    On April 28, 2010, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``Evaluating the Impact of Small Business 
Trade Policy on Job Creation and Economic Growth.'' The purpose 
of the hearing was to examine the effect of international trade 
policies on small firms' ability to stimulate economic growth. 
The hearing considered the effectiveness of current trade 
promotion programs designed for small businesses as well as 
recommendations to ensure these resources contribute to an 
employment-focused recovery.
    The Committee received testimony from small business 
industry representatives and international trade policy 
experts. The President of the National Farmer's Union detailed 
the importance of export promotion assistance to ensure the 
continued global competitiveness of U.S. agricultural 
producers. The President of TechAmerica highlighted the 
contributions of small technology exporters to economic growth 
and the critical role these businesses should serve in the 
nation's recovery strategy. An economist with the Peterson 
Institute for International Economics testified in support of 
an expansion to lending and technical assistance to promote 
U.S. exports as well as improvements to the effectiveness of 
trade promotion programs targeted to small businesses. A small 
manufacturing firm owner also detailed the importance of export 
opportunities, particularly to maintain the enterprise's market 
share and global competitiveness during a domestic economic 
downturn.

           TAX INITIATIVES THAT PROMOTE SMALL BUSINESS GROWTH

    On May 5, 2010, the House Committee on Small Business held 
a hearing entitled ``Tax Initiatives that Promote Small 
Business Growth.'' The hearing examined tax policies that 
support small business growth and job creation. In particular, 
the Committee focused on expiring tax incentives created or 
extended by the Recovery Act, such as favorable depreciation 
and expensing schedules and energy tax credits. The hearing 
also examined proposed tax incentives, such as increasing and 
expanding tax rules related to expensing, business start up 
costs and deductions for meals and entertainment. The purpose 
of the hearing was to discuss the impact tax incentives have on 
small business job creation and growth. The witnesses provided 
testimony that they used many of the tax incentives for their 
businesses and suggested that extensions and expansions of 
these tax policies will further assist in the economic 
recovery. Witness testimony was offered by Christopher J. Green 
on behalf of the American Institute of Architects, Chad Collins 
on behalf of the National Roofing Contractors Association; Dave 
Koenig on behalf of the National Restaurant Association; Hugh 
Joyce on behalf of the Air Conditioning Contractors of America; 
and Curtis Dubay on behalf of the Heritage Foundation.

 SMALL BUSINESSES AND BROADBAND: AN ENGINE FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND JOB 
                                CREATION

    On May 12, 2010, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Small Businesses and Broadband: An Engine for Economic Growth 
and Job Creation.'' The Committee heard testimony from Mr. Evan 
Burfield, Chairman & CEO, Synteractive Corporation; Mr. Steve 
Messere, Founder & CEO, Revenue Spark Inc.; Mr. Greg Whisenant, 
Founder & CEO, CrimeReports; Mr. Tom McDonald, CEO, BeSafe 
Technologies; and Ms. Lindsay Dofelmier, Co-Owner, Urban Agent 
Team LLC. The hearing examined the transformative effect that 
innovative broadband applications and services have on small 
businesses. During this hearing, the Committee heard from small 
businesses on how broadband is helping to expand their 
business, grow the economy and create new jobs.

                        HEROES OF SMALL BUSINESS

    The Committee held a hearing on May 26, 2010, entitled, 
``Heroes of Small Business.'' Entrepreneurs from across the 
country testified on how they have achieved success. The 
Committee examined how these firms have created jobs and 
supported their local communities.

  RECOVERY IN THE GULF: WHAT THE $20 BILLION BP CLAIMS FUND MEANS FOR 
                            SMALL BUSINESSES

    On June 30, 2010 the Committee held a hearing to evaluate 
the BP Gulf Spill Independent Claims fund established by BP to 
assist businesses and individuals affected by the Deepwater 
Horizon oil spill. The Committee heard testimony from Kenneth 
Feinberg, who was the Independent Administrator of the trust 
fund.
    The Committee found that some businesses were complaining 
that they have not even received the initial advanced payments 
of $5,000 while others were complaining that BP is losing 
documentation supporting claims. In addition, although BP had 
made payments to many individuals and small businesses of the 
initial advanced disbursement, increasing numbers of small 
businesses were facing longer periods without compensation.
    Most of the early payments received by entrepreneurs and 
small businesses had been limited to one month's worth of lost 
wages and income or lost net profits, which businesses claimed 
was minimal compared to the lost sales of the business 
especially during peak fishing and tourism season. Some small 
firms and self-employed fishermen were still waiting to receive 
their larger claim payments with many starting to question if 
they could stay in business while they awaited payment.
    BP continually stated its commitment to ensuring businesses 
continue to operate and keep employees working but many local 
businesses found the minimal advance payment inadequate to 
cover current operating costs and payrolls. As of early June 
2010--before the hearing occurred--only about 10 percent of 
small businesses had received payments from BP with only a 
handful of larger claims paid in Louisiana.

          BONUS DEPRECIATION: WHAT IT MEANS FOR SMALL BUSINESS

    On July 14, 2010, the House Committee on Small Business 
held a hearing entitled ``Bonus Depreciation: What it Means for 
Small Business.'' The hearing focused on bonus depreciation and 
evaluated how it benefits small businesses. Bonus depreciation 
offers flexibility and increased cash flow to businesses by 
providing a 50% immediate deduction on the cost of new 
property. The hearing gave members of the Committee the 
opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness of bonus depreciation 
in small business investments and assess how the secondary 
effect of increased demand benefits the overall economy. The 
Committee focused on bonus depreciation due to a proposal to 
extend bonus depreciation in the Small Business Jobs and Credit 
Act of 2010. Witnesses provided their views on the benefits of 
bonus depreciation and why it should be extended. Witnesses 
included Jack Sanford on behalf of the American Road and 
Transportation Builders Association; Robert Ring on behalf of 
the Air Conditioning Contractors of America; Jon Budington on 
behalf of the Printing Industries of America; Daniel Fesler on 
behalf of the National Lumber and Building Materials Dealers 
Association; and Dennis Vander Molen on behalf of the 
Associated Equipment Distributors.

    THE IMPACT OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ON ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND JOB 
                                CREATION

    On July 21, 2010, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``The Impact of Intellectual Property on Entrepreneurship and 
Job Creation.'' The Committee heard testimony from Mr. Robert 
Holleyman, President & CEO, Business Software Alliance; Mr. 
Rick Carnes, President, Songwriters Guild of America; Mr. 
Steven Friedman, President, t3 Technologies, Inc.; Mr. Peter 
Carnes, CEO, Traffax Inc.; and Mr. William Mansfield, Director 
of Intellectual Property, ABRO Industries. The hearing examined 
the importance of intellectual property to the growth of small 
businesses and the broader economy. Witnesses shared their 
perspective on the steps needed to support job creation and the 
long-term health of small businesses in IP-intensive 
industries.

      HEARING ON WASTE, FRAUD, AND ABUSE PURSUANT TO HOUSE RULE XI

    On July 28, 2010, the Committee held a hearing to examine a 
recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on the 
Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone) Program, the 
agency's response to the BP Oil Spill, and progress made in 
implementing GAO's recommendations concerning the Service-
Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business program, and several 
other matters. The Committee heard testimony from the Karen 
Mills, Administrator of SBA and Greg Kutz, Managing Director of 
Forensic Audits and Special Investigations at GAO.
                    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax

                          Oversight Activities

      HOW THE COMPLEXITY OF THE TAX CODE HINDERS SMALL BUSINESSES

    On May 7, 2009, the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a 
hearing highlighting the growing complexity of the Internal 
Revenue Code and the impediments this creates for small 
businesses. The hearing focused on ways to simplify the tax 
code, make it more efficient, and less burdensome to comply 
with. The complicated nature of the income tax imposes costs 
not only on small businesses, who are forced to spend time and 
money preparing and filing their returns, but also on the 
Internal Revenue Service (IRS) who is tasked with audit, 
collection, and enforcement of our nation's tax laws.
    Witnesses included Keith Hall, National Tax Advisor for the 
National Association of Self Employed, and owner of his own 
accounting firm; Christine Chin-Ryan owner of Synergy 
Consulting, Inc.; Eric Blackledge, owner of Blackledge 
Furniture; and Stam Stathis, a certified public accountant of 
CPA Associates. Witnesses emphasized the need to create 
permanency with respect to tax provisions, do away with the 
Alternative Minimum Tax, and eliminate costly and inefficient 
record keeping requirements. Shortly after the hearing, 
Congressman Schrader introduced a tax simplification bill that 
created a standard deduction for those operating a business out 
of their homes.

               LEGISLATIVE PROPOSALS TO REFORM THE SBA'S

                        CAPITAL ACCESS PROGRAMS

    On July 23, 2009 the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a 
hearing to examine proposed legislative initiatives to address 
deficiencies in the SBA's lending and investment programs that 
had been identified by previous hearings before the Committee. 
Witnesses at this hearing discussed several legislative 
proposals that would make a number of important reforms to the 
SBA's existing programs and establish new programs to close the 
gap for equity investment that was left when the SBA's 
investing programs were curtailed. The Subcommittee received 
testimony from the American Bankers Association, the 
Corporation for Enterprise Development; the National 
Association of Home Builders; the National Association of 
Development Companies; the National Association of Small 
Business Investment Companies; and American Academy of Family 
Physicians.

          EXPLORING WAYS FOR SMALL BUSINESS TO ACCESS CAPITAL

    On August 4, 2009, the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held 
a field hearing in Salem, Oregon on expanding access to capital 
for entrepreneurs and spurring economic growth. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the SBA's Portland District 
Office, local businesses, and lenders.

                 ACCESS TO CAPITAL FOR SMALL BUSINESSES

    On April 19, 2010, the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held 
a field hearing in Sarasota, Florida, entitled, ``Access to 
Capital for Small Businesses.'' The purpose of the hearing was 
to examine the state of small business lending, with particular 
emphasis on the prevailing conditions in South Florida. Hearing 
witnesses included local business owners and lenders.
               Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology

                          Oversight Activities

   ENSURING STIMULUS CONTRACTS FOR SMALL AND VETERAN-OWNED BUSINESSES

    The Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology held a 
hearing entitled ``Ensuring Stimulus Contracts for Small and 
Veteran-Owned Businesses'' on March 12, 2008. This hearing 
reviewed federal agencies' efforts to provide small businesses 
and veteran-owned small businesses with contracting 
opportunities contained in P.L. 111-5, the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Committee examined 
federal actions to date, as well as recommendations for 
ensuring small business participation in ARRA-related 
infrastructure projects. The Committee considered these efforts 
in the context of small business procurement law, including the 
applicability of subcontracting requirements, protections under 
the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), and the application 
of federal small business goals.

 LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES TO STRENGTHEN AND MODERNIZE THE SBIR AND STTR 
                                PROGRAMS

    On June 4, 2009 the Subcommittee on Contracting and 
Technology held a hearing entitled ``Legislative Initiatives to 
Strengthen and Modernize the SBIR and STTR Programs.'' At this 
hearing, witnesses provided testimony on four legislative 
proposals that, if enacted, would modernize these initiatives. 
Committee members heard how these proposals will affect small 
businesses' ability to advance research and development.

      HELPING SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATORS THROUGH THE RESEARCH AND 
                       EXPERIMENTATION TAX CREDIT

    On July 9, 2009, the Subcommittee on Contracting and 
Technology held a hearing on the R&D tax credit and the role it 
plays in innovation and growth for America's small businesses. 
Witnesses included Bart Heenan, CEO of Morphix Technologies; 
Scott Ferros, CFO of Blackhawk; Doug Wilson, Executive Vice 
President of LifeNet Health; Dr. Karl Schoenbach of Old 
Dominion University; Ned Barrett, President of Direct Logic 
Solutions; and Richard Bendis, President & CEO Innovation 
America.
    The witnesses detailed that the R&D tax credit is vital for 
American companies looking to stay ahead in increasingly global 
economy. They emphasized that capital and research lead to new 
inventions, product, and ultimately jobs. However, since 
capital and research can take place almost anywhere in the 
world, it is important for the U.S. economy to keep pace with 
the rest of the world, changes need to be made. The panel 
argued that the credit needs to be made a permanent part of the 
tax code so that firms can rely on the incentive when planning 
their research budgets. Additionally, the witnesses noted that 
the complexity of the provision needs to be reduced so that 
more and more small businesses can take advantage of the 
credit.

 THE ROLE OF FEDERAL LABS IN SPURRING INNOVATION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP 
                            ACROSS THE U.S.

    On September 24, 2009, the Subcommittee on Contracting and 
Technology held a hearing entitled, ``The Role of Federal Labs 
in Spurring Innovation and Entrepreneurship Across the U.S.'' 
The Subcommittee heard testimony from industry representatives 
on how small businesses performing contracts for federal labs 
and research facilities have generated technological 
advancements and local economic benefits. The hearing reviewed 
the importance of these research projects in job creation.

                 VETERAN CONTRACTING--PREVENTING FRAUD

    The Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology held a 
hearing on May 24, 2010 in Norfolk, Virginia to discuss a 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report that discovered 
fraud in the Service-Disabled Veteran Owned Small Business 
(SDVOSB) procurement program. In addition, the hearing examined 
procurement opportunities available to SDVOSBs. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from Greg Kutz, GAO's Managing 
Director of Forensic Audits and Special Investigations; Cindy 
Walters, Director of the Hampton Roads Procurement Assistance 
Center; Janice Cavolt, owner of JBC Corp and local 
representative from the American Legion; Elton Roller, owner of 
Greenland Enterprises, Inc., a certified SDVOSB; and George 
Armbruster and Duke Ingraham, co-owners of Fleet Services and 
Installation, LLC, an SDVOSB.

  ENSURING CONTRACTING OPPORTUNITIES AND PREVENTING FRAUD FOR SERVICE-
                DISABLED VETERAN-OWNED SMALL BUSINESSES

    On July 15, 2010, the Subcommittee on Contracting and 
Technology held a hearing to discuss the Service-Disabled, 
Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) procurement program. 
Federal agencies testified regarding how they work to meet 
their SDVOSB goals as well as on the contracts that they 
awarded to SDVOSBs with funds from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The Subcommittee heard testimony from 
representatives from the following agencies: Department of 
Veteran Affairs; Department of Defense; Environmental 
Protection Agency; and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. 
These agencies were selected to testify because they either had 
noteworthy performance or were cited in the October 2009 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report regarding fraud 
in the SDVOSB program.
              Subcommittee on Regulations and Health Care

                          Oversight Activities

               IMPACT OF FOOD RECALLS ON SMALL BUSINESSES

    On March 11, 2009, the Subcommittee on Regulations and 
Healthcare held a hearing entitled, ``Impact of Food Recalls on 
Small Businesses.'' The Food and Drug Administration and U.S. 
Department of Agriculture testified on how their agencies 
responded to a rash of food recalls occurring in the months 
before the hearing, and how they work with small businesses 
during recalls. Representatives of small firms discussed the 
severe economic impact that food recalls have on their 
businesses, and what should be done to reduce the incidence of 
such recalls.

 IMPACTS OF OUTSTANDING REGULATORY POLICY ON SMALL BIOFUELS PRODUCERS 
                           AND FAMILY FARMERS

    On May 21, 2009 the Subcommittee on Regulations and 
Healthcare held a hearing on outstanding regulatory issues 
impacting the domestic biofuels industry. The Subcommittee 
heard testimony from witnesses who discussed pending renewable 
fuel regulations and the regulatory framework affecting the 
biofuels and related agriculture industries. This forum 
examined the implementation of programs in the 2007 Energy Bill 
as well as the 2008 Farm Bill.
    Witnesses on the first panel included: Ms. Cheryl Cook, 
Deputy Under Secretary for Rural Development, United States 
Department of Agriculture; and Ms. Margo Oge, Director Office 
of Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency. Witnesses on the second panel included: Mr. 
Mike Noble, President, Lake Erie Biofuels, LLC; Mr. Ben 
Wootton, President, Keystone, Shiremanstown, PA; Mr. Gregory L. 
Bafalis, President & CEO, Green Earth Fuels, LLC; Mr. Ray 
Gaesser, Executive Committee Member, American Soybean 
Association; Mr. Zippy Duvall, President, Georgia Farm Bureau 
Federation; and Mr. K.C. Das, Ph.D., P.E., Associate Professor, 
University of Georgia.

HEALTH IT ADOPTION AND THE NEW CHALLENGES FACED BY SOLO AND SMALL GROUP 
                          HEALTHCARE PRACTICES

    On June 24, 2009, the Subcommittee on Regulations and 
Healthcare held a hearing entitled ``Health IT Adoption and the 
New Challenges Faced by Solo and Small Group Healthcare 
Practices.'' The Committee discussed the challenges solo and 
small group practices face in adopting health information 
technology (HIT). It also examined the implementation of 
policies in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 
to promote Health IT adoption. Congresswoman Kathy Dahlkemper, 
Chair of the Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare, 
introduced the Health Information Technology Financing Act of 
2009, a small business proposal designed to increase wider 
adoption of HIT by providers though the Small Business 
Administration. Testimony was offered by Dr. David Blumenthal 
on behalf of the US Department of Health and Human Services; 
Mr. Jim Fetzner of Comfort Care located in Erie, Pennsylvania; 
Mr. Rob Jackson of Grove City Medical Center located in Grove 
City, Pennsylvania; Dr. Susan Kressly on behalf of the American 
Academy of Pediatrics; Dr. Charles J. Stuckey, O.D.; on behalf 
of the Pennsylvania Optometric Association; and Ms. Carladenise 
A. Edwards, Ph.D. on behalf of the Georgia Department of 
Community Health.
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship, and Trade 
                          Oversight Activities

 THE IMPACT OF COMPETITIVE BIDDING ON SMALL BUSINESSES IN THE DURABLE 
                      MEDICAL EQUIPMENT COMMUNITY

    On February 11, 2009, the Subcommittee on Rural 
Development, Entrepreneurship, and Trade held a hearing 
entitled ``The Impact of Competitive Bidding on Small 
Businesses in the Durable Medical Equipment Community.'' The 
hearing focused on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services 
(CMS) final rule on competitive bidding for durable medical 
equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS). Under 
the rule, DMEPOS companies are required to submit bids, 
allowing CMS to select suppliers based on cost and volume, or 
on potential savings. Witnesses raised concerns about the 
bidding process suggesting implementation of the program could 
lead to access and quality problems.
    Testimony was provided by Laurence Wilson, Director of 
DMEPOS Policy, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services; 
Wayne Stanfield on behalf of the National Association of 
Independent Medical Equipment Suppliers; William Griffin on 
behalf of North Carolina Association for Medical Equipment 
Services; Robert E Brant, Accredited Medical Equipment 
Providers of America, Inc.; Ms. Georgetta Blackburn, AA 
Homecare; and Dr. Alan Routman on Behalf of American 
Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES TO MODERNIZE SBA'S ENTREPRENEURIAL DEVELOPMENT 
                                PROGRAMS

    On April 2, 2009, the Subcommittee on Rural Development, 
Entrepreneurship, and Trade held a hearing to examine 
legislative proposals to modernize the SBA's entrepreneurial 
development (ED) programs. Small business representatives 
testified on how the proposed legislative initiatives will 
impact the effectiveness of SBA's ED programs, while 
strengthening small firms' ability to expand.

  TEXTILE IMPORT ENFORCEMENT: IS THE PLAYING FIELD LEVEL FOR AMERICAN 
                           SMALL BUSINESSES?

    On June 18, 2009, the Subcommittee on Rural Development, 
Entrepreneurship, and Trade held a hearing entitled ``Textile 
Import Enforcement: Is the Playing Field Level for American 
Small Businesses?'' The Assistant Commissioner in the Office of 
International Trade at U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Dan 
Baldwin, delivered testimony. The hearing examined the 
challenges small businesses face from illegally trafficked 
products and whether enforcement of textile laws is adequate.

         THE FUTURE OF SPECIALTY CROPS FOR SMALL FAMILY FARMERS

    On Thursday, July 30, 2009 the Subcommittee on Rural 
Development, Entrepreneurship and Trade, held a hearing 
entitled, ``The Future of Specialty Crops for Small Family 
Farmers.'' This forum provided a discussion of the current Farm 
Bill programs, and how they will apply to fresh fruits and 
vegetables. It enabled the Subcommittee to consider future 
policies that will further develop the industry's future during 
these times of uncertainty. This Subcommittee was also able to 
hear testimony from producers about how production will 
continue to provide small businesses with a future in this 
industry, even during a period of economic instability.
    The hearing included two panels. The first panel included 
the Honorable Kathleen Merrigan, Deputy Secretary of 
Agriculture, with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The 
second panel included: Mr. Bill Holbrook, Cold Mountain Farms 
from Waynesville, NC; Mr. Kenny Barnwell, Kenny Barnwell 
Orchards, from Edneyville, NC; Mr. Brian Rose, President, 
Flavor 1st Growers & Packers, from Horse Shoe, NC; Mr. Rich 
Hudgins, President & CEO, California Canning Peach Association, 
and Mr. Jim Anderson, Executive Director, with the Missouri 
Wine and Grape Board.

             THE ROLE OF AUTO DEALERS ON RURAL COMMUNITIES

    On September 16, 2009, the Subcommittee on Rural 
Development, Entrepreneurship and Trade held a hearing on the 
role of auto dealerships on rural communities. This hearing 
examined the effect of automobile dealers on the local 
communities that these dealers are located within, with a focus 
on rural communities. The Subcommittee heard testimony from 
auto dealers and an academic scholar on this issue.

   COAL COMBUSTION BYPRODUCTS: POTENTIAL IMPACT OF A HAZARDOUS WASTE 
       DESIGNATION ON SMALL BUSINESSES IN THE RECYCLING INDUSTRY

    On July 22, 2010, the Subcommittee on Rural Development, 
Entrepreneurship and Trade held a hearing to discuss the effect 
of proposed coal combustion waste (CCW) regulations on small 
businesses. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) testified 
about the proposed regulations and a panel of industry 
representatives and experts testified about the regulation's 
impact on small businesses.
    The Subcommittee stressed the importance of the business 
community and the EPA working together to promote 
environmentally progressive strategies to dispose of CCW. 
During the hearing, witnesses testified that the new 
regulations proposed by the EPA could shut down many businesses 
in the coal ash recycling and associated manufacturing sectors. 
Witnesses further testified that it could also deter industry 
investment in such strategies and, as result, increase the 
amount of waste in landfills. Instead, witnesses concluded that 
any final EPA rules should draw on the commercial markets for 
CCW ``beneficial use'' products, which are an economically 
efficient means to reduce this waste stream.
              Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight

                          Oversight Activities

  EXPANDING EQUITY INVESTMENT IN SMALL BUSINESSES, INVESTIGATIONS AND 
                               OVERSIGHT

    On March 26, 2009, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight held a hearing to explore the role of equity 
investment for small firms and examine potential measures for 
expanding equity investment for small businesses. More 
specifically, the hearing focused on issues related to equity 
investment in small business with emphasis on how difficult 
economic conditions have affected investment in small firms. 
The Committee received testimony from the National Association 
of Small Business Investment Companies, the Angel Capital 
Association, the Private Equity Council, the National Venture 
Capital Association, the Biotechnology Industry Organization 
and a Business Development Company.

     THE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY IMPROVEMENT ACT AND SMALL BUSINESS

    On May 14, 2009, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight held a hearing entitled ``The Consumer Product Safety 
Improvement Act and Small Business.'' The Acting Chairman of 
the Consumer Product Safety Commission, Nancy Nord, delivered 
testimony. The Subcommittee heard testimony from small business 
manufacturers of children's products. The small firms discussed 
the challenges they face in complying with the Consumer Product 
Safety Improvement Act. The Subcommittee explored how the CPSC 
can minimize related regulatory burdens on small businesses.

  THE UPCOMING HIGHWAY BILL AND ENSURING IT MEETS THE NEEDS OF SMALL 
                                BUSINESS

    On July 16, 2009, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight held a hearing entitled ``The Upcoming Highway Bill 
and Ensuring It Meets the Needs of Small Business.'' The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from small firms in the 
construction industry including contractors, equipment 
distributors, architects and materials providers. The hearing 
examined how investing in highway infrastructure benefits local 
economies and what improvements to America's surface 
transportation system are required to meet the needs of 
entrepreneurs.

             THE IMPACT OF ENERGY POLICY ON SMALL BUSINESS

    On August 25, 2009, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight held a field hearing in Tulsa, Oklahoma on the impact 
of national energy policy on small businesses. As Congress 
considered energy and climate change legislation, it was 
appropriate to convene this hearing to ensure that small 
businesses and family farmers would have a critical role in any 
policy solutions. The hearing examined the potential 
opportunities that potential reforms can present and ensured 
that the needs of small businesses were addressed in crafting 
measures. The Subcommittee heard testimony from local energy 
businesses.

                 ACCESS TO CAPITAL FOR SMALL BUSINESSES

    On May 17, 2010, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight held a field hearing in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
entitled, ``Access to Capital for Small Businesses.'' The 
purpose of the hearing was to examine the state of small 
business lending, with particular emphasis on the prevailing 
conditions in Western Pennsylvania.

              IMPACT OF INTERCHANGE FEES ON SMALL BUSINESS

    On July 29, 2010, the Subcommittee on Investigations and 
Oversight, held a hearing to examine how the current fee 
structure associated with card payment transactions has 
affected small businesses and small financial institutions. 
Specifically, the Subcommittee explored the advantages that the 
current system provides to small businesses, consumers, and 
banks, as well as how the costs of this system are allocated 
among these parties. Additionally, this hearing explored how 
the interchange system will be affected by recent changes in 
law that are expected to come about with the passage of the 
Frank-Dodd Financial Regulatory Reform bill. Witnesses at this 
hearing included the CEOs of a community bank, a credit union 
and representatives from two small businesses.
                 OVERSIGHT PLAN FOR THE 111TH CONGRESS

    Clause 2(d) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 111th Congress requires that each 
standing committee in the first session of a Congress adopt an 
oversight plan for the two-year period of the Congress and 
submit the plan to the Committee on Government Reform and the 
Committee on House Administration.
    Clause 1(d)(1) of rule XI requires each committee to submit 
to the House not later than January 2 of each odd-numbered 
year, a report on the activities of that committee under rules 
X and XI during the Congress ending on January 3 of such year. 
Clause 1(d)(3) of rule XI also requires that the report include 
a summary of the oversight plans submitted pursuant to clause 
2(d) of rule X; a summary of the actions taken and 
recommendations made with respect to each such plan; and a 
summary of any additional oversight activities undertaken by 
the committee and any recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon.
    Part A of this section contains the Oversight Plan of the 
Committee on Small Business for the One Hundred Eleventh 
Congress, which the Committee considered and adopted on January 
28, 2009.
    Part B of this section contains a summary of the actions 
taken to implement that plan and the recommendations made with 
respect to the plan. Additional oversight activities undertaken 
by the Committee, and the recommendations made or actions taken 
thereon, are contained in the specific sections relating to the 
activities of the full Committee and each of the subcommittees.
                                 PART A

 OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS FOR THE ONE HUNDRED 
                           ELEVENTH CONGRESS

                              ----------                              


     January 28, 2009. Approved by the Committee on Small Business.

                              ----------                              

    Ms. Velazquez, from the Committee on Small Business, 
submitted to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
and the Committee on House Administration the following

                                 REPORT

    Clause 2(d)(1) of rule X of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives for the 111th Congress requires each standing 
committee, not later than February 15th of the first session to 
adopt an oversight plan for the 111th Congress. The oversight 
plan must be submitted simultaneously to the Committee on 
Government Reform and the Committee on House Administration.
    The following agenda constitutes the oversight plan of the 
Committee on Small Business for the 111th Congress. It includes 
areas in which the Committee and its subcommittees expect to 
conduct oversight during this Congress, but does not preclude 
oversight or investigation of additional matters or programs as 
they arise. The Committee will consult, as appropriate, with 
other committees of the House that may share jurisdiction over 
any of the subjects listed below.
I. Oversight of the Small Business Administration
    A. Agency Management. Given the challenges facing the 
economy, the Committee will review the adequacy of the 
management structure, staffing levels, and financial resources 
of the agency's programs. The Committee will review new 
initiatives that have been implemented to respond to the 
economic slowdown and determine if further action or 
modification is warranted. With the decrease in SBA lending 
activity, the Committee will examine the role that the 
centralization of loan processes played, including the role 
that the facilities in Herndon, Virginia; Hazard, Kentucky; and 
Citrus Heights, California have played. The Committee will also 
consider whether the commercial loan centers in Fresno, 
California and Little Rock, Arkansas are accomplishing their 
mission. The Committee will examine the role of SBA District 
Offices and whether they are meeting the needs of the local 
community. The Committee will review human resources policies 
and employee training programs, including SBA University, to 
determine their effect on agency morale and preparedness. The 
Committee will review the agency's cooperative agreements, 
partnerships and co-sponsorships. The Committee will continue 
to assess the adequacy of the agency's budgetary requests, 
financial management, and reporting goals.
    B. Lending Programs. With loan volumes declining 
substantially across SBA's lending programs, the Committee will 
review measures to reverse these trends. This will include 
examining alternatives to existing programs, as well as 
changing existing initiatives' structure. The Committee also 
will analyze the government's response to the recent economic 
downturn and financial crisis. This will include an evaluation 
of the impact of the Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP) and 
the Capital Purchase Program (CPP) on SBA lending. In addition, 
the Committee will assess whether the Federal Reserve's Term 
Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) has assisted the 
secondary market for SBA loans. The Committee will also 
consider enhancing the 7(a) and Certified Development Company 
programs so that they are more effective in reaching borrowers 
unable to secure conventional loans. Additionally, the 
Committee will review the Microloan program with the intent of 
making it more affordable for borrowers and reducing barriers 
to its growth.
    C. Lender Oversight. The Committee will conduct hearings 
regarding the effectiveness of SBA's Office of Lender 
Oversight. This will include an assessment of the SBA's ability 
to monitor risk in its loan portfolio and the corrective 
actions it has taken to address undue risk. In addition, the 
Committee will also review the sufficiency of the budgetary 
resources for the lender oversight function. The Committee also 
will examine methods the SBA uses to manage risk in its loan 
portfolio and review the agency's policies and practices 
regarding its lending partners. Finally, the Committee will 
review the procedures to monitor the SBA's investment programs, 
including an assessment of actions taken to protect the 
government from loss due to capital impairment in these 
programs.
    D. Investment Programs. The Committee will conduct hearings 
regarding the availability of equity capital for small firms in 
the current economic environment. The Committee will consider 
proposals to modify and reestablish the SBIC participating 
securities program, with a focus on broadening early-stage 
investment in high-growth, job-creating industries. The 
Committee will continue to consider policy changes that will 
increase angel investment. Finally, the Committee will assess 
the New Markets Venture Capital program and how it can be 
strengthened to better fulfill its mission of making equity 
capital more available to low-income in urban and rural 
communities.
    E. Disaster Programs. The Committee will review the 
implementation of major statutory changes to the SBA's disaster 
loan and response programs made during the 110th Congress. This 
will include an assessment of the programs that: incorporate 
private sector lenders into the disaster loan program; improve 
the agency's response during and after disasters; enhance 
coordination among agency's responding to disasters; and 
provide for improved system resiliency. In addition, the 
Committee will review SBA's disaster simulations, planning and 
preparations for large-scale disasters, and modifications made 
to the disaster cadre.
    F. Entrepreneurial Development Programs. The Committee will 
conduct hearings into how these programs can play a greater 
role in current economic downturn and assist struggling 
businesses and unemployed workers. This will include ensuring 
that these initiatives are focused on stimulating economic 
development, providing workforce retraining, and creating new 
jobs. The Committee also will evaluate the sufficiency of these 
programs' services to make certain that the needs of small 
businesses are being met. The Committee will examine proposals 
to establish a national incubator program that will provide and 
serve as a catalyst for entrepreneurial growth in local 
communities.
    G. Government Contracting and Business Development 
Programs. The Committee will examine the SBA's contracting and 
business development to ensure that the agency's efforts are 
meeting the needs of small businesses. In particular, the 
Committee will review the 8(a) program, the Small Disadvantaged 
Business program, and the Women's Procurement Program. With 
regard to the Women's Procurement Program, the Committee will 
continue to review the agency's implementation actions. The 
effectiveness of SBA's role in mitigating bundled contracts, 
including the hiring and retention of procurement center 
representatives, will be assessed. In light of reports raised 
by the SBA's Inspector General, the Committee will examine the 
role that Alaskan Native Corporations play in the 8(a) program 
and ensure that the program's rules and regulations encourage 
minority small business growth and development. The Committee 
will continue to oversee the HUBZone program, including 
addressing the GAO's findings of fraud and insufficient program 
controls. The Committee will assess the Service-Disabled 
Veteran-Owned Procurement Program to ensure that it is being 
properly implemented. The Committee will examine recent 
decisions by the GAO (International Programs, Inc. B-400278; B-
400308), as well as changes to the Federal Acquisition 
Regulations (FAR) that would effect the coordination of SBA's 
contracting and business development programs government-wide. 
The Committee will examine the SBA's Office of Size Standards 
to ensure that it has the resources and organization structure 
to effectively update size standards in a timely manner. With 
regard to the 7(j) program, the Committee will review the 
agency's process to determine awards under this authority. 
Finally, the Committee will review the SBA's actions to improve 
the accuracy of federal contracting databases that list 
eligibility and awards made to small businesses.
    H. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small 
Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Building on the 
Committee's efforts to assess and reauthorize the SBIR and STTR 
programs during the 110th Congress, the Committee will consider 
proposals to strengthen and modernize the SBIR and STTR 
programs. In order to further the most promising technologies 
and promote maximum job creation, the Committee will consider 
specific proposals to permit venture capital-backed companies 
to participate in the SBIR program.
    I. Office of Advocacy. The Committee will assess the 
policies of the Office of Advocacy and its capabilities to 
reduce regulatory burdens on small businesses.
    J. Veterans Corporation. The Committee will review the on-
going activities of the National Veterans Business Development 
Corporation to determine whether the Corporation is serving as 
an effective advocate for veteran-owned businesses. In light of 
concerns that the Corporation is not meeting its obligation to 
veterans, the Committee will examine the Corporation's 
operation and performance to determine whether or not it should 
be replaced with a new entity. The Committee will examine the 
Corporation's relationship within the context of all federal 
programs designed to assist veterans, particularly those 
returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. The Committee also will 
evaluate the relationship between the SBA and the Corporation 
to identify whether the SBA is working cooperatively with the 
Corporation, or whether work is being unnecessarily replicated. 
The Committee will identify whether the Corporation's efforts 
at expanding and enhancing private funding options have been 
successful.
II. Agriculture
    A. Implementation of Recent Agricultural Policy. The 
Committee will examine the impact of federal policies on family 
farms, ranchers, and rural small businesses. The Committee will 
provide an in-depth examination of the implementation of the 
2008 Farm Bill and its impact on small entities. This will 
include an investigation of the policies' effects on the 
income, production costs, and prices received by small 
producers.
    B. Financial and Technical Assistance. The Committee will 
examine the impact of access to capital issues facing rural 
areas, farmers and agribusinesses. The Committee will evaluate 
federal programs that provide training, information, and 
networking resources to enhance entrepreneurial activity in 
these regions.
    C. Program Harmonization. The Committee will examine the 
SBA and Department of Agriculture economic development programs 
to determine how the two agencies can better coordinate their 
missions to assist small business owners, both through program 
harmonization and streamlined communications.
    D. Renewable fuels. The Committee will examine the role of 
small businesses in renewable fuel development and production. 
The Committee will assess the operational needs of small 
farmers seeking to produce alternative fuel products.
    E. Climate Change. The Committee will examine how farmers 
and small businesses can contribute to climate change 
mitigation, and how they can minimize their climate impact in a 
way that will positively affect their revenues and 
profitability.
    F. Food Prices. The Committee will examine how over the 
course of the last months of 2008, commodity prices have 
dramatically declined, yet retail food prices remain high. The 
Committee will examine further all responses to the food price 
issue, including their impact on American farmers, consumers 
and small businesses.
    G. Value Added Products. The Committee will increase 
oversight of financing and technical assistance programs that 
aid small farmers' expansion into emerging niche agricultural 
markets, including organic products. The Committee will 
evaluate the operational needs of small farmers working to add 
value to outputs and maintain competitiveness in the changing 
marketplace.
    H. Rural Economic Development. The Committee will oversee 
federal activities to spur economic development in rural 
communities. The Committee will conduct hearings on the 
physical and financial infrastructure needed to maintain and 
grow small rural businesses, including access to air 
transportation.
    I. Competition Problems in Rail Industry and Impact on 
Rural Areas. The Committee will examine competition problems 
facing small firms as related to the rail industry and rail 
rates, and identify anticompetitive barriers to entry. The 
Committee will identify antitrust policies that increase 
competition and foster market conditions, thus allowing for 
more competition in terms of price and availability for rural 
areas.
III. Energy
    A. Energy Bill Provisions. The 110th Congress passed 
sweeping energy legislation signed by the President (P.L. 110-
140 December 19, 2007) that included Title XII, entitled 
``Small Business Energy Programs.'' The Committee will play an 
active oversight role as these provisions are implemented, 
especially with respect to the adequacy of the programs for 
small firms.
    B. Energy Efficiency. The Committee will investigate 
methods to increase energy efficiency and improve resource 
conservation practices for small businesses. The Committee will 
conduct oversight of federal initiatives to streamline business 
operations and reduce energy costs for small firms.
    C. Renewable Energy Incentives. The Committee will examine 
expiring renewable energy tax incentives. This will include a 
review of how important these policies have been in stimulating 
small business commerce within the sectors of renewable 
biofuels, wind, solar, and geothermal.
    D. Energy Prices. The Committee will conduct hearings on 
the effect of volatile energy and petroleum prices on small 
businesses, particularly fuel intensive sectors, such as 
farming, transportation, and those that use petroleum products 
as feedstock.

IV. Financial services and credit availability

    A. Financial Crisis. The Committee will review the impact 
that legislation aimed at stabilizing the U.S. financial 
markets has had on small financial firms and other small 
businesses. This will include an assessment of the Troubled 
Asset Relief Program (TARP) and the Capital Purchase Program 
(CPP). In addition, the Committee will review several actions 
taken by the Federal Reserve, including the establishment of 
the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF) and its 
effect on commercial lending.
    B. Emerging Economic Trends. The Committee will continue to 
examine ongoing economic conditions stemming from the recession 
that began in August of 2008, and their effect on small firms' 
ability to grow, create jobs, and access capital.
    C. Credit Markets. The Committee will review conditions in 
the national credit markets as they relate to small business 
lending and investment and will oversee federal efforts to 
ensure that those markets function properly.
    D. Secondary Market. The Committee will examine the role 
that the secondary market plays in small business finance. This 
will include a review of asset-securitization procedures and 
policies in place for commercial lending. The Committee will 
consider whether the secondary market for small business loans 
can be enhanced through standardization, credit enhancements, 
or making performance data more readily available.
    E. Costs of Sarbanes-Oxley Compliance. In 2009, the 
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) will release data on 
the costs small public companies would face if they were 
required to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. 
The Committee will evaluate the findings of the SEC and will 
assess the affect of SOX 404 compliance costs on small firms.
    F. Venture Capital. The Committee will conduct oversight 
hearings into trends in venture capital investment, including 
whether start-up firms are securing such funding. The Committee 
also will consider declining initial public offering activity 
and its impact of venture capital financing.
    G. Capital Formation. The Committee will review barriers 
that impede small businesses' access to the capital markets, 
including obstacles to initial public offerings and the public 
equity markets. This will include a review of how SEC rules, 
regulations, and forms affect small companies and whether SEC 
regulation S-B is sufficiently tailored to the needs of small 
issuers.
    H. Middle Market Financing. The Committee will examine 
whether middle market companies are able to secure sufficient 
and cost-effective financial resources. These companies, which 
generate between $5 million and $250 million in annual revenue, 
contribute approximately 70 percent toward the nation's gross 
national product. The financing needs of these companies are 
often well beyond the capacity of SBA's programs and, given the 
current economic downturn, many of these companies are left 
without access to affordable credit and capital.
    I. Role of Small Lenders. The Committee will assess the 
impact of consolidation and attrition in the financial services 
industry on small lenders and small business borrowers. In 
addition, the Committee will review industry trends and 
regulatory developments that may reduce the availability of 
financing to small firms.
    J. Insurance. The Committee will evaluate the use of 
insurance products by small businesses, including property/
casualty lines. The Committee also will assess the impact of 
federal insurance reforms on small insurers and small 
businesses. Finally, the Committee will examine the impact of 
federal regulatory efforts on small insurance companies and 
insurance brokers.

V. Health care

    A. Access to Affordable Health Coverage. The Committee will 
evaluate a number of health care policies designed to expand 
access to affordable health insurance through small employers. 
The Committee will look at proposed federal changes to give 
small employers greater options for coverage. The Committee 
will examine current and proposed state initiatives to promote 
coverage, and will evaluate the impact of these reforms on 
small employers in those markets. The Committee will examine 
the impact of these changes on the small-group health insurance 
market.
    B. Expanding Available Options for Small Employers to 
Purchase Health Insurance. The Committee will examine options 
for removing barriers to affordable small employer coverage. 
The Committee will conduct hearings to review new and emerging 
policies to increase access to affordable health care coverage. 
These possible changes include, but are not limited to, 
increasing pooling mechanisms for small businesses, reinsurance 
models, and ERISA reforms.
    C. Tax Credits to Increase Health Coverage. The Committee 
will analyze the intersection of tax policy and health care in 
the 111th Congress as health care reform becomes not only a 
national but also a small business priority. The Committee will 
examine whether the current system, which allows an employer 
deduction for health insurance premiums, is the best way to 
make health care affordable for the millions of small business 
employers and small business employees that currently are 
without any coverage. The Committee will examine reform 
options, including but not limited to: capping the deduction on 
employer benefits, converting the deduction into a fixed 
refundable credit for the small business employer, converting 
the deduction into a fixed, refundable credit for the small 
business employee, or some other reform option.
    D. Health IT Adoption. The Committee will conduct hearings 
to evaluate the economic benefits derived through the adoption 
of a uniform, secure, interoperable health information 
technology infrastructure (Health IT) by small healthcare 
groups--i.e. physicians, vendors and other providers. In 
particular, the Committee will consider the degree to which 
Health IT creates market efficiencies and whether those 
advantages will exist for small groups. The Committee will 
evaluate the challenges of Health IT adoption.
    E. Health Care Consolidation. The Committee will examine 
the impact of consolidation in the health care industry on the 
cost and availability of care to small firms. The Committee 
will assess the effects of health insurer consolidation on 
healthcare providers. The Committee will examine the need to 
revise the FTC/DOJ Joint Health Care Guidelines to reflect 
increased consolidation health care markets, and to ensure that 
the Guidelines are not placing physicians on an unlevel playing 
field.
    F. CMS Healthcare Provider Compensation. The Committee will 
examine federal reimbursement of healthcare providers and the 
effect that such reimbursement decisions have on non-Medicare/
Medicaid insurer reimbursement to physicians and other 
healthcare providers. This will provide a particular focus of 
the impact on small healthcare practices.
    G. CMS Regulation. The Committee will evaluate CMS 
regulations that affect the business operation of small 
healthcare providers. In particular, the Committee will examine 
CMS' regulatory structure and consider how current regulations 
may be enhanced to improve the business environment of 
healthcare providers.

VI. International trade

    A. Domestic and International Trade Policies. The Committee 
will hold hearings to identify measures for inclusion in trade 
agreements that reflect the interests of small domestic 
businesses, particularly facilitation measures and sector-
specific preferences. The Committee also will work to increase 
the representation of small business interests in the 
negotiation of new trade agreements and enforcement of existing 
agreements and treaties. This will include an effort to expand 
the focus on small business interests among federal trade 
policymakers. Additionally, the Committee will identify 
domestic policies compliant with international regulations, 
such as export loans, which help ensure the global 
competitiveness of small United States businesses.
    B. Trade and Employment. The Committee will examine the 
impact of trade policies on job losses among small firms. This 
will include a review of trade agreements, regulations, and 
procedures that adversely effect small firms' ability to create 
and retain domestic jobs.
    C. Trade Promotion Programs. The Committee will hold 
oversight hearings to measure the performance of federal trade 
programs, which seek to reduce small firms' costs of expanding 
into international markets, including those administered by the 
SBA, Departments of Commerce and Agriculture, the Export-Import 
Bank, and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. The 
Committee also will evaluate the implementation of the National 
Export Promotion Strategy, particularly its focus on small 
businesses. Further, the Committee will highlight components of 
the country's infrastructure that facilitate efficient cross-
border trade, but are in need of improvements such as ports, 
roads, and airport facilities.
    D. Regulations Affecting Trade. The Committee will assess 
whether existing international trade sanctions effectively 
prevent unfair trade practices such as theft of intellectual 
property or dumping of products below the cost of production. 
This evaluation will incorporate an examination of mechanisms 
to increase small businesses' access to relief from unfair 
trade practices through trade remedy programs. Finally, the 
Committee will work with the Executive Branch to reduce 
regulations that serve as barriers to small businesses engaged 
in importing and exporting.
    E. Trade Data and Trends. The Committee will evaluate the 
availability and quality of data measuring the contributions to 
the nation's trade performance by small businesses, including 
information gathered by the Department of Commerce and the 
United States Trade Representative. This will include an effort 
to examine the data compiled by federal agencies, indicating 
the output by small firms receiving trade-related assistance.

VII. Procurement

    A. Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). The Committee will 
examine the impact of waiving certain provisions of the Federal 
Acquisition Regulation on small business in the implementation 
of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. The 
Committee will examine measures taken by the Department of 
Treasury to utilize small businesses, including minority-owned 
and women-owned businesses as asset mangers, consultants, and 
servicers for the TARP.
    B. Omnibus Economic Stimulus. The Committee will conduct 
oversight of any economic stimulus legislation to determine its 
impact of small businesses. This will include an examination of 
the number and amount of federal contracts awarded to small 
businesses and an analysis of the job creation benefits of such 
procurement actions.
    C. Implementation of National Defense Authorization Act of 
2008. The Committee will review the impact of the ``enhanced 
competition'' and new bid protest provisions of this Act on 
small firms. This will include an investigation of whether 
these new authorities are benefiting small firms, particularly 
in defense-related industries.
    D. Application of Small Business Set-Asides for Task and 
Delivery Orders under Multiple Award Contracts. The Committee 
will examine recent GAO decisions (including Delex Systems, 
Inc., B-400403) that determined that federal small business 
set-asides and ``the rule of two'' apply to task and delivery 
order under multiple award schedule contracts. The Committee 
will examine efforts taken by agencies to understand if such 
set-asides are being applied consistently government-wide.
    E. Use of Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (ID/IQ) 
versus Sealed Bids for Construction Project Awards. The 
Committee will investigate whether federal agencies are 
increasingly relying on ID/IQ solicitations, instead of sealed 
bids, to award construction projects. The Committee will use 
this examination to determine whether such a trend promotes 
competition, particularly for smaller firms in construction and 
related industries.
    F. Emergency Contracting Authority. The Committee will 
review the federal government's emergency contracting 
practices, such as the use of no-bid contracts and the raising 
of the micropurchase threshold, to ensure that maximum 
competition is achieved in such circumstances, particularly 
with regard to small business participation.
    G. Contract Bundling. The practice of contract bundling 
displaces small businesses from the federal marketplace. The 
Committee will continue to monitor the use of ``bundled'' 
contracts, and ensure that regulations to reduce contract 
bundling are being followed. The Committee will continue to 
work to ``unbundle'' contracts where appropriate.
    H. Federal Contracting Goal. The Committee will review 
federal agencies performance in meeting annual contracting 
goals. In order to foster greater small business participation 
in the federal marketplace, the Committee will seek to work 
with agencies that have historically underperformed in meeting 
their contracting goals.
    I. Agency Miscounting of Contracts. The Committee will 
investigate the sufficiency of actions taken by the SBA, the 
FAR Council, and the Office of Federal Procurement Policy to 
ensure that contract awards to small firms are accurately 
enumerated. The continued reliance by the Executive Branch on 
an inaccurate data collection system overstates agency 
compliance with small business contracting goals--a situation 
that has yet to be rectified. The Committee will continue to 
review whether processes, including the usage of the Federal 
Procurement Data System, are appropriate to provide an accurate 
and transparent accounting of small business participation in 
the federal procurement market.

VIII. Regulations

    A. The Committee will examine federal agency rules and 
regulations, as well as consider proposals to simplify them and 
ensure that small businesses are not subject to undue 
regulatory burdens.
    B. The Committee will identify regulations that impose 
unnecessary barriers to competitive market entry by small 
businesses and place small businesses at a competitive 
disadvantage with respect to larger competitors.
    C. The Committee will identify regulations that fail to 
minimize recordkeeping and reporting requirements, including 
the elimination of duplicative requirements as required by the 
Paperwork Reduction Act.
    D. The Committee will assess whether small businesses are 
provided sufficient compliance assistance, including small 
entity compliance guides issued by agencies as mandated by the 
Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act.
    E. The Committee will examine the agency process for 
promulgating rules and regulations including: the adequacy of 
an agency's compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act; the 
adequacy of an agency's compliance with the Paperwork Reduction 
Act; whether the agency minimized burdens and maximized 
benefits for small businesses while achieving its statutory and 
regulatory objectives; whether the agency fully considered 
alternatives to the regulations that would lessen burdens on 
small firms; and, whether small businesses have been provided 
sufficient opportunity to comment and provide input into the 
development of regulations.
    F. The Committee will examine the need to amend and further 
strengthen the Regulatory Flexibility Act and the Paperwork 
Reduction Act to improve agency compliance with the laws and 
ensure that small businesses are not unnecessarily burdened by 
regulations.

IX. Taxation issues

    A. Tax Incentives and Measures to Stimulate Economy. The 
Committee will hold hearings on the state of the U.S. economy 
and how tax policy geared towards small businesses can generate 
an economic recovery. The Committee will focus on tax stimulus 
items to mitigate the negative effects of the economic 
slowdown. This will include an examination of the concerns of 
specific industries such as housing, manufacturing, technology, 
travel, and retail, where small businesses play a dominant 
role. The Committee will highlight regulatory and legislative 
efforts that increase consumption, hiring, retention, and 
investment by and for small businesses.
    B. Current State of the Tax Code. Nearly all aspects of 
taxation, including the current taxation of individual income, 
capital gains, estate taxes, and dividends, are set to change 
in 2010. As such, the committee will analyze, keeping fiscal 
considerations in mind, whether a renewal, modification, or 
expiration of some or all of these tax policy items best 
promotes development and growth of the economy and small 
business. Finally, the Committee will examine if this is the 
appropriate time to enact fundamental tax reform that includes 
a rationalization of deductions, exclusion, and credits, and an 
integrated tax system, which would promote small business 
expansion.
    C. Investment in Small Businesses and Tax Policy. The 
Committee will study tax proposals that encourage investments 
from outside sources while also analyzing tax initiatives that 
encourage small firms to expand their businesses. This includes 
not only scrutiny of existing incentives, such as the 
Investment Tax Credit, and New Markets Tax Credit, but also new 
tax credits, deductions or preferences that would encourage 
investors to directly invest in small business start-ups. 
Additionally, the Committee will the examine other specific tax 
relief, such as Section 179 expensing provisions, accelerated 
bonus depreciation provisions, and hiring and retention tax 
credits that encourage small firms to expand their workforce 
and grow their businesses.
    D. Alternative Minimum Tax. The Committee will examine ways 
to reform the alternative minimum tax to provide tax relief for 
small businesses. The Committee will review proposed changes 
and the budgetary costs of making such modifications.
    E. Tax Modernization. The last major reform of the tax code 
occurred in 1986, and changes made since have occurred in a 
piecemeal fashion. Therefore, the Committee will investigate 
obsolete provisions in the tax code that need to be modernized 
to help small businesses. The Committee will identify code 
provisions that need to be updated on account of inflation, 
altered business realities, or inequitable treatment due to the 
small business's choice of entity.
    F. Tax Simplification and Fairness. The Committee will 
explore the growing complexity of the United States tax system 
and its adverse impact on small employers. Also, because the 
tax system is based on voluntary compliance, the Committee will 
examine the myriad of complex and unclear tax rules that cause 
frequent errors by small businesses and exacerbate 
opportunities for noncompliance. Finally, the Committee also 
will examine inequities within the tax code that treat smaller 
businesses differently from their larger counterparts. The 
Committee will focus on proposals and make recommendations that 
ensure that tax policy is fair and reasonable for small 
businesses.
    G. Three Percent Withholding Requirement and Potential 
Impact on Small Businesses. A three percent withholding measure 
was added to the Tax Increase Prevention and Reconciliation Act 
of 2005. This measure, which will become effective in 2011, 
will require that all federal payments have three percent 
withheld for future taxes. The Committee will examine the 
potential negative impact this provision could have on the cash 
flow for small firms who perform federal contracts. The 
Committee will review whether this could hinder the 
competitiveness of small businesses.
    H. Retirement and Pension Benefits. The Committee will 
analyze tax code restructuring to enhance the ability of small 
businesses to offer retirement benefits through lowering their 
costs. Any such restructuring also will examine mechanisms to 
maximize employee enrollment. In performing this assessment, 
the Committee necessarily will investigate why such plans are 
outdated given current economic conditions, the morass of 
regulatory red-tape that prevents nearly 70 percent of small 
businesses from offering retirement plans. The Committee will 
explore what can be done to minimize the impact of burdensome 
pension plans and regulations so that small businesses can find 
and retain quality employees.

X. Technology and innovation

    A. Broadband Deployment. The Committee will assess the 
impact and conduct oversight of proposals to spur broadband 
deployment. This will include a review of the benefit from 
efforts to expand access to broadband services. The Committee 
will review the concerns of rural areas that are 
``underserved'' in terms of broadband coverage. It will examine 
the issue of how increased broadband speed affects the 
potential for further economic growth.
    B. Immediate Job Creation with Broadband Deployment. The 
Committee will investigate and oversee efforts to use public 
funds to encourage broadband deployment as an economic 
stimulus. This will include an assessment of the potential for 
immediate job creation with small telecommunications companies. 
In addition, the Committee will review how rapid deployment 
spurs growth.
    C. Universal Service Fund. The Committee will investigate 
the economic benefits of increasing the speed of broadband and 
proposals for reform of the Universal Service Fund. The 
Committee will assess whether such action could increase costs 
borne by providers or consumers.
    D. Broadband Adoption. The Committee will investigate the 
benefits of increasing the affordability of high-speed access 
to the Internet. The Committee will consider an array of 
potential government-led incentives designed to encourage 
consumers, including small firms, to adopt broadband services.
    E. Openness and Networks. The Committee will seek to ensure 
that small firms, including device manufactures, software 
application providers and online service providers, have open 
access to the public and private networks of the Internet. The 
Committee will also examine proposals that limit the necessary 
network management that helps ensure that all consumers, 
including small businesses, benefit from high-speed Internet 
access.
    F. Patent Reform. The Committee will examine the cost and 
benefits of proposed reforms to the U.S. patent system. In 
particular, the Committee will seek to evaluate the effect of 
patent reform legislation on the small businesses that apply 
for, receive and enforce patents. It will also assess the 
impact of reforms on those small companies that manufacture 
innovative products, license patented technologies, and defend 
themselves in alleged patent infringement cases.
    G. Cybersecurity. The Committee will monitor any efforts to 
create onerous or questionable cybersecurity mandates on 
private industry in an attempt to monitor and protect the 
Internet. The Committee will ensure that the concerns of small 
firms are raised. It will also assess the current government-
wide National Cybersecurity Initiative to ensure small 
technology firms have adequate contracting opportunities.
    H. Online Advertising. The Committee will examine the 
increasing importance of online marketing strategies to many 
successful small businesses and the concerns some have raised 
about consumer privacy. The Committee will also consider 
challenges some small firms have driving traffic to their 
website and converting on-line advertising into sales.
    I. Proposed Changes to Internet Domains. The Committee will 
investigate a proposal by the Internet Corporation for Assigned 
Names and Numbers (ICANN) to introduce new generic top-level 
domains (gTLDs). The proposed change is likely to compel many 
small businesses to invest in defensive domain registrations 
but may also provide new opportunities for some small firms. 
ICANN is expected to release the final gTLD in 2009 and the 
Committee will consider the costs and benefits of the proposal.
    J. Small Business Adoption of New Technology Tools. The 
Committee will examine the success with which small firms are 
utilizing new technologies and services (including social 
networking, so-called ``cloud computing'' services) to make 
their companies more efficient and competitive. The Committee 
will consider the challenges some small businesses face with 
respect to the effective adoption of these technologies and 
services.

XI. Transportation and infrastructure

    A. The Committee will conduct oversight hearings on the 
impact of transportation and infrastructure legislation and 
associated project funding on small businesses. This will 
include examining how small contractors are utilized in these 
projects, as well as the impact on local businesses that are 
dependent on transportation networks.

XII. Veteran's entrepreneurship

    A. Customized Assistance. The Committee will hold hearings 
to ensure federal entrepreneurial and capital assistance 
programs accommodate the growing veteran population. This will 
include evaluating the programs to ensure that services address 
the specialized needs of current veterans, including service 
disabled, women, and Reservists/Guardsman.
    B. Federal Veteran Procurement Policy. The Committee will 
review federal actions to assist veteran entrepreneurs and 
ensure that they are consistent with federal small business 
policy. This will include a review of regulations establishing 
agency-specific veteran contracting initiatives.
    C. Program Performance. The Committee will examine the 
effectiveness of federal programs that seek to improve 
veterans' access to markets and training by monitoring the 
output of veterans receiving entrepreneurial assistance. The 
Committee also will work with Executive Branch officials to 
ensure veterans have improved access to local business 
development facilities.
    D. Transition Services. The Committee will identify current 
transition assistance needs of separating service members and 
those experiencing ongoing deployments, such as Reservists, to 
help them apply skills gained in the service to the private 
sector. This will include working with administration officials 
to ensure that federal agencies, including, but not limited to, 
the SBA, and the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, 
prepare service members with resources to initiate 
entrepreneurial enterprises upon separation from the military.
    E. Federal Coordination and Centralization. The Committee 
will examine whether the federal government is sufficiently 
coordinating activities and allocating resources appropriately 
with regard to veteran entrepreneurship activities and 
initiatives. In addition, the Committee will investigate 
whether a government-wide office should be established to 
better facilitate the provision of services to veteran 
entrepreneurs.

XIII. Workforce issues

    A. Green Jobs. As small firms combat climate change by 
implementing renewable energy strategies from wind, solar, and 
geothermal to the development of more energy efficient heating 
systems, the Committee will have the opportunity to consider 
and evaluate green jobs and public policies that affect 
potential growth. The Committee also will evaluate needs for 
more workforce training.
    B. Technology Workforce. The Committee will investigate the 
impact of government programs and initiatives on small 
technology companies' ability to hire and retain the 
scientists, researchers and engineers these companies need to 
succeed. The Committee will examine the efficacy of public-
private partnerships aimed at strengthening education and 
training for American students and workers in subjects related 
to science, technology, engineering and math and will consider 
mechanisms that increase small firm participation in such 
initiatives. The Committee also will investigate the potential 
benefits to small firms associated with increasing the annual 
cap on H-1B visas, reforming the process by which employment 
visas are awarded, and permitting the recapture of used green 
cards.
    C. Visa System. The Committee will assess whether the 
existing visa system is meeting the workforce needs of small 
firms, and how it is affecting their ability to compete in a 
global marketplace. The Committee will examine suggestions to 
improve the visa system that benefits small firms.
                                 PART B

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON SMALL BUSINESS 
                 FOR THE ONE HUNDRED ELEVENTH CONGRESS

I. Oversight of the Small Business Administration
            A. Agency management
    The Committee conducted an aggressive oversight agenda 
during the 111th Congress. The Committee held ten oversight 
hearings of the SBA and its programs. During this Congress, the 
Committee has reviewed the SBA's activities in its three core 
operational areas: access to capital, entrepreneurial 
development, and contracting. In addition, the Committee held 
hearings regarding the Disaster Program and the Small Business 
Innovation Research (SBIR) Program, two significant initiatives 
administered by the agency. Three hearings were held to assess 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports requested by the 
Committee and one hearing was conducted to examine an SBA 
Inspector General investigation. These Committee oversight 
hearings included:\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\All of Committee's SBA-related oversight hearings have been held 
at the full committee level.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
     The State of SBA's Entrepreneurial Development 
Programs and Their Role in Promoting Economic Recovery 
(Oversight of the SBA's Entrepreneurial Development Programs), 
February 11, 2009
     GAO Investigation of the SBA's HUBZone Contracting 
Program, March 25, 2009
     The Importance of Technology in an Economic 
Recovery (Oversight of the SBA's Small Business Innovation 
Research Program), April 22, 2009
     Laying the Groundwork for Economic Recovery: 
Expanding Small Business Access to Capital (Oversight of the 
SBA's Lending and Investment Programs), June 10, 2009
     GAO Investigation on the SBA's Disaster Program, 
July 29, 2009
     GAO Investigation of the SBA's Service-Disabled 
Veteran-Owned Small Business Contracting Program, November 18, 
2009
     Small Business Participation in the Federal 
Procurement Marketplace (Oversight of the SBA's Contracting 
Programs), March 24, 2010
     SBA Inspector General Investigation of the SBA's 
504/CDC Program, April 21, 2010
     Improving Contracting Opportunities and Preventing 
Fraud for Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses, July 
15, 2010
     GAO Fraud Investigation: Undercover Tests Show 
HUBZone Program Remains Vulnerable to Fraud and Abuse, July 28, 
2010
    The Committee also continued to oversee the management of 
the SBA through the consideration of the agency's FY 2010 and 
FY 2011 budget proposals. The Committee approved views and 
estimates on the SBA's budget for each of these fiscal years, 
which included associated meetings and interviews with agency 
personnel and analysis of the SBA's managerial operations. On 
March 11, 2009 the Committee on Small Business marked up the FY 
2010 Budget Views and Estimates. On March 4, 2010 the Committee 
marked up the FY 2011 Budget Views and Estimates.
            B. Lending programs
    The Committee held six hearings that focused on the SBA's 
7(a), Certified Development Company, and Microloan programs, 
culminating in the introduction and passage of three pieces of 
legislation, H.R. 3723, H.R. 3737, and H.R. 3739, which were 
ultimately incorporated into H.R. 3854, reported out of 
Committee, and passed by the House.
    On March 26, 2009, the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations held a hearing to 
examine issues related to investment in small businesses, with 
particular emphasis on how prevailing economic conditions have 
affected investment in small firms. Witnesses in this hearing 
explained how the current recession has aggravated the need for 
investment funds, particularly for equity investing in small 
firms, and how new federal initiatives could allay those needs. 
Additionally, this hearing explored numerous setbacks to the 
SBA's investment programs that had dramatically reduced the 
amount of investment in early stage and startup businesses and 
had inhibited the flow of venture capital to small businesses 
in general.
    The full Committee subsequently held a hearing on June 10, 
2009, to examine the challenges facing the full array of the 
SBA's capital access programs. The Committee received testimony 
on issues facing the 7(a), Certified Development Company (CDC), 
and 7(m)/Microloan programs. Witnesses at this hearing 
discussed various deficiencies affecting the efficacy of these 
programs and proposed steps that could be taken to better meet 
the SBA's capital access mission.
    On July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, Subcommittee 
on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine proposed 
legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the SBA's 
lending and investment programs that had been identified by 
previous hearings before the Committee.
    The Committee held a hearing on October 14, 2009, to review 
proposed legislation to address deficiencies in the SBA's 
lending and investment programs that had been identified by 
previous hearings before the Committee. Witnesses at this 
hearing expressed their support for several legislative 
proposals to reform the SBA's existing programs and establish 
new programs that will help close the gap for equity 
investment.
    Throughout the 111th Congress, the Committee conducted 
vigorous oversight to ensure the SBA swiftly and correctly 
implemented provisions from H.R. 1, the ``American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act,'' that related to small business access to 
capital. Via hearings, meetings with SBA staff and 
Congressional correspondence the Committee pressed to see the 
statute properly applied, so as to best meet entrepreneurs' 
financing needs.
            C. Investment programs
    The Committee conducted several hearings on the SBA's 
investment programs, culminating in the introduction and 
passage of H.R. 3854, which modernized the SBA's investment 
programs.
    The Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Investigations held a hearing on March 26, 2009 to examine 
issues related to investment in small businesses. Witnesses in 
this hearing explained how the current recession has aggravated 
the need for investment funds, particularly for equity 
investing in small firms, and how new federal initiatives could 
allay those needs. Additionally, this hearing explored numerous 
setbacks to the SBA's investment programs that had dramatically 
reduced the amount of investment in early stage and startup 
businesses and had inhibited the flow of venture capital to 
small businesses in general.
    The Committee held a hearing on June 10th, 2009, to examine 
the challenges facing the full array of the SBA's capital 
access programs. The Committee received testimony on issues 
facing the Small Business Investment Company (SBIC), New 
Markets Venture Capital (NMVC), and Renewable Fuels Capital 
Investment (RFCI) Company programs.
    On Thursday, July 23, 2009 the Small Business Committee, 
Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a hearing to examine 
proposed legislative initiatives to address deficiencies in the 
SBA's lending and investment programs that had been identified 
by previous hearings before the Committee. Witnesses at this 
hearing discussed several legislative proposals that would make 
a number of important reforms to the SBA's existing programs 
and establish new programs that will help close the gap for 
equity investment that was left when the SBA's investing 
programs were curtailed.
    On October 14, 2009, the Committee held a hearing to review 
proposed legislation to address deficiencies in the SBA's 
lending and investment programs that had been identified by 
previous hearings before the Committee. Witnesses at this 
hearing expressed their support for several legislative 
proposals to reform the SBA's existing programs to help close 
the gap for equity investment.
            D. Disaster programs
    The Committee conducted oversight of SBA's Disaster program 
during the 111th Congress. On July 29, 2009, the Committee held 
an agency oversight hearing that focused on a GAO examination 
of the SBA's Disaster program. This hearing reviewed the 
agency's progress in making improvements post-Katrina and made 
recommendations for improvements.
    In addition, the Committee authored, considered, and passed 
legislation to improve the Disaster program. This legislation, 
H.R. 3743, passed the House on November 6, 2009.
            E. Entrepreneurial development programs
    The Committee continued to monitor and update SBA 
Entrepreneurial Development (ED) programs to ensure the 
agency's technical assistance and training resources meet the 
needs of small business owners, particularly as they address 
challenges in the current economic climate. The Committee 
evaluated the agency's core ED programs, including Small 
Business Development Centers, Women's Business Centers, SCORE, 
as well as Native American and Veterans Outreach assistance, in 
terms of service gaps, resource needs, and policy 
recommendations. New initiatives were also considered to expand 
the business assistance resources available to current 
entrepreneurs.
    To assess the ED programs assistance to small business 
during the economic downturn and identify new business 
development needs, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``The State of SBA's Entrepreneurial 
Development Programs and Their Role in Promoting an Economic 
Recovery'' on February 11, 2009. The overall effectiveness of 
the agency's business management and training services were 
evaluated as well as the capacity of these initiatives to spur 
growth in the nation's economy. The Committee received 
testimony from SBA ED program administrators, including 
representatives of the Associations of Small Business 
Development Centers and Women's Business Centers, regarding 
institutional and resource needs to operate these services as 
demand for assistance increases.
    Proposed legislative updates to SBA's ED programs were 
evaluated by the Subcommittee on Rural and Urban 
Entrepreneurship on April 2, 2009, in a hearing entitled 
``Legislative Proposals to Strengthen SBA's Entrepreneurial 
Development Programs.'' Program administrators and small 
business representatives assessed the quality of services to be 
established through the bill available to firms through an 
expansion of resources and policy modifications to the 
programs.
    Updates to the bill were incorporated in bill, H.R. 1803, 
``Veterans Business Center Act of 2009, which expands the 
agency's ED resources for veteran entrepreneurs. The House 
approved the bill on July 28, 2009 by voice vote. The 
legislation was sponsored by the Chairman of the Subcommittee 
on Contracting and Technology, Committee on Small Business, 
Representative Nye.
    Legislation to establish distance learning ED resources for 
small businesses across the country, H.R. 1807, ``Educating 
Entrepreneurs through Today's Technology Act,'' was approved by 
the House on July 28, 2009 by voice vote. The bill was 
sponsored by Rep. Glenn Thompson.
    The Committee evaluated comprehensive legislation to 
reauthorize SBA's ED programs on May 6, 2009. Small business 
representatives highlighted the critical gaps in the agency's 
business assistance services that the proposed legislation 
addressed.
    On May 20, 2009, the House of Representatives voted in 
support of H.R. 2352, ``The Job Creation Through 
Entrepreneurship Act of 2009,'' by 406-15 which comprehensively 
reauthorized and updated SBA's ED programs. The bill was 
sponsored by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Rural and 
Urban Entrepreneurship, Committee on Small Business, 
Representative Shuler.
            F. Government contracting and business development programs
    The Committee conducted regular oversight through hearings 
on SBA's contracting programs, which reviewed the challenges 
that small firms face in making use of these initiatives. In 
particular, the Committee focused on fraud in the SBA's HUBZone 
and Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) 
contracting programs.
    This included hearings on a GAO Investigation of the SBA's 
HUBZone Contracting Program on March 25, 2009 and a GAO 
Investigation of the SBA's Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small 
Business Contracting Program on November 18, 2009. These 
hearings demonstrated that these programs were susceptible to 
fraud and that the SBA needs to take immediate corrective 
action. Additional hearing pertaining to the SDVOSB program 
were conducted on May 24, 2010 and July 15, 2010 and pertaining 
to the HUBZone program on July 28, 2010.
    In addition, the Committee conducted a hearing that 
examined small business procurement issues, including the 
performance of SBA's contracting programs. This hearing, 
entitled Small Business Participation in the Federal 
Procurement Marketplace, occurred on March 24, 2010.
            G. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small 
                    Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs
    The Committee on Small Business undertook a comprehensive 
reauthorization effort of the SBIR and STTR programs during the 
111th Congress. This included oversight and legislative 
hearings, meetings with key stakeholders, and consideration of 
reauthorization legislation in both the Committee and on the 
House floor.
    In the 111th Congress, the Committee on Small Business 
convened a hearing on April 22, 2009 to explore the numerous 
contributions that the SBIR program makes to national security 
priorities, health technology, economic development objectives 
and America's international economic competitiveness. On June 
4, 2009, the Committee on Small Business, Subcommittee on 
Contracting and Technology held a hearing to review proposed 
legislation, which would become H.R. 2965 and would reauthorize 
the SBIR program. A further hearing on H.R. 2965 was held at 
the full Committee on June 17, 2009. Witnesses testified on the 
legislation's broad benefits to small businesses and American 
innovation. Ultimately, the legislation was considered and 
passed the House by a vote of 386 yeas and 41 nays.
            H. Office of Advocacy
    The Committee conducted oversight of the Office of Advocacy 
through the annual budget process. The Committee made 
recommendations concerning the Office of Advocacy's budget and 
raised concerns that the administration had not yet confirmed a 
Chief Counsel, which was addressed through a recent recess 
appointment of Winslow Sargeant in August 2010.
            I. Veterans Corporation
    The Committee continued to monitor the performance of the 
National Veterans Business Development Corporation (NVBDC) and 
to work to improve the services delivered through the 
organization to veteran entrepreneurs. The Committee worked to 
shift the administration of the NVBDC's Veterans Business 
Outreach Centers to the Small Business Administration. The 
shift was conducted to enhance the effectiveness of these 
outreach facilities and increase the efficiency of resources 
allocated to assist veteran entrepreneurs.
II. Agriculture
    The Committee conducted regular oversight of agricultural 
issues that affect small businesses and family farmers. On July 
22, 2009 the Committee held a hearing entitled ``Meeting the 
Needs of Small Businesses and Family Farmers in Regulating our 
Nation's Waters.'' The nation's waterways play a critical role 
in all acts of commerce, especially when it comes to small 
businesses and agriculture. The Committee took the opportunity 
to evaluate the regulatory framework for our nation's waters 
and the concerns of small business and family farmers. The 
Committee heard from farmers and small businesses on ways to 
ensure that the federal regulation of waterways meets the needs 
of our environment and economy.
    On Thursday, July 30, 2009 the Subcommittee on Rural 
Development, Entrepreneurship and Trade, held a hearing 
entitled, ``The Future of Specialty Crops for Small Family 
Farmers.'' This forum provided a discussion of the current Farm 
Bill programs, and how they will apply to fresh fruits and 
vegetables. It enabled the Subcommittee to consider policies 
that will further develop the industry's future during these 
times of uncertainty. This Subcommittee was also able to hear 
testimony from producers about how production will continue to 
provide small businesses with a future in this industry, even 
during a period of economic instability
    The Committee also held several hearings on biofuels during 
the 111th Congress. On March 4, 2009 held a hearing entitled, 
``The State of the Renewable Fuels Industry in the Current 
Economy.'' The hearing focused on access to capital issues, the 
effect of volatile energy prices, and how the overall downturn 
is affecting the renewable fuels industry. This forum also 
examined current policies promoting renewable and next 
generation fuels, including those in the 2008 Farm Bill. It 
enabled the Committee to consider future policies that will 
further develop the industry's future during these times of 
uncertainty. The Committee heard testimony from small renewable 
fuels producers and related industries on how they are 
adjusting during a period of economic instability.
    On May 21, 2009 the Subcommittee on Regulations and 
Healthcare held a hearing on outstanding regulatory issues 
impacting the domestic biofuels industry. The Subcommittee 
heard testimony from witnesses who discussed pending renewable 
fuel regulations and the regulatory framework affecting the 
biofuels and related agriculture industries. This forum 
examined the implementation of programs in the 2007 Energy Bill 
as well as the 2008 Farm Bill.
    In addition to hearings, the Committee conducted oversight 
of biofuels issues through the legislative process. H.R. 3854 
also amended the SBA's ``Renewable Fuel Capital Investment 
Company'' (RFCIC) program. This program authorizes the creation 
of new Renewable Fuel Capital Investment Companies (RFCICs), 
which issue SBA guaranteed debentures to invest in small 
businesses engaged in researching, manufacturing, developing, 
and bringing to market renewable energy sources. In particular, 
these Companies place specific emphasis on businesses that 
produce biofuels.
    The Committee examined the impact of climate change on 
small businesses. On April 29, 2009 the Committee on Small 
Business held a hearing entitled: ``Climate Change Solutions 
for Small Businesses and Family Farmers.'' This forum was 
critical when the House considered energy and climate change 
legislation, as small businesses and family farmers will have a 
critical role in any policy solutions. The hearing examined the 
potential opportunities reforms can present and ensured the 
needs of small businesses are addressed in crafting measures. 
This forum led to the Chairwoman sending a letter outlining 
small business and agriculture issues that should be addressed 
during House consideration.
    The hearing also offered an opportunity for panelists to 
discuss existing industry practices as well as policy solutions 
that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions while maintaining a 
strong economy.

III. Energy

    The Committee conducted oversight of the impact of energy 
prices on small businesses. On August 25, 2009, the 
Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight held a field 
hearing in Tulsa, Oklahoma on the impact of national energy 
policy on small businesses. As Congress considered energy and 
climate change legislation, it was appropriate to convene this 
hearing to ensure that small businesses and family farmers 
would have a critical role in any policy solutions. The hearing 
examined the potential opportunities that potential reforms can 
present and ensured that the needs of small businesses were 
addressed in crafting measures. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from local energy businesses.

IV. Financial services and credit availability

    The Committee undertook an extensive hearing agenda 
pertaining to small business credit availability, holding six 
hearings, including three field hearings. On March 26, 2009, 
the Small Business Committee, Subcommittee on Oversight and 
Investigations held a hearing to examine issues related to 
investment in small businesses, with particular emphasis on how 
prevailing economic conditions have affected investment in 
small firms. Witnesses in this hearing explained how the 
current recession has aggravated the need for investment funds, 
particularly for equity investing in small firms, and how new 
federal initiatives could allay those needs. The Committee held 
a hearing on June 10, 2009 to examine the challenges facing the 
full array of the SBA's capital access programs. Witnesses at 
this hearing discussed various deficiencies affecting the 
efficacy of these programs and proposed steps that could be 
taken to better meet the SBA's capital access mission.
    The Committee continued to review trends and conditions in 
the credit markets. In a hearing held on October 7, 2009, the 
Committee examined how the decline of the housing market 
affected small firms' ability to grow, create jobs, and access 
capital. During this hearing, the Committee also reviewed 
conditions in the national credit markets as they related to 
small businesses in the home building and real estate 
industries.
    The Committee conducted a series of field hearings that 
occurred across the country that examined credit conditions 
affecting small businesses. On May 17, 2010, the Subcommittee 
on Investigations and Oversight held a field hearing in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, entitled, ``Access to Capital for 
Small Businesses.'' The purpose of the hearing was to examine 
the state of small business lending, with particular emphasis 
on the prevailing conditions in Western Pennsylvania. On April 
19, 2010, the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a field 
hearing in Sarasota, Florida, entitled, ``Access to Capital for 
Small Businesses.'' The purpose of the hearing was to 
investigate local commercial lending trends. Hearing witnesses 
included local business owners and lenders. On August 4, 2009, 
the Subcommittee on Finance and Tax held a field hearing in 
Salem, Oregon on expanding access to capital for entrepreneurs 
and spurring economic growth. The Subcommittee heard testimony 
from the SBA's Portland District Office, local businesses, and 
lenders.
    In addition, on February 26, 2010, the Committee on Small 
Business and the Committee on Financial Services held a joint 
hearing entitled, ``Condition of Small Business and Commercial 
Real Estate Lending in Local Markets.'' The purpose of this 
hearing was to examine the state of small business lending and 
the role that this activity would play in the economic 
recovery. Additionally, this hearing reviewed the current state 
and potential risks in the commercial real estate (CRE) sector 
and explored how it relates to the small business lending and 
real estate sectors. The hearing was comprised of three panels 
of witnesses, including small business representatives and CRE 
professionals; federal regulators and agency officials; and 
lenders and investment companies.
    The Committee also looked at the impact of changes to the 
financial services regulatory structure on small firms. This 
hearing, which was held on September 23, 2009, examined how 
proposed changes to the structure and powers of federal 
financial services regulators would impact smaller firms.

V. Health care

    The Committee conducted oversight of health care issues and 
their impact on small firms. In particular, the Committee 
examined health care proposals. On February 4, 2009, the House 
Committee on Small Business held a hearing entitled ``Health 
Care Reform in a Struggling Economy: What's on the Horizon for 
Small Business?'' The Committee discussed the challenge of 
offering health insurance coverage for small businesses. 
Particular attention was given to the leading health reform 
proposals under consideration by Congress, and the 
opportunities health reform may offer small firms and their 
workers. On March 18, 2009, the Committee held a hearing 
entitled ``The President's Budget and Medicare: How Will Small 
Providers be Impacted?'' The Committee examined Medicare policy 
within the President's budget outline for FY 2010. The purpose 
of the hearing was to consider the Administration's proposed 
changes to Medicare, and the implications it presents for small 
medical practices and medical facilities. On June 3, 2009, the 
Committee on Small Business held a hearing entitled ``Common 
Ground: Finding Consensus on Health Reform, the Small Business 
Perspective.'' The Committee examined the health reform debate 
giving particular attention to those issues impacting the small 
business community. Witnesses were asked to provide their views 
on health reform, and where they see opportunities for 
legislative consensus.
    The Committee also examined the issues surrounding the 
adoption of Health Information Technology. On June 24, 2009, 
the Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare held a hearing 
entitled ``Health IT Adoption and the New Challenges Faced by 
Solo and Small Group Healthcare Practices.'' The Committee 
discussed the challenges solo and small group practices face in 
adopting health information technology (HIT). It also examined 
the implementation of policies in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act of 2009 to promote Health IT adoption. 
Congresswoman Kathy Dahlkemper, Chair of the Subcommittee on 
Regulations and Healthcare, introduced H.R. 3014, the Health 
Information Technology Financing Act of 2009, a small business 
proposal designed to increase wider adoption of HIT by 
providers through the Small Business Administration. H.R. 3014 
passed the House on November 18, 2009.
    Oversight was also conducted regarding issues facing small 
medical practices and suppliers. On July 8, 2009, the Committee 
on Small Business held a hearing entitled ``The Looming 
Challenge for Small Medical Practices: The Projected Physician 
Shortage and How Health Care Reforms Can Address the Problem.'' 
The Committee discussed the issue of physician supply and the 
future of small medical practices. Specifically, witnesses 
offered their views regarding the projected physician workforce 
shortage, strategies to address the problem, and how current 
trends have influenced care in rural and underserved areas. On 
February 11, 2009, the Subcommittee on Rural Development, 
Entrepreneurship, and Trade held a hearing entitled ``The 
Impact of Competitive Bidding on Small Businesses in the 
Durable Medical Equipment Community.'' The hearing focused on 
the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) final rule 
on competitive bidding for durable medical equipment, 
prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS). Under the rule, 
DMEPOS companies are required to submit bids, allowing CMS to 
select suppliers based on cost and volume, or on potential 
savings. Witnesses raised concerns about the bidding process 
suggesting implementation of the program could lead to access 
and quality problems.
    The Committee also considered the impact of H1N1 Influenza 
on small health care providers. On September 9, 2009, the 
Committee on Small Business held a hearing entitled ``The 
Challenges of the 2009-H1N1 Influenza and its Potential Impact 
on Small Businesses and Healthcare Providers.'' The hearing 
examined (1) the preparation of small business for H1N1 
Influenza, (2) the financial impact a pandemic would have on 
small business, (3) the stress the 2009-H1N1 outbreak could 
place on small medical practices, and (4) the response of the 
federal government.

VI. International trade

    The Committee continued to monitor international trade 
policies and programs impacting small businesses. Discussions 
were held with Federal trade policy makers, including 
Administrators of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, 
the Department of Commerce, and the Small Business 
Administration to ensure the promotion of small business 
interests during the negotiation and enforcement of trade 
agreements and the development of domestic trade policies that 
support small businesses' competitiveness in the globalized 
marketplace.
    The Committee continued to work with administrators of 
federal technical and financial assistance programs, including 
officials from the Department of Commerce and the Small 
Business Administration, to ensure small firms participating in 
the international marketplace have access to resources to 
adjust to challenging business conditions impacting their 
ability to spur employment and economic growth. To evaluate the 
job creation role of small business-dominated industries 
integrated into the global economy, the Committee held a 
hearing entitled, ``The Role of Small Business Suppliers and 
Manufacturers in the Domestic Auto Industry'' on May 13, 2009. 
The hearing examined the implications of the current economic 
conditions upon the domestic automobile industry's capacity to 
sustain small firms and their continued expansion and workforce 
investments.
    The Committee continued to monitor programs and their 
resources developed to promote small businesses' 
competitiveness in and access to the global marketplace. 
Discussions were held with Administration officials and 
business groups to identify appropriate services to meet export 
assistance needs. Meetings were held with Export-Import Bank 
officials to evaluate the effectiveness of programs designed to 
increase lending resources for small business overseas 
transactions and with Small Business Administration officials 
to address gaps in that agency's financial and technical 
assistance resources. To reduce gaps in technical and financial 
assistance programs established for small firms engaged in 
international trade, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Evaluating the Impact of Small Business Trade Policy on Job 
Creation and Economic Growth.'' The Committee received 
testimony from small firms from various sectors to identify the 
tools and assistance necessary to profitably pursue a global 
business strategy.
    The Committee continued to work with federal trade 
regulation administrators regarding the development and 
enforcement of rules impacting small businesses involved in 
international trade transactions. The Committee met with 
officials of the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative to 
ensure the international agreements included regulations 
customized to the needs of small firms, particularly regarding 
physical presence requirements and trade enforcement 
procedures. The Committee also met with business industry 
representatives to evaluate efforts to reduce the burden of 
regulations upon international transactions. To examine the 
challenges small firms face from illegally trafficked products, 
the Committee held a hearing on June 18, 2009 entitled 
``Textile Import Enforcement: Is the Playing Field Level for 
American Small Businesses?'' The Committee received testimony 
from U.S. government trade officials and small businesses in 
the textile industry to examine whether enforcement of textile 
laws is adequate.
    The Committee continued to monitor the qualitative and 
quantitative data collected to measure trends in small business 
trade transactions and the level of federal assistance to 
promote these activities. The Committee met with officials from 
the U.S. Export-Import Bank and the Small Business 
Administration to evaluate the agencies' efforts to track the 
level of service and impact from these programs upon small 
firms.

VII. Procurement

    The Committee conducted oversight of federal procurement 
matters pertaining to small businesses. On March 24, 2010, the 
Committee on Small Business held a hearing on issues related to 
small business procurement. The focus of the hearing was on 
small businesses' participation in the federal procurement 
marketplace and what steps should be taken to modernize the 
government's efforts in this area. The Committee examined 
several issues, including the potential for small business 
reforms to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the GSA 
schedule, the need to expand small firms' access to multiple 
award and multiple agency contracts, the adequacy of the 
acquisition workforce and contract bundling. Witnesses 
represented small businesses from a wide range of industries 
and demographics including veterans, women, aerospace, 
engineering, and consulting.
    In addition, the Committee conducted oversight of federal 
procurement practices related to the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The Subcommittee on Contracting and 
Technology held a hearing entitled ``Ensuring Stimulus 
Contracts for Small and Veteran-Owned Businesses'' on March 12, 
2009. This hearing reviewed federal agencies' efforts to 
provide small businesses and veteran-owned small businesses 
with contracting opportunities contained in ARRA. The Committee 
examined federal actions to date, as well as recommendations 
for ensuring small business participation in ARRA-related 
infrastructure projects. The Committee considered these efforts 
in the context of small business procurement law, including the 
applicability of subcontracting requirements, protections under 
the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), and the application 
of federal small business goals.

VIII. Regulations

    The Committee convened hearings pertaining to federal 
regulations' impact on small firms. On May 14, 2009, the 
Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight held a hearing 
entitled ``The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act and 
Small Business.'' The Acting Chairman of the Consumer Product 
Safety Commission, Nancy Nord, delivered testimony. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from small business manufacturers 
of children's products. The small firms discussed the 
challenges they face in complying with the Consumer Product 
Safety Improvement Act. The Subcommittee explored how the CPSC 
can minimize related regulatory burdens on small businesses.
    On March 11, 2009, the Subcommittee on Regulations and 
Healthcare held a hearing entitled, ``Impact of Food Recalls on 
Small Businesses.'' The Food and Drug Administration and U.S. 
Department of Agriculture testified on how their agencies 
responded to a rash of food recalls occurring in the months 
before the hearing, and how they work with small businesses 
during recalls. Representatives of small firms discussed the 
severe economic impact that food recalls have on their 
businesses, and what should be done to reduce the incidence of 
such recalls.
    In addition, the Committee sent several letters to the 
administration concerning regulatory matters. On April 8, 2009, 
the Chairwoman submitted a letter to the Chairman of the 
Federal Trade Commission regarding the Commission's lack of 
compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act on the final 
rule implementing provisions of the Fair and Accurate Credit 
Transactions Act of 2003 pertaining to identity theft ``red 
flags'' (72 Fed. Reg. 63718). On May 1, 2009, the Chairwoman 
sent a letter to the Director of the Office of Management and 
Budget urging him to strengthen the voice of small businesses 
in the Federal rulemaking process in his recommendations to the 
President for a new executive order on Federal regulatory 
review.

IX. Taxation issues

    The Committee held a wide range of hearings on tax matters 
pertaining to small businesses. This included several forums on 
the IRS and its impact on small firms. On April 1, 2009, the 
Commissioner of the IRS, Douglas Shulman, testified before the 
Committee on a wide range of small business tax issues. The 
hearing explored the IRS's efforts to make it as easy possible 
for small businesses to comply with the tax code and also how 
the IRS plans outreach to small businesses so that the IRS can 
understand the needs and concerns of small businesses. After 
the hearing, the Committee sent a letter to the IRS detailing 
small business concerns and the Commissioner responded via 
letter and assured the Committee it will work closely with the 
Chair regarding all small business tax issues.
    A follow-up hearing was conducted on April 14, 2010, when 
the Committee held a hearing entitled ``Entrepreneurs and Tax 
Day: How the IRS Policies and Procedures Impact Small 
Businesses.'' The Committee discussed the Internal Revenue 
Service's relationship with small businesses and the agency's 
efforts to simplify the tax code for small businesses. The 
hearing explored the administrative burdens for small 
businesses regarding tax compliance and examinations while 
examining strategies the IRS could implement to aide small 
businesses. The hearing also assessed small business outreach 
programs within the IRS, paying special attention to the 
agency's response to tax law changes created by the Recovery 
Act. Specifically, the hearing focused on staffing and 
procedures the IRS utilized to ensure effective administration 
of the Recovery Act. Committee Members also evaluated how the 
National Research Program on Employment Taxes will impact small 
businesses and steps the IRS will take to reduce the 
administrative burdens associated with the study.
    In addition, on May 7, 2009, the Subcommittee on Finance 
and Tax held a hearing highlighting the growing complexity of 
the Internal Revenue Code and the impediments this creates for 
small businesses. The hearing focused on ways to simplify the 
tax code, make it more efficient, and less burdensome to comply 
with. Shortly after the hearing, Congressman Schrader 
introduced a tax simplification bill that created a standard 
deduction for those operating a business out of their homes.
    The Committee held several hearings pertaining to tax 
incentives to promote small business expansion. On July 15, 
2009, the Committee held a hearing analyzing the tax provisions 
contained in the stimulus package that benefitted small 
businesses during the recession and what more needs to take 
place to revive our economy. Realizing the economic situation 
our country was facing early in the year, Congress passed the 
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to 
jumpstart the economy. ARRA contained a variety of tax rebates, 
credits, deductions, and other incentives directly targeted at 
small businesses. The hearing focused on whether small 
businesses had utilized these provisions.
    The Committee held a hearing on September 30, 2009 
examining tax provisions that are due to expire at the end of 
the year and their importance to small businesses. Commonly 
known as ``tax extenders'', Congress on an annual or bi-annual 
basis extends certain tax provisions that encourage business 
investment, and promotes consumer spending. The hearing took on 
increased importance since the economy had recently shown signs 
of improvement. The witnesses stressed that to sustain that 
economic momentum, Congress should extend these important tax 
provisions.
    On May 5, 2010, the Committee held a hearing to examine tax 
policies that support small business growth and job creation. 
In particular, the Committee focused on expiring tax incentives 
created or extended by the Recovery Act, such as favorable 
depreciation and expensing schedules and energy tax credits. 
The hearing also examined proposed tax incentives, such as 
increasing and expanding tax rules related to expensing, 
business start up costs and deductions for meals and 
entertainment. The purpose of the hearing was to discuss the 
impact tax incentives have on small business job creation and 
growth.
    The Committee also looked at specific policies that promote 
small business growth. On July 14, 2010, the House Committee on 
Small Business held a hearing entitled ``Bonus Depreciation: 
What it Means for Small Business.'' The hearing focused on 
bonus depreciation and evaluated how it benefits small 
businesses. Bonus depreciation offers flexibility and increased 
cash flow to businesses by providing a 50 percent immediate 
deduction on the cost of new property. The hearing gave members 
of the Committee the opportunity to evaluate the effectiveness 
of bonus depreciation in small business investments and assess 
how the secondary effect of increased demand benefits the 
overall economy.
    In addition to bonus depreciation, the Committee reviewed 
the research and development tax credit. On July 9, 2009, the 
Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology held a hearing on 
the research and development tax credit and the role it plays 
in innovation and growth for America's small businesses. The 
witnesses detailed that the research and development tax credit 
is vital for American companies looking to stay ahead in 
increasingly global economy. They emphasized that capital and 
research lead to new inventions, product, and ultimately jobs. 
However, since capital and research can take place almost 
anywhere in the world, it is important for the U.S. economy to 
keep pace with the rest of the world changes need to be made. 
The panel argued that the credit needs to be made a permanent 
part of the tax code so that firms can rely on the incentive 
when planning their research budgets. Additionally, the 
witnesses noted that the complexity of the provision needs to 
be reduced so that more and more small businesses can take 
advantage of the credit.
    Another specific tax policy the Committee examined was the 
first time home buyer tax credit. On October 7, 2009, the 
Committee held a hearing entitled ``The State of the Nation's 
Housing Sector: An Examination of the First Time Buyer's Credit 
and Future Policies to Sustain a Recovery.'' The Committee 
examined the current state of the nation's housing sector and 
the millions of small businesses who operate in it. The hearing 
assessed the impact of the first-time homebuyer tax credit and 
federal policies affecting the real estate industry.
    The Committee also considered the impact of the estate tax 
on small firms. On November 4, 2009, the Committee held a 
hearing regarding this issue. The hearing highlighted the 
concerns small businesses have with the uncertainty surrounding 
the estate tax regime. The witnesses detailed how the 
complexity and uncertainty surrounding the estate has increased 
operational costs for their respective businesses and made 
planning nearly impossible. Further, the witnesses detailed 
that the estate tax is especially burdensome for capital 
intensive businesses such as family farms and those in the 
printing industries.

X. Technology and innovation

    The Committee conducted oversight of technology policy 
issues and their impact on small firms. On October 28, 2009, 
the Committee held a hearing entitled ``The Recovery Act and 
Broadband: Evaluation of Broadband Investments on Small 
Businesses and Job Creation.'' The Committee heard testimony 
from government and industry representatives on steps to 
advance broadband deployment and adoption through American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) programs. Through 
this hearing, the Committee examined the impact on small firms 
and the importance of these programs in job creation.
    On May 12, 2010, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``Small Businesses and Broadband: An Engine for Economic Growth 
and Job Creation.'' The hearing examined the transformative 
effect that innovative broadband applications and services have 
on small businesses. During this hearing, the Committee heard 
from small businesses on how broadband is helping to expand 
their business, grow the economy and create new jobs.
    On July 21, 2010, the Committee held a hearing entitled 
``The Impact of Intellectual Property on Entrepreneurship and 
Job Creation.'' The hearing examined the importance of 
intellectual property to the growth of small businesses and the 
broader economy. Witnesses shared their perspective on the 
steps needed to support job creation and the long-term health 
of small businesses in IP-intensive industries.

XI. Transportation and infrastructure

    The Committee conducted oversight of transportation issues 
and their impact on small firms. The Subcommittee on 
Investigations and Oversight, on July 16, 2009, held a hearing 
entitled ``The Upcoming Highway Bill and Ensuring It Meets the 
Needs of Small Business.'' The hearing examined how highway 
funding impacts small firms; how small contractors are utilized 
in highway projects; and, the impact of transportation networks 
on small businesses.

XII. Veteran's entrepreneurship

    The Committee worked to expand veteran entrepreneurial 
assistance. Specifically, the Committee considered the emerging 
business assistance needs of these entrepreneurs, including 
service disabled, women, and Reservist members. To evaluate the 
usefulness of current entrepreneurial development resources for 
veterans, the Committee held a hearing on February 11, 2009 
which examined the SBA's assistance programs, including their 
effectiveness serving the expanding small business population. 
Testimony was provided by small business representatives 
providing recommendations for increasing training and technical 
assistance tools while ensuring they are appropriate for all 
entrepreneurs.
    The Committee identified additional federal efforts to 
expand veterans' opportunities in the federal marketplace and 
endeavored to make sure that these entrepreneurs are able to 
compete for their fair share of federal contracts. The 
Committee held a hearing on March 12, 2009, which focused on 
veteran owned business and service disabled veteran owned 
business participation in federal contracting in general and 
stimulus contracting in particular. Representatives of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, the Small Business 
Administration, the Department of Defense, the Department of 
Transportation and the Department of Energy as well as veteran 
and service disabled business owners testified. The purpose of 
the hearing was to ensure that the agencies improve their 
efforts to use and meet Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small 
Business (SDVOSB) and Veteran-Owned Small Business (VOSB) 
procurement goals.
    The Committee continued to monitor the quality and level of 
services provided by Federal veteran entrepreneurial 
development programs. The Committee also considered ways to 
improve the effectiveness of the Small Business 
Administration's veteran business assistance resources. 
Legislative proposals to enhance entrepreneurial development 
assistance, including for veteran small business owners, were 
considered at a hearing on April 2, 2009 by the Subcommittee on 
Rural and Urban Entrepreneurship. Legislation to expand the 
resources available for outreach and training to assist veteran 
entrepreneurs was developed through HR 1803, Veterans Business 
Center Act of 2009. The House approved the bill on July 28, 
2009.
    The Committee considered efforts to enhance tools for 
separating service members' interested in transitioning to 
entrepreneurial enterprises. To provide active service members 
with comprehensive counseling services and training sessions, 
federal veteran assistance programs were expanded to this 
sector. A legislative initiative was established to improve 
entrepreneurial development resources for potential veteran 
entrepreneurs through the Military Entrepreneurship Program. 
The program was designed to provide business counseling and 
entrepreneurial development assistance to members of the Armed 
Forces and establishes a liaison to facilitate outreach to 
these members. Additional legislative provisions were 
established to establish eligibility for Reservists and 
Guardsman for SBA's entrepreneurial development services as 
these members face ongoing military responsibilities while many 
attempt to maintain small businesses. The initiatives were 
incorporated into H.R. 2352, ``the Job Creation through 
Entrepreneurship Act of 2009,'' which the House approved on May 
21, 2009.
    The Committee continued to consider approaches to increase 
the coordination of Federal veteran entrepreneurial assistance 
resources. The Committee helped to transfer the administration 
of the Veterans Business Outreach Centers from the National 
Veterans Business Development Corporation to the Small Business 
Administration in order to increase the efficient use of 
federal resources and centralize the administration of these 
outreach facilities. The Committee is working with the SBA to 
create an integrated network of assistance centers that will 
disseminate best practices and improve service delivery for 
veterans across the country who are seeking tools to grow their 
businesses.

XIII. Workforce issues

    The Committee convened several hearings that examined 
worforce issues and policies to promote job creation. On 
October 28, 2009, the Committee held a hearing entitled ``The 
Recovery Act and Broadband: Evaluation of Broadband Investments 
on Small Businesses and Job Creation.'' The Committee heard 
testimony from government and industry representatives on steps 
to advance broadband deployment and adoption through American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) programs. Through 
this hearing, the Committee examined the impact on small firms 
and the importance of these programs in job creation.
    On March 17, 2010, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``Business Incubators and Their Role in Job 
Creation.'' The purpose of the hearing was to evaluate the 
overall effectiveness of incubators in promoting employment 
growth within the current economic conditions. The hearing 
considered how these business development facilities and 
programs can contribute to an employment-focused economic 
recovery as well as current obstacles to their effectiveness.
    On April 28, 2010, the Committee on Small Business held a 
hearing entitled ``Evaluating the Impact of Small Business 
Trade Policy on Job Creation and Economic Growth.'' The purpose 
of the hearing was to examine the effect of international trade 
policies on small firms' ability to stimulate economic growth. 
The hearing considered the effectiveness of current trade 
promotion programs designed for small businesses as well as 
recommendations to ensure these resources contribute to an 
employment-focused recovery.
 Hearings Held Pursuant to Clauses 2(n), (o), and (p) of House Rule XI

    The Committee held a hearing on March 25, 2009 to assess 
the extent of the fraud and management problems in the SBA's 
Historically Underutilized Business Zone Empowerment 
Contracting (HUBZone) program and whether or not the agency 
implemented GAO recommendations from 2008 regarding these 
problems. In addition, GAO reviewed its findings regarding the 
``credit elsewhere'' requirement of the Small Business 
Administration's (SBA) 7(a) loan program. GAO's Managing 
Director of Forensic Audits and Special Investigations, Greg 
Kutz, testified on GAO's findings of the expanded fraud 
investigation the Committee requested in 2008. Bill Shear, 
Director of Financial Markets and Community Investment at GAO, 
provided a progress report on the recommendations GAO made in 
2008 to strengthen the operation of the HUBZone program and 
also reviewed GAO's findings on the ``credit elsewhere'' 
standard as it is applied to 7(a) loans. The SBA testified 
about their progress in resolving problems uncovered in these 
programs.
    On July 29, 2009, the Committee held a hearing to fulfill 
its mandate of performing Quarterly Congressional Oversight of 
the SBA. The purpose of the hearing was to review the SBA's 
progress in addressing identified deficiencies in its various 
programs. Specifically, this hearing focused on the SBA's 
progress in implementing legislative reforms to its Disaster 
Assistance program and the HUBZone program. The Committee 
received testimony from the SBA Administrator as well as from 
the Government Accountability Office.
    The Committee on Small Business held a hearing on November 
19, 2009 that focused on the SBA's operation of the Service-
Disable Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) procurement 
program. Witnesses included SBA Administrator Karen Mills and 
Mr. Kutz, GAO's Managing Director of Special Investigations. 
GAO testified regarding SBA's fraud prevention controls for the 
SDVOSB program. It found that ten contracts were let to 
ineligible firms. GAO also determined that over $100 million in 
sole source or restricted competition SDVOSB contracts and $300 
million in other contracts went to those 10 ineligible firms. 
GAO uncovered that one firm did not employ any service disabled 
veteran and, in four cases, found that SBA had previously found 
the firms ineligible after bid protests, but that the 
contracting agencies had allowed the contracts to proceed. The 
majority of the cases involved ineligible firms, including some 
large and one foreign-owned firm, which used an SDVOSB ``front 
company'' to ``pass-through'' the benefits of the contract.
    On Wednesday April 21, 2010, the Committee held a hearing 
to fulfill its mandate of performing Quarterly Congressional 
Oversight of the SBA. The purpose of the hearing was to receive 
the report of an audit conducted by the SBA's Office of the 
Inspector General to determine whether Certified Development 
Companies (CDCs) that participate in the Premier Certified 
Lender (PCL) loan program exercised prudent underwriting 
practices when making SBA loans and whether the compensation 
practices of CDC executives were excessive relative to the 
gross receipts of CDCs. The results of this report found 
widespread deficiencies within the PCL program and determined 
that in 4 out of 5 instances, PCLs were paying out excessive 
executive compensation. Witnesses at this hearing included the 
Administrator of the SBA and the SBA Inspector General.
    On July 28, 2010, the Committee held a hearing to examine a 
recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on the 
Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone) Program, the 
agency's response to the BP Oil Spill, and progress made in 
implementing GAO's recommendations concerning the Service-
Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business program, and several 
other matters. The Committee heard testimony from the Karen 
Mills, Administrator of SBA and Greg Kutz, Managing Director of 
Forensic Audits and Special Investigations at GAO.
                   APPENDIX I--COMMITTEE LEGISLATION

                       PART A--COMMITTEE REPORTS

    Reports filed by the Committee on Small Business with the 
House
    111-112: To Accompany H.R. 2352, a bill to amend the Small 
Business Act, and for other purposes. May 15, 2009
    111-190: To Accompany H.R. 2965, a bill to amend the Small 
Business Act with respect to the Small Business Innovation 
Research Program and the Small Business Technology Transfer 
Program, and for other purposes. June 26, 2009
    111-315: To Accompany H.R. 3854, a bill to amend the Small 
Business Act and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 to 
improve programs providing access to capital under such Acts, 
and for other purposes. October 26, 2009
                          PART B--PUBLIC LAWS

    This table lists measures that contained matters within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Small Business, which were 
enacted into law during the 111th Congress.
    1. [111th] H.R. 1: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
of 2009
    Sponsor: Rep. Obey, David R. [WI-7] (introduced 1/26/2009)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-5
    2. [111th] H.R. 1541: To provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-12] (introduced 3/
17/2009)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-10
    3. [111th] S. 1513: A bill to provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [LA] (introduced 7/24/2009)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-43
    4. [111th] H.R. 3614: To provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-12] (introduced 9/
22/2009)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-66
    5. [111th] S. 1929: A bill to provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [LA] (introduced 10/26/
2009)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-89
    6. [111th] H.R. 4508: To provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-12] (introduced 1/
26/2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-136
    7. [111th] H.R. 4691: Temporary Extension Act of 2010
    Sponsor: Rep. Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15] (introduced 2/
25/2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-144
    8. [111th] H.R. 4938: To permit the use of previously 
appropriated funds to extend the Small Business Loan Guarantee 
Program, and for other purposes.
    Sponsor: Rep. Serrano, Jose E. [D-NY-16] (introduced 3/25/
2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-150
    9. [111th] S. 3253: A bill to provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [LA] (introduced 4/22/2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-162
    10. [111th] H.R. 5849: To provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Rep. Velazquez, Nydia M. [D-NY-12] (introduced 7/
26/2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-214
    11. [111th] H.R. 5297: Small Business Jobs and Credit Act 
of 2010
    Sponsor: Rep. Frank, Barney [MA-4] (introduced 5/13/2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-240
    12. [111th] S. 3839: A bill to provide for an additional 
temporary extension of programs under the Small Business Act 
and the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, and for other 
purposes.
    Sponsor: Sen. Landrieu, Mary L. [D-LA] (introduced 9/24/
2010)
    Latest Major Action: Became Public Law No: 111-251
                  APPENDIX II--COMMITTEE PUBLICATIONS

                       PART A--COMMITTEE HEARINGS

January 2009
    January 14, 2009
    Full Committee meeting on: ``The State of the Small 
Business Economy and Identifying Policies to Promote Economic 
Recovery''
    January 28, 2009
    Committee on Small Business Organizational Meeting
February 2009
    February 4, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Health Care Reform in a 
Struggling Economy: What is in the Horizon for Small 
Business?''
    February 11, 2009
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade hearing on: ``The Impact of Competitive Bidding on Small 
Businesses in the Durable Medical Equipment Community''
    February 11, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The State of SBA's 
Entrepreneurial Development Programs and Their Role in 
Promoting Economic Recovery''
    February 25, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Drop in Retirement Savings: 
The Challenges Small Businesses Face Funding and Maintaining 
Retirement Plans in a Struggling Economy''
March 2009
    March 4, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The State of the Renewable 
Fuels Industry in the Current Economy''
    March 11, 2009
    Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare hearing on: 
``Impact of Food Recalls on Small Businesses''
    March 11, 2009
    Full Committee Mark Up on Views and Estimates for SBA 
Budget FY 2010
    March 12, 2009
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology hearing on: 
``Ensuring Stimulus Contracts for Small and Veteran Owned 
Businesses''
    March 18, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The President's FY 2010 Budget 
and Medicare: How Will Small Providers Be Impacted?
    March 25, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Quarterly Congressional 
Mandated Oversight of the SBA''
    March 26, 2009
    Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight hearing on: 
``Expanding Equity Investment in Small Businesses''
April 2009
    April 1, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``IRS Oversight: Are Tax 
Compliance Costs Slowing the Economy Recovery?''
    April 2, 2009
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade hearing on: ``Legislative Initiatives to Modernize SBA's 
Entrepreneurial Development Programs''
    April 22, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Importance of Technology 
in an Economic Recovery''
    April 29, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Climate Change Solutions for 
Small Businesses and Family Farmers''
    April 30, 2009
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade Markup on ED Programs Legislations

May 2009

    May 6, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Legislation to Reauthorize and 
Modernize SBA's Entrepreneurial Development Programs''
    May 7, 2009
    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax hearing on: ``How the 
Complexity of the Tax Code Hinders Small Businesses''
    May 13, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Role of Small Business 
Suppliers and Manufacturers in the Domestic Auto Industry''
    May 13, 2009
    Full Committee Markup of Entrepreneurial Development 
Programs' Legislation
    May 14, 2009
    Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight hearing on: 
``The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act and Small 
Business''
    May 20, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Heroes of Small Business''
    May 21, 2009
    Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare hearing on: 
``Impacts of Outstanding Regulatory Policy on Small Biofuels 
Producers and Family Farmers''

June 2009

    June 3, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Common Ground: Finding 
Consensus on Health Reform, the Small Business Perspective''
    June 4, 2009
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology hearing on: 
``Legislative Initiatives to Strengthen and Modernize the SBIR 
and STTR Programs''
    June 10, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Laying the Groundwork for 
Economic Recovery: Expanding Small Business Access to Capital''
    June 11, 2009
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology Markup on 
Legislations to Modernize the SBIR and STTR Programs
    June 17, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Legislative Initiatives to 
Strengthen and Modernize the SBIR and STTR Programs''
    June 18, 2009
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade hearing on: ``Textile Import Enforcement: Is the Playing 
Field Level for American Small Businesses?''
    June 24, 2009
    Subcommittee on Regulations and Healthcare hearing on: 
``Health Information Technology and Small Healthcare 
Practices''
    June 25, 2005
    Full Committee Markup on Legislations to Modernize the SBIR 
and STTR Programs

July 2009

    July 8, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Looming Challenge for 
Small Medical Practices: The Projected Physician Shortage and 
How Health Care Reforms Can Address the Problem''
    July 9, 2009
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology hearing on: 
``Helping Small Business Innovators through the Research and 
Experimentation Tax Credit''
    July 15, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Economic Recovery: Tax 
Stimulus Items that Benefitted Small Business with a Look 
Ahead''
    July 16, 2009
    Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight hearing on: 
``The Upcoming Highway Bill and Ensuring it Meets the Needs of 
Small Businesses''
    July 22, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Meeting the Needs of Small 
Businesses and Family Farmers in Regulating Our Nation's 
Waters''
    July 23, 2009
    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax hearing on ``Legislative 
Proposals to Reform the SBA's Capital Access Programs''
    July 29, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Quarterly Congressional 
Mandated Oversight of the SBA''
    July 30, 2009
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade hearing on: ``The Future of Specialty Crops for Small 
Family Farmers''

August 2009

    August 4, 2009
    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax field hearing in Salem, 
Oregon on: ``Exploring Ways for Small Business Access to 
Capital''
    August 25, 2009
    Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight field hearing 
in Tulsa, Oklahoma on: ``The Impact of Energy Policy on Small 
Business''

September 2009

    September 9, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Challenges of the 2009-
H1N1 Influenza and its Potential Impact on Small Businesses and 
Healthcare Providers''
    September 16, 2009
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade hearing on: ``The Role of Auto Dealers on Rural 
Communities''
    September 23, 2003
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Impact of Financial 
Regulatory Restructuring on Small Businesses and Community 
Lenders''
    September 24, 2009
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology hearing on: 
``The Roles of Federal Labs in Spurring Innovation and 
Entrepreneurship Across the U.S.''
    September 30, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Expiring Tax Incentives: 
Examining their Importance for Small Businesses on the Road to 
an Economic Recovery''

October 2009

    October 7, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The State of the Nation's 
Housing Sector: An Examination of the First Time's Buyers 
Credit and Future Policies to Sustain Recovery''
    October 8, 2009
    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax Markup on Access to Capital 
Legislation
    October 14, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Increasing Access to Capital 
for Small Business''
    October 21, 2009
    Full Committee Markup on Access to Capital Legislation
    October 28, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Recovery Act and 
Broadband: Evaluating the Impact on Small Business''

November 2009

    November 4, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Small Business and the Estate 
Tax: Identifying Reforms to Meet the Needs of Small Firms and 
Family Farmers''
    November 19, 2009
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Quarterly Congressional 
Mandated Oversight of the SBA''

February 2010

    February 26, 2010
    Joint Small Business Committee and Financial Services 
Committee hearing on: ``Condition of Small Business and 
Commercial Real Estate Lending in Local Markets''

March 2010

    March 4, 2010
    Full Committee Mark-Up on SBA's FY 2011 Views and Estimates
    March 17, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Business Incubators and Their 
Role in Job Creation''
    March 24, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Small Business Participation 
in the Federal Procurement Marketplace''

April 2010

    April 14, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Entrepreneurs and Tax Day: How 
the IRS Policies and Procedures Impact Small Businesses''
    April 19, 2010
    Subcommittee on Finance and Tax field hearing in Sarasota, 
Florida on: ``Access to Capital for Small Businesses''
    April 21, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Quarterly Congressional 
Mandated Oversight of the SBA''
    April 28, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Evaluating the Impact of Trade 
Policy on Job Creation and Economic Growth''

May 2010

    May 5, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Tax Initiatives that Promote 
Small Business Growth''
    May 12, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Small Businesses and 
Broadband: An Engine for Economic Growth and Job Creation''
    May 17, 2010
    Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight field hearing 
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on: ``Access to Capital for Small 
Businesses''
    May 24, 2010
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology field hearing in 
Norfolk, Virginia on: ``Veteran Contracting--Preventing Fraud''
    May 26, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Heroes of Small Business''

June 2010

    June 30, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Recovery in the Gulf: What the 
$20 Billion BP Claims Fund Means for Small Business''

July 2010

    July 14, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Bonus Depreciation: What it 
Means for Small Business''
    July 15, 2010
    Subcommittee on Contracting and Technology hearing on: 
``Improving Contracting Opportunities and Preventing Fraud for 
Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Businesses''
    July 21, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``The Impact of Intellectual 
Property on Entrepreneurship and Job Creation''
    July 22, 2010
    Subcommittee on Rural Development, Entrepreneurship and 
Trade hearing on: ``Coal Combustion Byproducts: Potential 
Impacts of Hazardous Waste Designation on Small Businesses in 
the Recycling Industry''
    July 28, 2010
    Full Committee hearing on: ``Quarterly Congressional 
Mandated Oversight of the SBA''
    July 29, 2010
    Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight hearing on: 
``Impact of Interchange Fees on Small Business''
    Total Hearings: 75
    Full Committee Hearings: 45
    Subcommittee Hearings: 28
    Joint Hearings: 1
    Committee Meetings: 1
    Field Hearings: 5
    Full Committee Legislative Markups: 5
    Subcommittee Legislative Markups: 3